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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Polyacrylamide and water quality effects on infiltration in sandy loam soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were evaluated on a Hanford sandy loam soil (coarse-loamy,field tests near Fresno, CA, on Hanford sandy loam soils toA soil sam- ple (Hanford sandy loam) was shaken in 10 mg PAM

Ajwa, Husein A; Trout, T J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Polyacrylamide and water quality effects on infiltration in sandy loam soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in San Joaquin Valley sandy loam soils. Paper #012259. 2001Effects on Infiltration in Sandy Loam Soils Husein A. Ajwa*irrigation in some sandy loam soils in California.

Ajwa, Husein A; Trout, T J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Aggregate-associated carbon and nitrogen in reclaimed sandy loam soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Minimal research has been conducted on aggregate, C, and N in coarse-textured soils used to reclaim surface coal mine lands. Furthermore, little is known about the contribution different plant communities make to the recovery of aggregation in these soils. Two chronosequences of semiarid reclaimed sites with sandy loam soils were sampled under shrub- and grass-dominated communities. Aggregation, aggregate fractions, and associated C and N were measured. No definitive trends of increasing macroaggregates between sites were observed undershrubs; however, macro- and microaggregation was greater in the 16-yr-old (0.20 and 0.23 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) than in the 5-yr-old soils (0.02 and 0.08 kg aggregate kg{sup -1} soil, respectively) under grasses. Although C and N concentrations were drastically reduced (50-75%) with mining activity between the <1-yr-old and native soils, aggregate C and N concentrations tinder shrubs and grasses were similar to each other and to the native soils in the 5-yr-old site. Sods under grass in the 16-yr-old site had lower available and aggregate-occluded C and N concentrations than the 5-yr-old site, while C and N concentrations did not change between 5- and 16-yr-old soils under shrubs. Conversely, aggregate C and N pool sizes under shrubs and grasses both increased with site age to conditions similar to those observed in the native soil. Reclaimed shrub site soils had consistently higher C concentrations in the older reclaimed sites (10 and 16 yr old) than the soils under grasses, indicating greater accumulation and retention of C and N in organic material under shrub than grass communities in semiarid reclaimed sites.

Wick, A.F.; Stahl, P.D.; Ingram, L.J. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Ecohydrological Analysis of the Transport of Nitrate and Ammonium in Sandy Desert Soils in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an Unsaturated Zone of a Sandy Loam Field. Soil Science 176:sorption of ammonium by sandy soil in fixed bed columns:and Evaporation in a Sandy Column. Soil Science Society of

Scanlan, Julie Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Sandy Ressler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandy Ressler. Sandy's face Hi I'm Sandy Ressler and I've been here at NIST since 1985ish. All the publications listed below ...

6

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

had a Luvisol with sandy loam texture. As silage maize isat the site Karkendamm with sandy soil (Fig. 2). Both sitesstony silt loam and fine sandy loam soil and applied urea

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Sandy Updates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sandy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington DC 20585 sandy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington DC 20585 202-586-5000 en Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages http://energy.gov/articles/smart-grid-week-hurricane-season-and-department-s-efforts-make-grid-more-resilient-power Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages

8

Sandy P. Ressler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VUG Home Page Staff Sandy P. Ressler. Sandy P. Ressler. click on picture for more information!! phone: (301) 975-3549 ...

9

Linking Farmer, Forest and Watershed: Agricultural Systems and Natural Resources Management Along the Upper Njoro River, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Number Texture density pH (PPM) (meg/100g) (%) Sandy SiltLoam Sandy SiltLoam Sandy Silt Loam Sandy Silt Loam Sandy Silt Loam Clay

Krupnik, Timothy J.; Jenkins, Marion W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Super Storm Sandy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Super Storm Sandy Super Storm Sandy JOHN DAVIS: Heavy rain, high winds, and surging waters pummeled the eastern seaboard in November of 2012 as hurricane Sandy chewed up the east coast leaving in its wake a swath of loss and destruction. In advance of this "storm of the century" the demand for gasoline spiked as thousands were forced to evacuate and many others stocked up on their fuel for their portable generators. After the storm passed, power outages and a crippled delivery infrastructure let to gas shortages that lasted for weeks hindering cleanup efforts and paralyzing entire cities. Atlantic City, NJ took a heavy toll in physical damage with numerous homes and boardwalk attractions damaged beyond repair. But, thanks to a program that began in 2009 the city?s recovery began more quickly than most. Atlantic City's

11

Sandy Updates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy.gov Sandy Updates Sandy Updates June 6, 2013 President Barack Obama listens to then-Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs...

12

Sandy Updates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 26, 2012 The Energy Department Prepares for Hurricane Sandy As the storm continues to track, watch for situation reports from the Energy Department...

13

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report #3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report 3 Hurricane Sandy Situation Report 3 OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY (OE) SITUATION REPORT 3 FOR HURRICANE SANDY More...

14

Sandy Updates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 5, 2012 November 5, 2012 Supervising Engineer for Public Service Electric and Gas Company, Michael Vincent, right, Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, center, and FEMA Deputy Administrator Rich Serino review power restoration at the Hoboken electrical substation. Restoration of power to communities impacted by Hurricane Sandy remains a high priority. | Photo by Jocelyn Augustino/FEMA. Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy Energy Department Secretary Steven Chu recounts his meeting with utility crews at the front lines of Hurricane Sandy power restoration efforts. November 5, 2012 Readout of Secretary Chu's Visit to New York and New Jersey Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today traveled to New York and New Jersey, where he met with state and local leaders and industry officials to discuss

15

Sandy Ridge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandy Ridge Sandy Ridge Facility Sandy Ridge Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Algonquin Power Developer Gamesa Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Bald Eagle PA Coordinates 40.75088201°, -78.23842764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.75088201,"lon":-78.23842764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

Sandy Updates | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sandy Updates Sandy Updates Sandy Updates RSS June 6, 2013 President Barack Obama listens to then-Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza. Smart Grid Week: Hurricane Season and the Department's Efforts to Make the Grid More Resilient to Power Outages Next up in our Smart Grid Week series -- improving electric grid technologies to adequately prepare for emergencies with power outages. May 16, 2013 President Barack Obama listens to Acting Energy Secretary Daniel B. Poneman during a meeting with electric utility CEOs and trade association representatives at the Department of Energy in Washington, D.C., May 8, 2013. | Official White House Photo by Pete Souza.

17

Sandy Hill Case Study Packet 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandy Hill Case Study Packet 2004. The Baldrige Case Study Packet is composed of documents used to train Baldrige ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

18

Women @ Energy: Giselle Sandi | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giselle Sandi Giselle Sandi Women @ Energy: Giselle Sandi March 28, 2013 - 9:30am Addthis Giselle Sandi received a Ph.D. in electrochemistry and joined Argonne National Laboratory as a postdoctoral appointee in 1994. Giselle Sandi received a Ph.D. in electrochemistry and joined Argonne National Laboratory as a postdoctoral appointee in 1994. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Giselle Sandi received a Ph.D. in electrochemistry and joined Argonne National Laboratory as a postdoctoral appointee in 1994. She led fundamental research in the areas of energy storage, materials for hydrogen storage, and electrocatalytic membranes. During the same period, she was an adjunct faculty at the Illinois Institute of Technology, where she had the

19

Hurricane Sandy Situation Reports (October & November 2012) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Sandy Situation Reports (October & November 2012) Hurricane Sandy Situation Reports (October & November 2012) Hurricane Sandy Situation Reports (October & November 2012) Hurricane Sandy situation reports detail the storm's impacts and the restoration activities being taken by the energy sector. Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 20 November 7, 2012 (10:00 AM EST) Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 19 November 6, 2012 (3:00 PM EST) Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 18 November 6, 2012 (10:00 AM EST) Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 17 November 5, 2012 (3:00 PM EST) Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 16 November 5, 2012 (10:00 AM EST) Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 15 November 4, 2012 (3:00 PM EST) Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 14 November 4, 2012 (10:00 AM EST) Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 13 November 3, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)

20

Sandy, Utah Manufacturing Site, BD Medical Award Recipient of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Sandy, Utah Manufacturing Site BD Medical 9450 S. State Street Sandy, UT 84070 The BD Medical facility in Sandy, Utah is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sandy Vista Regroups and Rebuilds [Participation with a View  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Left: Proposed build-out of Sandy Vista neighborhood. Above:rehabili tated homes in Sandy Vista. 1. New single-familyfund. PLA C ES 1 2 : 2 P1GFORD, WIGHT: SANDY VISTA

Pigford, Richard; Wight, Karen

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Ecological Impacts of Beach Grooming on Exposed Sandy Beaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

use of an exposed sandy beach in southern California.of grooming on exposed sandy beaches in southern California.of grooming on exposed sandy beaches in southern California.

Dugan, Jenifer

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ecological Impacts of Beach Grooming on Exposed Sandy Beaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beach Grooming on Exposed Sandy Beaches R/CZ-174 J.E. Dugan,of California, Santa Barbara Sandy beaches and associatedstructure and function of sandy beach ecosystems. We used a

Dugan, Jenifer E.; Hubbard, David M.; Page, Henry M.; Schimel, Joshua P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modeling the Effects of Fire on Streamflow in a Chaparral Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constant in days. Soil K s _Sandy Loam: Saturated hydraulicconductivity for the Sandy Loam soil type. Ks_Loam:for the Loam soil type. n_Sandy Loam: exponent in the

McMichael, Christine E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Google Crisis Map for Hurricane Sandy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Map for Hurricane Sandy Google Crisis Map for Hurricane Sandy The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds,...

26

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - SLAC's Sandy Merola Explains...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLAC's Sandy Merola Explains Energy Science Network's Importance on YouTube By Mike Ross November 30, 2011 Sandy Merola, SLAC's Chief Operating Officer, has a prominent role in a...

27

Long-term nitrate leaching below the root zone in California tree fruit orchards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BD (g/cm3) loam loamy sand sand sandy loam Texture silt siltsquares (SS) for subgroup "sandy loam" in groups 2, 3, and 4Group 2, Population 1, subgroup sandy loam. Figure 4.5.3f-j.

Harter, Thomas; Horwath, William R; Hopmans, Jan W; Denton, Michelle; Onsoy, Yuksel S

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Deep vadose zone hydrology demonstrates fate of nitrate in eastern San Joaquin Valley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the experimental site. Sandy loam is the most fre quentare: SL1 recent Hanford sandy loam C clay, very thinVar2 various textures, sandy loam to clay loam S medium

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fine-grained sedimentation on the Chenier Plain Coast and inner continental shelf, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the evolution of a mud-dominated coastal sedimentary system on multiple time scales. Fine-grained systems exhibit different properties and behavior from sandy coasts, and have received relatively little ...

Draut, Amy Elizabeth

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Review: Red Pedagogy: Native American Social and Political Thought by Sandy Grande  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Political Thought by Sandy Grande. New York: Rowman &discourse. For these reasons, Sandy Grandes (2004) text

Caldern, Dolores

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Vineyard nutrient needs vary with rootstocks and soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drain nutrients from sandy soils. CALIFORNIA AGRICULTURE Chardonnay on Egbert clay (sandy loam variant) soils at onewas Zinfandel on a Sierra sandy loam soil. At all three

Lambert, Jean-Jacques; Anderson, Michael M; Wolpert, J A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Responding To Hurricane Sandy: DOE Situation Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Responding To Hurricane Sandy: DOE Situation Reports Responding To Hurricane Sandy: DOE Situation Reports Responding To Hurricane Sandy: DOE Situation Reports November 7, 2012 - 11:15am Addthis Sandy made landfall as a post-tropical cyclone on the southern coast of New Jersey near Atlantic City at 8 p.m. on October 29, with top sustained winds of 80 mph. | Photo courtesy of NOAA. Sandy made landfall as a post-tropical cyclone on the southern coast of New Jersey near Atlantic City at 8 p.m. on October 29, with top sustained winds of 80 mph. | Photo courtesy of NOAA. Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov What are the key facts? For more information about emergency preparedness, visit Ready.gov. For the latest news on Hurricane Sandy, visit the FEMA blog. November 7, 2012 - 4:02pm: Reports on Hurricane Sandy can now be found in

33

Nitrogen fertiliser management of sugarcane crops for meeting global environmental challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mulgrave Mossman Mossman Soil texture (0-0.6 m) sandy clayloam sandy clayloam sandy loam to sandy light clay light clay sandy clay

Thorburn, Peter J; Webster, Tony J; Biggs, Jody S; Biggs, Ian M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient Communities Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient Communities October 29, 2013 - 10:21am Addthis Workers repair power lines in the Mid-Atlantic shortly after Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Workers repair power lines in the Mid-Atlantic shortly after Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy What are the key facts? This week marks the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy making landfall in New Jersey. The federal government has been committed to the recovery and rebuilding efforts since day one, but much work remains. The Energy Department is taking actions to protect our energy

35

Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient Communities Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient Communities October 29, 2013 - 10:21am Addthis Workers repair power lines in the Mid-Atlantic shortly after Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Workers repair power lines in the Mid-Atlantic shortly after Hurricane Sandy. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy What are the key facts? This week marks the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy making landfall in New Jersey. The federal government has been committed to the recovery and rebuilding efforts since day one, but much work remains. The Energy Department is taking actions to protect our energy

36

Big Sandy, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigSandy,Texas&oldid227775" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

37

Big Sandy, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigSandy,Tennessee&oldid227774" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

38

FIMA Briefing of the MAT Investigation of Hurricane Sandy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power loss, not flood or high wind event ... Center Complex and New Tower at Coney Island Hospital (Manhattan, NY) Sandy MAT HQ Out-Brief 16 ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

39

NETL Hurricane Sandy Relief Efforts Recognized by Energy Secretary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hurricane Sandy Relief Efforts Recognized by Energy Secretary Morgantown, W.Va. -Jay Hanna, an engineer and project manager with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL),...

40

"This past month Sandy Ressler of the Information Access ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In recent months, Sandy Ressler of the Information Access Division has presented keynote talks entitled "Beer Bellies, Bountiful Behinds and other ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Black spots produced by buried macroalgae in intertidal sandy sediments of the Wadden Sea: effects on the meiobenthos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of chloropigments in sandy sediments. -- J. exp.1988. Wrack breakdown on sandy beaches - its impact onMACROALGAE IN INTERTIDAL SANDY SEDIMENTS OF THE WADDEN SEA:

Neira, Carlos; Rackemann, Michael

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Management practices to improve the use efficiency of nutrients and water in a sandy soil under rice based cropping system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Productivity of coarse textured sandy soil and loamy sandwater and nutrients. Onattukara sandy tract is a fluvial andthe physical constraints of sandy soil and to enhance the

Bhaskaran, Usha Pankajam Dr.; S, Pushkala. Dr; A.K., Sreelatha Dr; Aparna, B Dr.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Intensification of Hurricane Sandy (2012) through Extratropical Warm Core Seclusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Sandys landfall along the New Jersey shoreline at 2330 UTC 29 October 2012 produced a catastrophic storm surge stretching from New Jersey to Rhode Island that contributed to damage in excess of $50 billion the sixth costliest U.S. ...

Thomas J. Galarneau; Jr.; Christopher A. Davis; Melvyn A. Shapiro

44

The Energy Department Prepares for Hurricane Sandy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Energy Department Prepares for Hurricane Sandy The Energy Department Prepares for Hurricane Sandy The Energy Department Prepares for Hurricane Sandy October 26, 2012 - 6:15pm Addthis Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov What are the key facts? For more information about emergency preparedness, visit Ready.gov. For the latest news on Hurricane Sandy, visit the FEMA blog. The Department of Energy (DOE) is working closely with FEMA and, in support of state and local officials, is planning to deploy emergency response personnel in advance of Hurricane Sandy. DOE is sending personnel to the FEMA Regional Response Coordination Centers in Boston, New York and Philadelphia over the weekend as well as putting additional personnel on standby to assist. DOE is taking steps to support state and local

45

Hurricane Sandy and Our Energy Infrastructure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Sandy and Our Energy Infrastructure Hurricane Sandy and Our Energy Infrastructure Hurricane Sandy and Our Energy Infrastructure November 30, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis David Sandalow David Sandalow Former Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) and Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs Acting Under Secretary of Energy David Sandalow's remarks, as delivered, at the Columbia University Energy Symposium on November 30, 2012. One month ago last night, Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast of the United States. The storm first made landfall just south of Atlantic City, New Jersey, with 80-mile per hour winds, torrential rains and record storm surges. In Manhattan's Battery Park, the ocean rose nine feet higher than a typical high tide and three feet higher than the previous record. Sandy's 1100-mile diameter made it the largest Atlantic

46

Hurricane Sandy and Our Energy Infrastructure | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Sandy and Our Energy Infrastructure Hurricane Sandy and Our Energy Infrastructure Hurricane Sandy and Our Energy Infrastructure November 30, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis David Sandalow David Sandalow Former Under Secretary of Energy (Acting) and Assistant Secretary for Policy & International Affairs Acting Under Secretary of Energy David Sandalow's remarks, as delivered, at the Columbia University Energy Symposium on November 30, 2012. One month ago last night, Hurricane Sandy slammed into the East Coast of the United States. The storm first made landfall just south of Atlantic City, New Jersey, with 80-mile per hour winds, torrential rains and record storm surges. In Manhattan's Battery Park, the ocean rose nine feet higher than a typical high tide and three feet higher than the previous record. Sandy's 1100-mile diameter made it the largest Atlantic

47

Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for Improvement (February 2013) Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for...

48

Measurement and Modeling of Solute Diffusion Coefficients in Unsaturated Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mullins and Sommers [1986] sandy clay loam soil. Figure 1-the predicted lines for the sandy clay loam and clay soilsanalysis of RMSE. Sand Sandy clay loam Clay RMSE 0.0030

Chou, Hsin-Yi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy November 5, 2012 - 6:30pm Addthis Supervising Engineer for Public Service Electric and Gas Company, Michael Vincent, right, Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, center, and FEMA Deputy Administrator Rich Serino review power restoration at the Hoboken electrical substation. Restoration of power to communities impacted by Hurricane Sandy remains a high priority. | Photo by Jocelyn Augustino/FEMA. Supervising Engineer for Public Service Electric and Gas Company, Michael Vincent, right, Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, center, and FEMA Deputy Administrator Rich Serino review power restoration at the Hoboken electrical substation. Restoration of power to communities impacted by

50

Students Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Students Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Students Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy Students Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy November 9, 2012 - 3:43pm Addthis Franklin High School students working on their online map of gas and charging stations. | Photo courtesy Dayana Bustamante Franklin High School students working on their online map of gas and charging stations. | Photo courtesy Dayana Bustamante Bob Brese Bob Brese Chief Information Officer Ian Kalin Director of the Energy Data Initiative What are the key facts? Students in New Jersey are using open data and online maps to support their community in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. As part of our efforts in helping with Hurricane Sandy restoration efforts, the Energy Department is working closely with other federal partners, state

51

Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy Working Together to Recover and Rebuild After Hurricane Sandy November 5, 2012 - 6:30pm Addthis Supervising Engineer for Public Service Electric and Gas Company, Michael Vincent, right, Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, center, and FEMA Deputy Administrator Rich Serino review power restoration at the Hoboken electrical substation. Restoration of power to communities impacted by Hurricane Sandy remains a high priority. | Photo by Jocelyn Augustino/FEMA. Supervising Engineer for Public Service Electric and Gas Company, Michael Vincent, right, Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu, center, and FEMA Deputy Administrator Rich Serino review power restoration at the Hoboken electrical substation. Restoration of power to communities impacted by

52

NREL: Technology Deployment - FEMA Engages NREL in Hurricane Sandy Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMA Engages NREL in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Effort FEMA Engages NREL in Hurricane Sandy Recovery Effort May 8, 2013 Natural Disasters, By the Numbers There have been 144 weather/climate disasters since 1980 in which overall damages reached or exceeded $1 billion. In 2005, the estimated economic loss due to Hurricane Katrina was about $187 billion. In 2012, the estimated total loss due to Hurricane Sandy was $71 billion in New York and New Jersey alone. By the time Hurricane Sandy pounded the East Coast on October 29, 2012, it had grown to be the largest Atlantic hurricane on record-with winds spanning 1,100 miles. The devastation left in its wake affected 24 states with the most severe damage concentrated in New Jersey and New York; total damage topped an estimated $71 billion for the two states alone. For the first time, NREL was funded by the Federal Emergency Management

53

Students Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy Students Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy November 9, 2012 - 3:43pm Addthis Franklin High School students working on their online map of gas and charging stations. | Photo courtesy Dayana Bustamante Franklin High School students working on their online map of gas and charging stations. | Photo courtesy Dayana Bustamante Bob Brese Bob Brese Chief Information Officer Ian Kalin Director of the Energy Data Initiative What are the key facts? Students in New Jersey are using open data and online maps to support their community in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. As part of our efforts in helping with Hurricane Sandy restoration efforts, the Energy Department is working closely with other federal partners, state

54

Kevin Blackwell, FRA Mike Butler, UETC Sandy Covi, UPRR Steve...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a.m. EDT Participants on the call included: Kevin Blackwell, FRA Mike Butler, UETC Sandy Covi, UPRR Steve Hamp, DOE-NTP The call began at approximately 10:30 a.m. EDT. Mr....

55

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The Sandy River Delta is located at the confluence of the Sandy and Columbia Rivers, just east of Troutdale, Oregon. It comprises about 1,400 land acres north of Interstate 84, managed by the USDA Forest Service, and associated river banks managed by the Oregon Division of State Lands. Three islands, Gary, Flag and Catham, managed by Metro Greenspaces and the State of Oregon lie to the east, the Columbia River lies to the north and east, and the urbanized Portland metropolitan area lies to the west across the Sandy River. Sandy River Delta was historically a wooded, riparian wetland with components of ponds, sloughs, bottomland woodland, oak woodland, prairie, and low and high elevation floodplain. It has been greatly altered by past agricultural practices and the Columbia River hydropower system. Restoration of historic landscape components is a primary goal for this land. The Forest Service is currently focusing on restoration of riparian forest and wetlands. Restoration of open upland areas (meadow/prairie) would follow substantial completion of the riparian and wetland restoration. The Sandy River Delta is a former pasture infested with reed canary grass, blackberry and thistle. The limited over story is native riparian species such as cottonwood and ash. The shrub and herbaceous layers are almost entirely non-native, invasive species. Native species have a difficult time naturally regenerating in the thick, competing reed canary grass, Himalayan blackberry and thistle. A system of drainage ditches installed by past owners drains water from historic wetlands. The original channel of the Sandy River was diked in the 1930's, and the river diverted into the ''Little Sandy River''. The original Sandy River channel has subsequently filled in and largely become a slough. The FS acquired approximately 1,400 acres Sandy River Delta (SRD) in 1991 from Reynolds Aluminum (via the Trust for Public Lands). The Delta had been grazed for many years but shortly after FS acquisition grazing was terminated while a master plan and Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were developed for the site. During the following three years, the vegetation changed dramatically as a result of cessation of grazing. The dramatic changes included the explosive increases of reed canary grass monocultures in wet areas and the expansion of Himalayan blackberries throughout the site.

Kelly, Virginia; Dobson, Robin L.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

OVERVIEW OF RESPONSE TO HURRICANE SANDY-NOR'EASTER AND  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OVERVIEW OF RESPONSE TO OVERVIEW OF RESPONSE TO HURRICANE SANDY-NOR'EASTER AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability February 26, 2013 I. Introduction Following the severe and widespread impact of Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed the preparation, response, recovery, and restoration activities performed within its organization and by the Energy Sector. Understanding the wide range of challenges encountered by owners and operators of the energy infrastructure, States and localities, utility customers, and the Federal government will establish the basis for continuous improvement in preparedness and response activities. Hurricane Sandy was the second-largest Atlantic tropical cyclone on record. Making landfall on

57

Hurricane Sandy-Nor'easter Situation Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hurricane Sandy-Nor'easter Situation Reports Hurricane Sandy-Nor'easter Situation Reports Hurricane Sandy-Nor'easter Situation Reports December 3, 2012 - 4:07pm Addthis On November 7, a Nor’easter began to impact the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast with strong winds, rain or snow, and coastal flooding. | Photo courtesy of NOAA. On November 7, a Nor'easter began to impact the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast with strong winds, rain or snow, and coastal flooding. | Photo courtesy of NOAA. Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov For questions about power restorations or to report a power outage, contact your local utility company. For safety tips, visit Ready.gov. December 3, 2012 - 4:07pm: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released the final situation report regarding power outages

58

Shoreface Morphodynamics, Back Beach Variability, and Implications of Future Sea-Level Rise for California's Sandy Shorelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

semidiurnal spring tidal cycles on a sandy beach, cycleson a sandy beach, Aust. J. Mar. Freshwater Res. 33:377-400.Change Data for the Sandy Shorelines of the California

Harden, Erika Lynne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A Preliminary Analysis of Network Outages During Hurricane Sandy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.3.*). To evaluate outages, we require that, historically, at least 10% of the addresses in the block reply to pingsA Preliminary Analysis of Network Outages During Hurricane Sandy USC/ISI Technical Report ISI, linquan, yuri}@isi.edu ABSTRACT This document describes our analysis of Internet outages during

Heidemann, John

60

Intensification of Hurricane Sandy (2012) through Extratropical Warm Core Seclusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricane Sandy's landfall along the New Jersey shoreline at 2330 UTC 29 October 2012 produced a catastrophic storm surge stretching from New Jersey to Rhode Island that contributed to damage in excess of $50 billionthe sixth costliest U.S. ...

Thomas J. Galarneau Jr.; Christopher A. Davis; Melvyn A. Shapiro

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Hydraulic Properties in a Silt Loam Soil under Natural Prairie,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReproducedfromSoilScienceSocietyofAmericaJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Hydraulic Properties in a Silt Loam Soil under Natural Prairie, Conventional Till, and No-Till Juan P. Fuentes, Markus Flury,* and David F. Bezdicek ABSTRACT undergo this dramatic cyclic change in soil

Flury, Markus

62

MHK Projects/Sandy Cove | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandy Cove Sandy Cove < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.4776,"lon":-63.5408,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

63

Ashton-Sandy Spring, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ashton-Sandy Spring, Maryland: Energy Resources Ashton-Sandy Spring, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.1539265°, -77.004626° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1539265,"lon":-77.004626,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

Big Sandy, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandy, Montana: Energy Resources Sandy, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 48.1788692°, -110.1135412° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.1788692,"lon":-110.1135412,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

Macroarthropod communities of Sandy Springs of East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The macroarthropod fauna of first- and second-order sandy streams of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer system was sampled and compared with the fauna of temporary and standing spring-fed habitats in the same area, as well as with the fauna of limestone streams on the western border of this sand deposit. The taxa collected are discussed with new species and distribution records. Indicator and expected species in permanent, sandy, first-order streams of the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer are shown to be Synurella near bifurca, Crangonyx pseudogracilis, Calopteryx maculata, Argia immunda, Cordulegaster maculata, Diplectrona modesta, Molanna tryphena, and Bittacomorpha clavipes. Comparisons with the spring fauna of the Edwards Plateau show that east Texas springs have low endemicity and are dominated by Nearctic taxa which are restricted to colder stream headwaters where springs of the Edwards aquifer have high endemicity and are dominated by western and tropical groups.

Gibson, James Randall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Photo of the Week: Satellite View of Sandy at Night | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of the Week: Satellite View of Sandy at Night Photo of the Week: Satellite View of Sandy at Night Photo of the Week: Satellite View of Sandy at Night November 2, 2012 - 10:21am Addthis On Monday, October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall 5 miles south of Atlantic City, New Jersey, with maximum sustained winds near 80 mph. This satellite image was taken 16 to 18 hours before Sandy's landfall on the New Jersey coast, using the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite on NASA's Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite. The Department of Energy, in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) and other federal agencies, is working around the clock to support the states and utilities that have been impacted by Sandy. Learn more about federal efforts to support utility power restoration. | Photo courtesy of CIMSS/University Wisconsin-Madison/NASA/NOAA.

67

Evaluation of the sorption mechanism of catechol and its chlorinated derivatives in a Palouse silt loam soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catechol and its chlorinated derivatives are important in soil as intermediary metabolites in the degradation of many synthetic and naturally-occurring aromatics. This study examined the sorption mechanisms of catechol, 4-chlorocatechol, 4,5-dichlorocatechol, and tetrachlorocatechol in a Palouse silt loam soil. Sorption was evaluated by the batch equilibration method using /sup 14/C-labeled chemicals and varying solvent combinations and conditions. Data were fitted to the Freundlich isotherm equation. All the catechols were strongly sorbed with isotherm slopes of one or greater indicating strong intermolecular associations upon adsorption. Sorption decreased as the catechol molecule became more chlorinated, except tetrachlorocatechol which was one of the most sorbed. Increasing the ionic strength of the solution increased sorption of dichlorocatechol and tetrachlorocatechol. Increasing quantities of acetone or 2-propanol in the equilibration solution produced little change in the sorption of catechol and chlorocatechol, but a slight decrease in the sorption of dichlorocatechol and tetrachlorocatechol. These results indicate that solubility and hydrophobicity had s significant effect on the adsorption of dichlorocatechol and tetrachlorocatechol.

Harper, S.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Drip irrigation can effectively apply boron to San Joaquin Valley vineyards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to bloom in 1998 Cajon sandy loam (Tulare Co. ) TreatmentBSb 4Sa BSa 60ab 70b Pollaski sandy loam (Fresno Co. ) Bloomhave clusters associated with sandy soils and vine that set

Peacock, William L.; Christensen, L. Peter

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Efficacy of Vegetated Buffer Strips for Retaining Cryptosporidium parvum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cryptosporidium parvum in sandy porous media (soils andwith grass, filled with a sandy loam soil, spiked with 200 gwith grass, filled with a sandy loam soil, spiked with 200 g

Tate, Kenneth W; Das Gracas C Pereira, Maria; Atwill, Edward R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fine Grained Robotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fine grained robotics is the idea of solving problems utilizing multitudes of very simple machines in place of one large complex entity. Organized in the proper way, simple machines and simple behaviors can lead to emergent ...

Flynn, Anita M.

71

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

72

Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for Improvement (February 2013) Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for Improvement (February 2013) Following the severe and widespread impact of Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed the preparation, response, recovery, and restoration activities performed within its organization and by the Energy Sector. Understanding the wide range of challenges encountered by owners and operators of the energy infrastructure, States and localities, utility customers, and the Federal government will establish the basis for continuous improvement in preparedness and response activities. This document provides an initial review of DOE's Sandy-Nor'easter

73

Power Outages Update: Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outages Update: Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy Outages Update: Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy Power Outages Update: Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy October 29, 2012 - 9:37pm Addthis Sandy made landfall as a post-tropical cyclone on the southern coast of New Jersey near Atlantic City at 8 p.m. with top sustained winds of 80 mph. | Photo courtesy of NOAA Sandy made landfall as a post-tropical cyclone on the southern coast of New Jersey near Atlantic City at 8 p.m. with top sustained winds of 80 mph. | Photo courtesy of NOAA Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs As of 8:00 pm EDT on October 29, there were more than 3.6 million customers without power in the affected states. The Energy Department is continuing to monitor the progress of the storm throughout the night and will publish

74

In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety November 6, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis Natural gas jitneys like this are Atlantic City's main form of public transportation. These vehicles were used to evacuate vulnerable residents during Hurricane Sandy. This vehicle is fueling up at a natural gas station built, owned, and operated by Clean Energy Fuels, who kept the station running despite widespread shortages of gasoline and diesel elsewhere. | Photo courtesy of Clean Energy Natural gas jitneys like this are Atlantic City's main form of public transportation. These vehicles were used to evacuate vulnerable residents during Hurricane Sandy. This vehicle is fueling up at a natural gas station

75

Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for Improvement (February 2013) Overview of Response to Hurricane Sandy-Nor'Easter and Recommendations for Improvement (February 2013) Following the severe and widespread impact of Hurricane Sandy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed the preparation, response, recovery, and restoration activities performed within its organization and by the Energy Sector. Understanding the wide range of challenges encountered by owners and operators of the energy infrastructure, States and localities, utility customers, and the Federal government will establish the basis for continuous improvement in preparedness and response activities. This document provides an initial review of DOE's Sandy-Nor'easter

76

In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to Safety November 6, 2012 - 5:00pm Addthis Natural gas jitneys like this are Atlantic City's main form of public transportation. These vehicles were used to evacuate vulnerable residents during Hurricane Sandy. This vehicle is fueling up at a natural gas station built, owned, and operated by Clean Energy Fuels, who kept the station running despite widespread shortages of gasoline and diesel elsewhere. | Photo courtesy of Clean Energy Natural gas jitneys like this are Atlantic City's main form of public transportation. These vehicles were used to evacuate vulnerable residents during Hurricane Sandy. This vehicle is fueling up at a natural gas station

77

Gibson Grove A.M.E. Zion Church Gone But Not Forgotten: The Archaeology of an African American Church  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 10 YR 5/4 yellowish brown sandy silt loam with about 30%of 10 YR 5/4 yellowish brown sandy silt loam with about 30%loam 30% rock 2) 10YR 5/6 sandy loam STP No: 3 Location: W

Jones, Alexandra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Big Sandy Rural Elec Coop Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rural Elec Coop Corp Rural Elec Coop Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Big Sandy Rural Elec Coop Corp Place Kentucky Utility Id 1708 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png (SCHEDULE A-1 FARM & HOMO),Residential Residential Commercial and Small Power Commercial Large Power Rate - Primary Meter Industrial Large Power Rate - Secondary Meter Industrial Large Power Service - Primary Meter Industrial Large Power Service - Secondary Meter Industrial Light - 1,500 watt Lighting Light - 100 watt MH Lighting

79

East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy East Coast Utilities prepare for Hurricane Sandy Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 29 October, 2012 - 14:46 East Coast Hurricane Sandy OpenEI outages storm United States Utility Companies As Hurricane Sandy continues to track towards the coast of the Eastern United States, utility companies have been preparing for an imminent threat that could lead to a substantial and prolonged power outage for utility customers not only on the East Coast, but also as far west as Chicago and as far north as Canada. The storm will feature Category 1 force winds, currently gusting up to 90 mph, lightning, rain, hail, possibly some tornados once the storm makes landfall, and even blizzard conditions in higher elevations of the

80

Numerical simulation of the response of sandy soils treated with pre-fabricated vertical drains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is part of the ongoing effort of the Seismic Risk Mitigation for Port Systems Grand Challenge. It addresses the problem of numerically simulating the response of sandy soils treated with earthquake drains, ...

Vytiniotis, Antonios

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Role of Satellite Data in the Forecasting of Hurricane Sandy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The excellent forecasts made by ECMWF predicting the devastating landfall of Hurricane Sandy attracted a great deal of publicity and praise in the immediate aftermath of the event. The almost unprecedented and sudden left hook of the storm ...

Anthony Philip McNally; Massimo Bonavita; Jean-Nol Thpaut

82

Pelletization of fine coals  

SciTech Connect

The present research project attempts to provide a basis to determine the pelletizability of fine coals, to ascertain the role of additives and binders and to establish a basis for binder selection. Currently, there are no established techniques for determining the quality of coal pellets. Our research is intended to develop a series of tests on coal pellets to measure their storage characteristics, transportability, ease of gasification and rate of combustion. Information developed from this research should be valuable for making knowledgeable decisions for on-time plant design, occasional binder selection and frequent process control during the pelletization of coal fines. During the last quarter, we continued the batch pelletization studies on Upper Freeport coal. The results as presented in that last quarterly report (April 1991) indicated that the surface conditions on the coal particle influenced the pelletizing growth rates. For example, a fresh (run of mine) sample of coal will display different pelletizing growth kinetics than a weathered sample of the same coal. Since coal is a heterogeneous material, the oxidized product of coal is equally variable. We found it to be logistically difficult to consistently produce large quantities of artificially oxidized coal for experimental purposes and as such we have used a naturally weathered coal. We have plans to oxidize coals under controlled oxidizing conditions and be able to establish their pelletizing behavior. The next phase of experiments were directed to study the effect of surface modification, introduced during the coal cleaning steps, on pelletizing kinetics. Accordingly, we initiated studies with two additives commonly used during the flotation of coal: dextrin (coal depressant) and dodecane (coal collector).

Sastry, K.V.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Continuous fine ash depressurization system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for depressurizing and cooling a high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein. In one aspect, the system has an apparatus for cooling the high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein and a pressure letdown device for depressurization by separating the cooled fine solid particles from a portion of the fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein, resulting in a lower temperature, lower pressure outlet of solid particles for disposal or handling by downstream equipment.

Liu, Guohai (Birmingham, AL); Peng, Wan Wang (Birmingham, AL); Vimalchand, Pannalal (Birmingham, AL)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

84

file://C:\\Documents%20and%20Settings\\rma\\My%20Documents\\CSEQ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(C) (%) (%) (%) (yr) established AL01 Crossville Alabama 34.18 -86.01 1325 16 Hartsells sandy loam 65 20 15 10 1979 AL02 Auburn Alabama 32.88 -85.81 1346 18 Pacolet sandy loam...

85

Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts November 2, 2012 - 2:57pm Addthis The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds, FEMA disaster declared areas and more. | This map is created and maintained by Google.org. To find your location, either enter your location in the box in the upper left corner or click and drag the map. Use the "Layers" button to select which data to display. Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov The Obama Administration is working around the clock to support the impacted states and utilities. To keep up to date with the Federal Government's response efforts, visit some of the site listed below.

86

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 4 October 30, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 October 30, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 5:00 am EDT October 30, Sandy has maximum sustained winds of 65 mph and the center of Sandy is 15 miles east of York, PA and is moving 15 mph west northwest. A State of Emergency has been declared for Connecticut, Delaware, Washington D.C., Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and West Virginia. As of 9:00 am EDT October 30, the impacted States report a total of 8,114,433 customers without power in the affected areas. See State totals below.

87

Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts Stay Up To Date on Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts November 2, 2012 - 2:57pm Addthis The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds, FEMA disaster declared areas and more. | This map is created and maintained by Google.org. To find your location, either enter your location in the box in the upper left corner or click and drag the map. Use the "Layers" button to select which data to display. Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov The Obama Administration is working around the clock to support the impacted states and utilities. To keep up to date with the Federal Government's response efforts, visit some of the site listed below.

88

Combined effects of short-term rainfall patterns and soil texture on nitrogen cycling -- A Modeling Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O partial pressure in the sandy loam soil with 15-day vs. 5-rates of NO and N 2 O in the sandy loam soil with 15-day vs.er (DEN) concentration from sandy loam soil for 5-day and

Gu, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Kinetics and Mechanisms of Potassium Release from Sandy Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics and Mechanisms of Potassium Release from Sandy Middle Atlantic Coastal Plain Soils1 M. C.) grown on these soils did not respond to K applications. The soils contained high levels of total K, and was contained in the sand fractionsof the soils. Kineticsof K release from the whole soils and from the coarse

Sparks, Donald L.

90

Rain water transport and storage in a model sandy soil with hydrogel particle additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study rain water infiltration and drainage in a dry model sandy soil with superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives by measuring the mass of retained water for non-ponding rainfall using a self-built 3D laboratory set-up. In the pure model sandy soil, the retained water curve measurements indicate that instead of a stable horizontal wetting front that grows downward uniformly, a narrow fingered flow forms under the top layer of water-saturated soil. This rain water channelization phenomenon not only further reduces the available rain water in the plant root zone, but also affects the efficiency of soil additives, such as superabsorbent hydrogel particles. Our studies show that the shape of the retained water curve for a soil packing with hydrogel particle additives strongly depends on the location and the concentration of the hydrogel particles in the model sandy soil. By carefully choosing the particle size and distribution methods, we may use the swollen hydrogel particles to modify the soil pore structure, to clog or extend the water channels in sandy soils, or to build water reservoirs in the plant root zone.

Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN ON A ALBANY CAT RON CREEK DALEY BU LL CREEK LEE C HAPEL AR Y ROT HWELL MEAD OW CR EEK HOL LY CREEK CON CORD TAU LBEE KH...

92

Fuel Cell and Battery Electric Vehicles Compared By C. E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduction goals1 . As shown in Figure 1, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV's) and plugin hybrid electric electric vehicle; H2 ICE HEV = hydrogen internal combustion engine hybrid electric vehicle) C.E. Thomas Fuel Cell and Battery Electric Vehicles Compared By C. E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President H2Gen

93

Sediment facies classification of a sandy shoreline by means of airborne imaging spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne imaging spectroscopy data (AISA Eagle and HyMap) were applied to classify the sediments of a sandy beach in seven sand type classes. On the AISA-Eagle data, several classification strategies were tried out and compared with each other. The best ...

B. Deronde; P. Kempeneers; R. Houhuys; J. -P. Henriet; V. Van Lancker

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Quantum Fine-Grained Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regarding the strange properties of quantum entropy and entanglement, e.g., the negative quantum conditional entropy, we revisited the foundations of quantum entropy, namely, von Neumann entropy, and raised the new method of quantum fine-grained entropy. With the applications in entanglement theory, quantum information processing, and quantum thermodynamics, we demonstrated the capability of quantum fine-grained entropy to resolve some notable confusions and problems, including the measure of entanglement and quantumness, the additivity conjecture of entanglement of formation etc, and the definition of temperature for single quantum system.

Wang, Dong-Sheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 20 November 7, 2012 (10:00 AM EST)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 November 7, 2012 (10:00 AM EST) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. The National Weather Service is forecasting a nor'easter to bringing strong winds, rain or snow, and coastal flooding to areas of the mid-Atlantic and Northeast, including areas affected by Sandy, As of 9:00 am EST November 7, there are 650,416 customers without power in the affected States. 7,860,835 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric

96

OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY (OE) SITUATION REPORT #3 FOR HURRICANE SANDY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 October 29, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: As of 2:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) reports Hurricane Sandy has maximum sustained winds of 90 mph. Sandy is 110 miles southeast of Atlantic City, NJ moving north-northeast at 28 mph. The NHC predicts hurricane force winds are expected along portions of the coast between Chincoteague, VA and Chatham, MA. On the forecast track the center of the storm is forecast to make landfall this evening along the southern New Jersey coast. A State of Emergency has been declared for Connecticut, Delaware, Washington D.C., Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Virginia. As of 2:00 pm EDT October 29, the impacted States report a total of 316,563 customers without

97

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 2 October 29, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 29, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: As of 8:00 am EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) reports Hurricane Sandy has maximum sustained winds of 85 mph. Sandy is 265 miles southeast of Atlantic City, NJ moving north-northeast at 20 mph. The NHC predicts hurricane force winds are expected along portions of the coast between Chincoteague, VA and Chatham, MA. On the forecast track the center of the storm is forecast to be near the Mid-Atlantic coast tonight. A State of Emergency has been declared for Connecticut, Delaware, Washington D.C., Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Virginia. As of 8:00 am EDT October 29, the impacted States report a total of 36,426 customers without

98

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 6 October 31, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 October 31, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. At of 5:00 am EDT October 31, the Hydrometeorological Prediction Center reported that there was no discernible surface circulation for the remnants of Sandy and the storm has weakened into a surface trough of low pressure over western Pennsylvania. As of 9:00 am EDT October 31 there are 6,249,397 customers without power in the affected States. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 486,927 24%

99

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 1 October 28, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 28, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: As of 2:00 pm EDT October 28, the National Hurricane Center reports Hurricane Sandy has maximum sustained winds of 75 mph. Sandy is 575 miles south of New York City moving northeast at 14 mph and on the forecast track the center of the storm is forecast to be near the Mid- Atlantic coast tomorrow night. As of 2:00 pm EDT October 28, there are fewer than 5,000 customers without power in Delaware, the District of Columbia, Florida, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. Utilities are preparing for the hurricane by pre-positioning supplies, securing workers, and requesting mutual assistance support to restore power after the storm makes landfall. Restoration

100

Tide gate sensor network as a forensic tool: establishing facts during superstorm sandy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a Sensor Network based Tide Gate Monitoring System (SensorTGMS) that automatically collects the real-time water levels at tide gates in the New Jersey Meadowlands District where ninety percent of which lies within two feet of the ... Keywords: emergency management, flood alerts, forensic analysis, hurricane, hurricane damages, sensor network, superstorm sandy, tide gate monitoring system, water level, water quality

Soon Ae Chun; Francisco Artigas

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

New Energy Department Team Established to Help Local Authorities Get Gas Stations Impacted by Hurricane Sandy Back Online  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As part of the government-wide effort to assist the response and recovery efforts following Hurricane Sandy, the Energy Department has established a team to assist local authorities in their efforts to get help get gas stations back online.

102

A resource complex for Sandy Neck Beach : an exploration in building on an ever-changing land  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is an exploration into a spit of land, called Sandy Neck Beach on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. It is a barrier beach system which is experiencing many changes. These changes are manifest not only in its physical ...

Solarz, Cynthia L. (Cynthia Lynne)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Sandy Ressler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Combination in the SPIE's symposium on ... to 4th International Conference on 3D Digital Imaging and ... of the NIST Virtual Library" IEEE Internet ...

104

Ripples and Ripples: from Sandy Deserts to Ion-Sputtered Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the morphological evolution of surfaces during ion sputtering and we compare their dynamical roughening with aeolian ripple formation in sandy deserts. We show that the two phenomena can be described within the same theoretical framework. This approach explains the different dynamical behaviors experimentally observed in metals or in semiconductors and amorphous systems. In the case of ion erosion, we find exponential growth at constant wavelength up to a critical roughness $W_c$. Whereas, in metals, by introducing the contribution of the Erlich-Schwoebel barrier, we find a transition from an exponential growth to a power law evolution.

T. Aste; U. Valbusa

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We work on the family of topologies for the Minkowski manifold M. We partially order this family by inclusion to form the lattice \\Sigma(M), and focus on the sublattice Z of topologies that induce the Euclidean metric space on every time axis and every space axis. We analyze the bounds of Z in the lattice \\Sigma(M), in search for its supremum. Our conclusion --that such a supremum does not belong in Z-- is compared with constructive proofs of existence of the fine topology, defined as the maximum of Z and conceived to play an essential role in contemporary physical theories. Essential mathematical and physical questions arise.

Norberto Sainz

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

Virginia Farm*a*SySt Virginia Farmstead  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(rank 2) HIGH RISK (rank 1) RISK NUMBER Steel, glass lined (liquid tight design, above ground) storage tank on coarsetextured soils (sand, sandy loam). Water table or fractured bed rock less than 20 feet, loam). Water table deeper than 20 feet. Concrete cracked, coarse textured soils (sand, sandy loam

Liskiewicz, Maciej

107

Fly ash as a liming material for corn production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash produced as a by-product of subbituminous coal combustion can potentially serve as an alternative liming material without negatively affecting corn (Zea mays L.) production in areas where use of conventional liming materials can be uneconomical due to transportation costs. A study was conducted to determine if fly ash produced from the Nebraska Public Power District Gerald Gentleman Power Station located in Sutherland, NE could be used as an alternative liming material. Combinations of dry fly ash (DFA), wet fly ash (WFA), beet lime (by-product of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) processing) (BL), and agricultural lime (AGL) were applied at rates ranging from 0.43 to 1.62 times the recommended lime rate to plots on four acidic soils (Anselmo fine sandy loam, Hord fine sandy loam, Holdrege sandy loam, and Valentine fine sand). Soil samples were collected to a depth of 0.2 m from plots and analyzed for pH before lime applications and twice periodically after lime application. The Hord and Valentine soils were analyzed for exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na,and Al for determination of percent Al saturation on selected treatments and sampling dates. Corn grain yields were determined annually. It is concluded that the fly ash utilized in this study and applied at rates in this study, increases soil pH comparable to agricultural lime and is an appropriate alternative liming material.

Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Stevens, W.B.; McCallister, D.L.; Kackman, S.D. [University of Nebraska, North Platte, NE (US)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems Speaker(s): Allen Robinson Date: November 11, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Combustion systems such as motor vehicles and power plants are major sources of fine particulate matter. This talk describes some of the changes in fine particle emissions that occur as exhaust from combustion systems mix with background air. This mixing cools and dilutes the exhaust which influences gas-particle partitioning of semi-volatile species, the aerosol size distribution, and the fine particle mass. Dilution sampling is used to characterize fine particle emissions from combustion systems because it simulates the rapid cooling and dilution that occur as exhaust mixes with the atmosphere. Results from dilution sampler

109

Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration : Annual Report, January 2008 - March 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period 2008-2009, there were 2 contracts with BPA. One (38539) was dealing with the restoration work for 2007 and the other (26198) was an extension on the 2006 contract including the NEPA for Dam removal on the old channel of the Sandy River. For contract 38539, the Sandy River Delta Habitat Restoration project continued its focus on riparian hardwood reforestation with less emphasis on wetlands restoration. Emphasis was placed on Sundial Island again due to the potential removal of the dike and the loss of access in the near future. AshCreek Forest Management was able to leverage additional funding from grants to help finance the restoration effort; this required a mid year revision of work funded by BPA. The revised work not only continued the maintenance of restored hardwood forests, but was aimed to commence the restoration of the Columbia River Banks, an area all along the Columbia River. This would be the final restoration for Sundial Island. The grant funding would help achieve this. Thus by 2011, all major work will have been completed on Sundial Island and the need for access with vehicles would no longer be required. The restored forests continued to show excellent growth and development towards true riparian gallery forests. Final inter-planting was commenced, and will continue through 2010 before the area is considered fully restored. No new wetland work was completed. The wetlands were filled by pumping in early summer to augment the water levels but due to better rainfall, no new fuel was required to augment existing. Monitoring results continued to show very good growth of the trees and the restoration at large was performing beyond expectations. Weed problems continue to be the most difficult issue. The $100,000 from BPA planned for forest restoration in 2008, was augmented by $25,000 from USFS, $120,000 from OR150 grant, $18,000 from LCREP, and the COE continued to add $250,000 for their portion. Summary of the use of these funds are displayed in Table 1 (page 5). Work on the restoration of the original Sandy River channel (dam removal, contract 26198) continued slowly. The draft EA was completed and sent out for review. The COE has decided to finish the NEPA with the intent to complete the project.

Dobson, Robin [USDA Forest Service, Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 16 November 5, 2012 (10:00 AM EST)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 November 5, 2012 (10:00 AM EST) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 9:00 am EST November 5, there are 1,374,676 customers without power in the affected States. 7,136,575 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 33,868 2% 626,559 592,691 Maryland

111

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 17 November 5, 2012 (3:00 PM EST)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 November 5, 2012 (3:00 PM EST) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EST November 5, there are 1,351,683 customers without power in the affected States. 7,159,568 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 30,608 2% 626,559 595,951 Maryland

112

Kevin Blackwell, FRA Mike Butler, UETC Sandy Covi, UPRR Bob Fronczak, AAR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conference Call Friday, March 26, 1999 11:30 a.m- Conference Call Friday, March 26, 1999 11:30 a.m- 12:30 p.m. Participants on the call included: Kevin Blackwell, FRA Mike Butler, UETC Sandy Covi, UPRR Bob Fronczak, AAR Daren Gilbert, State of Nevada Swenam Lee, DOE-FETC William Naughton, ComEd The call consisted of summary discussion of version #2 of the topic group's "TEC/WG Transportation Safety Rail Comparison" and additional discussion of comments submitted by Dr. Swenam Lee (DOE-FETC) and Mr. Steve Hamp (NTP-Albuquerque). In general, group participants felt that the edited version of the paper did a good job of meeting the objectives agreed upon by the group. Mr. Butler asked that participants refrain from

113

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 15 November 4, 2012 (3:00 PM EST)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 November 4, 2012 (3:00 PM EST) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EST November 4, there are 1,855,958 customers without power in the affected States. 6,655,293 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 64,955 4% 626,559 561,604 Maryland

114

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 11 November 2, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 November 2, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EDT November 2 there are 3,491,595 customers without power in the affected States. This is a decrease from the 3,628,739 customers without power reported in Situation Report #10. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 232,142 11% 626,559 394,417 Maryland 17,803 < 1% 311,020 293,217 Massachusetts 2,248 < 1% 298,072

115

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 18 November 6, 2012 (10:00 AM EST)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 November 6, 2012 (10:00 AM EST) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 9:00 am EST November 6, there are 973,759 customers without power in the affected States. 7,537,492 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 9,864 < 1% 626,559 616,695 Maryland

116

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 9 November 1, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 November 1, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EDT November 1 there are 4,454,650 customers without power in the affected States. This is a decrease from the 4,657,013 customers without power reported in Situation Report #8. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 348,294 17% 626,559 278,265 Maryland 40,760 2% 311,020 270,260 Massachusetts 12,883 < 1% 298,072

117

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 19 November 6, 2012 (3:00 PM EST)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 November 6, 2012 (3:00 PM EST) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EST November 6, there are 930,783 customers without power in the affected States. 7,580,468 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 7,371 < 1% 626,559 619,188 Maryland

118

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 10 November 2, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 November 2, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 9:00 am EDT November 2 there are 3,628,739 customers without power in the affected States. This is a decrease from the 4,454,650 customers without power reported in Situation Report #9. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 238,871 12% 626,559 387,688 Maryland 18,608 < 1% 311,020 292,412 Massachusetts 1,660 < 1% 298,072

119

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 14 November 4, 2012 (10:00 AM EST)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 November 4, 2012 (10:00 AM EST) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 9:00 am EST November 4 there are 1,923,169 customers without power in the affected States. 6,558,082 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 75,289 5% 626,559 551,270 Maryland

120

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 12 November 3, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 November 3, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 9:00 am EDT November 3 there are 2,576,101 customers without power in the affected States. 5,935,150 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 144,678 7% 626,559 481,881 Maryland

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 13 November 3, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 November 3, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EDT November 3 there are 2,497,421 customers without power in the affected States. 6,013,830 customers have been restored out of the 8,511,251 combined total peak outages reported in the Situation Reports for all 21 States affected. Restoration estimates and efforts by electric utilities are reported below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 132,805 6% 626,559 493,754 Maryland

122

TSNo s02-staats173645-P Alum Amendment Effects on Soil Phosphorus Stabilization in Poultry Litter Amended Sandy Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TSNo s02-staats173645-P Title Alum Amendment Effects on Soil Phosphorus Stabilization in Poultry Litter Amended Sandy Soils. abstract Increased poultry production has contributed to excess nutrient (i.e., phosphorus (P)) problems in Atlantic Coastal Plain soils due to land application of poultry litter and manure

Sparks, Donald L.

123

X-ray Microtomography Determination of Air?Water Interfacial Area?Water Saturation Relationships in Sandy Porous Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, total smooth air-water interfacial areas were measured for a series of nine natural and model sandy porous media as a function of water saturation using synchrotron X-ray microtomography. Interfacial areas decreased linearly with water saturation, while the estimated maximum interfacial area compared favorably to the media geometric surface areas. Importantly, relative interfacial area (i.e., normalized by geometric surface area) versus water saturation plots for all media collapsed into a single linear cluster (r{sup 2} = 0.93), suggesting that geometric surface area is an important, and perhaps sufficient, descriptor of sandy media that governs total smooth interfacial area?water saturation relationships. Measured relationships were used to develop an empirical model for estimating interfacial area-water saturation relationships for sandy porous media. Model-based interfacial area estimates for independent media were generally slightly higher than interfacial areas measured using aqueous-phase interfacial tracer methods, which may indicate that microtomography captures regions of the air-water interface that are not accessible to aqueous-phase interfacial tracers. The empirical model presented here requires only average particle diameter and porosity as input parameters and can be used to readily estimate air-water interfacial area?water saturation relationships for sandy porous media.

Costanza-Robinson, Molly S.; Harrold, Katherine H.; Lieb-Lappen, Ross M. (Middlebury)

2008-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

124

MOBILIZATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF COLLOIDS GENERATED FROM CEMENT LEACHATES MOVING THROUGH A SRS SANDY SEDIMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naturally occurring mobile colloids are ubiquitous and are involved in many important processes in the subsurface zone. For example, colloid generation and subsequent mobilization represent a possible mechanism for the transport of contaminants including radionuclides in the subsurface environments. For colloid-facilitated transport to be significant, three criteria must be met: (1) colloids must be generated; (2) contaminants must associate with the colloids preferentially to the immobile solid phase (aquifer); and (3) colloids must be transported through the groundwater or in subsurface environments - once these colloids start moving they become 'mobile colloids'. Although some experimental investigations of particle release in natural porous media have been conducted, the detailed mechanisms of release and re-deposition of colloidal particles within natural porous media are poorly understood. Even though this vector of transport is known, the extent of its importance is not known yet. Colloid-facilitated transport of trace radionuclides has been observed in the field, thus demonstrating a possible radiological risk associated with the colloids. The objective of this study was to determine if cementitious leachate would promote the in situ mobilization of natural colloidal particles from a SRS sandy sediment. The intent was to determine whether cementitious surface or subsurface structure would create plumes that could produce conditions conducive to sediment dispersion and mobile colloid generation. Column studies were conducted and the cation chemistries of influents and effluents were analyzed by ICP-OES, while the mobilized colloids were characterized using XRD, SEM, EDX, PSD and Zeta potential. The mobilization mechanisms of colloids in a SRS sandy sediment by cement leachates were studied.

Li, D.; Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.; Seaman, J.

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

125

Transfer of cadmium from a sandy acidic soil to man: A population study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This population study included 230 subjects (age range 20-83 years) who consumed vegetables grown in kitchen gardens on a sandy acidic soil (mean pH {approximately}6.3). The study investigated the association between the Cd (cadmium) levels in blood and urine and the Cd concentration in the soil (range 0.2-44 ppm). Seventy-six subjects were current smokers and 122 participants lived in a district with known Cd pollution. Urinary Cd in the 230 subjects averaged 8.7 nmole/24 hr, (range 1.3 to 47 nmole/24 hr) after age adjustment positively correlated with the Cd level in the soil; a twofold increase of the Cd concentration in the soil was accompanied by a 7% rise in urinary Cd in men and by a 4% rise in women. Blood Cd averaged 11.5 nmole/liter (range 1.8-41 nmole/liter) and was negatively associated with the Cd level in the soil. After adjustment for significant covariates (smoking and serum {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase in both sexes, and age and serum ferritin in women), a twofold increase in the Cd concentration in the soil was accompanied by a 6% decrease in blood Cd in men and by a 10% decrease in women. In conclusion, in a rural population, consuming vegetables grown on a sandy acidic soil, 2 to 4% of the variance of urinary Cd was directly related to the Cd level in the soil. The negative correlation with blood Cd, a measure of more recent exposure, was biased by the implementation of preventive measures in the polluted district.

Staessen, J.A.; Celis, H.G.; Fagard, R.H.; Lijnen, P.J.; Thijs, L.B.; Amery, A.K. (Univ. of Leuven (Belgium)); Vyncke, G. (Ministry of the Flemish Community, Hasselt (Belgium)); Lauwerys, R.R.; Roels, H.A. (Univ. of Louvain, Brussels (Belgium)); Claeys, F. (Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, Brussels (Belgium)); Dondeyne, F. (Ministry of the Flemish Community, Brussels (Belgium)); Ide, G. (LISEC Research Centre for Ecology and Forestry, Genk (Belgium)); Rondia, D.; Sartor, F. (Univ. of Liege, (Belgium))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Computabilities of Fine-Continuous Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a sequential-based definition of locally uniformly Fine-computable functions together with a definition of effective locally uniform convergence. This definition of computability makes some discontinuous functions, which may diverge, computable. ...

Takakazu Mori

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

Rudisill, T.S.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Study of Pelletization of Manganese Ore Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ores, fine manganese fines are characterized by large amount and low price. ... A Study of Coal-Based Direct Reduction of Composite Binder Magnetite...

129

Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in auto-rickshaws in New Delhi, India Title Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in...

130

New York/New Jersey Intra Harbor Petroleum Supplies Following Hurricane Sandy: Summary of Impacts Through November 13, 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

New York/New Jersey Intra New York/New Jersey Intra Harbor Petroleum Supplies Following Hurricane Sandy: Summary of Impacts Through November 13, 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | New York/New Jersey Intra Harbor Petroleum Supplies Following Hurricane Sandy: Summary of Impacts Through November 13, 2012 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or

131

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 5 October 30, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 October 30, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EDT October 30, the impacted States report a total of 8,204,914 customers without power in the affected areas. There is some increase in outages as the storm moves west-northwest. See State totals below. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 626,559 31% 626,559 0 Delaware 18,611 4% 45,137 26,526 District of Columbia 3,010 1% 3,583 573 Illinois 1,149 < 1% 1,149 0 Indiana 9,224 < 1% 9,224 0 Kentucky

132

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 8 November 1, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 November 1, 2012 (10:00 AM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 9:00 am EDT November 1 there are 4,657,013 customers without power in the affected States. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 353,949 17% 626,559 272,610 Maryland 48,224 2% 311,020 262,796 Massachusetts 18,055 < 1% 298,072 280,017 Michigan 10,009 < 1% 120,637 110,628 New Hampshire 14,387 2% 141,992 127,605 New Jersey 1,813,280 45% 2,615,291 802,011 New York 1,583,315 17% 2,097,933 514,618 Ohio 98,994 1% 267,323

133

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 7 October 31, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 October 31, 2012 (3:00 PM EDT) http://www.oe.netl.doe.gov/emergency_sit_rpt.aspx Highlights: At 8:00 pm EDT October 29, the National Hurricane Center reported Sandy made landfall near Atlantic City, NJ as a post tropical cyclone. As of 2:00 pm EDT October 31 there are 6,062,526 customers without power in the affected States. Summary Impacted State Current Customer Outages Percentage of Customers Without Power Peak Outages Reported in DOE SitReps Customers Restored Since Peak Connecticut 502,465 25% 626,559 124,094 Delaware 2,757 < 1% 45,137 42,380 Kentucky 2,941 < 1% 8,379 5,438 Maine 9,145 < 1% 90,727 81,582 Maryland 103,997 4% 311,020 207,023 Massachusetts 82,809 2% 298,072 215,263 Michigan 35,422 < 1% 120,637 85,215 New Hampshire 55,809 8% 141,992 86,183 New Jersey 2,052,724

134

Time scales of DNAPL migration in sandy aquifers examined via numerical simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time required for dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) to cease migrating following release to the subsurface is a valuable component of a site conceptual model. This study uses numerical simulation to investigate the migration of six different DNAPLs in sandy aquifers. The most influential parameters governing migration cessation time are the density and viscosity of the DNAPL and the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer. Releases of between 1 and 40 drums of chlorinated solvent DNAPLs, characterized by relatively high density and low viscosity, require on the order of months to a few years to cease migrating in a heterogeneous medium sand aquifer having an average hydraulic conductivity of 7.4 x 10{sup -3} cm/s. In contrast to this, the release of 20 drums of coal tar {rho}{sub D} = 1061 kg/m{sup 3}, {mu}{sub D} = 0.161 Pa(.)s) requires more than 100 years to cease migrating in the same aquifer. Altering the mean hydraulic conductivity of the aquifer results in a proportional change in cessation times. Parameters that exhibit relatively little influence on migration time scales are the DNAPL-water interfacial tension, release volume, source capillary pressure, mean aquifer porosity, and ambient ground water hydraulic gradient. This study also demonstrates that low-density DNAPLs (e.g., coal tar) give rise to greater amounts of lateral spreading and greater amounts of pooling on capillary barriers than high-density DNAPLs such as trichloroethylene or tetrachloroethylene.

Gerhard, J.I.; Pang, T.; Kueper, B.H. [University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Inst. of Infrastructure & Environmental

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Removal of contaminants from fine-grained soils using electrokinetic flushing. Semiannual report, July 1 through December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report details the status of work conducted on the use of electrokinetics (EK) to remediate a fine grained soil contaminated with lead. The experimental work entails soil collection and characterization, soil adsorption and desorption of lead, and experimental setup construction and testing. Test soil was collected from Northern Erie County, New York and underwent standard preparation and physical/chemical characterization. The soil is a silt loam with a low hydraulic permeability ({approx} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s), a large amount of fine materials, moderate organic carbon content, and a moderately high cation exchange capacity (CEC). The soil has a low indigenous lead content and is slightly acidic. The soil was artificially contaminated with lead to concentrations of 95, 800, and 7,600 mg Pb/kg soil. Lead desorption experiments were conducted using several concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3}, EDTA, CaCl{sub 2}, acetic acid, and tap water. HCl, HNO{sub 3}, and EDTA desorbed the majority of the soil-bound lead. Acetic acid and CaCl{sub 2} were less effective while tap water was ineffective. An experimental apparatus consisting of a consolidation unit and electrokinetic (EK) soil reactor to mimic EK flushing in the field was designed and constructed. The experimental unit underwent testing to determine if water could be moved through the soil under an applied electric current. Significant quantities of water were moved through soil. Based on limited results, water movement increased with increased conductivity. The pH and conductivity of the reservoir waters were monitored during the reactor testing. With time, the pH at the cathode dropped to less than 4 and at the anode was raised to about 10. Conductivities of the two reservoirs increased from their initial values because of ion migration from the soil into the reservoirs and the increase in either H{sup +} and OH{sup {minus}}.

Reed, B.E.; Berg, M.T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Stability Behavior and Thermodynamic States of Iron and Manganese in Sandy Soil Aquifer, Manukan Island, Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of 20 soil samples were collected from 10 boreholes constructed in the low lying area, which included ancillary samples taken from the high elevation area. Redox processes were investigated in the soil as well as groundwater in the shallow groundwater aquifer of Manukan Island, Sabah, Malaysia. Groundwater samples (n = 10) from each boreholes were also collected in the low lying area to understand the concentrations and behaviors of Fe and Mn in the dissolved state. This study strives to obtain a general understanding of the stability behaviors on Fe and Mn at the upper unsaturated and the lower-saturated soil horizons in the low lying area of Manukan Island as these elements usually play a major role in the redox chemistry of the shallow groundwater. Thermodynamic calculations using PHREEQC showed that the groundwater samples in the study area are oversaturated with respect to goethite, hematite, Fe(OH){sub 3} and undersaturated with respect to manganite and pyrochroite. Low concentrations of Fe and Mn in the groundwater might be probably due to the lack of minerals of iron and manganese oxides, which exist in the sandy aquifer. In fact, high organic matters that present in the unsaturated horizon are believed to be responsible for the high Mn content in the soil. It was observed that the soil samples collected from high elevation area (BK) comprises considerable amount of Fe in both unsaturated (6675.87 mg/kg) and saturated horizons (31440.49 mg/kg) compared to the low Fe content in the low lying area. Based on the stability diagram, the groundwater composition lies within the stability field for Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+} under suboxic condition and very close to the FeS/Fe{sup 2+} stability boundary. This study also shows that both pH and Eh values comprise a strong negative value thus suggesting that the redox potential is inversely dependent on the changes of pH.

Lin, Chin Yik, E-mail: cy_lin_ars@hotmail.com [Universiti Malaysia Sabah, School of Science and Technology (Malaysia); Abdullah, Mohd. Harun [Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Water Research Unit, School of Science and Technology (Malaysia); Musta, Baba; Praveena, Sarva Mangala [Universiti Malaysia Sabah, School of Science and Technology (Malaysia); Aris, Ahmad Zaharin [Universiti Putra Malaysia, Faculty of Environmental Studies (Malaysia)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

System for utilizing oil shale fines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for utilizing fines of carbonaceous materials such as particles or pieces of oil shale of about one-half inch or less diameter which are rejected for use in some conventional or prior surface retorting process, which obtains maximum utilization of the energy content of the fines and which produces a waste which is relatively inert and of a size to facilitate disposal. The system includes a cyclone retort (20) which pyrolyzes the fines in the presence of heated gaseous combustion products, the cyclone retort having a first outlet (30) through which vapors can exit that can be cooled to provide oil, and having a second outlet (32) through which spent shale fines are removed. A burner (36) connected to the spent shale outlet of the cyclone retort, burns the spent shale with air, to provide hot combustion products (24) that are carried back to the cyclone retort to supply gaseous combustion products utilized therein. The burner heats the spent shale to a temperature which forms a molten slag, and the molten slag is removed from the burner into a quencher (48) that suddenly cools the molten slag to form granules that are relatively inert and of a size that is convenient to handle for disposal in the ground or in industrial processes.

Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Process for treating moisture laden coal fines  

SciTech Connect

A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

Davis, Burl E. (New Kensington, PA); Henry, Raymond M. (Gibsonia, PA); Trivett, Gordon S. (South Surrey, CA); Albaugh, Edgar W. (Birmingham, AL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Fine ash formation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, 15 pulverized coal samples were burnt in a drop-tube furnace to investigate the formation of fine particulates and the influence of coal ash properties on their emission. Coal combustion was carried out at 1673 K in air. Fine particles were collected by a cyclone and a low-pressure impactor. The elemental compositions of the collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We examined the chemical compositions of the fine particles as a function of particle diameter and examined the proportions of the elements in the parent coal samples. We determined that almost all particles less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter were formed by means of volatilization-condensation of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the coal. We also demonstrated that the amount of SiO{sub 2} in particle size less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter was related to the amount of fine included quartz and clay minerals in the parent coal. The primary components of particles greater than 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and as the diameter of the particles decrease, the mass fractions of iron, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus increased. However, the particle diameter at which this tendency commenced differed depending on the element. Particles between 0.22 and 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were thought to have been formed by the fragmentation and coalescence of particles in the coal and by the simultaneous condensation of volatilized elements onto other particles. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Tsuyoshi Teramae; Takayuki Takarada [Idemitsu Kosan Company, Limited, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environmental Research Laboratory

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Laboratory Evaluation of Fine-mesh Traveling Water Screens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final results of four years of laboratory evaluations on performance of fine-mesh traveling water screens to protect larval fish at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). Prior to this study, the biological effectiveness of fine-mesh screens was uncertain because performance data from the few existing facilities that use fine-mesh screens have been highly variable. This project is producing additional data necessary to determine biological efficacy of fine-mesh screens.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Sandy River Delta, Technical Report 2000-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Land managers are often challenged with the mandate to control exotic and invasive plant species. Reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) and Himalayan blackberry (Rubus discolor) are 2 such species that are currently threatening natural areas in western United States. Reed canarygrass may be native to the inland northwest (Antieau 2000), but it has invaded many wetland areas as dense, monoculture stands. Spread of this plant species is largely attributed to human disturbances, e.g., draining, farming (Antieau 2000). Reed canarygrass often dominates other emergent vegetation such as cattail (Typha spp.) and bulrush (Scirpus spp.) (Whitson et al. 1996, Apfelbaum and Sams 1987), and the resulting habitat is largely unsuitable for wetland birds. Himalayan blackberry was introduced to the United States as a garden shrub and was planted at wildlife-management areas for food and cover. It easily colonizes disturbed places, such as roadsides, ditches, and flood plains (Hoshovsky 2000). Once established, it forms a thick, impenetrable stand, which excludes native shrub species. Although Himalayan blackberry does provide food and cover for wildlife, particularly during fall and winter, it decreases habitat diversity, and therefore, may decrease wildlife diversity. Furthermore, patterns of avian nest predation may be altered in some exotic-shrub communities (Schmidt and Whelan 1999). For land managers to make sound decisions regarding invasive-plant control, it is useful to obtain information on current plant distributions in relation to targeted wildlife species, and then use models to predict how those species may respond to changes in vegetation. The Habitat Evaluations Program was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to evaluate current and future habitat conditions for fish and wildlife (Stiehl 1994). The program is based on Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for specific wildlife species. Each model contains several variables that represent life requisites (e.g., food and nesting cover) for that species. These variables are evaluated with vegetation sampling, and/or through the interpretation of aerial photographs and the like. Variable values are assigned a numerical score. The score may be based on a categorical rating (e.g . , different vegetation types receive different scores based on their importance for that species) or may be the result of a linear relationship (e.g., the score increases with the variable value; Figure 1). Variable scores are then input into a mathematical formula, which results in an HSI score. The HSI score ranges from 0-1, with 0 representing poor-quality habitat and 1 optimal habitat. HSI models assume a positive, linear relationship between wildlife-species density and the HSI score. For example, with an HSI score of 1, we assume that a species will be present at its highest density. Models can be projected into the future by changing variable values and observing the corresponding changes in HSI scores. Most models are relatively simple, but some are complex. These models have come under considerable scrutiny in the last several years, particularly concerning the validity of model assumptions (Van Horne 1983, Laymon and Barrett 1986, Hobbs and Hanley 1990, Kellner et al. 1992). Regardless of criticisms, these models may be used with success when there is an understanding and acceptance of model limitations. Each model should be evaluated as to its applicability in a given situation. Model validation, where results have on-the-ground verification, is highly recommended. Specific objectives of this project were to (1) conduct avian surveys and measure the present vegetation at the Sandy River Delta, (2) input the vegetation data into HSI models for 5 avian species, (3) evaluate the current habitat suitability for these species, and (4) predict species responses to potential changes in vegetation, resulting from the removal of reed canarygrass and/or Himalayan blackberry.

Rocklage, Ann; Ratti, John

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Soldering Small Beads to Fine Wires  

SciTech Connect

One method suggested for soldering small beads to fine wires using a torch to heat the bead, flux, and magnesia brick did not prove entirely satisfactory in this case. It was found the brick would draw heat away from the bead and flux at too fast a rate resulting in a poor weld, a rough surface, and an excessive accumulation of flux on the bead. Secondly, removal of the depleted flux presented a problem when the welding was done on the surface of the brick.

Stanton, J. S.

1950-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Biomass Lignin Binder for Coal Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the production of a waste stream consisting of lignin from a dilute acid hydrolysis process for making ethanol fuel from cellulosic biomass. The lignin waste stream was then evaluated as a possible binder to hold coal fines in a useable form for fuel in a coal-fired power plant. The production and use of a lignin-rich waste stream is of interest because it would enable a biomass energy content in the fuel for the coal-fired power plant, while using waste coal and waste biomass. The ...

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

144

Developing physical surrogates for benthic biodiversity using co-located samples and regression tree models: a conceptual synthesis for a sandy temperate embayment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine physical and geochemical data can be valuable surrogates for predicting the distributions and assemblages of marine species. This study investigated the bio-environment surrogacy relationships in Jervis Bay, a sandy marine embayment in south-eastern ... Keywords: Jervis Bay, benthic biodiversity, conceptual model, surrogates

Zhi Huang; Matthew McArthur; Lynda Radke; Tara Anderson; Scott Nichol; Justy Siwabessy; Brendan Brooke

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

Rudisill, T. S.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

146

Evaluation of superpave fine aggregate specification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superpave[] was the final product of the Strategic Highway Research Program's (SHRP) asphalt pavement research effort during 1987-93. Some aspects of the Superpave aggregate specifications are not universally accepted. The validity of the fine aggregate angularity (FAA) requirement is questioned by both the owner agencies and the paving and aggregate industries. The FAA test is based on the assumption that more fractured faces will result in higher void content in the loosely compacted sample; however, this is not always true. The aggregate industry has found that cubical shaped particles, even with 100% fractured faces, may not meet the FAA requirement for high-volume traffic. State agencies are concerned that local materials previously considered acceptable and which have provided good field performance, now cannot meet the Superpave requirements. Twenty three-fine aggregates from different part of the USA were tested using major angularity tests: FAA test, direct shear test, compacted aggregate resistance (CAR) test, image analysis Hough transform, and visual inspection. The results from those tests were compared with the available performance history. The FAA test method does not consistently identify angular, cubical aggregates as high quality materials. There is a fair correlation between the CAR stability value and angle of internal friction (AIF) from direct shear test. No correlation was found between FAA and CAR stability or between FAA and AIF. A good correlation was found between FAA and K-index from Hough transform method. Some cubical crushed aggregates whose FAA values were less than 45 gave very high values of CAR stability, AIF and K-index. The statistical analysis of the SHRP LTPP database reveals that there is no evidence of any good linear relationship between FAA and rutting. Of the methods evaluated, image analysis using Hough transform appears most promising for measuring fine aggregate angularity. Until a replacement method for FAA can be identified, the author recommends that the FAA criteria be lowered from 45. The FAA vs. rutting data analysis should be continued with a larger amount of data as the LTPP SHRP database is expanded.

Chowdhury, Md. Tahjib-Ul-Arif

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

High Temperature Hold Time Effects on Fine Grain Processed 718 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. Fine Grain Alloy 718 is a relatively cost effective turbine and compressor disk alloy with superior yield strength and low cycle fatigue properties.

148

Ultra Fine Grain/Ultra Low Carbon 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultra low carbon alloy 718 composition has been investigated in combination with ultra fine grain processing to improve the low cycle fatigue capabilities.

149

Tensile Properties of Fine Grain MA956 Oxide Dispersion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Tensile Properties of Fine Grain MA956 Oxide Dispersion ... Weld Overlay Claddings by Gas-metal-arc Welding Process for Extending Plant...

150

Application and evaluation of spiral separators for fine coal cleaning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Eight buckets of wet coal samples were collected from Shade Coal Preparation Plant,including the feed, clean coal, refuse, and middlings for fine spiral and coarse (more)

Che, Zhuping.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Full Scale Gatorizing of Fine Grain Inconel 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and fine grain size achieved in the extruded billet as well as the high cost ... with alloys such as 718, 901, or A286 succeeded in producing fine-grained billet by using ... by oil quench and aging at 718"C/8 hrs. and furnace cool to 62l0CI8 hrs.

152

Effect of Long-term Lime and Potassium Applications on Quantity-Intensity (Q/I) Relationships in Sandy Soil1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Sandy Soil1 D. L. SPARKS AND W. C. LiEBHARDT2 ABSTRACT The effects of long-term lime and K applications on quan- tity-intensity (Q/I) relationships were investigated on the Ap and B21t horizons of a Kalmia soil, and chloritized ver- miculite. Soil pH and exchangeable bases increased with depth and with lime additions

Sparks, Donald L.

153

Stored carbon partly fuels fine-root respiration but is not used for production of new fine roots  

SciTech Connect

The relative use of new photosynthate compared to stored C for the production and maintenance of fine roots, and the rate of C turnover in heterogeneous fine-root populations, are poorly understood. We followed the relaxation of a 13C tracer in fine roots in a Liquidambar styraciflua plantation at the conclusion of a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment. Goals included quantifying the relative fractions of new photosynthate versus stored C used in root growth and root respiration, as well as the turnover rate of fine-root C fixed during [CO2] fumigation. New fine-root growth was largely from recent photosynthate, while nearly one-quarter of respired C was from a storage pool. Changes in the isotopic composition of the fine-root population over two full growing seasons indicated heterogeneous C pools; less than 10% of root C had a residence time < 3 months, while a majority of root C had a residence time > 2 years. Compared to a 1-pool model, a 2-pool model for C turnover in fine roots (with 5 and 0.37 yr-1 turnover times) doubles the fine-root contribution to forest NPP (9-13%) and supports the 50% root-to-soil transfer rate often used in models.

Lynch, Douglas J [ORNL; Matamala-Paradeda, Roser [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miguel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A Finely-Predicted Higgs Boson Mass from A Finely-Tuned Weak Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If supersymmetry is broken directly to the Standard Model at energies not very far from the unified scale, the Higgs boson mass lies in the range 128-141 GeV. The end points of this range are tightly determined. Theories with the Higgs boson dominantly in a single supermultiplet predict a mass at the upper edge, (141 \\pm 2) GeV, with the uncertainty dominated by the experimental errors on the top quark mass and the QCD coupling. This edge prediction is remarkably insensitive to the supersymmetry breaking scale and to supersymmetric threshold corrections so that, in a wide class of theories, the theoretical uncertainties are at the level of \\pm 0.4 GeV. A reduction in the uncertainties from the top quark mass and QCD coupling to the level of \\pm 0.3 GeV may be possible at future colliders, increasing the accuracy of the confrontation with theory from 1.4% to 0.4%. Verification of this prediction would provide strong evidence for supersymmetry, broken at a very high scale of ~ 10^{14 \\pm 2} GeV, and also for a Higgs boson that is elementary up to this high scale, implying fine-tuning of the Higgs mass parameter by ~ 20-28 orders of magnitude. Currently, the only known explanation for such fine-tuning is the multiverse.

Lawrence J. Hall; Yasunori Nomura

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

Shape dependence of band-edge exciton fine structure in CdSe nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exciton fine structure in CdSe nanocrystals Qingzhong Zhao,fine structure of wurtzite CdSe nanocrystals is investigatedexciton fine structure of CdSe nanocrystals is determined by

Zhao, Qingzhong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A performance model for fine-grain accesses in UPC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UPC's implicit communication and fine-grain programming style make application performance modeling a challenging task. The correspondence between remote references and communication events depends on the internals of the compiler and runtime system. ...

Zhang Zhang; Steven R. Seidel

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #280: August 11, 2003 Fines...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the fuel economy of new light vehicles sold in the United States. The CAFE program fines vehicle manufacturers whose corporate average is less than 27.5 miles per gallon (mpg) for...

158

A fine-grained component-level power measurement method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ever growing energy consumption of computer systems have become a more and more serious problem in the past few years. Power profiling is a fundamental way for us to better understand where, when and how energy is consumed. This paper presents a ... Keywords: energy efficiency, fine-grained component-level power measurement method, computer system energy consumption, power profiling, direct measurement method, power dissipation synchronization, program phase, SPEC CPU2006 benchmarks, fine time granularity, memory management, architecture design

Zehan Cui; Yan Zhu; Yungang Bao; Mingyu Chen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

160

Genome sequencing reveals fine scale diversification and reticulation history during speciation in Sus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as: Frantz et al. : Genome sequencing reveals fine scaleThornton K, Presgraves DC: Genome sequencing reveals complexRESEARCH Open Access Genome sequencing reveals fine scale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Gravity Wave Fine Structure Interactions, Part 1: Influences of Fine-Structure Form and Orientation on Flow Evolution and Instability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four idealized direct numerical simulations are performed to examine the dynamics arising from the superposition of a monochromatic gravity wave and sinusoidal linear and rotary fine structure in the velocity field. These simulations are motivated ...

David C. Fritts; Ling Wang; Joseph A. Werne

162

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

163

Microsoft Word - Finely_NorthValley_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cecilia Brown Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Finely Creek and North Valley Creek property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-58888 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real property transfers for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management Location: Finely Creek: Township 16 North, Range 20 West, Section 24; Missoula County, MT. North Valley Creek: Township 17 North, Range 20 West, Section 19; Lake County, MT. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for the purchase of 9 acres of property, referred to as the Finely Creek Property,

164

Effect of hydrogel particle additives on water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils: A custom pressure plate apparatus and capillary bundle model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To probe the effects of hydrogel particle additives on the water-accessible pore structure of sandy soils, we introduce a custom pressure plate method in which the volume of water expelled from a wet granular packing is measured as a function of applied pressure. Using a capillary bundle model, we show that the differential change in retained water per pressure increment is directly related to the cumulative cross-sectional area distribution $f(r)$ of the water-accessible pores with radii less than $r$. This is validated by measurements of water expelled from a model sandy soil composed of 2 mm diameter glass beads. In particular, the expelled water is found to depend dramatically on sample height and that analysis using the capillary bundle model gives the same pore size distribution for all samples. The distribution is found to be approximately log-normal, and the total cross-sectional area fraction of the accessible pore space is found to be $f_0=0.34$. We then report on how the pore distribution and total water-accessible area fraction are affected by superabsorbent hydrogel particle additives, uniformly mixed into a fixed-height sample at varying concentrations. Under both fixed volume and free swelling conditions, the total area fraction of water-accessible pore space in a packing decreases exponentially as the gel concentration increases. The size distribution of the pores is significantly modified by the swollen hydrogel particles, such that large pores are clogged while small pores are formed.

Y. Wei; D. J. Durian

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fine Structure of Dark Energy and New Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following our recent work on the cosmological constant problem, in this letter we make a specific proposal regarding the fine structure (i.e., the spectrum) of dark energy. The proposal is motivated by a deep analogy between the blackbody radiation problem, which led to the development of quantum theory, and the cosmological constant problem, which we have recently argued calls for a conceptual extension of the quantum theory. We argue that the fine structure of dark energy is governed by a Wien distribution, indicating its dual quantum and classical nature. We discuss a few observational consequences of such a picture of dark energy.

Vishnu Jejjala; Michael Kavic; Djordje Minic

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Fine Prediction of Energy Power Production in Wind Farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fine Prediction of Energy Power Production in Wind Farms November 30, 2007 This report have been Technological Need: Wind Power Prediction Clean energy production systems and environmental policies have and Numerical Models The first important point to stress is that the energy power obtained from a single wind

167

ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE  

SciTech Connect

SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

Herman, D.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

Adsorption of Water Vapor by Bare Soil in an Olive Grove in Southern Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data for water vapor adsorption and evaporation are presented for a bare soil (sandy loam, clay content 15%) in a southern Spanish olive grove. Water losses and gains were measured using eight high-precision minilysimeters, placed around an olive ...

A. Verhoef; A. Diaz-Espejo; J. R. Knight; L. Villagarca; J. E. Fernndez

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

170

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Councils Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

171

Fine, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fine, New York: Energy Resources Fine, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.2478396°, -75.1377015° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.2478396,"lon":-75.1377015,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

172

Three new approaches to the problem of dewatering fine coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased use of continuous miners and longwall shearers have made fine coal a growing proportion of preparation plant feed. Increased crushing within the plant itself to facilitate ash and sulfur removal further tips the size consist towards the fine end of the scale. Of itself there is nothing intrinsically wrong with fine coal, but the disproportionately large quantity of surface moisture entrained with it creates costly problems. Clark D. Harrison of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Homer City, PA, and James R. Cavalet of Science Applications International Corp., Homer City, have quantified the reasons for fine coal drying. According to their calculations an extra 1% moisture can add from $310,000 to $1 million per year to transport costs. The $310,000 (case 1) would be true for a power plant using 3.1 million tpy at a plant that is 250 miles from its source, and the $1 million (case 2) is a power plant that is 1,000 miles from its source and using 2.5 million tpy. Extra water also means extra heat used and wasted to vaporize this water, an additional avoidable expense of $700,000 for case 1 and $560,000 for case 2. There are also the uncalculated wet-coal-produced costs of plugged pulverizers, plugged chutes and frozen coal. Perhaps the figure that brings the deleterious effects of wet coal closest to home for a preparation plant manager is that a 1% increase in moisture can offset a 4.5% decrease in ash. In considering how to remove excess water, mechanical drying has advantages over thermal drying in that it produces no air pollution and is not as capital intensive, but unfortunately it is also not as effective.

Burger, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Monitoring Fine Sediment; Grande Ronde and John Day Rivers, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated to monitor surface fine sediment levels and overwinter intrusion of fine sediment in spring chinook salmon spawning habitat in the North Folk John Day and Grande Ronde Rivers, for five years.

Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Greene, M. Jonas; Purser, Michael D. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Regionalization in Fine-Grid GFS MOS 6-h Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent emergence of the National Digital Forecast Database as the flagship product of the National Weather Service has resulted in an increased demand for forecast guidance products on fine-mesh grids. Unfortunately, fine-grid forecasts with ...

Jerome P. Charba; Frederick G. Samplatsky

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A multiprocessor architecture combining fine-grained and coarse-grained parallelism strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: coarse-grained, fine-grained, instruction-level parallelism, loop-level parallelism, multiprocessor, performance comparisons, pipelining, superscalar

David J. Lilja

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Title Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lunden, Melissa M., Douglas R. Black, Megan McKay, Kenneth L. Revzan, Allen H. Goldstein, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page 373 Issue 5 Pagination 373-388 Date Published 02/2006 ISSN 0278-6826 (Print), 1521-7388 (Online) Abstract Atmospheric aerosols from natural and anthropogenic processes have both primary and secondary origins, and can influence human health, visibility, and climate. One key process affecting atmospheric concentrations of aerosols is the formation of new particles and their subsequent growth to larger particle sizes. A field study was conducted at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California from May through September of 2002 to examine the effect of biogenic volatile organic compounds on aerosol formation and processing. The study included in-situ measurements of concentration and biosphere-atmosphere flux of VOCs, ozone, aerosol size distribution, aerosol physical and optical properties, and meteorological variables. Fine particle growth events were observed on approximately 30 percent of the 107 days with complete size distribution data. Average particle growth rates measured during these events were 3.8 ± 1.9 nm hr-1. Correlations between aerosol properties, trace gas concentrations, and meteorological measurements were analyzed to determine conditions conducive to fine particle growth events. Growth events were typically observed on days with a lesser degree of anthropogenic influence, as indicated by lower concentrations of black carbon, carbon monoxide, and total aerosol volume. Days with growth events also had lower temperatures, increased wind speeds, and larger momentum flux. Measurements of ozone concentrations and ozone flux indicate that gas phase oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds occur in the canopy, strongly suggesting that a significant portion of the material responsible for the observed particle growth are oxidation products of naturally emitted very reactive organic compounds.

177

Hardware and software efficacy in assessment of fine root diameter distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine roots constitute the majority of root system surface area and thus most of the nutrient and water absorption surface. Fine roots are, however, the least understood of all plant roots. A sensitivity analysis of several software programs capable of ... Keywords: Diameter distribution, Digital image analysis, Fine roots, High resolution, Root length, Scanner

Richard W. Zobel

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Process for preparing fine grain titanium carbide powder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing finely divided titanium carbide powder in which an organotitanate is reacted with a carbon precursor polymer to provide an admixture of the titanium and the polymer at a molecular level due to a crosslinking reaction between the organotitanate and the polymer. The resulting gel is dried, pyrolyzed to drive off volatile components and provide carbon. The resulting solids are then heated at an elevated temperature to convert the titanium and carbon to high-purity titanium carbide powder in a submicron size range.

Janney, M.A.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Hydraulic fracturing method employing a fines control technique  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for controlling fines or sand in an unconsolidated or loosely consolidated formation or reservoir penetrated by at least one wellbore where hydraulic fracturing is used in combination with control of the critical salinity rate and the critical fluid flow velocity. The method comprises: (a) placing at least one wellbore in the reservoir; (b) hydraulically fracturing the formation via the wellbore with a fracturing fluid which creates at least one fracture; (c) placing a proppant comprising a gravel pack into the fracture; (d) determining the critical salinity rate and the critical fluid flow velocity of the formation or reservoir surrounding the wellbore; (e) injecting a saline solution into the formation or reservoir at a velocity exceeding the critical fluid flow velocity and at a saline concentration sufficient to cause the fines or particles to be transferred and fixed deep wihtin the formation or reservoir without plugging the formation, fracture, or wellbore; and (f) producing a hydrocarbonaceous fluid from the formation or reservoir at a velocity such that the critical flow velocity is not exceeded deep within the formation, fracture, or wellbore.

Stowe, L.R.

1986-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Unraveling the Excess Air/Coal Fineness Enigma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the use of powered coal as a boiler fuel, the factors involved in heat loss from unburnt carbon in the ash are but partially understood. More finely pulverized coal particles will result in lower carbon-in-ash losses. On the other hand, the finer grind of coal requires a considerably higher energy input to the pulverizing mill. Thus, an optimum balance must be achieved between fuel savings and grinding costs to arrive at the maximum economic savings. If these were the only considerations, the solution would be simple. The problem, however, is compounded by a concurrent reduction in mill capacity as the fineness is increased. In addition, there are marked interactions between coal particle size and excess air as they effect carbon burning rate with its concomitant effect upon carbon-in-ash heat loss. Finally, variability in the excess air will alter the energy supplied to the induced-draft and forced-draft air fans. To generate a greater understanding of the impact of the aforesaid factors, upon potential fuel savings, a computer simulation was developed for the powdered coal boiler. The current paper presents results of exploratory studies using the simulator.

Laspe, C. G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Supercritical fluid molecular spray thin films and fine powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid films are deposited, or fine powders formed, by dissolving a solid material into a supercritical fluid solution at an elevated pressure and then rapidly expanding the solution through a short orifice into a region of relatively low pressure. This produces a molecular spray which is directed against a substrate to deposit a solid thin film thereon, or discharged into a collection chamber to collect a fine powder. The solvent is vaporized and pumped away. Solution pressure is varied to determine, together with flow rate, the rate of deposition and to control in part whether a film or powder is produced and the granularity of each. Solution temperature is varied in relation to formation of a two-phase system during expansion to control porosity of the film or powder. A wide variety of film textures and powder shapes are produced of both organic and inorganic compounds. Films are produced with regular textural feature dimensions of 1.0-2.0 .mu.m down to a range of 0.01 to 0.1 .mu.m. Powders are formed in very narrow size distributions, with average sizes in the range of 0.02 to 5 .mu.m.

Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hydrogen Atom and Time Variation of Fine-Structure Constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we have solved the de Sitter special relativistic ($\\mathcal{SR}_{cR}$-) Dirac equation of hydrogen in the earth-QSO(quasar) framework reference by means of the adiabatic approach. The aspects of geometry effects of de Sitter space-time described by Beltrami metric are explored and taken into account. It is found that the $\\mathcal{SR}_{cR}$-Dirac equation of hydrogen is a time dependent quantum Hamiltonian system. We provide an explicit calculation to justify the adiabatic approach in dealing with this time-dependent system. Since the radius of de Sitter sphere $R$ is cosmologically large, the evolution of the system is very slow so that the adiabatic approximation legitimately works with high accuracy. We conclude that the electromagnetic fine-structure constant, the electron mass and the Planck constant are time variations. This prediction of fine-structure constant is consistent with the presently available observation data. For confirming it further, experiments/observations are required.

Mu-Lin Yan

2009-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reduction of iron ore fines by coal fines in a packed bed and fluidized bed apparatus: A comparative study  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of iron ore fines by coal fines in packed and fluidized beds has been studied. The investigation includes study of the kinetic aspects of reduction, carbon and sulfur content of the direct reduced iron (DRI) produced, and metallography of the products. For both processes, the kinetic data fit the first-order reaction model. Reduction in a fluidized bed is much faster than in a packed bed system. In both cases, DRI contains a substantial amount of free carbon at the kinetic data fit the first-order reaction model. Reduction in a fluidized bed is much faster than in a packed bed system. In both cases, DRI contains a substantial amount of free carbon at the initial stages of reduction. At the later stages of reduction, the carbon present in the DRI is mainly in the combined state. For identical temperatures and particle sizes, reaction in fluidized bed is much faster compared to that in a packed bed. At any particular degree of reduction, sulfur content in DRI samples produced by fluidized bed reduction is always more than that of DRI samples produced by packed bed reduction. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs reveal that metallic whiskers formed during reduction in packed beds only. These whiskers become more prominent at higher temperatures and longer times.

Haque, R. (Bangladesh Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Metallurgical Engineering Department); Ray, H.S. (Regional Research Lab., Orissa (India)); Mukherjee, A. (Indian Inst. of Tech., (India).Metallurgical Engineering Department)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

DeRyckere, John F. (Eau Claire, WI); Jenkins, Philip Nord (Eau Claire, WI); Cornett, Frank Nolan (Chippewa Falls, WI)

2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fine structure constant in the spacetime of a cosmic string  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the fine structure constant in the spacetime of a cosmic string. In the presence of a cosmic string the value of the fine structure constant reduces. We also discuss on numerical results. The gravitational properties of cosmic strings are strikingly different from those of non-relativistic linear distributions of matter. To explain the origin of the difference, we note that for a static matter distribution with energymomentum tensor, T ? = diag (?, ?p1, ?p2, ?p3) , (1) the Newtonian limit of the Einstein equations become ? 2 ? = 4?G (? + p1 + p2 + p3), (2) where ? is the gravitational potential. For non-relativistic matter, pi ? ? and ? 2 ? = 4?G?. Strings, on the other hand, have a large longitudinal tension. For a straight string parallel to the z-axis, p3 = ??, with p1 and p2 vanish when averaged over the string cross-section. Hence, the righthand side of Eq.(2) vanishes, suggesting that straight strings produce no gravitational forece on surrounding matter. This conclusion is confirmed by a full general-relativistic analysis. Another feature distinguishing cosmic strings from more familiar sources is their relativistic motion. As a result, oscillating loops of string can be strong emitters of gravitational radiation. A gravitating string is described by the combined system of Einstein, Higgs and guage field equations. The problem of solving these coupled equations is formidable and no exact solutions have been found to date. Fortunately, for most cosmological applications the problem can be made tractable by adopting two major simplifications. First, assuming that the string thickness is much smaller than all other relevant dimensions, the string can be 1

Forough Nasseri

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Waste Coal Fines Reburn for NOx and Mercury Emission Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Injection of coal-water slurries (CWS) made with both waste coal and bituminous coal was tested for enhanced reduction of NO{sub x} and Hg emissions at the AES Beaver Valley plant near Monaca, PA. Under this project, Breen Energy Solutions (BES) conducted field experiments on the these emission reduction technologies by mixing coal fines and/or pulverized coal, urea and water to form slurry, then injecting the slurry in the upper furnace region of a coal-fired boiler. The main focus of this project was use of waste coal fines as the carbon source; however, testing was also conducted using pulverized coal in conjunction with or instead of waste coal fines for conversion efficiency and economic comparisons. The host site for this research and development project was Unit No.2 at AES Beaver Valley cogeneration station. Unit No.2 is a 35 MW Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) front-wall fired boiler that burns eastern bituminous coal. It has low NO{sub x} burners, overfire air ports and a urea-based selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system for NO{sub x} control. The back-end clean-up system includes a rotating mechanical ash particulate removal and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. Coal slurry injection was expected to help reduce NOx emissions in two ways: (1) Via fuel-lean reburning when the slurry is injected above the combustion zone. (2) Via enhanced SNCR reduction when urea is incorporated into the slurry. The mercury control process under research uses carbon/water slurry injection to produce reactive carbon in-situ in the upper furnace, promoting the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers. By controlling the water content of the slurry below the stoichiometric requirement for complete gasification, water activated carbon (WAC) can be generated in-situ in the upper furnace. As little as 1-2% coal/water slurry (heat input basis) can be injected and generate sufficient WAC for mercury capture. During July, August, and September 2007, BES designed, procured, installed, and tested the slurry injection system at Beaver Valley. Slurry production was performed by Penn State University using equipment that was moved from campus to the Beaver Valley site. Waste coal fines were procured from Headwaters Inc. and transported to the site in Super Sacks. In addition, bituminous coal was pulverized at Penn State and trucked to the site in 55-gallon drums. This system was operated for three weeks during August and September 2007. NO{sub x} emission data were obtained using the plant CEM system. Hg measurements were taken using EPA Method 30B (Sorbent Trap method) both downstream of the electrostatic precipitator and in the stack. Ohio Lumex Company was on site to provide rapid Hg analysis on the sorbent traps during the tests. Key results from these tests are: (1) Coal Fines reburn alone reduced NO{sub x} emissions by 0-10% with up to 4% heat input from the CWS. However, the NO{sub x} reduction was accompanied by higher CO emissions. The higher CO limited our ability to try higher reburn rates for further NO{sub x} reduction. (2) Coal Fines reburn with Urea (Carbon enhanced SNCR) decreased NO{sub x} emissions by an additional 30% compared to Urea injection only. (3) Coal slurry injection did not change Hg capture across the ESP at full load with an inlet temperature of 400-430 F. The Hg capture in the ESP averaged 40%, with or without slurry injection; low mercury particulate capture is normally expected across a higher temperature ESP because any oxidized mercury is thought to desorb from the particulate at ESP temperatures above 250 F. (4) Coal slurry injection with halogen salts added to the mixing tank increased the Hg capture in the ESP to 60%. This significant incremental mercury reduction is important to improved mercury capture with hot-side ESP operation and wherever hindrance from sulfur oxides limit mercury reduction, because the higher temperature is above sulfur oxide dew point interference.

Stephen Johnson; Chetan Chothani; Bernard Breen

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

168 Phase Transformation from Ultra-Fine Grained Austenite in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Large number of grain boundaries in ultra-fine grained (UFG) metals ..... Oxides Nanocompounds for Electrodes in Electrochemical Capacitors.

188

Development Of Reclamation Substrates For Alberta Oil Sands Using Mature Fine Tailings And Coke.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mature fine tailings and coke are waste products of the oil sands industry with potential for reclamation. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various (more)

Luna-Wolter, Gabriela L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Lignin as Both Fuel and Fusing Binder in Briquetted Anthracite Fines for Foundry Coke Substitute.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lignin that had been extracted from Kraft black liquor was investigated as a fusing binder in briquetted anthracite fines for a foundry coke substitute. Cupola (more)

Lumadue, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Towards Memory-Load Balanced Fast Fourier Transformations in Fine-Grain Execution Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The code let model is a fine-grain dataflow-inspired program execution model that balances the parallelism and overhead of the runtime system. It plays an important role in terms of performance, scalability, and energy efficiency in exascale studies ... Keywords: FFT, fine-grain, execution model, memory bandwidth

Chen Chen, Yao Wu, Stephane Zuckerman, Guang R. Gao

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

HEP/123-qed Fine structure of alpha decay in odd nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an ? decay level scheme, the fine structure in odd nuclei is explained by taking into account the radial and rotational couplings between the unpaired valence nucleon and the core of the decaying system. It is shown that the experimental behavior of the ? decay fine structure phenomenon is governed by the dynamical characteristics of the system.

M. Mirea

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Can hidden correlations mimic a variable fine structure constant?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Murphy et al. (2003a, MNRAS, 345, 609) claim to find evidence of cosmological variations of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ in the spectra of intervening QSO absorption line systems. We find that this result is affected by systematic effects. The $\\alpha$ values estimated in individual line systems depend on the set of atomic transitions used and therefore the quoted dependence on the cosmic age may reflect the fact that different sets of transitions are used at different redshifts. A correlation between line shifts and relative optical depths of the atomic transitions is also present. This correlation is very tight for a high-redshift subsample and accounts for the anomalous dispersion of the $\\alpha$ values found by Murphy et al. (2003a) in this subsample. The above correlations are consistent with a scenario in which gravitational redshift, caused by the gravity of the dark halo, contributes to the shift in frequency of individual components. Gravitational redshift causes differential spectral shifts of the same order as magnitude of those measured. In the presence of line misidentification, these shifts can be interpreted in terms of a variable $\\alpha$. In order to verify the gravitational redshift hypothesis, a direct access to Murphy et al. (2003a) data, or to a large amount of new high resolution data, is necessary.

Rino Bandiera; Edvige Corbelli

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Fine-tuning molecular energy levels by nonresonant laser pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the shifts imparted to vibrational and rotational levels of a linear molecule by a nonresonant laser field at intensities of up to 10^12 W/cm^2. Both types of shift are found to be either positive or negative, depending on the initial rotational state acted upon by the field. An adiabatic field-molecule interaction imparts a rotational energy shift which is negative and exceeds the concomitant positive vibrational shift by a few orders of magnitude. The rovibrational states are thus pushed downward in such a field. A nonresonant pulsed laser field that interacts nonadiabatically with the molecule is found to impart rotational and vibrational shifts of the same order of magnitude. The nonadiabatic energy transfer occurs most readily at a pulse duration which amounts to about a tenth of the molecule's rotational period, and vanishes when the sudden regime is attained for shorter pulses. We applied our treatment to the much studied 87Rb_2 molecule in the last bound vibrational levels of its lowest singlet and triplet electronic states. Our calculations indicate that 15 ns and 1.5 ns laser pulses of an intensity in excess of 5x10^9 W/cm^2 are capable of dissociating the molecule due to the vibrational shift. Lesser shifts can be used to fine tune the rovibrational levels and thereby to affect collisional resonances by the nonresonant light. The energy shifts may be discernible spectroscopically, at a 10 MHz resolution.

Mikhail Lemeshko; Bretislav Friedrich

2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

Sandy Hill School District Scorebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These include the emerging on- line education requirement, the adult learner market segment, the English as a Second Language (ESL) and ...

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

195

DOE Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Power Initiative Project DOE Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Power Initiative Project July 6, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The success of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project has led to a repayment of $580,000 to U.S. taxpayers, with much more - potentially exceeding $13 million - possible in the future. Great River Energy (GRE) of Maple Grove, Minn., made the payment to the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) recently as part of an agreement associated with the DryFining™ CCPI project. Implemented by NETL, CCPI is a cost-shared collaboration between the Federal government and private industry aimed at stimulating investment

196

Fine and Microstructure Observations on a Hydrographic Section from the Azores to the Flemish Cap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous conductivity-temperature-depth-dissolved-oxygen (CTD) data are used to investigate the spatial distribution of fine and microstructure between the Azores and Flemish Cap. The CTD data are used to calculate a conductivity-microstructure ...

Daniel T. Georgi; Raymond W. Schmitt

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Gravity Wave Fine Structure Interactions, Part 2: Energy Dissipation Evolutions, Statistics, and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fritts et al. (2013) employ four direct numerical simulations (DNS) to examine the dynamics and energetics of idealized gravity wave fine structure (GW-FS) interactions. That study, and this companion paper, were motivated by the ubiquity of ...

David C. Fritts; Ling Wang

198

Fine-Resolved, Near-Coastal Spatiotemporal Variation of Temperature in Response to Insolation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses GIS-based modeling of incoming solar radiation to quantify fine-resolved spatiotemporal responses of monthly average temperature, and diurnal temperature variation, at different times and locations within a field study area located ...

Nikki Vercauteren; Georgia Destouni; Carl Johan Dahlberg; Kristoffer Hylander

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Effect of Prongs in the Measurement of Atmospheric Turbulence with Fine-Wire Resistance Transducers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the fine-wire resistance temperature transducer was analyzed including the effects of (i) conducive heat transfer between wire and the supporting prong and (ii) a thermal boundary layer, which can form around the prongs especially ...

V. P. Singh; F. Eaton; R. Rubio

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Optimizing fine-grained communication in a biomolecular simulation application on Cray XK6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Achieving good scaling for fine-grained communication intensive applications on modern supercomputers remains challenging. In our previous work, we have shown that such an application --- NAMD --- scales well on the full Jaguar XT5 without long-range ...

Yanhua Sun; Gengbin Zheng; Chao Mei; Eric J. Bohm; James C. Phillips; Laximant V. Kal; Terry R. Jones

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Influence of Mesoscale Dynamics and Turbulence on Fine Dust Transport in Owens Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine dust particles emitted from Owens (dry) Lake in California documented during the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) of 2006 have been examined using surface observations and a mesoscale aerosol model. Air quality stations around Owens (...

Qingfang Jiang; Ming Liu; James D. Doyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Isopycnal Momentum Budget of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The momentum budget of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) is analyzed using data from the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model (FRAM), using density as a vertical coordinate, since density is approximately conserved on streamlines. This steady ...

Peter D. Killworth; M. Majed Nanneh

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Bayesian considerations on the multiverse explanation of cosmic fine-tuning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental laws and constants of our universe seem to be finely tuned for life. The various multiverse hypotheses are popular explanations for the fine tuning. This paper reviews the four main suggestions on inference in the presence of possible multiple universes and observer selection effects. Basic identities from probability theory and previously unnoticed conditional dependencies of the propositions involved are used to decide among the alternatives. In the case of cosmic fine-tuning, information about the observation is not independent of the hypothesis. It follows that the observation should be used as data when comparing hypotheses. Hence, approaches that use the observation only as background information are incorrect. It is also shown that in some cases the self-sampling assumption by Bostrom leads to probabilities greater than one, leaving the approach inconsistent. The "some universe" (SU) approach is found wanting. Several reasons are given on why the "this universe" (TU) approach seems to be correct. Lastly, the converse selection effect by White is clarified by showing formally that the converse condition leads to SU and its absence to TU. The overall result is that, because multiverse hypotheses do not predict the fine-tuning for this universe any better than a single universe hypothesis, the multiverse hypotheses fail as explanations for cosmic fine-tuning. Conversely, the fine-tuning data does not support the multiverse hypotheses.

V. Palonen

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

204

How can New Zealand producers increase the level of fine wool production? Research using linear programming as a modelling tool with case studies in Marlborough and Canterbury.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fine wool is suitable for clothing, both designer suits and outdoor active wear. Around 6,817 tonnes of clean, fine wool was exported between July 2009 (more)

Kidd, Robert James Trevelyan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. These samples' combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. This report covers the first quarter's progress. Major activities during this period were focused on finding the plants where a demo MTU column will be installed to prepare the samples needed to characterize the combustion behavior of slurry effluents. Also, a meeting was held at Penn State University to discuss the availability of the laboratory furnace for testing the plant coal/recovered coal fines blends.

Singh, Shyam.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Measurement and Evaluation of Ultra-fine Particle Emissions from Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Evaluation of Ultra-fine Particle Emissions from Laser Measurement and Evaluation of Ultra-fine Particle Emissions from Laser Printers Speaker(s): Tunga Salthammer Date: October 9, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Several publications have recently appeared which describe the release of ultra-fine particles (UFPs) from hardcopy devices not only in chamber tests but also under real room conditions. Due to assumed health impacts attributed to UFPs this subject currently receives substantial public attention. For the characterization of emitted UFPs from laser printers, different test methods (box chamber tests, flow chamber tests, furnace tests) and analytical techniques (SMPS, FMPS, VHTDMA, GC/MS, Headspace/MS, thermography, etc...) were applied. It could be shown that the release of

207

Exciton fine-structure splitting of telecom wavelength single quantum dots: statistics and external strain tuning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a charge tunable device, we investigate the fine structure splitting of neutral excitons in single long-wavelength (1.1\\mu m response of the splitting to the external strain, including positive and negative tuning slopes, different tuning ranges, and linear and parabolic dependencies, indicating that these physical parameters depend strongly on the unique microscopic structure of the individual quantum dot. To better understand the experimental results, we apply a phenomenological model describing the exciton polarization and fine-structure splitting under uniaxial strain. The model predicts that, with an increased experimental strain tuning range, the fine-structure can be effectively canceled for select telecom wavelength dots using uniaxial strain. These results are promising for the generation of on-demand entangled photon pairs at telecom wavelengths.

Luca Sapienza; Ralph N. E. Malein; Christopher E. Kuklewicz; Peter E. Kremer; Kartik Srinivasan; Andrew Griffiths; Edmund Clarke; Ming Gong; Richard J. Warburton; Brian D. Gerardot

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

Localized electrical fine tuning of passive microwave and radio frequency devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the localized electrical fine tuning of passive multiple element microwave or RF devices in which a nonlinear dielectric material is deposited onto predetermined areas of a substrate containing the device. An appropriate electrically conductive material is deposited over predetermined areas of the nonlinear dielectric and the signal line of the device for providing electrical contact with the nonlinear dielectric. Individual, adjustable bias voltages are applied to the electrically conductive material allowing localized electrical fine tuning of the devices. The method of the present invention can be applied to manufactured devices, or can be incorporated into the design of the devices so that it is applied at the time the devices are manufactured. The invention can be configured to provide localized fine tuning for devices including but not limited to coplanar waveguides, slotline devices, stripline devices, and microstrip devices.

Findikoglu, Alp T. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University's prestigious  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University's prestigious graduate training program in conservation, is accepting applications for The Leon Levy Visiting Fellowship specializing in the conservation of archaeological materials of the ancient world, from the western

Mohri, Mehryar

210

Induction of fine-grained part-of-speech taggers via classifier combination and crosslingual projection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an original approach to part-of-speech tagging of fine-grained features (such as case, aspect, and adjective person/number) in languages such as English where these properties are generally not morphologically marked. The goals of ...

Elliott Franco Drbek; David Yarowsky

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A Kinetic Energy Budget and Internal Instabilities in the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy analysis of the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model (FRAM) reveals the instability processes in the model. The main source of time-mean kinetic energy is the wind stress and the main sink is transfer to mean potential energy. The wind ...

V. O. Ivchenko; A. M. Treguier; S. E. Best

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Daily Simulation of Ozone and Fine Particulates over New York State: Findings and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the potential utility of the application of a photochemical modeling system in providing simultaneous forecasts of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) over New York State. To this end, daily simulations from the ...

C. Hogrefe; W. Hao; K. Civerolo; J.-Y. Ku; G. Sistla; R. S. Gaza; L. Sedefian; K. Schere; A. Gilliland; R. Mathur

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

We are not equally negative: fine-grained labeling for multimedia event detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimedia event detection (MED) is an effective technique for video indexing and retrieval. Current classifier training for MED treats the negative videos equally. However, many negative videos may resemble the positive videos in different degrees. ... Keywords: attribute representation, attribute selection, fine-grained labeling, multi-source attributes, multimedia event detection (MED)

Zhigang Ma; Yi Yang; Zhongwen Xu; Nicu Sebe; Alexander G. Hauptmann

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants  

SciTech Connect

Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Seasonal influence of insolation on fine-resolved air temperature variation and snowmelt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses GIS-based modeling of incoming solar radiation to quantify fine-resolved spatiotemporal responses of year-round monthly average temperature within a field study area located on the eastern coast of Sweden. A network of temperature ...

Nikki Vercauteren; Steve W. Lyon; Georgia Destouni

216

Research article: Fine grained sampling of residue characteristics using molecular dynamics simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a fine-grained computational analysis of protein structure, we investigated the relationships between a residue's backbone conformations and its side-chain packing as well as conformations. To produce continuous distributions in high resolution, we ... Keywords: Backbone conformation, Dynameome, Molecular dynamics simulation, Ramachandran plot, Residue volume, Rotamer, Side-chain packing

Hyun Joo; Xiaotao Qu; Rosemarie Swanson; C. Michael McCallum; Jerry Tsai

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Transport and Resuspension of Fine Particles in a Tidal Boundary Layer near a Small Peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a theory on the transport and resuspension of fine particles in a tidal boundary layer when the ambient tidal flow is nonuniform due to a peninsula along the coastline. As a first step toward better physical understanding the ...

Chiang C. Mei; Chimin Chian; Feng Ye

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

SunCast: fine-grained prediction of natural sunlight levels for improved daylight harvesting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daylight harvesting is the use of natural sunlight to reduce the need for artificial lighting in buildings. The key challenge of daylight harvesting is to provide stable indoor lighting levels even though natural sunlight is not a stable light source. ... Keywords: daylight harvesting, fine-grained prediction, sunlight, wireless sensor networks

Jiakang Lu; Kamin Whitehouse

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A Coarse to Fine Facial Key Landmark Points Locating Algorithm Based on Active Shape Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we proposed an improved coarse to fine improved algorithm to enhance the accuracy of facial key landmark points locating. Based on the analysis of PCA, the proposed algorithm redesigns the parameter update rule through adding a monotonically ... Keywords: ASM, facial key landmarks point locating

Bo Fan; Xiaokang Yang; Xi Zhou; Weiyao Lin; Changjian Chen

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The parXXL Environment: Scalable Fine Grained Development for Large Coarse Grained Platforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and datastructure update, that are mandatory to send cell output into con- nected cell input buffers on remote with a paradoxical situation: their modeling and thinking is fine-grained, speaking e.g. of atoms, cells, items collaborations with researchers in optic components and hot plasma (from LMOPS and LPMIA lab- oratories) guide

Vialle, Stéphane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrophobic Dewatering of Fine Coal. Topical report, March 1, 1995-March 31, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many advanced fine coal cleaning technologies have been developed in recent years under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy. However, they are not as widely deployed in industry as originally anticipated. An important reason for this problem is that the cleaned coal product is difficult to dewater because of the large surface area associated with fine particles. Typically, mechanical dewatering, such as vacuum filtration and centrifugation, can reduce the moisture to 20-35% level, while thermal drying is costly. To address this important industrial problem, Virginia Tech has developed a novel dewatering process, in which water is displaced from the surface of fine particulate materials by liquid butane. Since the process is driven by the hydrophobic interaction between coal and liquid butane, it was referred to as hydrophobic dewatering (HD). A fine coal sample with 21.4 pm median size was subjected to a series of bench-scale HD tests. It was a mid-vol bituminous coal obtained from the Microcel flotation columns operating at the Middle Fork coal preparation plant, Virginia. All of the test results showed that the HD process can reduce the moisture to substantially less than 10%. The process is sensitive to the amount of liquid butane used in the process relative to the solids concentration in the feed stream. Neither the intensity nor the time of agitation is critical for the process. Also, the process does not require long time for phase separation. Under optimal operating conditions, the moisture of the fine coal can be reduced to 1% by weight of coal.

Yoon, R.; Sohn, S.; Luttrell, J.; Phillips, D.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Properties and potential uses of water treatment sludge from the Neches River of southeast Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land application of water treatment plant (WTP) sludge has been an unsolved problem. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate characteristics of organic polymer sludge, and (2) to determine the effects of the sludge on soil properties that influence utilization of the sludge as a soil amendment. Water treatment sludges were obtained from water utilities along the Neches Rivet-near Beaumont, Texas. They were mostly coagulated with organic polymers. Mineralogical composition, cation exchange capacity (CEC), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), aggregate stability, Atterberg limits, hydraulic conductivity, dispersion, crust strength, adsorption characteristics, nitrogen content and mineralization potential of the sludge or sludge-amended soil were determined in this study. Mineralogical composition of organic polymer sludge was similar to local Beaumont clay soil. The major fraction of the sludge, the coarse clay, was estimated to be 40% kaolinite, 32% smectite, 20% quartz and 8% mica. However, XRD patterns of the sludge indicated that expansion of the smectite was inhibited by organic polymer coagulant added during water clarification, which also was confirmed by aggregate stability of the sludge. Cation exchange capacity of the bulk sludge samples ranged from 8 to 28 cmol kg-1. Quantitative mineralogical analyses showed that CEC of the sludge was reduced by blockage of cation exchange sites with organic polymers. SEM and TEM results indicated that the sludge was mostly fine aggregates of clay particles. Dried sludge aggregates were not prone to swell, due to their resistance to rewetting. The aggregate stability of dried sludge was above 90% after a 24 hours soaking period in water, compared to 7% aggregate stability of local Beaumont clay soil. Addition of 0 to 10% sludge to Boonville sandy loam soil increased the aggregate stability of the soil from 4 to 13%. Atterberg limit showed that wet sludge had wide ranges of moisture contents in semi-solid and plastic states, and shrunk greatly during drying. Shrinkage limit of the sludges ranged from 16 to 66%; plastic limit from 111 to 138%; and liquid limit from 208 to 320%, which suggested that the sludge was highly plastic and compressible. Addition of 0 to 10% sludge into Boonville sandy loam soil increased the infiltration rate of the soil two orders of magnitudes from 1.4 x 10-4 to 1. I X 10-2 CM / S, and reduced the dispersion of the soil significantly. Moreover, addition of from 0 to 10% sludge into Boonville sandy loam soil greatly reduced the crusting produced by rainfall, and the penetration resistance of the crust decreased from 53.1 to 14.4 kg / cm. Metal adsorbing ability of the Boonville sandy loam soil was reduced by addition of the sludge. Adsorption of Zn+2 decreased from 19.7 to 17.7 ug / g when the sludge was amended from 0 to 10%. Total nitrogen and exchangeable ammonium nitrogen (NH4+) contents of the sludge were four times and twenty times as high, respectively, as those of local Beaumont clay and Lake Charles clay soils. Organic polymer coagulants added during water treatment apparently increased nitrogen content of the sludge. Although the sludge contained considerable total nitrogen, incubation experiment of sludge-amended Beaumont clay or Lake Charles clay soil showed that nitrogen mineralization rate was not affected by the sludge addition. This study indicated that the sludge can improve soil physical properties significantly, e.g. soil aggregation, infiltration, dispersion and crusting. The low nitrogen mineralization rate of the sludge showed that the sludge had little fertility and would not produce a groundwater contamination problem.

Kan, Weiqun

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Advanced coal-gasification technical analyses. Appendix 2: coal fines disposal. Final report, December 1982-September 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of several studies conducted by KRSI under the Advanced Coal Gasification Technical Analyses contract with GRI. It addresses the issue of disposal and/or utilization of the coal fines that cannot be used as feedstock for fixed-bed (i.e. Lurgi) gasifiers. Specific items addressed are: (1) Technical, legal and economic aspects of fines burial, (2) Estimation of the premium for fines-free coal delivered to an SNG plant and resulting reduction in SNG production costs, (3) Comparison of the relative advantages and limitations of Winkler and GKT gasifiers to consuming fines, (4) Review of coal-size consist curves in the GRI Guidelines to assess the fines content of ROM coals, (5) a first-pass design and cost estimate using GKT gasifiers in tandem with Lurgi gasifiers in an North Dakota lignite-to-SNG plant to consume full range of coal-size consist, (6) Evaluation of the General Electric technology for extrusion of coal fines and testing of the extrudates in a fixed-bed gasifier, and (7) Investigation of equipment and variables involved in briquetting of coal fines, such that fines could be fed to the gasifiers along with the lump coal.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Jain, S.K.; Shah, K.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

New microtextural criterion for differentiation of compaction and early cementation in fine-grained limestones  

SciTech Connect

Mechanisms of porosity reduction in fine-grained limestones (micrites), the most abundant type of limestone, have been difficult to evaluate because of the fine crystal sizes. Scanning electron microscopy reveals common minute voids termed microfenestrae ({approximately} 1.5-40{mu}m diameter) in Holocene lime muds from all marine carbonate environments studied. Experimental compaction of lime muds greatly reduces abundance of microfenestrae at pressures less than 10 bar. Thus, the abundance of cement-filled microfenestrae in micrites appears to be a widely applicable criterion for recognition of the extent of cementation prior to significant compaction in any given micrite. Microfenestrae in most Phanerozoic micrites studied are about as common as in Holocene lime muds, suggesting that early cementation is a more important mechanism in micrite porosity reduction than recent views have suggested.

Lasemi, Z.; Boardman, M.R. (Miami Univ., Oxford OH (USA)); Sandberg, P.A. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fine-grained authorization for job and resource management usingakenti and the globus toolkit(R)  

SciTech Connect

As the Grid paradigm is adopted as a standard way of sharing remote resources across organizational domains, the need for fine-grained access control to these resources increases. This paper presents an authorization solution for job submission and control, developed as part of the National Fusion Collaboratory, that uses the Globus Toolkit 2 and the Akenti authorization service in order to perform fine-grained authorization of job and resource management requests in a Gridenvironment. At job startup, it allows the system to evaluate a user's Resource Specification Language request against authorization policies on resource usage determining how many CPUs or memory a user can use on a given resource or which executables the user can run based on authorization policies, it allows other virtual organization members to manage the user's job.

Thompson, Mary R.; Essiari, Abdelilah; Keahey, Kate; Welch, Von; Lang, S.; Liu, Bo

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Constraints on Field Theoretical Models for Variation of the Fine Structure Constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent theoretical ideas and observational claims suggest that the fine structure constant alpha may be variable. We examine a spectrum of models in which alpha is a function of a scalar field. Specifically, we consider three scenarios: oscillating alpha, monotonic time variation of alpha, and time-independent alpha that is spatially varying. We examine the constraints imposed upon these theories by cosmological observations, particle detector experiments, and ``fifth force'' experiments. These constraints are very strong on models involving oscillation, but cannot compete with bounds from the Oklo sub-nuclear reactor on models with monotonic time-like variation of alpha. One particular model with spatial variation is consistent with all current experimental and observational measurements, including those from two seemingly conflicting measurements of the fine structure constant using the many multiplet method on absorption lines.

Charles L. Steinhardt

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

227

Cryogenic fractionator gas as stripping gas of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped with a stripping gas to remove acidic gases, at least a portion of the stripping gas comprises a gas comprising hydrogen, nitrogen and methane separated from the coker products.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

5-Year Research Plan on Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory Five Year Research Plan on Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere FY2001-FY2005 NETL PM Research Program Ambient Sampling & Analysis Control Technology R&D Source Characterization Predictive Modeling -iii- TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A. Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B. Outlook for PM and the Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. OVERVIEW OF THE PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 A. Program Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 B. Current Program Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1. The Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

229

Is there Correlation between Fine Structure and Dark Energy Cosmic Dipoles?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis (including redshift tomography) of the cosmic dipoles in the Keck+VLT quasar absorber and in the Union2 SnIa samples. We show that the fine structure constant cosmic dipole obtained through the Keck+VLT quasar absorber sample at $4.1\\sigma$ level is anomalously aligned with the corresponding dark energy dipole obtained through the Union2 sample at $2\\sigma$ level. The angular separation between the two dipole directions is $11.3^\\circ \\pm 11.8^\\circ$. We use Monte Carlo simulations to find the probability of obtaining the observed dipole magnitudes with the observed alignment, in the context of an isotropic cosmological model with no correlation between dark energy and fine structure constant $\\alpha$. We find that this probability is less than one part in $10^6$. We propose a simple physical model (extended topological quintessence) which naturally predicts a spherical inhomogeneous distribution for both dark energy density and fine structure constant values. The model is based on the existence of a recently formed giant global monopole with Hubble scale core which also couples non-minimally to electromagnetism. Aligned dipole anisotropies would naturally emerge for an off-centre observer for both the fine structure constant and for dark energy density. This model smoothly reduces to \\lcdm for proper limits of its parameters. Two predictions of this model are (a) a correlation between the existence of strong cosmic electromagnetic fields and the value of $\\alpha$ and (b) the existence of a dark flow on Hubble scales due to the repulsive gravity of the global defect core (`Great Repulser') aligned with the dark energy and $\\alpha$ dipoles. The direction of the dark flow is predicted to be towards the spatial region of lower accelerating expansion. Existing data about the dark flow are consistent with this prediction.

Antonio Mariano; Leandros Perivolaropoulos

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

230

Engineering and Biological Assessment of Fine Mesh Fish Protection-Modified Traveling Water Screens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a study that examined: (1) the protection afforded to early life stages (eggs, larvae, and juveniles) of fish and shellfish by different traveling water screen (TWS) mesh sizes and (2) the engineering challenges, operational and maintenance (O&M) issues, and installation costs that power plants may experience if fine-mesh modified TWSs are identified as a site-specific best technology available (BTA) for minimizing entrainment mortality in accordance with a ...

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

231

Measurement of the magnetic fine structure of the 10G and 10H states of helium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The magnetic fine-structure intervals separating the four members of the 10G and 10H manifolds of helium have been measured with a precision of 0.1% using a fast-beam microwave-optical resonance technique. The results are found to be in good agreement with theory, illustrating that the two-electron wave function is very nearly hydrogenic. The measurements are also used to determine the small exchange energies of the 10G and 10H states.

Hessels, E.A.; Sturrus, W.G.; Lundeen, S.R.; Cok, D.R.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Fine grain pipeline systems for real-time motion and stereo-vision computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Image processing systems require high computational load that motivates the design of specific hardware architectures in order to arrive at real-time platforms. We adopt innovative design techniques based on the intensive utilisation of the inherent ... Keywords: FPGAs, algorithm parallelisation, cognitive vision models, customised architectures, data flow architectures, field programmable gate arrays, fine-grain pipelining, high performance architectures, image processing, on-chip integration, optical flow, pipelined techniques, real-time motion, reconfigurable hardware, stereo vision, superscalar units

Javier Diaz; Eduardo Ros; Alberto Prieto; Francisco J. Pelayo

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The HIGGS Boson Mass at 2 Loops in the Finely Tuned Split Supersymmetric Standard Model  

SciTech Connect

The mass of the Higgs boson in the finely tuned Split Supersymmetric Standard Model is calculated. All 1 loop threshold effects are included, in addition to the full RG running of the Higgs quartic coupling through 2 loops. The 2 loop corrections are very small, typically less than 1GeV. The 1 loop threshold corrections to the top yukawa coupling and the Higgs mass generally push the Higgs mass down a few GeV.

Binger, M

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

234

Very Fine Aerosols from the World Trade Center Collapse Piles: Anaerobic Incineration  

SciTech Connect

By September 14, three days after the initial World Trade Center collapse, efforts at fire suppression and heavy rainfall had extinguished the immediate surface fires. From then until roughly mid-December, the collapse piles continuously emitted an acrid smoke and fume in the smoldering phase of the event. Knowledge of the sources, nature, and concentration of these aerosols is important for evaluation and alleviation of the health effects on workers and nearby residents. In this paper, we build on our earlier work to ascribe these aerosols to similar processes that occur in urban incinerators. The simultaneous presence of finely powdered (circa 5 {micro}m) and highly basic (pH 11 to 12) cement dust and high levels of very fine (< 0.25 {micro}m) sulfuric acid fumes helps explain observed health impacts. The unprecedented levels of several metals in the very fine mode can be tied to liberation of those metals that are both present in elevated concentrations in the debris and have depressed volatility temperatures caused by the presence of organic materials and chlorine.

Cahill, T A; Cliff, S S; Shackelford, J; Meier, M; Dunlap, M; Perry, K D; Bench, G; Leifer, R

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

235

Ocean acoustic wave propagation and ray method correspondence: internal wave fine structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic wave fields propagating long ranges through the ocean are refracted by the inhomogeneities in the ocean's sound speed profile. Intuitively, for a given acoustic source frequency, the inhomogeneities become ineffective at refracting the field beyond a certain fine scale determined by the acoustic wavelength. On the other hand, ray methods are sensitive to infinitely fine features. Thus, it is possible to complicate arbitrarily the ray dynamics, and yet have the wave field propagate unchanged. This feature raises doubts about the ray/wave correspondence. Given the importance of various analyses relying on ray methods, a proper model should, at a minimum, exclude all of the fine structure that does not significantly alter the propagated wave field when the correspondence to the ray dynamics is integral. We develop a simple, efficient, smoothing technique to be applied to the inhomogeneities - a low pass filtering performed in the spatial domain - and give a characterization of its necessary extent as a function of acoustic source frequency. We indicate how the smoothing improves the ray/wave correspondence, and show that the so-called ``ray chaos'' problem remains above a very low frequency (about 15-25 Hz).

Katherine C. Hegewisch; Nicholas R. Cerruti; Steven Tomsovic

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Decoherent Histories Quantum Mechanics with One 'Real' Fine-Grained History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decoherent histories quantum theory is reformulated with the assumption that there is one "real" fine-grained history, specified in a preferred complete set of sum-over-histories variables. This real history is described by embedding it in an ensemble of comparable imagined fine-grained histories, not unlike the familiar ensemble of statistical mechanics. These histories are assigned extended probabilities, which can sometimes be negative or greater than one. As we will show, this construction implies that the real history is not completely accessible to experimental or other observational discovery. However, sufficiently and appropriately coarse-grained sets of alternative histories have standard probabilities providing information about the real fine-grained history that can be compared with observation. We recover the probabilities of decoherent histories quantum mechanics for sets of histories that are recorded and therefore decohere. Quantum mechanics can be viewed as a classical stochastic theory of histories with extended probabilities and a well-defined notion of reality common to all decoherent sets of alternative coarse-grained histories.

Murray Gell-Mann; James B. Hartle

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Fine-Tuning Price of Neutralino Dark Matter in Models with Non-Universal Higgs Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the amounts of fine-tuning of the parameters of the MSSM with non-universal soft supersymmetry-breaking contributions to the Higgs masses (the NUHM) that would be required for the relic neutralino density to lie within the range favoured by WMAP and other astrophysical and cosmological observations. Such dark matter fine-tuning is analogous to the commonly studied electroweak fine-tuning associated with satisfying the electroweak symmetry breaking conditions, which we also study for completeness. We identify several distinct regions of the NUHM parameter space: a bulk region, a $\\stau-\

John Ellis; S. F. King; J. P. Roberts

2007-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

238

An assessment of density-based fine-scale methods for estimating diapycnal diffusivity in the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine-scale estimates of diapycnal diffusivity ? are computed from CTD and XCTD data sampled in Drake Passage and in the eastern Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean and are compared against microstructure measurements from the same times and ...

Marina Frants; Gillian M. Damerell; Sarah T. Gille; Karen J. Heywood; Jennifer MacKinnon; Janet Sprintall

239

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through -200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Humidity Fluctuations over a Vegetated Surface Measured with a Lyman-Alpha Hygrometer and a Fine-Wire Thermocouple Psychrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of humidity fluctuations over a crop made with a specially modified Lyman-alpha hygrometer and a fine-wire thermocouple psychrometer are compared. Standard deviations of the two sets of data are comparable except ...

T. Grayson Redford Jr.; Shashi B. Verma; Norman J. Rosenberg

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Documentation and Preservation of Art-in-Architecture of Michigan: The Section of Fine Arts Projects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Section of Fine Arts Art-in-Architecture program created public and permanent cultural artifacts that expressed and recorded American beliefs, values, and stories for future generations. (more)

Chidester, Cheryl Ann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Comment on the paper "Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?" at arXiv:1003.3703v1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A constructive and straightforward proof of the existence of the Zeeman topology is provided, contradicting a fallacious claim contained in the paper "Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?" available at arXiv:1003.3703v1.

Giacomo Dossena

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Comment on the paper "Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?" at arXiv:1003.3703v1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A constructive and straightforward proof of the existence of the Zeeman topology is provided, contradicting a fallacious claim contained in the paper "Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?" available at arXiv:1003.3703v1.

Dossena, Giacomo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development of an Ultra-fine Coal Dewatering Technology and an Integrated Flotation-Dewatering System for Coal Preparation Plants  

SciTech Connect

The project proposal was approved for only the phase I period. The goal for this Phase I project was to develop an industrial model that can perform continuous and efficient dewatering of fine coal slurries of the previous flotation process to fine coal cake of {approx}15% water content from 50-70%. The feasibility of this model should be demonstrated experimentally using a lab scale setup. The Phase I project was originally for one year, from May 2005 to May 2006. With DOE approval, the project was extended to Dec. 2006 without additional cost from DOE to accomplish the work. Water has been used in mining for a number of purposes such as a carrier, washing liquid, dust-catching media, fire-retardation media, temperature-control media, and solvent. When coal is cleaned in wet-processing circuits, waste streams containing water, fine coal, and noncombustible particles (ash-forming minerals) are produced. In many coal preparation plants, the fine waste stream is fed into a series of selection processes where fine coal particles are recovered from the mixture to form diluted coal fine slurries. A dewatering process is then needed to reduce the water content to about 15%-20% so that the product is marketable. However, in the dewatering process currently used in coal preparation plants, coal fines smaller than 45 micrometers are lost, and in many other plants, coal fines up to 100 micrometers are also wasted. These not-recovered coal fines are mixed with water and mineral particles of the similar particle size range and discharged to impoundment. The wasted water from coal preparation plants containing unrecoverable coal fine and mineral particles are called tailings. With time the amount of wastewater accumulates occupying vast land space while it appears as threat to the environment. This project developed a special extruder and demonstrated its application in solid-liquid separation of coal slurry, tailings containing coal fines mostly less than 50 micron. The extruder is special because all of its auger surface and the internal barrier surface are covered with the membranes allowing water to drain and solid particles retained. It is believed that there are four mechanisms working together in the dewatering process. They are hydrophilic diffusion flow, pressure flow, agitation and air purging. Hydrophilic diffusion flow is effective with hydrophilic membrane. Pressure flow is due to the difference of hydraulic pressure between the two sides of the membrane. Agitation is provided by the rotation of the auger. Purging is achieved with the air blow from the near bottom of the extruder, which is in vertical direction.

Wu Zhang; David Yang; Amar Amarnath; Iftikhar Huq; Scott O'Brien; Jim Williams

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

245

Effect of coarse or fine grinding on utilization of dry or ensiled corn by lactating dairy cows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study evaluated the effect of coarse or fine grinding of three forms of corn on the performance of lactating cows. Six diets, fed as total mixed rations, were identical except for the corn portion of the diet. Corn treatments were dry shelled corn, high moisture ensiled ear corn, and high moisture ensiled shelled corn, either coarsely or finely ground. The experimental design was a6 6 Latin square with 36 cows. Eighteen cows were assigned to the six different treatments and were fed once daily. Within this group of 18 cows, six had a ruminal cannula and were used to evaluate nutrient digestibilities and ruminal fermentation. The remaining 18 cows, six of which were ruminally cannulated, were similarly assigned, except they were fed twice daily. In the group fed once daily, milk production and composition were not affected by treatment. Starch digestibility was greater with the high moisture and with the finely ground corn treatments. In addition, the high moisture ensiled corn treatments had reduced ruminal ammonia concentrations. In the group that was fed twice daily, milk production and protein yield were greatest for the finely ground high moisture ensiled shelled corn treatment. Starch utilization was improved by fine grinding. Lower ruminal ammonia concentrations were obtained with the high moisture ensiled corn treatments, and there was a tendency for reduced ammonia concentration with fine grinding. Results indicate that high moisture ensiled corn as well as fine grinding improved nitrogen and starch utilization. (Key words: corn, milk, particle size, starch) Abbreviation key: CG = coarsely ground, DSC = dry shelled corn, FG = finely ground, HMEC = high mois-

F. San Emeterio; R. B. Reis; W. E. Campos; L. D. Satter

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Comparison of Continuous Soil Moisture Simulations Using Different Soil Hydraulic Parameterizations for a Site in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous time series of soil water content over a period of more than 9 months for a midlatitude sandy loam soil covered by grass are calculated with the Campbell and the van Genuchten soil hydraulic functions and the ClappHornberger, Cosby et ...

Gerd Schdler

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

SoilAtmosphere Exchange of Nitrous Oxide, Nitric Oxide, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Logged and Undisturbed Forest in the Tapajos National Forest, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective logging is an extensive land use in the Brazilian Amazon region. The soilatmosphere fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO), methane (CH4), and carbon dioxide (CO2) are studied on two soil types (clay Oxisol and sandy loam ...

Michael Keller; Ruth Varner; Jadson D. Dias; Hudson Silva; Patrick Crill; Raimundo Cosme de Oliveira Jr.; Gregory P. Asner

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal fines. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. For this effort, we will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach. Previously it has been decided that corn starch would be used as binder and a roller-and-die mill would be used for pellet manufacture. A quality starch binder has been identified and tested. To potentially lower binder costs, a starch that costs about 50% of the high quality starch was tested. Results indicate that the lower cost starch will not lower binder cost because more is required to produce a comparable quality pellet. Also, a petroleum in water emulsion was evaluated as a potential binder. The compound seemed to have adhesive properties but was found to be a poor binder. Arrangements have been made to collect a waste slurry from the mine previously described.

Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Changes in the fine structure of stochastic distributions as a consequence of space-time fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earlier we showed that the fine structure of the spectrum of amplitude variations in the results of measurements of the processes of different nature (in other words, the fine structure of the dispersion of results or the pattern of the corresponding histograms) is subject to macroscopic fluctuations, changing regularly with time. These changes indicate that the dispersion of results that remains after all artifacts are excluded inevitably accompanies any measurements and reflects very basic features of our world. In our research, we have come to the conclusion that this dispersion of results is the effect of space-time fluctuations, which, in their turn, are caused by the movement of the measured object in an anisotropic gravitational field. Among other things, this conclusion means that the examination of the detailed pattern of distributions obtained from the results of measurement of the dynamics of processes of different nature discovers laws, which cannot be revealed with traditional methods for the analysis of time series. These assertions are based on the results of long-term experimental investigations conducted for many decades. The major part of these results, starting with 1958, is published in Russian. The goal of this paper is to give a brief review of those results and provide corresponding references. The most general conclusion of our research is the evidence that the fine structure of stochastic distributions is not accidental. In other words, noncasual is the pattern of histograms plotted from a rather small number of the results of measurement of the dynamics of processes of different nature, from the biochemical reactions and noise in the gravitational antenna to the alpha-decay.

Simon E. Shnoll

2006-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fine-grid calculations for stellar electron and positron capture rates on Fe isotopes  

SciTech Connect

The acquisition of precise and reliable nuclear data is a prerequisite to success for stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Core-collapse simulators find it challenging to generate an explosion from the collapse of the core of massive stars. It is believed that a better understanding of the microphysics of core-collapse can lead to successful results. The weak interaction processes are able to trigger the collapse and control the lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y{sub e}) of the corematerial. It is suggested that the temporal variation of Y{sub e} within the core of a massive star has a pivotal role to play in the stellar evolution and a fine-tuning of this parameter at various stages of presupernova evolution is the key to generate an explosion. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, isotopes of iron, mainly {sup 54-56}Fe, are considered to be key players in controlling Y{sub e} ratio via electron capture on these nuclides. Recently an improved microscopic calculation of weak-interaction-mediated rates for iron isotopes was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of calculated rates. The results were suggestive of some fine-tuning of the Y{sub e} ratio during various phases of stellar evolution. Here we present for the first time the fine-grid calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on {sup 54-56}Fe. The sensitivity of the pn-QRPA calculated capture rates to the deformation parameter is also studied in this work. Core-collapse simulators may find this calculation suitable for interpolation purposes and for necessary incorporation in the stellar evolution codes.

Nabi, Jameel-Un, E-mail: jameel@giki.edu.pk [Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Engineering Sciences (Pakistan)] [Ghulam Ishaq Khan Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Engineering Sciences (Pakistan); Tawfik, Abdel Nasser, E-mail: a.tawfik@eng.mti.edu.eg [MTI University, Egyptian Center for Theoretical Physics (ECTP) (Egypt)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Gas-Mediated Impact Dynamics in Fine-Grained Granular Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-cohesive granular media exhibit complex responses to sudden impact that often differ from those of ordinary solids and liquids. We investigate how this response is mediated by the presence of interstitial gas between the grains. Using high-speed x-ray radiography we track the motion of a steel sphere through the interior of a bed of fine, loose granular material. We find a crossover from nearly incompressible, fluid-like behavior at atmospheric pressure to a highly compressible, dissipative response once most of the gas is evacuated. We discuss these results in light of recent proposals for the drag force in granular media.

John R. Royer; Eric I. Corwin; Peter J. Eng; Heinrich M. Jaeger

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

DY/DZ from fine structure in the Main Sequence based on Hipparcos parallaxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The slope Delta Y/Delta Z is a quantity of interest in relation to stellar evolution, the initial mass function and the determination of the primordial helium abundance. In this paper we estimate Delta Y/Delta Z from fine structure in the Main Sequence of nearby stars from Hipparcos data for stars with Z \\leq Zsun and find a value of about 3, which is consistent with what has been found in extragalactic H II regions and with stellar models for suitable upper limits to the initial masses of supernovae according to the IMF slope adopted.

B. E. J. Pagel; L. Portinari

1997-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

254

Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies  

SciTech Connect

This project is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) for the Engineering Design and Analysis of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies. The major goal is to provide the simulation tools for modeling both conventional and advanced coal cleaning technologies. This DOE project is part of a major research initiative by the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) aimed at advancing three advanced coal cleaning technologies-heavy-liquid cylconing, selective agglomeration, and advanced froth flotation through the proof-of-concept (POC) level.

1992-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (POC) scale oil agglomeration technology capable of increasing the recovery and improving the quality of fine coal strearrts. Two distinct agglomeration devices will be tested, namely, a conventional high shear mixer and a jet processor. To meet the overall objective an eleven task work plan has been designed. The work ranges from batch and continuous bench-scale testing through the design, commissioning and field testing of POC-scale agglomeration equipment.

None

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

256

Solar abundances and helioseismology: fine structure spacings and separation ratios of low-degree p modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used 4752 days of data collected by the Birmingham Solar-Oscillations Network (BiSON) to determine very precise oscillation frequencies of acoustic low-degree modes that probe the solar core. We compare the fine (small frequency) spacings and frequency separation ratios formed from these data with those of different solar models. We find that models constructed with low metallicity are incompatible with the observations. The results provide strong support for lowering the theoretical uncertainties on the neutrino fluxes. These uncertainties had recently been raised due to the controversy over the solar abundances.

Sarbani Basu; William J. Chaplin; Yvonne Elsworth; Roger New; Aldo M. Serenelli; Graham A. Verner

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

257

SENSOR FOR INDIVIDUAL BURNER CONTROL OF FIRING RATE, FUEL-AIR RATIO, AND COAL FINENESS CORRELATION  

SciTech Connect

To minimize program cost, additional testing is planned to be performed in concert with EPRI-funded testing at the Coal Flow Test Facility in late July. This will be followed by field testing to be performed by EPRI in August. The minimal effort put into the analysis during this reporting period revealed surprising variation in the trends of the dynamic signatures over time. It is unclear whether these temporal trends are related to noise or to the actual dynamics. Further data analysis and fine-tuning of the algorithm will be done upon arrival of the data to be collected in the near future.

Wayne Hill; Roger Demler

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a technically feasible and economically viable process for drying and stabilizing high-moisture subbituminous coal. Controlled thermal drying of coal fines was achieved using the inclined fluidized-bed drying and stabilization process developed by the Western Research Institute. The project scope of work required completion of five tasks: (1) project planning, (2) characterization of two feed coals, (3) bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed drying studies, (4) product characterization and testing, and (5) technical and economic evaluation of the process. High moisture subbituminous coals from AMAX Eagle Butte mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. in Healy, Alaska were tested in a 10-lb/hr bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed. Experimental results show that the dried coal contains less than 1.5% moisture and has a heating value over 11,500 Btu/lb. The coal fines entrainment can be kept below 15 wt % of the feed. The equilibrium moisture of dried coal was less than 50% of feed coal equilibrium moisture. 7 refs., 60 figs., 47 tabs.

Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Kang, T.W.; Berggren, M.H.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evaluation of fine-particle size catalysts using bituminous and subbituminous coals  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of Sandia`s fine-particle size catalyst testing project are to evaluate and compare the activities of fine-particle size catalysts being developed in DOE/PETC`s Advanced Research Coal Liquefaction Program by using Sandia`s standard coal liquefaction test procedures. The first test procedure uses bituminous coal (DECS-17 Blind Canyon coal), phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, and a factorial experimental design that is used to evaluate catalysts over ranges of temperature, time, and catalyst loading. The best catalyst evaluated to date is West Virginia University`s iron catalyst that was impregnated onto the coal. Current work is aimed at developing a standard test procedure using subbituminous Wyodak coal. Ibis test is being developed using Pacific Northwest Laboratories` 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst and coal samples impregnated with either molybdenum or iron at Argonne National Laboratories. Results of testing catalysts with bituminous coal will be summarized and the development of the subbituminous coal test procedure will be presented.

Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Optimizing Fine-grained Communication in a Biomolecular Simulation Application on Cray XK6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Achieving good scaling for fine-grained communication intensive applications on modern supercomputers remains challenging. In our previous work, we have shown that such an application NAMD scales well on the full Jaguar XT5 without long-range interactions; Yet, with them, the speedup falters beyond 64K cores. Although the new Gemini interconnect on Cray XK6 has improved network performance, the challenges remain, and are likely to remain for other such networks as well. We analyze communication bottlenecks in NAMD and its CHARM++ runtime, using the Projections performance analysis tool. Based on the analysis, we optimize the runtime, built on the uGNI library for Gemini. We present several techniques to improve the fine-grained communication. Consequently, the performance of running 92224-atom Apoa1 with GPUs on TitanDev is improved by 36%. For 100-million-atom STMV, we improve upon the prior Jaguar XT5 result of 26 ms/step to 13 ms/step using 298,992 cores on Jaguar XK6.

Sun, Yanhua [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Zheng, Gengbin [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Mei, Chao [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Phillips, James C. [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Kale, Laxmikant V [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Jones, Terry R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Microbial properties of mine spoil materials in the initial stages of soil development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The early years of soil genesis during mine spoil reclamation are critical for vegetative establishment and may help predict reclamation success. Mine spoils in the Halle-Leipzig region of Germany were analyzed for microbial changes following a hay mulch-seeding treatment without topsoil or fertilizer application. Microbial biomass carbon (C{sub mic}) and dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of spoils were measured each year in the first 3 yr after treatment. In the third year, bacterial community DNA fingerprints were compared with those from a reference soil. Microbial indicators were measured at three depths in the upper 10 cm of spoils at three sites with contrasting parent materials: glacial till (sandy loam), limnic tertiary sediments (high-lignite sandy clay loam), and quaternary sand and gravel (loamy sand). Before reclamation, C{sub mic} means and standard deviations of surface spoils (0-1 cm) were 9{+-}6, 39{+-}11, and 38{+-}16 mg kg{sup -1} for the loamy sand, high-lignite sandy clay loam, and sandy loam spoils, respectively. Within one year, mean C{sub mic} at the surface increased to 148{+-}70, 229{+-}64, and 497{+-}167 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively, and was significantly higher at 0 to 1 cm than at lower depths. Highest DHA and DNA yields were obtained in the 0- to 1-cm depth of the sandy loam spoils. Microbial biomass C values exhibited significant correlations with DHA, DNA yield, and extractable C for all three mine spoils. Soil microbial indices were more responsive than plant measurements to differences in parent materials.

Machulla, G.; Bruns, M.A.; Scow, K.M. [University of Halle Wittenberg, Halle Saale (Germany). Inst. for Soil Science

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report number 8, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost, harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. On the other hand, Mulled Coal does not cause the fugitive and airborne dust problems normally associated with thermally dried coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: the Mulled Coal process, which has been proved to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well on a continuous basis, producing consistent quality, and at a convincing rate of production in a commercial coal preparation plant; the wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation; and a wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form, can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems.

1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. This report covers the first quarter`s progress. Major activities during this period were focused on finding the plants where a demo MTU column will be installed to prepare the samples needed to characterize the combustion behavior of slurry effluents. Also, a meeting was held at Penn State University to discuss the availability of the laboratory furnace for testing the plant coal/recovered coal fines blends.

Singh, Shyam

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculants and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude. 8 figs.

Kansa, E.J.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

1997-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculents and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Big Sandy Energy Project Supplement Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i Section 1 ONE Background .....................................................................................................................1-1 1.1 Introduction.............................................................................................. 1-1 1.2 EIS Process .............................................................................................. 1-2 1.3 Summary of Proposed Action.................................................................. 1-2 Section 2 TWO Proposed Action Revisions and New Information .......................................................2-1 2.1 Proposed Powerplant and Associated Facilities ...................................... 2-1 2.1.1 Combustion Turbines and Generators .........................................

267

Sandy, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

32°, -111.870793° 32°, -111.870793° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.589732,"lon":-111.870793,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

Sandy, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -122.2614761° °, -122.2614761° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.3973427,"lon":-122.2614761,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

269

OpenEI Community - Hurricane Sandy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

have been preparing for an imminent threat that could lead to a substantial and prolonged power outage for utility customers not only on the East Coast, but also as far west as...

270

Sandy Hill School District Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... SHSD also engages numerous office and furniture suppliers and educational, food, technology ... safe learning environment ... fiscal management and ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

271

Sandy Hill School District Feedback Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... national average of 20%. This low rate results in $500,000 saved annually from not having to recruit, hire, and orient new faculty and staff. ...

2013-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

272

Google Crisis Map for Hurricane Sandy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Google Crisis Map has power outage information, shelter and recovery centers, local emergency Twitter feeds, FEMA disaster declared areas and more. | This map is created and maintained by...

273

Sea Level Rise Tool For Sandy Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and related professional communities (e.g., local chapters of associations such as ASCE, ASFPM, APA, etc.) 4. What counties are include in this sea level rise tool? Answer In...

274

Hurricane Sandy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

threat that could lead to a substantial and prolonged power outage for utility customers not only on the East Coast, but also as far west as Chicago and as far north as Canada....

275

Fine Tuning for Best-Value Super ESPC Deals Using the Responsibility Matrix  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savings and Performance Guarantees Savings and Performance Guarantees That Work for You QUICK STUDY Fine Tuning for Best-Value Super ESPC Deals Using the Responsibility Matrix Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) are a practical and flexible tool for obtaining energy improvements for federal facilities. While the overarching Super ESPC establishes general terms and conditions of the agree- ment between the agency and the energy service company (ESCO), the contract leaves broad latitude to custom-tailor a deal to suit the agency's own particular needs, priorities, and circumstances. The agency can precisely define the nature of the savings guarantee and how optimum performance of the energy conservation measures (ECMs) will be ensured through- out the life of the contract. A full aware-

276

Human error and general aviation accidents: A comprehensive, fine-grained analysis using HFACS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS) is a theoretically based tool for investigating and analyzing human error associated with accidents and incidents. Previous research performed at both at the University of Illinois and the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) have been highly successful and have shown that HFACS can be reliably used to analyze the underlying human causes of both commercial and general aviation (GA) accidents. these analyses have helped identify general trends in the types of human factors issues and aircrew errors that have contributed to civil aviation accidents. The next step is to identify the exact nature of the human errors identified. The purpose of this research effort, therefore, was to address these questions by performing a fine-grained HFACS analysis of the individual human causal factors associated with GA accidents and to assist in the generation of intervention programs. This report details those findings and offers an approach for developing interventions to address them.

Douglas A. Wiegmann; Albert Boquet; Cristy Detwiler; Kali Holcomb; Troy Faaborg; Douglas A. Wiegmann, Ph.D., Ph.D.; Albert Boquet, Ph.D.; Cristy Detwiler; Kali Holcomb; Troy Faaborg

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

POC-scale testing of oil agglomeration techniques and equipment for fine coal processing  

SciTech Connect

The information presented in this manual is solely for the purpose of operating the POC-scale equipment for fine coal processing as described herein. This manual provides a general description of the process technology and guidelines for plant operating procedures. It is intended for use by the operators and maintenance personnel who will be responsible for the operations of the plant. No attempt should be made to operate the plant until the principles of the process and operating instructions contained in this manual are fully understood. Operating personnel should thoroughly familiarize themselves with all processing equipment prior to commencing plant operation. All equipment is skid mounted to provide a self-contained unit. The dimensions of the unit are comply with standard guidelines. A minimum distance of 2 feet is provided between equipment for walkway and maintenance.

W. Pawlak; K. Szymocha

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J{approx}5x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2}, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E=10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately D{sub x}=0.5 {mu}m.

Sugimoto, W.; Sugita, S.; Sakai, Y.; Goto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohga, Y.; Kita, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Ohara, T. [Topcon Corporation, 75-1 Hasunuma-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-8580 (Japan)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Synthesis of LiFePO{sub 4} with fine particle by co-precipitation method  

SciTech Connect

LiFePO{sub 4} is a potential candidate for the cathode material of the lithium secondary batteries. A co-precipitation method was adopted to prepare LiFePO{sub 4} because it is simple and cheap. Nitrogen gas was needed to prevent oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} in the aqueous solution. The co-precipitated precursor shows the high reactivity with the reductive gas, and the single phase of LiFePO{sub 4} is successfully synthesized with the aid of carbon under less reductive conditions. LiFePO{sub 4} fine powder prepared by co-precipitation method shows high rate capability, impressive specific capacity and cycle property.

Park, K.S. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: gappa37@dreamwiz.com; Kang, K.T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, S.B. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Y.J. [Battery Technology Team, ETRI, Daejon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fine and hyperfine structure of P-levels in muonic hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corrections of orders $\\alpha^5$ and $\\alpha^6$ are calculated in the fine structure interval $\\Delta E^{fs}=E(2P_{3/2})-E(2P_{1/2})$ and in the hyperfine structure of the energy levels $2P_{1/2}$ and $2P_{3/2}$ in muonic hydrogen. The obtained numerical values $\\Delta E^{fs}= 8352.08 \\mu eV$, $\\Delta \\tilde E^{hfs}(2P_{1/2})=7964.36 \\mu eV$, $\\Delta \\tilde E^{hfs}(2P_{3/2})=3392.59 \\mu eV$ can be considered as a reliable estimate for the comparison with corresponding experimental data and for the extraction of the experimental value of the Lamb shift $(2P-2S)$ in muonic hydrogen.

A. P. Martynenko

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fine Tuning for Best-Value Super ESPC Deals Using the Responsibility Matrix  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savings and Performance Guarantees Savings and Performance Guarantees That Work for You QUICK STUDY Fine Tuning for Best-Value Super ESPC Deals Using the Responsibility Matrix Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (Super ESPCs) are a practical and flexible tool for obtaining energy improvements for federal facilities. While the overarching Super ESPC establishes general terms and conditions of the agree- ment between the agency and the energy service company (ESCO), the contract leaves broad latitude to custom-tailor a deal to suit the agency's own particular needs, priorities, and circumstances. The agency can precisely define the nature of the savings guarantee and how optimum performance of the energy conservation measures (ECMs) will be ensured through- out the life of the contract. A full aware-

282

Chiral Symmetry Restoration, Naturalness and the Absence of Fine-Tuning I: Global Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Standard Model (SM), and the scalar sector of its zero-gauge-coupling limit -- the chiral-symmetric limit of the Gell Mann-Levy Model (GML) -- have been shown not to suffer from a Higgs Fine-Tuning (FT) problem. All ultraviolet quadratic divergences (UVQD) are absorbed into the mass-squared of pseudo Nambu-Goldstone (pNGB) bosons, in GML. Since chiral SU(2)_{L-R} symmetry is restored as the pNGB mass-squared or as the Higgs vacuum expectation value (VEV) are taken to 0, small values of these quantities and of the Higgs mass are natural, and therefore not Fine-Tuned. In this letter, we extend our results on the absence of FT to a wide class of high-mass-scale (M_{Heavy}>>m_{Higgs}) extensions to a simplified SO(2) version of GML. We explicitly demonstrate naturalness and no-FT for two examples of heavy physics, both SO(2) singlets: a heavy (M_S >> m_{Higgs}) real scalar field (with or without a VEV); and a right-handed Type 1 See-Saw Majorana neutrino with M_R >> m_{Higgs}. We prove that for |q^2| energy effective theory with certain high-mass-scale extensions. We conjecture that, since gravity couples democratically to particles, quantum gravitational theories that respect chiral symmetry will also retain naturalness, and avoid FT problems for GML and the SM. Phenomenological consequences include the renewed possibility of thermal lepto-genesis in the neutrino-MSM. Absent a FT problem, there should be no expectation that LHC will discover physics beyond the SM unrelated to neutrino mixing.

Bryan W. Lynn; Glenn D. Starkman

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fatigue and Creep-Fatigue Deformation of an Ultra-Fine Precipitate Strengthened Advanced Austenitic Alloy  

SciTech Connect

An advanced austenitic alloy, HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine-precipitation-strengthened), has been identified as an ideal candidate material for the structural components of fast reactors and energy-conversion systems. HT-UPS alloys demonstrate improved creep resistance relative to 316 stainless steel (SS) through additions of Ti and Nb, which precipitate to form a widespread dispersion of stable nanoscale metallic carbide (MC) particles in the austenitic matrix. The low-cycle fatigue and creep-fatigue behavior of an HT-UPS alloy have been investigated at 650 C and a 1.0% total strain, with an R-ratio of -1 and hold times at peak tensile strain as long as 150 min. The cyclic deformation response of HT-UPS is directly compared to that of standard 316 SS. The measured values for total cycles to failure are similar, despite differences in peak stress profiles and in qualitative observations of the deformed microstructures. Crack propagation is primarily transgranular in fatigue and creep-fatigue of both alloys at the investigated conditions. Internal grain boundary damage in the form of fine cracks resulting from the tensile hold is present for hold times of 60 min and longer, and substantially more internal cracks are quantifiable in 316 SS than in HT-UPS. The dislocation substructures observed in the deformed material differ significantly; an equiaxed cellular structure is observed in 316 SS, whereas in HT-UPS the microstructure takes the form of widespread and relatively homogenous tangles of dislocations pinned by the nanoscale MC precipitates. The significant effect of the fine distribution of precipitates on observed fatigue and creep-fatigue response is described in three distinct behavioral regions as it evolves with continued cycling.

M.C. Carroll; L.J. Carroll

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Architectural characteristics of fine-grained submarine fans: A model applicable to the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Submarine fan deposits in the Gulf of Mexico, modern and ancient, fall in the category of fine-grained, low overall sand/shale ratio basin-floor fans. Models published over the years that have been applied to both exploration and production are based on sand-rich fans, most of which were deposited in active margin settings. These models should not be used for the Gulf of Mexico or any other deep water system with similar basinal settings. Observations from the excellent outcrops of the Permian Tanqua Karoo in southwestern South Africa, together with information from the modern Mississippi Fan, and the Jackfork turbidites in Arkansas, enable the construction of a model that addresses the architecture of both the macro and meso-scale depositional features of fine-grained turbidite systems. At the entrance to the basin floor the conduit, carved out across the slope, may start to widen. Most of the density flows moving through do not necessarily occupy the conduit`s entire width. The result is a complex of laterally and vertically stacked channel fills and associated levee-overbank deposits with a good degree of connectivity. The channel fills are mostly massive, whereas the levee deposits are low-contrast, low-resistivity thin-bedded sandstones and shales with high permeability. Such sandstones can be potentially very productive. The channels gradually become smaller and as their influence on directing the heads of turbidity currents decreases, oblong sheet sands are deposited, each having a very large width to thickness ratio and a high sand/shale ratio. The vertical stacking patterns within these sheet sands commonly display lateral offset of individual beds or groups of beds, and therefore form a distinct reservoir type with varying internal fluid-flow characteristics.

Bouma, A.H.; Coleman, J.H. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); DeV Wickens, H. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Sorption of organic carbon compounds to the fine fraction of surface and Subsurface Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transported from the soil surface is stabilized in deeper soil profiles by physicochemical sorption processes. However, it is unclear how different forms of organic carbon (OC) compounds common in soil organic matter interact with soil minerals in the surface (A) and subsurface (B) horizons. We added four compounds (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) to the silt- and clay-sized fraction (fine fraction) of A and B horizons of eight soils from varying climates (3 temperate, 3 tropical, 1 arctic and 1 sub-arctic). Equilibriumbatch experiments were conducted using 0 to 100 mg C L 1 of 14C-labeled compounds for 8 h. Sorption parameters (maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k) calculated by fitting sorption data to the Langmuir equation showed that Qmax of A and B horizons was very similar for all compounds. Both Qmax and k values were related to sorbate properties, with Qmax being lowest for glucose (20 500 mg kg 1), highest for stearic acid (20,000 200,000 mg kg 1), and intermediate for both cinnamic acid (200 4000 mg kg 1) and starch (400 6000 mg kg 1). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that physicochemical properties of the sorbents influenced the Qmax of cinnamic acid and stearic acid, but not glucose and starch. The sorbent properties did not show predictive ability for binding coefficient k. By using the fine fraction as sorbent, we found that the mineral fractions of A horizons are equally reactive as the B horizons irrespective of soil organic carbon content.

Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Zinn, Yuri [Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; Gisladottir, Gudrun [University of Iceland; Ann, Russell [Iowa State University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Resistance spot welding of ultra-fine grained steel sheets produced by constrained groove pressing: Optimization and characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constrained groove pressing as a severe plastic deformation method is utilized to produce ultra-fine grained low carbon steel sheets. The ultra-fine grained sheets are joined via resistance spot welding process and the characteristics of spot welds are investigated. Resistance spot welding process is optimized for welding of the sheets with different severe deformations and their results are compared with those of as-received samples. The effects of failure mode and expulsion on the performance of ultra-fine grained sheet spot welds have been investigated in the present paper and the welding current and time of resistance spot welding process according to these subjects are optimized. Failure mode and failure load obtained in tensile-shear test, microhardness, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope images have been used to describe the performance of spot welds. The region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. The results show that optimum welding parameters (welding current and welding time) for ultra-fine grained sheets are shifted to lower values with respect to those for as-received specimens. In ultra-fine grained sheets, one new region is formed named recrystallized zone in addition to fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal. It is shown that microstructures of different zones in ultra-fine grained sheets are finer than those of as-received sheets. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resistance spot welding process is optimized for joining of UFG steel sheets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimum welding current and time are decreased with increasing the CGP pass number. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microhardness at BM, HAZ, FZ and recrystallized zone is enhanced due to CGP.

Khodabakhshi, F.; Kazeminezhad, M., E-mail: mkazemi@sharif.edu; Kokabi, A.H.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

An agronomic evaluation of serradella(Ornithopus compressus L.), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.), and mat bean (Vigna aconitifolia (Jacq.) Marechal) on two soils in east central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of four forage legumes was assessed during the 1993 summer season on two soil types (Boonville fine sandy loam, pH 7.3 and Weswood silt loam, pH 8. 1) in the Brazos Valley of east central Texas. These legumes were: two cultivars of yellow serradella (Ornithopus compressus L.), cowpea [Vigna urtguiculata (L.) Walp.], and mat bean [Vigna aconitifolia (Jacq.) Marechal]. With supplemental irrigation, 1993 yields of the Vigna species produced biomass ranging from 5,000 to 7,000 kg/ha. The serradella cultivars Paros and Madeira' produced less biomass, (400 to 720 kg/ha, respectively), and did not grow well under warm summer temperatures. The Vigna species produced greater yield under high temperatures on both soil types. During 1994, yields of cowpea and mat bean were 4,413 to 5,283 kg/ha, respectively. Serradella germination percentages were low (11 to 22%) for Madeira and Paros respectively, on either soil type under high temperatures and drought stress. The two serradelia cultivars were planted again in the fall of 1994 and established well during the cool season. Seven serradella accessions along with twoVigna species were also evaluated in the greenhouse. The serradella genotypes produced biomass ranging from 0.62 to 7.26 g/pot compared to 0.46 to 7.58 g/pot for mat bean and cowpea, respectively. Serradella entry GEH-69 was the only genotype adapted to the alkaline Weswood soil (pH 8. 1). Macro-and micronutrient contents of all forages were sufficient for plant physiological maintenance and met or exceeded animal requirements. In situ digestibility analysis results indicated that cowpea was the most digestible forage (90%) followed by mat bean (85%), Madeira serradella (770/o), and Paros serradella (72 O/o).

Karim, Ana Lee

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Receptive field self-organization in a model of the fine structure in v1 cortical columns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study a dynamical model of processing and learning in the visual cortex, which reflects the anatomy of V1 cortical columns and properties of their neuronal receptive fields. Based on recent results on the fine-scale structure of columns in V1, we ...

Jrg Lcke

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Synchrotron radiation x-ray absorption fine-structure and Raman studies on CdZnTe ternary alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) technology has been employed to obtained Zn K-edge absorption spectra for Cd1[subscript 1-x]Zn[subscript x]Te alloy with x = 0.03, 0.10, ...

Becla, Piotr

290

Geyser-1: a MIPS R3000 CPU core with fine-grained run-time power gating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geyser-1 is a MIPS CPU which provides a fine-grained run-time power gating (PG) controlled by instructions. Unlike traditional PGs, it uses special standard cells in which the virtual ground (VGND) is separated from the real ground, and a certain number ...

D. Ikebuchi; N. Seki; Y. Kojima; M. Kamata; L. Zhao; H. Amano; T. Shirai; S. Koyama; T. Hashida; Y. Umahashi; H. Masuda; K. Usami; S. Takeda; H. Nakamura; M. Namiki; M. Kondo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF ADVANCED PHYSICAL FINE COAL CLEANING FOR PREMIUM FUEL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel, together with Amax Research and Development Center (Amax R&D), has prepared this study which provides conceptual cost estimates for the production of premium quality coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) in a commercial plant. Two scenarios are presented, one using column flotation technology and the other the selective agglomeration to clean the coal to the required quality specifications. This study forms part of US Department of Energy program ?Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications,? (Contract No. DE-AC22- 92PC92208), under Task 11, Project Final Report. The primary objective of the Department of Energy program is to develop the design base for prototype commercial advanced fine coal cleaning facilities capable of producing ultra-clean coals suitable for conversion to stable and highly loaded CWF. The fuels should contain less than 2 lb ash/MBtu (860 grams ash/GJ) of HHV and preferably less than 1 lb ash/MBtu (430 grams ash/GJ). The advanced fine coal cleaning technologies to be employed are advanced column froth flotation and selective agglomeration. It is further stipulated that operating conditions during the advanced cleaning process should recover not less than 80 percent of the carbon content (heating value) in the run-of-mine source coal. These goals for ultra-clean coal quality are to be met under the constraint that annualized coal production costs does not exceed $2.5 /MBtu ($ 2.37/GJ), including the mine mouth cost of the raw coal. A further objective of the program is to determine the distribution of a selected suite of eleven toxic trace elements between product CWF and the refuse stream of the cleaning processes. Laboratory, bench-scale and Process Development Unit (PDU) tests to evaluate advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration were completed earlier under this program with selected coal samples. A PDU with a capacity of 2 st/h was designed by Bechtel and installed at Amax R&D, Golden, Colorado by Entech Global for process evaluation tests. The tests successfully demonstrated the capability of advanced column flotation as well as selective agglomeration to produce ultra-clean coal at specified levels of purity and recovery efficiency. Test results and the experience gained during the operation of the PDU have provided valuable insights into the processes studied. Based on the design data obtained from the test work and a set of project design criteria, two sets of conceptual designs for commercial CWF production plants have been developed, one using column flotation and the other using selective agglomeration process. Using these designs, Capital as well as Operating and Maintenance (O&M) cost estimates for the plants have been compiled. These estimates have then been used to derive the annualized cost of production of premium CWF on a commercial scale. Further, a series of sensitivity analysis have been completed to evaluate the effects of variations in selected cost components and process parameters on the overall economics of premium fuel production

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

A LOW COST AND HIGH QUALITY SOLID FUEL FROM BIOMASS AND COAL FINES  

SciTech Connect

Use of biomass wastes as fuels in existing boilers would reduce greenhouse gas emissions, SO2 and NOx emissions, while beneficially utilizing wastes. However, the use of biomass has been limited by its low energy content and density, high moisture content, inconsistent configuration and decay characteristics. If biomass is upgraded by conventional methods, the cost of the fuel becomes prohibitive. Altex has identified a process, called the Altex Fuel Pellet (AFP) process, that utilizes a mixture of biomass wastes, including municipal biosolids, and some coal fines, to produce a strong, high energy content, good burning and weather resistant fuel pellet, that is lower in cost than coal. This cost benefit is primarily derived from fees that are collected for accepting municipal biosolids. Besides low cost, the process is also flexible and can incorporate several biomass materials of interest The work reported on herein showed the technical and economic feasibility of the AFP process. Low-cost sawdust wood waste and light fractions of municipal wastes were selected as key biomass wastes to be combined with biosolids and coal fines to produce AFP pellets. The process combines steps of dewatering, pellet extrusion, drying and weatherizing. Prior to pilot-scale tests, bench-scale test equipment was used to produce limited quantities of pellets for characterization. These tests showed which pellet formulations had a high potential. Pilot-scale tests then showed that extremely robust pellets could be produced that have high energy content, good density and adequate weatherability. It was concluded that these pellets could be handled, stored and transported using equipment similar to that used for coal. Tests showed that AFP pellets have a high combustion rate when burned in a stoker type systems. While NOx emissions under stoker type firing conditions was high, a simple air staging approach reduced emissions to below that for coal. In pulverized-fuel-fired tests it was found that the ground pellets could be used as an effective NOx control agent for pulverized-coal-fired systems. NOx emissions reductions up to 63% were recorded, when using AFP as a NOx control agent. In addition to performance benefits, economic analyses showed the good economic benefits of AFP fuel. Using equipment manufacturer inputs, and reasonable values for biomass, biosolids and coal fines costs, it was determined that an AFP plant would have good profitability. For cases where biosolids contents were in the range of 50%, the after tax Internal Rates of Return were in the range of 40% to 50%. These are very attractive returns. Besides the baseline analysis for the various AFP formulations tested at pilot scale, sensitivity analysis showed the impact of important parameters on return. From results, it was clear that returns are excellent for a range of parameters that could be expected in practice. Importantly, these good returns are achieved even without incentives related to the emissions control benefits of biomass.

John T. Kelly; George Miller; Mehdi Namazian

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

POC-SCALE TESTING OF A DRY TRIBOELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR FOR FINE COAL CLEANING  

SciTech Connect

Numerous advanced coal cleaning processes have been developed in recent years that are capable of substantially reducing both ash- and sulfur-forming minerals from coal. However, most of the processes involve fine grinding and use water as the cleaning medium; therefore, the clean coal products must be dewatered before they can be transported and burned. Unfortunately, dewatering fine coal is costly, which makes it difficult to deploy advanced coal cleaning processes for commercial applications. As a means of avoiding problems associated with the fine coal dewatering, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed a dry coal cleaning process in which mineral matter is separated from coal without using water. In this process, pulverized coal is subjected to triboelectrification before being placed in an electric field for electrostatic separation. The triboelectrification is accomplished by passing a pulverized coal through an in-line mixer made of copper. Copper has a work function that lies between that of carbonaceous material (coal) and mineral matter. Thus, coal particles impinging on the copper wall lose electrons to the metal thereby acquiring positive charges, while mineral matter impinging on the wall gain electrons to acquire negative charges. The charged particles then pass through an electric field where they are separated according to their charges into two or more products depending on the configuration of the separator. The results obtained at NETL showed that it is capable of removing more than 90% of the pyritic sulfur and 70% of the ash-forming minerals from a number of eastern U.S. coals. However, the BTU recoveries were less than desirable. The laboratory-scale batch triboelectrostatic separator (TES) used by NETL relied on adhering charged particles on parallel electrode surfaces and scraping them off. Therefore, its throughput will be proportional to the electrode surface area. If this laboratory device is scaled-up as is, it would suffer from low throughput capacities and high maintenance requirements. In general, surface area-based separators (e.g., shaking tables, magnetic drum separator, electrodynamic separator, etc.) have lower throughput capacities than volume-based separators (e.g., flotation cell, dense-medium bath, cyclones, etc.) by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the electrodes of the laboratory unit need to be cleaned frequently, creating a high maintenance requirement if it is scaled-up to a commercial unit. The bench-scale continuous TES unit developed at NETL, on the other hand, separates positively and negatively charged particles by splitting the gaseous stream containing these particles in an electric field by means of a flow splitter, so that the oppositely charged particles can be directed into different compartments. This device is fundamentally different from the laboratory unit in that the former is a surface area-based separator, while the latter is a volume-based separator. The bench-scale unit is referred to as an entrained flow separator by the in-house researchers at NETL. Thus, the entrained flow TES unit is a significant improvement over the laboratory unit with regard to throughput capacity. In the present work, the entrained flow separator concept will be utilized for developing a proof-of concept (POC) separator that can be scaled-up to commercial size units. To accomplish this, it is necessary to develop a bench-scale separator that can achieve high Btu recoveries while maintaining the high degree of separation efficiencies. It is the objective of the present investigation to develop an efficient separator by studying the mechanisms of triboelectrification and investigating better ways of separating the charged particles. An important criterion for developing efficient separators is that they not only provide high separation efficiencies but also have high throughput capacities, which are essential ingredients for successful commercialization.

R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; E.S. Yan; A.D. Walters

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Evaluation of ceramic filters for high-temperature/high-pressure fine particulate control. Final report Dec 75-Jun 76  

SciTech Connect

High temperature gas turbines used to generate electric power require gas streams virtually free of particulate matter. Gas streams from high temperature, high pressure coal processes, such as low Btu gasification and pressurized fluidized bed combustion, require considerable particulate removal. In order to maintain high thermal efficiency the particulate clean-up must be done at the high temperatures of the process. Many new concepts for fine particulate control at elevated temperatures are presently being proposed. One such concept utilizes ceramic membrane filters. The report gives results of a study to analyze and evaluate ceramic membrane filters as a new, fine particulate (<3 um) control concept for high-temperature (approx. 900/sup 0/C), high-pressure processes. Several ceramic filters were identified as potential candidates for fine particulate removal. There does not seem to be any inherent material limitation to high-temperature operation; however, no evidence of high-temperature filter application was found. The filters typically are 2-6 mm thick, cylindrical, and available with various pore sizes, increasing upward from 0.5 um. These elements may be suitable for fine particulate control in hot gas streams. The most promising, although undeveloped, idea for a ceramic filter is to use ceramic honeycomb monoliths similar to those available for catalyst supports and heat exchangers. The walls of the monoliths are about 0.2-0.4 mm thick and of varying pore size and porosity. Geometric configurations are available which would force the gas to flow through the membrane walls. Pressure losses would be very small relative to those of standard ceramic filter elements. The application of ceramic monoliths to high-temperature fine particulate control appears very promising. It is strongly recommended that this concept be investigated further.

Poe, G.G.; Evans, R.M.; Bonnett, W.S.; Waterland, L.R.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

MROrchestrator: A Fine-Grained Resource Orchestration Framework for MapReduce Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient resource management in data centers and clouds running large distributed data processing frameworks like MapReduce is crucial for enhancing the performance of hosted applications and boosting resource utilization. However, existing resource scheduling schemes in Hadoop MapReduce allocate resources at the granularity of fixed-size, static portions of nodes, called slots. In this work, we show that MapReduce jobs have widely varying demands for multiple resources, making the static and fixed-size slot-level resource allocation a poor choice both from the performance and resource utilization standpoints. Furthermore, lack of co-ordination in the management of mul- tiple resources across nodes prevents dynamic slot reconfigura- tion, and leads to resource contention. Motivated by this, we propose MROrchestrator, a MapReduce resource Orchestrator framework, which can dynamically identify resource bottlenecks, and resolve them through fine-grained, co-ordinated, and on- demand resource allocations. We have implemented MROrches- trator on two 24-node native and virtualized Hadoop clusters. Experimental results with a suite of representative MapReduce benchmarks demonstrate up to 38% reduction in job completion times, and up to 25% increase in resource utilization. We further show how popular resource managers like NGM and Mesos when augmented with MROrchestrator can hike up their performance.

Sharma, Bikash [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Prabhakar, Ramya [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Kandemir, Mahmut [Pennsylvania State University; Das, Chita [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Image-Directed Fine-needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid with Safety-engineered Devices  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to integrate safety-engineered devices into outpatient fine-needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy of the thyroid in an interventional radiology practice. Materials and Methods: The practice center is a tertiary referral center for image-directed FNA thyroid biopsies in difficult patients referred by the primary care physician, endocrinologist, or otolaryngologist. As a departmental quality of care and safety improvement program, we instituted integration of safety devices into our thyroid biopsy procedures and determined the effect on outcome (procedural pain, diagnostic biopsies, inadequate samples, complications, needlesticks to operator, and physician satisfaction) before institution of safety devices (54 patients) and after institution of safety device implementation (56 patients). Safety devices included a patient safety technology-the mechanical aspirating syringe (reciprocating procedure device), and a health care worker safety technology (antineedlestick safety needle). Results: FNA of thyroid could be readily performed with the safety devices. Safety-engineered devices resulted in a 49% reduction in procedural pain scores (P < 0.0001), a 56% reduction in significant pain (P < 0.002), a 21% increase in operator satisfaction (P < 0.0001), and a 5% increase in diagnostic specimens (P = 0.5). No needlesticks to health care workers or patient injuries occurred during the study. Conclusions: Safety-engineered devices to improve both patient and health care worker safety can be successfully integrated into diagnostic FNA of the thyroid while maintaining outcomes and improving safety.

Sibbitt, Randy R., E-mail: THESIBB2@aol.com; Palmer, Dennis J., E-mail: lyonscreek@aol.com [Montana Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology (United States); Sibbitt, Wilmer L., E-mail: wsibbitt@salud.unm.edu; Bankhurst, Arthur D., E-mail: abankhurst@salud.unm.edu [University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Department of Internal Medicine (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

High-Throughput Asynchronous Pipelines for Fine-Grain Dynamic Datapaths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces several new asynchronous pipeline designs which offer high throughput as well as low latency. The designs target dynamic datapaths, both dualrail as well as single-rail. The new pipelines are latchfree and therefore are particularly well-suited for fine-grain pipelining, i.e., where each pipeline stage is only a single gate deep. The pipelines employ new control structures and protocols aimed at reducing the handshaking delay, the principal impediment to achieving high throughput in asynchronous pipelines. As a test vehicle, a 4-bit FIFO was designed using 0.6 micron technology. The results of careful HSPICE simulations of the FIFO designs are very encouraging. The dualrail designs deliver a throughput of up to 860 million data items per second. This performance represents an improvement by a factor of 2 over a widely-used comparable approach by Williams [16]. The new single-rail designs deliver a throughput of up to 1208 million data items per second.

Montek Singh; Steven M. Nowick

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Fine structure collision strengths and line ratios for [Ne V] in infrared and optical sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improved collisions strengths for the mid-infrared and optical transitions in Ne V are presented. Breit-Pauli R-Matrix calculations for electron impact excitation are carried out with fully resolved near-threshold resonances at very low energies. In particular, the fine structure lines at 14 micron and 24 micron due to transitions among the ground state levels 1s^22s^22p^3 (^3P_{0,1,2}), and the optical/near-UV lines at 2973, 3346 and 3426 Angstrom transitions among the ^3P_{0,1,2}, ^1D_2, ^1S_0 levels are described. Maxwellian averaged collision strengths are tabulated for all forbidden transistion within the ground configuration. Significant differences are found in the low temperature range Te < 10000 K for both the FIR and the opitcal transitions compared to previous results. An analysis of the 14/24 line ratio in low-energy-density (LED) plasma conditions reveals considerable variation; the effective rate coefficient may be dominated by the very low-energy behaviour rather than the maxwellian averaged...

Dance, Michael; Nahar, Sultana N; Pradhan, Anil K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fine topological structure of coherent complex light created by carbon nanocomposites in LC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fine complex light structure, optical singularities and electroconductivty of nematic 5CB doped by multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were investigated. MWCNTs gather spontaneously to system of micro scale clusters with random fractal borders at small enough concentration. They are surrounded by the striped micro scale cladding which creates optical singularities in propagating laser beam. Applied transverse electric field above the Freedericksz initiates homeotropic arrangement of 5CB and the striped inversion walls between nanotubes clusters what diminishes free energy of a composite. Theory of their appearance and properties was built. Simultaneously the striped cladding disappears what can be treated as new mechanism of structure orientation nonlinearity in nonlinear photonics. Polarization singularities (circular C points) were measured firstly. Percolation of clusters enhances strongly electrical conductivity of the system and creates inversion walls even without applied field. Carbon nanotubes composites in LC form bridge between nano dopants and micro/macro system and are promising for applications. Elaborated protocol of singular optics inspection and characterization of LC nanocomposites is promising tool for applications in modern nanosience and technique.

Vlad. V. Ponevchinsky; Andrey I. Goncharuk; Serguey S. Minenko; Longin N. Lisetskii; Nikolai I. Lebovka; Marat S. Soskin

2013-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

300

Evaluation of fine-particle size catalysts using standard test procedures  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to evaluate and compare the activities/selectivities of fine-particle size catalysts being developed in the DOE/PETC Advanced Research (AR) Liquefaction Program by using standard coal liquefaction activity test procedures. Since bituminous and subbituminous coals have significantly different properties, it is feasible that catalysts may perform differently with these coal types. Because all previous testing has been done with the DECS-17 Blind Canyon bituminous coal, it is important to develop the capability of evaluating catalysts using a subbituminous coal. Initial efforts towards developing a subbituminous coal test are aimed at comparing the reactivities of the Wyodak subbituminous coal and the Blind Canyon bituminous coal. Therefore, the same factorial experimental design was used with the Wyodak coal as was used previously with the Blind Canyon coal. In addition, PNL`s 6-line ferrihydrite catalyst precursor was used in the development of the Wyodak coal test procedure because this catalyst is the best powder catalyst found to date in Sandia`s tests with Blind Canyon coal. Results show that Blind Canyon coal yields higher DHP amounts in the reaction products and higher tetrahydrofuran conversions at the higher severity conditions. Wyodak coal gives higher heptane conversions and higher gas yields for all conditions tested.

Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Goodnow, D.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic study of uranium nitrides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium mononitride (UN), sesquinitride (U2N3) and dinitride (UN2) were characterized by extended X-Ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Analysis on UN indicate the presence of three uranium shells at distances of 3.46(3), 4.89(5) and 6.01(6) A and a nitrogen shell at a distance of 2.46(2) A . For U2N3, two absorbing uranium atoms at different crystallographic positions are present in the structure. One of the uranium atoms is surrounded by nitrogen atoms at 2.28(2) A and by uranium atoms at 3.66(4) and 3.95(4) A . The second type of uranium atom is surrounded by nitrogen atoms at 2.33(2) and 2.64(3) A and by uranium atoms at 3.66(4), 3.95(4) and 5.31(5) A . Results on UN2 indicate two uranium shells at 3.71(4) and 5.32(5) A and two nitrogen shells at 2.28(2).

Poineau, Frederic [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Yeamans, Charles B. [University of California, Berkeley; Cerefice, Gary S. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Sattelberger, Alfred P [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Use of a vegetative filter zone to control fine-grained sediments from surface mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a vegetative filter zone in trapping fine-grained sediments from surface mining operations. The area selected for study was located in Whitley County, Kentucky, directly below an active surface mining operation. The outslope above the filter was the primary drainage area monitored during the study. This project was initiated with the specific purpose of conducting a field test on vegetation as a viable sediment trapping medium. From the onset, the project was wholly designed for a field evaluation under typical mining conditions. The filter area was constructed directly below an abandoned surface mine bench, on typical soil types found in mined areas of Eastern Kentucky. The outslope located above the filter was the primary source area for sediment flow. Sediment-laden water samples were collected at the inlet flume for comparison with samples collected at the outlet flume to permit evaluation of the sediment removal capability of the vegetative filter. Results of the monitoring efforts revealed that a dramatic reduction in sediment load was achieved by vegetative filtration with trapping efficiencies ranging from 70 to 99% for the storms monitored. Based on results of this study, it is concluded that vegetative filters are an effective method for reducing the quantity of sediment transported into surface streams and rivers from disturbed mined lands.

Barfield, B.J.; Albrecht, S.C.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Microstructure, Morphology, and Nanomechanical Properties Near Fine Holes Produced by Electro-Discharge Machining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine holes in metal alloys are employed for many important technological purposes, including cooling and the precise atomization of liquids. For example, they play an important role in the metering and delivery of fuel to the combustion chambers in energy-efficient, low-emissions diesel engines. Electro-discharge machining (EDM) is one process employed to produce such holes. Since the hole shape and bore morphology can affect fluid flow, and holes also represent structural discontinuities in the tips of the spray nozzles, it is important to understand the microstructures adjacent to these holes, the features of the hole walls, and the nanomechanical properties of the material that was in some manner altered by the EDM hole-making process. Several techniques were used to characterize the structure and properties of spray-holes in a commercial injector nozzle. These include scanning electron microscopy, cross-sectioning and metallographic etching, bore surface roughness measurements by optical interferometry, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy of recast EDM layers extracted with the help of a focused ion beam.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Coffey, Dorothy W [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Yang, Nan [Caterpillar Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Fabrication and thermoelectric properties of fine-grained TiNiSn compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nearly single-phased TiNiSn half-Heusler compound thermoelectric materials were synthesized by combining mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS) in order to reduce its thermal conductivity by refining the grain sizes. Although TiNiSn compound powders were not synthesized directly via MA, dense bulk samples of TiNiSn compound were obtained by the subsequent SPS treatment. It was found that an excessive Ti addition relative to the TiNiSn stoichiometry is effective in increasing the phase purity of TiNiSn half-Heusler phase in the bulk samples, by compensating for the Ti loss caused by the oxidation of Ti powders and MA processing. The maximum power factor value obtained in the Ti-compensated sample is 1720 muW m{sup -1} K{sup -2} at 685 K. A relatively high ZT value of 0.32 is achieved at 785 K for the present undoped TiNiSn compound polycrystals. - Graphical abstract: Nearly single-phased TiNiSn-based half-Heusler compound polycrystalline materials with fine grains were fabricated by combining mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS). A high ZT value for undoped TiNiSn was obtained because of the reduced thermal conductivity.

Zou Minmin [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Jingfeng, E-mail: jingfeng@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Du Bing; Liu Dawei [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kita, Takuji [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Vehicle Engineering Group, Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200, Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

AN INTRIGUING CHROMOSPHERIC JET OBSERVED BY HINODE: FINE STRUCTURE KINEMATICS AND EVIDENCE OF UNWINDING TWISTS  

SciTech Connect

We report a chromospheric jet lasting for more than 1 hr observed by the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope in unprecedented detail. The ejection occurred in three episodes separated by 12-14 minutes, with the amount and velocity of material decreasing with time. The upward velocities range from 438 to 33 km s{sup -1}, while the downward velocities of the material falling back have smaller values (mean: -56km s{sup -1}) and a narrower distribution (standard deviation: 14km s{sup -1}). The average acceleration inferred from parabolic spacetime tracks is 141 m s{sup -2}, a fraction of the solar gravitational acceleration. The jet consists of fine threads (0.''5-2'' wide), which exhibit coherent, oscillatory transverse motions perpendicular to the jet axis and about a common equilibrium position. These motions propagate upward along the jet, with the maximum phase speed of 744+-11 km s{sup -1}at the leading front of the jet. The transverse oscillation velocities range from 151 to 26 km s{sup -1}, amplitudes from 6.0 to 1.9 Mm, and periods from 250 to 536 s. The oscillations slow down with time and cease when the material starts to fall back. The falling material travels along almost straight lines in the original direction of ascent, showing no transverse motions. These observations are consistent with the scenario that the jet involves untwisting helical threads, which rotate about the axis of a single large cylinder and shed magnetic helicity into the upper atmosphere.

Liu Wei; Berger, Thomas E.; Title, Alan M.; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Department ADBS, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The flotation characteristics of coal-pyrites under various conditions was studied and compared with ore-pyrite and coal to determine the causes of pyrite rejection difficulties in coal flotation. Both the native and induced floatabilities of pyrites were investigated. It was found that both coal- and ore-pyrites, ff prepared by dry-grinding, show little or no floatability in the absence of any chemical reagents. After ultrasonic pretreatment, ore-pyrite floats effectively in the acidic to neutral pH range. Kentucky No. 9 coal-pyrite (KYPY) shows significant flotation in the pH range 7--10. With ethyl xanthate as collector, ore-pyrite floats well up to pH = 10; while coal-pyrite reveals no flotation above pH = 6. For the first time, the effect of coal collector on the floatability of coal-pyrite has been studied. It was shown that in the presence of fuel oil--a widely used collector for promoting coal flotation, coal-pyrite, particularly for the fine sizes, shows good flotation below pH = 11, whereas ore-pyrite has no or little floatability. These studies demonstrate that one of the main causes of the coal-pyrite flotation in coal separation is the oil-induced floatability due to adsorption/attachment of oil droplets on the coal-pyrite surfaces, the native'' or self-induced'' floatability of pyrite is no as profound as the oil-induced flotation.

Wang, Xiang-Huai; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, Chengliang; Raichur, A.M.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hubble Space Telescope Fine Guidance Sensor Parallaxes of Galactic Cepheid Variable Stars: Period-Luminosity Relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) We present new absolute trigonometric parallaxes and relative proper motions for nine Galactic Cepheid variable stars: l Car, zeta Gem, beta Dor, W Sgr, X Sgr, Y Sgr, FF Aql, T Vul, and RT Aur. We obtain these results with astrometric data from Fine Guidance Sensor 1r, a white-light interferometer on Hubble Space Telescope. We find absolute parallaxes with an average sigma_pi/pi = 8%. Two stars (FF Aql and W Sgr) required the inclusion of binary astrometric perturbations, providing Cepheid mass estimates. With these parallaxes we compute absolute magnitudes in V, I, K, and Wesenheit W_{VI} bandpasses corrected for interstellar extinction and Lutz-Kelker-Hanson bias. Adding our previous absolute magnitude determination for delta Cep, we construct Period-Luminosity relations for ten Galactic Cepheids. We compare our new Period-Luminosity relations with those adopted by several recent investigations, including the Freedman and Sandage H_0 projects. Adopting our Period-Luminosity relationship would tend to increase the Sandage H_$ value, but leave the Freedman H_0 unchanged. Comparing our Galactic Cepheid PLR with those derived from LMC Cepheids, we find the slopes for K and W_{VI} identical in the two galaxies within their respective errors. Our data lead to a W_{VI} distance modulus for the Large Magellanic Cloud, m-M = 18.50\\pm0.03, uncorrected for any metallicity effects. Applying recently derived metalllcity corrections yields a corrected LMC distance modulus of (m-M)_0=18.40\\pm0.05. Comparing our Period-Luminosity relationship to solar-metallicity Cepheids in NGC 4258 results in a distance modulus, 29.28 \\pm 0.08, which agrees with that derived from maser studies.

G. Fritz Benedict; Barbara E. McArthur; Michael W. Feast; Thomas G. Barnes; Thomas E. Harrison; Richard J. Patterson; John W. Menzies; Jacob L. Bean; Wendy L. Freedman

2006-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

Moisture retention properties of a mycorrhizal soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The water relations of arbuscular mycorrhizal plants have been compared often, but virtually nothing is known about the comparative water relations of mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal soils. Mycorrhizal symbiosis typically affects soil structure, and soil structure affects water retention properties; therefore, it seems likely that mycorrhizal symbiosis may affect soil water relations. We examined the water retention properties of a Sequatchie fine sandy loam subjected to three treatments: seven months of root growth by (1) nonmycorrhizal Vigna unguiculata given low phosphorus fertilization, (2) nonmycorrhizal Vigna unguiculata given high phosphorus fertilization, (3) Vigna unguiculata colonized by Glomus intraradices and given low phosphorus fertilization. Mycorrhization of soil had a slight but significant effect on the soil moisture characteristic curve. Once soil matric potential (\\11m) began to decline, changes in \\II m per unit change in soil water content were smaller in mycorrhizal than in the two nonmycorrhizal soils. Within the range of about-1 to-5 MPa, the mycorrhizal soil had to dry more than the nonmycorrhizal soils to reach the same \\11m. Soil characteristic curves of non mycorrhizal soils were similar, whether they contained roots of plants fed high or low phosphorus. The mycorrhizal soil had significantly more water stable aggregates and substantially higher extraradical hyphal densities than the nonmycorrhizal soils. Importantly, we were able to factor out the possibly confounding influence of differential root growth among mycorrhizal and nonmycorrhizal

Robert M. Augel; Ann L. W. Stodola; Layme E. Tims; Arnold M. Saxton

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Pilot scale single stage fine coal dewatering and briquetting process. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the current coal preparation research is to reduce the ash and sulfur content from coal, using fine grinding and various coal cleaning processes to separate finely disseminated mineral matter and pyrite from coal. Small coal particles are produced by the grinding operation, thus the ultrafine coal becomes very difficult to dewater. In addition, the ultrafine coal also creates problems during its transportation, storage and handling at utility plants. The current research is seeking to combine ultrafine coal dewatering and briquetting processes into a single stage operation, using hydrophobic binders as coal dewatering and binding reagents with the help of a compaction device. From previous tests, it has been found that coal pellets with a moisture content of less than 15% and good wear and water resistance can be successfully fabricated at pressures of less than 6,000 psi using a lab scale ram extruder. The primary objective of the research described in this quarter has been to extend the lab scale ultrafine coal dewatering and briquetting process into a pilot scale operation, based on the test data obtained from earlier research. A standard roller briquetting machine was used to dewater fine coal-binder mixtures during the briquetting process. The operating parameters, including moisture content of feed, feed rate, and roller speed, were evaluated on the basis of the performance of the briquettes. Briquettes fabricated at rates of up to 108 pellets per minute exhibited satisfactory water and wear resistance, i.e., less than 7.5% cured moisture and less than 8.3% weight loss after 6 min. of tumbling. Also, coal-binder samples with moisture contents of 40 percent have been successfully dewatered and briquetted. Briquetting of fine coal was possible under current feeding conditions, however, a better feeding system must be designed to further improve the quality of dewatered coal briquettes.

Wilson, J.W.; Ding, Y. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering; Honaker, R.Q. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fine Mesh Traveling and Vacuum Screens, Approach Velocity, Impingement Survival and Spraywash Pressure: Supplemental Laboratory Stud ies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of additional laboratory studies on the performance of fine mesh traveling screens (traditional band and vacuum) for protecting the early life stages of fish at cooling water intake structures (CWIS). This information supplements biological performance data previously developed in prior-year Electric Power Research Institute- (EPRI-) sponsored research (see EPRI reports 1019027, 1019864, and 1020663). This report also reviews additional impingement-related ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

311

SOURCE SIGNATURES OF FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PETROLEUM REFINING AND FUEL USE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The molecular structure and microstructure of a suite of fine particulate matter (PM) samples produced by the combustion of residual fuel oil and diesel fuel were investigated by an array of analytical techniques. Some of the more important results are summarized below. Diesel PM (DPM): A small diesel engine test facility was used to generate a suite of diesel PM samples from different fuels under engine load and idle conditions. C XANES, {sup 13}C NMR, XRD, and TGA were in accord that the samples produced under engine load conditions contained more graphitic material than those produced under idle conditions, which contained a larger amount of unburned diesel fuel and lubricating oil. The difference was enhanced by the addition of 5% of oxygenated compounds to the reference fuel. Scanning transmission x-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM) was able to distinguish particulate regions rich in C=C bonds from regions rich in C-H bonds with a resolution of {approx}50 nm. The former are representative of more graphitic regions and the latter of regions rich in unburned fuel and oil. The dominant microstructure observed by SEM and TEM consisted of complex chain-like structures of PM globules {approx}20-100 nm in mean diameter, with a high fractal dimension. High resolution TEM revealed that the graphitic part of the diesel soot consisted of onion-like structures made up of graphene layers. Typically 3-10 graphene layers make up the ''onion rings'', with the layer spacing decreasing as the number of layers increases. ROFA PM: Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) PM has been analyzed by a new approach that combines XAFS spectroscopy with selective leaching procedures. ROFA PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 2.5+} produced in combustion facilities at the U.S. EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRML) were analyzed by XAFS before and after leaching with water, acid (1N HCl), and pentane. Both water and acid leaching removed most of the metal sulfates, which were the dominant phase present for most metals (V, Ni, Zn, etc.). This allowed conclusive identification in the leaching residue of important secondary sulfide and oxide phases, including Ni sulfide, a toxic and carcinogenic phase observed in the leached PM{sub 2.5+} samples. Other significant secondary phases identified included V{sub 2}O{sub 4}, V sulfide, and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

Gerald P. Huffman; Frank E. Huggins; Naresh Shah; Artur Braun; Yuanzhi Chen; J. David Robertson; Joseph Kyger; Adel F. Sarofim; Ronald J. Pugmire; Henk L.C. Meuzelaar; JoAnn Lighty

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

SciTech Connect

This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles: the MCMA motor vehicles produce abundant amounts of primary PM, elemental carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and a wide range of air toxics; the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds in an urban core and a valuable tool for validating local emissions inventory; a much better understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds; the first spectroscopic detection of glyoxal in the atmosphere; a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources; characterization of ozone formation and its sensitivity to VOCs and NOx; a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distribution and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models; evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for O3 and NO2; and the implementation of an innovative Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for inorganic aerosol modeling as a powerful tool to analyze aerosol data and predict gas phase concentrations where these are unavailable. During the MILAGRO Campaign the collaborative team utilized a combination of central fixed sites and a mobile laboratory deployed throughout the MCMA to representative urban and boundary sites to measure trace gases and fine particles. Analysis of the extensive 2006 data sets has confirmed the key findings from MCMA-2002/2003; additionally MCMA-2006 provided more detailed gas and aerosol chemistry and wider regional scale coverage. Key results include an updated 2006 emissions inventory; extension of the flux system to measure fluxes of fine particles; better understanding of the sources and apportionment of aerosols, including contribution from biomass burning and industrial sources; a comprehensive evaluation of metal containing particles in a complex urban environment; identification of a close correlation between

Luisa T. Molina, Rainer Volkamer, Benjamin de Foy, Wenfang Lei, Miguel Zavala, Erik Velasco; Mario J. Molina

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Laboratory evaluation of the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils. A laboratory program compares hydraulic conductivity measurements made ...

Adams, Amy Lynn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Process and apparatus for separating fine particles by microbubble flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine particles, especially coal, so as to produce a high purity and large recovery efficiently. This is accomplished through the use of a high aspect ratio flotation column, microbubbles, and a countercurrent use of wash water to gently wash the froth. Also, disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a high efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or an in-line static generator.

Yoon, Roe-Hoan (Blacksburg, VA); Adel, Gregory T. (Blacksburg, VA); Luttrell, Gerald H. (Blacksburg, VA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Process and apparatus for separating fine particles by microbubble flotation together with a process and apparatus for generation of microbubbles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for the microbubble flotation separation of very fine particles, especially coal, so as to produce a high purity and large recovery efficiently. This is accomplished through the use of a high aspect ratio flotation column, microbubbles, and a countercurrent use of wash water to gently wash the froth. Also, disclosed are unique processes and apparatus for generating microbubbles for flotation in a high efficient and inexpensive manner using either a porous tube or an in-line static generator. 23 figures.

Yoon, R.H.; Adel, G.T.; Luttrell, G.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Synergistic Utilization of Coal Fines and Municipal Solid Waste in Coal-Fired Boilers. Phase I Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study was performed on a novel concept: to synergistically utilize a blend of waste coal fines with so-called E-fuel for cofiring and reburning in utility and industrial boilers. The E-fuel is produced from MSW by the patented EnerTech's slurry carbonization process. The slurry carbonization technology economically converts MSW to a uniform, low-ash, low-sulfur, and essentially chlorine-free fuel with energy content of about 14,800 Btu/lb.

V. Zamansky; P. Maly; M. Klosky

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

317

Bioconversion of Secondary Fiber Fines to Ethanol Using Counter-Current Enzymatic Saccharification and Co-Fermentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research examined several enzymatic and microbial process for the conversion of waste cellulosic fibers into ethanol. The first was a one-stage process in which pulp fines were contacted with commercial enzyme solutions. The second process used sequential, multistage saccharification. The third used sequential enzyme addition in a countercurrent mode. Experiments compared the results with various feedstocks, different commercial enzymes, supplementation with b-glucosidase, and saccharification combined with fermentation. The highest saccharification (65%) from a 4% consistency pulp and the highest sugar concentration (5.4%) from an 8% consistency pulp were attained when 5 FPU/g plus 10 IU/g of b-glucosidase were used.

Ethanol Using; Counter-current Enzymatic; Thomas W. Jeffries; Richard Schartman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications: Subtask 3.3 - dewatering studies  

SciTech Connect

If successful, the novel Hydrophobic Dewatering (HD) process being developed in this project will be capable of efficiently removing moisture from fine coal without the expense and other related drawbacks associated with mechanical dewatering or thermal drying. In the HD process, a hydrophobic substance is added to a coal-water slurry to displace water from the surface of coal, while the spent hydrophobic substance is recovered for recycling. For this process to have commercialization potential, the amount of butane lost during the process must be small. Earlier testing revealed the ability of the hydrophobic dewatering process to reduce the moisture content of fine coal to a very low amount as well as the determination of potential butane losses by the adsorption of butane onto the coal surface. Work performed in this quarter showed that the state of oxidation affects the amount of butane adsorbed onto the surface of the coal and also affects the final moisture content. the remaining work will involve a preliminary flowsheet of a continuous bench-scale unit and a review of the economics of the system. 1 tab.

Yoon, R.H., Phillips, D.I., Sohn, S.M., Luttrell, G.H. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Center for Coal and Mineral Processing, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Measurement and capture of fine and ultrafine particles from a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor with an electrostatic precipitator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out in a pilot-scale pulverized coal combustor at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) were used to measure the particle size distributions (PSDs) in the range of 17 nm to 10 m at the inlet and outlet of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). At the ESP inlet, a high number concentration of ultrafine particles was found, with the peak at approximately 75 nm. A trimodal PSD for mass concentration was observed with the modes at approximately 80-100 nm, 1-2 {mu}m, and 10 {mu}m. The penetration of ultrafine particles through the ESP increased dramatically as particle size decreased below 70 nm, attributable to insufficient or partial charging of the ultrafine particles. Injection of nanostructured fine-particle sorbents for capture of toxic metals in the flue gas caused high penetration of the ultrafine particles through the ESP. The conventional ESP was modified to enhance charging using soft X-ray irradiation. A slipstream of flue gas was introduced from the pilot-scale facility and passed through this modified ESP. Enhancement of particle capture was observed with the soft X-ray irradiation when moderate voltages were used in the ESP, indicating more efficient charging of fine particles. 32 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Ying Li; Achariya Suriyawong; Michael Daukoru; Ye Zhuang; Pratim Biswas [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States). Aerosol and Air Quality Research Laboratory

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report, September 19, 1988--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R&D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A study of immobilization of four heavy metals by solidification/stabilization with portland cement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two sites were established in Harris County, Texas, to relate seasonal saturation to soil morphology, micromorphology, soil reduction potential (Eh), and iron phases; and to test a,a'-dipyridyl dye for field identification of iron-reduction. The Wockley soil is a Plinthic Paleudalf and the Katy soil is an Aquic Paleudalf. Both soils have shallow fine sandy loam surface soils, and clay loam subsoils, overlying buried clayey soils. Field evidence of saturation consisted of low-chroma soil colors, mottling, and iron and manganese segregations. Ironstone nodules are plentiful in upper Bt horizons of the Wockley soil, and plinthite occurs. The Katy soil has distinct sand-silt coats on ped faces of Btg horizons. Micromorphology shows iron being actively reduced in the upper profiles of both soils, through destruction of nodules, the presence of cuffent pore and void linings; and some fine soft agglomerations in the Katy soil. Some iron nodules are not being reduced, having sharp boundaries to the matrix, or clay coatings or plugs covering the nodules. Active and inactive features can occur in the same horizons. Pore and void linings were the most indicative field characteristics of saturation in the Wockley soil, while the sand-silt coats on ped faces were convincing evidence of saturation and reduction in the Katy soil. Micromorphology showed that field evidence in these soils must be interpreted cautiously. The incidence of high rainfalls over the study period exceeded the expected probabilities, implying that rare high rainfall events or sequences of events promote saturation and reduction, but continuing high rainfalls suggest that climatic probabilities need to be more thoroughly documented. Manganese was reduced when soils were at or above field capacity. Iron reduction could not be checked when the Wockley soil was saturated. The E horizon of the Katy soil seems prone to reduction of iron when water tables are present. Poorly crystalline free iron was very low in both soils. Highly crystalline free iron was more prevalent in high-chroma segments of the soils. The cl,a'-dipyridyl dye could not be fully tested; however it did not give false positive readings.

Trussell, Susan A

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Design and producing of fine-group cross section library HENDL3.0/FG for subcritical system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To improve the accuracy of the neutron analyses for subcritical system with thermal fission blanket, a coupled neutron and photon (315 n + 42{gamma}) fine-group cross section library HENDL3.0/FG based on ENDF/B-VII, JEFF3.1 and JENDL3.3 was produced by FDS team. In order to test the availability and reliability of the HENDL3.0/FG data library, shielding and critical safety benchmarks were performed with VisualBUS code. The testing results indicated that the discrepancy between calculation and experimental values of nuclear parameters fell in a reasonable range. It showed that the nuclear data library had accuracy and availability. (authors)

Zou, J.; Zeng, Q.; Xu, D.; Hu, L.; Long, P. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Univ. of Science and Technology of China, No.350 Shushanhu Road, Shushan District, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Cobra-IE Evaluation by Simulation of the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Test (BFBT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The COBRA-IE computer code is a thermal-hydraulic subchannel analysis program capable of simulating phenomena present in both PWRs and BWRs. As part of ongoing COBRA-IE assessment efforts, the code has been evaluated against experimental data from the NUPEC BWR Full-Size Fine-Mesh Bundle Tests (BFBT). The BFBT experiments utilized an 8 x 8 rod bundle to simulate BWR operating conditions and power profiles, providing an excellent database for investigation of the capabilities of the code. Benchmarks performed included steady-state and transient void distribution, single-phase and two-phase pressure drop, and steady-state and transient critical power measurements. COBRA-IE effectively captured the trends seen in the experimental data with acceptable prediction error. Future sensitivity studies are planned to investigate the effects of enabling and/or modifying optional code models dealing with void drift, turbulent mixing, rewetting, and CHF.

Burns, C. J. and Aumiler, D. L.

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

324

CT-Guided Percutaneous Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Inferior Vena Cava Wall: A Posterior Coaxial Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 72-year-old man was referred to our department with an incidentally diagnosed bronchogenic carcinoma of the right upper lobe. Positron emission tomography (PET) combined with computed tomography (PET-CT) revealed an unexpected hot spot in the ventral wall of the infrarenal segment of the inferior vena cava (IVC). Diagnostic biopsy of this lesion was performed under CT guidance with semiautomated 20G fine-needle aspiration (FNA) through a 19G coaxial needle. Cytology revealed few carcinoma cells, which led to the remarkable diagnosis of a distant metastasis to the IVC wall. Both the immediate postinterventional CT control and the further surveillance period of the patient were unremarkable; in particular, no signs of bleeding complications were detected. We conclude that coaxial FNA of an IVC wall lesion is technically feasible and may even help diagnose distant metastasis.

Kos, Sebastian, E-mail: skos@gmx.de; Bilecen, Deniz [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology (Switzerland); Baumhoer, Daniel [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Pathology (Switzerland); Guillaume, Nicolas [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Jacob, Augustinus L. [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology (Switzerland)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology  

SciTech Connect

X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

Lezama-pacheco, Juan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Conradson, Steven D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clark, David L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Improvement of storage, handling, and transportability of fine coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Mulled Coal process was developed as a means of overcoming the adverse handling characteristics of wet fine coal without thermal drying. The process involves the addition of a low cost harmless reagent to wet fine coal using off-the-shelf mixing equipment. Based on laboratory- and bench-scale testing, Mulled Coal can be stored, shipped, and burned without causing any of the plugging, pasting, carryback and freezing problems normally associated with wet coal. The objectives of this project are to demonstrate that: The Mulled Coal process, which has been proven to work on a wide range of wet fine coals at bench scale, will work equally well in a commercial coal preparation plant. The wet product from a fine coal cleaning circuit can be converted to a solid fuel form for ease of handling and cost savings in storage and rail car transportation. A wet fine coal product thus converted to a solid fuel form can be stored, shipped, and burned with conventional fuel handling, transportation, and combustion systems. The Mulled Coal circuit was installed in an empty bay at the Chetopa Preparation Plant. Equipment has been installed to divert a 2.7 tonnes/hr (3 tons/hr) slipstream of the froth concentrate to a dewatering centrifuge. The concentrated wet coal fines from the centrifuge dropped through a chute directly into a surge hopper and feed system for the Mulled Coal circuit. The Mulled Coal product was gravity discharged from the circuit to a truck or product discharge area from which it will be hauled to a stockpile located at the edge of the clean coal stockpile area. During the 3-month operating period, the facility produced 870 tonnes (966 tons) of the Muffed Coal for evaluation in various storage, handling, and transportation equipment and operations. Immediately following the production demonstration, the circuit was disassembled and the facility was decommissioned.

1996-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

Using fine-scale fuel measurements to assess wildland fuels, potential fire behavior and hazard mitigation treatments in the southeastern USA.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inherent spatial and temporal heterogeneity of fuelbeds in forests of the southeastern United States may require fine scale fuel measurements for providing reliable fire hazard and fuel treatment effectiveness estimates. In a series of five papers, an intensive, fine scale fuel inventory from the Savanna River Site in the southeastern United States is used for building fuelbeds and mapping fire behavior potential, evaluating fuel treatment options for effectiveness, and providing a comparative analysis of landscape modeled fire behavior using three different data sources including the Fuel Characteristic Classification System, LANDFIRE, and the Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment. The research demonstrates that fine scale fuel measurements associated with fuel inventories repeated over time can be used to assess broad scale wildland fire potential and hazard mitigation treatment effectiveness in the southeastern USA and similar fire prone regions. Additional investigations will be needed to modify and improve these processes and capture the true potential of these fine scale data sets for fire and fuel management planning.

Ottmar, Roger, D.; Blake, John, I.; Crolly, William, T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning for Premium Fuel Applications: Task 9 - Selective agglomeration Module Testing and Evaluation.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this project was the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing of both processes on six coals to optimize the processes, followed by the design, construction, and operation of a 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). The project began in October, 1992, and is scheduled for completion by September 1997. This report summarizes the findings of all the selective agglomeration (SA) test work performed with emphasis on the results of the PDU SA Module testing. Two light hydrocarbons, heptane and pentane, were tested as agglomerants in the laboratory research program which investigated two reactor design concepts: a conventional two-stage agglomeration circuit and a unitized reactor that combined the high- and low-shear operations in one vessel. The results were used to design and build a 25 lb/hr bench-scale unit with two-stage agglomeration. The unit also included a steam stripping and condensation circuit for recovery and recycle of heptane. It was tested on six coals to determine the optimum grind and other process conditions that resulted in the recovery of about 99% of the energy while producing low ash (1-2 lb/MBtu) products. The fineness of the grind was the most important variable with the D80 (80% passing size) varying in the 12 to 68 micron range. All the clean coals could be formulated into coal-water-slurry-fuels with acceptable properties. The bench-scale results were used for the conceptual and detailed design of the PDU SA Module which was integrated with the existing grinding and dewatering circuits. The PDU was operated for about 9 months. During the first three months, the shakedown testing was performed to fine tune the operation and control of various equipment. This was followed by parametric testing, optimization/confirmatory testing, and finally a 72-hour round the clock production run for each of the three project coals (Hiawatha, Taggart, and Indiana VII). The parametric testing results confirmed that the Taggart coal ground to a D80 of 30 microns could be cleaned to 1 lb ash/MBtu, whereas the Hiawatha and Indiana Vil coals had to be ground to D80s of 40 and 20 microns, respectively, to be cleaned to 2 lb ash/MBtu. The percent solids, residence time, shear intensity (impeller tip speed and energy input per unit volume), and heptane dosage were the main variables that affected successful operation (phase inversion or microagglomerate formation in the high-shear reactor and their growth to 2-3 mm in size during low shear). Downward inclination of the vibrating screen and adequate spray water helped produce the low ash products. Btu recoveries were consistently greater than 98%. Two-stage steam stripping achieved about 99% heptane recovery for recycle to the process. Residual hydrocarbon concentrations were in the 3000 to 5000 ppm range on a dry solids basis.

Moro, N.` Jha, M.C.

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

329

Extended electron energy loss fine structure simulation of the local boron environment in sodium aluminoborosilicate glasses containing gadolinium  

SciTech Connect

Gadolinium can be dissolved in sodium-alumino-borosilicate glasses up to 47 wt% in a baseline borosilicate glass (mol%) 20 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 60 SiO2,and 20 Na2O. Understanding of Gd dissolution in borosilicate melts is important in glass formulation optimization. Electron energy loss fine structure (ELFS) spectroscopy is chosen, which provides well resolved local atomic structure information for both amorphous and crystalline materials with high sensitivity to low Z elements such as Al, B, Na, O, and Si where the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique faces experimental difficulty. In this study, we report our results of boron K-edge ELFS study. Two borosilicate glass samples with 30 and 47 mass% Gd2O3, B20Gd30 and B20Gd47were chosen for B K-edge ELFS study. EEL spectra were acquired on a Philips 430 TEM equipped with Gatan PEELS system 666 and EL/P 2.1 software with Custom function AcqLong. The ELFS data analysis was performed using UWELFS, UWXAFS and FEFF software. From our Gd solubility study, the local structure of Gd in the borate environment possibly resembles double chain structure found in crystalline Gd(BO2)3 as proposed by Chakraborty et al. The B/Gd ratio's in both glasses are smaller then 3, which means the excess Gd atoms in the Si-sites would be 17 and 60 mol% of the total Gd atoms, respectively according to the model, yet the local environment of borate sites saturated with Gd should be remained. To verity above hypothesis, the double chain structure model was applied to fit boron K-edge. The model was shown to well fit experimental boron K-edge EELS spectra for both glasses with some degree of distance distortion which is understandable in amorphous structure. Therefore, it is very likely that Gd stabilized in borate sites has a local structure resembling the double chain Gd(BO2)3 structure as proposed by our solubility study and literature.

Qian, Morris (Charles Evans & Associates) [Charles Evans & Associates; Li, Hong (PPG Industries, Inc) [PPG Industries, Inc; Li, Liyu (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB); Strachan, Denis M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. One plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through -200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace win be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. The burning profile of the plant coal and the three blends was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Results indicated slower burning of the blends due to low volatile matter and oxidized coal particles. Ash fusing temperatures of the samples were determined using ASTM procedure. Preliminary combustion evaluation of the samples (100% plant coal, 80% plant coal/20% recovered coal fines) indicated that the flame was stable at 100,000-200,000 Btu/hr firing rate. Carbon conversion efficiency of 85 to 90% was recorded using the Ash Tracer technique. Tests are continuing to determine the operating boundaries for these blends while measuring the emissions of SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, CO and O{sub 2}, maintaining a stable flame.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program was to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples were prepared as 100% plant coal, 90% plant coal/10% fines, 85% plant coal/15% fines, and 80% plant coal /20% fines with a particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. The plant coal and recovered coal fines were obtained from the Randolph Preparation Plant of Peabody Coal Co., Marissa, IL. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace was used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace was used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. The burning profile of the plant coal and the three blends was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Results indicated slower burning of the blends due to low volatile matter and oxidized coal particles. Combustion emissions of these samples were determined in the down-fired combustor, while relative ignition temperatures were determined in the drop tube furnace. Chemical composition of ashes were analyzed to establish a correlation with their respective ash fusion temperatures. Overall study of these samples suggested that the blended samples had combustion properties similar to the original plant coal. In other words, flames were stable under identical firing rates of approximately 200,000 Btu`s/hr and 25% excess air. CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub x}, were similar to each other and within the experimental error. Combustion efficiency of 99{sup +}% was achievable. Ash chemical analysis of each sample revealed that slagging and fouling should not be different from each other.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fnr (EtrA) acts as a fine-tuning regulator of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EtrA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model organism for study of adaptation to varied redox niches, shares 73.6% and 50.8% amino acid sequence identity with the oxygen-sensing regulators Fnr in E. coli and Anr in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively; however, its regulatory role of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella spp. is not well understood. The expression of the nap genes, nrfA, cymA and hcp was significantly reduced in etrA deletion mutant EtrA7-1; however, limited anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction occurred, suggesting that multiple regulators control nitrate reduction in this strain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and fumarate reductase gene expression was down regulated at least 2-fold and the EtrA7-1 mutant grew poorly with fumarate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), suggesting both respiratory pathways are under EtrA control. Transcript analysis further suggested a role of EtrA in prophage activation and down regulation of genes implicated in aerobic metabolism. In contrast to previous studies that attributed a minor regulatory role to EtrA in Shewanella spp., this study demonstrates that EtrA acts as a global transcriptional regulator and confers physiological advantages to strain MR-1 under certain growth conditions. In conjunction with other regulators, EtrA fine-tunes the expression of genes involved in anaerobic metabolism in S. oneidensis strain MR-1.

Cruz-Garza, Claribel; Murray, Alison E.; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; McCue, Lee Ann; Romine, Margaret F.; Loffler, F. E.; Tiedje, James M.

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

FINE PARTICAL AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and pulverized coal. The objective was to determine potential tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} mitigation through using a CO{sub 2} neutral fuel, such as municipal sewage sludge, and the emergence of other potential problems such as the emission of toxic fly ash particles. The work led to new insight into mechanisms governing the partitioning of major and trace metals from the combustion of sewage sludge, and mixtures of coal and sewage sludge. The research also showed that the co-combustion of coal and sewage sludge emitted fine particulate matter that might potentially cause greater lung injury than that from the combustion of either coal alone or municipal sewage sludge alone. The reason appeared to be that the toxicity measured required the presence of large amounts of both zinc and sulfur in particles that were inhaled. MSS provided the zinc while coal provided the sulfur. Additional research showed that the toxic effects could most likely be engineered out of the process, through the introduction of kaolinite sorbent downstream of the combustion zone, or removing the sulfur from the fuel. These results are consequences of applying ''Health Effects Engineering'' to this issue. Health Effects Engineering is a new discipline arising out of this work, and is derived from using a collaboration of combustion engineers and toxicologists to mitigate the potentially bad health effects from combustion of this biomass fuel.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Wayne S. Seames; Art Fernandez

2003-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fine uniform filament superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multifilamentary superconductor composite having a high fill factor is formed from a plurality of stacked monofilament precursor elements, each of which includes a low density superconductor precursor monofilament. The precursor elements all have substantially the same dimensions and characteristics, and are stacked in a rectilinear configuration and consolidated to provide a multifilamentary precursor composite. The composite is thereafter thermomechanically processed to provide a superconductor composite in which each monofilament is less than about 50 microns thick.

Riley, Jr., Gilbert N. (Marlborough, MA); Li, Qi (Marlborough, MA); Roberts, Peter R. (Groton, MA); Antaya, Peter D. (Sutton, MA); Seuntjens, Jeffrey M. (Singapore, SG); Hancock, Steven (Worcester, MA); DeMoranville, Kenneth L. (Jefferson, MA); Christopherson, Craig J. (Worcester, MA); Garrant, Jennifer H. (Natick, MA); Craven, Christopher A. (Bedford, MA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

FINE GRAIN NUCLEAR EMULSION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing nuclear track emulsions having mean grain sizes less than 0.1 microns is described. The method comprises adding silver nitrate to potassium bromide at a rate at which there is always a constant, critical excess of silver ions. For minimum size grains, the silver ion concentration is maintained at the critical level of about pAg 2.0 to 5.0 during prectpitation, pAg being defined as the negative logarithm of the silver ion concentration. It is preferred to eliminate the excess silver at the conclusion of the precipitation steps. The emulsion is processed by methods in all other respects generally similar to the methods of the prior art. (AEC)

Oliver, A.J.

1962-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

336

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter, including for the first time particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers ({micro}m) referred to as PM2.5. PM2.5 in the atmosphere also contributes to reduced atmospheric visibility, which is the subject of existing rules for siting emission sources near Class 1 areas and new Regional Haze rules. There are few existing data regarding emissions and characteristics of fine aerosols from oil, gas and power generation industry combustion sources, and the information that is available is generally outdated and incomplete. Traditional stationary source air emission sampling methods tend to underestimate or overestimate the contribution of the source to ambient aerosols because they do not properly account for primary aerosol formation, which occurs after the gases leave the stack. Primary aerosol includes both filterable particles that are solid or liquid aerosols at stack temperature plus those that form as the stack gases cool through mixing and dilution processes in the plume downwind of the source. These deficiencies in the current methods can have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making. PM2.5 measurement issues were extensively reviewed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) (England et al., 1998), and it was concluded that dilution sampling techniques are more appropriate for obtaining a representative particulate matter sample from combustion systems for determining PM2.5 emission rate and chemical speciation. Dilution sampling is intended to collect aerosols including those that condense and/or react to form solid or liquid aerosols as the exhaust plume mixes and cools to near-ambient temperature immediately after the stack discharge. These techniques have been widely used in recent research studies. For example, Hildemann et al. (1994) and McDonald et al. (1998) used filtered ambient air to dilute the stack gas sample followed by 80-90 seconds residence time to allow aerosol formation and growth to stabilize prior to sample collection and analysis. More accurate and complete emissions data generated using the methods developed in this program will enable more accurate source-receptor and source apportionment analysis for PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) implementation and streamline the environmental assessment of oil, gas and power production facilities. The overall goals of this program were to: (1) Develop improved dilution sampling technology and test methods for PM2.5 mass emissions and speciation measurements, and compare results obtained with dilution and traditional stationary source sampling methods. (2) Develop emission factors and speciation profiles for emissions of fine particulate matter, especially organic aerosols, for use in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses. (3) Identify and characterize PM2.5 precursor compound emissions that can be used in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses.

Glenn C. England

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

Cosmological Variation of the Fine Structure Constant from an Ultra-Light Scalar Field: The Effects of Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmological variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ due to the evolution of a spatially homogeneous ultra-light scalar field ($m \\sim H_0$) during the matter and $\\Lambda$ dominated eras is analyzed. Agreement of $\\Delta \\alpha/\\alpha$ with the value suggested by recent observations of quasar absorption lines is obtained by adjusting a single parameter, the coupling of the scalar field to matter. Asymptotically $\\alpha(t)$ in this model goes to a constant value $\\bar{\\alpha} \\approx \\alpha_0$ in the early radiation and the late $\\Lambda$ dominated eras. The coupling of the scalar field to (nonrelativistic) matter drives $\\alpha$ slightly away from $\\bar{\\alpha}$ in the epochs when the density of matter is important. Simultaneous agreement with the more restrictive bounds on the variation $|\\Delta \\alpha/\\alpha|$ from the Oklo natural fission reactor and from meteorite samples can be achieved if the mass of the scalar field is on the order of 0.5--0.6 $H_\\Lambda$, where $H_\\Lambda = \\Omega_\\Lambda^{1/2} H_0$. Depending on the scalar field mass, $\\alpha$ may be slightly smaller or larger than $\\alpha_0$ at the times of big bang nucleosynthesis, the emission of the cosmic microwave background, the formation of early solar system meteorites, and the Oklo reactor. The effects on the evolution of $\\alpha$ due to nonzero mass for the scalar field are emphasized. An order of magnitude improvement in the laboratory technique could lead to a detection of $(\\dot{\\alpha}/\\alpha)_0$.

Carl L. Gardner

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Arsenic, and Fine Particulate Matter From Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kevin crist Kevin crist Principal Investigator Ohio University Research and Technology Center Athens, OH 45701 740-593-4751 cristk@ohiou.edu Environmental and Water Resources Evaluation of thE Emission, transport, and dEposition of mErcury, arsEnic, and finE particulatE mattEr from coal-BasEd powEr plants in thE ohio rivEr vallEy rEgion Background The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established an aggressive research initiative to address the technical and scientific issues surrounding the impact of coal-based power systems on ambient levels of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ), nitrogen oxides (NO X ), mercury/air toxics, and acid gases. Regulatory drivers such as the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the 1997 revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards, and the 2005 Clean Air

339

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulate bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the twelfth quarter, July 1--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal. Five different coal samples were used in the column flotation test program. They are Mammoth, Lower Kittanning, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Illinois No. 6 seam coals, which correspond to anthracite-, low volatile-, medium volatile-, and high volatile-seam coals, respectively. In this quarterly report, the test results for the Upper Freeport seam coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal are reported.

Peng, F.F. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Mineral Processing Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies - froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 24, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Stone Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

United States, New York, Limestone, Sandy Hill, 8RA6, 26828, y, Front Face (South), Dscf0268_6.jpg. No 8RA6 is: Description. dark gray. fine grain. ...

342

Program on Technology Innovation: Liquid Precursor High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spray Process for Making Fine Structured and Highly Bonded Alloy Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray processes are used in applications requiring the highest density and adhesion strength, which is not achievable in most other thermal spray processes. Like other thermal spray processes, however, a normal HVOF process is not able to apply fine powders less than 10m via a conventional powder feeder like other thermal spray processes. The advantages of using smaller nano-sized particles in a HVOF process include uniform coating, uniform microstructure, higher ...

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Phase stability and grain growth in an Ag/Bi-2223 composite conductor prepared using fine-grained Bi-2223 as a precursor.  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the stability and microstructural transformability of the Bi-2223 phase in a silver-sheathed monofilament composite tape fabricated using fine-grained Bi{sub 1.7}Pb{sub 0.3}Sr{sub 1.9}Ca{sub 2.0}-Cu{sub 3.0}O{sub y} (Bi-2223) as the precursor powder. The fully formed Bi-2223 precursor was prepared using established procedures. The purpose of this study was to explore the prospects for growing textured, large-grain-size Bi-2223 from the fine-grained precursor by process parameter perturbations. These perturbations included thermal ramp up variations, programmed heat treatment temperature and oxygen pressure fluctuations, and parameter manipulations during cool-down. Our results show that the types of heat treatments used in conventional oxide-powder-in-tube (OPIT) processing do not facilitate Bi-2223 grain growth when the precursor powder is preconcerted Bi-2223. We also observed that the Bi-2223 partially. decomposed during conventional thermal ramp-up in 0.075 atm O{sub 2}, but that this decomposition can be inhibited by ramping up in a reduced oxygen pressure. A pathway was found for back-reacting the fine-grained Bi-2223 (to Bi-2212, Bi-2201 and nonsuperconducting secondary phases), then reforming large-grained Bi-2223 in a colony microstructure having some distinct differences from that produced during conventional OPIT processing.

Merchant, N. N.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sandy Springs, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs, Georgia: Energy Resources Springs, Georgia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9242688°, -84.3785379° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9242688,"lon":-84.3785379,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

Sandy Ridge, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8147805°, -78.2355696° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8147805,"lon":-78.2355696,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

346

Sandy Valley, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5.8169191°, -115.6322283° 5.8169191°, -115.6322283° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8169191,"lon":-115.6322283,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

Sandy Hook, Connecticut: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hook, Connecticut: Energy Resources Hook, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4200956°, -73.2820608° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4200956,"lon":-73.2820608,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

348

After Sandy, Rebuilding Smarter with Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

called for in the President's Climate Action Plan. Challenging Innovators to Design New Disaster-Response Solutions In August, the White House Office of Science and Technology...

349

Hurricane Sandy One Year Later: Rebuilding Stronger, More Resilient...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

those communities today, it is valuable to assess the lessons learned from this natural disaster so that we can rebuild stronger, more resilient communities that are better...

350

Sandy Beaver Teaching Professorships updated 11/28/11  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. Simmons 1988 John Crawford, Jr. Spencer F. Eccles Tom C. Korologos Dorothy Snow 1989 Bruce L Spencer Williams 1963 Grant Johannesen V. Fae Thomas Wallace Stegner G. Stanley McAllister 1964 Homer R W. Burt Robert L. Chambers Bryon A. Hunter #12;1979 Bernard P. Brockbank R. Adams Cowley, M

Arnold, Jonathan

351

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Sandy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

352

Modeling the dynamics and depositional patterns of sandy rivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis seeks to advance our understanding of the dynamic nature, spatial organization and depositional record of topography in sand-bedded rivers. I examine patterns and processes over a wide range of scales, on Earth ...

Jerolmack, Douglas J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Google Crisis Map for Hurricane Sandy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams U.S. Hydropower Potential from Existing Non-powered Dams Creating an Energy Innovation Ecosystem Creating an Energy...

354

Google Crisis Map for Hurricane Sandy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Facilities Department of Energy Facilities Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects 2009 Energy Expenditure Per Person 2009 Energy...

355

Google Crisis Map for Hurricane Sandy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerating Offshore Wind Development Accelerating Offshore Wind Development Concentrating Solar Power Facilities Concentrating Solar Power Facilities ARPA-e OPEN 2012 Projects...

356

January 15, 2003 CONSTRUCTION STANDARD SPECIFICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or other acceptable material. Provide lumber dressed on at least two (2) edges and one (1) side for tight with sand plates or horizontal runners if base material will not adequately support chair legs. 03300-8 CAST. Fine Aggregate: Clean, sharp, natural sand free from loam, clay lumps or other deleterious substances

357

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated bubble flotation of fine coal using 3-in. ID flotation column. Technical progress report for the eleventh quarter, April 1--June 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are four modes of the collector dispersion techniques. They are (1) direct liquid additions and stirring, (2) ultrasonic energy collector dispersion, (3) atomized collector dispersion, and (4) gasified collector transported in air stream. Among those collector dispersion techniques, the technique using the gasified collector transported in air phase can be used to enhance the flotation performance with substantial reduction in collector usage and selectivity, compared to the flotation using direct liquid addition (and mechanical agitation) technique. In this phase of study, two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. The 1-in. ID flotation column was used to scale-up to 3-in. ID flotation column. The initial starting point to operate the 3-in ID flotation column were determined using both 1-in. and 3-in. flotation columns based on the three phases of work plans and experiment design. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal.

Peng, F.F.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nuclear quantum effects in the structure and lineshapes of the N{sub 2} near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectrum  

SciTech Connect

We study the relative ability of several models of x-ray absorption spectra to capture the Franck-Condon structure apparent from an experiment on gaseous nitrogen. In doing so, we adopt the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and a constrained density functional theory method for computing the energies of the x-ray-excited molecule. Starting from an otherwise classical model for the spectrum, we systematically introduce more realistic physics, first by substituting the quantum mechanical nuclear radial density in the bond separation R for the classical radial density, then by adding the effect of zero-point energy and other level shifts, and finally by including explicit rovibrational quantization of both the ground and excited states. The quantization is determined exactly, using a discrete variable representation (DVR). We show that the near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectrum can be predicted semiquantitatively within this framework. We also address the possibility of non-trivial temperature dependence in the spectrum. By using constrained density functional theory in combination with more accurate potentials, we demonstrate that it is possible to improve the predicted spectrum. Ultimately, we establish the predictive limits of our method with respect to vibrational fine structure in NEXAFS spectra.

Fatehi, Shervin; Schwartz, Craig P.; Saykally, Richard J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Prendergast, David [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Searching for variations in the fine-structure constant and the proton-to-electron mass ratio using quasar absorption lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abridged) Quasar absorption lines provide a precise test of the assumed constancy of the fundamental constants of physics. We have investigated potential changes in the fine-structure constant, alpha, and the proton-to-electron mass ratio, mu. The many-multiplet method allows one to use optical fine-structure transitions to constrain (Delta alpha)/alpha at better than the 10^(-5) level. We present a new analysis of 154 quasar absorbers with 0.2 1.6 sub-samples independently yield consistent estimates of the dipole direction, which suggests that the effect is not caused by telescope systematics. We consider a number of systematic effects and show that they are unable to explain the observed dipole effect. We have used spectra of the quasars Q0405-443, Q0347-383 and Q0528-250 from VLT/UVES to investigate the absorbers at z=2.595, 3.025 and 2.811 in these spectra respectively. We find that (Delta mu)/mu=(10.1 +/- 6.6) x 10^(-6), (8.2 +/- 7.5) x 10^(-6) and (-1.4 +/- 3.9) x 10^(-6) in these absorbers respectivel...

King, Julian A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Calcination and solid state reaction of ceramic-forming components to provide single-phase ceramic product having fine particle size  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention consists of an improved method for the preparation of single phase, fine grained ceramic materials from precursor powder mixtures where at least one of the components of the mixture is an alkali earth carbonate. The process consists of heating the precursor powders in a partial vacuum under flowing oxygen and under conditions where the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} evolved during the calcination is kept to a very low level relative to the oxygen. The process has been found particularly suitable for the preparation of high temperature copper oxide superconducting materials such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} ``123`` and YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8} ``124``.

Balachandran, U.; Poeppel, R.B.; Emerson, J.E.; Johnson, S.A.

1990-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Pilot Demonstration of Technology for the Production of High Value Materials from the Ultra-Fine (PM2.5) Fraction of Coal Combustion Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of recovering a very fine fraction of fly ash, that is 5 microns in diameter or less and examining the characteristics of these materials in new or at least less traditional applications. These applications included as a polymer filler or as a 'super' pozzolanic concrete additive. As part of the effort the ash from 6 power plants was investigated and characterized. This work included collection from ESP Hoppers and ponds. The ash was thoroughly characterized chemically and physically. Froth flotation was used to reduce the carbon and testing showed that flotation could effectively reduce carbon to acceptable levels (i.e. 0.5% LOI) for most of the substrates tested. in order to enable eventual use as fillers. Hydraulic classification was used in the separation of the fine ash from the coarse ash. Hydraulic classification requires the ash to be dispersed to be effective and a range of dispersants were tested for adsorption as well as sedimentation rate. A wide range of dosages were required (0.3 to 10 g/kg). In general the ponded ash required less dispersant. A model was developed for hydraulic classification. A pilot-scale hydraulic classifier was also designed and operated for the project. Product yields of up to 21% of feed solids were achieved with recoveries of <5 {micro}m particles as high as 64%. Mean particle sizes (D{sub 50}) of the ultra fine ash (UFA) products varied from 3.7 to 10 {micro}m. A patent was filed on the classifier design. A conceptual design of a Process Demonstration Unit (PDU) with a feed rate of 2 tons of raw ash feed per hour was also completed. Pozzolanic activity was determined for the UFA ashes in mortars. In general the overall strength index was excellent with values of 90% achieved in 3 days and {approx}100% in 7 days. Three types of thermoplastic polymers were evaluated with the UFA as a filler: high density polyethylene, thermoplastic elastomer and polyethylene terphthalate filled polymers were prepared and subjected to SEM analysis to verify that the UFA was well dispersed. The addition of fillers increased the modulus of the HDPE composite, but decreased both the offset yield stress and offset yield strain, showing that the fillers essentially made the composite stiffer but the transition to plastic deformation occurred earlier in filled HDPE as stress was applied. Similar results were obtained with TPE, however, the decrease in either stress or strain at offset yield were not as significant. Dynamic mechanical analyses (DMA) were also completed and showed that although there were some alterations in the properties of the HDPE and TPE, the alterations are small, and more importantly, transition temperatures are not altered. The UFA materials were also tested in expanded urethanes, were improvements were made in the composites strength and stiffness, particularly for lighter weight materials. The results of limited flammability and fire safety testing were encouraging. A flowsheet was developed to produce an Ultra-Fine Ash (UFA) product from reclaimed coal-fired utility pond ash. The flowsheet is for an entry level product development scenario and additional production can be accommodated by increasing operating hours and/or installing replicate circuits. Unit process design was based on experimental results obtained throughout the project and cost estimates were derived from single vendor quotes. The installation cost of this plant is estimated to be $2.1M.

T. L. Robl; J. G. Groppo; R. Rathbone; B. Marrs; R. Jewell

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

362

Short-range atomic structure of 1 wt. % Ga [delta]-stabilized plutonium by x-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) spectroscopy we have determined the radii of the first three atomic shells around Ga and the first Pu shell in a fcc Pu alloy stabilized by 1 wt. % Ga. We find the Ga to be substitutional in the fcc lattice, with the first and second shells contracted by 3.7 and 0.9%, respectively, relative to distances expected from the lattice constant derived from x-ray diffraction. The lattice is well ordered around Ga, but there is considerable static disorder in all observed coordination shells of Pu. We discuss these results in relation to the mechanism by which Ga effects phase stabilization.

Cox, L.E.; Martinez, R. (Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Nickel, J.H.; Conradson, S.D.; Allen, P.G. (Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Particle Formation from Pulsed Laser Irradiation of SootAggregates studied with scanning mobility particle sizer, transmissionelectron microscope and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the physical and chemical changes induced in soot aggregates exposed to laser radiation using a scanning mobility particle sizer, a transmission electron microscope, and a scanning transmission x-ray microscope to perform near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Laser-induced nanoparticle production was observed at fluences above 0.12 J/cm(2) at 532 nm and 0.22 J/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Our results indicate that new particle formation proceeds via (1) vaporization of small carbon clusters by thermal or photolytic mechanisms, followed by homogeneous nucleation, (2) heterogeneous nucleation of vaporized carbon clusters onto material ablated from primary particles, or (3) both processes.

Michelsen, Hope A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; vanPoppel, Laura H.; Dansson, Mark A.; Buseck, Peter R.; Buseck, Peter R.

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Al K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) study on the coordination structure of aluminum in minerals and Y zeolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Curved-wave-multiple-scattering cluster calculations with the FEFF6 code were used to interpret experimental AlK-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of various minerals and Y zeolites for energies {approximately}15 eV above threshold. Octahedral, tetrahedral, and square planar geometries of Al can be easily distinguished from each other utilizing characteristic features in the NEXAFS data. NEXAFS line shapes are used for determining the geometrical conformations of Al atoms in Y zeolites with one or more conformational geometries. In the H-Y zeolite, separate contributions to the NEXAFS from tetrahedrally and octahedrally coordinated Al atoms are identified. The differences in the octahedrally coordinated Al spectra in the H-Y zeolite compared with spectra for standard octahedrally coordinated Al compounds can be attributed to the presence of very small nonregular clusters of octahedrally coordinated Al dispersed over the zeolite. However, the presence of some pentacoordinated Al cannot be excluded.

Bokhoven, J.A. van; Sambe, H.; Ramaker, D.E. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Chemistry Dept.; Koningsberger, D.C. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

365

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales oil dedusting. Subtask 3.4, Electroseparation of fines from shale oil  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report on ``Shale Oil Dedusting`` presents the results of a research program conducted by the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT, Chicago) to determine the suitability and effectiveness of the lamella electrosettler -- a novel solid-liquid separation device -- for removing fine shale particles from shale oil via the application of an electric field. The work was conducted by IIT from November 1989 through December 1990 as a subcontractor to the Institute of Gas Technology. The overall objective of the larger program was to develop the ``Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for EasternOil Shales.`` The subtask undertaken by IIT was part of a larger task entitled ``Testing of Process Improvement Concepts.`` The lamella electrosettler has been shown to be an effective method for separating fine particulate (including colloidal) matter from a liquid using the application of an electric field. Using the walls of the settler as electrodes and during continuous operation, solids migrate preferentially toward one of the electrodes and become concentrated in the refuse stream. The product stream is clarified of particulates. The success of the process depends upon the physical properties of the solids and liquids being tested. A sample with a high specific conductance is not suitable for separation in the lamella electrosettler. The liquid begins to heat up under the influence of the electric field and, eventually, may short. Also, under these conditions, the particles cannot maintain a charge. The high conductivity of the shale oil samples tested rendered them unsuitable for further testing in the lamella electrosettler.

Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gidaspow, D.; Jayaswal, U.; Wasan, D.T. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Thermoelectric properties of fine-grained FeVSb half-Heusler alloys tuned to p-type by substituting vanadium with titanium  

SciTech Connect

Fine-grained Ti-doped FeVSb half-Heusler alloys were synthesized by combining mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering and their thermoelectric properties were investigated with an emphasis on the influences of Ti doping and phase purity. It was found that substituting V with Ti can change the electrical transport behavior from n-type to p-type due to one less valence electron of Ti than V, and the sample with nominal composition FeV{sub 0.8}Ti{sub 0.4}Sb exhibits the largest Seebeck coefficient and the maximum power factor. By optimizing the sintering temperature and applying annealing treatment, the power factor is significantly improved and the thermal conductivity is reduced simultaneously, resulting in a ZT value of 0.43 at 500 Degree-Sign C, which is relatively high as for p-type half-Heusler alloys containing earth-abundant elements. - Graphical abstract: Fine-grained Ti-doped FeVSb alloys were prepared by the MA-SPS method. The maximum ZT value reaches 0.43 at 500 Degree-Sign C, which is relatively high for p-type half-Heusler alloys. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-doped FeVSb half-Heusler alloys were synthesized by combining MA and SPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting V with Ti changes the electrical behavior from n-type to p-type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermoelectric properties are improved by optimizing sintering temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermoelectric properties are further improved by applying annealing treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high ZT value of 0.43 is obtained at 500 Degree-Sign C for p-type Ti-doped FeVSb alloys.

Zou, Minmin [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Jing-Feng, E-mail: jingfeng@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kita, Takuji [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Vehicle Engineering Group, Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200, Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan)] [Advanced Material Engineering Division, Vehicle Engineering Group, Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200, Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the ninth quarter, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

A main portion of this reporting period has been consumed in the following tasks to establish the base line for hydrocarbon oil encapsulated bubble flotation: (1) to measure the residence time distribution and formulate the axial dispersion model of 1-in. I.D. flotation column, (2) to obtain the optimum operating conditions using three phase experiment design approach followed the fractional factorial design, (3) to develop the column scale-up procedure and formulate recovery predicting model for flotation column, (4) to apply the models developed to design a 3-in. ID flotation column and predicting the cleaning results, (5) to test the collector gasification system installed on the 3-in. I.D. flotation column for hydrocarbon-oil capsulated bubble flotation of fine coal. Column flotation of minus 47 {mu}m (-400 US sieve) Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal was carried out to study the column scale-up procedure using one-inch column. The dispersion model of nonideal flow was applied to describe the hydrodynamic state within the column. This model may be used to predict the collection zone recovery of column flotation in scale-up procedure if the column flotation is a first-order rate process. Residence Time Distribution (RTD) data of the column flotation were measured to determine the parameters of the model. It was found that an empirical distribution, logarithmic normal distribution can describe the RTD curve well. The effects of operating variables and column geometry on the Peclet number, Pe, which measure the extent of axial dispersion were studied and an empirical expression of Pe was obtained. Using the dispersion model, the column flotation of fine coal recovery can be predicted.

Peng, F.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Field Evaluation of Debris Handling and Sediment Clogging of a 2.0-mm Fine-Mesh Traveling Water Screen at the Hawthorn Power Plant, Missouri River, in Kansas City, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an evaluation of the field performance of a fine-mesh (2.0-mm) traveling water screen (TWS) in a debris- and sediment-laden river. Fine-mesh overlay panels were installed on one intake screen at Kansas City Power and Light's Hawthorn Generating Station on the Missouri River, in Kansas City, Missouri. Its operation relative to an adjoining coarse-mesh (9.5-mm) screen was evaluated over a nearly 22-month period from December 2009 through August 2011.

2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley Region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley Region.

Kevin Crist

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

370

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2005-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

371

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2004-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

372

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

373

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, evaluated the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation involved two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring included the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station contains sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO2, O3, etc.). Laboratory analyses of time-integrated samples were used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Nearreal- time measurements were used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 30 months of field data were collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data provides mercury, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis includes (1) development of updated inventories of mercury emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This is accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results were compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratorys monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by the USEPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions provides critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal-fired power plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley Region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

375

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by the USEPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

376

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5)DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Analysis of data collected to date show that: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites, and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Data analysis focusing on relating the aerometric measurements to local and regional scale emissions of sources of primary and secondary fine particles using receptor-based air quality models will follow.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

In situ X-ray absorption fine structure studies of a manganese dioxide electrode in a rechargeable MnO{sub 2}/Zn alkaline battery environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electronic and structural aspects of a MnO{sub 2} electrode in a rechargeable MnO{sub 2}/Zn battery environment have been investigated by in situ Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The relative amplitudes of the three major Fourier transform shells of the EXAFS (extended XAFS) function of the rechargeable MnO{sub 2} electrode in the undischarged state were found to be similar to those found for ramsdellite, a MnO{sub 2} polymorph with substantial corner-sharing linkages among the basic MnO{sub 6} octahedral units. The analyses of the background-subtracted pre-edge peaks and absorption edge regions for the nominally 1-e{sup {minus}} discharged electrode were consistent with Mn{sup 3+} as being the predominant constituent species, rather than a mixture of Mn{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 2+} sites. Furthermore, careful inspection of both the XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS indicated that the full recharge of MnO, which had been previously discharged either by a 1- or 2-equivalent corner-sharing linkages compared to the original undischarged MnO{sub 2}.

Mo, Y.; Hu, Y.; Bae, I.T.; Miller, B.; Scherson, D.A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Antonio, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules.

Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer [Department Chemie und Pharmazie, Lehrstuhl fuer Physikalische Chemie II and ICMM, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Hieringer, Wolfgang [Department Chemie und Pharmazie, Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Egerlandstrasse 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fine-grained clay fraction (,0.2 {mu}m): An interesting tool to approach the present thermal and permeability state in active geothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated by X-ray diffraction the very fine grained secondary minerals (< 0.2 {micro}m) developed in geothermal systems, in relation with their present thermal and permeability state. Because the smallest particles are the most reactive part of a rock, they are the youngest mineral phases of the geothermal fields. This study has been performed on two active geothermal fields: Milos field, Greece (130 < T < 320 C) and Chipilapa field, Salvador (90 < T < 215 C). In the Milos field, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fraction observed in the reservoir strongly differs from the overlying altered metamorphic schists in the presence of abundant quantities of saponite and talc/saponite interstratified minerals at unusually high temperature. These phases are considered to be kinetically control-led ''metastable'' minerals which rapidly evolve towards actinolite and talc for present temperatures higher than 300 C. Their occurrence is a good indicator of discharge in highly permeable zones. In the geothermal field of Chipilapa, the mineralogical composition of the < 0.2 {micro}m clay fractions fairly agrees with the temperatures presently measured in the wells, whereas several discrepancies may be pointed out from the compositions of coarser clay fractions (< 5 {micro}m) which contain minerals inherited from higher temperature stages. Permeable zones may be evidenced from an increase of expandable components in the interstratified minerals and a decrease of the coherent domain of the unexpandable clay particles (chlorite).

Patrier, P.; Papapanagiotou, P.; Beaufort, D.; Traineau, H.; Bril, H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Combustor for fine particulate coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Combustor for fine particulate coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

Combustor for fine particulate coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1988-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

383

In situ Ru K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies of electroprecipitated ruthenium dioxide films with relevance to supercapacitor applications.  

SciTech Connect

Modifications in electronic and structural aspects of RuO{sub 2} films electroprecipitated onto Au electrodes induced by changes in the applied potential have been examined in situ in aqueous 0.50 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} by Ru K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Fourier transform of the k{sup 3}-weighted extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), k{sup 3}x(k), for the film polarized at +1.20V vs RHE is characterized by two shells attributed to Ru-O and Ru-Ru interactions with average distances of 1.94(1) and 3.12(2) {angstrom}, respectively, in agreement with results obtained ex situ for Ru{sup 4+} in hydrous RuO{sub 2} by other groups. In contrast, films in the reduced state, i.e., +0.40 V vs RHE, yielded only a single shell ascribed to a Ru-O interaction at 2.02(1) {angstrom} with no evidence for a distant Ru-Ru shell. The long Ru-O distance is in agreement with that reported earlier for the hydrous Ru{sup 3+} ion [Ru-(OH{sub 2}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} in the solid state. Moreover, the difference between the average Ru-O bond lengths for the reduced and oxidized films is consistent with the difference in the ionic radii of Ru{sup 3+} and Ru{sup 4+}. On this basis it has been suggested that films in the reduced state contain Ru{sup 3+} sites, consistent with the electrochemical results, in a phase with apparently less order beyond the Ru-O coordination sphere than for hydrous RuO{sub 2}.

Mo, Y.; Antonio, M. R.; Stefan, I. C.; Scherson, D. A.; Chemistry; Case Western Reserve Univ.

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

384

Pyrite surface characterization and control for advanced fine coal desulfurization technologies. Seventh quarterly technical progress report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to conduct extensive studies on the surface reactivity and surface hydrophobicity of coal-pyrites using various surface characterization techniques and to correlate the alteration of the coal-pyrite surface with the efficiency of pyrite rejection in coal flotation. The flotation characteristics of coal-pyrites under various conditions was studied and compared with ore-pyrite and coal to determine the causes of pyrite rejection difficulties in coal flotation. Both the native and induced floatabilities of pyrites were investigated. It was found that both coal- and ore-pyrites, ff prepared by dry-grinding, show little or no floatability in the absence of any chemical reagents. After ultrasonic pretreatment, ore-pyrite floats effectively in the acidic to neutral pH range. Kentucky No. 9 coal-pyrite (KYPY) shows significant flotation in the pH range 7--10. With ethyl xanthate as collector, ore-pyrite floats well up to pH = 10; while coal-pyrite reveals no flotation above pH = 6. For the first time, the effect of coal collector on the floatability of coal-pyrite has been studied. It was shown that in the presence of fuel oil--a widely used collector for promoting coal flotation, coal-pyrite, particularly for the fine sizes, shows good flotation below pH = 11, whereas ore-pyrite has no or little floatability. These studies demonstrate that one of the main causes of the coal-pyrite flotation in coal separation is the oil-induced floatability due to adsorption/attachment of oil droplets on the coal-pyrite surfaces, the ``native`` or ``self-induced`` floatability of pyrite is no as profound as the oil-induced flotation.

Wang, Xiang-Huai; Leonard, J.W.; Parekh, B.K.; Jiang, Chengliang; Raichur, A.M.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

Surface Structure and Chemical Switching of Thioctic Acid Adsorbed on Au(111) as Observed Using Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thioctic acid (alpha-lipoic acid) is a molecule with a large disulfide-containing base, a short alkyl-chain with four CH{sub 2} units, and a carboxyl termination. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of thioctic acid adsorbed on Au(111) have been investigated with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine film quality, bonding and morphology. Using standard preparation protocols for SAMs, that is, dissolving thioctic acid in ethanol and exposing gold to the solution, results in poor films. These films are highly disordered, contain a mixture of carboxyl and carboxylate terminations, have more than monolayer coverage, and exhibit unbound disulfide. Conversely, forming films by dissolving 1 mmol thioctic acid into 5% acetic acid in ethanol (as previously reported with carboxyl-terminated alkyl-thiols) forms ordered monolayers with small amounts of unbound sulfur. NEXAFS indicates tilted over endgroups with the carboxyl group normal on average 38{sup o} from the surface normal. Slight dichroism in other features indicates alkyl chains statistically more upright than prostrate on the surface. Reflection-absorption Fourier transform infrared (RA-FTIR) spectra indicate hydrogen bonding between neighboring molecules. In such well-formed monolayers, a stark reorientation occurs upon deprotonation of the endgroup by rinsing in a KOH solution. The carboxylate plane normal is now about 66{sup o} from sample normal, a much more upright orientation. Data indicate this reorientation may also cause a more upright orientation to the alkyl portion of the molecules.

Meulenberg, R W; van Buuren, T; Vance, A L; Terminello, L J; Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; Fadley, C S

2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

386

The use of Texel, Dorper, Suffolk, and Rambouillet rams in terminal crossbreeding programs on fine wool type sheep to improve growth rate and carcass composition of offspring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A crossbreeding study to compare the use of Texel, Dorper, Suffolk and Rambouillet rams as terminal sires on fine wool type sheep was conducted at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. Two-hundred fifty-five multiparous Rambouillet ewes were randomly divided into four breeding groups and mated to rams representing the test breeds. Ewes were maintained on native grass pastures and supplemented with concentrate or dry hay, when forage sources were deemed insufficient to meet ewes' dietary requirements according to NRC (1985) for gestating and lactating ewes. Ewes lambed and were maintained on pasture through weaning. Data collected and analyzed included birth weights, lamb vigor scores and death loss prior to weaning. Lambs were weaned at average age of 90d, weaning weights were taken and adjusted for age, sex, and type of birth/rearing. Seventy-eight lambs, 20 from each of the Rambouillet, Suffolk, Texel and 18 from the Dorper subgroups, were placed in the feedlot portion of this study. Lambs were fed ad libitum for 78d. Refusals were weighed back weekly and feed conversions calculated. After a 12hr shrink, final weights were obtained, post weaning average daily gain calculated, and lambs were slaughtered. Hot carcass weights were obtained and dressing percentages calculated. Cold carcass weights, loin eye area (LEA), 12[] rib fat thickness, leg circumferences and carcass lengths were measured. Leg conformation scores were assigned to each carcass after a 48h chill. Texel-sired lambs had a higher mean (P.10). Texel- and Suffolk-sired lambs had higher mean final weights (P.10) among breeds. Dorper-sired lambs had the lowest final weights, lightest hot carcass weights and shortest carcass lengths (P<.01).

Taylor, Todd Allen

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Characterization of the 3-D Properties of the Fine-Grained Turbidite 8 Sand Reservoir, Green Canyon 18, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the internal organization of the Lower Pleistocene 8 Sand reservoir in the Green Canyon 18 field, Gulf of Mexico, helps to increase knowledge of the geology and the petrophysical properties, and hence contribute to production management in the area. Interpretation of log data from 29 wells, core and production data served to detail as much as possible a geological model destined for a future reservoir simulation. Core data showed that the main facies resulting from fine-grained turbidity currents is composed of alternating sand and shale layers, whose extension is assumed to be large. They correspond to levee and overbank deposits that are usually associated to channel systems. The high porosity values, coming from unconsolidated sediment, were associated to high horizontal permeability but generally low kv/kh ratio. The location of channel deposits was not obvious but thickness maps suggested that two main systems, with a northwest-southeast direction, contributed to the 8 Sand formation deposition. These two systems were not active at the same time and one of them was probably eroded by overlying formations. Spatial relationships between them remained unclear. Shingled stacking of the channel deposits resulted from lateral migration of narrow, meandering leveed channels in the mid part of the turbidite system. Then salt tectonics tilted turbidite deposits and led to the actual structure of the reservoir. The sedimentary analysis allowed the discrimination of three facies A, B and E, with given porosity and permeability values, that corresponded to channel, levee and overbank deposits. They were used to populate the reservoir model. Well correlation helped figure out the extension of these facies.

Plantevin, Matthieu Francois

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Design and economics of a lignite-to-SNG (substitute natural gas) facility using Lurgi gasifiers for lignite gasification with KRW gasifiers for gasification of coal fines. Topical report (Final), April 1985-January 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-pass design and cost estimate was prepared for a plant to convert lignite to substitute natural gas (SNG) using Lurgi dry-bottom gasifiers to gasify the coal and the KRW fluid-bed gasifiers to gasify the coal fines. The overall plant thermal efficiency is between that of the Lurgi and KRW base case designs. The study-case design is of commercial interest compared to a Lurgi plant when the Lurgi plant coal fines cannot be sold. The study case is more capital-intensive because it requires more-expensive boilers and more of different types of process units than either base case. There is no advantage over a KRW plant design that provides a 30% lower cost of gas.

Smelser, S.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Previous Semi-Annual Technical Progress Reports presented the following: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Analyses of data conducted during the period from April 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003 are presented in this Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report. Report Revision No. 1 includes the additions or removals of text presented in the previous version of this report.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

390

Investigation and modeling of processing-microstructure-property relations in ultra-fine grained hexagonal close packed materials under strain path changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultra-fine grained (UFG) materials have attracted considerable interest due to the possibility of achieving simultaneous increase in strength and ductility. Effective use of these materials in engineering applications requires investigating the processing-microstructure-property inter-relations leading to a comprehensive understanding of the material behavior. Research efforts on producing UFG hexagonal close packed (hcp) materials have been limited in spite of their envisaged utilization in various technologies. The present study explores multiple UFG hcp materials to identify the general trends in their deformation behaviors, microstructural features, crystallographic texture evolutions and mechanical responses under strain path changes. UFG hcp materials, including commercial purity Ti, Ti-6Al-4V alloy and high purity Zr, were fabricated using equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) as a severe plastic deformation (SPD) technique following various processing schedules. Several characterization methods and a polycrystal plasticity model were utilized in synergy to impart the relationships between the UFG microstructure, the texture and the post-ECAE flow behavior. Pure UFG hcp materials exhibited enhanced strength properties, making them potential substitutes for coarse-grained high strength expensive alloys. Incorporation of post-ECAE thermo-mechanical treatments was effective in further improvement of the strength and ductility levels. Strong anisotropy of the post-ECAE flow response was evident in all the materials studied. The underlying mechanisms for anisotropy were identified as texture and processing-induced microstructure. Depending on the ECAE route, the applied strain level and the specific material, the relative importance of these two mechanisms on plastic flow anisotropy varied. A viscoplastic self-consistent approach is presented as a reliable model for predicting the texture evolutions and flow behaviors of UFG hcp materials in cases where texture governs the plastic anisotropy. Regardless of the material, the initial billet texture and the extrusion conditions, ECAE of all hcp materials revealed similar texture evolutions. Accurate texture and flow behavior predictions showed that basal slip is the responsible mechanism for such texture evolution in all hcp materials independent of their axial ratio. High strength of the UFG microstructure was presented as a triggering mechanism for the activation of unexpected deformation systems, such as high temperature deformation twinning in Ti-6Al-4V and room temperature basal slip in pure Zr.

Yapici, Guney Guven

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Genetic characterization of red rice (Oryza sativa L.) and control in imidazolinone tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red rice from the southern United States was collected and analyzed using Simple Sequence Length Polymorphism (SSLP) markers in an effort to test the assumption that red rice is Oryza sativa ssp. indica. The 18 markers used are distributed across all 12 chromosomes of the rice genome and can be used to distinguish between sibling cultivars. The results indicate that traditional classification of red rice based on morphological characteristics alone is inadequate. Some red rice was closely related to Oryza sativa ssp. indica, while other red rice was more closely related to Oryza sativa ssp. japonica. Some red rice samples collected from Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas are very closely related to the noxious weed, Oryza rufipogon accession IRGC 105491. This research revealed that different classes of red rice are intermingled across the southern United States rice belt. Within individual commercial production fields, Oryza sativa ssp. indica-like red rice and Oryza rufipogon-like red rice can be found within a single 9 m collection site. In 2000 and 2001, studies were conducted at several locations across the Texas rice-producing region with imidazolinone tolerant rice to determine the most efficacious sequential application rate and timing of imazethapyr for control of red rice and other weeds. At Beaumont, red rice and barnyardgrass control was greater than 94% with 0.07, 0.09 and 0.10 kg/ha preplant incorporated or preemergence followed by at least 0.04 kg/ha early postemergence on a clay soil. Broadleaf signalgrass control near Eagle Lake showed that preplant incorporated and preemergence applications followed by early postemergence applications provided greater than 86% control in 2000, and greater than 90% control in 2001. Sequential postemergence applications at Beaumont resulted in greater than 95% red rice and barnyardgrass control when 0.04 kg/ha late postemergence followed any early postemergence application. Sequential postemergence applications controlled broadleaf signalgrass greater than 98% in both years. Red rice control at Lissie on a fine sandy loam soil was at least 98% with all sequential treatments. Crop injury was found to be a function of the postemergence application in all studies. Crop yields were not reduced by early season crop injury from imazethapyr applications, regardless of soil type.

Ottis, Brian Vance

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

In situ Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure of a pyrite electrode in a Li/polyethylene oxide (LiClO{sub 4})/FeS{sub 2} battery environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electronic and structural properties of materials generated by the reduction and subsequent oxidation of pyrite in a lithium-based solid polymer electrolyte have been examined by in situ fluorescence Fe K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) in a FeS{sub 2}/Li battery environment. The XAFS results obtained are consistent with the formation of metallic iron as one of the products of the full (4-electron) discharge, in agreement with information reported in other laboratories. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data reveal that a subsequent 2-electron or 4-electron recharge generates a species with a Fe-S bond distance identical to that of pyrite, d(Fe-S) = 2.259 {angstrom}, with no other clearly detectable interactions due to more distant atoms. Based on the similarities between the metrical parameters and other features in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), the ferrous sites in these species appear to be tetrahedrally coordinated, as in chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}), for which d(Fe-S) is 2.257 {angstrom}, and, thus, different than in Li{sub 2} FeS{sub 2}, a material that exhibits longer Fe-S distances.

Totir, D.; Bae, I.T.; Hu, Y.; Scherson, D.A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Antonio, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Padro, C.E.G. Padro, C.E.G. Padro, C.E.G. Thomas, SandyThomas, SandyThomas, Sandy Thomas, Sandy Thomas, Sandy Thomas, Sandy Year

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Geological Society of America Special Paper 458  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A consists of tight clay that is silty and slightly sandy. The sand-sized por- tion consists of common are mainly fine-grained marine siliciclastics, with the exception of Pleistocene sand, clay, and gravel.75 rmcd; 712.7 ft* 225.43 rmcd; 739.6 ft* R ** ** N* N R R ** CalvertFormation Polarity EXPLANATION SAND

395

Numerical investigation for the impact of CO2 geologic sequestration on regional groundwater flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kurotaki Middle Quarternay Lithofacies West/East sandymuddy sandygravelly sandy gravelly sandy muddy sandy gravelly (b) p

Yamamoto, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Multiple Objective Stormwater Management For the Coliseum Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

asphalt landscaping lawns and grass; sandy soil, slope sandy soil, slope sandy soil, slope <2% Cover Factor*

Jones, Jesse; Kraai, Rachel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Effect of grain size on remotely sensed spectral reflectance of sandy desert surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the otherwise stable, armored desert surface. This has resulted in sand plumes, eroded from the fields by wind

Painter, Thomas H.

398

Hurricane Sandy Situation Report # 3 October 29, 2012 (3:00 PM...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

expected along portions of the coast between Chincoteague, VA and Chatham, MA. On the forecast track the center of the storm is forecast to make landfall this evening along the...

399

In the Face of Hurricane Sandy, CNG Vehicles Shuttle People to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residents living along the Boardwalk, protecting them from catastrophic flooding and wind. Other jitneys transported clinic patients to medical treatments and helped those...

400

Formal Methods for Dynamic Power Management Rajesh K. Gupta Sandy lrani Sandee K Shukla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to determine when to transition to the next power state. By comparison, multi-state systems are naturally, they transition to the lowest power state if the idle period extends beyond a fixed threshold value, For the sake manufacturer's specification) the transition power pij, and transition times tu, to move from state s i to s

Irani, Sandy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

All-Energy 2010 -participants Sandy Duncan Regional Consultant 1 Stop Renewables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2 Good, Michael Milz, Good; Charles Sharkey, Excellent; Chelsea Obermeier, Very Good, Becca Francis Pre-Novice A 1st Sarah Lerch 2nd Chelsea Linke 3rd Christy Duprey 4th Gabe Bateman Beef Show Junior Frank Best In Show Kaileen Campbell Best Senior Handler Will Hartmann Best Junior Handler Rachel Creedon

402

Economic Analysis of Electrolysis-Based Hydrogen Fueling Stations Matt Jones, Sandy Allan, Joan Ogden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) to calculate the effect on hydrogen price for three scenarios: constant electricity input, off Electricity Input Shown PRODUCTION STORAGE COMPRESSOR DISPENSER OTHER Storage Tank Electrolyzer Unit Transformer/Reactor Unit Compressor Units (2) Gas Holder Balance of Plant 3 units @ 46 kg/h 3 units Electrical

California at Davis, University of

403

Potential Geomorphic and Ecological Impacts of Marmot Dam Removal, Sandy River, OR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Canberra, ACT, 0200, Australia, Paul.Tregoning@anu.edu.au. Abstract: The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment space gravity mission was launched in 2002 with the principal aim of providing global and high-resolution estimates of the constant and time-variable part of the Earth's gravity field with unprecedented accuracy

404

New York Taps NIST's Sunder for Post-Sandy Review of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in New York's transportation, energy, communications and ... Ready Commission will review critical systems ... Sunder manages an annual budget of ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

405

Polarimetric Radar Observations of Biological Scatterers in Hurricanes Irene (2011) and Sandy (2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biological scatterers, consisting of birds and insects, may become trapped near the circulation center of tropical cyclones, particularly if a well-developed eyewall is present. These scatterers may be observed using weather radar, where they may ...

Matthew S. Van Den Broeke

406

[CuCln](2-n) Ion-Pair Species in 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride Ionic Liquid-Water Mixtures: Ultraviolet-Visible, X-ray Absorbtion Fine Structure, and Density Functional Theory Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report details of the coordination environment about Cu(II) in a pure ionic liquid, 1- ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([EMIM]Cl) and in mixtures containing varying amounts of water from 0-100% of the [EMIM]Cl. There are many stages in the ion pairing of the divalent cation, Cu(II) including the contact ion pairing of Cu2+ with multiple Cl- to form various CuCln (2-n) polyanions. Thereis also the subsequent solvation and ion pairing of the polychlorometallate anion with the EMIM+ cation. Using a combination of x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), UV-Vis spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations (TDDFT) we are able to follow the detailed structural changes about Cu(II). Ion pair formation is strongly promoted in [EMIM]Cl by the low dielectric constant and by the extensive breakdown of the water hydrogen bond network in [EMIM]Cl/water mixtures. In the [EMIM]Cl solvent the CuCl4 2- species dominates and its geometry is quite similar to gas-phase structure. These results are important in understanding catalysis and separation processes involving transition metals in ionic liquid systems.

Li, Guosheng; Camaioni, Donald M.; Amonette, James E.; Zhang, Z. Conrad; Johnson, Timothy J.; Fulton, John L.

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

Interpretation of Wild 2 Dust Fine Structure: Comparison of Stardust Aluminium Foil Craters to the Three-Dimensional Shape of Experimental Impacts by Artificial Aggregate Particles and Meteorite Powders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New experimental results show that Stardust crater morphology is consistent with interpretation of many larger Wild 2 dust grains being aggregates, albeit most of low porosity and therefore relatively high density. The majority of large Stardust grains (i.e. those carrying most of the cometary dust mass) probably had density of 2.4 g cm{sup -3} (similar to soda-lime glass used in earlier calibration experiments) or greater, and porosity of 25% or less, akin to consolidated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, and much lower than the 80% suggested for fractal dust aggregates. Although better size calibration is required for interpretation of the very smallest impacting grains, we suggest that aggregates could have dense components dominated by {micro}m-scale and smaller sub-grains. If porosity of the Wild 2 nucleus is high, with similar bulk density to other comets, much of the pore-space may be at a scale of tens of micrometers, between coarser, denser grains. Successful demonstration of aggregate projectile impacts in the laboratory now opens the possibility of experiments to further constrain the conditions for creation of bulbous (Type C) tracks in aerogel, which we have observed in recent shots. We are also using mixed mineral aggregates to document differential survival of pristine composition and crystalline structure in diverse fine-grained components of aggregate cometary dust analogues, impacted onto both foil and aerogel under Stardust encounter conditions.

Kearsley, A T; Burchell, M J; Price, M C; Graham, G A; Wozniakiewicz, P J; Cole, M J; Foster, N J; Teslich, N

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

408

Rapid Changes in Soil Carbon and Structural Properties Due to Stover Removal from No-Till Corn Plots  

SciTech Connect

Harvesting corn (Zea mays L.) stover for producing ethanol may be beneficial to palliate the dependence on fossil fuels and reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, but stover harvesting may deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) and degrade soil structure. We investigated the impacts of variable rates of stover removal from no-till (NT) continuous corn systems on SOC and soil structural properties after 1 year of stover removal in three soils in Ohio: Rayne silt loam (fine-loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston. This study also assessed relationships between SOC and soil structural properties as affected by stover management. Six stover treatments that consisted of removing 100, 75, 50, 25, and 0, and adding 100% of corn stover corresponding to 0 (T0), 1.25 (T1.25), 2.50 (T2.5), 3.75 (T3.75), 5.00 (T5), and 10.00 (T10) Mg haj1 of stover, respectively, were studied for their total SOC concentration, bulk density (>b), aggregate stability, and tensile strength (TS) of aggregates. Effects of stover removal on soil properties were rapid and significant in the 0- to 5-cm depth, although the magnitude of changes differed among soils after only 1 year of stover removal. The SOC concentration declined with increase in removal rates in silt loams but not in clay loam soils. It decreased by 39% at Coshocton and 30% at Charleston within 1 year of complete stover removal. At the same sites, macroaggregates contained 10% to 45% more SOC than microaggregates. Stover removal reduced 94.75-mm macroaggregates and increased microaggregates (P G 0.01). Mean weight diameter (MWD) and TS of aggregates in soils without stover (T0) were 1.7 and 3.3 times lower than those in soils with normal stover treatments (T5) across sites. The SOC concentration was negatively correlated with >b and positively with MWD and LogTS. Stover removal at rates as low as 1.25 Mg haj1 reduced SOC and degraded soil structure even within 1 year, but further monitoring is needed to establish threshold levels of stover removal in relation to changes in soil quality.

Blanco-Canqui, H; Lal, Rattan; Post, W M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Owens, L B.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

APPLICATION OF FINE WATER MISTS TO FIRE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... evaporate in this calculation. ... NOZZLE PERFORMANCE EVALUATION ... of the flue gas at the entrance to the electrostatic precipitator, in order to ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

FINE WATER SPRAY FIRE SUPPRESSION ALTERNATIVE ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... different products, ie, chemicals, gases, water, etc., being ... of an AB6 STAL GT-35 Jupiter gas turbine. ... to the use of water on operating gas turbines. ...

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

411

Clean Production of Coke from Carbonaceous Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to produce steel (a necessary commodity in developed nations) using conventional technologies, you must have metallurgical coke. Current coke-making technology pyrolyzes high-quality coking coals in a slot oven, but prime coking coals are becoming more expensive and slot ovens are being shut-down because of age and environmental problems. The United States typically imports about 4 million tons of coke per year, but because of a world-wide coke scarcity, metallurgical coke costs have risen from about $77 per tonne to more than $225. This coke shortage is a long-term challenge driving up the price of steel and is forcing steel makers to search for alternatives. Combustion Resources (CR) has developed a technology to produce metallurgical coke from alternative feedstocks in an environmentally clean manner. The purpose of the current project was to refine material and process requirements in order to achieve improved economic benefits and to expand upon prior work on the proposed technology through successful prototype testing of coke products. The ultimate objective of this project is commercialization of the proposed technology. During this project period, CR developed coke from over thirty different formulations that meet the strength and reactivity requirements for use as metallurgical coke. The technology has been termed CR Clean Coke because it utilizes waste materials as feedstocks and is produced in a continuous process where pollutant emissions can be significantly reduced compared to current practice. The proposed feed material and operating costs for a CR Clean Coke plant are significantly less than conventional coke plants. Even the capital costs for the proposed coke plant are about half that of current plants. The remaining barrier for CR Clean Coke to overcome prior to commercialization is full-scale testing in a blast furnace. These tests will require a significant quantity of product (tens of thousands of tons) necessitating the construction of a demonstration facility. Talks are currently underway with potential partners and investors to build a demonstration facility that will generate enough coke for meaningful blast furnace evaluation tests. If the testing is successful, CR Clean Coke could potentially eliminate the need for the United States to import any coke, effectively decreasing US Steel industry dependence on foreign nations and reducing the price of domestic steel.

Craig N. Eatough

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fine Anthracite Coal Washing Using Spirals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spiral performed well in cleaning the coarse 8 x 16 mesh size fraction, as demonstrated by the Ep ranging from 0.091 to 0.177. This is in line with typical spiral performance. In addition, the presence of the coarser size fraction did not significantly affect spiral performance on the typical 16 x 100 mesh fraction, in which the Ep ranged from 0.144 to 0.250. Changes in solids concentration and flow rate did not show a clear correlation with spiral performance. However, for difficult-to-clean coals with high near-gravity material, such as this anthracite, a single-stage spiral cleaning such a wide size fraction may not be able to achieve the clean coal ash and yield specifications required. In the first place, while the performance of the spiral on the coarse 8 x 16 mesh fraction is good with regard to Ep, the cutpoints (SG50s) are high (1.87 to 1.92), which may result in a clean coal with a higher-than-desired ash content. And second, the combination of the spiral's higher overall cutpoint (1.80) with the high near-gravity anthracite results in significant misplaced material that increases the clean coal ash error. In a case such as this, one solution may be to reclean the clean coal and middlings from the first-stage spiral in a second stage spiral.

R.P. Killmeyer; P.H. Zandhuis; M.V. Ciocco; W. Weldon; T. West; D. Petrunak

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Airborne Fine Particulate Matter (PM) Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for reducing the PM contribution from energy production, especially from coal fired power plants. The program was initiated in 1998 when Congress appropriated funds to the DOE...

414

Exchange of fine sediments with gravel riverbeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a G1 sample pit to show the hockey-stick pattern; a similarone sample pit to show the hockey-stick pattern; a similartrapping that looks like a hockey-stick, with ? decreasing

Leonardson, Rebecca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fine-tune capacitor-bank control  

SciTech Connect

There are a lot of questions in the ideal substation capacitor-control scheme. Allegheny Power System engineers satisfied a lot of those conditions when they decided to use programmable controllers to switch substation banks. The operation of the controllers is discussed.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fine-tuning the search for microsatellites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and implementation is discussed of Fire@mSat"2, an algorithm to detect microsatellites (short approximate tandem repeats) in DNA. The algorithm relies on deterministic finite automata. The parameters are designed to support requirements expressed ... Keywords: Detection algorithm, Finite automata, Microsatellite detection, Pattern matching, Repeat detection

C. De Ridder, D. G. Kourie, B. W. Watson, T. R. Fourie, P. V. Reyneke

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

"Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

Robert E. Barber

2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

418

Fine Detail with Low Mesh Parameter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WINDOW License Agreement: During the WINDOW installation process, you will be asked to agree to the following License Agreement (presented here for informational purposes): END...

419

Current advances: The fine-structure constant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... bare" electron while the virtual electrons are repelled ... a completely quantized two-dimensional electron gas ... in a high-mobility semiconductor device ...

420

Fine-Blanking Tooling and Lubrication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 13   Properties of the commonly used tool coatings...thickness, μm Coefficient of friction Maximum usage temperature, °C Corrosion resistance TiN Golden-yellow 24 1??4 0.4 to ~0.6 600 Good TiAlN Black-violet 33 1??4 0.4 to ~0.45 800 Good CrN Chrome white 18 1??4 0.5 to ~0.6 700 Excellent TiCN Blue-gray 36 1??4 0.25 to ~0.4 400 Good Source: Ref 6...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Changes in long-term no-till corn growth and yield under different rates of stover mulch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Received for publication January 4, 2006. Removal of corn (Zea mays L.) stover for biofuel production may affect crop yields by altering soil properties. A partial stover removal may be feasible, but information on appropriate rates of removal is unavailable. We assessed the short-term impacts of stover management on long-term no-till (NT) continuous corn grown on a Rayne silt loam (fine loamy, mixed, active, mesic Typic Hapludults) at Coshocton, Hoytville clay loam (fine, illitic, mesic Mollic Epiaqualfs) at Hoytville, and Celina silt loam (fine, mixed, active, mesic Aquic Hapludalfs) at South Charleston in Ohio, and predicted corn yield from soil properties using principal component analysis (PCA). The study was conducted in 2005 on the ongoing experiments started in May 2004 under 0 (T0), 25 (T25), 50 (T50), 75 (T75), 100 (T100), and 200 (T200)% of stover corresponding to 0, 1.25, 2.50, 3.75, 5.00, and 10.00 Mg ha-1 of stover, respectively. Stover removal promoted early emergence and rapid seedling growth (P Stover management affected corn yield only at the Coshocton site where average grain and stover yields in the T200, T100, T75, and T50 (10.8 and 10.3 Mg ha-1) were higher than those in the T0 and T25 treatments (8.5 and 6.5 Mg ha-1) (P stover removal at rates as low as 50% (2.5 Mg ha-1) decreased crop yields. Soil properties explained 71% of the variability in grain yield and 33% of the variability in stover yield for the Coshocton site. Seventeen months after the start of the experiment, effects of stover management on corn yield and soil properties were site-specific.

Blanco-Canqui, Dr. Humberto [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Owens, Lloyd [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Past Project on Visualization and Virtual Reality for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NAME: Visualization and Virtual Reality for Manufacturing CONTACT: Sandy Ressler, sandy.ressler@nist.gov IMPETUS ...

423

Fining Effect and Fining Agents in High Alkali Alumino-silicate Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Binary and Ternary Phase Diagram Studies of Thermal Energy Storage Materials ... of Core-shell Structured Multiferroic Nanocomposites for Energy Harvesting .... Low-temperature Spin Spray Deposited Ferrite/Piezoelectric Thin Film ... Multi-

424

Shoreface Morphodynamics, Back Beach Variability, and Implications of Future Sea-Level Rise for California's Sandy Shorelines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

border is artificially armored (Runyan and Griggs, 2003),or vertical bluffs or armored infrastructure (Fig. 1.4), butto-high sloping bluffs armored in areas by low and mid-bluff

Harden, Erika Lynne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Evaluation of Waterwall Corrosion Fatigue, Volume 2: Roadmap Case Study: Evaluation of AEP's Big Sandy Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As we continue to operate an ever-aging fleet of power plants, we experience increased boiler tube failures from failure mechanisms related to aging. One such failure mechanism is corrosion fatigue. Corrosion fatigue may result in failures in any water-touched surface in boilers and has been found in waterwalls, risers, and supply tubing, and drums. This report provides detailed research on the causes and actions to address corrosion fatigue in boiler waterwall tubing.

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Kelp Wrack: Hopping with Life in Santa Barbara County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of mechanically removing it from sandy beaches. Results fromecology and sustainability of sandy beaches, many of whichthe animal species living on sandy beaches depend on wrack.

Dugan, Jenifer E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

California Beach Health: Evaluation of Grunion as an Indicator Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Grunion and Sandy Beaches: Considerations for theAbout Human Impacts on Sandy Beaches. Martin, K. Keynotescientists. Human Impacts on Sandy Beaches in California.

Martin, Karen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Kelp Wrack: Hopping with Life in Orange County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of mechanically removing it from sandy beaches. Results fromecology and sustainability of sandy beaches, many of whichthe animal species living on sandy beaches depend on wrack.

Dugan, Jenifer E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Kelp Wrack: Hopping with Life in Ventura County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsidies on Exposed Sandy Beaches of Southern California.of mechanically removing it from sandy beaches. Results fromecology and sustainability of sandy beaches, many of which

Dugan, Jenifer E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Making a good match: How schools and external service providers negotiate needs and services in support of school improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improvement By Mary Vixie Sandy A dissertation submitted inimprovement By Mary Vixie Sandy Abstract Making a goodschool improvement by Mary Vixie Sandy Doctor of Education

Vixie Sandy, Mary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The role of nursery habitats and climate variability in reef fish fisheries in the Gulf of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rocky systems ( ) and sandy systems ( ), in central (a)boulders [ 1000 cm 3 ] over sandy bottoms), and mangroverocky reefs and southeastern sandy bottoms in front of large

Aburto-Oropeza, Marco Octavio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Kelp Wrack: Hopping with Life in San Diego County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsidies on Exposed Sandy Beaches of Southern California.of mechanically removing it from sandy beaches. Results fromecology and sustainability of sandy beaches, many of which

Dugan, Jenifer E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Differences and Commonalities in Physical, Chemical and Mineralogical Properties of Zanzibari Geophagic Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coarse blocky structure; sandy texture; contains fragmentsslakes immediately in water. Sandy material containing whiteimmediately in water. Sandy material received in crushed

Young, Sera L.; Wilson, M. Jeffrey; Hillier, Stephen; Delbos, Evelyne; Ali, Said M.; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Kelp Wrack: Hopping with Life in Los Angeles County  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsidies on Exposed Sandy Beaches of Southern California.of mechanically removing it from sandy beaches. Results fromecology and sustainability of sandy beaches, many of which

Dugan, Jenifer E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Combined effects of short-term rainfall patterns and soil texture on nitrogen cycling -- A Modeling Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation variability and magnitude are expected to change in many parts of the world over the 21st century. We examined the potential effects of intra-annual rainfall patterns on soil nitrogen (N) transport and transformation in the unsaturated soil zone using a deterministic dynamic modeling approach. The model (TOUGHREACT-N), which has been tested and applied in several experimental and observational systems, mechanistically accounts for microbial activity, soil-moisture dynamics that respond to precipitation variability, and gaseous and aqueous tracer transport in the soil. Here, we further tested and calibrated the model against data from a precipitation variability experiment in a tropical system in Costa Rica. The model was then used to simulate responses of soil moisture, microbial dynamics, nitrogen (N) aqueous and gaseous species, N leaching, and N trace-gas emissions to changes in rainfall patterns; the effect of soil texture was also examined. The temporal variability of nitrate leaching and NO, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O effluxes were significantly influenced by rainfall dynamics. Soil texture combined with rainfall dynamics altered soil moisture dynamics, and consequently regulated soil N responses to precipitation changes. The clay loam soil more effectively buffered water stress during relatively long intervals between precipitation events, particularly after a large rainfall event. Subsequent soil N aqueous and gaseous losses showed either increases or decreases in response to increasing precipitation variability due to complex soil moisture dynamics. For a high rainfall scenario, high precipitation variability resulted in as high as 2.4-, 2.4-, 1.2-, and 13-fold increases in NH{sub 3}, NO, N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes, respectively, in clay loam soil. In sandy loam soil, however, NO and N{sub 2}O fluxes decreased by 15% and 28%, respectively, in response to high precipitation variability. Our results demonstrate that soil N cycling responses to increasing precipitation variability depends on precipitation amount and soil texture, and that accurate prediction of future N cycling and gas effluxes requires models with relatively sophisticated representation of the relevant processes.

Gu, C.; Riley, W.J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Conference Program Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... email: Angela Ellis. Sandy Gray - Administrative Specialist phone: 301/975-3884, email: Sandy Gray. Gladys Arrisueo- Social ...

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

World Engineering Anthropometry Resource Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Mr. Sandy Ressler (co-chair CODATA task group) National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), USA; ... Webmaster: Sandy Ressler. ...

438

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

team is... http:energy.govemservicesprogram-managementsafety Download Hurricane Sandy Situation Reports (October & November 2012) Hurricane Sandy situation reports detail...

439

QuickTime VR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QuickTime VR. Christine Piatko and Sandy Ressler. ... Sandy Ressler's Office. Plant Floor of Black & Decker in Fayetteville NC. ...

440

becoming transreal: Micha Cardenas and Elle Mehrmand mix first life with Second Life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Amy Sara Carroll, and Sandy Stone. Refer- encing his ownThe second respondent, Sandy Stone, stated that as

Juliano, Linzi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine sandy loam" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microcast-X Fine Grain Casting - A Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

showed this treatment solutioned both the Laves and delta phases. Final preparation for forging included preform grinding to remove sharp edges, shot blasting.

442

Laser Fine-Adjustment Thruster For Space Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

To the present time, a few laser propulsion engine devices have been developed by using dominant mechanisms of laser propulsion. Generally these mechanisms are laser ablation, laser breakdown of gases, and laser detonation waves that are induced due to extraction of the internal energy of polymer propellants. In the paper, we consider the Aero-Space Laser Propulsion Engine (ASLPE) developed earlier, in which all of these mechanisms are realized via interaction of laser radiation with polymers both in continuous wave (CW) and in repetitively pulsed modes of laser operation. The ASLPE is considered to be exploited as a unit of a laser propulsion device being arranged onboard space vehicles moving around the Earth or in interplanetary missions and intended to correct the vehicles orbits. To produce a thrust, a power of the solar pumped lasers designed to the present time is considered in the paper. The problem of increasing the efficiency of the laser propulsion device is analyzed as applied to space missions of vehicles by optimizing the laser propulsion propellant composition.

Rezunkov, Yu. A.; Egorov, M. S.; Repina, E. V.; Safronov, A. L. [Research Institute for Complex Testing of Optic-Electronic Devices, Sosnovy Bor, Leningrad region, Russian Federation, 188540 (Russian Federation); Rebrov, S. G. [Keldyish Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

443

Ultra Fine Grain Processed UDIMET Alloy 718 for Isothermal Forging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

was consistent with AMS 5662 requirements, as indicated in Table I. Table I ... Stroke rate control was obtained using a ,Linear Voltage. Displacement...

444

Processing of High Strength Superalloy Components from Fine ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

stock to reduce oxide content (61, the potential exists for reduced cost and improved ... using an alloy with a modified MERL 76 com- position. (Table I). Table I.

445

High Temperature Properties and Fine Structure of High Manganese ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

concluded to be scarcely effective to the solut$on.hardening, as pointed by Kawabe etc. (9) regardi ng the effect of addition of boron to 18Cr-12Ni-0,2$&I steel.

446

Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Studies of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In present studies, EXAFS is used to investigate changes in molecular structure ... Structural and Thermal Stability Properties of Cellulose Nanocomposites with...

447