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1

Combustor for fine particulate coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Combustor for fine particulate coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

3

Combustor for fine particulate coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate coal combustor with two combustion chambers is provided. The first combustion chamber is toroidal; air and fuel are injected, mixed, circulated and partially combusted. The air to fuel ratio is controlled to avoid production of soot or nitrogen oxides. The mixture is then moved to a second combustion chamber by injection of additional air where combustion is completed and ash removed. Temperature in the second chamber is controlled by cooling and gas mixing. The clean stream of hot gas is then delivered to a prime mover. 4 figs.

Carlson, L.W.

1988-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

4

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

5

Evaluation of ceramic filters for high-temperature/high-pressure fine particulate control. Final report Dec 75-Jun 76  

SciTech Connect

High temperature gas turbines used to generate electric power require gas streams virtually free of particulate matter. Gas streams from high temperature, high pressure coal processes, such as low Btu gasification and pressurized fluidized bed combustion, require considerable particulate removal. In order to maintain high thermal efficiency the particulate clean-up must be done at the high temperatures of the process. Many new concepts for fine particulate control at elevated temperatures are presently being proposed. One such concept utilizes ceramic membrane filters. The report gives results of a study to analyze and evaluate ceramic membrane filters as a new, fine particulate (<3 um) control concept for high-temperature (approx. 900/sup 0/C), high-pressure processes. Several ceramic filters were identified as potential candidates for fine particulate removal. There does not seem to be any inherent material limitation to high-temperature operation; however, no evidence of high-temperature filter application was found. The filters typically are 2-6 mm thick, cylindrical, and available with various pore sizes, increasing upward from 0.5 um. These elements may be suitable for fine particulate control in hot gas streams. The most promising, although undeveloped, idea for a ceramic filter is to use ceramic honeycomb monoliths similar to those available for catalyst supports and heat exchangers. The walls of the monoliths are about 0.2-0.4 mm thick and of varying pore size and porosity. Geometric configurations are available which would force the gas to flow through the membrane walls. Pressure losses would be very small relative to those of standard ceramic filter elements. The application of ceramic monoliths to high-temperature fine particulate control appears very promising. It is strongly recommended that this concept be investigated further.

Poe, G.G.; Evans, R.M.; Bonnett, W.S.; Waterland, L.R.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Daily Simulation of Ozone and Fine Particulates over New York State: Findings and Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the potential utility of the application of a photochemical modeling system in providing simultaneous forecasts of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) over New York State. To this end, daily simulations from the ...

C. Hogrefe; W. Hao; K. Civerolo; J.-Y. Ku; G. Sistla; R. S. Gaza; L. Sedefian; K. Schere; A. Gilliland; R. Mathur

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

5-Year Research Plan on Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory Five Year Research Plan on Fine Particulate Matter in the Atmosphere FY2001-FY2005 NETL PM Research Program Ambient Sampling & Analysis Control Technology R&D Source Characterization Predictive Modeling -iii- TABLE OF CONTENTS Page I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A. Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B. Outlook for PM and the Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. OVERVIEW OF THE PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 A. Program Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 B. Current Program Highlights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1. The Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

8

SOURCE SIGNATURES OF FINE PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PETROLEUM REFINING AND FUEL USE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The molecular structure and microstructure of a suite of fine particulate matter (PM) samples produced by the combustion of residual fuel oil and diesel fuel were investigated by an array of analytical techniques. Some of the more important results are summarized below. Diesel PM (DPM): A small diesel engine test facility was used to generate a suite of diesel PM samples from different fuels under engine load and idle conditions. C XANES, {sup 13}C NMR, XRD, and TGA were in accord that the samples produced under engine load conditions contained more graphitic material than those produced under idle conditions, which contained a larger amount of unburned diesel fuel and lubricating oil. The difference was enhanced by the addition of 5% of oxygenated compounds to the reference fuel. Scanning transmission x-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM) was able to distinguish particulate regions rich in C=C bonds from regions rich in C-H bonds with a resolution of {approx}50 nm. The former are representative of more graphitic regions and the latter of regions rich in unburned fuel and oil. The dominant microstructure observed by SEM and TEM consisted of complex chain-like structures of PM globules {approx}20-100 nm in mean diameter, with a high fractal dimension. High resolution TEM revealed that the graphitic part of the diesel soot consisted of onion-like structures made up of graphene layers. Typically 3-10 graphene layers make up the ''onion rings'', with the layer spacing decreasing as the number of layers increases. ROFA PM: Residual oil fly ash (ROFA) PM has been analyzed by a new approach that combines XAFS spectroscopy with selective leaching procedures. ROFA PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 2.5+} produced in combustion facilities at the U.S. EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRML) were analyzed by XAFS before and after leaching with water, acid (1N HCl), and pentane. Both water and acid leaching removed most of the metal sulfates, which were the dominant phase present for most metals (V, Ni, Zn, etc.). This allowed conclusive identification in the leaching residue of important secondary sulfide and oxide phases, including Ni sulfide, a toxic and carcinogenic phase observed in the leached PM{sub 2.5+} samples. Other significant secondary phases identified included V{sub 2}O{sub 4}, V sulfide, and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

Gerald P. Huffman; Frank E. Huggins; Naresh Shah; Artur Braun; Yuanzhi Chen; J. David Robertson; Joseph Kyger; Adel F. Sarofim; Ronald J. Pugmire; Henk L.C. Meuzelaar; JoAnn Lighty

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, evaluated the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation involved two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring included the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station contains sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO2, O3, etc.). Laboratory analyses of time-integrated samples were used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Nearreal- time measurements were used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 30 months of field data were collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data provides mercury, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis includes (1) development of updated inventories of mercury emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This is accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results were compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory’s monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by the USEPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions provides critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As stated in the proposal: Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg0 and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by the USEPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2006-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

11

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley Region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley Region.

Kevin Crist

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

12

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2005-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2004-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

14

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Fine Particulate Matter, and Arsenic from Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately of 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technologies Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

15

EVALUATION OF THE EMISSION, TRANSPORT, AND DEPOSITION OF MERCURY, FINE PARTICULATE MATTER, AND ARSENIC FROM COAL-BASED POWER PLANTS IN THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY REGION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) and Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors, is evaluating the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: ambient air monitoring and regional-scale modeling analysis. The scope of work for the ambient air monitoring will include the deployment of a surface air monitoring (SAM) station in southeastern Ohio. The SAM station will contain sampling equipment to collect and measure mercury (including speciated forms of mercury and wet and dry deposited mercury), arsenic, particulate matter (PM) mass, PM composition, and gaseous criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, etc.). Laboratory analysis of time-integrated samples will be used to obtain chemical speciation of ambient PM composition and mercury in precipitation. Near-real-time measurements will be used to measure the ambient concentrations of PM mass and all gaseous species including Hg{sup 0} and RGM. Approximately 18 months of field data will be collected at the SAM site to validate the proposed regional model simulations for episodic and seasonal model runs. The ambient air quality data will also provide mercury, arsenic, and fine particulate matter data that can be used by Ohio Valley industries to assess performance on multi-pollutant control systems. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal-fired power plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg{sup 0}, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions. To the greatest extent possible, model results will also be compared to field data collected at other air monitoring sites in the Ohio Valley Region, operated independently of this project. These sites may include (1) the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's monitoring site at its suburban Pittsburgh, PA facility; (2) sites in Pittsburgh (Lawrenceville) PA and Holbrook, PA operated by ATS; (3) sites in Steubenville, OH and Pittsburgh, PA operated by U.S. EPA and/or its contractors; and (4) sites operated by State or local air regulatory agencies. Field verification of model results and predictions will provide critical information for the development of cost effective air pollution control strategies by the coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region.

Kevin Crist

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

16

Characterization of Fine Particulate Matter (PM) and Secondary PM Precursor Gases in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area  

SciTech Connect

This project was one of three collaborating grants funded by DOE/ASP to characterize the fine particulate matter (PM) and secondary PM precursors in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during the MILAGRO Campaign. The overall effort of MCMA-2006, one of the four components, focused on i) examination of the primary emissions of fine particles and precursor gases leading to photochemical production of atmospheric oxidants and secondary aerosol particles; ii) measurement and analysis of secondary oxidants and secondary fine PM production, with particular emphasis on secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and iii) evaluation of the photochemical and meteorological processes characteristic of the Mexico City Basin. The collaborative teams pursued the goals through three main tasks: i) analyses of fine PM and secondary PM precursor gaseous species data taken during the MCMA-2002/2003 campaigns and preparation of publications; ii) planning of the MILAGRO Campaign and deployment of the instrument around the MCMA; and iii) analysis of MCMA-2006 data and publication preparation. The measurement phase of the MILAGRO Campaign was successfully completed in March 2006 with excellent participation from the international scientific community and outstanding cooperation from the Mexican government agencies and institutions. The project reported here was led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Molina Center for Energy and the Environment (MIT/MCE2) team and coordinated with DOE/ASP-funded collaborators at Aerodyne Research Inc., University of Colorado at Boulder and Montana State University. Currently 24 papers documenting the findings from this project have been published. The results from the project have improved significantly our understanding of the meteorological and photochemical processes contributing to the formation of ozone, secondary aerosols and other pollutants. Key findings from the MCMA-2003 include a vastly improved speciated emissions inventory from on-road vehicles: the MCMA motor vehicles produce abundant amounts of primary PM, elemental carbon, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and a wide range of air toxics; the feasibility of using eddy covariance techniques to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds in an urban core and a valuable tool for validating local emissions inventory; a much better understanding of the sources and atmospheric loadings of volatile organic compounds; the first spectroscopic detection of glyoxal in the atmosphere; a unique analysis of the high fraction of ambient formaldehyde from primary emission sources; characterization of ozone formation and its sensitivity to VOCs and NOx; a much more extensive knowledge of the composition, size distribution and atmospheric mass loadings of both primary and secondary fine PM, including the fact that the rate of MCMA SOA production greatly exceeded that predicted by current atmospheric models; evaluations of significant errors that can arise from standard air quality monitors for O3 and NO2; and the implementation of an innovative Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for inorganic aerosol modeling as a powerful tool to analyze aerosol data and predict gas phase concentrations where these are unavailable. During the MILAGRO Campaign the collaborative team utilized a combination of central fixed sites and a mobile laboratory deployed throughout the MCMA to representative urban and boundary sites to measure trace gases and fine particles. Analysis of the extensive 2006 data sets has confirmed the key findings from MCMA-2002/2003; additionally MCMA-2006 provided more detailed gas and aerosol chemistry and wider regional scale coverage. Key results include an updated 2006 emissions inventory; extension of the flux system to measure fluxes of fine particles; better understanding of the sources and apportionment of aerosols, including contribution from biomass burning and industrial sources; a comprehensive evaluation of metal containing particles in a complex urban environment; identification of a close correlation between

Luisa T. Molina, Rainer Volkamer, Benjamin de Foy, Wenfang Lei, Miguel Zavala, Erik Velasco; Mario J. Molina

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated new National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter, including for the first time particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers ({micro}m) referred to as PM2.5. PM2.5 in the atmosphere also contributes to reduced atmospheric visibility, which is the subject of existing rules for siting emission sources near Class 1 areas and new Regional Haze rules. There are few existing data regarding emissions and characteristics of fine aerosols from oil, gas and power generation industry combustion sources, and the information that is available is generally outdated and incomplete. Traditional stationary source air emission sampling methods tend to underestimate or overestimate the contribution of the source to ambient aerosols because they do not properly account for primary aerosol formation, which occurs after the gases leave the stack. Primary aerosol includes both filterable particles that are solid or liquid aerosols at stack temperature plus those that form as the stack gases cool through mixing and dilution processes in the plume downwind of the source. These deficiencies in the current methods can have significant impacts on regulatory decision-making. PM2.5 measurement issues were extensively reviewed by the American Petroleum Institute (API) (England et al., 1998), and it was concluded that dilution sampling techniques are more appropriate for obtaining a representative particulate matter sample from combustion systems for determining PM2.5 emission rate and chemical speciation. Dilution sampling is intended to collect aerosols including those that condense and/or react to form solid or liquid aerosols as the exhaust plume mixes and cools to near-ambient temperature immediately after the stack discharge. These techniques have been widely used in recent research studies. For example, Hildemann et al. (1994) and McDonald et al. (1998) used filtered ambient air to dilute the stack gas sample followed by 80-90 seconds residence time to allow aerosol formation and growth to stabilize prior to sample collection and analysis. More accurate and complete emissions data generated using the methods developed in this program will enable more accurate source-receptor and source apportionment analysis for PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) implementation and streamline the environmental assessment of oil, gas and power production facilities. The overall goals of this program were to: (1) Develop improved dilution sampling technology and test methods for PM2.5 mass emissions and speciation measurements, and compare results obtained with dilution and traditional stationary source sampling methods. (2) Develop emission factors and speciation profiles for emissions of fine particulate matter, especially organic aerosols, for use in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses. (3) Identify and characterize PM2.5 precursor compound emissions that can be used in source-receptor and source apportionment analyses.

Glenn C. England

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Arsenic, and Fine Particulate Matter From Coal-Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kevin crist Kevin crist Principal Investigator Ohio University Research and Technology Center Athens, OH 45701 740-593-4751 cristk@ohiou.edu Environmental and Water Resources Evaluation of thE Emission, transport, and dEposition of mErcury, arsEnic, and finE particulatE mattEr from coal-BasEd powEr plants in thE ohio rivEr vallEy rEgion Background The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has established an aggressive research initiative to address the technical and scientific issues surrounding the impact of coal-based power systems on ambient levels of fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ), nitrogen oxides (NO X ), mercury/air toxics, and acid gases. Regulatory drivers such as the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the 1997 revised National Ambient Air Quality Standards, and the 2005 Clean Air

19

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5)DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Analysis of data collected to date show that: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites, and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Data analysis focusing on relating the aerometric measurements to local and regional scale emissions of sources of primary and secondary fine particles using receptor-based air quality models will follow.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Previous Semi-Annual Technical Progress Reports presented the following: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Analyses of data conducted during the period from April 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003 are presented in this Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report. Report Revision No. 1 includes the additions or removals of text presented in the previous version of this report.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Advanced particulate matter control apparatus and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for collection and removal of particulate matter, including fine particulate matter, from a gas stream, comprising a unique combination of high collection efficiency and ultralow pressure drop across the filter. The apparatus and method utilize simultaneous electrostatic precipitation and membrane filtration of a particular pore size, wherein electrostatic collection and filtration occur on the same surface.

Miller, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, ND); Zhuang, Ye (Grand Forks, ND); Almlie, Jay C. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the US Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and recollection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hour parametric tests and 100-hour proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency.

Stanley J. Miller; Grant L. Schelkoph; Grant E. Dunham

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Just the Basics: Particulate Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is Particulate is Particulate Matter? One of the major components of air pollution is particulate matter, or PM. PM refers to airborne particles that include dust, dirt, soot, smoke, and liquid droplets. These particles can range in size from microscopic to large enough to be seen. PM is characterized by its size, with fine particles of less than 2.5 micrometers in size designated as PM 2.5 and coarser particles between 2.5 and 10 micrometers in size designated as PM 10 . PM arises from many sources, including combustion occurring in factories, power plants, cars, trucks, buses, trains, or wood fires; or through simple agitation of existing particulates by tilling of land, quarrying and stone-crushing, and off- road vehicular movement. Of particular interest is PM generated during diesel

24

Airborne Fine Particulate Matter (PM) Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for reducing the PM contribution from energy production, especially from coal fired power plants. The program was initiated in 1998 when Congress appropriated funds to the DOE...

25

Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Project Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

As the consumption of energy increases, its impact on ambient air quality has become a significant concern. Recent studies indicate that fine particles from coal combustion cause health problems as well as atmospheric visibility impairment. These problems are further compounded by the concentration of hazardous trace elements such as mercury, cadmium, selenium, and arsenic in fine particles. Therefore, a current need exists to develop superior, but economical, methods to control emissions of fine particles. Since most of the toxic metals present in coal will be in particulate form, a high level of fine- particle collection appears to be the best method of overall air toxics control. However, over 50% of mercury and a portion of selenium emissions are in vapor form and cannot be collected in particulate control devices. Therefore, this project will focus on developing technology not only to provide ultrahigh collection efficiency of particulate air toxic emissions, but also to capture vapor- phase trace metals such as mercury and selenium. Currently, the primary state-of-the-art technologies for particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). However, they both have limitations that prevent them from achieving ultrahigh collection of fine particulate matter and vapor-phase trace metals. The objective of this project is to develop a highly reliable advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC) that can provide > 99.99 % particulate collection efficiency for all particle sizes between 0.01 and 50 14m, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, and is cost-0443competitive with existing technologies. Phase I of the project is organized into three tasks: Task I - Project Management, Reporting, and Subcontract Consulting Task 2 - Modeling, Design, and Construction of 200-acfm AHPC Model Task 3 - Experimental Testing and Subcontract Consulting

Miller, S.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems Fine Particle Emissions from Combustion Systems Speaker(s): Allen Robinson Date: November 11, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Combustion systems such as motor vehicles and power plants are major sources of fine particulate matter. This talk describes some of the changes in fine particle emissions that occur as exhaust from combustion systems mix with background air. This mixing cools and dilutes the exhaust which influences gas-particle partitioning of semi-volatile species, the aerosol size distribution, and the fine particle mass. Dilution sampling is used to characterize fine particle emissions from combustion systems because it simulates the rapid cooling and dilution that occur as exhaust mixes with the atmosphere. Results from dilution sampler

27

NETL: Control Technology: Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Under DOE-NETL sponsorship, the University of North Dakota, Energy and Environmental Research Center (UND-EERC) has developed a new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Otter Tail Power Company. The AHPC utilizes both electrostatic collection and filtration in a unique geometric configuration that achieves ultrahigh particle collection with much less collection area than conventional particulate control devices. The primary technologies for state-of-the-art particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). A major limitation of ESPs is that the fractional penetration of 0.1- to 1.0-µm particles is typically at least an order of magnitude greater than for 10-µm particles, so a situation exists where the particles that are of greatest health concern are collected with the lowest efficiency. Fabric filters are currently considered to be the best available control technology for fine particles, but emissions are dependent on ash properties and typically increase if the air-to-cloth (A/C) ratio is increased. In addition, many fabrics cannot withstand the rigors of high-SO2 flue gases, which are typical for bituminous fuels. Fabric filters may also have problems with bag cleanability and high pressure drop, which has resulted in conservatively designed, large, costly baghouses.

28

NICKEL SPECIATION OF URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER  

SciTech Connect

A four-step sequential Ni extraction method, summarized in Table AB-1, was evaluated for identifying and quantifying the Ni species occurring in urban total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and fine particulate matter (<10 {micro}m [PM{sub 10}] and <2.5 {micro}m [PM{sub 2.5}] in aerodynamic diameter). The extraction method was originally developed for quantifying soluble, sulfidic, elemental, and oxidic forms of Ni that may occur in industrial atmospheres. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy were used to evaluate the Ni species selectivity of the extraction method. Uncertainties in the chemical speciation of Ni in urban PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} greatly affect inhalation health risk estimates, primarily because of the large variability in acute, chronic, and cancer-causing effects for different Ni compounds.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Charlene R. Crocker; Carolyn M. Nyberg; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Particulate Matter Standards (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency sets the standards for particulate emissions from a variety of sources, including facilities that generate power. ...

31

Airborne particulate discriminator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for rapid and accurate detection and discrimination of biological, radiological, and chemical particles in air. A suspect aerosol of the target particulates is treated with a taggant aerosol of ultrafine particulates. Coagulation of the taggant and target particles causes a change in fluorescent properties of the cloud, providing an indication of the presence of the target.

Creek, Kathryn Louise (San Diego, CA); Castro, Alonso (Santa Fe, NM); Gray, Perry Clayton (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Particulate Controls for Near-Zero Emissions Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the ability of current and developing particulate control technologies to meet extremely low, continuous, particulate emission limits. Interest in this topic is due to concerns about the environmental impact of coal-fired power plants and the trend towards lower and lower particulate emission limits proposed by regulators and environmental groups. The report characterizes the capabilities of existing electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and fabric filters (FFs) and identifies several ...

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

MERCURY CONTROL WITH ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

SciTech Connect

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addressed Technical Topical Area 4-Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team included the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Power Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., and has been marketed as the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter by Gore. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter also appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas--solid contactor. The objective of the project was to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach included bench-scale batch tests, larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, and field demonstration at the 2.5-MW (9000-acfm) scale at a utility power plant to prove scale-up and demonstrate longer-term mercury control. An additional task was included in this project to evaluate mercury oxidation upstream of a dry scrubber by using mercury oxidants. This project demonstrated at the pilot-scale level a technology that provides a cost-effective technique to control mercury and, at the same time, greatly enhances fine particulate collection efficiency. The technology can be used to retrofit systems currently employing inefficient ESP technology as well as for new construction, thereby providing a solution for improved fine particulate control combined with effective mercury control for a large segment of the U.S. utility industry as well as other industries.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fluidizing device for solid particulates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible whip or a system of whips with novel attachments is suspended in a hopper and is caused to impact against fibrous and irregularly shaped particulates in the hopper to fluidize the particulates and facilitate the flow of the particulates through the hopper. The invention provides for the flow of particulates at a substantially constant mass flow rate and uses a minimum of energy.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fluidizing device for solid particulates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible whip or a system of whips with novel attachments is suspended in a hopper and is caused to impact against fibrous and irregularly shaped particulates in the hopper to fluidize the particulates and facilitate the flow of the particulates through the hopper. The invention provides for the flow of particulates at a substantially constant mass flow rate and uses a minimum of energy.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Golden, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Computabilities of Fine-Continuous Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a sequential-based definition of locally uniformly Fine-computable functions together with a definition of effective locally uniform convergence. This definition of computability makes some discontinuous functions, which may diverge, computable. ...

Takakazu Mori

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

RETORT WATER PARTICULATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

62 (from an inert gas run using Utah shale) produce a highfrom an inert gas run using Antrim shale) produced a highhot combustion gases may release spent shale fines which are

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

RETORT WATER PARTICULATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effluents from In Situ Oil Shale Processing. Proceedings ofDecomposition of Colorado Oil Shale: II, Carbonate Minerals.Suspension of Spent Shale Fines and Oil~ Oil shale becomes

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material and product thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Void/particulate detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for detecting voids and particulates in a flowing stream of fluid contained in a pipe may comprise: (a) a transducer for transmitting an ultrasonic signal into the stream, coupled to the pipe at a first location; (b) a second transducer for detecting the through-transmission of said signal, coupled to the pipe at a second location; (c) a third transducer for detecting the back-scattering of said signal, coupled to the pipe at a third location, said third location being upstream from said first location; (d) circuit means for normalizing the back-scattered signal from said third transducer to the through-transmitted signal from said second transducer; which normalized signal provides a measure of the voids and particulates flowing past said first location.

Claytor, T.N.; Karplus, H.B.

1983-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Rigid particulate matter sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor to detect particulate matter. The sensor includes a first rigid tube, a second rigid tube, a detection surface electrode, and a bias surface electrode. The second rigid tube is mounted substantially parallel to the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the first rigid tube. The detection surface electrode is disposed to face the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed on an outer surface of the second rigid tube. The bias surface electrode is disposed to face the detection surface electrode on the first rigid tube. An air gap exists between the detection surface electrode and the bias surface electrode to allow particulate matter within an exhaust stream to flow between the detection and bias surface electrodes.

Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

Regenerable particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a three-dimensional lattice structure, such as a filter used to remove particulates from a gas stream, where the physical lattice structure is designed utilizing software simulation from pre-defined mass transfer and flow characteristics and the designed lattice structure is fabricated using a free-form fabrication manufacturing technique, where the periodic lattice structure is comprised of individual geometric elements.

Stuecker, John N. (Albuquerque, NM); Cesarano, III, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, James E. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

43

NETL: News Release - Projects Selected to Study Coal Plant Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2004 5, 2004 Projects Selected to Study Coal Plant Particulate Matter, Human Health PITTSBURGH, PA - The Department of Energy has selected three projects to help determine whether fine particulates emitted from coal-fired power plants affect human health, and which components of the particulates may be most problematic. Past studies have established that particulate matter smaller than 2.5 microns in diameter from all sources does affect human health, but there is scant information to provide a link between PM2.5 emitted specifically from coal plants and cardiac or respiratory health problems in humans. PM2.5 refers to particles-invisible to the eye-no more than 1/30th of the width of a human hair Coal plants emit only small quantities of "primary" PM2.5 (e.g., fly ash) because all plants have high-efficiency particulate-collection devices. However, coal plants are responsible for a great deal of "secondary" PM2.5, which forms in the atmosphere from emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Data collected in the new studies will be used to help design standards reviews and to devise strategies for controlling power plant emissions of PM2.5, SO2, and NOx.

44

An Introduction to Particulate Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Fiscal Year 2014. Title An Introduction to Particulate Matter Publication Type Book Chapter Year of Publication 2009 Authors Prisco, Joe, Rich Hill, Pam Lembke, D. Moore,...

45

Fine Grained Robotics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fine grained robotics is the idea of solving problems utilizing multitudes of very simple machines in place of one large complex entity. Organized in the proper way, simple machines and simple behaviors can lead to emergent ...

Flynn, Anita M.

46

High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters Home Standards DOE Workshops Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference Proceedings Qualified Filter List News Items Related Sites HEPA Related Lessons Learned Contact Us HSS Logo High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters The HEPA Filter web site provides a forum for informing and reporting department-wide activities related to filtration and ventilation issues with special reference to the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters' use, inspection, and testing. This site contains essentials of DOE HEPA filter test program, procedures, requirements and quality assurance aspects applicable to HEPA filters used in DOE facilities. This site contains information about the DOE-accepted Filter Test Facility and its management, operation and quality assuranceprogram.

47

Electrical diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine includes a diesel particulate filter (DPF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust. An electrical heater is disposed upstream of the DPF and selectively heats the exhaust to initiate combustion of the particulates within the exhaust as it passes therethrough. Heat generated by combustion of the particulates induces combustion of particulates within the DPF.

Gonze, Eugene V; Ament, Frank

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

49

Fine ash formation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, 15 pulverized coal samples were burnt in a drop-tube furnace to investigate the formation of fine particulates and the influence of coal ash properties on their emission. Coal combustion was carried out at 1673 K in air. Fine particles were collected by a cyclone and a low-pressure impactor. The elemental compositions of the collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We examined the chemical compositions of the fine particles as a function of particle diameter and examined the proportions of the elements in the parent coal samples. We determined that almost all particles less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter were formed by means of volatilization-condensation of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the coal. We also demonstrated that the amount of SiO{sub 2} in particle size less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter was related to the amount of fine included quartz and clay minerals in the parent coal. The primary components of particles greater than 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and as the diameter of the particles decrease, the mass fractions of iron, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus increased. However, the particle diameter at which this tendency commenced differed depending on the element. Particles between 0.22 and 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were thought to have been formed by the fragmentation and coalescence of particles in the coal and by the simultaneous condensation of volatilized elements onto other particles. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Tsuyoshi Teramae; Takayuki Takarada [Idemitsu Kosan Company, Limited, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environmental Research Laboratory

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

Hydrocarbon-enhanced particulate filter regeneration via microwave ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regeneration method for a particulate filter includes estimating a quantity of particulate matter trapped within the particulate filter, comparing the quantity of particulate matter to a predetermined quantity, heating at least a portion of the particulate filter to a combustion temperature of the particulate matter, and introducing hydrocarbon fuel to the particulate filter. The hydrocarbon fuel facilitates combustion of the particulate matter to regenerate the particulate filter.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Brown, David B. (Brighton, MI)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Method for the Removal of Ultrafine Particulates from an Aqueous Suspension  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating ultra-fine particulate from an aqueous suspension such as a process stream or a waste stream. The method involves the addition of alkali silicate and an organic gelling agent to a volume of liquid, from the respective process or waste stream, to form a gel. The gel then undergoes syneresis to remove water and soluble salts from the gel-containing the particulate, thus, forming a silica monolith. The silica monolith is then sintered to form a hard, nonporous waste form.

Chaiko, David J.; Kopasz, John P.; Ellison, Adam J.G.

1999-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

52

Process for particulate removal from coal liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

Rappe, Gerald C. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Proposal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Process R&D Overview 100G Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) Performance...

54

Pelletization of fine coals  

SciTech Connect

The present research project attempts to provide a basis to determine the pelletizability of fine coals, to ascertain the role of additives and binders and to establish a basis for binder selection. Currently, there are no established techniques for determining the quality of coal pellets. Our research is intended to develop a series of tests on coal pellets to measure their storage characteristics, transportability, ease of gasification and rate of combustion. Information developed from this research should be valuable for making knowledgeable decisions for on-time plant design, occasional binder selection and frequent process control during the pelletization of coal fines. During the last quarter, we continued the batch pelletization studies on Upper Freeport coal. The results as presented in that last quarterly report (April 1991) indicated that the surface conditions on the coal particle influenced the pelletizing growth rates. For example, a fresh (run of mine) sample of coal will display different pelletizing growth kinetics than a weathered sample of the same coal. Since coal is a heterogeneous material, the oxidized product of coal is equally variable. We found it to be logistically difficult to consistently produce large quantities of artificially oxidized coal for experimental purposes and as such we have used a naturally weathered coal. We have plans to oxidize coals under controlled oxidizing conditions and be able to establish their pelletizing behavior. The next phase of experiments were directed to study the effect of surface modification, introduced during the coal cleaning steps, on pelletizing kinetics. Accordingly, we initiated studies with two additives commonly used during the flotation of coal: dextrin (coal depressant) and dodecane (coal collector).

Sastry, K.V.S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

MERCURY CONTROL WITH THE ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 4-Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team includes the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Power Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., and is now marketed as the ADVANCED HYBRID{trademark} Filter by Gore. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas-solid contactor. The objective of the three-task project is to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the AHPC at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach includes bench-scale batch testing that ties the new work to previous results and links results with larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, pilot-scale testing on a coal-fired combustion system with both a pulse-jet baghouse and an AHPC to prove or disprove the research hypotheses, and field demonstration pilot-scale testing at a utility power plant to prove scaleup and demonstrate longer-term mercury control. This project, if successful, will demonstrate at the pilot-scale level a technology that would provide a cost-effective technique to accomplish control of mercury emissions and, at the same time, greatly enhance fine particulate collection efficiency. The technology can be used to retrofit systems currently employing inefficient ESP technology as well as for new construction, thereby providing a solution to a large segment of the U.S. utility industry as well as other industries requiring mercury control.

Stanley J. Miller; Ye Zhuang; Michelle R. Olderbak

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Mercuty Control With The Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector  

SciTech Connect

This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 4 - Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team includes the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., and is now marketed as the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter by Gore. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas-solid contactor. The objective of the three-task project is to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the AHPC at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach includes bench-scale batch testing that ties the new work to previous results and links results with larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, pilot-scale testing on a coal-fired combustion system with both a pulse-jet baghouse and an AHPC to prove or disprove the research hypotheses, and field demonstration pilot-scale testing at a utility power plant to prove scaleup and demonstrate longer-term mercury control. This project, if successful, will demonstrate at the pilot-scale level a technology that would provide a cost-effective technique to accomplish control of mercury emissions and, at the same time, greatly enhance fine particulate collection efficiency. The technology can be used to retrofit systems currently employing inefficient ESP technology as well as for new construction, thereby providing a solution to a large segment of the U.S. utility industry as well as other industries requiring mercury control.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michelle R. Olderbak

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Continuous fine ash depressurization system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for depressurizing and cooling a high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein. In one aspect, the system has an apparatus for cooling the high pressure, high temperature fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein and a pressure letdown device for depressurization by separating the cooled fine solid particles from a portion of the fine solid particles stream having entrained gas therein, resulting in a lower temperature, lower pressure outlet of solid particles for disposal or handling by downstream equipment.

Liu, Guohai (Birmingham, AL); Peng, Wan Wang (Birmingham, AL); Vimalchand, Pannalal (Birmingham, AL)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

58

Microsoft Word - Finely_NorthValley_CX.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cecilia Brown Cecilia Brown Project Manager - KEWM-4 Proposed Action: Finely Creek and North Valley Creek property funding Fish and Wildlife Project No. and Contract No.: 2002-003-00, BPA-58888 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.25 Real property transfers for cultural resources protection, habitat preservation, and wildlife management Location: Finely Creek: Township 16 North, Range 20 West, Section 24; Missoula County, MT. North Valley Creek: Township 17 North, Range 20 West, Section 19; Lake County, MT. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) for the purchase of 9 acres of property, referred to as the Finely Creek Property,

59

Diesel particulate filter with zoned resistive heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diesel particulate filter assembly comprises a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a heater assembly. The DPF filters a particulate from exhaust produced by an engine. The heater assembly has a first metallic layer that is applied to the DPF, a resistive layer that is applied to the first metallic layer, and a second metallic layer that is applied to the resistive layer. The second metallic layer is etched to form a plurality of zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

60

Zone heated diesel particulate filter electrical connection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical connection system for a particulate filter is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) disposed within an outer shell wherein the PF is segmented into a plurality of heating zones; an outer mat disposed between the particulate filter and the outer shell; an electrical connector coupled to the outer shell of the PF; and a plurality of printed circuit connections that extend along the outer surface of the PF from the electrical connector to the plurality of heating zones.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Proposal Guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Deadline: June 30, 2008 Funding LLNL supports projects with funding from University of California. Funding for the IGPP Minigrant projects is limited to 50,000 per...

62

Methods of separating particulate residue streams  

SciTech Connect

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

Electrically heated particulate filter using catalyst striping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A catalyst coating is applied to the PF that increases a temperature of the combustion of the particulates within the PF.

Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; Ament, Frank

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

AIR QUALITY: MERCURY, TRACE ELEMENTS, AND PARTICULATE MATTER CONFERENCE  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the planning/preparation, facilitation, and outcome of the conference entitled ''Air Quality: Mercury, Trace Elements, and Particulate Matter'' that was held December 1-4, 1998, in McLean, Virginia (on the outskirts of Washington, DC). The goal of the conference was to bring together industry, government, and the research community to discuss the critical issue of how air quality can impact human health and the ecosystem, specifically hazardous air pollutants and fine airborne particles; available and developing control technologies; strategies and research needs; and an update on federal and state policy and regulations, related implementation issues, and the framework of the future.

John H. Pavlish; Steven A. Benson

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Catalytic fabric filtration for simultaneous NO{sub x} and particulate control. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project proposed was to evaluate the catalyst-coated fabric filter concept for effective control of NO{sub 2} and particulate emissions simultaneously. General goals included demonstrating high removal efficiency of NO{sub x} and particulate matter, acceptable bag and catalyst life, and that process economics show a significant cost savings in comparison to a commercial SCR process and conventional particulate control. Specific goals included the following: reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 60 ppM or less; demonstrate particulate removal efficiency of >99.5%; demonstrate a bag/catalyst life of >1 year; Control ammonia slip to <25 ppM; show that catalytic fabric filtration can achieve a 50% cost savings over conventional fabric filtration and SCR control technology; determine compatibility with S0{sub 2} removal systems; and show that the concept results in a nonhazardous waste product.

Weber, G.F.; Dunham, G.E.; Laudal, D.L.; Ness, S.R.; Schelkoph, G.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Unsolicited Proposals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy's (DOE’s) central point of receipt for all Unsolicited Proposals is the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) which includes all DOE Program Research Areas.   

67

Electrically heated particulate filter propagation support methods and systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A control system that controls regeneration of a particulate filter is provided. The system generally includes a regeneration module that controls current to the particulate filter to initiate combustion of particulate matter in the particulate filter. A propagation module estimates a propagation status of the combustion of the particulate matter based on a combustion temperature. A temperature adjustment module controls the combustion temperature by selectively increasing a temperature of exhaust that passes through the particulate filter.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

Engines - 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates Diesel particulate matter has a very complex geometry Most studies have observed these three-dimensional structures in...

69

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3 - Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)...

70

Radiant zone heated particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fine Structure of Dark Energy and New Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following our recent work on the cosmological constant problem, in this letter we make a specific proposal regarding the fine structure (i.e., the spectrum) of dark energy. The proposal is motivated by a deep analogy between the blackbody radiation problem, which led to the development of quantum theory, and the cosmological constant problem, which we have recently argued calls for a conceptual extension of the quantum theory. We argue that the fine structure of dark energy is governed by a Wien distribution, indicating its dual quantum and classical nature. We discuss a few observational consequences of such a picture of dark energy.

Vishnu Jejjala; Michael Kavic; Djordje Minic

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Title Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-514E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Lobscheid, Agnes B., Thomas E. McKone, and D. A. Valleroc Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5659-5672 Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and particulate matter (PM) are co-pollutants emitted as by-products of combustion processes. Convincing evidence exists for PAHs as a primary toxic component of fine PM (PM2.5). Because PM2.5 is listed by the US EPA as a "Criteria Pollutant," it is monitored regularly at sites nationwide. In contrast, very limited data is available on measured ambient air concentrations of PAHs. However, between 1999-2001, ambient air concentrations of PM2.5 and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) are available for California locations. We use multivariate linear regression models (MLRMs) to predict ambient air levels of BaP in four air basins based on reported PM2.5 concentrations and spatial, temporal and meteorological variables as variates. We obtain an R2 ranging from 0.57-0.72 among these basins. Significant variables (p<0.05) include the average daily PM2.5 concentration, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity, and the coastal distance as well as season, and holiday or weekend. Combining the data from all sites and using only these variables to estimate ambient BaP levels, we obtain an R2 of 0.55. These R2-values, combined with analysis of the residual error and cross validation using the PRESS-statistic, demonstrate the potential of our method to estimate reported outdoor air PAH exposure levels in metropolitan regions. These MLRMs provide a first step towards relating outdoor ambient PM2.5 and PAH concentrations for epidemiological studies when PAH measurements are unavailable, or limited in spatial coverage, based on publicly available meteorological and PM2.5 data

73

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the second year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operation. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation tests results for a gas turbine, a process heater, and a commercial oil/gas fired boiler are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods. A series of pilot tests were conducted to identify the constraints to reduce the size of current research dilution sampler for future stack emission tests. Based on the test results, a bench prototype compact dilution sampler developed and characterized in GE EER in August 2002.

Glenn England; Oliver Chang; Stephanie Wien

2002-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Electrically heated particulate filter enhanced ignition strategy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A catalyst coating applied to at least one of the PF and the grid. A control module estimates a temperature of the grid and controls the engine to produce a desired exhaust product to increase the temperature of the grid.

Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

75

An improved visualization of diesel particulate filter/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prevalence of diesel particulate filters (DPF) is increasing as emissions standards worldwide evolve to match current technologies. Since the first application of DPFs in the 1980's, PM trapping effectiveness has ...

Boehm, Kevin (Kevin W.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

New ESP additive controls particulates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that a conditioning agent enhanced precipitator performance after plant switched to low-sulfur coal. Firing low-sulfur coal at a power plant designed for medium- or high-sulfur coal will impact the downstream particulate control device. Since the performance of an electro-static precipitator (ESP) is a strong function of the sulfur content in the coal, switching to a low-sulfur coal will severely impact collection efficiency. Particle resistivity is the dominant parameter affecting the performance of an ESP. When the resistivity is too high, the ESP must be increased in size by a factor of two to three, resulting in proportionally increased capital and operating costs. Fly ash from low-sulfur coal is known to have a typical resistivity one or two orders of magnitude above that for ideal collection efficiency in a well-designed ESP. Therefore, when a utility burning a medium- or high-sulfur coal switches to a low-sulfur coal, the increase in particle resistivity resulting from the reduced SO{sub 3} concentration will lead to severe problems in the ESP. There have been many instances where utilities have switched from a high- to a low-sulfur coal, and the problems caused by the increased resistivity have had such a devastating effect on the performance of the ESP that emissions have increased by a factor of 10.

Durham, M.D.; Baldrey, K.E.; Bustard, C.J.; Martin, C.E.; Dharmarajan, N.N.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Method of producing particulate-reinforced composites and composties produced thereby  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for producing particle-reinforced composite materials through utilization of an in situ reaction to produce a uniform dispersion of a fine particulate reinforcement phase. The process includes forming a melt of a first material, and then introducing particles of a second material into the melt and subjecting the melt to high-intenisty acoustic vibration. A chemical reaction initiates between the first and second materials to produce reaction products in the melt. The reaciton products comprise a solide particulate phase, and the high-intensity acoustic vibration fragments and/or separates the reaction products into solid particles that are dispersed in the melt and are smaller than the particles of the second material. Also encompassed are particles-reinforced composite materials produced by such a process.

Han, Qingyou; Liu, Zhiwei

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

Quantum Fine-Grained Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regarding the strange properties of quantum entropy and entanglement, e.g., the negative quantum conditional entropy, we revisited the foundations of quantum entropy, namely, von Neumann entropy, and raised the new method of quantum fine-grained entropy. With the applications in entanglement theory, quantum information processing, and quantum thermodynamics, we demonstrated the capability of quantum fine-grained entropy to resolve some notable confusions and problems, including the measure of entanglement and quantumness, the additivity conjecture of entanglement of formation etc, and the definition of temperature for single quantum system.

Wang, Dong-Sheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous The government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC21-88MC 23174 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Cohen, Mitchell R. (Troy, NY); Gal, Eli (Lititz, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and system are described for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous mixture.

Cohen, M.R.; Gal, E.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Program on Technology Innovation: An Alternate Framework for the Risk Assessment of Ambient Particulate Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The designation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is based on the protection of human health. PM2.5 is currently regulated on a mass concentration basis (particle mass per volume of air), with the standard providing limits on both 24-hour and annual average concentrations. A fundamental tenet of this mass-based approach to regulation is its implicit assumption that all particle components are equally harmful to health. In light of the complexity of t...

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

PRODUCTION OF SHEET FROM PARTICULATE MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for forming coherent sheet material from particulate material such as granular or powdered metal, granular or powdered oxide, slurries, pastes, and plastic mixes which cohere under pressure. The primary object is to avoid the use of expensive and/ or short lived pressing tools, that is, dies and specially profiled rolls, and so to reduce the cost of the product and to prcvide in a simple manner for the making of the product in a variety of shapes or sizes. The sheet material is formed when the particulate material is laterally confined in a boundary material deformable in all lateral directions under axial pressure and then axially compressing the layer of particulate material together with the boundary material.

Blainey, A.

1959-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

83

Particulate hot gas stream cleanup technical issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup particulate samples and descriptions of filter performance studied under this contract were designed to address problems with filter operation that have been linked to characteristics of the collected particulate matter. One objective of this work was to generate an interactive, computerized data bank of the key physical and chemical characteristics of ash and char collected from operating advanced particle filters and to relate these characteristics to the operation and performance of these filters. The interactive data bank summarizes analyses of over 160 ash and char samples from fifteen pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification facilities utilizing high-temperature, high pressure barrier filters.

Pontius, D.H.; Snyder, T.R.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Particulate matter sensor with a heater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus to detect particulate matter. The apparatus includes a sensor electrode, a shroud, and a heater. The electrode measures a chemical composition within an exhaust stream. The shroud surrounds at least a portion of the sensor electrode, exclusive of a distal end of the sensor electrode exposed to the exhaust stream. The shroud defines an air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud and an opening toward the distal end of the sensor electrode. The heater is mounted relative to the sensor electrode. The heater burns off particulate matter in the air gap between the sensor electrode and the shroud.

Hall, Matthew (Austin, TX)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

85

Particulate Fouling of HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Alexander Siegel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particulate Fouling of HVAC Heat Exchangers by Jeffrey Alexander Siegel B.S. (Swarthmore College.......................................................................................xv CHAPTER 1: PARTICULATE FOULING OF HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS ....1 1.1 Introduction.......................................................................11 CHAPTER 2: MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS

Siegel, Jeffrey

86

Microscopy investigations of ash and particulate matter accumulation in diesel particulate filter surface pores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been increased focus on the environmental impact of automobile emissions in recent years. These environmental concerns have resulted in the creation of more stringent particulate matter emissions regulations in ...

Beauboeuf, Daniel P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Does Zeeman's Fine Topology Exist?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We work on the family of topologies for the Minkowski manifold M. We partially order this family by inclusion to form the lattice \\Sigma(M), and focus on the sublattice Z of topologies that induce the Euclidean metric space on every time axis and every space axis. We analyze the bounds of Z in the lattice \\Sigma(M), in search for its supremum. Our conclusion --that such a supremum does not belong in Z-- is compared with constructive proofs of existence of the fine topology, defined as the maximum of Z and conceived to play an essential role in contemporary physical theories. Essential mathematical and physical questions arise.

Norberto Sainz

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

88

Electrically heated particulate filter preparation methods and systems  

SciTech Connect

A control system that controls regeneration of a particulate filter is provided. The system generally includes a fuel control module that controls injection of fuel into exhaust that passes through the particulate filter. A regeneration module controls current to the particulate filter to initiate regeneration after the fuel has been injected into the exhaust.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR - PILOT-SCALE TESTING  

SciTech Connect

A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funding. In addition to DOE and the EERC, the project team includes W.L. Gore and Associates, Inc., Allied Environmental Technologies, Inc., and the Big Stone power station. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique approach to develop a compact but highly efficient system. Filtration and electrostatics are employed in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The objective of the AHPC is to provide >99.99% particulate collection efficiency for particle sizes from 0.01 to 50 {micro}m and be applicable for use with all U.S. coals at a lower cost than existing technologies. In previous field tests with the AHPC, some minor bag damage was observed that appeared to be caused by electrical effects. Extensive studies were then carried out to determine the reason for the bag damage and to find possible solutions without compromising AHPC performance. The best solution to prevent the bag damage was found to be perforated plates installed between the electrodes and the bags, which can block the electric field from the bag surface and intercept current to the bags. The perforated plates not only solve the bag damage problem, but also offer many other advantages such as operation at higher A/C (air-to-cloth) ratios, lower pressure drop, and an even more compact geometric arrangement. For this project, AHPC pilot-scale tests were carried out to understand the effect of the perforated plate configuration on bag protection and AHPC overall performance and to optimize the perforated plate design. Five different perforated plate configurations were evaluated in a coal combustion system. The AHPC performed extremely well even at a low current level (1.5-3.0 mA) and a low pulse trigger pressure of 6.5 in. W.C. (1.62 kPa), resulting in a bag-cleaning interval of over 40 min at an A/C ratio of 12 ft/min (3.7 m/min) for most of the test period. The longest bag-cleaning interval was 594 min, which is the best to date. The residual drag was reduced to the range from 0.25 to 0.35 in. H{sub 2}O/ft/min, showing an excellent bag-cleaning ability under the perforated plate configurations. The K{sub 2}C{sub i} at the current level of 3 mA was as low as 1.0, indicating excellent ESP performance. All the results are the best achieved to date.

Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michael E. Collings; Michelle R. Olderbak

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Spatial and temporal distributions of particulate matter and particulate organic carbon, Northeast Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distribution of particulate matter (PM) and particulate organic carbon (POC) was determined during the Northeast Gulf of Mexico Chemical Oceanography and Hydro-graphy program (NEGOM). The hydrography and physical forcing functions were examined to explain particulate matter distribution. PM and POC were determined for discrete samples, and PM was also compared with in situ beam attenuation measure-ments in order to make estimations of continuous particle concentration profiles. Measurements were made three times per year for three years, during 1997-1998, 1998-1999, and 1999-2000, but only the first two years' worth of results are reported here. PM distributions vary seasonally and interannually. General patterns tend to be fairly consistent spatially and temporally during fall and spring, but intensity changes accord-ing to season. Differences present at the surface appear to be due mainly to riverine input of nutrients and particles from the several major rivers that flow into the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Wind-forced circulation appears to be a minor influence on surface particulate distribution. Secondary eddies can have an effect upon distribution, as seen with an anticyclonic feature over the upper slope during Summer 1998 which entrained less saline, high particulate river water offshore. A similar effect was noted during Summer 1999, but to a lesser degree. A shelf edge current associated with anticyclonic flow seems to be a mechanism responsible for the appearance of nepheloid layers on the outer shelf.

Bernal, Christina Estefana

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Waste Coal Fines Reburn for NOx and Mercury Emission Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Injection of coal-water slurries (CWS) made with both waste coal and bituminous coal was tested for enhanced reduction of NO{sub x} and Hg emissions at the AES Beaver Valley plant near Monaca, PA. Under this project, Breen Energy Solutions (BES) conducted field experiments on the these emission reduction technologies by mixing coal fines and/or pulverized coal, urea and water to form slurry, then injecting the slurry in the upper furnace region of a coal-fired boiler. The main focus of this project was use of waste coal fines as the carbon source; however, testing was also conducted using pulverized coal in conjunction with or instead of waste coal fines for conversion efficiency and economic comparisons. The host site for this research and development project was Unit No.2 at AES Beaver Valley cogeneration station. Unit No.2 is a 35 MW Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) front-wall fired boiler that burns eastern bituminous coal. It has low NO{sub x} burners, overfire air ports and a urea-based selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system for NO{sub x} control. The back-end clean-up system includes a rotating mechanical ash particulate removal and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber. Coal slurry injection was expected to help reduce NOx emissions in two ways: (1) Via fuel-lean reburning when the slurry is injected above the combustion zone. (2) Via enhanced SNCR reduction when urea is incorporated into the slurry. The mercury control process under research uses carbon/water slurry injection to produce reactive carbon in-situ in the upper furnace, promoting the oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal-fired power boilers. By controlling the water content of the slurry below the stoichiometric requirement for complete gasification, water activated carbon (WAC) can be generated in-situ in the upper furnace. As little as 1-2% coal/water slurry (heat input basis) can be injected and generate sufficient WAC for mercury capture. During July, August, and September 2007, BES designed, procured, installed, and tested the slurry injection system at Beaver Valley. Slurry production was performed by Penn State University using equipment that was moved from campus to the Beaver Valley site. Waste coal fines were procured from Headwaters Inc. and transported to the site in Super Sacks. In addition, bituminous coal was pulverized at Penn State and trucked to the site in 55-gallon drums. This system was operated for three weeks during August and September 2007. NO{sub x} emission data were obtained using the plant CEM system. Hg measurements were taken using EPA Method 30B (Sorbent Trap method) both downstream of the electrostatic precipitator and in the stack. Ohio Lumex Company was on site to provide rapid Hg analysis on the sorbent traps during the tests. Key results from these tests are: (1) Coal Fines reburn alone reduced NO{sub x} emissions by 0-10% with up to 4% heat input from the CWS. However, the NO{sub x} reduction was accompanied by higher CO emissions. The higher CO limited our ability to try higher reburn rates for further NO{sub x} reduction. (2) Coal Fines reburn with Urea (Carbon enhanced SNCR) decreased NO{sub x} emissions by an additional 30% compared to Urea injection only. (3) Coal slurry injection did not change Hg capture across the ESP at full load with an inlet temperature of 400-430 F. The Hg capture in the ESP averaged 40%, with or without slurry injection; low mercury particulate capture is normally expected across a higher temperature ESP because any oxidized mercury is thought to desorb from the particulate at ESP temperatures above 250 F. (4) Coal slurry injection with halogen salts added to the mixing tank increased the Hg capture in the ESP to 60%. This significant incremental mercury reduction is important to improved mercury capture with hot-side ESP operation and wherever hindrance from sulfur oxides limit mercury reduction, because the higher temperature is above sulfur oxide dew point interference.

Stephen Johnson; Chetan Chothani; Bernard Breen

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Coarse to Fine Facial Key Landmark Points Locating Algorithm Based on Active Shape Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we proposed an improved coarse to fine improved algorithm to enhance the accuracy of facial key landmark points locating. Based on the analysis of PCA, the proposed algorithm redesigns the parameter update rule through adding a monotonically ... Keywords: ASM, facial key landmarks point locating

Bo Fan; Xiaokang Yang; Xi Zhou; Weiyao Lin; Changjian Chen

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Emissions Control - Advanced Diesel Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that on-highway diesel vehicles have filtration systems to reduce tail-pipe soot emissions, known as particulate matter (PM). Diesel particulate filtration (DPF) systems are currently the most efficient at directly controlling PM. Argonne researchers, working with Corning, Inc., and Caterpillar, Inc., through a cooperative research and development agreement, are exploiting previously unavailable technology and research results on diesel PM filtration and regeneration processes, aiming to the technology transfer of advanced PM emission control to industry. Argonne's Research In operation of DPF systems, the filtration and regeneration of particulate emissions are the key processes to be controlled for high efficiency. Due to difficulties in accessing the micro-scaled structures of DPF membranes and monitoring particulate filtration and high-temperature thermal processes, however, research has been limited to macroscopic observation for the product.

94

X-Ray Absorption Characterization of Diesel Exhaust Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have characterized particulates from a 1993 11.1 Detroit Diesel Series 60 engine with electronic unit injectors operated using fuels with and without methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) and overbased calcium sulfonate added. X-ray photoabsorption (XAS) spectroscopy was used to characterize the diesel particulates. Results reveal a mixture of primarily Mn-phosphate with some Mn-oxide, and Ca-sulfate on the surface of the filtered particulates from the diesel engine.

Nelson, A J; Ferreira, J L; Reynolds, J G; Roos, J W

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13 - Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13...

96

TransForum v3n4 - Diesel Particulates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ZEROING IN ON DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS Thick clouds of soot particles no longer billow from new bus and truck exhaust pipes, thanks to today's advanced diesel engines, which...

97

Particulate Measurements and Emissions Characterization of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to measure and characterize particulate emissions from light-duty alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and equivalent gasoline-fueled vehicles. The project included emission testing of a fleet of 129 gasoline-fueled vehicles and 19 diesel vehicles. Particulate measurements were obtained over Federal Test Procedure and US06 cycles. Chemical characterization of the exhaust particulate was also performed. Overall, the particulate emissions from modern technology compressed natural gas and methanol vehicles were low, but were still comparable to those of similar technology gasoline vehicles.

Durbin, T. D.; Truex, T. J.; Norbeck, J. M. (Center for Environmental Research and Technology College of Engineering, University of California - Riverside, California)

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

98

Performance evaluation of diesel particulate filters on heavy duty vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel particulate filters, or DPFs, are exhaust aftertreatment devices used to reduce exhaust emissions from diesel powered vehicles. Typical designs have a wall flow filter… (more)

Rosepiler, Stephen G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Transpiration Purging Access Probe for Particulate Laden or  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

need for sensors that tolerate dirty environments, research is currently active on the patent-pending technology "Transpiration Purging Access Probe for Particulate Laden or...

100

Effect of Biodiesel Blends on Diesel Particulate Filter Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents results of tests of ultra-low sulfur diesel blended with soy-biodiesel at 5 percent using a Cummins ISB engine with a diesel particulate filter.

Williams, A.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R. R.; Ireland, J.; Fang, H. L.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Electrically heated particulate filter with reduced stress  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter comprising an inlet for receiving exhaust gas. A zoned heater is arranged in the inlet and comprises a resistive heater comprising N zones, where N is an integer greater than one. Each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates others of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Hydrophobic Dewatering of Fine Coal. Topical report, March 1, 1995-March 31, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many advanced fine coal cleaning technologies have been developed in recent years under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy. However, they are not as widely deployed in industry as originally anticipated. An important reason for this problem is that the cleaned coal product is difficult to dewater because of the large surface area associated with fine particles. Typically, mechanical dewatering, such as vacuum filtration and centrifugation, can reduce the moisture to 20-35% level, while thermal drying is costly. To address this important industrial problem, Virginia Tech has developed a novel dewatering process, in which water is displaced from the surface of fine particulate materials by liquid butane. Since the process is driven by the hydrophobic interaction between coal and liquid butane, it was referred to as hydrophobic dewatering (HD). A fine coal sample with 21.4 pm median size was subjected to a series of bench-scale HD tests. It was a mid-vol bituminous coal obtained from the Microcel flotation columns operating at the Middle Fork coal preparation plant, Virginia. All of the test results showed that the HD process can reduce the moisture to substantially less than 10%. The process is sensitive to the amount of liquid butane used in the process relative to the solids concentration in the feed stream. Neither the intensity nor the time of agitation is critical for the process. Also, the process does not require long time for phase separation. Under optimal operating conditions, the moisture of the fine coal can be reduced to 1% by weight of coal.

Yoon, R.; Sohn, S.; Luttrell, J.; Phillips, D.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

Rudisill, T.S.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

104

Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including ... Keywords: Aerosols, Aggregation, Particle adhesion, Particulate flow

J. S. Marshall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Method for removing particulate matter from a gas stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Particulate matter is removed from a stream of pressurized gas by directing the stream of gas upwardly through a bed of porous material, the porous bed being held in an open ended container and at least partially submerged in liquid. The passage of the gas through the porous bed sets up a circulation in the liquid which cleans the particulate matter from the bed.

Postma, Arlin K. (Benton City, WA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Process for off-gas particulate removal and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the event of a breach in the off-gas line of a melter operation requiring closure of the line, a secondary vessel vent line is provided with a particulate collector utilizing atomization for removal of large particulates from the off-gas. The collector receives the gas containing particulates and directs a portion of the gas through outer and inner annular channels. The collector further receives a fluid, such as water, which is directed through the outer channel together with a second portion of the particulate-laden gas. The outer and inner channels have respective ring-like termination apertures concentrically disposed adjacent one another on the outer edge of the downstream side of the particulate collector. Each of the outer and inner channels curves outwardly away from the collector`s centerline in proceeding toward the downstream side of the collector. Gas flow in the outer channel maintains the fluid on the channel`s wall in the form of a ``wavy film,`` while the gas stream from the inner channel shears the fluid film as it exits the outer channel in reducing the fluid to small droplets. Droplets formed by the collector capture particulates in the gas stream by one of three mechanisms: impaction, interception or Brownian diffusion in removing the particulates. The particulate-laden droplets are removed from the fluid stream by a vessel vent condenser or mist eliminator. 4 figs.

Carl, D.E.

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

107

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, Virginia Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria, Virginia Docket No. EO-05-01: TRC Environmental Corporation (TRC) of Lowell, Massachusetts was retained by Mirant Potomac River, LLC (Mirant) to provide sampling and analytical support in completing a Particulate Emission Test of Unit 1 of the Potomac River generating facility. The Test Program at the Potomac facility involved the completion of two series of emissions tests for particulate matter (PM), the first during normal unit operation and the second with the injection of TRONA upstream of hot side ESP fields. All tests were completed while Unit 1 was operating at 90% of full load (84MW)

108

A Study of Pelletization of Manganese Ore Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ores, fine manganese fines are characterized by large amount and low price. ... A Study of Coal-Based Direct Reduction of Composite Binder Magnetite ...

109

Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in auto-rickshaws in New Delhi, India Title Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in...

110

Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

Henager, Jr., Charles H. (Richland, WA); Hirth, John P. (Viola, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Overlap zoned electrically heated particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one, and wherein the N zones and the M sub-zones are arranged in P layers, where P is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Chapman, Mark R [Brighton, MI

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

2013 Electricity Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Survey Form Changes 2013 Proposals The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is proposing to change its data protection policy for the following survey forms: Form...

113

SSRL Call for Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crystallography proposals are due April 1 and July 1 Due to the installation and commissioning of SPEAR3 (April 2003-January 2004), the schedule for proposal submissions has...

114

DEVELOPMENT OF FINE PARTICULATE EMISSION FACTORS AND SPECIATION PROFILES FOR OIL AND GAS-FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results from the first year of this three-year project to develop dilution measurement technology for characterizing PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter smaller than 2.5 micrometers) and precursor emissions from stationary combustion sources used in oil, gas and power generation operations. Detailed emission rate and chemical speciation test results for a refinery gas-fired process heater and plans for cogeneration gas turbine tests and pilot-scale tests are presented. Tests were performed using a research dilution sampling apparatus and traditional EPA methods to compare PM2.5 mass and chemical speciation. Test plans are presented for a gas turbine facility that will be tested in the fourth quarter of 2002. A preliminary approach for pilot-scale tests is presented that will help define design constraints for a new dilution sampler design that is smaller, lighter, and less costly to use.

Glenn C. England; Stephanie Wien; Mingchih O. Chang

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Measurements of particulate matter concentrations at a landfill site (Crete, Greece)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large amounts of solid waste are disposed in landfills and the potential of particulate matter (PM) emissions into the atmosphere is significant. Particulate matter emissions in landfills are the result of resuspension from the disposed waste and other activities such as mechanical recycling and composting, waste unloading and sorting, the process of coating residues and waste transport by trucks. Measurements of ambient levels of inhalable particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) were performed in a landfill site located at Chania (Crete, Greece). Elevated PM{sub 10} concentrations were measured in the landfill site during several landfill operations. It was observed that the meteorological conditions (mainly wind velocity and temperature) influence considerably the PM{sub 10} concentrations. Comparison between the PM{sub 10} concentrations at the landfill and at a PM{sub 10} background site indicates the influence of the landfill activities on local concentrations at the landfill. No correlation was observed between the measurements at the landfill and the background sites. Finally, specific preventing measures are proposed to control the PM concentrations in landfills.

Chalvatzaki, E.; Kopanakis, I. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Kontaksakis, M. [Municipal Company of Solid Waste Management, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Glytsos, T.; Kalogerakis, N. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Lazaridis, M., E-mail: lazaridi@mred.tuc.g [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

EMSL: Proposal Extensions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Summary/Extension for Fiscal Year 2014 Proposal Summary/Extension for Fiscal Year 2014 Published December 2013. Additional Information User Portal 2014 Call for Proposals 2014 Proposal Guidance 2014 Proposal Review Criteria Guidance for Letters of Intent to JGI-EMSL Collaborative Science Call Guidance for Full Proposals to JGI-EMSL Collaborative Science Call (Invited Only) 2014 Proposal Planning 2014 Proposal Summary/Extension Previous Calls External Peer Reviewers Fellowships and Awards Nufo, logo Summaries of the work performed with EMSL resources are required for all user projects (see details below) and should be submitted through the User Portal. For projects open for one year or less, these summaries are due when the proposal closes. For projects that are submitted in response to a Call for Proposals and are eligible for yearly extensions, summaries are

117

EMSL: Proposal Guidance:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance for Fiscal Year 2014 Guidance for Fiscal Year 2014 Published December 2013 EMSL awards the majority of resources to proposals responding to the annual calls/cycles. To expedite the decision process, please contact the appropriate Capability Lead(s) based on your resource needs before beginning a proposal. Capabilities and contact information are detailed on EMSL's capability web pages. Additional Information User Portal 2014 Call for Proposals 2014 Proposal Guidance 2014 Proposal Review Criteria Guidance for Letters of Intent to JGI-EMSL Collaborative Science Call Guidance for Full Proposals to JGI-EMSL Collaborative Science Call (Invited Only) 2014 Proposal Planning 2014 Proposal Summary/Extension Previous Calls External Peer Reviewers Fellowships and Awards Nufo, logo An EMSL user proposal requires detailed information for a thorough peer and

118

JGI - CSP Proposal Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Schedule Proposal Schedule CSP | Overview | How to Propose a Project | Review Process | DOE Relevance Proposal Schedule | FAQ Small-scale Microbial/Metagenome Proposals - reviewed twice yearly Small-scale proposals for specific types of microbial and metagenome projects are accepted on a continuous basis and will be reviewed twice a year. Letters of intent are not required. Deadline for submission is 60 days prior to the review date. Next review dates (submission deadline in parentheses): January 2014 (Nov 22, 2013) July 2014 (May 23, 2014) Submit small-scale microbial/metagenome proposals anytime using the Work Initiation Process (WIP) interface. Synthetic Biology proposals Synthetic biology proposals are accepted on a continuous basis and will be reviewed twice a year. Letters of intent are not required. Deadline for

119

Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

Sayuti, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Malikussaleh University of Lhokseumawe, 24300 Aceh (Indonesia); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

120

JV Task 95-Particulate Control Consulting for Minnesota Ore Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to assist U.S. Steel in the evaluation, selection, planning, design, and testing of potential approaches to help meet U.S. Steel's goal for low-particulate matter emissions and regulatory compliance. The energy-intensive process for producing iron pellets includes treating the pellets in high-temperature kilns in which the iron is converted from magnetite to hematite. The kilns can be fired with either natural gas or a combination of gas and coal or biomass fuel and are equipped with wet venturi scrubbers for particulate control. Particulate measurements at the inlet and outlet of the scrubbers and analysis of size-fractionated particulate samples led to an understanding of the effect of process variables on the measured emissions and an approach to meet regulatory compliance.

Stanley Miller

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Ris-R-1053(EN) Particulate Air Pollution with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

particulate matter in inner city air. The particle size distribution shows that 92 % of the mass of airborne91 F Main reaction pathways in non sulphur vulcanisation 94 G Flame atomic absorption spectrometer

122

Plasma Aftertreatment for Simultaneous Control of NOx and Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasma reactors can be operated as a particulate trap or as a NO{sub x} converter. The soluble organic fraction (SOF) of the trapped particulates can be utilized for the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The NO{sub 2} can then be used to non-thermally oxidize the carbon fraction of the particulates. This paper examines the energy density required for oxidation of the SOF hydrocarbons and the fate of NO{sub 2} during the oxidation of the particulate carbon. The energy density required for complete oxidation of the SOF hydrocarbons is shown to be unacceptably large. The reaction of NO{sub 2} with carbon is shown to lead mainly to backconversion of NO{sub 2} to NO. These results suggest that the use of a catalyst in combination with the plasma will be required to efficiently reduce the NO{sub x} and oxidize the SOF hydrocarbons.

Penetrante, B.M.; Brusasco, R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Pitz, W.J.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

123

A process for off-gas particulate removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes an off-gas system for the removal of radioactive particulates from a melter for the vitrification of radioactive wastes to form glass waste forms. A diagram is provided.

Carl, D.E.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

State emissions limitations for boilers: particulate matter  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes regulations applicable to boilers as reflected in current state and local air regulations. Not all of these regulations are officially part of Federally-approved State Implementation Plans (SIPs). Several regulations have only recently been adopted by the State and are now undergoing EPA review for incorporation into the SIP. Each summary also contains local regulations more stringent than the State rules. Most local regulations in this handbook are included in the State Implementation Plan. Site-specific emission limits (variances from State limits or limits more stringent than State limits) are not included in these summaries. Appendix A contains maps showing the location of Air Quality Control Regions or other districts by which several States regulate emissions. Appendix B contains a summary of National Ambient Air Quality Standards, which States are required to meet as a minimum. Appendix C contains a description and summary of Federal New Source Performance Standards. Appendix D contains formulas for conversion of emmissions limits expressed in one set of units to the most common units - No. PM/MMBtu. Appendix E contains Figure 2 of ASME APS-1, used for determining particulate emissions limits in some States.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Zone heated inlet ignited diesel particulate filter regeneration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system includes: a particulate filter (PF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust; and a grid that includes electrically resistive material that is segmented by non-conductive material into a plurality of zones and wherein the grid is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

System for utilizing oil shale fines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided for utilizing fines of carbonaceous materials such as particles or pieces of oil shale of about one-half inch or less diameter which are rejected for use in some conventional or prior surface retorting process, which obtains maximum utilization of the energy content of the fines and which produces a waste which is relatively inert and of a size to facilitate disposal. The system includes a cyclone retort (20) which pyrolyzes the fines in the presence of heated gaseous combustion products, the cyclone retort having a first outlet (30) through which vapors can exit that can be cooled to provide oil, and having a second outlet (32) through which spent shale fines are removed. A burner (36) connected to the spent shale outlet of the cyclone retort, burns the spent shale with air, to provide hot combustion products (24) that are carried back to the cyclone retort to supply gaseous combustion products utilized therein. The burner heats the spent shale to a temperature which forms a molten slag, and the molten slag is removed from the burner into a quencher (48) that suddenly cools the molten slag to form granules that are relatively inert and of a size that is convenient to handle for disposal in the ground or in industrial processes.

Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA); Bagheri, Reza (Bethlehem, PA)

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figures.

McInnis, E.L.; Scharff, R.P.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

129

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

130

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

McInnis, Edwin L. (Allentown, PA); Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA)

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

McInnis, E.L.; Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.

1996-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

132

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

McInnis, Edwin L. (Allentown, PA); Scharff, Robert P. (Louisville, KY); Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration by electrical heating of resistive coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine includes a diesel particulate filter (DPF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust. An electrical heater is integrally formed in an upstream end of the DPF and selectively heats the exhaust to initiate combustion of the particulates within the exhaust as it passes therethrough. Heat generated by combustion of the particulates induces combustion of particulates within the DPF.

Williamson, Weldon S. (Malibu, CA); Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

General User Proposal Scores  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General User Proposal Scores General User Proposal Scores General User Proposal Scores Print Tuesday, 01 June 2010 10:34 Scoring Proposals are scored on a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being the best score and 5 the worst. Reviewers are requested to use the following ranking schema: Must do High Priority Medium Priority Low priority Don't do Beam time is assigned based on each proposal's score in relation to all other proposals for a given beamline. For beamlines where beamtime requests exceed available beamtime, a cutoff score is assigned after which no beam time is allocated. proposal scores Beam Time Cutoff Scores for the Current Cycle The table below lists the percent of beam time shifts allocated/requested for each beamline, and the cutoff scores, below which no beam time was assigned.

135

Microwave-Regenerated Diesel Exhaust Particulate Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of a microwave-regenerated particulate filter system has evolved from bench scale work to actual diesel engine experimentation. The filter system was initially evaluated on a stationary mounted 1.2-L diesel engine and was able to remove a significant amount of carbon particles from the exhaust. The ability of the microwave energy to regenerate or clean the filter was also demonstrated on this engine under idle conditions. Based on the 1.2-L experiments, improvements to the filter design and materials were implemented and the system was re-evaluated on a vehicle equipped with a 7.3-L diesel engine. The 7.3-L engine was selected to achieve heavy filter loading in a relatively short period of time. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate filter-loading capacity, power requirements for regeneration, and filter regeneration efficiency. A more detailed evaluation of the filter was performed on a stationary mounted 1.9-L diesel engine. The effect of exhaust flow rate, loading, transients, and regeneration on filter efficiency was evaluated with this setup. In addition, gaseous exhaust emissions were investigated with and without an oxidation catalyst on the filter cartridge during loading and regeneration. (SAE Paper SAE-2001-01-0903 © 2001 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Nixdorf, Richard D. (Industrial Ceramic Solution, LLC); Green, Johney Boyd; Story, John M.; Wagner, Robert M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2001-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

136

ARM - Submitting Proposals : Guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govField CampaignsSubmitting Proposals : Guidelines govField CampaignsSubmitting Proposals : Guidelines Schedule and Availability Preproposals now open for AMF and AAF Preproposals due 1 Feb Invited full proposals due 1 May AAF available Dec 2015 AMF1 available Apr 2016 AMF2 available early 2017 AMF3 available for guest instrumentation or intensive operational periods Forms Propose a Campaign Form Instrument Support Request (ISR) Form (Word, 89KB) Documentation Steps to Send Campaign Data to ARM Data Archive Field Campaign Guidelines (PDF, 1.1MB) Submitting Proposals : Guidelines Proposals are welcome from all members of the scientific community for conducting field campaigns and scientific research using the ARM Climate Research Facility sites at the Southern Great Plains (SGP), North Slope of Alaska (NSA), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), one of the ARM Mobile

137

Characteristics of inhalable particulate matter concentration and size distribution from power plants in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The collection efficiency of particulate emission control devices (PECDs), particulate matter (PM) emissions, and PM size distribution were determined experimentally at the inlet and outlet of PECDs at five coal-fired power plants. Different boilers, coals, and PECDs are used in these power plants. Measurement in situ was performed by an electrical low-pressure impactor with a sampling system, which consisted of an isokinetic sampler probe, precut cyclone, and two- stage dilution system with a sample line to the instruments. The size distribution was measured over a range from 0.03 to 10 {mu}m. Before and after all of the PECDs, the particle number size distributions display a bimodal distribution. The PM2.5 fraction emitted to atmosphere includes a significant amount of the mass from the coarse particle mode. The controlled and uncontrolled emission factors of total PM, inhalable PM (PM10), and fine PM (PM2.5) were obtained. Electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and baghouse total collection efficiencies are 96.38 99.89% and 99.94%, respectively. The minimum collection efficiency of the ESP and the baghouse both appear in the particle size range of 0.1 1 0 {mu}m. In this size range, ESP and baghouse collection efficiencies are 85.79 98.6% and 99.54%. Real- time measurement shows that the mass and number concentration of PM10 will be greatly affected by the operating conditions of the PECDs. The number of emitted particles increases with increasing boiler load level because of higher combustion temperature. During test run periods, the data reproducibility is satisfactory. 19 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

Honghong Yi; Jiming Hao; Lei Duan; Xinghua Li; Xingming Guo [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Department of Environmental Science and Engineering

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Proposed Rules Federal Register  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

information that it is making available about the liquid-immersed distribution transformer equipment classes that were analyzed in a previously issued notice of proposed...

139

2014 Coal Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Survey Form Changes Proposed for 2014. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has begun the process of re-clearing the coal survey ...

140

ARM - AAF Proposal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Process Science (PDF) Baseline Instruments Campaign Instruments Instrumentation Workshop 2008 AAF Fact Sheet G-1 Fact Sheet Images Field Campaigns AAF Campaigns...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SPPR Group Proposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Proposal June 23, 2010 Agenda Purpose of Meeting Presenters Background Information  Three Terminal Plan & Market Access  Business Case  Transmission Infrastructure Program ED5-Palo Verde Project Potential Rate Impacts Discussion / Comments 2 Purpose of Meeting Provide background information Share the SPPR Group's current proposal and how it might affect Parker-Davis Project (P-DP) customers Obtain your feedback on the proposal 3 Presenters Background Information - Todd Rhoades ED5-PV Project Description - Todd Rhoades Project Marketability - John Steward Project Cost & Financing - Jack Murray Potential Rate Impacts - Jack Murray Next Steps - Todd Rhoades 4 Three Terminal Plan November 2009 5 Business Case

142

Process for treating moisture laden coal fines  

SciTech Connect

A process is provided for making a free flowing granular product from moisture laden caked coal fines, such as wet cake, by mixing a water immiscible substance, such as oil, with the caked coal, preferably under low shear forces for a period of time sufficient to produce a plurality of free flowing granules. Each granule is preferably comprised of a dry appearing admixture of one or more coal particle, 2-50% by weight water and the water immiscible substance.

Davis, Burl E. (New Kensington, PA); Henry, Raymond M. (Gibsonia, PA); Trivett, Gordon S. (South Surrey, CA); Albaugh, Edgar W. (Birmingham, AL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. These samples' combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. This report covers the first quarter's progress. Major activities during this period were focused on finding the plants where a demo MTU column will be installed to prepare the samples needed to characterize the combustion behavior of slurry effluents. Also, a meeting was held at Penn State University to discuss the availability of the laboratory furnace for testing the plant coal/recovered coal fines blends.

Singh, Shyam.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Non-thermal Aftertreatment of Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modern diesel passenger vehicles employing common rail, high speed direct injection engines are capable of matching the drivability of gasoline powered vehicles with the additional benefit of providing high torque at low engine speed [1]. The diesel engine also offers considerable fuel economy and CO2 emissions advantages. However, future emissions standards [2,3] present a significant challenge for the diesel engine, as its lean exhaust precludes the use of aftertreatment strategies employing 3- way catalytic converters, which operate under stoichiometric conditions. In recent years significant developments by diesel engine manufacturers have greatly reduced emissions of both particulates (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) [4,5]. However to achieve compliance with future legislative limits it has been suggested that an integrated approach involving a combination of engine modifications and aftertreatment technology [1] will be required. A relatively new approach to exhaust aftertreatment is the application of non-thermal plasma (NTP) or plasma catalyst hybrid systems. These have the potential for treatment of both NOx and PM emissions [6- 8]. The primary focus of recent plasma aftertreatment studies [9-12] has concentrated on the removal of NOx. It has been shown that by combining plasmas with catalysts it is possible to chemically reduce NOx. The most common approach is to use a 2- stage system relying upon the plasma oxidation of hydrocarbons to promote NO to NO2 conversion as a precursor to NO2 reduction over a catalyst. However, relatively little work has yet been published on the oxidation of PM by plasma [ 8,13]. Previous investigations [8] have reported that a suitably designed NTP reactor containing a packing material designed to filter and retain PM can effect the oxidation of PM in diesel exhausts at low temperatures. It has been suggested that the retained PM competes with hydrocarbons for O, and possibly OH, radicals. This is an important consideration in plasma - catalyst hybrid schemes for the removal of NOx employing an NO2 selective catalyst, as the oxidation of PM may deplete the key radicals necessary for NO to NO2 conversion. It was also suggested that where simultaneous NOx and PM removal are required, alternative catalyst formulations may be needed which may be selective to NO rather than NO2.

Thomas, S.E.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

145

Proposal Review Panel Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Review Panel Descriptions Proposal Review Panel Descriptions To ensure competent scientific review, a proposal may be assigned to a different panel (at the discretion of the Review Panel Chair), or the panel may seek additional ad hoc reviews from other experts. High-Pressure This panel reviews scattering and diffraction proposals that focus on materials at high pressure. Techniques such as (but not limited to) diffraction, nuclear resonant scattering, and inelastic x-ray scattering for materials at high pressure are appropriate for this panel to consider. Instrumentation This panel reviews proposals related to the development of beamline instrumentation, sample environments, x-ray optical components, and/or detectors that are relevant to synchrotron radiation research. This panel

146

2013 Electricity Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Survey Form Changes in 2013 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) proposed changes to its electricity data collection in 2013. These changes involve three forms: Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report" The addition of a new form, the Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form)" Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." The proposals were initially announced to the public via a Federal Register Notice published March 15, 2012. Comments regarding this proposed information collection were due by May 14, 2012. EIA reviewed all comments and made several revisions to the proposals as a result. A second Federal Register Notice was published on August 30, 2012. It outlined the proposals

147

Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an ``air to cloth ratio``) for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

Goldsmith, R.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an air to cloth ratio'') for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

Goldsmith, R.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Laboratory Evaluation of Fine-mesh Traveling Water Screens  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final results of four years of laboratory evaluations on performance of fine-mesh traveling water screens to protect larval fish at cooling water intake structures (CWISs). Prior to this study, the biological effectiveness of fine-mesh screens was uncertain because performance data from the few existing facilities that use fine-mesh screens have been highly variable. This project is producing additional data necessary to determine biological efficacy of fine-mesh screens.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

150

Implementation Proposal for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation Proposal for Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response Report to Congress Prepared by staff of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy The opinions and views expressed in this staff report do not necessarily represent those of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, its Chairman, or individual Commissioners, and are not binding on the Commission. Implementation Proposal for The National Action Plan on Demand Response July 2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ............................................................................................... iii I. Introduction ......................................................................................................1

151

Proposed Technical Specification Amendment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter provides the final revised Technical Specification (TS) pages for the subject proposed TS amendment. In Reference 1 Duke Energy requested an amendment to the Catawba Nuclear Station Facility Operating Licenses and Technical Specifications (TS). The proposed amendment revises various TS that are affected by the revised heatup, cooldown, critically, and inservice test pressure and temperature (P/T) limits for the reactor coolant system (RCS) of each unit. The proposed amendment also revised the TS requirements for the low temperature overpressure protection (LTOP) system for each unit. www. duke-energy. corn

D. M. Jamil; Duke Power

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption of solar radiation Title Contribution of organic carbon to wood smoke particulate matter absorption of solar radiation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kirchstetter, Thomas W., and Tracy L. Thatcher Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 12 Pagination 6067-6072 Abstract A spectroscopic analysis of 115 wintertime partic- ulate matter samples collected in rural California shows that wood smoke absorbs solar radiation with a strong spectral se- lectivity. This is consistent with prior work that has demon- strated that organic carbon (OC), in addition to black car- bon (BC), appreciably absorbs solar radiation in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions. We apportion light absorp-

153

Relationship between acid content of particulates and rainfall in Bangkok  

SciTech Connect

Rainfall at nine stations in Bangkok, Thailand, varied from pH 5.57 to 6.32, low values compared with cities in North America and Europe. Particulate acid content ranged from 5.38 to 10.15 micrograms per cu meter. Analysis for several ions showed that the concentration of sulfate was the controlling factor in acidity of rain. pH was reduced by 1 unit for each 9.09 micrograms per cu meter acid content of particulates according to a relationship derived in the study: pH = 6.87 - 0.11 (acidity of particulates in micrograms per cu meter). 13 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

Khan, S.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Proposed WSRC Clearance Modifications  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Savannah River Company proposes to modify criteria used for releasing material from Savannah River Site radiological areas to other SRS areas and for releasing material from SRS for uncontrolled use.

Crase, K.W.

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

Mesoscale Simulations of Particulate Flows with Parallel Distributed Lagrange Multiplier Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid particulate flows are common phenomena in nature and industry. Modeling of such flows at micro and macro levels as well establishing relationships between these approaches are needed to understand properties of the particulate matter. We propose a computational technique based on the direct numerical simulation of the particulate flows. The numerical method is based on the distributed Lagrange multiplier technique following the ideas of Glowinski et al. (1999). Each particle is explicitly resolved on an Eulerian grid as a separate domain, using solid volume fractions. The fluid equations are solved through the entire computational domain, however, Lagrange multiplier constrains are applied inside the particle domain such that the fluid within any volume associated with a solid particle moves as an incompressible rigid body. Mutual forces for the fluid-particle interactions are internal to the system. Particles interact with the fluid via fluid dynamic equations, resulting in implicit fluid-rigid-body coupling relations that produce realistic fluid flow around the particles (i.e., no-slip boundary conditions). The particle-particle interactions are implemented using explicit force-displacement interactions for frictional inelastic particles similar to the DEM method of Cundall et al. (1979) with some modifications using a volume of an overlapping region as an input to the contact forces. The method is flexible enough to handle arbitrary particle shapes and size distributions. A parallel implementation of the method is based on the SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) library, which allows handling of large amounts of rigid particles and enables local grid refinement. Accuracy and convergence of the presented method has been tested against known solutions for a falling sphere as well as by examining fluid flows through stationary particle beds (periodic and cubic packing). To evaluate code performance and validate particle contact physics algorithm, we performed simulations of a representative experiment conducted at the University of California at Berkley for pebble flow through a narrow opening.

Kanarska, Y

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Technical report, December 1, 1991--February 29, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through -200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fluidizing a mixture of particulate coal and char  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of mixing particulate materials comprising contacting a primary source and a secondary source thereof whereby resulting mixture ensues; preferably at least one of the two sources has enough motion to insure good mixing and the particulate materials may be heat treated if desired. Apparatus for such mixing comprising an inlet for a primary source, a reactor communicating therewith, a feeding means for supplying a secondary source to the reactor, and an inlet for the secondary source. Feeding means is preferably adapted to supply fluidized materials.

Green, Norman W. (Pomona, CA)

1979-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

158

Research priorities for airborne particulates matter in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Despite substantial progress in reducing air pollution over the past 30 years, particulates remain a poorly understood health concern that requires further study. The article provides a brief overview of the work of an independent National Research Council (NRC) Committee on particulate matter (PM). It highlights the committee's process for developing during its deliberations. It reflects on the committee as a potential model to provide guidance on a broad research area in which findings may have significant policy implications. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Samet, J.; Wassle, R.; Holmes, K.J.; Abt, E.; Bakshi, K. [John Hopkins University (US). Bloomberg School of Public Health

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Soldering Small Beads to Fine Wires  

SciTech Connect

One method suggested for soldering small beads to fine wires using a torch to heat the bead, flux, and magnesia brick did not prove entirely satisfactory in this case. It was found the brick would draw heat away from the bead and flux at too fast a rate resulting in a poor weld, a rough surface, and an excessive accumulation of flux on the bead. Secondly, removal of the depleted flux presented a problem when the welding was done on the surface of the brick.

Stanton, J. S.

1950-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Biomass Lignin Binder for Coal Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the production of a waste stream consisting of lignin from a dilute acid hydrolysis process for making ethanol fuel from cellulosic biomass. The lignin waste stream was then evaluated as a possible binder to hold coal fines in a useable form for fuel in a coal-fired power plant. The production and use of a lignin-rich waste stream is of interest because it would enable a biomass energy content in the fuel for the coal-fired power plant, while using waste coal and waste biomass. The ...

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Crystal Structure and Characterization of Particulate Methane Monooxygenase from Methylocystis species Strain M  

SciTech Connect

Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is an integral membrane metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Previous biochemical and structural studies of pMMO have focused on preparations from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. A pMMO from a third organism, Methylocystis species strain M, has been isolated and characterized. Both membrane-bound and solubilized Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contain {approx}2 copper ions per 100 kDa protomer and exhibit copper-dependent propylene epoxidation activity. Spectroscopic data indicate that Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO contains a mixture of Cu{sup I} and Cu{sup II}, of which the latter exhibits two distinct type 2 Cu{sup II} electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data are best fit with a mixture of Cu-O/N and Cu-Cu ligand environments with a Cu-Cu interaction at 2.52-2.64 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of Methylocystis sp. strain M pMMO was determined to 2.68 {angstrom} resolution and is the best quality pMMO structure obtained to date. It provides a revised model for the pmoA and pmoC subunits and has led to an improved model of M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO. In these new structures, the intramembrane zinc/copper binding site has a different coordination environment from that in previous models.

Smith, Stephen M.; Rawat, Swati; Telser, Joshua; Hoffman, Brian M.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (WSU-MED); (NWU)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

162

A Proposed Architecture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposed Proposed Architecture for the NLC Diagnostic Regions Peter Tenenbaum, for the Diagnostic Region Group LCC-Note-0011 Draft 5-February-1999 1 introduction The NLC Main Linac CD-1 design contains 4 diagnostic regions (injection, extraction, and at the junctions between supersectors); the injector and beam delivery regions contain additional diagnostic regions modelled on those in the main linac, and one additional region may be added to the main linac (at the 330 GeV point, halfway through the third supersector). Each diagnostic region must support a variety of different beam measuring and manipulating tasks. In this Note we propose an overall architecture which permits all of these requirements to be met. 2 Requirements The main linac diagnostic regions must provide the following: * Beam position monitors for use by the conventional fast feedback system, and actuators (DC

163

Proposed Rules Federal Register  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21813 21813 Vol. 76, No. 75 Tuesday, April 19, 2011 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 429 [Docket Number: EERE-2010-BT-CE-0014] RIN 1904-AC23 Energy Conservation Program: Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the ''Department'') proposes to amend the compliance dates for revisions to its certification, compliance, and enforcement regulations for certain commercial and industrial equipment covered under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended (EPCA or the ''Act''). Specifically, DOE is tentatively proposing an 18-month extension to the

164

2014 Electricity Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Form Changes Proposed for Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic) Survey Form Changes Proposed for 2014 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is proposing changes to its electricity data collection in 2014. These changes involve the following surveys: Form EIA-63B, "Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report," Form EIA-411, "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report," Form EIA-826, "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions," Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report," Form EIA-860M, "Monthly Update to the Annual Electric Generator Report," Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report," Form EIA-861S, "Annual Electric Power Industry Report (Short Form)," and

165

Development of Metal Substrate for Denox Catalysts and Particulate Trap  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop advanced metallic catalyst substrate materials and designs for use in off-highway applications. The new materials and designs will be used as catalyst substrates and diesel particulate traps. They will increase durability, reduce flow resistance, decrease time to light-off, and reduce cost relative to cordierite substrates. Metallic catalyst substrates are used extensively for diesel oxidation catalysts and have the potential to be used in other catalytic systems for diesel engines. Metallic substrates have many advantages over ceramic materials including improved durability and resistance to thermal shock and vibration. However, the cost is generally higher than cordierite. The most common foil material used for metallic substrates is FeCr Alloy, which is expensive and has temperature capabilities beyond what is necessary for diesel applications. The first task in the project was Identification and Testing of New Materials. In this task, several materials were analyzed to determine if a low cost substitute for FeCr Alloy was available or could be developed. Two materials were identified as having lower cost while showing no decrease in mechanical properties or oxidation resistance at the application temperatures. Also, the ability to fabricate these materials into a finished substrate was not compromised, and the ability to washcoat these materials was satisfactory. Therefore, both candidate materials were recommended for cost savings depending on which would be less expensive in production quantities. The second task dealt with the use of novel flow designs to improve the converter efficiency while possibly decreasing the size of the converter to reduce cost even more. A non-linear flow path was simulated to determine if there would be an increase in efficiency. From there, small samples were produced for bench testing. Bench tests showed that the use of non-linear channels significantly reduced the light-off temperature for diesel oxidation catalytic converters. Finally, the third task was to implement these materials and designs into a full-size converter. Hot shake testing of 13-inch diameter straight channel substrates showed no significant difference in durability between the current material and the two proposed materials. At the time that this program ended, preparations were being made for full-scale emissions testing of the new design converter for comparison to a traditional straight channel with equal catalyst loading.

Pollard, Michael; Habeger, Craig; Frary, Megan; Haines, Scott; Fluharty, Amy; Dakhoul, Youssef; Carr, Michael; Park, Paul; Stefanick, Matthew; DaCosta, Herbert; Balmer-Millar, M Lou; Readey, Michael; McCluskey, Philip

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Investigations of ash layer characteristics and ash distribution in a diesel particulate filter using novel lubricant additive tracers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are currently widely used in various applications as a means of collecting particulate matter in order to meet increasingly stringent particle… (more)

Morrow, Ryan (Ryan Michael)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Electrically heated particulate matter filter with recessed inlet end plugs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate matter (PM) filter includes filter walls having inlet ends and outlet ends. First adjacent pairs of the filter walls define inlet channels. Second adjacent pairs of the filter walls define outlet channels. Outlet end plugs are arranged in the inlet channels adjacent to the output ends. Inlet end plugs arranged in the outlet channels spaced from the inlet ends.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Ament, Frank (Troy, MI)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

168

Guidelines for Particulate Control for Advanced SO2 Control Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assist utilities in complying with Phase II of the Clean Air Act Amendments, this report delineates the effects of advanced SO2 control technologies on particulate control systems. This guide can prove invaluable to environmental engineers and planners who must select compatible systems and identify sound operating strategies for these technologies.

1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Electrically heated particulate filter diagnostic systems and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system that diagnoses regeneration of an electrically heated particulate filter is provided. The system generally includes a grid module that diagnoses a fault of the grid based on at least one of a current signal and a voltage signal. A diagnostic module at least one of sets a fault status and generates a warning signal based on the fault of the grid.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

170

Inductively heated particulate matter filter regeneration control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and zones. The system also includes a heating element. A control module selectively activates the heating element to inductively heat one of the zones.

Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore Jr., Michael J; Kirby, Kevin W; Phelps, Amanda; Gregoire, Daniel J

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

Economic Evaluation of Particulate Control Technologies: Volume 1: New Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baghouses (reverse-gas, shake-deflate, and pulse-jet) and electrostatic precipitators are the principal options for controlling particulate emissions at coal-fired power plants. This report provides the latest cost information and cost models for determining the capital and O&M costs of the two technologies for various design conditions in new units.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residues  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) is developing an immobilization process for graphite fines residues generated during nuclear materials production activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats). The continued storage of this material has been identified as an item of concern. The residue was generated during the cleaning of graphite casting molds and potentially contains reactive plutonium metal. The average residue composition is 73 wt percent graphite, 15 wt percent calcium fluoride (CaF2), and 12 wt percent plutonium oxide (PuO2). Approximately 950 kilograms of this material are currently stored at Rocky Flats. The strategy of the immobilization process is to microencapsulate the residue by mixing with a sodium borosilicate (NBS) glass frit and heating at nominally 700 degrees C. The resulting waste form would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Since the PuO2 concentration in the residue averages 12 wt percent, the immobilization process was required to meet the intent of safeguards termination criteria by limiting plutonium recoverability based on a test developed by Rocky Flats. The test required a plutonium recovery of less than 4 g/kg of waste form when a sample was leached using a nitric acid/CaF2 dissolution flowsheet. Immobilization experiments were performed using simulated graphite fines with cerium oxide (CeO2) as a surrogate for PuO2 and with actual graphite fines residues. Small-scale surrogate experiments demonstrated that a 4:1 frit to residue ratio was adequate to prevent recovery of greater than 4 g/kg of cerium from simulated waste forms. Additional experiments investigated the impact of varying concentrations of CaF2 and the temperature/heating time cycle on the cerium recovery. Optimal processing conditions developed during these experiments were subsequently demonstrated at full-scale with surrogate materials and on a smaller scale using actual graphite fines.In general, the recovery of cerium from the full-scale waste forms was higher than for smaller scale experiments. The presence of CaF2 also caused a dramatic increase in cerium recovery not seen in the small-scale experiments. However, the results from experiments with actual graphite fines were encouraging. A 4:1 frit to residue ratio, a temperature of 700 degrees C, and a 2 hr heating time produced waste forms with plutonium recoveries of 4 plus/minus 1 g/kg. With an increase in the frit to residue ratio, waste forms fabricated at this scale should meet the Rocky Flats product specification. The scale-up of the waste form fabrication process to nominally 3 kg is expected to require a 5:1 to 6:1 frit to residue ratio and maintaining the waste form centerline temperature at 700 degrees C for 2 hr.

Rudisill, T. S.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

173

Electrically heated particulate filter regeneration methods and systems for hybrid vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for controlling regeneration of a particulate filter for a hybrid vehicle is provided. The system generally includes a regeneration module that controls current to the particulate filter to initiate regeneration. An engine control module controls operation of an engine of the hybrid vehicle based on the control of the current to the particulate filter.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI)

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

174

Corrosion and degradation of ceramic particulate filters in direct coal-fired turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature ceramic filters show considerable promise for efficient particulate removal from coal combustion systems. Advanced coal utilization processes such as direct coal-fired turbines require particulate-free gas for successful operation. This paper describes the various ceramic particulate filters under development and reviews the degradation mechanisms expected when operated in coal combustion systems.

Sawyer, J. (Acurex Corp., Mountain View, CA (US)); Vass, R.J.; Brown, N.R.; Brown, J.J. (Center for Advanced Ceramic Materials, CIT TDC, Virginai Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (US))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Olympic voting system proposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to address the contentious issue of judged Olympic events, the Olympic committee has proposed a pilot audience participation system to score the gymnastics and diving competitions in the upcoming 2004 Athens Summer Games. The system would ... Keywords: Olympics usability, audience, design methodology, ergonomics, industrial design, interaction design, interactive, interface, voting

Seamus Costello; Kari Kubala; Matt Turley; Mehmet Uzer

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

NSLS Committees | Proposal Oversight Panel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Oversight Panel Charge Assume responsibility for completing any missing third reviews of the regular Proposal Review Panels. Review proposals with large rating...

177

Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines Print Tuesday, 01 June 2010 09:52 Submit a New Proposal for Structural Biology Beamlines...

178

Direct-energy-regenerated particulate trap technology. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this CRADA between Lockheed Martin and Cummins Engine Company was to develop fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (SiC) composite materials for use as diesel engine particulate traps. Chemical vapor deposition techniques were used to partially densify and rigidize a thin fibrous substrate and produce the porous SiC- based filter. Microwave energy was used to directly couple to the deposited SiC to uniformly heat the filter and oxidize the collected carbon particulates. For commercial usage particulate traps must: (1) filter carbon particulates from a high temperature diesel exhaust at an acceptably low backpressure, (2) survive thousands of thermal transients due to regeneration or cleaning of the filter by oxidizing the collected carbon, (3) be durable and reliable over the expected life of the filter (300,000 miles or 10,000 hours), and (4) provide a low overall operating cost which is competitive with other filtering techniques. The development efforts performed as part of this CRADA have resulted in a very promising new technology for Cummins Engine Company. Ceramic fiber based filter papers were developed at Fleetguard, Inc., (a Cummins Subsidiary) and used to produce the spiral wound, corrugated filter cartridges. Optimized SiC coatings were developed at Lockheed Martin which couple with 2.45 GHz microwaves. Prototype particulate filter cartridges fabricated at Fleetguard and rigidized at Lockheed Martin performed well in single cylinder engine tests at Cummins. These prototype filters obtained filtering efficiencies greater than 80% at acceptably low backpressures and could be successfully headed and regenerated using a conventional in-home microwave oven.

Stinton, D.P.; Janney, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Yonushonis, T.M.; McDonald, A.C.; Wiczynski, P.D. [Cummins Engine Co., Inc., Columbus, IN (United States); Haberkamp, W.C. [Fleetguard, Inc. (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of superpave fine aggregate specification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superpave[] was the final product of the Strategic Highway Research Program's (SHRP) asphalt pavement research effort during 1987-93. Some aspects of the Superpave aggregate specifications are not universally accepted. The validity of the fine aggregate angularity (FAA) requirement is questioned by both the owner agencies and the paving and aggregate industries. The FAA test is based on the assumption that more fractured faces will result in higher void content in the loosely compacted sample; however, this is not always true. The aggregate industry has found that cubical shaped particles, even with 100% fractured faces, may not meet the FAA requirement for high-volume traffic. State agencies are concerned that local materials previously considered acceptable and which have provided good field performance, now cannot meet the Superpave requirements. Twenty three-fine aggregates from different part of the USA were tested using major angularity tests: FAA test, direct shear test, compacted aggregate resistance (CAR) test, image analysis Hough transform, and visual inspection. The results from those tests were compared with the available performance history. The FAA test method does not consistently identify angular, cubical aggregates as high quality materials. There is a fair correlation between the CAR stability value and angle of internal friction (AIF) from direct shear test. No correlation was found between FAA and CAR stability or between FAA and AIF. A good correlation was found between FAA and K-index from Hough transform method. Some cubical crushed aggregates whose FAA values were less than 45 gave very high values of CAR stability, AIF and K-index. The statistical analysis of the SHRP LTPP database reveals that there is no evidence of any good linear relationship between FAA and rutting. Of the methods evaluated, image analysis using Hough transform appears most promising for measuring fine aggregate angularity. Until a replacement method for FAA can be identified, the author recommends that the FAA criteria be lowered from 45. The FAA vs. rutting data analysis should be continued with a larger amount of data as the LTPP SHRP database is expanded.

Chowdhury, Md. Tahjib-Ul-Arif

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants  

SciTech Connect

Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H. [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Dept. for Mining Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Unsolicited Proposals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unsolicited Proposals Unsolicited Proposals Aviation Management Green Leases Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Real Estate Approvals Documents and Publications...

182

High Temperature Hold Time Effects on Fine Grain Processed 718 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract. Fine Grain Alloy 718 is a relatively cost effective turbine and compressor disk alloy with superior yield strength and low cycle fatigue properties.

183

Ultra Fine Grain/Ultra Low Carbon 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ultra low carbon alloy 718 composition has been investigated in combination with ultra fine grain processing to improve the low cycle fatigue capabilities.

184

Tensile Properties of Fine Grain MA956 Oxide Dispersion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Tensile Properties of Fine Grain MA956 Oxide Dispersion ... Weld Overlay Claddings by Gas-metal-arc Welding Process for Extending Plant ...

185

Application and evaluation of spiral separators for fine coal cleaning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Eight buckets of wet coal samples were collected from Shade Coal Preparation Plant,including the feed, clean coal, refuse, and middlings for fine spiral and coarse… (more)

Che, Zhuping.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Environmental Assessment - Proposed Actions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

availability of Waste availability of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facilities and infrastructure to scientists who wish to conduct experiments there. DOE would allow these experiments if they can be conducted without interfering with the WIPP's primary transuranic waste disposal mission and if they reflect contemporary budget priorities. This fact sheet presents questions and answers about the proposed action and its alternative. The deep geologic repository at the WIPP could provide a favorable environment for exper- iments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository sci- ence, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. Los Alamos National Laboratory has been conducting

187

SSRL- Proposal Review Panel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab search Go [an error occurred while processing this directive] Proposal Review Panel Sub Panels Structural Molecular Biology & Biophysics Materials 1: Structure, Reactivity & Self-Assembly Materials 2: Electronic Properties, Magnetic Properties & Surface Science Molecular Environmental & Interface Science Membership Torgny Gustafsson Rutgers University Dept of Physics & Astronomy 136 Frelinghuysen Rd Piscataway NJ 08854-0849 Victor Henrich Yale University Dept of Applied Physics 327 Becton Center, 15 Prospect St. New Haven CT 06511 Christopher P. Hill University of Utah Biochemistry 15 N. Medical Dr. East, Rm 4100 Salt Lake City, UT 84112-5650 Franz Himpsel University of Wisconsin Dept of Physics 1150 University Avenue

188

Engines - Particulate Studies - Revealing the True Nature of Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Nanoparticle Research: Revealing the True Nature of Diesel Particulates Engine Nanoparticle Research: Revealing the True Nature of Diesel Particulates Thermophoretic sampling device Argonne's test engine with the thermophoretic sampling device attached. Nanostructure of graphitic diesel soot under high engine load A transmission electron microscope reveals the nanostructures of graphitic diesel soot sampled under high engine loads. Morphology of particles collected from diesel combustion with iso-paraffin-enriched fuel. Morphology of particles collected from diesel combution with iso-paraffin-enriched fuel. Amorphous soot particle collected from biodiesel combustion undera low-temperature condition. Amorphous soot particle collected from biodiesel combustion under low temperature conditions. Researchers have many ideas about how to reduce the soot produced by diesel

189

Fluidizable particulate materials and methods of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides fluidizable, substantially spherical particulate material of improved attrition resistance having an average particle size from about 100 to about 400 microns useful as sorbents, catalysts, catalytic supports, specialty ceramics or the like. The particles are prepared by spray drying a slurry comprising inorganic starting materials and an organic binder. Exemplary inorganic starting materials include mixtures of zinc oxide with titanium dioxide, or with iron oxide, alumina or the like. Exemplary organic binders include polyvinyl alcohol, hydroxypropylemethyl cellulose, polyvinyl acetate and the like. The spray dried particles are heat treated at a first temperature wherein organic binder material is removed to thereby provide a porous structure to the particles, and thereafter the particles are calcined at a higher temperature to cause reaction of the inorganic starting materials and to thereby form the final inorganic particulate material.

Gupta, Raghubir P. (Durham, NC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Particulate Contamination Within Fusion Devices and Complex (Dusty) Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decade, dust particulate contamination has increasingly become an area of concern within the fusion research community. In a burning plasma machine design like the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), dust contamination presents problems for diagnostic integration and may contribute to tritium safety issues. Additionally due to ITER design, such dust contamination problems are projected to become of even greater concern due to dust/wall interactions and possible instabilities created within the plasma by such particulates. Since the dynamics of such dust can in general be explained employing a combination of the ion drag, Coulomb force, and ion pre-sheath drifts, recent research in complex (dusty) plasma physics often offers unique insights for this research area. This paper will discuss the possibility of how experimental observations of the dust and plasma parameters within a GEC rf Reference Cell might be employed to diagnose conditions within fusion reactors, hopefully pr...

Creel, J; Kong, J; Hyde, Truell W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Development of an Ultra-fine Coal Dewatering Technology and an Integrated Flotation-Dewatering System for Coal Preparation Plants  

SciTech Connect

The project proposal was approved for only the phase I period. The goal for this Phase I project was to develop an industrial model that can perform continuous and efficient dewatering of fine coal slurries of the previous flotation process to fine coal cake of {approx}15% water content from 50-70%. The feasibility of this model should be demonstrated experimentally using a lab scale setup. The Phase I project was originally for one year, from May 2005 to May 2006. With DOE approval, the project was extended to Dec. 2006 without additional cost from DOE to accomplish the work. Water has been used in mining for a number of purposes such as a carrier, washing liquid, dust-catching media, fire-retardation media, temperature-control media, and solvent. When coal is cleaned in wet-processing circuits, waste streams containing water, fine coal, and noncombustible particles (ash-forming minerals) are produced. In many coal preparation plants, the fine waste stream is fed into a series of selection processes where fine coal particles are recovered from the mixture to form diluted coal fine slurries. A dewatering process is then needed to reduce the water content to about 15%-20% so that the product is marketable. However, in the dewatering process currently used in coal preparation plants, coal fines smaller than 45 micrometers are lost, and in many other plants, coal fines up to 100 micrometers are also wasted. These not-recovered coal fines are mixed with water and mineral particles of the similar particle size range and discharged to impoundment. The wasted water from coal preparation plants containing unrecoverable coal fine and mineral particles are called tailings. With time the amount of wastewater accumulates occupying vast land space while it appears as threat to the environment. This project developed a special extruder and demonstrated its application in solid-liquid separation of coal slurry, tailings containing coal fines mostly less than 50 micron. The extruder is special because all of its auger surface and the internal barrier surface are covered with the membranes allowing water to drain and solid particles retained. It is believed that there are four mechanisms working together in the dewatering process. They are hydrophilic diffusion flow, pressure flow, agitation and air purging. Hydrophilic diffusion flow is effective with hydrophilic membrane. Pressure flow is due to the difference of hydraulic pressure between the two sides of the membrane. Agitation is provided by the rotation of the auger. Purging is achieved with the air blow from the near bottom of the extruder, which is in vertical direction.

Wu Zhang; David Yang; Amar Amarnath; Iftikhar Huq; Scott O'Brien; Jim Williams

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

Development of A Microwave Assisted Particulate Filter Regeneration System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The need for active regeneration of diesel particulate filters and the advantages of microwave assisted regeneration are discussed. The current study has multiple objectives, which include developing a microwave assisted particulate filter regeneration system for future generation light-duty diesel applications, including PNGV type applications. A variable power 2.0 kW microwave system and a tuned waveguide were employed. Cavity geometry is being optimized with the aid of computational modeling and temperature measurements during microwave heating. A wall-flow ceramic-fiber filter with superior thermal shock resistance, high filtration efficiency, and high soot capacity was used. The microwave assisted particulate filter regeneration system has operated for more than 100 hours in an engine test-cell with a 5.9-liter diesel engine with automated split exhaust flow and by-pass flow capabilities. Filter regeneration was demonstrated using soot loads up to 10 g/liter and engine exhaust at idling flow rates as the oxygen source. A parametric study to determine the optimal combination of soot loading, oxidant flow rate, microwave power and heating time is underway. Preliminary experimental results are reported.

Popuri, Sriram

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Description of Proposed Action  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad Field Office RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION 1 Description of Proposed Action Performance of a three-dimensional seismic survey line on approximately 2,409 acres contained within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area as part of a larger survey to determine whether hydrocarbons are present in the region in quantities that warrant extraction and development. Number and Title of Applicable Categorical Exclusion B3.1 Site Characterization/Environmental Monitoring Activities covered by this Categorical Exclusion include, but are not limited to, site characterization and environmental monitoring under CERCLA and RCRA. Specific activities include, but are not limited to: (a) Geological, geophysical (such as gravity, magnetic, electrical, seismic, and radar), geochemical, and

194

Proposal Team: C. Burger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMPLEX MATERIALS SCATTERING ( ) COMPLEX MATERIALS SCATTERING ( ) Proposal Team: C. Burger 1 , K. Cavicchi 2 , E. DiMasi 3 , A. Fluerasu 3 , S. Fraden 4 , M. Fukuto 3 , O. Gang 3 , B.S. Hsiao 1 , R.J. Kline 5 , S. Kumar 6 , O. Lavrentovich 6 , B. Ocko 3 , R. Pindak 3 , M. Rafailovich 1 , R.A. Register 7 , S. Sprunt 6 , H.H. Strey 1 , B.D. Vogt 8 , W.-L. Wu 5 , L. Wiegart 3 , K.G. Yager 3 1 Stony Brook University, 2 University of Akron, 3 Brookhaven National Lab, 4 Brandeis University, 5 NIST, 6 Kent State University, 7 Princeton University, 8 Arizona State University TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES KEY CONCEPTS SELECTED APPLICATIONS * Small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering on 3PW source, in transmission and reflection mode: USAXS, SAXS, WAXS, GISAXS, GIXRD * High-throughput x-ray scattering for intelligent exploration of vast parameter spaces

195

Full Scale Gatorizing™ of Fine Grain Inconel 718  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

and fine grain size achieved in the extruded billet as well as the high cost ... with alloys such as 718, 901, or A286 succeeded in producing fine-grained billet by using ... by oil quench and aging at 718"C/8 hrs. and furnace cool to 62l0CI8 hrs.

196

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Organic Species as Tracers Title Source Apportionment of Airborne Particulate Matter using Inorganic and Organic Species as Tracers Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Wang, Yungang, Philip K. Hopke, X. Xia, Oliver V. Rattigan, David C. Chalupa, and M. J. Source Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 55 Start Page 525 Pagination 525-532 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords source apportionment positive matrix factorization (pmf) particulate matter (pm) molecular markers (mm) aethalometer delta-c Abstract Source apportionment is typically performed on chemical composition data derived from particulate matter (PM) samples. However, many common sources no longer emit significant amounts of characteristic trace elements requiring the use of more comprehensive chemical characterization in order to fully resolve the PM sources. Positive matrix factorization (EPA PMF, version 4.1) was used to analyze 24-hr integrated molecular marker (MM), secondary inorganic ions, trace elements, carbonaceous species and light absorption data to investigate sources of PM2.5 in Rochester, New York between October 2009 and October 2010 to explore the role of specific MMs. An eight-factor solutionwas found for which the factors were identified as isoprene secondary organic aerosol (SOA), airborne soil, other SOA, diesel emissions, secondary sulfate, wood combustion, gasoline vehicle, and secondary nitrate contributing 6.9%, 12.8%, 3.7%, 7.8%, 45.5%, 9.1%, 7.9%, and 6.3% to the average PM2.5 concentration, respectively Concentrations of pentacosane, hexacosane, heptacosane, and octacosane in the gasoline vehicles factor were larger compared to diesel emissions. Aethalometer Delta-C was strongly associated with wood combustion. The compounds, n-heptacosanoic acid and n-octacosanoic acid, occasionally used in the past as tracers for road dust, were found to largely associate with SOA in this study. In comparison with a standard PMF analyses without MM, inclusion of themwas necessary to resolve SOA and wood combustion factors in urban areas.

197

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone (O3) and Particulate Matter Speaker(s): Morton Lippmann Date: May 17, 1997 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Most scientific studies that are relevant to the setting of the NAAQS were not designed or performed with that specific application in mind, resulting in bits and pieces of the overall puzzle. Despite these limitations, the particulate matter (PM) and O3 literature reviews and analyses in the recently issued EPA Criteria documents and staff papers are the best prepared and most comprehensive ever available to an EPA Administrator as a basis for NAAQS decisions. This seminar will discuss the scientific basis

198

Price/Cost Proposal Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRICECOST PROPOSAL FORM Page No. of NREL Solicitation Document Number: Offeror's Name and Address: Title of Proposed Effort and Task No., Phase No., or Project Total, As...

199

Original Workshop Proposal and Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Proposal and Description Visualization Requirements for Computational Science and Engineering Applications Proposal for a DoE Workshop to Be Held at the...

200

Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines Print Submit a New Proposal for Structural Biology Beamlines Available Beamlines The beamlines suitable for structural biology...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Stored carbon partly fuels fine-root respiration but is not used for production of new fine roots  

SciTech Connect

The relative use of new photosynthate compared to stored C for the production and maintenance of fine roots, and the rate of C turnover in heterogeneous fine-root populations, are poorly understood. We followed the relaxation of a 13C tracer in fine roots in a Liquidambar styraciflua plantation at the conclusion of a free-air CO2 enrichment experiment. Goals included quantifying the relative fractions of new photosynthate versus stored C used in root growth and root respiration, as well as the turnover rate of fine-root C fixed during [CO2] fumigation. New fine-root growth was largely from recent photosynthate, while nearly one-quarter of respired C was from a storage pool. Changes in the isotopic composition of the fine-root population over two full growing seasons indicated heterogeneous C pools; less than 10% of root C had a residence time < 3 months, while a majority of root C had a residence time > 2 years. Compared to a 1-pool model, a 2-pool model for C turnover in fine roots (with 5 and 0.37 yr-1 turnover times) doubles the fine-root contribution to forest NPP (9-13%) and supports the 50% root-to-soil transfer rate often used in models.

Lynch, Douglas J [ORNL; Matamala-Paradeda, Roser [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miguel A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Sieveless particle size distribution analysis of particulate materials through computer vision  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores the inconsistency of length-based separation by mechanical sieving of particulate materials with standard sieves, which is the standard method of particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. We observed inconsistencies of length-based separation of particles using standard sieves with manual measurements, which showed deviations of 17 22 times. In addition, we have demonstrated the falling through effect of particles cannot be avoided irrespective of the wall thickness of the sieve. We proposed and utilized a computer vision with image processing as an alternative approach; wherein a user-coded Java ImageJ plugin was developed to evaluate PSD based on length of particles. A regular flatbed scanner acquired digital images of particulate material. The plugin determines particles lengths from Feret's diameter and width from pixel-march method, or minor axis, or the minimum dimension of bounding rectangle utilizing the digital images after assessing the particles area and shape (convex or nonconvex). The plugin also included the determination of several significant dimensions and PSD parameters. Test samples utilized were ground biomass obtained from the first thinning and mature stand of southern pine forest residues, oak hard wood, switchgrass, elephant grass, giant miscanthus, wheat straw, as well as Basmati rice. A sieveless PSD analysis method utilized the true separation of all particles into groups based on their distinct length (419 639 particles based on samples studied), with each group truly represented by their exact length. This approach ensured length-based separation without the inconsistencies observed with mechanical sieving. Image based sieve simulation (developed separately) indicated a significant effect (P < 0.05) on number of sieves used in PSD analysis, especially with non-uniform material such as ground biomass, and more than 50 equally spaced sieves were required to match the sieveless all distinct particles PSD analysis. Results substantiate that mechanical sieving, owing to handling limitations and inconsistent length-based separation of particles, is inadequate in determining the PSD of non-uniform particulate samples. The developed computer vision sieveless PSD analysis approach has the potential to replace the standard mechanical sieving. The plugin can be readily extended to model (e.g., Rosin Rammler) the PSD of materials, and mass-based analysis, while providing several advantages such as accuracy, speed, low cost, automated analysis, and reproducible results.

Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Pordesimo, L. O. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Columbus, Eugene P [ORNL; Batchelor, William D [ORNL; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace will be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. This report covers the first quarter`s progress. Major activities during this period were focused on finding the plants where a demo MTU column will be installed to prepare the samples needed to characterize the combustion behavior of slurry effluents. Also, a meeting was held at Penn State University to discuss the availability of the laboratory furnace for testing the plant coal/recovered coal fines blends.

Singh, Shyam

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

A Finely-Predicted Higgs Boson Mass from A Finely-Tuned Weak Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If supersymmetry is broken directly to the Standard Model at energies not very far from the unified scale, the Higgs boson mass lies in the range 128-141 GeV. The end points of this range are tightly determined. Theories with the Higgs boson dominantly in a single supermultiplet predict a mass at the upper edge, (141 \\pm 2) GeV, with the uncertainty dominated by the experimental errors on the top quark mass and the QCD coupling. This edge prediction is remarkably insensitive to the supersymmetry breaking scale and to supersymmetric threshold corrections so that, in a wide class of theories, the theoretical uncertainties are at the level of \\pm 0.4 GeV. A reduction in the uncertainties from the top quark mass and QCD coupling to the level of \\pm 0.3 GeV may be possible at future colliders, increasing the accuracy of the confrontation with theory from 1.4% to 0.4%. Verification of this prediction would provide strong evidence for supersymmetry, broken at a very high scale of ~ 10^{14 \\pm 2} GeV, and also for a Higgs boson that is elementary up to this high scale, implying fine-tuning of the Higgs mass parameter by ~ 20-28 orders of magnitude. Currently, the only known explanation for such fine-tuning is the multiverse.

Lawrence J. Hall; Yasunori Nomura

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation of brass: Particulate and ICPMS measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Femtosecond Laser Ablation of Brass: Particulate and ICPMScompared for ablating brass alloys. All operating parametersby resolidi- fication of molten brass. Melting and splashing

Liu, C.; Mao, X.L.; Mao, S.; Zeng, X.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Modeling of Particulate Matter Emissions from Agricultural Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

State Air Pollution Regulation Agencies (SAPRAs) issue and enforce permits that limit particulate matter emissions from all sources including layer and broiler facilities, cattle feedyards, dairies, cotton gins, and grain elevators. In this research, a process was developed to determine distances from emitting sources to where the estimated concentrations were less than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). These distances are a function of emission rates and meteorological conditions. Different protocols were used to develop emission factors for cattle feedyards and layer houses. Dispersion modeling with American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD) was conducted to determine the emissions of particulate matter. These data were used to determine the distances from the sources to where the concentrations of particulate matter (PM) would be less than the NAAQS. The current air-permitting process requires that concentrations from a source do not exceed the NAAQS at the property line and beyond for the facility to be in compliance with its permit conditions. Emission factors for particulate matter less than 10 micrometers (PM10) were developed for cattle feedyards using a reverse modeling protocol and Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance (TEOM) sampler data. Corrections were applied to the TEOM measurements to account for TEOM vs. filter-based low-volume (FBLV) sampler bias and over-sampling of PM10 pre-collectors. Invalid concentrations and dust peaks larger than mean ± 3 times the standard deviation were excluded from this study. AERMOD predictions of downwind concentrations at cotton gins were observed for compliance with 24-hour PM10 and PM2.5 NAAQS at property lines. The emissions from three cotton gins were analyzed at 50 m and 100 m distances. TEOM and FBLV samplers were used to collect 24-hour PM10 measurements inside a laying hen house. The distances to the property lines at which the emissions of PM10 were below the 24-hour average PM10 standards were estimated using AERMOD. The results suggested that the special use of the NAAQS for as the property-line concentration not to be exceeded, could be problematic to agriculture. Emission factors that were comparable of published emission factors were obtained in this study. Large distances to property lines were required when minimum flow rate recommendations were not considered. Emission factors that are representative of the emissions in a particular facility are essential; else facilities could be inappropriately regulated.

Bairy, Jnana 1988-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Prospecting by sampling and analysis of airborne particulates and gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is claimed for prospecting by sampling airborne particulates or gases at a ground position and recording wind direction values at the time of sampling. The samples are subsequently analyzed to determine the concentrations of a desired material or the ratios of the desired material to other identifiable materials in the collected samples. By comparing the measured concentrations or ratios to expected background data in the vicinity sampled, one can select recorded wind directions indicative of the upwind position of the land-based source of the desired material.

Sehmel, G.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Low exhaust temperature electrically heated particulate matter filter system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, a sensor, a heating element, and a control module. The PM filter includes with an upstream end that receives exhaust gas, a downstream end and multiple zones. The sensor detects a temperature of the exhaust gas. The control module controls current to the heating element to convection heat one of the zones and initiate a regeneration process. The control module selectively increases current to the heating element relative to a reference regeneration current level when the temperature is less than a predetermined temperature.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI); Bhatia, Garima (Bangalore, IN)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

Zoned electrical heater arranged in spaced relationship from particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system comprises a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A zoned heater is arranged spaced from the upstream end and comprises N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones comprises M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Wireless zoned particulate matter filter regeneration control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An assembly includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that comprises an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas, a downstream end and multiple zones. An absorbing layer absorbs microwave energy in one of N frequency ranges and is arranged with the upstream end. N is an integer. A frequency selective filter has M frequency selective segments and receives microwave energy in the N frequency ranges. M is an integer. One of the M frequency selective segments permits passage of the microwave energy in one of the N frequency ranges and does not permit passage of microwave energy in the other of the N frequency ranges.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Kirby, Kevin W [Calabasas Hills, CA; Phelps, Amanda [Malibu, CA

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

211

Apparatus for removal of particulate matter from gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the removal of particulate matter from the gaseous product stream of an entrained flow coal gasifier which apparatus includes an initial screen, an intermediate screen which is aligned with the direction of flow of the gaseous product stream and a final screen transversely disposed to the flow of gaseous product and which apparatus is capable of withstanding at least a pressure differential of about 10 psi (68.95 kPa) or greater at the temperatures of the gaseous product stream.

Smith, Peyton L. (Baton Rouge, LA); Morse, John C. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Ash reduction system using electrically heated particulate matter filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A control system for reducing ash comprises a temperature estimator module that estimates a temperature of an electrically heated particulate matter (PM) filter. A temperature and position estimator module estimates a position and temperature of an oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter. An ash reduction control module adjusts at least one of exhaust flow, fuel and oxygen levels in the electrically heated PM filter to adjust a position of the oxidation wave within the electrically heated PM filter based on the oxidation wave temperature and position.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; He, Yongsheng [Sterling Heights, MI

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

213

Electrically heated particulate filter with zoned exhaust flow control  

SciTech Connect

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes X zones. An electrical heater includes Y heater segments that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and proximate with the PM filter. A valve assembly includes Z sections that are associated with respective ones of the X zones. A control module adjusts flow through each of the Z sections during regeneration of the PM filter via control of the valve assembly. X, Y and Z are integers.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Novel Concepts for Particulate Matter Control: 2013 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The latest regulatory challenge for U.S. utilities and the air pollution control industry is the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS). For existing coal-fired generating units, a maximum particulate matter (PM) emissions rate of 0.030 lb/mmBtu (filterable component only) must be met in conjunction with HCl emissions standards (0.002 lb/mmBtu) and mercury emissions standards (1.2 lb/mmBtu for non-low-rank virgin coals). MATS standards are ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

ENGINEERED PARTICULATES FOR CO-FIRING OF DIVERSE FEEDSTOCKS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a novel methodology for the formation of engineered particulates of energy-relevant material. Specifically, we aim to control interparticle cohesion in such a way as to generate macro-particles or agglomerates of several differing types of primary particles in specific proportions such that they would be of utility for co-firing applications. In Phase I of this project, we used a combination of experimentation and simulation to validate theoretically derived mixing/segregation rules for cohesive granular materials in static systems, flowing systems, and gas-solid systems.

Joseph J. McCarthy; Kunal Jain; Hongming Li; Deliang Shi

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Shape dependence of band-edge exciton fine structure in CdSe nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exciton fine structure in CdSe nanocrystals Qingzhong Zhao,fine structure of wurtzite CdSe nanocrystals is investigatedexciton fine structure of CdSe nanocrystals is determined by

Zhao, Qingzhong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Gas-Mediated Impact Dynamics in Fine-Grained Granular Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-cohesive granular media exhibit complex responses to sudden impact that often differ from those of ordinary solids and liquids. We investigate how this response is mediated by the presence of interstitial gas between the grains. Using high-speed x-ray radiography we track the motion of a steel sphere through the interior of a bed of fine, loose granular material. We find a crossover from nearly incompressible, fluid-like behavior at atmospheric pressure to a highly compressible, dissipative response once most of the gas is evacuated. We discuss these results in light of recent proposals for the drag force in granular media.

John R. Royer; Eric I. Corwin; Peter J. Eng; Heinrich M. Jaeger

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

A performance model for fine-grain accesses in UPC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UPC's implicit communication and fine-grain programming style make application performance modeling a challenging task. The correspondence between remote references and communication events depends on the internals of the compiler and runtime system. ...

Zhang Zhang; Steven R. Seidel

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #280: August 11, 2003 Fines...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the fuel economy of new light vehicles sold in the United States. The CAFE program fines vehicle manufacturers whose corporate average is less than 27.5 miles per gallon (mpg) for...

220

Clean Production of Coke from Carbonaceous Fines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to produce steel (a necessary commodity in developed nations) using conventional technologies, you must have metallurgical coke. Current coke-making technology pyrolyzes high-quality coking coals in a slot oven, but prime coking coals are becoming more expensive and slot ovens are being shut-down because of age and environmental problems. The United States typically imports about 4 million tons of coke per year, but because of a world-wide coke scarcity, metallurgical coke costs have risen from about $77 per tonne to more than $225. This coke shortage is a long-term challenge driving up the price of steel and is forcing steel makers to search for alternatives. Combustion Resources (CR) has developed a technology to produce metallurgical coke from alternative feedstocks in an environmentally clean manner. The purpose of the current project was to refine material and process requirements in order to achieve improved economic benefits and to expand upon prior work on the proposed technology through successful prototype testing of coke products. The ultimate objective of this project is commercialization of the proposed technology. During this project period, CR developed coke from over thirty different formulations that meet the strength and reactivity requirements for use as metallurgical coke. The technology has been termed CR Clean Coke because it utilizes waste materials as feedstocks and is produced in a continuous process where pollutant emissions can be significantly reduced compared to current practice. The proposed feed material and operating costs for a CR Clean Coke plant are significantly less than conventional coke plants. Even the capital costs for the proposed coke plant are about half that of current plants. The remaining barrier for CR Clean Coke to overcome prior to commercialization is full-scale testing in a blast furnace. These tests will require a significant quantity of product (tens of thousands of tons) necessitating the construction of a demonstration facility. Talks are currently underway with potential partners and investors to build a demonstration facility that will generate enough coke for meaningful blast furnace evaluation tests. If the testing is successful, CR Clean Coke could potentially eliminate the need for the United States to import any coke, effectively decreasing US Steel industry dependence on foreign nations and reducing the price of domestic steel.

Craig N. Eatough

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A fine-grained component-level power measurement method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ever growing energy consumption of computer systems have become a more and more serious problem in the past few years. Power profiling is a fundamental way for us to better understand where, when and how energy is consumed. This paper presents a ... Keywords: energy efficiency, fine-grained component-level power measurement method, computer system energy consumption, power profiling, direct measurement method, power dissipation synchronization, program phase, SPEC CPU2006 benchmarks, fine time granularity, memory management, architecture design

Zehan Cui; Yan Zhu; Yungang Bao; Mingyu Chen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Modifying Char Dustcake Pressure Drop Using Particulate Additives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coal gasification produces residual particles of coal char, coal ash, and sorbent that are suspended in the fuel gas stream exiting the gasifier. In most cases, these particles (referred to, hereafter, simply as char) must be removed from the stream prior to sending the gas to a turbine, fuel cell, or other downstream device. Currently, the most common approach to cleaning the gas stream at high temperature and pressure is by filtering the particulate with a porous ceramic or metal filter. However, because these dusts frequently have small size distributions, irregular morphology, and high specific surface areas, they can have very high gas flow resistance resulting in hot-gas filter system operating problems. Typical of gasification chars, the hot-gas filter dustcakes produced at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) during recent coal gasification tests have had very high flow resistance (Martin et al, 2002). The filter system has been able to successfully operate, but pressure drops have been high and filter cleaning must occur very frequently. In anticipation of this problem, a study was conducted to investigate ways of reducing dustcake pressure drop. This paper will discuss the efficacy of adding low-flow-resistance particulate matter to the high-flow-resistance char dustcake to reduce dustcake pressure drop. The study had two parts: a laboratory screening study and confirming field measurements at the PSDF.

Landham, C.; Dahlin, R.S.; Martin, R.A.; Guan, X.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

Cooler and particulate separator for an off-gas stack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes an off-gas stack for a melter, furnace or reaction vessel comprising an air conduit leading to two sets of holes, one set injecting air into the off-gas stack near the melter plenum and the second set injecting air downstream of the first set. The first set injects air at a compound angle, having both downward and tangential components, to create a reverse vortex flow, counter to the direction of flow of gas through the stack and also along the periphery of the stack interior surface. Air from the first set of holes prevents recirculation zones from forming and the attendant accumulation of particulate deposits on the wall of the stack and will also return to the plenum any particulate swept up in the gas entering the stack. The second set of holes injects air in the same direction as the gas in the stack to compensate for the pressure drop and to prevent the concentration of condensate in the stack. A set of sprayers, receiving water from a second conduit, is located downstream of the second set of holes and sprays water into the gas to further cool it.

Wright, G.T.

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

224

Distributor means for charging particulate material into receptacles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are receptacles, such as shaft furnaces illustrated by a blast furnace and an upright oil shale retort, embodying rotatable charge distributor means for distributing particulate charge material in the furnace, which charge distributor means can provide a high uniformity of distribution of various sizes of particles and also can provide and maintain a stock line of desired contour and heighth in the receptacle. The distributor means includes a hopper having rigidly fixed to it a plurality of downwardly extending chutes with lower discharge portions that discharge in concentric circular zones at the stock line. The distributor means includes a segmented portion at the juncture of the hopper and the chutes that divides the charge material discharged into the hopper in proportion to the area of the circular zone at the stock line that is fed by the chute. The distributor means embodies means for providing mass flow of the particulate charge material through the chutes to the stock line and for avoiding segregation between larger and smaller particles of charge material deposited at the stock line.

Greaves, Melvin J. (9995 Cliff Drive, Cleveland, OH 44102)

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

Shock driven jamming and periodic fracture of particulate rafts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A tenuous monolayer of hydrophobic particles at the air-water interface often forms a scum or raft. When such a monolayer is disturbed by the localized introduction of a surfactant droplet, a radially divergent surfactant shock front emanates from the surfactant origin and packs the particles into a jammed, compact, annular band with a packing fraction that saturates at a peak packing fraction $\\phi^*$. As the resulting two-dimensional, disordered elastic band grows with time and is driven radially outwards by the surfactant, it fractures to form periodic triangular cracks with robust geometrical features. We find the number of cracks $N$ and the compaction band radius $R^*$ at fracture onset vary monotonically with the initial packing fraction ($\\phi_{init}$). However, its width $W^*$ is constant for all $\\phi_{init}$. A simple geometric theory that treats the compaction band as an elastic annulus, and accounts for mass conservation allows us to deduce that $N \\simeq 2\\pi R^*/W^* \\simeq 4\\pi \\phi_{RCP}/\\phi_{init}$, a result we verify both experimentally and numerically. We show the essential ingredients for this phenomenon are an initially low enough particulate packing fraction that allows surfactant driven advection to cause passive jamming and eventual fracture of the hydrophobic particulate interface.

M. M. Bandi; T. Tallinen; L. Mahadevan

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

Is there Correlation between Fine Structure and Dark Energy Cosmic Dipoles?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis (including redshift tomography) of the cosmic dipoles in the Keck+VLT quasar absorber and in the Union2 SnIa samples. We show that the fine structure constant cosmic dipole obtained through the Keck+VLT quasar absorber sample at $4.1\\sigma$ level is anomalously aligned with the corresponding dark energy dipole obtained through the Union2 sample at $2\\sigma$ level. The angular separation between the two dipole directions is $11.3^\\circ \\pm 11.8^\\circ$. We use Monte Carlo simulations to find the probability of obtaining the observed dipole magnitudes with the observed alignment, in the context of an isotropic cosmological model with no correlation between dark energy and fine structure constant $\\alpha$. We find that this probability is less than one part in $10^6$. We propose a simple physical model (extended topological quintessence) which naturally predicts a spherical inhomogeneous distribution for both dark energy density and fine structure constant values. The model is based on the existence of a recently formed giant global monopole with Hubble scale core which also couples non-minimally to electromagnetism. Aligned dipole anisotropies would naturally emerge for an off-centre observer for both the fine structure constant and for dark energy density. This model smoothly reduces to \\lcdm for proper limits of its parameters. Two predictions of this model are (a) a correlation between the existence of strong cosmic electromagnetic fields and the value of $\\alpha$ and (b) the existence of a dark flow on Hubble scales due to the repulsive gravity of the global defect core (`Great Repulser') aligned with the dark energy and $\\alpha$ dipoles. The direction of the dark flow is predicted to be towards the spatial region of lower accelerating expansion. Existing data about the dark flow are consistent with this prediction.

Antonio Mariano; Leandros Perivolaropoulos

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

227

The art of proposal writing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This class covers general proposal writing for academic projects in two broad categories: research and education. It reviews the project concept, the search for an appropriate funding program, and development of a proposal based on a program announcement. ...

Barb Helfer; Steve Cunningham; Mike McGrath; Larry Rosenblum

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Meeting and Short Course Proposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Share your knowledge and propose an AOCS Meeting or Short Course. Meeting and Short Course Proposal Meetings, Conferences and Short Courses aocs AOCS Annual Meeting & Expo Call for Papers Conferences Congress control dispersions edible exhibit exp

229

OVERVIEW OF PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OVERVIEW OF PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION ENERGY ANALYSES FOR THE 2007 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT Jim Page, Malachi Weng-Gutierrez, and Gordon Schremp Fossil Fuels Office Fuels and Transportation....................................................................................................... 3 SUMMARY OF PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION ENERGY ANALYSES ............... 4 Background

230

Genome sequencing reveals fine scale diversification and reticulation history during speciation in Sus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as: Frantz et al. : Genome sequencing reveals fine scaleThornton K, Presgraves DC: Genome sequencing reveals complexRESEARCH Open Access Genome sequencing reveals fine scale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Gravity Wave – Fine Structure Interactions, Part 1: Influences of Fine-Structure Form and Orientation on Flow Evolution and Instability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four idealized direct numerical simulations are performed to examine the dynamics arising from the superposition of a monochromatic gravity wave and sinusoidal linear and rotary fine structure in the velocity field. These simulations are motivated ...

David C. Fritts; Ling Wang; Joseph A. Werne

232

Numerical simulation of the impact and deposition of charged particulate droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work addresses the impact and deposition of charged ''cluster-droplets'', comprised of particulates, on electrified surfaces. A direct numerical method is developed, based on an implicit, staggered, time-stepping scheme which separates the impulsive ... Keywords: Charged particulates, Clusters, Impact, Staggering scheme

T. I. Zohdi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Fictitious boundary and moving mesh methods for the numerical simulation of rigid particulate flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the numerical simulation of particulate flows using a new moving mesh method combined with the multigrid fictitious boundary method (FBM) [S. Turek, D.C. Wan, L.S. Rivkind, The fictitious boundary method for the implicit ... Keywords: ALE, FEM, Fictitious boundary, Moving mesh, Multigrid, Particulate flows

Decheng Wan; Stefan Turek

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Determination of Adenosine Triphosphate on Marine Particulates:Synthesis of Methods for Use on OTEC Samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

Jones, Anthony T.; Hartwig, Eric O.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Determination of adenosine triphosphate on marine particulates: synthesis of methods for use on OTEC samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is an indicator of living biomass in marine particulates. This report details the method used by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to analyze particulate ATP in samples taken from oligotrophic, tropical ocean waters. It represents a synthesis of previously published methods.

Jones, A.T.; Hartwig, E.O.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Resistive heater geometry and regeneration method for a diesel particulate filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One embodiment of the invention includes a diesel particulate filter comprising a first face and a second face; a bottom electrode layer formed over the first face of the diesel particulate filter; a middle resistive layer formed over a portion of the bottom electrode layer; and a top electrode layer formed over a portion of the middle resistive layer.

Phelps, Amanda (Malibu, CA); Kirby, Kevin W. (Calabasas Hills, CA); Gregoir, Daniel J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

237

ARM - Propose a Field Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPropose a Campaign govCampaignsPropose a Campaign Schedule and Availability Preproposals now open for AMF and AAF Preproposals due 1 Feb Invited full proposals due 1 May AAF available Dec 2015 AMF1 available Apr 2016 AMF2 available early 2017 AMF3 available for guest instrumentation or intensive operational periods Forms Propose a Campaign Form Instrument Support Request (ISR) Form (Word, 89KB) Documentation Steps to Send Campaign Data to ARM Data Archive Field Campaign Guidelines (PDF, 1.1MB) Propose a Campaign : Preproposal Form Preproposals are short summaries of the proposed campaign and can originate with any scientist. Before you begin your preproposal, you should review the guidelines for submitting proposals. If you are preparing your preproposals locally on your computer, please

238

Engineering analysis of fugitive particulate matter emissions from cattle feedyards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An engineering analysis of the fugitive particulate matter emissions from a feedyard is not simple. The presence of an evening dust peak in concentration measurements downwind of a feedyard complicates the calculation of an average 24-h emission flux for the feedyard. The evening dust peak is a recurring event that occurs during evening hours when particulate matter concentration measurements increase and decrease dramatically during a short period of time. The concentrations measured during the evening can be up to 8 times the concentrations measured throughout the rest of the day. There is a perception that these concentration increases are due to increases in cattle activity as the temperature decreases during the evening. The purpose of Objective 1 of this research was to quantify the changes in concentrations based on changes in meteorological conditions and/or cattle activity. Using ISCST3, a Gaussian-based EPAapproved dispersion model used to predict concentrations downwind of the feedyard , the results of this work indicate that up to 80% of the increase in concentrations can be attributed to changes in meteorological conditions (wind speed, stability class, and mixing height.)The total fugitive particulate matter emissions on a cattle feedyard are due to two sources: unpaved roads (vehicle traffic) and pen surfaces (cattle activity). Objective 2 of this research was to quantify the mass fraction of the concentration measurements that was due to unpaved road emissions (vehicle traffic). A recent finding by Wanjura et al. (2004) reported that as much as 80% of the concentrations measured after a rain event were due to unpaved road emissions. An engineering analysis of the potential of the unpaved road emissions versus the total feedyard emissions using ISCST3 suggests that it is possible for 70 to 80% of the concentration measurements to be attributed to unpaved road emissions. The purpose of Objective 3 was to demonstrate the science used by ISCST3 to predict concentrations downwind of an area source. Results from this study indicate that the ISCST3 model utilizes a form of the Gaussian line source algorithm to predict concentrations downwind of an area source.

Hamm, Lee Bradford

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Investigations of ash layer characteristics and ash distribution in a diesel particulate filter using novel lubricant additive tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are currently widely used in various applications as a means of collecting particulate matter in order to meet increasingly stringent particle emissions regulations. Over time, the DPF ...

Morrow, Ryan (Ryan Michael)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Synergistic effects of lubricant additive chemistry on ash properties impacting diesel particulate filter flow resistance and catalyst performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread use in recent years in both on- and offroad applications as an effective means for meeting the increasingly stringent particulate emission regulations. Overtime, ...

Munnis, Sean (Sean Andrew)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fine coal cleaning via the micro-mag process  

SciTech Connect

A method of cleaning particulate coal which is fed with a dense medium slurry as an inlet feed to a cyclone separator. The coal particle size distribution is in the range of from about 37 microns to about 600 microns. The dense medium comprises water and ferromagnetic particles that have a relative density in the range of from about 4.0 to about 7.0. The ferromagnetic particles of the dense medium have particle sizes of less than about 15 microns and at least a majority of the particle sizes are less than about 5 microns. In the cyclone, the particulate coal and dense-medium slurry is separated into a low gravity product stream and a high gravity produce stream wherein the differential in relative density between the two streams is not greater than about 0.2. The low gravity and high gravity streams are treated to recover the ferromagnetic particles therefrom.

Klima, Mark S. (Finleyville, PA); Maronde, Carl P. (McMurray, PA); Killmeyer, Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

PROPOSAL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydraulic Motion & Fluid Movement Hydraulic Motion & Fluid Movement RIO Technical Services Page 1 Department of Energy National Petroleum Technology Office Final Report Work Performed Under Contract Task 03NT30429 Sub-Task 2: Hydraulic Motion & Fluid Movement Through Small Diameter Pipes and Wellbores December 12, 2003 Prepared By: RIO Technical Services 4200 South Hulen, Suite 630 Fort Worth, Texas 76109 (817) 735-8264 NPTO Hydraulic Motion & Fluid Movement RIO Technical Services Page 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1.0 .............................................................................Introduction Section 2.0........................................................................Results& Findings 2.1..........Significant Parameters Affecting Efficient Cuttings Transport

243

PROPOSAL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downhole Motors Downhole Motors Department of Energy National Petroleum Technology Office Final Report Work Performed Under Contract Task 03NT30429 Sub-Task 1: Current Capabilities of Hydraulic Motors, Air/Nitrogen Motors, and Electric Downhole Motors January 30, 2004 Prepared By: RIO Technical Services 4200 South Hulen, Suite 630 Fort Worth, Texas 76109 (817) 735-8264 RIO Technical Services Page 1 NPTO Downhole Motors TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1.0................................................................................Introduction Section 2.0.................Brief History of Coil Tubing and Summary of Downhole Motors Section 3.0.....................................................................Results and Findings 3.1............Motors

244

Proposal to perform a high - statisics neutrino scattering experiment using a fine - grained detector in the NuMI Beam  

SciTech Connect

The NuMI facility at Fermilab will provide an extremely intense beam of neutrinos for the MINOS neutrino-oscillation experiment. The spacious and fully-outfitted MINOS near detector hall will be the ideal venue for a high-statistics, high-resolution {nu} and {bar {nu}}-nucleon/nucleus scattering experiment. The experiment described here will measure neutrino cross-sections and probe nuclear effects essential to present and future neutrino-oscillation experiments. Moreover, with the high NuMI beam intensity, the experiment will either initially address or significantly improve our knowledge of a wide variety of neutrino physics topics of interest and importance to the elementary-particle and nuclear-physics communities.

Morfin, J.G.; /Fermilab; McFarland, K.; /Rochester U.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fuel Efficient Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Modeling and Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described in this report seeks to promote effective diesel particulate filter technology with minimum fuel penalty by enhancing fundamental understanding of filtration mechanisms through targeted experiments and computer simulations. The overall backpressure of a filtration system depends upon complex interactions of particulate matter and ash with the microscopic pores in filter media. Better characterization of these phenomena is essential for exhaust system optimization. The acicular mullite (ACM) diesel particulate filter substrate is under continuing development by Dow Automotive. ACM is made up of long mullite crystals which intersect to form filter wall framework and protrude from the wall surface into the DPF channels. ACM filters have been demonstrated to effectively remove diesel exhaust particles while maintaining relatively low backpressure. Modeling approaches developed for more conventional ceramic filter materials, such as silicon carbide and cordierite, have been difficult to apply to ACM because of properties arising from its unique microstructure. Penetration of soot into the high-porosity region of projecting crystal structures leads to a somewhat extended depth filtration mode, but with less dramatic increases in pressure drop than are normally observed during depth filtration in cordierite or silicon carbide filters. Another consequence is greater contact between the soot and solid surfaces, which may enhance the action of some catalyst coatings in filter regeneration. The projecting crystals appear to provide a two-fold benefit for maintaining low backpressures during filter loading: they help prevent soot from being forced into the throats of pores in the lower porosity region of the filter wall, and they also tend to support the forming filter cake, resulting in lower average cake density and higher permeability. Other simulations suggest that soot deposits may also tend to form at the tips of projecting crystals due to the axial velocity component of exhaust moving down the filter inlet channel. Soot mass collected in this way would have a smaller impact on backpressure than soot forced into the flow restrictions deeper in the porous wall structure. This project has focused on the development of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques that are generally applicable to a wide variety of exhaust aftertreatment technologies. By helping to develop improved fundamental understanding pore-scale phenomena affecting filtration, soot oxidation, and NOX abatement, this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has also assisted Dow Automotive in continuing development and commercialization of the ACM filter substrate. Over the course of this research project, ACM filters were successfully deployed on the Audi R10 TDI racecar which won the 24 Hours of LeMans endurance race in 2006, 2007, and 2008; and the 12 Hours of Sebring endurance race in 2006 and 2007. It would not have been possible for the R10 to compete in these traditionally gasoline-dominated events without reliable and effective exhaust particulate filtration. These successes demonstrated not only the performance of automotive diesel engines, but the efficacy of DPF technology as it was being deployed around the world to meet new emissions standards on consumer vehicles. During the course of this CRADA project, Dow Automotive commercialized their ACM DPF technology under the AERIFYTM DPF brand.

Stewart, Mark L.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Kim, Do Heui; Maupin, Gary D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Particulate measurement issues in diesel exhausts using laser induced incandescence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of studies in the recent past have identified Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) as a versatile technique for in-flame measurement of soot concentrations. Recently, a number of researchers have focused their attention in adapting this technique to measure particulate in diesel exhausts. However the agreement with established physical sampling techniques, such as the EPA recommended filter paper collection method, was found to be less than ideal. This paper reports the efforts to adapt this technique for diesel exhaust characterization. Many of the factors affecting LII signal were identified through computer modeling. Parameters that could not be determined through such a model were determined experimentally following a parametric study. Subsequently, LII measurements were performed in the exhaust of a modified lab burner, with conditions close to that of diesel engine exhausts. Such measurements show excellent agreement with those performed using the standard filter paper collection technique.

Gupta, S. B.; Poola, R. B.; Sekar, R.

2000-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

247

TRANSIENT, REAL-TIME, PARTICULATE EMISSION MEASUREMENTS IN DIESEL ENGINES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports our efforts to develop an instrument, TG-1, to measure particulate emissions from diesel engines in real-time. TG-1 while based on laser-induced incandescence allows measurements at 10 Hz on typical engine exhausts. Using such an instrument, measurements were performed in the exhaust of a 1.7L Mercedes Benz engine coupled to a low inertia dynamometer. Comparative measurements performed under engine steady state conditions showed the instrument to agree within {+-}12% of measurements performed with an SMPS. Moreover, the instrument had far better time response and time resolution than a TEOM{reg_sign} 1105. Also, TG-1 appears to surpass the shortcomings of the TEOM instrument, i.e., of yielding negative values under certain engine conditions and, being sensitive to external vibration.

Gupta, S; Shih, J; Hillman, G; sekar, R; Graze, R; Shimpi, S; Martin, W; Pier, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Federal Register 4 Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 1 / Monday, January 3, 2011 / Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2010-0002] 10 CFR Part 1021 RIN 1990-AA34 National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures AGENCY: Office of the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking and public hearing. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) proposes to amend its existing regulations governing compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The majority of the changes are proposed for the categorical exclusions provisions contained in its NEPA Implementing Procedures, with a small number of related changes proposed for other provisions. These proposed changes are intended to better align the

249

PII S0016-7037(01)00632-9 Preservation of particulate non-lithogenic uranium in marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PII S0016-7037(01)00632-9 Preservation of particulate non-lithogenic uranium in marine sediments in revised form March 26, 2001) Abstract--Particulate non-lithogenic uranium (PNU), excess U above detrital). This excess U is referred to as particulate non-lithogenic U (PNU). Uranium concentrations in the supernant

van Geen, Alexander

250

NIST SBIR Proposals by State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST SBIR Phase I Proposals Received by State for FY1994 - FY 2013. STATE, FY94, FY95, FY96, FY97, FY98, FY99, FY00, ...

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

251

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This Final Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 1998 through December 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

252

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This semi-annual Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 2003 through March 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses the following conclusions: (1) The TEOM equipment performed as well as the sequential filter samplers in accounting for ambient PM{sub 2.5} levels; however, the FRM-obtained data was consistently lower than the averages from the TEOM/DRI-SFS measurements; (2) The trending in the PM{sub 2.5} levels was similar for Lawrenceville and Holbrook, which represent an urban and a rural site sixty-five miles apart. This implies that the PM{sub 2.5} levels appear to be impacted more by regional than by local effects; (3) The absolute median PM{sub 2.5} levels were slightly higher for Lawrenceville than for Holbrook, implying that local urban environmental contributions had a minor but measurable effect on total PM{sub 2.5} mass concentration; (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels were consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels observed in the spring and fall; (5) Sulfate levels predominated in the speciation data obtained from both the Holbrook and the Lawrenceville sites during winter and summer intensive sampling. Sulfate level measured at Holbrook were higher than those taken at Lawrenceville regardless of the season; (6) Ammonium levels remained relatively constant between seasons and between sites; (7) Nitrate levels measured at Lawrenceville were higher than those measured at Holbrook during winter intensive sampling. Nitrate levels measured during the summer intensive period were found to be very low at both locations; (8) In general, the predominant inorganic fraction of the samples analyzed could be described as being composed of a mixture of ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate with minor amounts of ammonium nitrate; (9) The PM10 fraction had a larger percentage of geological material and a smaller percentage of condensable material (ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate and total carbon species) than the PM{sub 2.5} fraction for samples collected in winter at Lawrenceville; and (10) Most high PM{sub 2.5} episodes occurred when the predominating wind direction was from the South-West. (11) Plots of ozone vs. NO{sub x} suggest chemical reaction between these molecules since a high concentration of one always results in a low concentration of the other. The analysis of the acquired data has so far addressed three of the four scientific questions originally posed. More data analysis is on-going including the correlation between O{sub 3} and PM{sub 2.5} levels and the correlation of mass data with meteorological observations.

Unknown

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Database and Analytical Tool Development for the Management of Data Derived from US DOE (NETL) Funded Fine Particulate (PM2.5) Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) was contracted by the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) to develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust web-accessible database application to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. The data management system was designed to include a web-based user interface that will allow easy access to the data by the scientific community, policy- and decision-makers, and other interested stakeholders, while providing detailed information on sampling, analytical and quality control parameters. In addition, the system will provide graphical analytical tools for displaying, analyzing and interpreting the air quality data. The system will also provide multiple report generation capabilities and easy-to-understand visualization formats that can be utilized by the media and public outreach/educational institutions. The project was conducted in two phases. Phase One included the following tasks: (1) data inventory/benchmarking, including the establishment of an external stakeholder group; (2) development of a data management system; (3) population of the database; (4) development of a web-based data retrieval system, and (5) establishment of an internal quality assurance/quality control system on data management. Phase Two involved the development of a platform for on-line data analysis. Phase Two included the following tasks: (1) development of a sponsor and stakeholder/user website with extensive online analytical tools; (2) development of a public website; (3) incorporation of an extensive online help system into each website; and (4) incorporation of a graphical representation (mapping) system into each website. The project is now technically completed.

Robinson Khosah

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Database and Analytical Tool Development for the Management of Data Derived from US DOE (NETL) Funded Fine Particulate (PM2.5) Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) was contracted by the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) to develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust web-accessible database application to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. The data management system was designed to include a web-based user interface that will allow easy access to the data by the scientific community, policy- and decision-makers, and other interested stakeholders, while providing detailed information on sampling, analytical and quality control parameters. In addition, the system will provide graphical analytical tools for displaying, analyzing and interpreting the air quality data. The system will also provide multiple report generation capabilities and easy-to-understand visualization formats that can be utilized by the media and public outreach/educational institutions. The project is being conducted in two phases. Phase One includes the following tasks: (1) data inventory/benchmarking, including the establishment of an external stakeholder group; (2) development of a data management system; (3) population of the database; (4) development of a web-based data retrieval system, and (5) establishment of an internal quality assurance/quality control system on data management. Phase Two, which is currently underway, involves the development of a platform for on-line data analysis. Phase Two includes the following tasks: (1) development of a sponsor and stakeholder/user website with extensive online analytical tools; (2) development of a public website; (3) incorporation of an extensive online help system into each website; and (4) incorporation of a graphical representation (mapping) system into each website. The project is now into its forty-eighth month of development activities.

Robinson P. Khosah; Frank T. Alex

2007-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

DATABASE AND ANALYTICAL TOOL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DATA DERIVED FROM US DOE (NETL) FUNDED FINE PARTICULATE (PM 2.5) RESEARCH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) was contracted by the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) to develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust web-accessible database application to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. The data management system was designed to include a web-based user interface that will allow easy access to the data by the scientific community, policy- and decision-makers, and other interested stakeholders, while providing detailed information on sampling, analytical and quality control parameters. In addition, the system will provide graphical analytical tools for displaying, analyzing and interpreting the air quality data. The system will also provide multiple report generation capabilities and easy-to-understand visualization formats that can be utilized by the media and public outreach/educational institutions. The project is being conducted in two phases. Phase One includes the following tasks: (1) data inventory/benchmarking, including the establishment of an external stakeholder group; (2) development of a data management system; (3) population of the database; (4) development of a web-based data retrieval system, and (5) establishment of an internal quality assurance/quality control system on data management. Phase Two, which is currently underway, involves the development of a platform for on-line data analysis. Phase Two includes the following tasks: (1) development of a sponsor and stakeholder/user website with extensive online analytical tools; (2) development of a public website; (3) incorporation of an extensive online help system into each website; and (4) incorporation of a graphical representation (mapping) system into each website. The project is now into its forty-second month of development activities.

Robinson P. Khosah; Charles G. Crawford

2006-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

258

DATABASE AND ANALYTICAL TOOL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF DATA DERIVED FROM US DOE (NETL) FUNDED FINE PARTICULATE (PM2.5) RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS) was contracted by the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) to develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust web-accessible database application to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. The data management system was designed to include a web-based user interface that will allow easy access to the data by the scientific community, policy- and decision-makers, and other interested stakeholders, while providing detailed information on sampling, analytical and quality control parameters. In addition, the system will provide graphical analytical tools for displaying, analyzing and interpreting the air quality data. The system will also provide multiple report generation capabilities and easy-to-understand visualization formats that can be utilized by the media and public outreach/educational institutions. The project is being conducted in two phases. Phase 1, which is currently in progress and will take twelve months to complete, will include the following tasks: (1) data inventory/benchmarking, including the establishment of an external stakeholder group; (2) development of a data management system; (3) population of the database; (4) development of a web-based data retrieval system, and (5) establishment of an internal quality assurance/quality control system on data management. In Phase 2, which will be completed in the second year of the project, a platform for on-line data analysis will be developed. Phase 2 will include the following tasks: (1) development of a sponsor and stakeholder/user website with extensive online analytical tools; (2) development of a public website; (3) incorporation of an extensive online help system into each website; and (4) incorporation of a graphical representation (mapping) system into each website. The project is now into its sixth month of Phase 1 development activities.

Robinson P. Khosah; Charles G. Crawford

2003-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

259

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales oil dedusting. Subtask 3.4, Electroseparation of fines from shale oil  

SciTech Connect

This Topical Report on ``Shale Oil Dedusting`` presents the results of a research program conducted by the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT, Chicago) to determine the suitability and effectiveness of the lamella electrosettler -- a novel solid-liquid separation device -- for removing fine shale particles from shale oil via the application of an electric field. The work was conducted by IIT from November 1989 through December 1990 as a subcontractor to the Institute of Gas Technology. The overall objective of the larger program was to develop the ``Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for EasternOil Shales.`` The subtask undertaken by IIT was part of a larger task entitled ``Testing of Process Improvement Concepts.`` The lamella electrosettler has been shown to be an effective method for separating fine particulate (including colloidal) matter from a liquid using the application of an electric field. Using the walls of the settler as electrodes and during continuous operation, solids migrate preferentially toward one of the electrodes and become concentrated in the refuse stream. The product stream is clarified of particulates. The success of the process depends upon the physical properties of the solids and liquids being tested. A sample with a high specific conductance is not suitable for separation in the lamella electrosettler. The liquid begins to heat up under the influence of the electric field and, eventually, may short. Also, under these conditions, the particles cannot maintain a charge. The high conductivity of the shale oil samples tested rendered them unsuitable for further testing in the lamella electrosettler.

Lau, F.S. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gidaspow, D.; Jayaswal, U.; Wasan, D.T. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fine Prediction of Energy Power Production in Wind Farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fine Prediction of Energy Power Production in Wind Farms November 30, 2007 This report have been Technological Need: Wind Power Prediction Clean energy production systems and environmental policies have and Numerical Models The first important point to stress is that the energy power obtained from a single wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Emission factors for ammonia and particulate matter from broiler Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total suspended particulate (TSP) concentrations, ammonia (NH?) concentrations, and ventilation rates were measured in four commercial, tunnel ventilated broiler houses in June through December of 2000 in Brazos County, Texas. Particle size distributions were developed from TSP samplers collected and used to determine the mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples collected. Concentrations of TSP and ammonia measured were multiplied by the ventilation rates measured to obtain emission factors for PM?? and ammonia from tunnel ventilated commercial broiler houses. TSP and NH? concentrations ranged from 7,387 to 11,387 []g/m³ and 2.02 to 45 ppm, respectively. Ammonia concentration exhibited a correlation with the age of the birds. Mass median diameters (MMD) found using particle size analysis with a Coulter Counter Multisizer were between 24.0 and 26.7 mm aerodynamic equivalent diameter. MMD increased with bird age. The mass fraction of PM?? in the TSP samples was between 2.72% and 8.40% with a mean of 5.94%. Ventilation rates were measured between 0.58 and 89 m³/s. Ammonia emission rates varied from 38 to 2105 g/hr. TSP emission rates and PM?? emission rates ranged from 7.0 to 1673 g/hr 0.58 to 99 g/hr respectively. Emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter increased with the age of the birds. Error and sensitivity analysis was conducted using Monte Carlo simulation for the calculation of emission rates. Error for ammonia emission rates was 99 g/hr during tunnel ventilation and 6 g/hr during sidewall ventilation. Error for TSP emission rates was 79 g/hr and 11 g/hr for tunnel and sidewall ventilation respectively. Sensitivity analysis showed that ventilation rate measurements and measurement of ammonia concentration had the most effect on the emission rates. Emission factors of NH? and PM?? estimated for these buildings were 1.32 ± 0.472 g/bird and 22.8 ± 9.28 g/bird, respectively. These emission factors take into account the variation of PM?? and NH? concentrations and ventilation rates with the age of the birds.

Redwine, Jarah Suzanne

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure by combusting the trapped soot. During this project an ancillary bio-medical application was discovered for lattices of hydroxyapatite. These structures show promise as bone scaffolds for the reparation of damaged bone. A case study depicting the manufacture of a customized device that fits into a damaged mandible is described.

Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE  

SciTech Connect

SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

Herman, D.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

264

Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Register Vol. 77, No. 28 Friday, February 10, 2012 Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 431 Docket Number EERE-2010-BT-STD- 0048 RIN 1904-AC04 Energy...

265

The Relationship between Particulate Chemistry and Air Masses in Southern Indiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The particulate characteristics of the surface layer of the atmosphere over a region of southwest Indiana were determined for forty-two 24-hour periods between September 1985 and April 1986. The water-soluble sulfate, chloride and sodium content ...

Richard H. Grant; William W. McFee

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

On-Board Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter Sensor for HCCI and Conventional Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the research was to refine and complete development of an on-board particulate matter (PM) sensor for diesel, DISI, and HCCI engines, bringing it to a point where it could be commercialized and marketed.

Hall, Matt; Matthews, Ron

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Understanding the meteorological drivers of U.S. particulate matter concentrations in a changing climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is a serious public health issue for the United States. While there is a growing body of evidence that climate change will partially counter the effectiveness of future precursor emission reductions to reduce ozone (O...

John P. Dawson; Bryan J. Bloomer; Darrell A. Winner; Christopher P. Weaver

268

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 3- Particulate Emissions from Industrial Processes (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations limit particulate emissions into the atmosphere by process weight per hour, where process weight is the total weight of all materials introduced into any specific process which...

269

Passive regeneration : long-term effects on ash characteristics and diesel particulate filter performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread growth as an effective means for meeting increasingly rigorous particle emissions regulations. There is growing interest to exploit passive regeneration of DPFs to ...

Bahr, Michael J., Nav. E. (Michael James). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

A Triple-Path Denuder Instrument for Ambient Particulate Sampling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field instrument for sampling sulfate and nitrate particulate matter in a controlled chemical environment has been constructed and field tested. The instrument contains HNO3 and NH3 denuders and an ambient air path, all connected by manifold to ...

Briant L. Davis; L. Ronald Johnson; Bryan J. Johnson; Robert J. Hammer

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Bhaskar Kura; Kalpalatha Kambham; Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran; Sandhya Potana [University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including smoke particle transport in the lungs, particle clogging of heat exchangers in construction vehicles, industrial nanoparticle transport and filtration systems, and dust fouling of electronic systems and MEMS components. Dust fouling of equipment is of particular concern for potential human occupation on dusty planets, such as Mars. The discrete-element method presented in this paper can be used for prediction of aggregate structure and breakup, for prediction of the effect of aggregate formation on the bulk fluid flow, and for prediction of the effects of small-scale flow features (e.g., due to surface roughness or MEMS patterning) on the aggregate formation. After presentation of the overall computational structure, the forces and torques acting on the particles resulting from fluid motion, particle-particle collision, and adhesion under van der Waals forces are reviewed. The effect of various parameters of normal collision and adhesion of two particles are examined in detail. The method is then used to examine aggregate formation and particle clogging in pipe and channel flow.

Marshall, J.S. [School of Engineering, University of Vermont, 33 Colchecter Avenue, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)], E-mail: jeffm@cems.uvm.edu

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Characterization of particulate matter deposited in diesel particulate filters: Visual and analytical approach in macro-, micro- and nano-scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-scale analytical investigations of particulate matter (soot and ash) of two loaded diesel particulate filters (DPF) from (a) a truck (DPF1) and (b) a passenger car (DPF2) reveal the following: in DPF1 (without fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 130-270 {mu}m thick, homogeneous porous cake with pronounced orientation. Soot aggregates consist of 15-30 nm large individual particles exhibiting relatively mature internal nanostructures, however, far from being graphite. Ash aggregates largely accumulate at the outlet part of DPF1, while minor amounts are deposited directly on the channel walls all along the filter length. They consist of crystalline phases with individual particles of sizes down to the nanoscale range. Chemically, the ash consists mainly of Mg, S, Ca, Zn and P, elements encountered in lubricating oil additives. In the passenger car DPF2 (with fuel-borne additives), soot aggregates form an approximately 200-500 {mu}m thick, inhomogeneous porous cake consisting of several superposed layers corresponding to different soot generations. The largest part of the soot cake is composed of unburned, oriented soot aggregates left behind despite repeated regenerations, while a small part constitutes a loose layer with randomly oriented aggregates, which was deposited last and has not seen any regeneration. Fe-oxide particles of micro- to nano-scale sizes, originating from the fuel-borne additive, are often dispersed within the part of the soot cake composed of the unburned soot leftovers. The individual soot nanoparticles in DPF2 are approximately 15-40 nm large and generally less mature than in the truck DPF1. The presence of soot leftovers in DPF2 indicates that the addition of fuel-borne material does not fully compensate for the temperatures needed for complete soot removal. Ash in DPF2 is filling up more than half of the filter volume (at the downstream part) and is dominated by Fe-oxide aggregates, due to the Fe-based fuel-borne additive, but otherwise its chemical composition reflects compounds of lubricating oil additives. (author)

Liati, Anthi; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Panayotis [EMPA, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for I.C. Engines, Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Optical backscatter probe for sensing particulate in a combustion gas stream  

SciTech Connect

A system for sensing particulate in a combustion gas stream is disclosed. The system transmits light into a combustion gas stream, and thereafter detects a portion of the transmitted light as scattered light in an amount corresponding to the amount of particulates in the emissions. Purge gas may be supplied adjacent the light supply and the detector to reduce particles in the emissions from coating or otherwise compromising the transmission of light into the emissions and recovery of scattered light from the emissions.

Parks, James E; Partridge, William P

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

275

FINE PARTICAL AND TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM THE COMBUSTION OF SEWAGE SLUDGE/COAL MIXTURES: A SYSTEMATIC ASSESSMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research project focuses on pollutants from the combustion of mixtures of dried municipal sewage sludge (MSS) and pulverized coal. The objective was to determine potential tradeoffs between CO{sub 2} mitigation through using a CO{sub 2} neutral fuel, such as municipal sewage sludge, and the emergence of other potential problems such as the emission of toxic fly ash particles. The work led to new insight into mechanisms governing the partitioning of major and trace metals from the combustion of sewage sludge, and mixtures of coal and sewage sludge. The research also showed that the co-combustion of coal and sewage sludge emitted fine particulate matter that might potentially cause greater lung injury than that from the combustion of either coal alone or municipal sewage sludge alone. The reason appeared to be that the toxicity measured required the presence of large amounts of both zinc and sulfur in particles that were inhaled. MSS provided the zinc while coal provided the sulfur. Additional research showed that the toxic effects could most likely be engineered out of the process, through the introduction of kaolinite sorbent downstream of the combustion zone, or removing the sulfur from the fuel. These results are consequences of applying ''Health Effects Engineering'' to this issue. Health Effects Engineering is a new discipline arising out of this work, and is derived from using a collaboration of combustion engineers and toxicologists to mitigate the potentially bad health effects from combustion of this biomass fuel.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Wayne S. Seames; Art Fernandez

2003-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

276

Proposal Calendar | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Calendar Proposal Calendar 2014 Run Cycle Proposal Deadline PRP BAC Notification Cycle Begins Cycle Ends 2014-1 Fri Nov-1-13 Tue Nov-19-13 Tue Dec-10-13 ~Dec-18-13 Tue Jan-28-14 Tue Apr-21-14 2014-2 Fri Mar-7-14 Tue Mar-25-14 Tue Apr-8-14 ~Apr-21-14 ~ May-14 ~Aug-14 2014-3 Fri Jul-11-14 Tue Jul-29-14 Tue Aug-12-14 ~Aug-25-14 ~ Oct-14 ~Dec-14 2015 Run Cycle Proposal Deadline PRP BAC Notification Cycle Begins Cycle Ends 2015-1 Fri Oct-31-14 Tue Nov-18-14 Tue Dec--2-14 ~Dec-14-14 ~Jan-15 ~Apr-15 2015-2 Fri Mar-6-15 Tue Mar-24-15 Tue Apr-7-15 ~Apr-20-15 ~ May-15 ~Aug-15 2015-3 Fri Jul-10-15 Tue Jul-28-15 Tue Aug-11-15 ~Aug-24-15 ~ Oct-15 ~Dec-15 2016 Run Cycle Proposal Deadline PRP BAC Notification Cycle Begins Cycle Ends

277

Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More stringent emissions regulations are continually being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion engines. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular particulate matter (PM) emissions should be regulated based on particle number in addition to particle mass. One aspect of this project is to study different sample handling methods for number based aerosol measurements, specifically, two different methods for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). One method is a thermodenuder (TD) and the other is an evaporative chamber/diluter (EvCh). These sample handling methods have been implemented in an engine test cell with a spark ignited direct injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was designed for stoichiometric, homogeneous combustion. SIDI is of particular interest for improved fuel efficiency compared to other SI engines, however, the efficiency benefit comes with greater PM emissions and may therefore be subject to the proposed number based PM regulation. Another aspect of this project is to characterize PM from this engine in terms of particle number and composition.

Matthias, Nicholas; Farron, Carrie; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Michael; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul M.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun S.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

JGI - CSP Proposal Study Panel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Programs User Programs Project Management Office Community Science Program Emerging Technologies Opportunity Program Technology Development Pilot Program Genomic Encyc. of Bacteria and Archaea MyJGI: Information for Collaborators The CSP Proposal Study Panel CSP | Overview | How to Propose a Project | Review Process | DOE Relevance Proposal Schedule | Project Management | Forms | FAQ | People and Contacts Members Nina Agabian University of California, San Francisco, http://www.ucsf.edu Chris Amemiya Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, http://www.benaroyaresearch.org Gary L. Andersen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, http://www.lbl.gov Jo Ann Banks Purdue University, http://www.purdue.edu John Battista Louisiana State University, http://www.lsu.edu Fred Brockman

279

III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

382 Federal Register 382 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 241 / Friday, December 14, 2012 / Rules and Regulations technical errors in § 447.400(a) and § 447.405 listed on page 66701. One correction ensures consistency between two sentences in the same paragraph and the other restores text inadvertently omitted from the final rule that had been included in the May 11, 2012 notice of proposed rulemaking (77 FR 27671) on pages 26789-90. Thus, we are correcting page 66701 to reflect the correct information. III. Waiver of Proposed Rulemaking We ordinarily publish a notice of proposed rulemaking in the Federal Register to provide a period for public comment before the provisions of a rule take effect in accordance with section 553(b) of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) (5 U.S.C. 553(b)). However,

280

Fine, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fine, New York: Energy Resources Fine, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.2478396°, -75.1377015° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.2478396,"lon":-75.1377015,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Particulate control for coal-fueled diesel engine exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Core Separator is a cylindrical vessel having one tangential inlet and two outlets at the opposite end of the vessel. It contains an outlet for the clean flow and a second outlet for the recirculating flow. The solids-laden flue gas is introduced through a fan to the inlet of the Core Separator. Due to the swirling motion of the flow, solids move to the periphery as the central jet leaving the system through the central outlet is cleaned of particulates. The peripheral flow with most of the particles is exhausted to the cyclone and then recirculates back to the Core Separator by means of the fan. The processes of separation and solids collection are accomplished separately and in different components. The Core Separator cleans the flow discharged from the system and detains solids within the system If the Core Separator efficiency is high enough, particles cannot leave the system. They recirculate again and again until the cyclone finally collects them for removal. An analytical formula can be derived that defines the system performance. E = E{sub c}E{sub s}/1{minus}E{sub s}(1{minus}E{sub c}), where E, E{sub c}, and E{sub s} are the system, collector, and Core Separator partial separation efficiencies respectively. Examination of this equation shows that the system efficiency remains high even with poor performance in the collector, as long as the efficiency of the Core Separator is high. For example, if E{sub s} is 99% and E{sub c} is 30%, the system efficiency is 96.7%.

Smolensky, L.A.; Easom, B.H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Three new approaches to the problem of dewatering fine coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased use of continuous miners and longwall shearers have made fine coal a growing proportion of preparation plant feed. Increased crushing within the plant itself to facilitate ash and sulfur removal further tips the size consist towards the fine end of the scale. Of itself there is nothing intrinsically wrong with fine coal, but the disproportionately large quantity of surface moisture entrained with it creates costly problems. Clark D. Harrison of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Homer City, PA, and James R. Cavalet of Science Applications International Corp., Homer City, have quantified the reasons for fine coal drying. According to their calculations an extra 1% moisture can add from $310,000 to $1 million per year to transport costs. The $310,000 (case 1) would be true for a power plant using 3.1 million tpy at a plant that is 250 miles from its source, and the $1 million (case 2) is a power plant that is 1,000 miles from its source and using 2.5 million tpy. Extra water also means extra heat used and wasted to vaporize this water, an additional avoidable expense of $700,000 for case 1 and $560,000 for case 2. There are also the uncalculated wet-coal-produced costs of plugged pulverizers, plugged chutes and frozen coal. Perhaps the figure that brings the deleterious effects of wet coal closest to home for a preparation plant manager is that a 1% increase in moisture can offset a 4.5% decrease in ash. In considering how to remove excess water, mechanical drying has advantages over thermal drying in that it produces no air pollution and is not as capital intensive, but unfortunately it is also not as effective.

Burger, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposals on Twitter Bookmark EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals on Google Bookmark EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals on Delicious Rank EERE...

284

Monitoring Fine Sediment; Grande Ronde and John Day Rivers, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated to monitor surface fine sediment levels and overwinter intrusion of fine sediment in spring chinook salmon spawning habitat in the North Folk John Day and Grande Ronde Rivers, for five years.

Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Greene, M. Jonas; Purser, Michael D. (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Regionalization in Fine-Grid GFS MOS 6-h Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent emergence of the National Digital Forecast Database as the flagship product of the National Weather Service has resulted in an increased demand for forecast guidance products on fine-mesh grids. Unfortunately, fine-grid forecasts with ...

Jerome P. Charba; Frederick G. Samplatsky

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Size-Resolved Density Measurements of Particulate Emissions from an Advanced Combustion Diesel Engine: Effect of Aggregate Morphology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the first in situ size-resolved density measurements of particles produced by premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) and compare these with conventional diesel particles. The densities of size-classified particles were determined by measurements with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA) and an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM). Particle masses of the different size classes were evaluated with a proposed DMA-APM response function for aggregates. Our results indicate that the effective densities of PCCI and conventional diesel particles were approximately the same for 50 and 100 nm electrical mobility diameters (0.9 and 0.6 g/cc, respectively), but the PCCI particle effective density (0.4 g/cc) was less than the conventional (0.5 g/cc) for 150 nm. The lowest effective particle densities were observed for exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) levels somewhat less than that required for PCCI operation. The inherent densities of conventional particles in the 50 and 100 nm size classes were 1.22 and 1.77 g/cc, which is in good agreement with Park et al. (2004). PCCI inherent particle densities for these same size classes were higher (1.27 and 2.10 g/cc), suggesting that there may have been additional adsorbed liquid hydrocarbons. For 150 nm particles, the inherent densities were nearly the same for PCCI and conventional particles at 2.20 g/cc. We expect that the lower effective density of PCCI particles may improve particulate emissions control with diesel particulate filters (DPFs). The presence of liquid hydrocarbons may also promote oxidation in DPFs.

Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A multiprocessor architecture combining fine-grained and coarse-grained parallelism strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: coarse-grained, fine-grained, instruction-level parallelism, loop-level parallelism, multiprocessor, performance comparisons, pipelining, superscalar

David J. Lilja

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Title Characteristics of fine particle growth events observed above a forested ecosystem in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Lunden, Melissa M., Douglas R. Black, Megan McKay, Kenneth L. Revzan, Allen H. Goldstein, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page 373 Issue 5 Pagination 373-388 Date Published 02/2006 ISSN 0278-6826 (Print), 1521-7388 (Online) Abstract Atmospheric aerosols from natural and anthropogenic processes have both primary and secondary origins, and can influence human health, visibility, and climate. One key process affecting atmospheric concentrations of aerosols is the formation of new particles and their subsequent growth to larger particle sizes. A field study was conducted at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada Mountains of California from May through September of 2002 to examine the effect of biogenic volatile organic compounds on aerosol formation and processing. The study included in-situ measurements of concentration and biosphere-atmosphere flux of VOCs, ozone, aerosol size distribution, aerosol physical and optical properties, and meteorological variables. Fine particle growth events were observed on approximately 30 percent of the 107 days with complete size distribution data. Average particle growth rates measured during these events were 3.8 ± 1.9 nm hr-1. Correlations between aerosol properties, trace gas concentrations, and meteorological measurements were analyzed to determine conditions conducive to fine particle growth events. Growth events were typically observed on days with a lesser degree of anthropogenic influence, as indicated by lower concentrations of black carbon, carbon monoxide, and total aerosol volume. Days with growth events also had lower temperatures, increased wind speeds, and larger momentum flux. Measurements of ozone concentrations and ozone flux indicate that gas phase oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds occur in the canopy, strongly suggesting that a significant portion of the material responsible for the observed particle growth are oxidation products of naturally emitted very reactive organic compounds.

289

Proposed Evanston Offshore Wind Farm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evanston Offshore Wind Farm Evanston Offshore Wind Farm August 1, 2011 Monday, August 1, 2011 Off Shore Wind Farm FAQ Document available from http://www.greenerevanston.org/ at the Renewable Energy Task Force tab Monday, August 1, 2011 City Manager Commits to City to sign onto Kyoto emissions reduction goals Wind Farm Timeline April 2006 Summer 2007 Fall 2008 February 2008 April 2010 March 2011 July 2011 Network for Evanston's Future proposes joint climate planning effort CGE Formed and Renewable Energy Task Force formed - Wind farm concept begun ECAP passed by City Council with 1st version of proposed Offshore Wind Farm included Offshore Wind Farm RFI unanimously passed by City Council Mayor Tisdahl appointments Committee on the Wind Farm City Council

290

Hardware and software efficacy in assessment of fine root diameter distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine roots constitute the majority of root system surface area and thus most of the nutrient and water absorption surface. Fine roots are, however, the least understood of all plant roots. A sensitivity analysis of several software programs capable of ... Keywords: Diameter distribution, Digital image analysis, Fine roots, High resolution, Root length, Scanner

Richard W. Zobel

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 13- Particulate Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Steam or Hot Water Generating Units (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this regulation is to limit emissions of particulate matter from fossil fuel fired and wood-fired steam or hot water generating units.

292

Synergistic effects of lubricant additive chemistry on ash properties impacting diesel particulate filter flow resistance and catalyst performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel particulate filters (DPF) have seen widespread use in recent years in both on- and offroad applications as an effective means for meeting the increasingly… (more)

Munnis, Sean (Sean Andrew)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

DEMONSTRATION OF A FULL-SCALE RETROFIT OF THE ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector (AHPC), developed in cooperation between W.L. Gore & Associates and the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), is an innovative approach to removing particulates from power plant flue gas. The AHPC combines the elements of a traditional baghouse and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) into one device to achieve increased particulate collection efficiency. As part of the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the U.S. Department of Energy and Otter Tail Power Company. The EERC is the patent holder for the technology, and W.L. Gore & Associates was the exclusive licensee for this project. The project objective was to demonstrate the improved particulate collection efficiency obtained by a full-scale retrofit of the AHPC to an existing electrostatic precipitator. The full-scale retrofit was installed on an electric power plant burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, Otter Tail Power Company's Big Stone Plant, in Big Stone City, South Dakota. The $13.4 million project was installed in October 2002. Project related testing concluded in December 2005. The following Final Technical Report has been prepared for the project entitled ''Demonstration of a Full-Scale Retrofit of the Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Technology'' as described in DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41420. The report presents the operation and performance results of the system.

Tom Hrdlicka; William Swanson

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Feasibility of plasma aftertreatment for simultaneous control of NOx and particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasma reactors can be operated as a particulate trap or as a NOx converter. Particulate trapping in a plasma reactor can be accomplished by electrostatic precipitation. The soluble organic fraction of the trapped particulates can be utilized for the hydrocarbon-enhanced oxidation of NO to NO2 . The NO2 can then be used to non-thermally oxidize the carbon fraction of the particulates. The oxidation of the carbon fraction by NO2 can lead to reduction of NOx or backconversion of NO2 to NO. This paper examines the hydrocarbon and electrical energy density requirements in a plasma for maximum NOx conversion in both heavy-duty and light-duty diesel engine exhaust. The energy density required for complete oxidation of hydrocarbons is also examined and shown to be much greater than that required for maximum NOx conversion. The reaction of NO2 with carbon is shown to lead mainly to backconversion of NO2 to NO. These results suggest that the combination of the plasma with a catalyst will be required to reduce the NOx and oxidize the hydrocarbons. The plasma reactor can be operated occasionally in the arc mode to thermally oxidize the carbon fraction of the particulates.

Brusasco, R M; Merritt, B T; Penetrante, B; Pitz, W J; Vogtlin, G E

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

ATF2 Proposal Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For achieving the high luminosity required at the International Linear Collider (ILC), it is critical to focus the beams to nanometer size with the ILC Beam Delivery System (BDS), and to maintain the beam collision with a nanometer-scale stability. To establish the technologies associated with this ultra-high precision beam handling, it has been proposed to implement an ILC-like final focus optics in an extension of the existing extraction beamline of ATF at KEK. The ATF is considered to be the best platform for this exercise, since it provides an adequate ultra-low emittance electron beam in a manner dedicated to the development of ILC. The two major goals for this facility, called ATF2, are: (A) Achievement of a 37 nm beam size, and (B) control of beam position down to 2 nm level. The scientific justification for the ATF2 project and its technical design have been described in Volume 1 of the ATF2 Proposal [1]. We present here Volume 2 of the ATF2 Proposal, in which we present specifics of the construction plans and the group organization to execute the research programs at ATF2. The sections in this report have been authored by relevant ATF2 subgroups within the International ATF Collaboration. The time line of the project is described in Section 2. Section 3 discuss the structure of the international collaboration. Sections 4 and 5 discuss budget considerations, which are presented as well as the design and construction tasks to be shared by the international collaboration at ATF2. Concluding remarks have been contributed by Dr. Ewan Paterson, Chair of the International Collaboration Board of the ATF collaboration.

Grishanov, B.I.; Logachev, P.; Podgorny, F.; Telnov, V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.; Kalinin, A.; /Daresbury; Napoly, O.; Payet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Braun, H.H.; Schulte, D.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Appleby, R.; Barlow, R.; Bailey, I.; Jenner, L.; Jones, R.; Kourevlev, G.; /Cockcroft Inst.; Elsen, E.; Vogel, V.; Walker, N.; /DESY /Fermilab /Hiroshima U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Oxford U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Orsay, LAL /Valencia U. /Annecy, LAPP /LBL, Berkeley /LLNL, Livermore /University Coll. London /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /North Carolina A-T State U. /Oregon U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Queen Mary, U. of London /SLAC /Tokyo U.

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

296

Restructuring proposed for Mexico's Pemex  

SciTech Connect

Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari soon will send a legislative proposal to Congress that splits state owned Petroleos Mexicanos into four subsidiaries. This paper reports that Pemex functions will be divided into Pemex Exploration Production, Pemex Refining, Pemex Gas Basic Petrochemicals, and Pemex Secondary Chemicals. An earlier report the the company would be split into seven units. Each of the four new operating companies will be an independent business unit with a separate board of directors and its own staff and support functions.

Not Available

1992-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

[Polymer-in-salt electrolytes]. Annual report and extension proposal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research proposed for the current grant consisted of five components, of which the authors have made substantial progress on three and have performed some exploratory work on a sixth for which they present here an argument for extending. The components on which they have made progress are: (1) development of and improvement on the basic polymer-in-salt idea. This will be separated into parts dealing with improvements in salt constitution, and improvements in polymer type, emphasizing the role of anionic polymers; (2) modifications of the polymer-in-salt electrolyte to include the addition of solid particulates to the salt-polymer matrix; and (3) physical measurements. The new component on which they have made some preliminary measurements over the summer period concerns the use of electrolytes developed under the present and other programs for improving the performance of photovoltaic cells. The rationale is that hole/electron separation in semiconductors under irradiation is aided by trapping the holes on a redox species in an adjacent electrolyte solution. The efficiency is proportional to a number of factors not fully understood, one of which is determined by the character of the electrolyte. Since the authors have new types of electrolytes under development, and since solar energy via photovoltaic is an environmentally important aspect of the energy sciences, they felt it was a desirable aspect of materials science to study in a laboratory in Arizona. Achievements in the past year are summarized.

Angell, C.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

Process for preparing fine grain titanium carbide powder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing finely divided titanium carbide powder in which an organotitanate is reacted with a carbon precursor polymer to provide an admixture of the titanium and the polymer at a molecular level due to a crosslinking reaction between the organotitanate and the polymer. The resulting gel is dried, pyrolyzed to drive off volatile components and provide carbon. The resulting solids are then heated at an elevated temperature to convert the titanium and carbon to high-purity titanium carbide powder in a submicron size range.

Janney, M.A.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Riverland expedited response action proposal  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Riverland Railroad Car Wash Pit and the 600 Area Army Munitions Burial Site. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA proposal will undergo reviews by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), DOE, EPA, Ecology, and the public. Ecology and EPA will issue an Action Agreement Memorandum after resolution of all review comments. The, memorandum will authorize remediation activities. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-IU-1 Operable Unit. A No Action Record of Decision may be issued after cleanup completion.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Impact of Biodiesel on the Oxidation Kinetics and Morphology of Diesel Particulate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We compare the oxidation characteristics of four different diesel particulates generated with a modern light-duty engine. The four particulates represent engine fueling with conventional ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), biodiesel, and two intermediate blends of these fuels. The comparisons discussed here are based on complementary measurements implemented in a laboratory micro-reactor, including temperature programmed desorption and oxidation, pulsed isothermal oxidation, and BET surface area. From these measurements we have derived models that are consistent with the observed oxidation reactivity differences. When accessible surface area effects are properly accounted for, the oxidation kinetics of the fixed carbon components were found to consistently exhibit an Arrhenius activation energy of 113 6 kJ/mol. Release of volatile carbon from the as-collected particulate appears to follow a temperaturedependent rate law.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Flow cytometric analysis of respiratory tract cells exposed to oil shale and silica particulates. [Hamsters  

SciTech Connect

Flow cytometric techniques were used to measure the cytological and biochemical damage to respiratory tract cells in animals exposed to particulates. Hamsters were exposed to raw and spent oil shale particulates and silica by intratracheal instillation. Exfoliated lung cells were obtained by sacrificing the animals and lavaging the respiratory tract posterior to the trachea with saline. Cell samples were fixed in ethanol and stained with mithramycin for fluorescence analysis of DNA content. DNA content distributions from hamsters exposed to spent oil shale and silica particulates showed atypical changes 28 to 35 days later. Cell counts and total numbers of macrophages, leukocytes, and epithelial cells in the lavage fluid also showed marked changes related to time after exposure.

Steinkamp, J.A.; Wilson, J.S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Apparatus for real-time airborne particulate radionuclide collection and analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus for collecting and analyzing an airborne particulate radionuclide having a filter mounted in a housing, the housing having an air inlet upstream of the filter and an air outlet downstream of the filter, wherein an air stream flows therethrough. The air inlet receives the air stream, the filter collects the airborne particulate radionuclide and permits a filtered air stream to pass through the air outlet. The improvement which permits real time counting is a gamma detecting germanium diode mounted downstream of the filter in the filtered air stream. The gamma detecting germanium diode is spaced apart from a downstream side of the filter a minimum distance for a substantially maximum counting detection while permitting substantially free air flow through the filter and uniform particulate radionuclide deposition on the filter.

Smart, John E. (West Richland, WA); Perkins, Richard W. (Richland, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

A Neo-Rumsfeldian Framework for the Thermodynamics of Organic Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Neo-Rumsfeldian Framework for the Thermodynamics of Organic Particulate A Neo-Rumsfeldian Framework for the Thermodynamics of Organic Particulate Matter Formation in the Atmosphere: Successes and Challenges Speaker(s): James F. Pankow Date: March 6, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 James F. Pankow. The thermodynamic principles according to which organic particulate matter (OPM) forms in the atmosphere have become well identified because of research progress made since about the mid 1990s. These are, ahem, known knowns. However, many unknowns exist regarding the concentrations and chemical characteristics of the biogenic and anthropogenic compounds present in the atmosphere that are important in OPM formation. In this context, since we know what we need to know more about, these are, well, known unknowns. Other known important unknowns are

304

Imbibition dynamics of nano-particulate ink-jet drops on micro-porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Imbibition dynamics of nano-particulate ink-jet drops on micro-porous media Hsiao, W.-K., Hoath, S. D., Martin, G. D., Hutchings, I. M., Chilton, N. B. and Jones, S., Proc Nanotech 2011 Conference, Boston, June 2011. Imbibition dynamics... of nano-particulate ink-jet drops on micro-porous media W.-K. Hsiao*, S. D. Hoath*, G. D. Martin*, I. M. Hutchings*, N. B. Chilton** and S. Jones** *Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge Cambridge CB3 0FS, United Kingdom, wkh26@cam...

Hsiao, W.-K.; Hoath, S.D.; Martin, G.D.; Hutchings, I.M.; Chilton, N.B.; Jones, S.

305

Hydraulic fracturing method employing a fines control technique  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for controlling fines or sand in an unconsolidated or loosely consolidated formation or reservoir penetrated by at least one wellbore where hydraulic fracturing is used in combination with control of the critical salinity rate and the critical fluid flow velocity. The method comprises: (a) placing at least one wellbore in the reservoir; (b) hydraulically fracturing the formation via the wellbore with a fracturing fluid which creates at least one fracture; (c) placing a proppant comprising a gravel pack into the fracture; (d) determining the critical salinity rate and the critical fluid flow velocity of the formation or reservoir surrounding the wellbore; (e) injecting a saline solution into the formation or reservoir at a velocity exceeding the critical fluid flow velocity and at a saline concentration sufficient to cause the fines or particles to be transferred and fixed deep wihtin the formation or reservoir without plugging the formation, fracture, or wellbore; and (f) producing a hydrocarbonaceous fluid from the formation or reservoir at a velocity such that the critical flow velocity is not exceeded deep within the formation, fracture, or wellbore.

Stowe, L.R.

1986-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

306

Unraveling the Excess Air/Coal Fineness Enigma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the use of powered coal as a boiler fuel, the factors involved in heat loss from unburnt carbon in the ash are but partially understood. More finely pulverized coal particles will result in lower carbon-in-ash losses. On the other hand, the finer grind of coal requires a considerably higher energy input to the pulverizing mill. Thus, an optimum balance must be achieved between fuel savings and grinding costs to arrive at the maximum economic savings. If these were the only considerations, the solution would be simple. The problem, however, is compounded by a concurrent reduction in mill capacity as the fineness is increased. In addition, there are marked interactions between coal particle size and excess air as they effect carbon burning rate with its concomitant effect upon carbon-in-ash heat loss. Finally, variability in the excess air will alter the energy supplied to the induced-draft and forced-draft air fans. To generate a greater understanding of the impact of the aforesaid factors, upon potential fuel savings, a computer simulation was developed for the powdered coal boiler. The current paper presents results of exploratory studies using the simulator.

Laspe, C. G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Supercritical fluid molecular spray thin films and fine powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid films are deposited, or fine powders formed, by dissolving a solid material into a supercritical fluid solution at an elevated pressure and then rapidly expanding the solution through a short orifice into a region of relatively low pressure. This produces a molecular spray which is directed against a substrate to deposit a solid thin film thereon, or discharged into a collection chamber to collect a fine powder. The solvent is vaporized and pumped away. Solution pressure is varied to determine, together with flow rate, the rate of deposition and to control in part whether a film or powder is produced and the granularity of each. Solution temperature is varied in relation to formation of a two-phase system during expansion to control porosity of the film or powder. A wide variety of film textures and powder shapes are produced of both organic and inorganic compounds. Films are produced with regular textural feature dimensions of 1.0-2.0 .mu.m down to a range of 0.01 to 0.1 .mu.m. Powders are formed in very narrow size distributions, with average sizes in the range of 0.02 to 5 .mu.m.

Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hydrogen Atom and Time Variation of Fine-Structure Constant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we have solved the de Sitter special relativistic ($\\mathcal{SR}_{cR}$-) Dirac equation of hydrogen in the earth-QSO(quasar) framework reference by means of the adiabatic approach. The aspects of geometry effects of de Sitter space-time described by Beltrami metric are explored and taken into account. It is found that the $\\mathcal{SR}_{cR}$-Dirac equation of hydrogen is a time dependent quantum Hamiltonian system. We provide an explicit calculation to justify the adiabatic approach in dealing with this time-dependent system. Since the radius of de Sitter sphere $R$ is cosmologically large, the evolution of the system is very slow so that the adiabatic approximation legitimately works with high accuracy. We conclude that the electromagnetic fine-structure constant, the electron mass and the Planck constant are time variations. This prediction of fine-structure constant is consistent with the presently available observation data. For confirming it further, experiments/observations are required.

Mu-Lin Yan

2009-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Study of Particulate Emissions of Engine Fuelled with Biodiesel-Diesel Blends Using Thermo-gravimetric Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particulate emissions of engine fuelled different proportions of Pistacia chinensis Bunge seed biodiesel-dieselblends were collected under different fuel supplying advance dangles and different operating conditions. The change of volatile organic fractions ... Keywords: Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis, Biodiesel, Engine, Particulate Emissions

Ma Zhihao; Zhang Xiaoyu; Wang Xin; Xu Bin; Wu Jian

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Proposed Agency Information Collection: Federal Register Notice...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Agency Information Collection: Federal Register Notice Volume 76, No. 154 - Aug. 10, 2011 Proposed Agency Information Collection: Federal Register Notice Volume 76, No....

311

ORNL Neutron Sciences User Proposal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Review & Ratings Process Beam time at HFIR and SNS is made available to the international scientific community through the General User Program (GUP). Proposals from...

312

2013 INCITE Proposals due June 27  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INCITE Proposals 2013 INCITE Proposals due June 27 June 15, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) The Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE)...

313

Department of Energy Proposed Agency Information Collection:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Energy Proposed Agency Information Collection: Federal Register Notice Volume 75, No. 100 - May 25, 2010 Department of Energy Proposed Agency Information Collection. The...

314

Department of Energy Proposed Agency Information Collection:...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Energy Proposed Agency Information Collection: Federal Register Notice Volume 75, No. 140 - Jul. 22, 2010 Department of Energy proposed Agency Information Collection:...

315

Reduction of iron ore fines by coal fines in a packed bed and fluidized bed apparatus: A comparative study  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of iron ore fines by coal fines in packed and fluidized beds has been studied. The investigation includes study of the kinetic aspects of reduction, carbon and sulfur content of the direct reduced iron (DRI) produced, and metallography of the products. For both processes, the kinetic data fit the first-order reaction model. Reduction in a fluidized bed is much faster than in a packed bed system. In both cases, DRI contains a substantial amount of free carbon at the kinetic data fit the first-order reaction model. Reduction in a fluidized bed is much faster than in a packed bed system. In both cases, DRI contains a substantial amount of free carbon at the initial stages of reduction. At the later stages of reduction, the carbon present in the DRI is mainly in the combined state. For identical temperatures and particle sizes, reaction in fluidized bed is much faster compared to that in a packed bed. At any particular degree of reduction, sulfur content in DRI samples produced by fluidized bed reduction is always more than that of DRI samples produced by packed bed reduction. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs reveal that metallic whiskers formed during reduction in packed beds only. These whiskers become more prominent at higher temperatures and longer times.

Haque, R. (Bangladesh Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Metallurgical Engineering Department); Ray, H.S. (Regional Research Lab., Orissa (India)); Mukherjee, A. (Indian Inst. of Tech., (India).Metallurgical Engineering Department)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Proposal to study stem forgings  

SciTech Connect

Reservoir designs consist of two primary features including the stem(s) and the body segment. The stem is either an integral part of the reservoir or is joined at some point in the fabrication sequence. The current interest is in high strength stems for advanced reservoir designs. The processing necessary to achieve these strength levels may result in heavily cold worked microstructures which may not interface well with the stem requirements. For instance, cold worked 316 plate stock has shown decreased hydrogen compatibility when contrasted to the annealed version in laboratory tests. More recently, Precision Forge produced a 100 ksi yield strength, 304L stem forging with a heavily deformed microstructure which also may show decreased compatibility in hydrogen. The proposed forging contract will evaluate the influence of forging parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 304L and 316 stem forgings. A summary of the data available on 304L stem forgings is shown graphically. The yield strength values are shown for each set of forging parameters. Tensile tests and microstructural examination will be conducted to complete the information for 304L and create a similar graph for 316 stem forgings.

Odegard, B.C.

1982-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Macromolecular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Macromolecular Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Macromolecular Crystallography Beam time for macromolecular crystallography projects is obtained by submitting an SSRL Macromolecular Crystallography Proposal. This proposal is peer reviewed by the Structural Molecular Biology and Biophysics subpanel of the SSRL Proposal Review Panel (PRP) for scientific merit and rating and for criticality of synchrotron radiation use. Proposal Forms New Proposal Request Form (note: you must be a registered user to submit a proposal through our User Portal. Click on "Become a New User" link to register.) Extension Application for Macromolecular Crystallography Proposals Rapid Access Application Form Types of Proposals Proposals should be submitted under one of the following classifications.

318

JGI - How to Propose a CSP Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Propose a CSP Project How to Propose a CSP Project CSP | Overview | How to Propose a Project | Review Process | DOE Relevance Proposal Schedule | FAQ How do I submit my proposal? Proposals for synthetic biology and small-scale microbial and metagenome projects may be submitted at any time as brief white papers and will be reviewed every six months. Deadline for submission is 60 days prior to the review. See proposal schedule for specific dates. Submit a small-scale microbial/metagenome or synthetic biology proposal For the CSP15 annual call, a letter of intent is required to submit a proposal to JGI. Submitters whose letters of intent/proposals are approved will receive further instructions via email. Submit a CSP annual proposal For the CSP15 JGI-EMSL joint call, a letter of intent is required to submit

319

2008-01-1748 An Analysis of Methods for Measuring Particulate Matter Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission engine and was operated during testing with no exhaust aftertreatment devices. The engine of particulate emissions. This engine was operated under three conditions, with no aftertreatment, with a DPF as Engine 2 with the SCR aftertreatment device, the three mass measurement methods display comparable mass

Wu, Mingshen

320

Developments in the Processing and Properties of Particulate Al-Si ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of low to medium density particulates.32,33 A fundamental characteristic of this technique is ..... K.G. Satyanarayana, R.M. Pillai, and B.C. Pai, Handbook of Ceramics and .... Direct questions about this or any other JOM page to jom@tms. org.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Sieveless particle size distribution analysis of particulate materials through computer vision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the inconsistency of ''length-based separation'' by mechanical sieving of particulate materials with standard sieves, which is the standard method of particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. We observed inconsistencies of length-based ... Keywords: Biomass sieve analysis, Dimension, Image processing, ImageJ plugin, Particle size distribution, Physical property

C. Igathinathane; L. O. Pordesimo; E. P. Columbus; W. D. Batchelor; S. Sokhansanj

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Estimating long term urban exposure to particulate matter and ozone in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OFIS is a robust and efficient model for simulating the formation of photochemical pollutants in an urban plume. In this paper we present applications of the recent further development of OFIS for calculating both particulate matter and ozone concentrations. ... Keywords: Air quality model, Ozone exposure, PM exposure, Urban air pollution

Athanasios Arvanitis; Nicolas Moussiopoulos

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Next Generation Non-particulate Dry Nonwoven Pad for Chemical Warfare Agent Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

New, non-particulate decontamination materials promise to reduce both military and civilian casualties by enabling individuals to decontaminate themselves and their equipment within minutes of exposure to chemical warfare agents or other toxic materials. One of the most promising new materials has been developed using a needlepunching nonwoven process to construct a novel and non-particulate composite fabric of multiple layers, including an inner layer of activated carbon fabric, which is well-suited for the decontamination of both personnel and equipment. This paper describes the development of a composite nonwoven pad and compares efficacy test results for this pad with results from testing other decontamination systems. The efficacy of the dry nonwoven fabric pad was demonstrated specifically for decontamination of the chemical warfare blister agent bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (H or sulfur mustard). GC/MS results indicate that the composite fabric was capable of significantly reducing the vapor hazard from mustard liquid absorbed into the nonwoven dry fabric pad. The mustard adsorption efficiency of the nonwoven pad was significantly higher than particulate activated carbon (p=0.041) and was similar to the currently fielded US military M291 kit (p=0.952). The nonwoven pad has several advantages over other materials, especially its non-particulate, yet flexible, construction. This composite fabric was also shown to be chemically compatible with potential toxic and hazardous liquids, which span a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic chemicals, including a concentrated acid, an organic solvent and a mild oxidant, bleach.

Ramkumar, S S; Love, A; Sata, U R; Koester, C J; Smith, W J; Keating, G A; Hobbs, L; Cox, S B; Lagna, W M; Kendall, R J

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Programmable Differential Delay Circuit With Fine Delay Adjustment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Circuitry that provides additional delay to early arriving signals such that all data signals arrive at a receiving latch with same path delay. The delay of a forwarded clock reference is also controlled such that the capturing clock edge will be optimally positioned near quadrature (depending on latch setup/hold requirements). The circuitry continuously adapts to data and clock path delay changes and digital filtering of phase measurements reduce errors brought on by jittering data edges. The circuitry utilizes only the minimum amount of delay necessary to achieve objective thereby limiting any unintended jitter. Particularly, this programmable differential delay circuit with fine delay adjustment is designed to allow the skew between ASICS to be minimized. This includes skew between data bits, between data bits and clocks as well as minimizing the overall skew in a channel between ASICS.

DeRyckere, John F. (Eau Claire, WI); Jenkins, Philip Nord (Eau Claire, WI); Cornett, Frank Nolan (Chippewa Falls, WI)

2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

325

Fine structure constant in the spacetime of a cosmic string  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the fine structure constant in the spacetime of a cosmic string. In the presence of a cosmic string the value of the fine structure constant reduces. We also discuss on numerical results. The gravitational properties of cosmic strings are strikingly different from those of non-relativistic linear distributions of matter. To explain the origin of the difference, we note that for a static matter distribution with energymomentum tensor, T µ ? = diag (?, ?p1, ?p2, ?p3) , (1) the Newtonian limit of the Einstein equations become ? 2 ? = 4?G (? + p1 + p2 + p3), (2) where ? is the gravitational potential. For non-relativistic matter, pi ? ? and ? 2 ? = 4?G?. Strings, on the other hand, have a large longitudinal tension. For a straight string parallel to the z-axis, p3 = ??, with p1 and p2 vanish when averaged over the string cross-section. Hence, the righthand side of Eq.(2) vanishes, suggesting that straight strings produce no gravitational forece on surrounding matter. This conclusion is confirmed by a full general-relativistic analysis. Another feature distinguishing cosmic strings from more familiar sources is their relativistic motion. As a result, oscillating loops of string can be strong emitters of gravitational radiation. A gravitating string is described by the combined system of Einstein, Higgs and guage field equations. The problem of solving these coupled equations is formidable and no exact solutions have been found to date. Fortunately, for most cosmological applications the problem can be made tractable by adopting two major simplifications. First, assuming that the string thickness is much smaller than all other relevant dimensions, the string can be 1

Forough Nasseri

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Particulate Emissions from a Pre-Emissions Control Era Spark-Ignition Vehicle: A Historical Benchmark  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study examined the particulate emissions from a pre-emissions control era vehicle operated on both leaded and unleaded fuels for the purpose of establishing a historical benchmark. A pre-control vehicle was located that had been rebuilt with factory original parts to approximate an as-new vehicle prior to 1968. The vehicle had less than 20,000 miles on the rebuilt engine and exhaust. The vehicle underwent repeated FTP-75 tests to determine its regulated emissions, including particulate mass. Additionally, measurements of the particulate size distribution were made, as well as particulate lead concentration. These tests were conducted first with UTG96 certification fuel, followed by UTG96 doped with tetraethyl lead to approximate 1968 levels. Results of these tests, including transmission electron micrographs of individual particles from both the leaded and unleaded case are presented. The FTP composite PM emissions from this vehicle averaged 40.5 mg/mile using unleaded fuel. The results from the leaded fuel tests showed that the FTP composite PM emissions increased to an average of 139.5 mg/mile. Analysis of the particulate size distribution for both cases demonstrated that the mass-based size distribution of particles for this vehicle is heavily skewed towards the nano-particle range. The leaded-fuel tests showed a significant increase in mass concentration at the <0.1 micron size compared with the unleaded-fuel test case. The leaded-fuel tests produced lead emissions of nearly 0.04 g/mi, more than a 4-order-of-magnitude difference compared with unleaded-fuel results. Analysis of the size-fractionated PM samples showed that the lead PM emissions tended to be distributed in the 0.25 micron and smaller size range.

John M.E. Storey; C. Scott Sluder; Douglas A. Blom; Erin Higinbotham

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

168 Phase Transformation from Ultra-Fine Grained Austenite in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Large number of grain boundaries in ultra-fine grained (UFG) metals ..... Oxides Nanocompounds for Electrodes in Electrochemical Capacitors.

328

Development Of Reclamation Substrates For Alberta Oil Sands Using Mature Fine Tailings And Coke.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mature fine tailings and coke are waste products of the oil sands industry with potential for reclamation. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various… (more)

Luna-Wolter, Gabriela L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Lignin as Both Fuel and Fusing Binder in Briquetted Anthracite Fines for Foundry Coke Substitute.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lignin that had been extracted from Kraft black liquor was investigated as a fusing binder in briquetted anthracite fines for a foundry coke substitute. Cupola… (more)

Lumadue, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

2008-01-0333 Detailed Effects of a Diesel Particulate Filter on the Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

filter, which is commonly made of cordierite or silicon carbide material. The high filtration efficiency fine fibers as a means of particle filtration. The DPF may also be an extruded wall-flow monolithic

Wu, Mingshen

331

Proposal Review Panel | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Review Panel Proposal Review Panel Submitting a proposal is the first step to access beam time at SSRL. Proposals are peer reviewed and rated by the SSRL Proposal Review Panel (PRP) on a scale from 1 (highest) to 5 (lowest). Successful proposals are eligble to request and may be awarded beam time on SSRL beam lines, with priority given to the highest rated proposals and those which demonstrate efficient and productive use of beam time. We have three proposal calls per year with one on-site PRP meeting at SSRL annually. Access Policy The work of the PRP is accomplished with four subpanels: BIO - The biology panel reviews proposals requesting beam time for imaging, X-ray spectroscopic studies, small-angle scattering experiments, and crystallography of biologically important samples.

332

MROrchestrator: A Fine-Grained Resource Orchestration Framework for MapReduce Clusters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient resource management in data centers and clouds running large distributed data processing frameworks like MapReduce is crucial for enhancing the performance of hosted applications and boosting resource utilization. However, existing resource scheduling schemes in Hadoop MapReduce allocate resources at the granularity of fixed-size, static portions of nodes, called slots. In this work, we show that MapReduce jobs have widely varying demands for multiple resources, making the static and fixed-size slot-level resource allocation a poor choice both from the performance and resource utilization standpoints. Furthermore, lack of co-ordination in the management of mul- tiple resources across nodes prevents dynamic slot reconfigura- tion, and leads to resource contention. Motivated by this, we propose MROrchestrator, a MapReduce resource Orchestrator framework, which can dynamically identify resource bottlenecks, and resolve them through fine-grained, co-ordinated, and on- demand resource allocations. We have implemented MROrches- trator on two 24-node native and virtualized Hadoop clusters. Experimental results with a suite of representative MapReduce benchmarks demonstrate up to 38% reduction in job completion times, and up to 25% increase in resource utilization. We further show how popular resource managers like NGM and Mesos when augmented with MROrchestrator can hike up their performance.

Sharma, Bikash [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Prabhakar, Ramya [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Kandemir, Mahmut [Pennsylvania State University; Das, Chita [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

ALTERNATE HIGH EFFICIENCY PARTICULATE AIR (HEPA) FILTRATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

In Phase IIA of this project, CeraMem has further developed and scaled up ceramic HEPA filters that are appropriate for use on filtration of vent gas from HLW tanks at DOE sites around the country. This work included procuring recrystallized SiC monoliths, developing membrane and cement materials, and defining a manufacturing process for the production of prototype full sizes HEPA filters. CeraMem has demonstrated that prototype full size filters can be manufactured by producing 9 full size filters that passed DOP aerosol testing at the Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility. One of these filters was supplied to the Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) for process tests using simulated HLW tank waste. SRTC has reported that the filter was regenerable (with some increase in pressure drop) and that the filter retained its HEPA retention capability. CeraMem has also developed a Regenerable HEPA Filter System (RHFS) design and acceptance test plan that was reviewed by DOE personnel. The design and acceptance test plan form the basis of the system proposal for follow-on work in Phase IIB of this project.

Bruce Bishop; Robert Goldsmith; Karsten Nielsen; Phillip Paquette

2002-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. One plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through -200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace win be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. The burning profile of the plant coal and the three blends was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Results indicated slower burning of the blends due to low volatile matter and oxidized coal particles. Ash fusing temperatures of the samples were determined using ASTM procedure. Preliminary combustion evaluation of the samples (100% plant coal, 80% plant coal/20% recovered coal fines) indicated that the flame was stable at 100,000-200,000 Btu/hr firing rate. Carbon conversion efficiency of 85 to 90% was recorded using the Ash Tracer technique. Tests are continuing to determine the operating boundaries for these blends while measuring the emissions of SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, CO and O{sub 2}, maintaining a stable flame.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program was to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples were prepared as 100% plant coal, 90% plant coal/10% fines, 85% plant coal/15% fines, and 80% plant coal /20% fines with a particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. The plant coal and recovered coal fines were obtained from the Randolph Preparation Plant of Peabody Coal Co., Marissa, IL. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace was used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace was used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. The burning profile of the plant coal and the three blends was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Results indicated slower burning of the blends due to low volatile matter and oxidized coal particles. Combustion emissions of these samples were determined in the down-fired combustor, while relative ignition temperatures were determined in the drop tube furnace. Chemical composition of ashes were analyzed to establish a correlation with their respective ash fusion temperatures. Overall study of these samples suggested that the blended samples had combustion properties similar to the original plant coal. In other words, flames were stable under identical firing rates of approximately 200,000 Btu`s/hr and 25% excess air. CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub x}, were similar to each other and within the experimental error. Combustion efficiency of 99{sup +}% was achievable. Ash chemical analysis of each sample revealed that slagging and fouling should not be different from each other.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

COM-CAT Request for Proposals Issued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source COM-CAT Request for Proposals Issued Image of COM-CAT Brochure A request for proposals (RFP) to...

337

Towards Memory-Load Balanced Fast Fourier Transformations in Fine-Grain Execution Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The code let model is a fine-grain dataflow-inspired program execution model that balances the parallelism and overhead of the runtime system. It plays an important role in terms of performance, scalability, and energy efficiency in exascale studies ... Keywords: FFT, fine-grain, execution model, memory bandwidth

Chen Chen, Yao Wu, Stephane Zuckerman, Guang R. Gao

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

HEP/123-qed Fine structure of alpha decay in odd nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an ? decay level scheme, the fine structure in odd nuclei is explained by taking into account the radial and rotational couplings between the unpaired valence nucleon and the core of the decaying system. It is shown that the experimental behavior of the ? decay fine structure phenomenon is governed by the dynamical characteristics of the system.

M. Mirea

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Can hidden correlations mimic a variable fine structure constant?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Murphy et al. (2003a, MNRAS, 345, 609) claim to find evidence of cosmological variations of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$ in the spectra of intervening QSO absorption line systems. We find that this result is affected by systematic effects. The $\\alpha$ values estimated in individual line systems depend on the set of atomic transitions used and therefore the quoted dependence on the cosmic age may reflect the fact that different sets of transitions are used at different redshifts. A correlation between line shifts and relative optical depths of the atomic transitions is also present. This correlation is very tight for a high-redshift subsample and accounts for the anomalous dispersion of the $\\alpha$ values found by Murphy et al. (2003a) in this subsample. The above correlations are consistent with a scenario in which gravitational redshift, caused by the gravity of the dark halo, contributes to the shift in frequency of individual components. Gravitational redshift causes differential spectral shifts of the same order as magnitude of those measured. In the presence of line misidentification, these shifts can be interpreted in terms of a variable $\\alpha$. In order to verify the gravitational redshift hypothesis, a direct access to Murphy et al. (2003a) data, or to a large amount of new high resolution data, is necessary.

Rino Bandiera; Edvige Corbelli

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Fine-tuning molecular energy levels by nonresonant laser pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the shifts imparted to vibrational and rotational levels of a linear molecule by a nonresonant laser field at intensities of up to 10^12 W/cm^2. Both types of shift are found to be either positive or negative, depending on the initial rotational state acted upon by the field. An adiabatic field-molecule interaction imparts a rotational energy shift which is negative and exceeds the concomitant positive vibrational shift by a few orders of magnitude. The rovibrational states are thus pushed downward in such a field. A nonresonant pulsed laser field that interacts nonadiabatically with the molecule is found to impart rotational and vibrational shifts of the same order of magnitude. The nonadiabatic energy transfer occurs most readily at a pulse duration which amounts to about a tenth of the molecule's rotational period, and vanishes when the sudden regime is attained for shorter pulses. We applied our treatment to the much studied 87Rb_2 molecule in the last bound vibrational levels of its lowest singlet and triplet electronic states. Our calculations indicate that 15 ns and 1.5 ns laser pulses of an intensity in excess of 5x10^9 W/cm^2 are capable of dissociating the molecule due to the vibrational shift. Lesser shifts can be used to fine tune the rovibrational levels and thereby to affect collisional resonances by the nonresonant light. The energy shifts may be discernible spectroscopically, at a 10 MHz resolution.

Mikhail Lemeshko; Bretislav Friedrich

2010-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DOE Proposes Higher Efficiency Standards for Refrigerators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New Proposed Standards for Residential Refrigerators and Freezers to Lower Energy Use by as much as Twenty-Five Percent

342

Study of Proposed Internet Congestion Control Algorithms*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Algorithms* Kevin L. Mills, NIST (joint ... Page 2. Study of Proposed Internet Congestion Control Algorithms – Mills et al. Innovations ...

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)  

SciTech Connect

Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement/lime, iron/steel, and gasoline/diesel factors, while associations with the sludge incineration factor and components were less consistent. In winter, increases in HR were associated with a refinery factor and its components. CAPs-associated HR decreases in winter were linked to sludge incineration, cement/lime, and coal/secondary factors and the majority of their associated components. Specific relationships for increased rMSSD in winter were difficult to determine due to lack of consistency between factors and associated constituents. In Steubenville, we observed significant changes in HR (both increases and decreases), SDNN, and rMSSD in the summer, but not in the winter. We examined associations between individual source factors/PM components and HRV metrics segregated by predominant wind direction (NE or SW). Changes in HR (both increases and decreases) were linked with metal processing, waste incineration, and iron/steel factors along with most of their associated elemental constituents. Reductions in SDNN were associated with metal processing, waste incineration, and mobile source factors and the majority of elements loading onto these factors. There were no consistent associations between changes in rMSSD and source factors/components. Despite the large number of coal-fired power plants in the region, and therefore the large contribution of secondary sulfate to overall PM mass, we did not observe any associations with the coal/secondary factor or with the majority of its associated components. There were several inconsistencies in our results which make definitive conclusions difficult. For example, we observed opposing signs of effect estimates with some components depending on season, and with others depending on wind direction. In addition, our extensive dataset clearly would be subject to issues of multiple comparisons, and the 'true' significant results are unknown. Overall, however, our results suggest that acute changes in cardiac function were most strongly associated with local industrial sources. Results for coal-fired power plant-deriv

Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Using Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Pollution Sources1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Factor Analysis to Attribute Health Impacts to Particulate Pollution Sources 1 Thomas Grahame U. S. Department of Energy Washington, DC George Hidy Envair/Aerochem Placitas, NM ABSTRACT Laden et al. (2000) recently reported results of applying factor analysis to data taken in six cities from1979 to1988, identifying airborne particle sources potentially affecting daily mortality. These authors sought relationships between source groups and risk measures using source tracer elements, Se (coal combustion), Pb (light duty motor vehicle sources), and Si (crustal--soil dispersion). Combined data analyses of this kind may overlook the complexity of source contributions, which have common tracer elements. In one of the cities, Boston for example, the authors found coal combustion

345

Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol.

Steinberg, Meyer (Melville, NY); Grohse, Edward W. (Port Jefferson, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Apparatus and method for removing particulate deposits from high temperature filters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustion of a fuel-air mixture is used to provide a high-temperature and high-pressure pulse of gaseous combustion products for the back-flush cleaning of ceramic filter elements contained in a barrier filter system and utilized to separate particulates from particulate-laden process gases at high temperature and high pressure. The volume of gaseous combustion products provided by the combustion of the fuel-air mixture is preferably divided into a plurality of streams each passing through a sonic orifice and conveyed to the open end of each filter element as a high pressure pulse which passes through the filter elements and dislodges dust cake supported on a surface of the filter element.

Nakaishi, Curtis V. (Morgantown, WV); Holcombe, Norman T. (McMurray, PA); Micheli, Paul L. (Morgantown, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Process for the conversion of carbonaceous feedstocks to particulate carbon and methanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the production of a pollutant-free particulate carbon (i.e., a substantially ash-, sulfur- and nitrogen-free carbon) from carbonaceous feedstocks. The basic process involves de-oxygenating one of the gas streams formed in a cyclic hydropyrolysis-methane pyrolysis process in order to improve conversion of the initial carbonaceous feedstock. De-oxygenation is effected by catalytically converting carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen contained in one of the pyrolysis gas streams, preferably the latter, to a methanol co-product. There are thus produced two products whose use is known per se, viz., a substantially pollutant-free particulate carbon black and methanol. These products may be admixed in the form of a liquid slurry of carbon black in methanol. 3 figs.

Steinberg, M.; Grohse, E.W.

1995-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

348

Apparatus and method for removing particulate deposits from high temperature filters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The combustion of a fuel-air mixture is used to provide a high-temperature and high-pressure pulse of gaseous combustion products for the back-flush cleaning of ceramic filter elements contained in a barrier filter system and utilized to separate particulates from particulate-laden process gases at high temperature and high pressure. The volume of gaseous combustion products provided by the combustion of the fuel-air mixture is preferably divided into a plurality of streams each passing through a sonic orifice and conveyed to the open end of each filter element as a high pressure pulse which passes through the filter elements and dislodges dust cake supported on a surface of the filter element.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Holcombe, N.T.; Micheli, P.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

Benedek, K. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cross-flow filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Retrieval of Profiles of Particulate Extinction from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) Data: Algorithm Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the algorithms used for the fully automated retrieval of profiles of particulate extinction coefficients from the attenuated backscatter data acquired by the lidar on board the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite ...

Stuart A. Young; Mark A. Vaughan

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Microscale Quantification of the Absorption by Dissolved and Particulate Material in Coastal Waters with an ac-9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measuring coastal and oceanic absorption coefficients of dissolved and particulate matter in the visible domain usually requires a methodology for amplifying the natural signal because conventional spectrophotometers lack the necessary ...

Michael S. Twardowski; James M. Sullivan; Percy L. Donaghay; J. Ronald V. Zaneveld

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the infiltration of outdoor PM2.5 into a residence in the San Joaquin Valley Title Use of time- and chemically resolved particulate data to characterize the infiltration of outdoor PM2.5 into a residence in the San Joaquin Valley Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Lunden, Melissa M., Tracy L. Thatcher, Susanne V. Hering, and Nancy J. Brown Journal Environmental Science and Technology Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 4724-4732 Date Published October 15, 2003 Abstract Recent studies associate particulate air pollution with adverse health effects. The indoor exposure to particles of outdoor origin is not well characterized, particularly for individual chemical species. In response to this, a field study in an unoccupied, single-story residence in Clovis, California was conducted. Real-time particle monitors were used both outdoors and indoors to quantity PM2.5 nitrate, sulfate, and carbon. The aggregate of the highly time-resolved sulfate data, as well as averages of these data, was fit using a time-averaged form of the infiltration equation, resulting in reasonable values for the penetration coefficient and deposition velocity. In contrast, individual values of the indoor/outdoor ratio can vary significantly from that predicted by the model for time scales ranging from a few minutes to several hours. Measured indoor ammonium nitrate levels were typically significantly lower than expected based solely on penetration and deposition losses. The additional reduction is due to the transformation of ammonium nitrate into ammonia and nitric acid gases indoors, which are subsequently lost by deposition and sorption to indoor surfaces. This result illustrates that exposure assessments based on total outdoor particle mass can obscure the actual causal relationships for indoor exposures

354

Development of Optical Technologies for Monitoring Moisture and Particulate in Geothermal Steam  

SciTech Connect

The results of an investigation directed at evaluating the feasibility of using optical measurements for the real-time monitoring moisture and particulate in geothermal steam is described. The measurements exploit new technologies that have been developed for the telecommunications industry and includes new solid state laser devices, large-bandwidth, high-sensitivity detectors and low loss optical fiber compo-nents. In particular, the design, fabrication, and in-plant testing of an optical steam monitor for the detection of moisture is presented. The measurement principle is based upon the selective absorption of infrared energy in response to the presence of moisture. Typically, two wavelengths are used in the measurements: a wavelength that is strongly absorbed by water and a reference wavelength that is minimally influenced by water and steam which serves as a reference to correct for particulate or droplet scattering. The two wavelengths are chosen to be as close as possible in order to more effectively correct for scattering effects. The basic instrumentation platform developed for the in-situ monitoring of steam moisture can be modified and used to perform other measurements of interest to plant operators. An upgrade that will allow the instrument to be used for the sensitive detection of particulate in process streams has been investigated. The new monitor design involves the use of laser diodes that are much less sensitive to water and water vapor and more sensitive to scattering phenomena, as well as new processing techniques to recover these signals. The design reduces the averaging time and sampling volume, while increasing the laser probe power, enhancing particulate detection sensitivity. The design concept and initial laboratory experiments with this system are also reported.

J. K. Partin

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: in-flight adsorption of mercury by charged suspended particulates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrostatic precipitation is the dominant method of particulate control used for coal combustion, and varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across ESPs. Nevertheless, the fate of gas-phase mercury within an ESP remains poorly understood. The present analysis focuses on the gas-particle mass transfer that occurs within a charged aerosol in an ESP. As a necessary step in gas-phase mercury adsorption or transformation, gas-particle mass transfer - particularly in configurations other than fixed beds - has received far less attention than studies of adsorption kinetics. Our previous analysis showed that only a small fraction of gas-phase mercury entering an ESP is likely to be adsorbed by collected particulate matter on the plate electrodes. The present simplified analysis provides insight into gas-particle mass transfer within an ESP under two limiting conditions: laminar and turbulent fluid flows. The analysis reveals that during the process of particulate collection, gas-particle mass transfer can be quite high, easily exceeding the mass transfer to ESP plate electrodes in most cases. Decreasing particle size, increasing particle mass loading, and increasing temperature all result in increased gas-particle mass transfer. The analysis predicts significantly greater gas-particle mass transfer in the laminar limit than in the turbulent limit; however, the differences become negligible under conditions where other factors, such as total mass of suspended particulates, are the controlling mass transfer parameters. Results are compared to selected pilot- and full-scale sorbent injection data. 41 refs., 5 figs.

Herek L. Clack [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States). Department of Mechanical, Materials and Aerospace Engineering

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Impacts of Particulate Matter on Human Health: An Updated Summary of EPRI Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hundreds of toxicological and epidemiological studies have been conducted over the past 20 years to better understand the effects of particulate matter (PM), and air pollution in general, on human health. Examples of environmental regulations and policies driven by these health concerns include the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), as well as State Implementation Plans (SIPs) and multi-pollutant control legislation. EPRI's PM/Health Research Program...

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

A Quantitative Aerosol Generator Designed for Particulate Matter (PM) Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems (CEMS) Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A growing number of utilities are required to continuously monitor particulate matter (PM) emissions using continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS). Currently, simultaneous EPA manual reference method tests (EPA Reference Method 5) must be used to calibrate and audit these PM CEMS following EPA Performance Specification 11 guidelines (PS-11). These calibrations are not only difficult, time consuming, and expensive to perform, but are particularly onerous because they require the utility to modify p...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

358

Grooved impactor and inertial trap for sampling inhalable particulate matter. [Patents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inertial trap and grooved impactor for providing a sharp cutoff for particles over 15 microns from entering an inhalable particulate sampler is disclosed. The impactor head has a tapered surface and is provided with V-shaped grooves. The tapered surface functions for reducing particle blow-off or reentrainment while the grooves prevent particle bounce. Water droplets and any resuspended material over the 15 micron size are collected by the inertial trap and deposited in a reservoir associated with the impactor.

Loo, B.W.

1982-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Pre-Proposal Development WHITE PAPERS, PRE-PROPOSALS, LETTERS OF INTENT, OR LETTERS OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-Proposal Development - 1 - WHITE PAPERS, PRE-PROPOSALS, LETTERS OF INTENT, OR LETTERS OF INQUIRY White papers, often used by defense agencies, and letters of intent and pre- proposals, typically unnecessary work for you and the sponsor. White Papers & Pre-Proposals Proposal preparation and review

Raina, Ramesh

360

60-DAY Federal Register Notice - Proposed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60-DAY Federal Register Notice - Proposed 60-DAY Federal Register Notice - Proposed [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Proposed Agency Information Collection AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Notice and Request for Comments SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) invites public comment on a proposed collection of information that DOE is developing for submission to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Comments are invited on: (a) whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Particulate Control Device (PCD) Testing at the Power Systems Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) objectives overseen by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to test systems and components for advanced coal-based power generation systems, including integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and integrated gasification/fuel cell (IGFC) systems. Stringent particulate requirements for fuel gas for both combustion turbines and fuel cells that are integral to these systems. Particulates erode and chemically attack the blade surfaces in turbines, and cause blinding of the electrodes in fuel cells. Filtration of the hot, high-pressure, gasified coal is required to protect these units. Filtration can be accomplished by first cooling the gas, but the system efficiency is reduced. High-temperature, high-pressure, particulate control devices (PCDs) need to be developed to achieve high efficiency and to extend the lifetime of downstream components to acceptable levels. Demonstration of practical high-temperature PCDs is crucial to the evolution of advanced, high-efficiency, coal-based power generation systems. The intent at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is to establish a flexible test facility that can be used to (1) develop advanced power system components, such as high-temperature, high-pressure PCDs; (2) evaluate advanced power system configurations and (3) assess the integration and control issues of these advanced power systems.

Longanbach, J.R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Particulate matter emissions from combustion of wood in district heating applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utilization of wood biomass to generate district heat and power in communities that have access to this energy source is increasing. In this paper the effect of wood fuel properties, combustion condition, and flue gas cleaning system on variation in the amount and formation of particles in the flue gas of typical district heating wood boilers are discussed based on the literature survey. Direct measurements of particulate matter (PM) emissions from wood boilers with district heating applications are reviewed and presented. Finally, recommendations are given regarding the selection of wood fuel, combustion system condition, and flue gas cleaning system in district heating systems in order to meet stringent air quality standards. It is concluded that utilization of high quality wood fuel, such as wood pellets produced from natural, uncontaminated stem wood, would generate the least PM emissions compared to other wood fuel types. Particulate matter emissions from grate burners equipped with electrostatic precipitators when using wood pellets can be well below stringent regulatory emission limit such as particulate emission limit of Metro Vancouver, Canada.

Ghafghazi, S. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sowlati, T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Melin, Staffan [Delta Research Corporation

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Program on Technology Innovation: Developing Technologies for the Direct Measurement of Particulate Mass Emissions from Flue Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the current status of continuous particulate monitoring systems. It addresses the recent advent of new monitoring systems and the role of miniaturization and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) in particulate monitor development. It examines sensors and monitoring systems in other fields of application, such as ambient, indoor, process, and clean room monitoring. Many of these methods are particle counting and particle sizing methods, meant for monitoring low particle concentration...

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fine-Grained Software Reconfiguration for Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposed in scenarios whose requirements cannot be fully predicted, or where the system functionality must. In this paper we present FIGARO, a programming model supported by an effi- cient run-time system and distributed changes over time and/or cannot be predicted a priori. For instance, in emergency response [2] systems

Picco, Gian Pietro

365

Guide for the Submission of Unsolicited Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GUIDE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF GUIDE FOR THE SUBMISSION OF UNSOLICITED PROPOSALS The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh Office has operational responsibility of the DOE Unsolicited Proposal (USP) Program. All unsolicited proposals should be forwarded by Email to John N. Augustine at DOEUSP@NETL.DOE.GOV who will serve as the single point of contact for all Department of Energy (DOE) unsolicited proposals. Please direct all unsolicited proposals, abstracts and correspondence to: John N. Augustine, Mail Stop 921-107 Unsolicited Proposal Manager U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 Email: DOEUSP@NETL.DOE.GOV -1- TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 3

366

60-DAY Federal Register Notice - Proposed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Proposed [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Proposed Agency Information Collection AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy ACTION: Notice and Request for Comments SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) invites public comment on a proposed collection of information that DOE is developing for submission to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. Comments are invited on: (a) whether the proposed collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including whether the information shall have practical utility; (b) the accuracy of the agency's estimate of the burden of the proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of

367

ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Steam - Renewal Proposal" Drs. Joseph J. MichalskyLee Harrison, State University of New York, Albany: "Spectral and Broadband Shortwave Radiometry and Analysis" Larry M....

368

Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Reducing Emissions Through Sustainable Transport: Proposal for a Sectoral Approach AgencyCompany Organization: GTZ...

369

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(MOFs) that can be regenerated electrically for use in future high efficiency electric vehicle (EV) heat pumps. Proposed work consists of indoor laboratory-based research and...

370

Chapter 2 Proposed Action and Alternatives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the other proposed improvements based on a conceptually defined site "buildout" scenario. A bounding analysis uses simplifying assumptions and analytical methods that are...

371

2011 Call for Proposals for NERSC Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allocations of high performance computing resources at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Proposals must...

372

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Department Requests Proposals for Advanced Scientific Computing Research News In the News 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 In Focus Presentations & Testimony...

373

Proposed Comprehensive Cyber Security Legislation, May 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of cyber security in the critical infrastructures of the United States has been recognized by the President and by members of Congress. To address potential cyber security threats and vulnerabilities, the Senate has proposed revisions to specific laws and regulations. This white paper includes a technical assessment of some of the key proposed revisions.

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE NUCLEAR POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTE TO EDITORS: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has received two reports from its independent Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. The attached reports, in the form of letters, comment on a proposed amendment to the NRC's rule on license renewal for nuclear power plants and a proposed revision to the decommissioning rule for nuclear power reactors. Attachments:

T. S. Kress

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

30-Day Federal Register Notice - Proposed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-Day Federal Register Notice - Proposed 30-Day Federal Register Notice - Proposed [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Proposed Agency Information Collection AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice and Request for OMB Review and Comment SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for clearance, a proposal for collection of information under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The proposed collection will {enter a brief description of the collection that highlights the major questions being asked; suggested length is 2 to 5 sentences}. DATES: Comments regarding this collection must be received on or before [INSERT DATE 30 DAYS AFTER DATE OF PUBLICATION IN THE FEDERAL REGISTER]. If you anticipate that you will be submitting comments, but find it difficult

376

30-Day Federal Register Notice - Proposed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30-Day Federal Register Notice - Proposed 30-Day Federal Register Notice - Proposed [6450-01-P] DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Proposed Agency Information Collection AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice and Request for OMB Review and Comment SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for clearance, a proposal for collection of information under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995. The proposed collection will {enter a brief description of the collection that highlights the major questions being asked; suggested length is 2 to 5 sentences}. DATES: Comments regarding this collection must be received on or before [INSERT DATE 30 DAYS AFTER DATE OF PUBLICATION IN THE FEDERAL REGISTER]. If you anticipate that you will be submitting comments, but find it difficult

377

NETL: Guide for Preparation of Cost Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Business Opportunities and Business Opportunities Guide for Preparation of Cost Proposals The following guide is to be used in the preparation of the offeror's cost proposal. It provides general instructions as well as the format, exhibits and content that is required to be included in the submission. In addition, the exhibits include examples of both cost elements and indirect rate data that are in typical proposals. Please note that these are provided as a guide only. Do not attempt to conform your proposal to match the exact elements and accounts in the examples. Both the cost elements and indirect rate data in your proposal should be able to be traced to and supported by your accounting system. Any questions should be directed to the contact person noted in the instructions.

378

Microsoft Word - Call_for_Proposals.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The University of Chicago The University of Chicago ATLAS Call for Proposals Deadline for proposals: Monday, October 28, 2013 Dear ATLAS User, This is a call for proposals for experiments at ATLAS, for the scheduling period beginning in January 2014. The ATLAS Program Advisory Committee (PAC) meeting will be held November 22-23, 2013. Please note that this is a call for proposals for all experiments using stable beams, radioactive beams produced by the in-flight technique, and low-energy and reaccelerated radioactive beams from the CARIBU source. This is also the first call for proposals for experiments with the GRETINA gamma-ray tracking array that will be operational at ATLAS from January 2014 to December 2014. GRETINA operation at ATLAS is expected to be split into two campaigns. GRETINA's first campaign at ATLAS will have it sited on the

379

DOE Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Power Initiative Project DOE Receives First Repayment from Successful DryFining™ Clean Coal Power Initiative Project July 6, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The success of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project has led to a repayment of $580,000 to U.S. taxpayers, with much more - potentially exceeding $13 million - possible in the future. Great River Energy (GRE) of Maple Grove, Minn., made the payment to the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) recently as part of an agreement associated with the DryFining™ CCPI project. Implemented by NETL, CCPI is a cost-shared collaboration between the Federal government and private industry aimed at stimulating investment

380

Fine and Microstructure Observations on a Hydrographic Section from the Azores to the Flemish Cap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous conductivity-temperature-depth-dissolved-oxygen (CTD) data are used to investigate the spatial distribution of fine and microstructure between the Azores and Flemish Cap. The CTD data are used to calculate a conductivity-microstructure ...

Daniel T. Georgi; Raymond W. Schmitt

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gravity Wave – Fine Structure Interactions, Part 2: Energy Dissipation Evolutions, Statistics, and Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fritts et al. (2013) employ four direct numerical simulations (DNS) to examine the dynamics and energetics of idealized gravity wave – fine structure (GW-FS) interactions. That study, and this companion paper, were motivated by the ubiquity of ...

David C. Fritts; Ling Wang

382

Fine-Resolved, Near-Coastal Spatiotemporal Variation of Temperature in Response to Insolation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses GIS-based modeling of incoming solar radiation to quantify fine-resolved spatiotemporal responses of monthly average temperature, and diurnal temperature variation, at different times and locations within a field study area located ...

Nikki Vercauteren; Georgia Destouni; Carl Johan Dahlberg; Kristoffer Hylander

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Effect of Prongs in the Measurement of Atmospheric Turbulence with Fine-Wire Resistance Transducers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of the fine-wire resistance temperature transducer was analyzed including the effects of (i) conducive heat transfer between wire and the supporting prong and (ii) a thermal boundary layer, which can form around the prongs especially ...

V. P. Singh; F. Eaton; R. Rubio

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Optimizing fine-grained communication in a biomolecular simulation application on Cray XK6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Achieving good scaling for fine-grained communication intensive applications on modern supercomputers remains challenging. In our previous work, we have shown that such an application --- NAMD --- scales well on the full Jaguar XT5 without long-range ...

Yanhua Sun; Gengbin Zheng; Chao Mei; Eric J. Bohm; James C. Phillips; Laximant V. Kalé; Terry R. Jones

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Influence of Mesoscale Dynamics and Turbulence on Fine Dust Transport in Owens Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine dust particles emitted from Owens (dry) Lake in California documented during the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) of 2006 have been examined using surface observations and a mesoscale aerosol model. Air quality stations around Owens (...

Qingfang Jiang; Ming Liu; James D. Doyle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Isopycnal Momentum Budget of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The momentum budget of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) is analyzed using data from the Fine Resolution Antarctic Model (FRAM), using density as a vertical coordinate, since density is approximately conserved on streamlines. This steady ...

Peter D. Killworth; M. Majed Nanneh

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025- Legislation and...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Regulation of Mercury and Fine Particulate Emissions Legislation and Regulations. Regulation of Mercury and Fine Particulate Emissions The EPA is currently developing regulations...

388

Bayesian considerations on the multiverse explanation of cosmic fine-tuning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fundamental laws and constants of our universe seem to be finely tuned for life. The various multiverse hypotheses are popular explanations for the fine tuning. This paper reviews the four main suggestions on inference in the presence of possible multiple universes and observer selection effects. Basic identities from probability theory and previously unnoticed conditional dependencies of the propositions involved are used to decide among the alternatives. In the case of cosmic fine-tuning, information about the observation is not independent of the hypothesis. It follows that the observation should be used as data when comparing hypotheses. Hence, approaches that use the observation only as background information are incorrect. It is also shown that in some cases the self-sampling assumption by Bostrom leads to probabilities greater than one, leaving the approach inconsistent. The "some universe" (SU) approach is found wanting. Several reasons are given on why the "this universe" (TU) approach seems to be correct. Lastly, the converse selection effect by White is clarified by showing formally that the converse condition leads to SU and its absence to TU. The overall result is that, because multiverse hypotheses do not predict the fine-tuning for this universe any better than a single universe hypothesis, the multiverse hypotheses fail as explanations for cosmic fine-tuning. Conversely, the fine-tuning data does not support the multiverse hypotheses.

V. Palonen

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

389

Electrically resistive coating for remediation (regeneration) of a diesel particulate filter and method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resistively heated diesel particulate filter (DPF). The resistively heated DPF includes a DPF having an inlet surface and at least one resistive coating on the inlet surface. The at least one resistive coating is configured to substantially maintain its resistance in an operating range of the DPF. The at least one resistive coating has a first terminal and a second terminal for applying electrical power to resistively heat up the at least one resistive coating in order to increase the temperature of the DPF to a regeneration temperature. The at least one resistive coating includes metal and semiconductor constituents.

Phelps, Amanda C. (Malibu, CA); Kirby, Kevin K. (Calabasas Hills, CA); Gregoire, Daniel J. (Thousand Oaks, CA)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Measuring the Effect of Fuel Chemical Structure on Particulate and Gaseous Emissions using Isotope Tracing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), a technique initially developed for radiocarbon dating and recently applied to internal combustion engines, carbon atoms within specific fuel molecules can be labeled and followed in particulate or gaseous emissions. In addition to examining the effect of fuel chemical structure on emissions, the specific source of carbon for PM can be identified if an isotope label exists in the appropriate fuel source. Existing work has focused on diesel engines, but the samples (soot collected on quartz filters or combustion gases captured in bombs or bags) are readily collected from large industrial combustors as well.

Buchholz, B A; Mueller, C J; Martin, G C; Upatnicks, A; Dibble, R W; Cheng, S

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

391

Filterable Particulate Matter Stack Test Methods: Performance Characteristics and Potential Improvements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuel-fired power plant owners are required to measure filterable particulate matter (fPM) in stack gases in order to comply with air permits that place limits on their emissions. Recent rulemakings by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have given power plant owners the option to comply with emission limits for non-mercury metals classified as hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) by measuring fPM as a surrogate parameter. Compliance can be demonstrated either by quarterly sampling using ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

392

Stress transmission and isostatic states of non-rigid particulate systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The isostaticity theory for stress transmission in macroscopic planar particulate assemblies is extended here to non-rigid particles. It is shown that, provided that the mean coordination number in $d$ dimensions is $d+1$, macroscopic systems can be mapped onto equivalent assemblies of perectly rigid particles that support the same stress field. The error in the stress field that the compliance introduces for finite systems is shown to decay with size as a power law. This leads to the conclusion that the isostatic state is not limited to infinitely rigid particles both in two and in three dimensions, and paves the way to an application of isostaticity theory to more general systems.

Raphael Blumenfeld

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

393

Particulate emissions from residential wood combustion: Final report: Norteast regional Biomass Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a resource document for the Northeastern states when pursuing the analysis of localized problems resulting from residential wood combustion. Specific tasks performed include assigning emission rates for total suspended particulates (TSP) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) from wood burning stoves, estimating the impact on ambient air quality from residential wood combustion and elucidating the policy options available to Northeastern states in their effort to limit any detrimental effects resulting from residential wood combustion. Ancillary tasks included providing a comprehensive review on the relevant health effects, indoor air pollution and toxic air pollutant studies. 77 refs., 11 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Flue Gas Conditioning to Reduce Particulate Emissions in Industrial Coal-Fired Boilers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical technology has been used successfully to solve many of the operational and emissions problems that result from burning coal. This paper describes the use of blended chemical flue gas conditioners to significantly reduce particulate emissions in coal-fired industrial boilers. In many cases, these chemical conditioning agents have increased the efficiency of electrostatic precipitators and mechanical collectors by more than fifty percent. The effectiveness of this technology has been demonstrated on units generating 50,000 to 200,000 lbs./hr. steam. Results achieved at various industrial plants under actual operating conditions are presented.

Miller, B.; Keon, E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Solid Phase Characterization of Tank 241-AY-102 Annulus Space Particulate  

SciTech Connect

The Special Analytical Studies Group at the 222-S Laboratory (222-S) examined the particulate recovered from a series of samples from the annular space of tank 241-AY-102 (AY-102) using solid phase characterization (SPC) methods. These include scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using the ASPEX?1 scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction (XRD) using the Rigaku?2 MiniFlex X-ray diffractometer, and polarized light microscopy (PLM) using the Nikon?3 Eclipse Pol optical microscope. The SEM is equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) to provide chemical information.

Cooke, G. A.

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

How can New Zealand producers increase the level of fine wool production? Research using linear programming as a modelling tool with case studies in Marlborough and Canterbury.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fine wool is suitable for clothing, both designer suits and outdoor active wear. Around 6,817 tonnes of clean, fine wool was exported between July 2009… (more)

Kidd, Robert James Trevelyan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Request for Proposal | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Request for Proposal | National Nuclear Security Administration Request for Proposal | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Request for Proposal Home > About Us > Our Operations > Acquisition and Project Management > Major Contract Solicitations > Environmental Program Services Contract >

398

Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for a High Energy Nuclear Database David A. Brown 1it requires the high-energy nuclear physics com- munity’s ?compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications

Brown, David A.; Vogt, Ramona

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

VULCAN Proposal Information | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Points for Beam Time Proposals Key Points for Beam Time Proposals The key points below are essential elements the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) considers when assigning a rating to your proposal for beam time on the VULCAN engineering instrument at SNS; see http://neutrons.ornl.gov/vulcan/. They apply to the Statement of Research, i.e., after the specified sections: Title, PI, abstract, facility requested, days requested, student involvement, experiment team, samples, and sample environment. Consideration of the key points will 1) encourage you to think through the feasibility and reasonableness of your proposed measurement and 2) provide relevant information to the SRC so they can make a sound judgment. Key points to include in your Statement of Research What scientific question are you trying to answer?

400

Cospolich Refrigerator: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5314)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Cospolich Refrigerator Co, Inc. failed to certify walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the energy conservation standards.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Refrigerator Manufacturers: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5341)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Refrigerator Manufacturers, LLC failed to certify a variety of walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

402

Kold Pack: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5323)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Kold Pack, Inc. failed to certify walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the energy conservation standards.

403

A proposed open cognitive architecture framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a proposed general-purpose cognitive architecture known as the Open Cognitive Architecture Framework (OpenCAF) capable of representing complex intelligent behavior for a variety of applications. This new cognitive architecture ...

Jeffrey S. Steinman; Craig N. Lammers; Maria E. Valinski

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Trastar: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-49003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Trastar Inc. failed to certify a variety of basic models of traffic signal modules and pedestrian models as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

405

Fermilab | Science at Fermilab | Experiments & Projects | Proposed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frontier Proposed Projects and Experiments LBNE Mu2e Project X NOvA MicroBooNE MICE Dark Energy Survey LSST The MINERvA Full Module Prototype plane moves into the NuMI...

406

Polar King: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5328)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Polar King International Inc. failed to certify a variety of walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

407

WASTE AREA GROUP 7 PROPOSED PLAN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 15, 2007 WASTE AREA GROUP 7 PROPOSED PLAN The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Citizens Advisory Board (CAB) has provided its input to the Department of Energy on the...

408

Proposal Submittal and Scheduling Procedures for Macromolecular...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

merit and to assure that all ES&H guidelines are met in accordance with standard SSRL policies and procedures. Sufficient generic information to enable Proposal Review Panel review...

409

Special Notice PROPOSED SUBSISTENCE HALIBUT REGULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for denied applications for a CHP, Ceremonial Permit, Educational Permit, or subsistence halibut registration certificate. Comments You may comment on these proposals in four ways: a) by mail; b) by fax; c) by e-mail; or

410

The fuzzball proposal for black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fuzzball proposal states that associated with a black hole of entropy S there are exp S horizon-free non-singular solutions that asymptotically look like the black hole but generically differ from the black hole up to the horizon scale. These solutions, the fuzzballs, are considered to be the black hole microstates while the original black hole represents the average description of the system. The purpose of this report is to review current evidence for the fuzzball proposal, emphasizing the use of AdS/CFT methods in developing and testing the proposal. In particular, we discuss the status of the proposal for 2 and 3 charge black holes in the D1-D5 system, presenting new derivations and streamlining the discussion of their properties. Results to date support the fuzzball proposal but further progress is likely to require going beyond the supergravity approximation and sharpening the definition of a "stringy fuzzball". We outline how the fuzzball proposal could resolve longstanding issues in black hole physics, such as Hawking radiation and information loss. Our emphasis throughout is on connecting different developments and identifying open problems and directions for future research.

Kostas Skenderis; Marika Taylor

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

411

COMMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ON JUNE 2003 FOURTH EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT CRITERIA DOCUMENT FOR PARTICULATE MATTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/OFFICE OF FOSSIL COMMENTS OF DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY STAFF ON JUNE 2003 FOURTH EXTERNAL REVIEW DRAFT CRITERIA DOCUMENT FOR PARTICULATE MATTER Summary and Conclusions The Fourth External Review Draft Criteria Document for Particulate Matter (henceforth, the CD) is a very comprehensive review of both epidemiological and toxicological research into the health effects of particulate matter (PM) in ambient air. DOE/Office of Fossil Energy offers the following comments on it. OMB's "Principles and Procedures" memorandum to agencies states: "OIRA's [OMB's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs] review also evaluates, on occasion in consultation with the Office of Science and Technology Policy, whether the agency has, in assessing exposure to a risk or an environmental

412

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 4: Diesel Particulate Filters -- Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This is the fourth and final report for the DPF test program and covers the effect of diesel sulfur level on: a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF), and a continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CR-DPF).

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency Studies Using Laboratory Generated Particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel offers higher fuel efficiency, but produces higher exhaust particulate matter. Diesel particulate filters are presently the most efficient means to reduce these emissions. These filters typically trap particles in two basic modes: at the beginning of the exposure cycle the particles are captured in the filter holes, and at longer times the particles form a "cake" on which particles are trapped. Eventually the "cake" removed by oxidation and the cycle is repeated. We have investigated the properties and behavior of two commonly used filters: silicon carbide (SiC) and cordierite (DuraTrap® RC) by exposing them to nearly-spherical ammonium sulfate particles. We show that the transition from deep bed filtration to "cake" filtration can easily be identified by recording the change in pressure across the filters as a function of exposure. We investigated performance of these filters as a function of flow rate and particle size. The filters trap small and large particles more efficiently than particles that are ~80 to 200 nm in aerodynamic diameter. A comparison between the experimental data and a simulation using incompressible lattice-Boltzmann model shows very good qualitative agreement, but the model overpredicts the filter’s trapping efficiency.

Yang, Juan; Stewart, Marc; Maupin, Gary D.; Herling, Darrell R.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Implications of Low Particulate Matter Emissions on System Fuel Efficiency for High Efficiency Clean Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced diesel combustion regimes such as High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) offer the benefits of reduced engine out NOX and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Lower PM emissions during advanced combustion reduce the demand on diesel particulate filters (DPFs) and can, thereby, reduce the fuel penalty associated with DPF regeneration. In this study, a SiC DPF was loaded and regenerated on a 1.7-liter 4-cylinder diesel engine operated in conventional and advanced combustion modes at different speed and load conditions. A diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a lean NOX trap (LNT) were also installed in the exhaust stream. Five steady-state speed and load conditions were weighted to estimate Federal Test Procedure (FTP) fuel efficiency. The DPF was loaded using lean-rich cycling with frequencies that resulted in similar levels of NOX emissions downstream of the LNT. The pressure drop across the DPF was measured at a standard point (1500 rpm, 5.0 bar) before and after loading, and a P rise rate was determined for comparison between conventional and advanced combustion modes. Higher PM emissions in conventional combustion resulted in a higher rate of backpressure rise across the DPF at all of the load points leading to more frequent DPF regenerations and higher fuel penalty. The fuel penalty during conventional combustion was 4.2% compared with 3.1% for a mixture of conventional and advanced modes.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Measuring Sub-micron Size Fractionated Particulate Matter on Aluminum Impactor Disks  

SciTech Connect

Sub-micron sized airborne particulate matter is not collected well on regular quartz or glass fiber filter papers. We used a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) to size fractionate particulate matter (PM) into six size fractions and deposit it on specially designed high purity thin aluminum disks. The MOUDI separated PM into fractions 56-100 nm, 100-180 nm, 180-320 nm, 320-560 nm, 560-1000 nm, and 1000-1800 nm. Since MOUDI have low flow rates, it takes several days to collect sufficient carbon on 47 mm foil disks. The small carbon mass (20-200 microgram C) and large aluminum substrate ({approx}25 mg Al) presents several challenges to production of graphite targets for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) analysis. The Al foil consumes large amounts of oxygen as it is heated and tends to melt into quartz combustion tubes, causing gas leaks. We describe sample processing techniques to reliably produce graphitic targets for {sup 14}C-AMS analysis of PM deposited on Al impact foils.

Buchholz, B A; Zermeno, P; Hwang, H; Young, T M

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

NEW CORDIERITE DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTERS FOR CATALYZED AND NON-CATALYZED APPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cordierite diesel particulate filters provide an economical approach to diesel emissions control. However, further reduction in the pressure drop of catalyzed and non-catalyzed cordierite filters is desirable. In order to derive a fundamental understanding of the relationship between clean and sootloaded pressure drop and the pore microstructure of the ceramic, and to optimize the microstructure for filter performance, cordierite filters have been fabricated spanning an extended range in porosity, pore size distribution, and pore connectivity. Analysis of the results has been applied to the development of several new cordierite diesel particulate filters that possess a unique combination of high filtration efficiency, high strength, and very low clean and soot-loaded pressure drop. Furthermore, catalyst systems have been developed that result in a minimal pressure drop increase of the catalyzed filter. Optimization of porosity and cell geometry has enabled fabrication o f filters with either high or low thermal mass appropriate to the regeneration strategy employed for a given engine management system.

Merkel, G; Cutler, W; Tao, T Chiffey, A; Phillips, P; Twigg, M; Walker, A

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

417

New Chemical Aerosol Characterization Methods- Examples Using Agricultural and Urban Airborne Particulate Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored different chemical characterization methods of agricultural and urban airborne particulate matter. Three different field campaigns are discussed. For the agricultural aerosols, measurement of the chemical composition of size-resolved agricultural aerosols collected from a ground site at the nominally downwind and upwind edge of a feedlot in West Texas were reported. High volume cascade impactor samplers were used for the collection of the particles, and two major analytical methods were applied to characterize different components of the aerosols, ion chromatography (IC ) was used to measure ionic composition with the main targets being ammonium (NH4 ), nitrate (NO3 -), and sulfate (SO4 2-), direct thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection (GC-MS/FID) methodology was used to identify and quantify organic compounds in the aerosol particles. For the urban aerosols, I report the measurement of mass, and the chemical composition of size-resolved aerosols collected from two different locations in Houston, analyzed by the thermal desorption GC-MS/FID method. The investigation of single particle composition using RM is reported as well: RM and chemical mapping techniques have been applied for the qualitative analysis of components in the samples of air particulate matter collected in downtown Houston.

Zhou, Lijun

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the after-treatment of automotive exhaust particulates and marine diesel exhaust NOx  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The trend in environmental legislation is such that primary engine modifications will not be sufficient to meet all future emissions requirements and exhaust aftertreatment technologies will need to be employed. One potential solution that is well placed to meet those requirements is non-thermal plasma technology. This paper will describe our work with some of our partners in the development of a plasma based diesel particulate filter (DPF) and plasma assisted catalytic reduction (PACR) for NOx removal. This paper describes the development of non-thermal plasma technology for the aftertreatment of particulates from a passenger car engine and NOx from a marine diesel exhaust application.

McAdams, R; Beech, P; Gillespie, R; Guy, C; Jones,S; Liddell, T; Morgan, R; Shawcross, J; Weeks, D; Hughes, D; Oesterle, J; Eberspdcher,

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

419

Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hudson River, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hudson River (Federal Project No. 41) was one of seven waterways that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. Sediment samples were collected from the Hudson River. Tests and analyses were conducted on Hudson River sediment core samples. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hudson River included bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Individual sediment core samples collected from Hudson River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). A composite sediment sample, representing the entire area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Site water and elutriate water, prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of Hudson River sediment, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed with three species. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.; Tokos, J.J.S. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Assessment of Contribution of Contemporary Carbon Sources to Size-Fractionated Particulate Matter and Time-Resolved Bulk Particulate Matter Using the Measurement of Radiocarbon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was motivated by a desire to improve understanding of the sources contributing to the carbon that is an important component of airborne particulate matter (PM). The ultimate goal of this project was to lay a ground work for future tools that might be easily implemented with archived or routinely collected samples. A key feature of this study was application of radiocarbon measurement that can be interpreted to indicate the relative contributions from fossil and non-fossil carbon sources of atmospheric PM. Size-resolved PM and time-resolved PM{sub 10} collected from a site in Sacramento, CA in November 2007 (Phase I) and March 2008 (Phase II) were analyzed for radiocarbon and source markers such as levoglucosan, cholesterol, and elemental carbon. Radiocarbon data indicates that the contributions of non-fossil carbon sources were much greater than that from fossil carbon sources in all samples. Radiocarbon and source marker measurements confirm that a greater contribution of non-fossil carbon sources in Phase I samples was highly likely due to residential wood combustion. The present study proves that measurement of radiocarbon and source markers can be readily applied to archived or routinely collected samples for better characterization of PM sources. More accurate source apportionment will support ARB in developing more efficient control strategies.

Hwang, H M; Young, T M; Buchholz, B A

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Proposed Laser-Based HED physics experiments for Stockpile Stewardship  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the scientific areas in High Energy Density (HED) physics that underpin the enduring LANL mission in Stockpile Stewardship (SS) has identified important research needs that are not being met. That analysis has included the work done as part of defining the mission need for the High Intensity Laser Laboratory (HILL) LANL proposal to NNSA, LDRD DR proposal evaluations, and consideration of the Predictive Capability Framework and LANL NNSA milestones. From that evaluation, we have identified several specific and scientifically-exciting experimental concepts to address those needs. These experiments are particularly responsive to physics issues in Campaigns 1 and 10. These experiments are best done initially at the LANL Trident facility, often relying on the unique capabilities available there, although there are typically meritorious extensions envisioned at future facilities such as HILL, or the NIF once the ARC short-pulse laser is available at sufficient laser intensity. As the focus of the LANL HEDP effort broadens from ICF ignition of the point design at the conclusion of the National Ignition Campaign, into a more SS-centric effort, it is useful to consider these experiments, which address well-defined issues, with specific scientific hypothesis to test or models to validate or disprove, via unit-physics experiments. These experiments are in turn representative of a possible broad experimental portfolio to elucidate the physics of interest to these campaigns. These experiments, described below, include: (1) First direct measurement of the evolution of particulates in isochorically heated dense plasma; (2) Temperature relaxation measurements in a strongly-coupled plasma; (3) Viscosity measurements in a dense plasma; and (4) Ionic structure factors in a dense plasma. All these experiments address scientific topics of importance to our sponsors, involve excellent science at the boundaries of traditional fields, utilize unique capabilities at LANL, and contribute to the Campaign milestone in 2018. Given their interdisciplinary nature, it is not surprising that these research needs are not being addressed by the other excellent high-energy density physics (HEDP) facilities coming on line, facilities aimed squarely at more established fields and missions. Although energy rich, these facilities deliver radiation (e.g., particle beams for isochoric heating) over a timescale that is too slow in these unit physics experiments to eliminate hydrodynamic evolution of the target plasma during the time it is being created. A theme shared by all of these experiments is the need to quickly create a quasi-homogeneous 'initial state' whose properties and evolution we wish to study. Otherwise, we cannot create unit experiments to isolate the physics of interest and validate the models in our codes, something that cannot be done with the integrated experiments often done in HED. Moreover, these experiments in some cases involve combinations of solid and plasmas, or matter in the warm-dense matter state, where neither the theoretical approximations of solid state or of fully-ionized weakly-coupled plasmas can be used. In all cases, the capability of 'isochoric heating' ('flash' heating at constant density) is important. In some cases, the ability to selectively heat to different degrees different species within a target, whether mixed or adjacent to each other, is critical for the experiment. This capability requires the delivery of very high power densities, which require the conversion of the laser into very short and intense pulses of secondary radiation (electrons, ions, neutrons, x-rays). Otherwise, there is no possibility of a clean experiment to constrain the models, in the cases there are any, or inform the creation of one. Another typical requirement of these experiments is the ability to probe these exotic extreme conditions of matter with flexible and diverse sources of secondary radiation. Without a high-intensity high-power laser with some unique attributes available on Trident today (e.g., ultra-high laser-puls

Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

422

Advanced Distillation: Programs Proposed to DOE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPRI has provided proposal preparation assistance and offered cost share funding assistance for two projects proposed in 2000. EPRI is highly interested, since this technology is applicable in all distillation systems, and since it will increase electric load in capacity increase revamps, probably the best economic targets in the U.S., since capital savings are best here. The approach can typically reduce energy use requirements, cooling (water) requirements, and environmental emissions per pound of distillate by 50%, while substantially reducing capital requirements for capacity increase revamps and new construction. If just 20% of all U.S. distillation were revamped by this approach as apposed to conventional, about 5x10^14 BTUs per year in energy use could be avoided, while increasing production by about 20%. Both the proposed petroleum refining (not awarded) and chemical industry programs and participants are described. As of this writing (1/31/01), chemical industry award selections have not yet been made.

Woinsky, S. G.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Guide for Preparation of Contract Cost Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 3610 Collins Ferry Road 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 880 P.O. Box 10940, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 This guide is available on the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory web site at: http://www.netl.doe.gov/business/index.html TABLE OF CONTENTS GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rounding Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Format and Content of the Cost Proposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cost Proposal Preparation Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

424

NRC proposes new reactor embrittlement regulations  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has proposed amending its regulations regarding embrittlement of pressure vessels in commercial nuclear power reactors. The amendments, which include clarifying the pressurized thermal shock requirements, changing the fracture toughness requirements and establishing new requirements for thermal annealing of a reactor pressure vessel, were prompted in part by NRC`s 1990 inspection of the reactor pressure vessel at the Yankee Rowe nuclear plant in Massachusetts. NRC`s proposed changes would establish a screening criterion for both the rate of irradiation embrittlement or RPV materials and fracture toughness, above which a plant cannot continue to be operated safely.

Newman, P.

1994-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

425

Measurement and Evaluation of Ultra-fine Particle Emissions from Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Evaluation of Ultra-fine Particle Emissions from Laser Measurement and Evaluation of Ultra-fine Particle Emissions from Laser Printers Speaker(s): Tunga Salthammer Date: October 9, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Hugo Destaillats Several publications have recently appeared which describe the release of ultra-fine particles (UFPs) from hardcopy devices not only in chamber tests but also under real room conditions. Due to assumed health impacts attributed to UFPs this subject currently receives substantial public attention. For the characterization of emitted UFPs from laser printers, different test methods (box chamber tests, flow chamber tests, furnace tests) and analytical techniques (SMPS, FMPS, VHTDMA, GC/MS, Headspace/MS, thermography, etc...) were applied. It could be shown that the release of

426

Exciton fine-structure splitting of telecom wavelength single quantum dots: statistics and external strain tuning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a charge tunable device, we investigate the fine structure splitting of neutral excitons in single long-wavelength (1.1\\mu m response of the splitting to the external strain, including positive and negative tuning slopes, different tuning ranges, and linear and parabolic dependencies, indicating that these physical parameters depend strongly on the unique microscopic structure of the individual quantum dot. To better understand the experimental results, we apply a phenomenological model describing the exciton polarization and fine-structure splitting under uniaxial strain. The model predicts that, with an increased experimental strain tuning range, the fine-structure can be effectively canceled for select telecom wavelength dots using uniaxial strain. These results are promising for the generation of on-demand entangled photon pairs at telecom wavelengths.

Luca Sapienza; Ralph N. E. Malein; Christopher E. Kuklewicz; Peter E. Kremer; Kartik Srinivasan; Andrew Griffiths; Edmund Clarke; Ming Gong; Richard J. Warburton; Brian D. Gerardot

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

427

Localized electrical fine tuning of passive microwave and radio frequency devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for the localized electrical fine tuning of passive multiple element microwave or RF devices in which a nonlinear dielectric material is deposited onto predetermined areas of a substrate containing the device. An appropriate electrically conductive material is deposited over predetermined areas of the nonlinear dielectric and the signal line of the device for providing electrical contact with the nonlinear dielectric. Individual, adjustable bias voltages are applied to the electrically conductive material allowing localized electrical fine tuning of the devices. The method of the present invention can be applied to manufactured devices, or can be incorporated into the design of the devices so that it is applied at the time the devices are manufactured. The invention can be configured to provide localized fine tuning for devices including but not limited to coplanar waveguides, slotline devices, stripline devices, and microstrip devices.

Findikoglu, Alp T. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

PARTICULATE CHARACTERIZATION AND ULTRA LOW-NOx BURNER FOR THE CONTROL OF NO{sub x} AND PM{sub 2.5} FOR COAL FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

In response to the serious challenge facing coal-fired electric utilities with regards to curbing their NO{sub x} and fine particulate emissions, Babcock and Wilcox and McDermott Technology, Inc. conducted a project entitled, ''Particulate Characterization and Ultra Low-NO{sub x} Burner for the Control of NO{sub x} and PM{sub 2.5} for Coal Fired Boilers.'' The project included pilot-scale demonstration and characterization of technologies for removal of NO{sub x} and primary PM{sub 2.5} emissions. Burner development and PM{sub 2.5} characterization efforts were based on utilizing innovative concepts in combination with sound scientific and fundamental engineering principles and a state-of-the-art test facility. Approximately 1540 metric tonnes (1700 tons) of high-volatile Ohio bituminous coal were fired. Particulate sampling for PM{sub 2.5} emissions characterization was conducted in conjunction with burner testing. Based on modeling recommendations, a prototype ultra low-NO{sub x} burner was fabricated and tested at 100 million Btu/hr in the Babcock and Wilcox Clean Environment Development Facility. Firing the unstaged burner with a high-volatile bituminous Pittsburgh 8 coal at 100 million Btu/hr and 17% excess air achieved a NO{sub x} goal of 0.20 lb NO{sub 2}/million Btu with a fly ash loss on ignition (LOI) of 3.19% and burner pressure drop of 4.7 in H{sub 2}O for staged combustion. With the burner stoichiometry set at 0.88 and the overall combustion stoichiometry at 1.17, average NO{sub x} and LOI values were 0.14 lb NO{sub 2}/million Btu and 4.64% respectively. The burner was also tested with a high-volatile Mahoning 7 coal. Based on the results of this work, commercial demonstration is being pursued. Size classified fly ash samples representative of commercial low-NO{sub x} and ultra low-NO{sub x} combustion of Pittsburgh 8 coal were collected at the inlet and outlet of an ESP. The mass of size classified fly ash at the ESP outlet was sufficient to evaluate the particle size distribution, but was of insufficient size to permit reliable chemical analysis. The size classified fly ash from the inlet of the ESP was used for detailed chemical analyses. Chemical analyses of the fly ash samples from the ESP outlet using a high volume sampler were performed for comparison to the size classified results at the inlet. For all test conditions the particulate removal efficiency of the ESP exceeded 99.3% and emissions were less than the NSPS limits of {approx}48 mg/dscm. With constant combustion conditions, the removal efficiency of the ESP increased as the ESP voltage and Specific Collection Area (SCA) increased. The associated decrease in particle emissions occurred in size fractions both larger and smaller than 2.5 microns. For constant ESP voltage and SCA, the removal efficiency for the ultra low-NO{sub x} combustion ash (99.4-99.6%) was only slightly less than for the low-NO{sub x} combustion ash (99.7%). The decrease in removal efficiency was accompanied by a decrease in ESP current. The emission of PM{sub 2.5} from the ESP did not change significantly as a result of the change in combustion conditions. Most of the increase in emissions was in the size fraction greater than 2.5 microns, indicating particle re-entrainment. These results may be specific to the coal tested in this program. In general, the concentration of inorganic elements and trace species in the fly ash at the ESP inlet was dependent on the particle size fraction. The smallest particles tended to have higher concentrations of inorganic elements/trace species than larger particles. The concentration of most elements by particle size range was independent of combustion condition and the concentration of soluble ions in the fly ash showed little change with combustion condition when evaluated on a carbon free basis.

Ralph Bailey; Hamid Sarv; Jim Warchol; Debi Yurchison

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: RETHINKING THE TURING TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS: RETHINKING THE TURING TEST An Exhibition of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments seeks designs that creatively reinterpret the Turing Test, which Alan Turing originally posed as a dialogic interrogation of a human and computer. In the test, an interrogator poses

Heller, Eric

430

STATE OF CALIFORNIA DUTY STATEMENT PROPOSED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and technology innovators and markets regarding RD&D objectives, opportunities and impacts. The incumbent informs for program analysis and planning activities. Research economic, market and technology issues. ServeSTATE OF CALIFORNIA DUTY STATEMENT PROPOSED CEC-004 (Revised 04/07) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

431

BOSTON UNIVERSITY CHARLES RIVER CAMPUS PROPOSAL SUMMARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research involve the following?) Requested from Total Project Yes/No Protocol, Date of Most Sponsor Costs Dept. Tel. Fax E-mail Campus Address Co-PI Project Title Funding Agency Division Subcontract (Prime) Program Officer Tel. Agency Deadline Proposed Year Entire Project Effective Dates of Project (MM

Goldberg, Bennett

432

CALL FOR PROPOSALS ATLANTIC BLUEFIN TUNA RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CALL FOR PROPOSALS ATLANTIC BLUEFIN TUNA RESEARCH JUNE 29, 2010 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Funding Opportunity Description: Northern bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus is the object of a major international fishery. Effective fisheries management will depend upon improvements in understanding of bluefin tuna biology

Berkson, Jim

433

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS LOUISIANA TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS LOUISIANA TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CENTER LTRC PROJECT NO. 14-3PF, SIO NO. 30001422 SOUTHEASTERN TRANSPORTATION CONSORTIUM SYNTHESES OF STATE-OF-PRACTICE Transportation Funding Sources and Alternatives in the Southeastern States Now and in the Future PROBLEM STATEMENT According

Harms, Kyle E.

434

Extended electron energy loss fine structure simulation of the local boron environment in sodium aluminoborosilicate glasses containing gadolinium  

SciTech Connect

Gadolinium can be dissolved in sodium-alumino-borosilicate glasses up to 47 wt% in a baseline borosilicate glass (mol%) 20 B2O3, 5 Al2O3, 60 SiO2,and 20 Na2O. Understanding of Gd dissolution in borosilicate melts is important in glass formulation optimization. Electron energy loss fine structure (ELFS) spectroscopy is chosen, which provides well resolved local atomic structure information for both amorphous and crystalline materials with high sensitivity to low Z elements such as Al, B, Na, O, and Si where the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique faces experimental difficulty. In this study, we report our results of boron K-edge ELFS study. Two borosilicate glass samples with 30 and 47 mass% Gd2O3, B20Gd30 and B20Gd47were chosen for B K-edge ELFS study. EEL spectra were acquired on a Philips 430 TEM equipped with Gatan PEELS system 666 and EL/P 2.1 software with Custom function AcqLong. The ELFS data analysis was performed using UWELFS, UWXAFS and FEFF software. From our Gd solubility study, the local structure of Gd in the borate environment possibly resembles double chain structure found in crystalline Gd(BO2)3 as proposed by Chakraborty et al. The B/Gd ratio's in both glasses are smaller then 3, which means the excess Gd atoms in the Si-sites would be 17 and 60 mol% of the total Gd atoms, respectively according to the model, yet the local environment of borate sites saturated with Gd should be remained. To verity above hypothesis, the double chain structure model was applied to fit boron K-edge. The model was shown to well fit experimental boron K-edge EELS spectra for both glasses with some degree of distance distortion which is understandable in amorphous structure. Therefore, it is very likely that Gd stabilized in borate sites has a local structure resembling the double chain Gd(BO2)3 structure as proposed by our solubility study and literature.

Qian, Morris (Charles Evans & Associates) [Charles Evans & Associates; Li, Hong (PPG Industries, Inc) [PPG Industries, Inc; Li, Liyu (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB); Strachan, Denis M.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)) [BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

IRC Budget Proposal spreadsheet example | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IRC Budget Proposal spreadsheet example IRC Budget Proposal spreadsheet example An example budget proposal for NEUP Integrated Research Project. Example Budget spreadsheet...

436

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application More Documents &...

437

Utility-Scale Smart Meter Deployments, Plans & Proposals | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plans & Proposals Utility-Scale Smart Meter Deployments, Plans & Proposals The Edison Foundation's chart of plans and proposals for utility-scale smart meter deployments....

438

ASKO Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-04/0614) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-040614) ASKO Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-040614) September 8, 2010 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that ASKO Appliances,...

439

Innovative Concept Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-03/0415...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-030415) Innovative Concept Appliances: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-030415) October 1, 2010 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that...

440

Observations on a Montana water quality proposal.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2005, a group of petitioners led by the Northern Plains Resource Council (NPRC) submitted a petition to revise water quality requirements to the Montana Board of Environmental Review (BER). Under Montana law, the BER had to consider the petition and either reject it or propose it as a new regulation. In September 2005, the BER announced proposed changes to the Montana water quality regulations. The proposal, which included almost the exact language found in the petition, was directed toward discharges of water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production. The key elements of the proposal included: (1) No discharges of CBNG water are allowed to Montana surface waters unless operators can demonstrate that injection to aquifers with the potential for later recovery of the water is not feasible. (2) When operators can demonstrate the injection is not feasible, the CBNG water to be discharged must meet very strict technology-based limits for multiple parameters. (3) The Montana water quality standards for the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) and electrical conductivity (EC) would be evaluated using the 7Q10 flow (lowest 7-consecutive-day flow in a 10-year period) rather than a monthly flow that is currently used. (4) SAR and EC would be reclassified as ''harmful parameters'', thereby greatly restricting the ability for CBNG discharges to be allowed under Montana's nondegradation regulations. The proposed regulations, if adopted in their current form, are likely to substantially reduce the amount of CBNG production in Montana. The impact also extends to Wyoming CBNG production through much greater restrictions on water quality that must be met at the interstate border.

Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fine particulate proposal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Cross-flow, filter-sorbet catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: A cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This synopsis describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation of brass: Particulate and ICPMS measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Femtosecond and nanosecond lasers were compared for ablating brass alloys. All operating parameters from both lasers were equal except for the pulse duration. The ablated aerosol vapor was collected on silicon substrates for particle size measurements or sent into an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The diameters and size distribution of particulates were measured from scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the collected ablated aerosol. SEM measurements showed that particles ablated using nanosecond pulses were single spherical entities ranging in diameter from several micrometers to several hundred nanometers. Primary particles ablated using femtosecond ablation were {approx}100 nm in diameter but formed large agglomerates. ICPMS showed enhanced signal intensity and stability using femtosecond compared to nanosecond laser ablation.

Liu, C.; Mao, X.L.; Mao, S.; Zeng, X.; Greif, R.; Russo, R.E.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Proceedings: Joint DOE/NSF Workshop on flow of particulates and fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These proceedings are the result of the Fifth DOR-NSF Workshop on fundamental research in the area of particulate two-phase flow and granular flow. The present collection of twenty contributions from universities and national laboratories is based on research projects sponsored by either the Department of Energy or the National Science Foundation. These papers illustrate some of the latest advances in theory, simulations, and experiments. The papers from the Workshop held September 29--October 1, 1993 have been separated into three basic areas: experiments, theory, and numerical simulations. A list of attendees at the workshop is included at the end of the proceedings. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to "float" in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields.

Hobson, David O. (Oak Ridge, TN); Alexeff, Igor (Oak Ridge, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Clinton, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to ''float'' in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields. 6 figs.