Sample records for financing global climate

  1. Financing a Global Deal on Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy Park at MethilGlobal Climate Changea Global

  2. Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy Park at MethilGlobal Climate Change

  3. UNDP-Catalysing Climate Finance: A Guidebook on Policy and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNDP-Catalysing Climate Finance: A Guidebook on Policy and Financing Options to Support Green, Low-Emission and Climate-Resilient Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool...

  4. Mexico-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) Name Mexico-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network (CTI PFAN) AgencyCompany...

  5. Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize...

  6. Global climatic catastrophes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budyko, M.I.; Golitsyn, G.S.; Izrael, A

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work inquires into global climatic catastrophes of the past, presenting data not easily available outside of the Socialist Countries, and applies these results to the study of future climatic developments, especially as they threaten in case of Nuclear Warfare - Nuclear Winter. The authors discuss probable after effects from the Soviet point of view on the basis of research, stressing the need to avoid all conflict which might lead to the next and final Global Climatic Catastrophy.

  7. Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for the Finance Sector Online Course Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change: Risks and Opportunities for...

  8. One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    One Year into Presidents Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing an Important Role Peter W. Davidson Peter W. Davidson Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office (LPO) Since...

  9. Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries AgencyCompany...

  10. EBRD-Sustainable Energy Initiative: Scaling Up Finance for Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type: Publications Website: www.ebrd.comdownloadsresearchfactsheetssei.pdf Cost: Free EBRD-Sustainable Energy Initiative: Scaling Up Finance for Climate Change Mitigation...

  11. Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Global Climate & Catastrophic Risk Forum 2012 A Joint Program with LA RIMS Education Day Rethinking Catastrophic Risk in Risk Management: Earthquake-Related Challenges Featuring: Keynote Speaker Dr. Frank Beuthin, Willis Group Holdings Plc. Yohei Miyamoto, Aon Risk Solutions Curtis deVera, Marsh

  12. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  13. World Bank-MENA Regional-NAMAs and Corresponding Climate Finance...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MENA Regional-NAMAs and Corresponding Climate Finance Instruments Jump to: navigation, search Name World Bank-MENA Regional-NAMAs and Corresponding Climate Finance Instruments...

  14. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

  15. Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Hot Topics Electric Vehicles Global Climate Change Green Building Hydraulic Fracturing Nuclear to global warming. The UKgovernment has just announced it is investing $1 billion in their development Green Living Industry Regulation Remediation Research and Technology Sustainability Waste Water Products

  16. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Anthropogenic climate change studies: scenario experiments (96) : : : : : : : : : 7 2 following its creation, the ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' team had to make its proofs in order

  17. Global climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, R.A.; Woodwell, G.M.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the climatic effects of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. It discusses the expected changes from the increases in trace gases and the extent to which the expected changes can be found in the climate record and in the retreat of glaciers. The use of ice cores in correlating atmospheric composition and climate is discussed. The response of terrestrial ecosystems as a biotic feedback is discussed. Possible responses are discussed, including reduction in fossil-fuel use, controls on deforestation, and reforestation. International aspects, such as the implications for developing nations, are addressed.

  18. From Climate Finance to Financing Green Growth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife EnergyFreight Best PracticeFrey NouvellesClimate

  19. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  20. Stopping Illicit Procurement: Lessons from Global Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, Gretchen; Kurzrok, Andrew J.

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Government regulators and the financial sector cooperate to combat money laundering and terrorist financing. This information-sharing relationship is built upon a strong legislative foundation and effective operational procedures. As with money-laundering and terrorist financing, halting the illicit procurement of dual-use commodities requires close coordination between government and industry. However, many of the legal and operational features present in financial threat cooperation do not exist in the export control realm. This article analyzes the applicability of financial industry cooperative measures to nonproliferation.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rates of Second Key Atmospheric Component On May 1, 2013, in Analysis, Capabilities, Climate, CRF, Energy, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling & Analysis, News, News &...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Energy Efficiency, Facilities, Global Climate & Energy, Materials Science, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, Partnership, Research &...

  3. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

  4. Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Supercomputers Fuel Global High-Resolution Climate Models Berkeley Lab Researcher Says Climate Science is Entering New...

  5. Sandia Energy - Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergyFailureGlobal Climate Models Home

  6. Soil degradation, global warming and climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.; Freire, Sergio Carneiro

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will demonstrate one methodology for assessing the potential large-scale impacts of soil degradation on African climates and water resources. In addition it will compare and contrast these impacts to those expected from global warming and compare impacts for differ...- ent watershed regions on the continent. 2. METHODS In order to make a similar comparison between pro- jected climate change scenarios due to global warming © Inter-Research 2001 *E-mail: feddema@ku.edu Soil degradation, global warming and climate...

  7. Global Climate Change: Environment, Technology and Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    . Appreciate the main aspects of hydropower resource estimation, turbine design, deployment and environmental AND ASSESSMENTS Global Climate Change: Environment, Technology and Society I am a Civil Hydraulic

  8. The private sector's capacity to manage climate risks and finance carbon neutral energy infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Craig A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the financial aspects of climate change relating to the private sector's capacity to manage climate risks and finance carbon neutral energy infrastructure. The dissertation examines (a) potential ...

  9. A High-Resolution Global Climate Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, P B

    2001-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A major factor limiting the quality and usefulness of global climate models is the coarse spatial resolution of these models. Global climate models today are typically run at resolutions of {approx}300 km (or even coarser) meaning that the smallest features represented are 300 km across. As Figure 1 shows, this resolution does not allow adequate representation of small or even large topographic features (e.g. the Sierra Nevada mountains). As a result of this and other problems, coarse-resolution global models do not come close to accurately simulating climate on regional spatial scales (e.g. within California). Results on continental and larger sales are much more realistic. An important consequence of this inability to simulate regional climate is that global climate model results cannot be used as the basis of assessments of potential societal impacts of climate change (e.g. effects on agriculture in the Central Valley, on management of water resources, etc.).

  10. Global air quality and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of Chemistry- Climate Models 5, 2010. 320 S. Wu,and R. Van Dorland, in Climate Change 2007: The PhysicalInter- governmental Panel on Climate Change, ed. D. Qin, M.

  11. First Steps Toward a Quality of Climate Finance Scorecard (QUODA-CF): Creating a Comparative Index to Assess International Climate Finance Contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sierra, Katherine; Roberts, Timmons; de Nevers, Michele; Langley, Claire; Smith, Cory

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Are climate finance contributor countries, multilateral aid agencies and specialized funds using widely accepted best practices in foreign assistance? How is it possible to measure and compare international climate finance contributions when there are as yet no established metrics or agreed definitions of the quality of climate finance? As a subjective metric, quality can mean different things to different stakeholders, while of donor countries, recipients and institutional actors may place quality across a broad spectrum of objectives. This subjectivity makes the assessment of the quality of climate finance contributions a useful and necessary exercise, but one that has many challenges. This work seeks to enhance the development of common definitions and metrics of the quality of climate finance, to understand what we can about those areas where climate finance information is available and shine a light on the areas where there is a severe dearth of data. Allowing for comparisons of the use of best practices across funding institutions in the climate sector could begin a process of benchmarking performance, fostering learning across institutions and driving improvements when incorporated in internal evaluation protocols of those institutions. In the medium term, this kind of benchmarking and transparency could support fundraising in contributor countries and help build trust with recipient countries. As a feasibility study, this paper attempts to outline the importance of assessing international climate finance contributions while describing the difficulties in arriving at universally agreed measurements and indicators for assessment. In many cases, data are neither readily available nor complete, and there is no consensus on what should be included. A number of indicators are proposed in this study as a starting point with which to analyze voluntary contributions, but in some cases their methodologies are not complete, and further research is required for a robust measurement tool to be created.

  12. CLIMATE CHANGE GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE · GLOBAL ECONOMY How to decarbonise the global economy Today's report on deep efforts of independent experts from 15 countries to find national pathways to making economies based-zero emissions sometime in the second half of this century. This deep cut should occur in a growing world economy

  13. WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Gary L.

    WHAT'S IN A NAME? GLOBAL WARMING VERSUS CLIMATE CHANGE May 2014 #12;What's In A Name? Global NATIONAL SURVEY STUDY 2: GLOBAL WARMING VS. CLIMATE CHANGE............................ 10 Is global?................................................................10 When you think of global warming / climate change, what comes first to mind

  14. Global climate change and international security.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karas, Thomas H.

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

  15. Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alliance Training Workshops on Mainstreaming Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Climate Change Alliance Training Workshop on...

  16. Issued March 2004 Global Climate & Energy Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    University Objective The objective of this project is to develop optimized nanocomposite materials for high of the project Design of Nanotube-Metal Nanocluster Complex Meeting the Hydrogen Storage Material RequirementsIssued March 2004 Global Climate & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY Nanomaterials Engineering

  17. Comments on: Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate,CobaltColdin679April

  18. Global fish production and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brander, K.M. [International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current global fisheries production of {approx}160 million tons is rising as a result of increases in aquaculture production. A number of climate-related threats to both capture fisheries and aquaculture are identified, but there is low confidence in predictions of future fisheries production because of uncertainty over future global aquatic net primary production and the transfer of this production through the food chain to human consumption. Recent changes in the distribution and productivity of a number of fish species can be ascribed with high confidence to regional climate variability, such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Future production may increase in some high-latitude regions because of warming and decreased ice cover, but the dynamics in low-latitude regions are giverned by different processes, and production may decline as a result of reduced vertical mixing of the water column and, hence, reduced recycling of nutrients. There are strong interactions between the effects of fishing and the effects of climate because fishing reduces the age, size, and geographic diversity of populations and the biodiversity of marine ecosystems, making both more sensitive to additional stresses such as climate change. Inland fisheries are additionally threatened by changes in precipiation and water management. The frequency and intensity of extreme climate events is likely to have a major impact on future fisheries production in both inland and marine systems. Reducing fishing mortality in the majority of fisheries, which are currently fully exploited or overexploited, is the pricipal feasible means of reducing the impacts of climate change.

  19. Parameterization of Urban Characteristics for Global Climate Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Trisha L.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of varying scales and effects of climate change on urban populations, urbanization must be included in global climate models (GCMs). To properly capture the spatial variability in urban areas, GCMs require global databases of urban extent and characteristics...

  20. Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on...

  1. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  2. UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative CONFERENCE ON CLIMATE CHANGE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Sponsored By UWM Global Climate Change and Sustainable Development Initiative Co Conference Description This conference will discuss the global issue of climate change in the regional

  3. Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Most estimates also indicate that climate change is likely to reduce agricultural productivity, production stability and incomes in some areas that already have high levels of...

  4. Global Climate Change: Opinions and Perceptions of Rural Nebraskans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Global Climate Change: Opinions and Perceptions of Rural Nebraskans 2008 Nebraska Rural Poll that they understand the issue of global climate change either fairly or very well. #12;Most rural Nebraskans believe climate change is already happening. #12;Most rural Nebraskans believe that our actions contribute

  5. AWI Conference on Global Climate Change Conference Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Hirosuke

    » slides (ppt) 10:15 » Break 10:45 » Food and Agriculture Issues How will climate change impact foodAWI Conference on Global Climate Change Conference Program APRU World Institute Workshop on Climate Board 2:30 » Climate Changes Overview Richard C.J. SOMERVILLE, Distinguished Professor, Scripps

  6. Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Global warming and Arctic climate. Raymond S. Bradley Climate System Research Center University of Massachusetts Amherst #12;How have global temperatures changed & why? 1. Average instrumental records from around the world; express all as anomalies from 1961-90 average #12;#12;Overall trend is upward ("global

  7. Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contracts with logging companies covering more than 15 million hectares of forest," the report stated with logging companies instead giving villages gifts of salt and beer worth less than $100. "In a contextIllegal logging threatens Congo's forests, global climate Illegal logging threatens Congo's forests

  8. alternative global climate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Sciences Websites Summary: A Statistical Analysis of Global Inter-Annual Climate Anomalies in Monthly Sea Surface Temperature Records. Jian Huang and Finbarr...

  9. U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment" report for United States Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by...

  10. Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector Global Climate Change and the Unique (?) Challenges Posed by the Transportation Sector 2002 DEER Conference...

  11. White House Conference on Global Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    President Clinton has directed the White House office on Environmental Policy to coordinate an interagency process to develop a plan to fulfill the commitment he made in his Earth Day address on April 21, 1993. This plan will become the cornerstone of the Climate Change Plan that will be completed shortly after the Rio Accord enters into force. The Office on Environmental Policy established the Interagency Climate Change Mitigation Group to draw on the expertise of federal agencies including the National Economic Council; the Council of Economic Advisors; the Office of Science and Technology Policy; the Office of Management and Budget; the National Security Council; the Domestic Policy Council; the Environmental Protection Agency; and the Departments of Energy, Transportation, Agriculture, Interior, Treasury, Commerce, and State. Working groups have been established to examine six key policy areas: energy demand, energy supply, joint implementation, methane and other gases, sinks, and transportation. The purpose of the White House Conference on Global Climate Change was to ``tap the real-world experiences`` of diverse participants and seek ideas and information for meeting the President`s goals. During the opening session, senior administration officials defined the challenge ahead and encouraged open and frank conversation about the best possible ways to meet it.

  12. Studies of dynamical processes affecting global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, C.; Cooper, D.; Eichinger, W. [and others

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main objective was, by a combined theoretical and observational approach, to develop improved models of dynamic processes in the oceans and atmosphere and to incorporate them into large climate codes, chiefly in four main areas: numerical physics, chemistry, water vapor, and ocean-atmosphere interactions. Main areas of investigation included studies of: cloud parameterizations for global climate codes, Lidar and the planetary boundary layer, chemistry, climate variability using coupled ocean-atmospheric models, and numerical physical methods. This project employed a unique approach that included participation of a number of University of California faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students who collaborated with Los Alamos research staff on specific tasks, thus greatly enhancing the research output. Overall accomplishments during the sensing of the atmospheric planetary were: (1) first two- and three-dimensional remote sensing of the atmospheric planetary boundary layer using Lidars, (2) modeling of 20-year cycle in both pressure and sea surface temperatures in North Pacific, (3) modeling of low frequency internal variability, (4) addition of aerosols to stratosphere to simulate Pinatubo effect on ozone, (5) development of fast, comprehensive chemistry in the troposphere for urban pollution studies, (6) new prognostic cloud parameterization in global atmospheric code remedied problems with North Pacific atmospheric circulation and excessive equatorial precipitation, (7) development of a unique aerosol analysis technique, the aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), which allows real-time analysis of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles, and (8) numerical physics applying Approximate Inertial Manifolds to ocean circulation. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Frontier The Role Played by Oceans in Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty Quantification, the Next Department University of Arizona October 11, 2008 #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate, Undergraduate Students: 2. UQGQG #12;Global Warming What is Climate? Ocean's Role in Climate Change Uncertainty

  14. Climate-Smart Agriculture: Policies, Practices and Financing for Food

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityCleanInformation Climate andSecurity,

  15. Nepal-Climate Finance Readiness Programme | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen EnergyNelsoniX Ltd Jump to: navigation, searchNepal-Climate

  16. UNDP-Climate Finance Options Platform | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin Baxin HydropowerTrinityTurnbull HydroUK CentreMechanism JumpClimate

  17. Colombia-Climate Finance Readiness Programme | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew York: EnergyCoeur dColmar, Pennsylvania:Colombia-Climate

  18. Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    1 Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data David G. Long Brigham Young CA 91109 ben@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov Sasan.Saatchi@jpl.nasa.gov Cheryl Bertoia U. S. National Ice Center: Long, D. G., M. R. Drinkwater, B. Holt, S. Saatchi, and C. Bertoia, Global ice and land climate studies

  19. Global Climate Change: Why Understanding the Scientific Enterprise Matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Global Climate Change: Why Understanding the Scientific Enterprise Matters Ellen MosleyPolar/ByrdPolarhttp://bprc.osu.edu/ Understanding Climate Change Risks and Identifying Opportunities for Mitigation & Adaptation in Ohio Ohio State University, May 15, 2014 #12;Key Points Earth's climate is changing - the world is warming ­ that debate

  20. UNDP-Catalysing Climate Finance: A Guidebook on Policy and Financing

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas,UGI Utilities

  1. Uganda-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas,UGIURDBCOSO EGS1/12/20090 Bid5094(CTI

  2. Ukraine-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas,UGIURDBCOSO EGS1/12/20090Uganda:(CTI

  3. Trinidad and Tobago-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75248TrigenAdvisory Network

  4. Expanding Global Cooperation on Climate Justice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    in evaluating the financial architecture necessary to support just and sustainable climate interventions

  5. Sweet-Talking the Climate? Evaluating Sugar Mill Cogeneration and Climate Change Financing in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranganathan, Malini; Haya, Barbara; Kirpekar, Sujit

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004).   Bagasse  Cogeneration  ??  Global  Review  and ?Promotion  of  biomass  cogeneration  with  power  export WADE  2004.   Bagasse  Cogeneration  –  Global  Review  and 

  6. Chapter 1 Climate monitoring The European Commission strategy for global climate change studies and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    Chapter 1 Climate monitoring The European Commission strategy for global climate change studies, Jerusalem, Israel Precipitation as a centerpiece in Climate Change Water is the lifeblood of our livelihood on Earth. Temperature-driven inhabitable areas are due to too cold temperatures, and not due to excessively

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to address the most challenging and demanding climate-change issues. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) is designed to accel-erate the development and applica-tion of...

  8. RICCI Sophie Global Change and Climate Modeling Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RICCI Sophie Global Change and Climate Modeling Team CERFACS - Toulouse, FRANCE Technical Report TR covariance matrix#17;. This hypothesis stems from the T S water mass properties conservation over long term

  9. Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing Enough Home > Blogs > Dc's blog Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(107) Contributor 5 November, 2014 - 14:49 The latest...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... Sandia Participated in the...

  11. Circular Retribution: The Effects of Climate Change on U .S. and Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prescher, Hannes

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of global climate change on U.S. agriculture. JournalClimate Change and the Global Harvest: Potential Impacts of the Greenhouse Effect on Agriculture. ”ensuing change in climate patterns, are making agriculture a

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Global Climate & Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director of Sandia's Geoscience, Climate, and Consequence Effects Center, spoke on "Hydraulic Fracturing: The Role of Government-Sponsored R&D" as part of a session on "The...

  13. Global Climate Projections Coordinating Lead Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olver, Peter

    (UK), G.-K. Plattner (Switzerland), J. Räisänen (Finland), A. Rinke (Germany), E. Roeckner (Germany in the 21st Century ............. 764 10.3.3 Changes in Ocean/Ice and High-Latitude Climate

  14. Global climate change: Social and economic research issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.; Snow, J.; Jacobson, H. [eds.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop was designed to bring together a group of scholars, primarily from the social sciences, to explore research that might help in dealing with global climate change. To illustrate the state of present understanding, it seemed useful to focus this workshop on three broad questions that are involved in coping with climate change. These are: (1) How can the anticipated economic costs and benefits of climate change be identified; (2) How can the impacts of climate change be adjusted to or avoided; (3) What previously studied models are available for institutional management of the global environment? The resulting discussions may (1) identify worthwhile avenues for further social science research, (2) help develop feedback for natural scientists about research information from this domain needed by social scientists, and (3) provide policymakers with the sort of relevant research information from the social science community that is currently available. Individual papers are processed separately for the database.

  15. Funding for adaptation to climate change : the case of Surat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Toral

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for cities to adapt to climate change is widely acknowledged, yet the question of adaptation finance remains uncertain. Unable to access global climate funds, cities must seek out alternative sources to support ...

  16. Economic Impacts from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program: Using Property-Assessed Clean Energy Financing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Cliburn, J. K.; Coughlin, J.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the economic impacts (including job creation) from the Boulder County, Colorado, ClimateSmart Loan Program (CSLP), an example of Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing. The CSLP was the first test of PACE financing on a multi-jurisdictional level (involving individual cities as well as the county government). It was also the first PACE program to comprehensively address energy efficiency measures and renewable energy, and it was the first funded by a public offering of both taxable and tax-exempt bonds.

  17. Emissions Pricing to Stabilize Global Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and the Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research (CEEPR). These two centers bridge many key areas an interdisciplinary group from two established research centers at MIT: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS that are most relevant to economic, social, and environmental effects. In turn, the greenhouse gas

  18. PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron-Gafford, Greg

    PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND GLOBAL CHANGE CAN CLIMATE DRIVEN CHANGES IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS BE USED TO PREDICT in photosynthesis, and thus substrate supply, influence the rate of ecosystem respiration (Re). Further- more in photosynthesis might result in concomitant changes in both the rate, and temperature-sensitivity, of Re. Re

  19. Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use -Part III -U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash | Climate Science & Politics Climate Science & Politics Home About the Site Global Food Shortage Linked to Biofuel Use - Part III - U.S. Backlash Posted in May 24th, 2008 by Climate Patrol in Biofuel, Food Crisis, Sustainability In the last few

  20. Local and Seasonal Effects in the U.S. of Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckaus, Richard S.

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Though the facts of global climate change are beyond doubt, there has been relatively limited information about its local consequences. Global climate models and their derivatives have provided often differing and unspecific ...

  1. Global Priority Conservation Areas in the Face of 21st Century Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Junsheng; Lin, Xin; Chen, Anping; Peterson, A. Townsend; Ma, Keping; Bertzky, Monika; Ciais, Philippe; Kapos, Valerie; Peng, Changhui; Poulter, Benjamin

    2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In an era when global biodiversity is increasingly impacted by rapidly changing climate, efforts to conserve global biodiversity may be compromised if we do not consider the uneven distribution of climate-induced threats. Here, via a novel...

  2. February 6, 2001 GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    February 6, 2001 GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACT ON AGRICULTURE Bruce A McCarl, Texas A . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. Agriculture and Climate Change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2.1 Climate Change Effects on Agricultural Productivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2

  3. Global and Sahel Regional Biophysical Processes, Vegetation Dynamics, and Climate Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Guoqiong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupling processes . 137 A.2 Dynamicand dynamic VBP over global land, but the climate-carbon coupling process,

  4. How strong is carbon cycle-climate feedback under global warming?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    and physical climate system in a global warming scenario is studied using an Earth system model including

  5. FINANCE & ACCOUNTING FINANCE & ACCOUNTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    FINANCE & ACCOUNTING FINANCE & ACCOUNTING Director of Finance & Accounting Rich Rechif Accounts Katherine Ivko PURCHASING Purchasing Manager Small Business Liaison Officer Denise Carroll Finance

  6. The economics of long-term global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to provide an overview of economic issues and research relevant to possible, long-term global climate change. It is primarily a critical survey, not a statement of Administration or Department policy. This report should serve to indicate that economic analysis of global change is in its infancy few assertions about costs or benefits can be made with confidence. The state of the literature precludes any attempt to produce anything like a comprehensive benefit-cost analysis. Moreover, almost all the quantitative estimates regarding physical and economic effects in this report, as well as many of the qualitative assertions, are controversial. Section I provides background on greenhouse gas emissions and their likely climatic effects and on available policy instruments. Section II considers the costs of living with global change, assuming no substantial efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Section III considers costs of reducing these emissions, though the available literature does not contain estimates of the costs of policies that would, on the assumptions of current climate models, prevent climate change altogether. The individual sections are not entirely compartmentalized, but can be read independently if necessary.

  7. perspective: The responses of tropical forest species to global climate change: acclimate, adapt, migrate, or go extinct?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeley, Kenneth J; Rehm, Evan M; Machovina, Brian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    maps.  Nature Climate Change, 2, 182–185.   Bacles, S.   (1998)  Global  climate  change  and  tropical  forest 2011) Impacts  of  climate  change  on  the  world's  most 

  8. Global climate change and the mitigation challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Climate Models from the Joint Global Change Research Institute

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Staff at the Joint Institute develop and use models to simulate the economic and physical impacts of global change policy options. The GCAM, for example, gives analysts insight into how regional and national economies might respond to climate change mitigation policies including carbon taxes, carbon trading, and accelerated deployment of energy technology. Three available models are Phoenix, GCAM, and EPIC. Phoenix is a global, dynamic recursive, computable general equilibrium model that is solved in five-year time steps from 2005 through 2100 and divides the world into twenty-four regions. Each region includes twenty-six industrial sectors. Particular attention is paid to energy production in Phoenix. There are nine electricity-generating technologies (coal, natural gas, oil, biomass, nuclear, hydro, wind, solar, and geothermal) and four additional energy commodities: crude oil, refined oil products, coal, and natural gas. Phoenix is designed to answer economic questions related to international climate and energy policy and international trade. Phoenix replaces the Second Generation Model (SGM) that was formerly used for general equilibrium analysis at JGCRI. GCAM is the Global Change Assessment Model, a partial equilibrium model of the world with 14 regions. GCAM operates in 5 year time steps from 1990 to 2095 and is designed to examine long-term changes in the coupled energy, agriculture/land-use, and climate system. GCAM includes a 151-region agriculture land-use module and a reduced form carbon cycle and climate module in addition to its incorporation of demographics, resources, energy production and consumption. The model has been used extensively in a number of assessment and modeling activities such as the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF), the U.S. Climate Change Technology Program, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and IPCC assessment reports. GCAM is now freely available as a community model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) Model is a process-based agricultural systems model composed of simulation components for weather, hydrology, nutrient cycling, pesticide fate, tillage, crop growth, soil erosion, crop and soil management and economics. Staff at PNNL have been involved in the development of this model by integrating new sub-models for soil carbon dynamics and nitrogen cycling.

  10. Structural Design Feasibility Study for the Global Climate Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewin,K.F.; Nagy, J.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neon, Inc. is proposing to establish a Global Change Experiment (GCE) Facility to increase our understanding of how ecological systems differ in their vulnerability to changes in climate and other relevant global change drivers, as well as provide the mechanistic basis for forecasting ecological change in the future. The experimental design was initially envisioned to consist of two complementary components; (A) a multi-factor experiment manipulating CO{sub 2}, temperature and water availability and (B) a water balance experiment. As the design analysis and cost estimates progressed, it became clear that (1) the technical difficulties of obtaining tight temperature control and maintaining elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels within an enclosure were greater than had been expected and (2) the envisioned study would not fit into the expected budget envelope if this was done in a partially or completely enclosed structure. After discussions between NEON management, the GCE science team, and Keith Lewin, NEON, Inc. requested Keith Lewin to expand the scope of this design study to include open-field exposure systems. In order to develop the GCE design to the point where it can be presented within a proposal for funding, a feasibility study of climate manipulation structures must be conducted to determine design approaches and rough cost estimates, and to identify advantages and disadvantages of these approaches including the associated experimental artifacts. NEON, Inc requested this design study in order to develop concepts for the climate manipulation structures to support the NEON Global Climate Experiment. This study summarizes the design concepts considered for constructing and operating the GCE Facility and their associated construction, maintenance and operations costs. Comparisons and comments about experimental artifacts, construction challenges and operational uncertainties are provided to assist in selecting the final facility design. The overall goal of this report is to provide a cost and technological basis for selection of the appropriate GCE Facility design.

  11. Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dommenget, Dietmar

    Conceptual understanding of climate change with a globally resolved energy balance model Dietmar on the surface energy balance by very simple repre- sentations of solar and thermal radiation, the atmospheric and cold regions to warm more than other regions. Keywords Climate dynamics Á Climate change Á Climate

  12. DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DO GLOBAL WARMING AND CLIMATE CHANGE REPRESENT A SERIOUS THREAT TO OUR WELFARE AND ENVIRONMENT? By Michael E. Mann I. Introduction The subjects of "global warming" and "climate change" have become parts of both the popular lexicon and the public discourse. Discussions of global warming often evoke passionate

  13. Same Science, Differing Policies; The Saga of Global Climate Change Eugene B. Skolnikoff *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the E.U. itself. The possibility of global warming that raises this fear of unacceptable levels of science. The global warming that it is feared may lead to climate change is not yet observable in everydaySame Science, Differing Policies; The Saga of Global Climate Change Eugene B. Skolnikoff

  14. Climate changes mirror global warming predictions BY THOMAS CROWLEY Guest columnist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate changes mirror global warming predictions BY THOMAS CROWLEY Guest columnist The Herald" and must reflect, at least in part, the climate system response to the increase in global warming. What if we wanted to prevent global warming. This is just doomsday speaking of the same type that he

  15. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature09407 Global metabolic impacts of recent climate warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huey, Raymond B.

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature09407 Global metabolic impacts of recent climate warming Michael E. Dillon and projected climate warming2,13,14 . Global warming is probably having profound and diverse effects phenology3,4 , community interactions5 , genetics3,6 and extinctions7 have been attributed to recent global

  16. A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Vast Machine Computer Models, Climate Data, and the Politics of Global Warming Paul N. Edwards models, climate data, and the politics of global warming / Paul N. Edwards. p. cm. Includes. Climatology--History. 3. Meteorology--History. 4. Climatology--Technological innovation. 5. Global temperature

  17. Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Increased Climate Variability Is More Visible Than Global Warming: A General System@utep.edu Abstract While global warming is a statistically confirmed long-term phenomenon, its most visible than the global warming itself. 1 Formulation of the Problem What is global warming. The term "global

  18. Climate change and agriculture : global and regional effects using an economic model of international trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical estimates of the economic welfare implications of the impact of climate change on global agricultural production are made. Agricultural yield changes resulting from climate scenarios associated with a doubling ...

  19. Preliminary global assessment of terrestrial biodiversity consequences of sea level rise mediated by climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menon, Shaily; Soberó n, Jorge; Li, Xingong; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable attention has focused on the climatic effects of global climate change on biodiversity, but few analyses and no broad assessments have evaluated the effects of sea level rise on biodiversity. Taking advantage of new maps of marine...

  20. Post-2020 climate agreements in the major economies assessed in the light of global models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavoni, Massimo; Kriegler, Elmar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Aboumahboub, Tino; Bowen, Alex; Calvin, Katherine V.; Campiglio, Emanuele; Kober, Tom; Jewell, Jessica; Luderer, Gunnar; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David; van Sluisveld, Mariesse; Zimmer, Anne; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated assessment models can help in quantifying the implications of international climate agreements and regional climate action. This paper reviews scenario results from model intercomparison projects to explore different possible outcomes of post-2020 climate negotiations, recently announced pledges and their relation to the 2°C target. We provide key information for all the major economies, such as the year of emission peaking, regional carbon budgets and emissions allowances. We highlight the distributional consequences of climate policies, and discuss the role of carbon markets for financing clean energy investments, and achieving efficiency and equity.

  1. THE IMPACT OF THERMAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH ON GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, Patrick [Arizona State University; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Otanicar, Todd [University of Tulsa; Phelan, Bernadette [Phelan Research Solutions, Inc.; Prasher, Ravi [Arizona State University; Taylor, Robert [University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Tyagi, Himanshu [Indian Institute of Technology Ropar, India

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate change is recognized by many people around the world as being one of the most pressing issues facing our society today. The thermal engineering research community clearly plays an important role in addressing this critical issue, but what kind of thermal engineering research is, or will be, most impactful? In other words, in what directions should thermal engineering research be targeted in order to derive the greatest benefit with respect to global climate change? To answer this question we consider the potential reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, coupled with potential economic impacts, resulting from thermal engineering research. Here a new model framework is introduced that allows a technological, sector-by-sector analysis of GHG emissions avoidance. For each sector, we consider the maximum reduction in CO2 emissions due to such research, and the cost effectiveness of the new efficient technologies. The results are normalized on a country-by-country basis, where we consider the USA, the European Union, China, India, and Australia as representative countries or regions. Among energy supply-side technologies, improvements in coal-burning power generation are seen as having the most beneficial CO2 and economic impacts. The one demand-side technology considered, residential space cooling, offers positive but limited impacts. The proposed framework can be extended to include additional technologies and impacts, such as water consumption.

  2. Biogeophysical effects of CO2-fertilization on global climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, G; Caldeira, K; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Delire, C; Phillips, T J

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2}-fertilization affects plant growth, which modifies surface physical properties, altering the surface albedo, and fluxes of sensible and latent heat. We investigate how such CO{sub 2}-fertilization effects on vegetation and surface properties would affect the climate system. Using a global three-dimensional climate-carbon model that simulates vegetation dynamics, we compare two multi-century simulations: a ''Control'' simulation with no emissions, and a ''Physiol-noGHG'' simulation where physiological changes occur as a result of prescribed CO{sub 2} emissions, but where CO{sub 2}-induced greenhouse warming is not included. In our simulations, CO{sub 2}-fertilization produces warming; we obtain an annual- and global-mean warming of about 0.65 K (and land-only warming of 1.4 K) after 430 years. This century-scale warming is mostly due to a decreased surface albedo associated with the expansion of the Northern Hemisphere boreal forests. On decadal time scales, the CO{sub 2} uptake by afforestation should produce a cooling effect that exceeds this albedo-based warming; but if the forests remain in place, the CO{sub 2}-enhanced-greenhouse effect would diminish as the ocean equilibrates with the atmosphere, whereas the albedo effect would persist. Thus, on century time scales, there is the prospect for net warming from CO{sub 2}-fertilization of the land biosphere. Further study is needed to confirm and better quantify our results.

  3. Pace of shifts in climate regions increases with global temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahlstein, Irina

    Human-induced climate change causes significant changes in local climates, which in turn lead to changes in regional climate zones. Large shifts in the world distribution of Köppen–Geiger climate classifications by the end ...

  4. Energy Conclave 2010 The global energy concerns of depleting fossil fuels and climate change have put

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    at the rapidly increasing energy demand, the limited supply of fossil fuels and the increased concern over globalEnergy Conclave 2010 8th - 15th The global energy concerns of depleting fossil fuels and climate

  5. The role of US agricultural and forest activities in global climate change mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, En

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005 the highest global surface temperature ever was recorded. A virtual consensus exists today among scientists that global warming is underway and that human greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are a significant cause. Possible mitigation of climate...

  6. Impact of emissions, chemistry, and climate on atmospheric carbon monoxide : 100-year predictions from a global chemistry-climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    The possible trends for atmospheric carbon monoxide in the next 100 yr have been illustrated using a coupled atmospheric chemistry and climate model driven by emissions predicted by a global economic development model. ...

  7. Opinion: Canada's efforts accelerate a global tragedy of the climate commons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opinion: Canada's efforts accelerate a global tragedy of the climate commons BY MAUREEN RYAN, KEN's statement that Canada "won't take `no' for an answer" regarding the impending U.S. decision about, Financial Post Opinion: Canada's efforts accelerate a global tragedy of the climate... http

  8. Climatic Impact of Global-Scale Deforestation: Radiative versus Nonradiative Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Climatic Impact of Global-Scale Deforestation: Radiative versus Nonradiative Processes EDOUARD L­ocean­atmosphere GCM is used to explore the biogeophysical impact of large-scale deforestation on surface climate that the surface albedo increase owing to deforestation has a cooling effect of 21.36 K globally. On the other hand

  9. Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limpasuvan, Varavut

    Can ozone depletion and global warming interact to produce rapid climate change? Dennis L. Hartmann of Climate Change (IPCC) assess- ment of the status of global warming, which reported that winter stratospheric ozone depletion and greenhouse warming are possible. These interactions may be responsible

  10. Global climate processes: Role of cirrus clouds for present and future PI: Ulrike Lohmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    26 P 2.2 CCC Global climate processes: Role of cirrus clouds for present and future climate PI nuclei affect cirrus clouds in the present and future climate? Does mineral dust lead to cirrus clouds the longwave radiation and could lead to a net cooling. Thus, it is important to better understand the role

  11. Climate change and the socioeconomics of global food production: A quantitative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    1 Climate change and the socioeconomics of global food production: A quantitative analysis of how, Andrew J. Dougill and Piers M. Forster August 2010 Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Working Paper No. 29 #12;2 The Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy (CCCEP) was established

  12. Global climate change and the scientific consensus Stephen Mulkey, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    1 Global climate change and the scientific consensus Stephen Mulkey, PhD Director of Research scientists. As scientists, our job is to present the data on climate change and to propose plausible recreate the Earth's climate in a laboratory bottle and change its composition to see what happens. Instead

  13. Global climate change is currently affecting many ecological systems and may have large impacts on agri-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be crucial in the tropics, where most agriculture is in rain-fed systems and climate change has a potentially of Biological Sciences. Synergies between Agricultural Intensification and Climate Change Could CreateArticles Global climate change is currently affecting many ecological systems and may have large

  14. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Buffered climate change effects in a Mediterranean pine species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL PAPER Buffered climate change effects in a Mediterranean pine Abstract Within-range effects of climatic change on tree growth at the sub-regional scale remain poorly- growth responses to climate change, the role of drought becomes even more complex in shaping communities

  15. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  16. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  17. California Wintertime Precipitation in Regional and Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, P M

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, wintertime precipitation from a variety of observational datasets, regional climate models (RCMs), and general circulation models (GCMs) is averaged over the state of California (CA) and compared. Several averaging methodologies are considered and all are found to give similar values when model grid spacing is less than 3{sup o}. This suggests that CA is a reasonable size for regional intercomparisons using modern GCMs. Results show that reanalysis-forced RCMs tend to significantly overpredict CA precipitation. This appears to be due mainly to overprediction of extreme events; RCM precipitation frequency is generally underpredicted. Overprediction is also reflected in wintertime precipitation variability, which tends to be too high for RCMs on both daily and interannual scales. Wintertime precipitation in most (but not all) GCMs is underestimated. This is in contrast to previous studies based on global blended gauge/satellite observations which are shown here to underestimate precipitation relative to higher-resolution gauge-only datasets. Several GCMs provide reasonable daily precipitation distributions, a trait which doesn't seem tied to model resolution. GCM daily and interannual variability is generally underpredicted.

  18. Assessing the effects of ocean diffusivity and climate sensitivity on the rate of global climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittner, Andreas

    sensitivity and ocean heat uptake on the rate of future climate change. We apply a range of values for climate a significant effect on the rate of transient climate change for high values of climate sensitivity, while values of climate sensitivity and low values of ocean diffusivity. Such high rates of change could

  19. Urban climate resilience : a global assessment of city adaptation plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katich, Kristina Noel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As policy makers accept climate change as an irrefutable threat, adaptation planning has emerged as a necessary action for countries, states, and municipalities. This thesis explores adaptive responses to climate change ...

  20. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s Fourth National Communication on Climate Change. A Reportclimate change can be assessed using data from national communicationscommunication were also reflected in the working drafts of the Spanish Climate Change

  1. How will changes in global climate influence California?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weare, B C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    future climate change impacts on water for agriculture andclimate change that will be important for California agriculture

  2. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results in 4° C global warming, sea level rise, specieslevels of greenhouse gases are responsible for incremental global warming.levels as that of the developing countries, the world would not today have faced the threat of global warming.

  3. An examination of urban heat island characteristics in a global climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Jackson, Trisha L.

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A parameterization for urban surfaces has been incorporated into the Community Land Model as part of the Community Climate System Model. The parameterization allows global simulation of the urban environment, in particular the temperature of cities...

  4. GLOBAL HYDRLOGIC PERSPECTIVES ON THE MID-CRETACEOUS GREENHOUSE CLIMATE (APTIAN-ALBIAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Marina B.

    2009-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the mid-Cretaceous greenhouse climate in the Aptian-Albian through the perspective of the global hydrologic cycle. Stable isotopic compositions of pedogenic and exposure surface carbonates presented ...

  5. Climate Change Influences on Global Distributions of Dengue and Chikungunya Virus Vectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Lindsay P.; Luther, Caylor; Moo-Llanes, David; Ramsey, Janine M.; Danis-Lozano, Rogelio; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This packet presents raster data files that accompany a manuscript submitted for publication to Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, titled “Climate Change Influences on Global Vector Distributions for Dengue and Chikungunya Viruses...

  6. Background: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems are affected.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    ." #12;Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Transportation Sources in Minnesota A Study gas (GHG) emissions from Minnesota's transportation sector. #12;Research Study Team UniversityBackground: Global Warming, 2009 1. Unequivocally, the climate is warming. Natural systems

  7. Sensitivity of Climate to Diapycnal Diffusivity: Part I. Equilibrium State; Part II. Global Warming Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalan, Fabio.

    Part I: The diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean is one of the least known parameters in current climate models. Measurements of this diffusivity are sparse and insufficient for compiling a global map. Inferences from inverse ...

  8. CO Capture, Reuse, and Storage Technologies2 for Mitigating Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO Capture, Reuse, and Storage Technologies2 for Mitigating Global Climate Change A White Paper Final Report DOE Order No. DE-AF22-96PC01257 Energy Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology 77 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 5. Geological Storage Technology

  9. Detection and Attribution of Climate Change : From global mean temperature change to climate extremes and high impact weather.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk will describe how evidence has grown in recent years for a human influence on climate and explain how the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change concluded that it is extremely likely (>95% probability) that human influence on climate has been the dominant cause of the observed global-mean warming since the mid-20th century. The fingerprint of human activities has also been detected in warming of the ocean, in changes in the global water cycle, in reductions in snow and ice, and in changes in some climate extremes. The strengthening of evidence for the effects of human influence on climate extremes is in line with long-held basic understanding of the consequences of mean warming for temperature extremes and for atmospheric moisture. Despite such compelling evidence this does not mean that every instance of high impact weather can be attributed to anthropogenic climate change, because climate variability is often a major factor in many locations, especially for rain...

  10. Global Change: Solutions? Combating climate change is local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    5% annual finance charge #12;Alternative Energy: Solar Photovoltaic Energy companies are targeting;Alternative Energy: Solar Photovoltaic Current electricity costs Cost of solar averaged over 20 years Includes residential and commercial buildings #12;Household Electricity: Solar Thermal ~5-10 year payback time #12

  11. Extinction Risk, Ecological Stress and Climate Change: How Species Respond to Changes in Global Biodiversity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Extinction Risk, Ecological Stress and Climate Change: How Species Respond to Changes in Global subordinate species less intelligent than us, at risk of extinction. In other words, anthropogenic activities have made other species sensitive to changes in climate and habitat vulnerable to extinction [Parry et

  12. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas intensity by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame. For the purposes of the initiative, greenhouse gas intensity is defined as the ratio of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions to economic output.

  13. U.S. Greenhouse Gas Intensity and the Global Climate Change Initiative (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Administrations Global Climate Change Initiative. A key goal of the Climate Change Initiative is to reduce U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity-defined as the ratio of total U.S. GHG emissions to economic output-by 18% over the 2002 to 2012 time frame.

  14. THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    to absorption of solar radiation in the climate system is found to be irrelevant to the maximized prop- erties from hot to cold places, thereby producing the kinetic energy of the fluid itself. His generalTHE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY

  15. National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment Energy and Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change will develop and advance partnerships that focus on transitioning the world to a new "low carbon" and "climate resilient" energy system. It will emphasize putting ideas into action - moving forward on policy and practice.

  16. How will changes in global climate influence California?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weare, B C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, UC Davis.climate change impacts on water for agriculture and otherincreased flooding and reduced water availability, higher

  17. adopting global climate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and biomass which are environmentally clean is aimed at diversification of the energy matrix, mitigating against climate change and providing alternatives to the use of...

  18. Projecting Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon Budgets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Projecting Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon Impacts of Global Climate Change on the U.S. Forest and Agriculture Sectors and Carbon Budgets of possible deleterious effects of climate change on agricultural and forest productivity has been raised

  19. RISNEWS DECEMBER2007NO Global climate and energy challenges can be solved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØNEWSNO 22007PAGE1 RISØNEWS DECEMBER2007NO 2 Global climate and energy challenges can be solved). Within the field of sustainable energy, we conduct research into bioenergy, fuel cells and hydrogen, emerging energy tech- nologies, society and systems, and wind power. If we wish to limit the global

  20. Project EARTH-12-SHELL1: Global expression of climatic and palaeoceanographic events in black shales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    geochronology, the expression of the global Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T- OAE) ­ a major black shale eventProject EARTH-12-SHELL1: Global expression of climatic and palaeoceanographic events in black shales: generation of new high-resolution records from the Jurassic of the Neuquen Basin, Argentina

  1. Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

  2. Global impacts of abrupt climate change: an initial assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    in progress". Whilst they are commented on by Tyndall researchers, they have not been subject to a full peer that the climate system has in the last few thousand years undergone a number of rapid or step changes, at regional of such abrupt climate changes1 include: · regional cooling following a shutdown of the thermohaline circulation

  3. Moisture Flux Convergence in Regional and Global Climate Models: Implications for Droughts in the Southwestern United States Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yanhong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Salathe, E.; Dominguez, Francina; Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The water cycle of the southwestern United States (SW) is dominated by winter storms that maintain a positive annual net precipitation. Analysis of the control and future climate from four pairs of regional and global climate models (RCMs and GCMs) shows that the RCMs simulate a higher fraction of transient eddy moisture fluxes because the hydrodynamic instabilities associated with flow over complex terrain are better resolved. Under global warming, this enables the RCMs to capture the response of transient eddies to increased atmospheric stability that allows more moisture to converge on the windward side of the mountains by blocking. As a result, RCMs simulate enhanced transient eddy moisture convergence in the SW compared to GCMs, although both robustly simulate drying due to enhanced moisture divergence by the divergent mean flow in a warmer climate. This enhanced convergence leads to reduced susceptibility to hydrological change in the RCMs compared to GCMs.

  4. Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming* CHIE IHARA, YOCHANAN KUSHNIR, AND MARK A. CANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change over the Equatorial Indo-Pacific in Global Warming* CHIE IHARA, YOCHANAN KUSHNIR to global warming is investigated using model outputs submitted to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate equatorial Indian Ocean warm more than the SSTs in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean under global warming

  5. REVIEW Open Access Climate-smart agriculture global research agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    , William R Horwath2 , Bryan M Jenkins10 , Ermias Kebreab11 , Rik Leemans12 , Leslie Lipper13 , Mark N Wollenberg23 , Lovell S Jarvis24 and Louise E Jackson2 Abstract Background: Climate-smart agriculture (CSA

  6. Linking local air pollution to global chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Monika.; Wang, Chien.; Webster, Mort David.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    We have incorporated a reduced-form urban air chemistry model in MIT's 2D-LO coupled chemistry-climate model. The computationally efficient reduced-form urban model is derived from the California Institute of Technology-Carnegie ...

  7. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on International Emissions Trading. Global Envi- ronmentalTask Group on Emissions Trading. Final Report: Introductionand Crawshaw, David. 2006. Emissions Trading Inquiry a Joke:

  8. New Directions: A facelift for the picture of the global energy balance Earth's climate is largely regulated by the global energy balance,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    New Directions: A facelift for the picture of the global energy balance Earth's climate is largely regulated by the global energy balance, which considers the energy flows within the climate system a perturbation of this energy balance, through a modification of the energy flows in the polluted atmosphere

  9. mathematical finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty listing for "mathematical finance" ... 49-46035; Email: viens@purdue.edu; Research Interests: probability, stochastic processes, mathematical finance.

  10. The Great Season Climatic Oscillation and the Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucenna, Ahmed

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present earth warming up is often explained by the atmosphere gas greenhouse effect. This explanation is in contradiction with the thermodynamics second law. The warming up by greenhouse effect is quite improbable. It is cloud reflection that gives to the earth s ground its 15 degres C mean temperature. Since the reflection of the radiation by gases is negligible, the role of the atmosphere greenhouse gases in the earth warming up by earth radiation reflection loses its importance. We think that natural climatic oscillations contribute more to earth climatic disturbances. The oscillation that we hypothesize to exist has a long period (800 to 1000 years). The glacier melting and regeneration cycles lead to variations in the cold region ocean water density and thermal conductibility according to their salinity. These variations lead one to think about a macro climate oscillating between maximum hot and minimum cold temperatures. This oscillation is materialized by the passages of the planet through hot, mil...

  11. An Integrated Assessment Framework for Uncertainty Studies in Global and Regional Climate Change: The IGSM-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an integrated assessment framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model (IGSM), ...

  12. The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

  13. Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 °C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

  14. Accounting for Global Climate Model Projection Uncertainty in Modern Statistical Downscaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johannesson, G

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Future climate change has emerged as a national and a global security threat. To carry out the needed adaptation and mitigation steps, a quantification of the expected level of climate change is needed, both at the global and the regional scale; in the end, the impact of climate change is felt at the local/regional level. An important part of such climate change assessment is uncertainty quantification. Decision and policy makers are not only interested in 'best guesses' of expected climate change, but rather probabilistic quantification (e.g., Rougier, 2007). For example, consider the following question: What is the probability that the average summer temperature will increase by at least 4 C in region R if global CO{sub 2} emission increases by P% from current levels by time T? It is a simple question, but one that remains very difficult to answer. It is answering these kind of questions that is the focus of this effort. The uncertainty associated with future climate change can be attributed to three major factors: (1) Uncertainty about future emission of green house gasses (GHG). (2) Given a future GHG emission scenario, what is its impact on the global climate? (3) Given a particular evolution of the global climate, what does it mean for a particular location/region? In what follows, we assume a particular GHG emission scenario has been selected. Given the GHG emission scenario, the current batch of the state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs) is used to simulate future climate under this scenario, yielding an ensemble of future climate projections (which reflect, to some degree our uncertainty of being able to simulate future climate give a particular GHG scenario). Due to the coarse-resolution nature of the GCM projections, they need to be spatially downscaled for regional impact assessments. To downscale a given GCM projection, two methods have emerged: dynamical downscaling and statistical (empirical) downscaling (SDS). Dynamic downscaling involves configuring and running a regional climate model (RCM) nested within a given GCM projection (i.e., the GCM provides bounder conditions for the RCM). On the other hand, statistical downscaling aims at establishing a statistical relationship between observed local/regional climate variables of interest and synoptic (GCM-scale) climate predictors. The resulting empirical relationship is then applied to future GCM projections. A comparison of the pros and cons of dynamical versus statistical downscaling is outside the scope of this effort, but has been extensively studied and the reader is referred to Wilby et al. (1998); Murphy (1999); Wood et al. (2004); Benestad et al. (2007); Fowler et al. (2007), and references within those. The scope of this effort is to study methodology, a statistical framework, to propagate and account for GCM uncertainty in regional statistical downscaling assessment. In particular, we will explore how to leverage an ensemble of GCM projections to quantify the impact of the GCM uncertainty in such an assessment. There are three main component to this effort: (1) gather the necessary climate-related data for a regional SDS study, including multiple GCM projections, (2) carry out SDS, and (3) assess the uncertainty. The first step is carried out using tools written in the Python programming language, while analysis tools were developed in the statistical programming language R; see Figure 1.

  15. Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shiliang

    1 Sensitivity of China's ozone air quality to 2000-2050 global changes of1 climate and emissions2 3 emissions of ozone precursors. The climate and16 emission effect in combination will increase afternoon mean increases18 in global (excluding China) anthropogenic emissions, 37% to Chinese emission19 increases

  16. Local Response to Global Climate Change: The Role of Local Development Plans in Climate Change Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is possibly the greatest threat facing human society in this century. The response to this challenge has been dominated by international negotiations for controlling greenhouse gas emissions. More recently there are efforts...

  17. Understanding Global Climate Change: 2011 (an instructional DVD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    science, and ecology. · Is based on reliable information from the National Aeronautics and Space the Earth 2. Earth's Grand Cycles 3. Energy in the Global System 4. Historical Perspective 5. Remote Sensing the National Science Foundation's Science and Technology Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CRe

  18. Global situational awareness and early warning of high-consequence climate change.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Carr, Martin J.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global monitoring systems that have high spatial and temporal resolution, with long observational baselines, are needed to provide situational awareness of the Earth's climate system. Continuous monitoring is required for early warning of high-consequence climate change and to help anticipate and minimize the threat. Global climate has changed abruptly in the past and will almost certainly do so again, even in the absence of anthropogenic interference. It is possible that the Earth's climate could change dramatically and suddenly within a few years. An unexpected loss of climate stability would be equivalent to the failure of an engineered system on a grand scale, and would affect billions of people by causing agricultural, economic, and environmental collapses that would cascade throughout the world. The probability of such an abrupt change happening in the near future may be small, but it is nonzero. Because the consequences would be catastrophic, we argue that the problem should be treated with science-informed engineering conservatism, which focuses on various ways a system can fail and emphasizes inspection and early detection. Such an approach will require high-fidelity continuous global monitoring, informed by scientific modeling.

  19. YEAR PROGRESS REPORT TITLE: Global Modeling of Tropospheric Aerosols and Their Contribution to Climate Variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as CCN would cool the climate system by about ­1.16 W m-2 , while carbonaceous aerosols from fossil fuel combustion acting alone may cool the system by about ­0.52 W m-2 (see Table 1). However, because-1- GACP 2nd YEAR PROGRESS REPORT TITLE: Global Modeling of Tropospheric Aerosols

  20. Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darby, Dennis

    Arctic ice export events and their potential impact on global climate during the late Pleistocene export events are identified from the Laurentide and the Innuitian ice sheets, between 14 and 34 ka, the Arctic export events appear to occur prior to Heinrich events. INDEX TERMS: 4207 Oceanography: General

  1. Sea Ice in the Global Climate System Kenneth M. Golden1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Sea Ice in the Global Climate System Kenneth M. Golden1 , Elizabeth Hunke2 , Cecilia Bitz3 Figure 2. The Antarctic sea ice pack with an open lead in the distance. (K. M. Golden) Figure 1. Pancake ice in the Southern Ocean off the coast of East Antarctica. (K. M. Golden

  2. Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population: Received 22 September 2011 Received in revised form 16 December 2011 Accepted 26 January 2012 Available availability a b s t r a c t Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack

  3. Global assessment of coral bleaching and required rates of adaptation under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    Global assessment of coral bleaching and required rates of adaptation under climate change S I M O, Australia Abstract Elevated ocean temperatures can cause coral bleaching, the loss of colour from reef- building corals because of a breakdown of the symbiosis with the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium. Recent

  4. ENERGY INVESTMENTS UNDER CLIMATE POLICY: A COMPARISON OF GLOBAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCollum, David; Nagai, Yu; Riahi, Keywan; Marangoni, Giacomo; Calvin, Katherine V.; Pietzcker, Robert; Van Vliet, Jasper; van der Zwaan, Bob

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The levels of investment needed to mobilize an energy system transformation and mitigate climate change are not known with certainty. This paper aims to inform the ongoing dialogue and in so doing to guide public policy and strategic corporate decision making. Within the framework of the LIMITS integrated assessment model comparison exercise, we analyze a multi-IAM ensemble of long-term energy and greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Our study provides insight into several critical but uncertain areas related to the future investment environment, for example in terms of where capital expenditures may need to flow regionally, into which sectors they might be concentrated, and what policies could be helpful in spurring these financial resources. We find that stringent climate policies consistent with a 2°C climate change target would require a considerable upscaling of investments into low-carbon energy and energy efficiency, reaching approximately $45 trillion (range: $30–$75 trillion) cumulative between 2010 and 2050, or about $1.1 trillion annually. This represents an increase of some $30 trillion ($10–$55 trillion), or $0.8 trillion per year, beyond what investments might otherwise be in a reference scenario that assumes the continuation of present and planned emissions-reducing policies throughout the world. In other words, a substantial "clean-energy investment gap" of some $800 billion/yr exists — notably on the same order of magnitude as present-day subsidies for fossil energy and electricity worldwide ($523 billion). Unless the gap is filled rather quickly, the 2°C target could potentially become out of reach.

  5. Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to:Echo, Maryland:Glenwillow,OpenEIGlobal Climate and

  6. Global simulations of smoke from Kuwaiti oil fires and possible effects on climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.; Malone, R.C.; Kao, C.Y.J.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Global Climate Model has bee used to simulate the global evolution of the Kuwaiti oil fire smoke and its potential effects on the climate. The initial simulations were done shortly before the fires were lit in January 1991. They indicated that such an event would not result in a ``Mini Nuclear Winter`` as some people were suggesting. Further simulations during the year suggested that the smoke could be responsible for subtle regional climate changes in the spring such as a 5 degree centigrade decrease in the surface temperature in Kuwait, a 10% decrease in precipitation in Saudi Arabia and a 10% increase in precipitation in the Tibetan Plateau region. These results are in qualitative agreement with the observations this year.

  7. Global simulations of smoke from Kuwaiti oil fires and possible effects on climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.A.; Malone, R.C.; Kao, C.Y.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Global Climate Model has bee used to simulate the global evolution of the Kuwaiti oil fire smoke and its potential effects on the climate. The initial simulations were done shortly before the fires were lit in January 1991. They indicated that such an event would not result in a Mini Nuclear Winter'' as some people were suggesting. Further simulations during the year suggested that the smoke could be responsible for subtle regional climate changes in the spring such as a 5 degree centigrade decrease in the surface temperature in Kuwait, a 10% decrease in precipitation in Saudi Arabia and a 10% increase in precipitation in the Tibetan Plateau region. These results are in qualitative agreement with the observations this year.

  8. Third Annual Summer Workshop in International Economics and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Third Annual Summer Workshop in International Economics and Finance And Rosenberg Institute of Global Finance Sunday, July 13 2014 Alumni Common

  9. Pew Center on Global Climate Change | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergy International Limited JumpPetbowPew Center on Global

  10. The dilemma of fossil fuel use and global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.; Fulkerson, W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Sanghvi, M.K. (Amoco Corp., Chicago, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of fossil fuels and relationship to climate change is discussed. As the use of fossil fuels has grown, the problems of protecting the environment and human health and safety have also grown, providing a continuing challenge to technological and managerial innovation. Today that challenge is to control atmospheric emissions from combustion, particularly those emissions that cause acidic deposition, urban pollution, and increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases. Technology for reducing acidic deposition is available and needs only to be adopted, and the remedies for urban pollution are being developed and tested. How effective or expensive these will be remains to be determined. The control of emissions of the greenhouse gas, CO{sub 2}, seems possible only be reducing the total amounts of fossil fuels used worldwide, and by substituting efficient natural gas technologies for coal. Long before physical depletion forces the transition away from fossil fuels, it is at least plausible and even likely that the greenhouse effect will impose a show-stopping constraint. If such a transition were soon to be necessary, the costs would be very high because substitute energy sources are either limited or expensive or undesirable for other reasons. Furthermore, the costs would be unevenly felt and would be more oppressive for developing nations because they would be least able to pay and, on average, their use rates of fossil fuels are growing much faster than those of many industrialized countries. It is prudent, therefore, to try to manage the use of fossil fuels as if a greenhouse constraint is an important possibility.

  11. Local Response to Global Climate Change: The Role of Local Development Plans in Climate Change Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Himanshu

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    in managing threats from natural hazards (Berke & Beatley, 1992; Brody, 2003a; Nelson & Steven), managing land use distribution (Kent & Jones, 1990), enhancing ecosystem management (Brody, 2003c; Brody, Carrasco, & Highfield, 2003; Brody, Highfield... & Godschalk, 2008; Brody, 2003b; Brody, Carrasco, et al., 2003; Burby, 1999; Burby, French, & Nelson, 1998; Burby & May, 1997; Dalton & Burby, 1994; Godschalk, Beatley, Berke, Brower, & Kaiser, 1999). Similarly, climate change researchers have identified...

  12. Kathleen M. Byington Chief Administrative and Finance Officer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    Kathleen M. Byington Chief Administrative and Finance Officer Vice President, Administration and Finance President, Maryland Global Initiatives Corp. Sponsored Projects Accounting & Compliance Laura Baker Scarantino Director BUDGET AND FINANCE Scott Bitner Associate Vice President INTERNATIONAL

  13. Improved Offshore Wind Resource Assessment in Global Climate Stabilization Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arent, D.; Sullivan, P.; Heimiller, D.; Lopez, A.; Eurek, K.; Badger, J.; Jorgensen, H. E.; Kelly, M.; Clarke, L.; Luckow, P.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a technique for digesting geospatial wind-speed data into areally defined -- country-level, in this case -- wind resource supply curves. We combined gridded wind-vector data for ocean areas with bathymetry maps, country exclusive economic zones, wind turbine power curves, and other datasets and relevant parameters to build supply curves that estimate a country's offshore wind resource defined by resource quality, depth, and distance-from-shore. We include a single set of supply curves -- for a particular assumption set -- and study some implications of including it in a global energy model. We also discuss the importance of downscaling gridded wind vector data to capturing the full resource potential, especially over land areas with complex terrain. This paper includes motivation and background for a statistical downscaling methodology to account for terrain effects with a low computational burden. Finally, we use this forum to sketch a framework for building synthetic electric networks to estimate transmission accessibility of renewable resource sites in remote areas.

  14. Integrating chemistry into 3D climate models: Detailed kinetics in the troposphere and stratosphere of a global climate model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, C.Y.J.; Elliott, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.; Turco, R.P.; Zhao, X. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The motivation for the project is to create the first complete, three-dimensional climate model that enfolds atmospheric photochemistry. The LANL chemical global climate model (GCM) not only distributes the trace greenhouse gases and modifies their concentrations within the detailed photochemical web, but also permits them to influence the radiation field and so force their own transport. Both atmospheric chemistry and fluid dynamics are nonlinear and zonally asymmetric phenomena. They can only be adequately modeled in three dimensions on the global grid. The kinetics-augmented GCM is the only program within the atmospheric community capable of investigating interaction involving chemistry and transport. The authors have conducted case studies of timely three-dimensional chemistry issues. Examples include ozone production from biomass burning plumes, kinetic feedbacks in zonally asymmetric transport phenomena with month- to year-long time scales, and volcano sulfate aerosols with respect to their potential effects on tropospheric ozone depletion.

  15. Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470482, DOI: 10.1111/geb.12012 Soil water balance performs better than climatic water variables in tree species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Global Ecology and Biogeography, (Global Ecol. Biogeogr.) (2013) 22, 470­482, DOI: 10.1111/geb water balance indices to predict the ecological niches of forest tree species. Location: France Methods aiming to determine the ecological niches of plant species and their responses to climate change. Key

  16. Project title: Global environmental change: biomineral proxies of ocean chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    #8; FINAL PROJECT REPORT Please remember to provide CMI with electronic copies of any outputs that you have generated. This might include papers, presentations, patents, course material, attendance lists, website addresses, etc. Project... CMI Project Review: Project Name Global Environmental Change: Biomineral Proxies of Ocean Chemistry and Climate Number 003/P Report Period 22 June 2001- 30 April 2004 Project Name Cambridge PI, affiliation Harry Elderfield (Earth...

  17. Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations Fi i Hi h Ed ti i th C t E i Cli tFinancing Higher Education in the Current Economic Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Don

    Financing Higher Education in the Current Economic Climate Toronto, ON January 23, 2010 Trends in Higher Education Portugal Mexico Austria Italy Chile2 Slovak Republic Czech Republic Turkey Brazil 44 Russia U S 1. Year for notes (www.oecd.org/edu/eag2009). © 2010, Donald E. Heller© 2010, Donald E. Heller #12;Changes

  18. The Thermodynamic Influence of Subgrid Orography in a Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Bian, Xindi; Hunt, Allen G.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessments of the impacts of climate change typically require information at scales of 10 km or less. Such a resolution will not be achieved by global climate models for many years. We have developed an alternative to explicit resolution that can meet the needs of climate change impact assessment now. We have applied to a global climate model a physically-based subgrid-scale treatment of the influence of orography on temperature, clouds, precipitation, and land surface hydrology. The treatment represents subgrid variations in surface elevation in terms of fractional area distributions of discrete elevation classes. For each class it calculates the height rise/descent of air parcels traveling through the grid cell, and applies the influence of the rise/descent to the temperature and humidity profiles of the elevation class. Cloud, radiative, and surface processes are calculated separately for each elevation class using the same physical parameterizations used by the model without the subgrid parameterization. The simulated climate fields for each elevation class can then be distributed in post-processing according to the spatial distribution of surface elevation within each grid cell. Parallel 10-year simulations with and without the subgrid treatment have been performed. The simulated temperature, precipitation and snow water are mapped to 2.5 minute (~5 km) resolution and compared with gridded analyses of station measurements. The simulation with the subgrid scheme produces a much more realistic distribution of snow water and significantly more realistic distributions of temperature and precipitation than the simulation without the subgrid scheme. Moreover, the grid cell means of most other fields are virtually unchanged by the subgrid scheme. This suggests that the tuning of the climate model without the subgrid scheme is also applicable to the model with the scheme.

  19. 15.023J / 12.848J / ESD.128J Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy, Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    Introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. Develops an integrated approach to analysis of ...

  20. 15.023J / 12.848J / ESD.128J Global Climate Change: Economics, Science, and Policy, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.

    Introduces scientific, economic, and ecological issues underlying the threat of global climate change, and the institutions engaged in negotiating an international response. Develops an integrated approach to analysis of ...

  1. Energy and Climate Change: 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy, and the Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 15th National Conference and Global Forum on Science, Policy and the Environment: Energy and Climate Change will develop and advance partnerships that focus on transitioning the world to a new ...

  2. Physically-Based Global Downscaling: Climate Change Projections for a Full Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to the high-resolution of topography in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate lead to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region. In most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

  3. Physically-Based Global Downscaling Climate Change Projections for a Full Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Shippert, Timothy R.

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A global atmosphere/land model with an embedded subgrid orography scheme is used to simulate the period 1977-2100 using ocean surface conditions and radiative constituent concentrations for a climate change scenario. Climate variables simulated for multiple elevation classes are mapping according to a high-resolution elevation dataset in ten regions with complex terrain. Analysis of changes in the simulated climate leads to the following conclusions. Changes in precipitation vary widely, with precipitation increasing more with increasing altitude in some region, decreasing more with altitude in others, and changing little in still others. In some regions the sign of the precipitation change depends on surface elevation. Changes in surface air temperature are rather uniform, with at most a two-fold difference between the largest and smallest changes within a region; in most cases the warming increases with altitude. Changes in snow water are highly dependent on altitude. Absolute changes usually increase with altitude, while relative changes decrease. In places where snow accumulates, an artificial upper bound on snow water limits the sensitivity of snow water to climate change considerably. The simulated impact of climate change on regional mean snow water varies widely, with little impact in regions in which the upper bound on snow water is the dominant snow water sink, moderate impact in regions with a mixture of seasonal and permanent snow, and profound impacts on regions with little permanent snow.

  4. Agriculture and Climate Change in Global Scenarios: Why Don't the Models Agree

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Gerald; van der Mensbrugghe, Dominique; Ahammad, Helal; Blanc, Elodie; Calvin, Katherine V.; Hasegawa, Tomoko; Havlik, Petr; Heyhoe, Edwina; Kyle, G. Page; Lotze-Campen, Hermann; von Lampe, Martin; Mason d'Croz, Daniel; van Meijl, Hans; Mueller, C.; Reilly, J. M.; Robertson, Richard; Sands, Ronald; Schmitz, Christoph; Tabeau, Andrzej; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Valin, Hugo; Willenbockel, Dirk

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agriculture is unique among economic sectors in the nature of impacts from climate change. The production activity that transforms inputs into agricultural outputs makes direct use of weather inputs. Previous studies of the impacts of climate change on agriculture have reported substantial differences in outcomes of key variables such as prices, production, and trade. These divergent outcomes arise from differences in model inputs and model specification. The goal of this paper is to review climate change results and underlying determinants from a model comparison exercise with 10 of the leading global economic models that include significant representation of agriculture. By providing common productivity drivers that include climate change effects, differences in model outcomes are reduced. All models show higher prices in 2050 because of negative productivity shocks from climate change. The magnitude of the price increases, and the adaptation responses, differ significantly across the various models. Substantial differences exist in the structural parameters affecting demand, area, and yield, and should be a topic for future research.

  5. Finance Director Beki Thomson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Andy Goor Finance Director Beki Thomson Deputy Director of Finance Operations Eric Gillespie Finance Operations Manager Accounts Payable Karen Laing Supervisor Laura McArthur Finance Assistant VACANCY Finance Assistant Sarah Milne Finance Assistant Julie Smith Finance Assistant Karina Thomson

  6. Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

  7. Recent Climate Changes in Precipitable Water in the Global Tropics as Revealed in NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    1 Recent Climate Changes in Precipitable Water in the Global Tropics as Revealed in NCEP: 1 (808) 956-2877 Email: chu@hawaii.edu #12;2 Abstract For the first time, long-term climate changes/NCAR Reanalysis Igor I. Zveryaev and Pao-Shin Chu* P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology, RAS, Moscow, Russia

  8. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  9. Carbon finance, tropical forests and the state : governing international climate risk in the Democratic Republic of Congo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Ian P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines how evolving norms of international climate change mitigation are translated into national forest governance policies and land management techniques in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The ...

  10. A Global View on the Wind Sea and Swell Climate and Variability from ERA-40 ALVARO SEMEDO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    A Global View on the Wind Sea and Swell Climate and Variability from ERA-40 ALVARO SEMEDO 2010) ABSTRACT In this paper a detailed global climatology of wind-sea and swell parameters, based on the 45-yr European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis (ERA-40) wave reanalysis

  11. Accounting for global-mean warming and scaling uncertainties in climate change impact studies Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 12071226, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Accounting for global-mean warming and scaling uncertainties in climate change impact studies 1207(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Accounting for global-mean warming from a few regional climate model runs are scaled, based on different global-mean warming projections

  12. Probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming and uncertain scaling relationship Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11(3), 10971114, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming of probability distributions for regional climate change from uncertain global mean warming and an uncertain/precipitation per degree global mean warming. Each scaling variable is assumed to be normally distributed

  13. Managing the global commons decision making and conflict resolution in response to climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Naegeli, W.; Lund, P. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop was convened to develop a better understanding of decision-making matters concerning management of the global commons and to resolve conflicts in response to climate change. This workshop report does not provide a narrative of the proceedings. The workshop program is included, as are the abstracts of the papers that were presented. Only the introductory paper on social science research by William Riebsame and the closing summary by Richard Rockwell are reprinted here. This brief report focuses instead on the deliberations of the working groups that developed during the workshop. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Long-Term Predictions of Global Climate Using the Ocean Conveyor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, P.; Wilson, J.R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many have attributed the Great Ocean Conveyor as a major driver of global climate change over millennia as well as a possible explanation for shorter (multidecadal) oscillations. The conveyor is thought to have a cycle time on the order of 1000 years, however recent research has suggested that it is much faster than previously believed (about 100 years). A faster conveyor leads to the possibility of the conveyor's role in even shorter oscillations such as the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The conveyor is primarily density driven. In this study the salty outflow of the Red Sea is used to predict its behavior ten years into the future. A successful model could lead to a long-term prediction (ten years) of El Ninos, Atlantic hurricane season intensity, as well as global temperature and precipitation patterns.

  15. Testing for the Possible Influence of Unknown Climate Forcings upon Global Temperature Increases from 1950-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Bruce T.; Knight, Jeff R.; Ringer, Mark A.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Cherchi, Annalisa

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Global-scale variations in the climate system over the last half of the twentieth century, including long-term increases in global-mean near-surface temperatures, are consistent with concurrent human-induced emissions of radiatively active gases and aerosols. However, such consistency does not preclude the possible influence of other forcing agents, including internal modes of climate variability or unaccounted for aerosol effects. To test whether other unknown forcing agents may have contributed to multidecadal increases in global-mean near-surface temperatures from 1950 to 2000, data pertaining to observed changes in global-scale sea surface temperatures and observed changes in radiatively active atmospheric constituents are incorporated into numerical global climate models. Results indicate that the radiative forcing needed to produce the observed long-term trends in sea surface temperatures—and global-mean near-surface temperatures—is provided predominantly by known changes in greenhouse gases and aerosols. Further, results indicate that less than 10% of the long-term historical increase in global-mean near-surface temperatures over the last half of the twentieth century could have been the result of internal climate variability. In addition, they indicate that less than 25%of the total radiative forcing needed to produce the observed long-term trend in global-mean near-surface temperatures could have been provided by changes in net radiative forcing from unknown sources (either positive or negative). These results, which are derived from simple energy balance requirements, emphasize the important role humans have played in modifying the global climate over the last half of the twentieth century.

  16. Influence of Climate Change Mitigation Technology on Global Demands of Water for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, electricity generation accounts for a large and potentially growing water demand, and as such is an important component to assessments of global and regional water scarcity. However, the current suite—as well as potential future suites—of thermoelectric generation technologies has a very wide range of water demand intensities, spanning two orders of magnitude. As such, the evolution of the generation mix is important for the future water demands of the sector. This study uses GCAM, an integrated assessment model, to analyze the global electric sector’s water demands in three futures of climate change mitigation policy and two technology strategies. We find that despite five- to seven-fold expansion of the electric sector as a whole from 2005 to 2095, global electric sector water withdrawals remain relatively stable, due to the retirement of existing power plants with water-intensive once-through flow cooling systems. In the scenarios examined here, climate policies lead to the large-scale deployment of advanced, low-emissions technologies such as carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), concentrating solar power, and engineered geothermal systems. In particular, we find that the large-scale deployment of CCS technologies does not increase long-term water consumption from hydrocarbon-fueled power generation as compared with a no-policy scenario without CCS. Moreover, in sensitivity scenarios where low-emissions electricity technologies are required to use dry cooling systems, we find that the consequent additional costs and efficiency reductions do not limit the utility of these technologies in achieving cost-effective whole-system emissions mitigation.

  17. Finance E-Newsletter November 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finance E-Newsletter November 2008 CFO's Message Dear Colleague, The second issue of the SEAS Finance Newsletter comes after a couple of months that have seen much turbulence in global financial everyone. As usual, I look forward to receiving your comments and feedback concerning how the Finance team

  18. Admin & Finance Terry Leist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    VP Admin & Finance Terry Leist VP Admin & Finance Terry Leist Chief Human Resources Officer Dennis - Administrative Assistant - Budget / Finance - Administrative Assistant - Budget / Finance Employee & Labor

  19. Sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes: Mean state and interannual variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Xiao, Heng; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the sensitivity of global tropical climate to land surface processes (LSP) using an atmospheric general circulation model both uncoupled (with prescribed SSTs) and coupled to an oceanic general circulation model. The emphasis is on the interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes, which have first order influence on the surface energy and water budgets. The sensitivity to those processes is represented by the differences between model simulations, in which two land surface schemes are considered: 1) a simple land scheme that specifies surface albedo and soil moisture availability, and 2) the Simplified Simple Biosphere Model (SSiB), which allows for consideration of interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical process. Observational datasets are also employed to assess the reality of model-revealed sensitivity. The mean state sensitivity to different LSP is stronger in the coupled mode, especially in the tropical Pacific. Furthermore, seasonal cycle of SSTs in the equatorial Pacific, as well as ENSO frequency, amplitude, and locking to the seasonal cycle of SSTs are significantly modified and more realistic with SSiB. This outstanding sensitivity of the atmosphere-ocean system develops through changes in the intensity of equatorial Pacific trades modified by convection over land. Our results further demonstrate that the direct impact of land-atmosphere interactions on the tropical climate is modified by feedbacks associated with perturbed oceanic conditions ("indirect effect" of LSP). The magnitude of such indirect effect is strong enough to suggest that comprehensive studies on the importance of LSP on the global climate have to be made in a system that allows for atmosphere-ocean interactions.

  20. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

  1. LEDS Global Partnership in Action: Advancing Climate-Resilient Low Emission Development Around the World (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many countries around the globe are designing and implementing low emission development strategies (LEDS). These LEDS seek to achieve social, economic, and environmental development goals while reducing long-term greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increasing resiliency to climate change impacts. The LEDS Global Partnership (LEDS GP) harnesses the collective knowledge and resources of more than 120 countries and international donor and technical organizations to strengthen climate-resilient low emission development efforts around the world.

  2. Collaborative Proposal: Transforming How Climate System Models are Used: A Global, Multi-Resolution Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estep, Donald

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the great interest in regional modeling for both weather and climate applications, regional modeling is not yet at the stage that it can be used routinely and effectively for climate modeling of the ocean. The overarching goal of this project is to transform how climate models are used by developing and implementing a robust, efficient, and accurate global approach to regional ocean modeling. To achieve this goal, we will use theoretical and computational means to resolve several basic modeling and algorithmic issues. The first task is to develop techniques for transitioning between parameterized and high-fidelity regional ocean models as the discretization grid transitions from coarse to fine regions. The second task is to develop estimates for the error in scientifically relevant quantities of interest that provide a systematic way to automatically determine where refinement is needed in order to obtain accurate simulations of dynamic and tracer transport in regional ocean models. The third task is to develop efficient, accurate, and robust time-stepping schemes for variable spatial resolution discretizations used in regional ocean models of dynamics and tracer transport. The fourth task is to develop frequency-dependent eddy viscosity finite element and discontinuous Galerkin methods and study their performance and effectiveness for simulation of dynamics and tracer transport in regional ocean models. These four projects share common difficulties and will be approach using a common computational and mathematical toolbox. This is a multidisciplinary project involving faculty and postdocs from Colorado State University, Florida State University, and Penn State University along with scientists from Los Alamos National Laboratory. The completion of the tasks listed within the discussion of the four sub-projects will go a long way towards meeting our goal of developing superior regional ocean models that will transform how climate system models are used.

  3. Estimates of the long-term U.S. economic impacts of global climate change-induced drought.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Loose, Verne W.; Warren, Drake E.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While climate-change models have done a reasonable job of forecasting changes in global climate conditions over the past decades, recent data indicate that actual climate change may be much more severe. To better understand some of the potential economic impacts of these severe climate changes, Sandia economists estimated the impacts to the U.S. economy of climate change-induced impacts to U.S. precipitation over the 2010 to 2050 time period. The economists developed an impact methodology that converts changes in precipitation and water availability to changes in economic activity, and conducted simulations of economic impacts using a large-scale macroeconomic model of the U.S. economy.

  4. Finance Director Beki Thomson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Andy Goor Finance Director Beki Thomson Deputy Director of Finance Operations Eric Gillespie Finance Operations Manager Accounts Payable Karen Laing Supervisor VACANCY Finance Assistant VACANCY Finance Assistant Sarah Milne Finance Assistant Julie Smith (0.6) Finance Assistant Karina Thomson Finance

  5. Venture Capital Finance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Venture Capital Finance Brian Baynes, Partner, Flagship Ventures

  6. Little Ice Age Glaciation in Alaska: A record of recent global climatic change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calkin, P.E.; Wiles, G.C.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General global cooling and temperature fluctuation accompanied by expansion of mountain glaciers characterized the Little Ice Age of about A.D. 1200 through A.D. 1900. The effects of such temperature changes appear first and are strongest at high latitudes. Therefore the Little Ice Age record of glacial fluctuation in Alaska may provide a good proxy for these events and a test for models of future climatic change. Holocene expansions began here as early as 7000 B.P. and locally show a periodicity of 350 years after about 4500 years B.P. The Little Ice Age followed a late Holocene interval of minor ice advance and a subsequent period of ice margin recession lasting one to seven centuries. The timing of expansions since about A.D. 1200 have often varied between glaciers, but these are the most pervasive glacial events of the Holocene in Alaska and frequently represent ice marginal maxima for this interval. At least two major expansions are, apparent in forefields of both land-terminating and fjord-calving glaciers, but the former display the most reliable and detailed climatic record. Major maxima occurred by the 16th century and into the mid-18th century. Culmination of advances occurred throughout Alaska during the 19th century followed within a few decades by general glacial retreat. Concurrently, equilibrium line altitudes have been raised 100-400 m, representing a rise of 2-3 deg C in mean summer temperature.

  7. Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    Finance and Risk & ENGINEERING Charles S. Tapiero Department Head and Morton and Angela Topfer · Corporate Finance and Financial Markets · Computational Finance · Risk Finance · Technology and Algorithmic Finance A Collective Leadership Students participation #12;RESEARCH STRENGTHS · Black Swans and Fragility

  8. Division of Finance Division of Finance Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Division of Finance Division of Finance Alignment September 11, 2014 1 #12;Division of Finance of Finance Goal of the DF Alignment Project The internal and external alignment of the Division of Finance of Finance The Process We Followed 17 Meetings17 Meetings 120+ Pages of Data 103 Themes 12 Meta Themes Goals

  9. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  10. The Role of Stratification-Dependent Mixing for the Stability of the Atlantic Overturning in a Global Climate Model*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    in a Global Climate Model* BEN MARZEION Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center, and Bjerknes Centre oceanic heat transport. Subsequently, and in opposition to results from previous studies, the overturning, as seen, for example, in temperature reconstructions from Greenland ice cores, are often ex- plained

  11. Global well-posedness of strong solutions to a tropical climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jinkai

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider the Cauchy problem to the TROPIC CLIMATE MODEL derived by Frierson-Majda-Pauluis in [Comm. Math. Sci, Vol. 2 (2004)] which is a coupled system of the barotropic and the first baroclinic modes of the velocity and the typical midtropospheric temperature. The system considered in this paper has viscosities in the momentum equations, but no diffusivity in the temperature equation. We establish here the global well-posedness of strong solutions to this model. In proving the global existence of strong solutions, to overcome the difficulty caused by the absence of the diffusivity in the temperature equation, we introduce a new velocity $w$ (called the pseudo baroclinic velocity), which has more regularities than the original baroclinic mode of the velocity. An auxiliary function $\\phi$, which looks like the effective viscous flux for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, is also introduced to obtain the $L^\\infty$ bound of the temperature. Regarding the uniqueness, we use the idea of p...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MonitoringClimate Security Climate Security Climate Security Global reductions in greenhouse gases will eventually be motivated by an international climate treaty and will entail...

  13. Scientist warns against overselling climate change Climate change forecasters should admit that they cannot predict how global warming will affect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    that they cannot predict how global warming will affect individual countries, a leading physicist has said-of-deaths-from-ozone-predicted.html) Antarctic sea floor gives clues about effects of future global warming (/earth/environment/climatechange /5279223/Antarctic-sea-floor-gives-clues-about-affects-of-future-global-warming.html) The Vanishing Face

  14. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  15. Financing Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A growing variety of options are available for financing an LED street lighting replacement program. One or another approach may be preferable based on the system ownership and maintenance model in...

  16. Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N – tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  18. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceRisk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane, Senior

  19. Local action for the global environment : municipal government participation in a voluntary climate protection program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravin, Amelia L., 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cities for Climate ProtectionTM (CCP) campaign is a voluntary environmental program for municipalities, which is increasingly being applied around the world by local governments taking action on climate change. This ...

  20. European-Led Climate Policy versus Global Mitigation Action: Implications on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change (CMCC) Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore, 30124 Venezia, Italy, Amit Kanudia, Sergey Paltsev, Ronald D. Sands and Katja Schumacher *Reprinted from Climate Change and predictions of the risks of climate change and the challenges of limiting human influence on the environment

  1. Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

  2. A Global Land System Framework for Integrated Climate-Change Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, C. Adam

    Land ecosystems play a major role in the global cycles of energy, water, carbon and nutrients. A Global Land System (GLS) framework has been developed for the Integrated Global Systems Model Version 2 (IGSM2) to simulate ...

  3. The Contribution of Biomass to Emissions Mitigation under a Global Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winchester, N.

    What will large-scale global bioenergy production look like? We investigate this question by developing a detailed representation of bioenergy in a global economy-wide model. We develop a scenario with a global carbon ...

  4. Review: The Global Warming Reader: A Century of Writing About Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Byron P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: The Global Warming Reader: A Century of WritingMcKibben, Bill, ed. The Global Warming Reader: A Century ofrecord of no action on global warming. Those who have done

  5. Global warming from chlorofluorocarbons and their alternatives: Time scales of chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Malcolm K.W.; Sze, Nien Dak; Molnar, Gyula; Prather, Michael J

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and their replacements on global warming. Nature Hansen J. ,gas emissions to global warming. Nature London Amendment toNature 315, 649-652, Global warming time scales WMO (World

  6. Remarks in the National Assembly of France The European Climate Foundation kindly helped arrange a discussion about global climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Remarks in the National Assembly of France The European Climate Foundation kindly helped arrange not go after every drop of oil/gas on the planet. Reality. Governments worldwide are ignoring on their internal consumption of fossil fuels. Why would China agree: to avoid fossil fuel addiction, clean up its

  7. Tales from the climate-change crossroads Four books by prominent global-warming pundits illustrate that exhortation and authority are not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and for questionable behaviour revealed in e-mail disclosures the climate crisis". He provides a colourful overview of low-carbon technologies -- wind, solar, nuclear behavior and thinking". Again, he does not say how a new global consciousness is to be delivered. Instead

  8. The impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    of Climate, 21, 638 Sriver & Huber, 2007, Observational evidence for an ocean heat pump induced by tropicalThe impact of tropical cyclones (TC) on global climate is still debated. They rapidly mix the water column beneath them, bringing cold water to the surface. One way to parameterise this process

  9. Global distribution and climate forcing of marine organic aerosol: 1. Model improvements and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, N.; Xu, J.; Gantt, Brett; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine organic aerosol emissions have been implemented and evaluated within the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's 7-mode Modal Aerosol Module (MAM-7). Emissions of marine primary organic aerosols (POA), phytoplanktonproduced isoprene- and monoterpenes-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOA) and methane sulfonate (MS{sup -}) are shown to affect surface concentrations of organic aerosols in remote marine regions. Global emissions of submicron marine POA is estimated to be 7.9 and 9.4 Tg yr{sup -1}, for the Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) emission parameterizations, respectively. Marine sources of SOA and particulate MS{sup -} (containing both sulfur and carbon atoms) contribute an additional 0.2 and 5.1 Tg yr{sup -1}, respectively. Widespread areas over productive waters of the Northern Atlantic, Northern Pacific, and the Southern Ocean show marine-source submicron organic aerosol surface concentrations of 100 ngm{sup -3}, with values up to 400 ngm{sup -3} over biologically productive areas. Comparison of long-term surface observations of water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) with POA concentrations from the two emission parameterizations shows that despite revealed discrepancies (often more than a factor of 2), both Gantt et al. (2011) and Vignati et al. (2010) formulations are able to capture the magnitude of marine organic aerosol concentrations, with the Gantt et al. (2011) parameterization attaining better seasonality. Model simulations show that the mixing state of the marine POA can impact the surface number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The largest increases (up to 20 %) in CCN (at a supersaturation (S) of 0.2 %) number concentration are obtained over biologically productive ocean waters when marine organic aerosol is assumed to be externally mixed with sea-salt. Assuming marine organics are internally-mixed with sea-salt provides diverse results with increases and decreases in the concentration of CCN over different parts of the ocean. The sign of the CCN change due to the addition of marine organics to seasalt aerosol is determined by the relative significance of the increase in mean modal diameter due to addition of mass, and the decrease in particle hygroscopicity due to compositional changes in marine aerosol. Based on emerging evidence for increased CCN concentration over biologically active surface ocean areas/periods, our study suggests that treatment of sea spray in global climate models (GCMs) as an internal mixture of marine organic aerosols and sea-salt will likely lead to an underestimation in CCN number concentration.

  10. Finance Division Employee Status Form Finance Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Finance Division Employee Status Form Finance Division CB 1225, 104 Airport Drive Chapel Hill, NC Phone: 919-962-7242 finance.unc.edu Failure to Follow Instructions Below Will Delay Processing Today information in five areas: 1. Division-wide emergency call tree 2. Finance Web site contacts 3. Departmental

  11. Sources for Global Climate Change Information (updated: March 17, 2011) The following information is provided for those who wish to learn more about this issue. These

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    of the role of greenhouse gases in maintaining Earth's energy balance, and the role of additional of Global Climate Change on the United States (NRC, 2008) http://www.ostp.gov/galleriesINSTC Reports/Scientific Assessment of the Effects of Global Change on the United States.pdf (copy this into browser) http

  12. Project EARTH-13-SHELLSPH1: Global expression of climatic and palaeoceanographic events in black shales: generation of new high-resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    geochronology, the expression of the global Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (T- OAE) ­ a major black shale event of other black shale events known from NW Europe, such as those at the Sinemurian- Pliensbachian boundaryProject EARTH-13-SHELLSPH1: Global expression of climatic and palaeoceanographic events in black

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Accelerated Climate Modeling for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy New Project Is the ACME of Computer Science to Address Climate Change On December 3, 2014, in Analysis, Climate, Global Climate & Energy,...

  14. How Do We Know that Human Activities Have Influenced Global Climate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santer, Benjamin D.

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities have significantly altered not only the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere, but also the climate system. Human influences have led to increases in well-mixed greenhouse gases, decreases in stratospheric ozone, and changes in the atmospheric burdens of sulfate and soot aerosols. All of these atmospheric constituents interact with incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. Human-induced changes in the concentrations of these constituents modify the natural radiative balance of Earth's atmosphere, and therefore perturb climate. Quantifying the size of the human effect on climate is a difficult statistical problem. 'Fingerprint' methods are typically used for this purpose. These methods involve rigorous statistical comparisons of modeled and observed climate change patterns. Fingerprinting assumes that each individual influence on climate has a unique signature in climate records. The climate fingerprints in response to different forcing factors are typically estimated with computer models, which can be used to perform the controlled experiments that we cannot conduct in the real world. One criticism of the findings of previous scientific assessments is that they have relied heavily on fingerprint studies involving changes in near-surface temperature. Recent fingerprint work, however, has considered a variety of other climate variables, such as ocean heat content, stratospheric temperatures, Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent, sea level pressure, atmospheric water vapor, and the height of the tropopause. These studies illustrate that a human-induced climate change signal is identifiable in many different variables and geographic regions, and that the climate system is telling us an internally- and physically-consistent story.

  15. How Do We Know That Human Activities Have Influenced Global Climate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Benjamin D. Santer

    2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Human activities have significantly altered not only the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere, but also the climate system. Human influences have led to increases in well-mixed greenhouse gases, decreases in stratospheric ozone, and changes in the atmospheric burdens of sulfate and soot aerosols. All of these atmospheric constituents interact with incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. Human-induced changes in the concentrations of these constituents modify the natural radiative balance of Earth's atmosphere, and therefore perturb climate. Quantifying the size of the human effect on climate is a difficult statistical problem. "Fingerprint" methods are typically used for this purpose. These methods involve rigorous statistical comparisons of modeled and observed climate change patterns. Fingerprinting assumes that each individual influence on climate has a unique signature in climate records. The climate fingerprints in response to different forcing factors are typically estimated with computer models, which can be used to perform the controlled experiments that we cannot conduct in the real world. One criticism of the findings of previous scientific assessments is that they have relied heavily on fingerprint studies involving changes in near-surface temperature. Recent fingerprint work, however, has considered a variety of other climate variables, such as ocean heat content, stratospheric temperatures, Northern Hemisphere sea ice extent, sea level pressure, atmospheric water vapor, and the height of the tropopause. These studies illustrate that a human-induced climate change signal is identifiable in many different variables and geographic regions, and that the climate system is telling us an internally- and physically-consistent story.

  16. Predicted change in global secondary organic aerosol concentrations in response to future climate, emissions, and land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, C. L.; Henze, D. K.; Horowitz, L. W.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Lamarque, J. F.; Guenther, A.; Hess, P. G.; Vitt, F.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Goldstein, A. H.; Fung, I.

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of chemical and physical environ- ments represented by these studies suggests that the mech- anisms and precursors contributing to SOA formation are diverse. In light of these discrepancies, previous estimates of the global source of SOA (12–40 Tg C a#2... and results are averaged to estimate the effect of interannual climate variability. 2.2. Anthropogenic Emissions [17] Emissions of both gas and aerosol phase species for the years 2000 and 2100 are taken from Horowitz [2006]. Present-day (2000) fossil fuel...

  17. The climate impacts of high-speed rail and air transportation : a global comparative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clewlow, Regina Ruby Lee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing concerns about the energy use and climate impacts of the transportation sector have prompted policymakers to consider a variety of options to meet the future mobility needs of the world's population, while ...

  18. Crop water stress under climate change uncertainty : global policy and regional risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gueneau, Arthur

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourty percent of all crops grown in the world today are grown using irrigation, and shifting precipitation patterns due to climate change are viewed as a major threat to food security. This thesis examines, in the framework ...

  19. The economic impact of global climate and tropospheric oxone on world agricultural production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaodu

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of my thesis is to analyze the economic impact on agriculture production from changes in climate and tropospheric ozone, and related policy interventions. The analysis makes use of the Emissions Prediction ...

  20. SWS 5182: Earth System Analysis Catalogue Description: Analysis of global-scale interdependences between climate, biogeochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    System Model Carbon sequestration and climate mitigation potential of vegetation and soils 12 - 13 Earth fuel 11 Terrestrial biogeochemistry Chapter 5 and Chapter 6 Account for land carbon cycle in your Earth

  1. Business, management and finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Business, management and finance Essentials Taught degrees Masters in Business Administration (MBA) MSc in Banking and Finance MSc in Corporate and Financial Risk Management MSc in Financial Mathematics MSc in International Accounting and Corporate Governance MSc in International Finance MSc

  2. Local Public Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1959. The Theory of Public Finance. New York: McGraw-Hill.T. 2003. School finance, spatial income segregation, and theJohn M. "local public finance." The New Palgrave Dictionary

  3. Health Capital and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Sara Bryant

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some evidence. Journal of Finance, 32: 337–348, 1977. M.of new foundations. Journal of Finance, 55:1623–1653, 2000.and P. DeMarzo. Corporate Finance. Addison-Wesley, New York,

  4. Finance & Administration Controller's Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Finance & Administration Controller's Office July 2014 Michael Williams Controller Controller Administrative Services 51111 Catherine Hebert Program Director ICOFA 61318 Revised: 7/28/2014 #12;Finance Surplus Property 81269 Revised: 7/28/2014 #12;Finance & Administration Controller's Office Disbursement

  5. Essays in Corporate Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syron, Erin Elizabeth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ment,” The Journal of Finance, 42(2), 1097–1102. Dechow, P.Analysis,” Journal of Finance, 53(1), 27–64. Palmrose, Z. -Accounting, Auditing and Finance, Forthcoming. Beneish, M.

  6. Essays in Behavioral Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior. Journal of Finance 64(6), 2515–2534. Cohen, L. ,returns. Journal of Finance 63(4), 1977–2011. Cohen, L. andannouncements. Journal of Finance 64, 709–749. DeLong, J.

  7. Finance & Administration Controller's Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Finance & Administration Controller's Office April 2014 Michael Williams Controller Controller ICOFA 61318 Revised: 4/4/2014 #12;Finance & Administration Controller's Office Accounting & Asset Coordinator Property Surplus Sales 81269 Revised: 4/4/2014 #12;Finance & Administration Controller's Office

  8. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

  9. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and communications, in Ocean Engineering Planning and Designmicropro?ler, Engineering in the Ocean Environment, Ocean ’engineering diagnostic data will be transmitted. 5. GLOBAL OCEAN

  10. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transports from ocean to land and global energy ?ows inof Earth energy imbal- ance, ocean warming, and thermostericthe ther- mal energy of the ocean, it remains a challenging

  11. Loss of Cherished Places -- Global Climate Change in Maryland: Loss at the Margins of Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting species extinction in response to global warminghave led to species extinction. Above: The Appalachian Trailspecies may have less chance to migrate, and may face extinction.

  12. Climate mitigation’s impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sector’s use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sector’s water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

  13. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Building a Global Infrastructure for Climate Change Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahrens, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ananthakrishnan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bharathi, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Brown, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Chen, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chervenak, A. L. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Cinquini, L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA (United States); Drach, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fox, P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hankin, S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Harper, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Hook, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Miller, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nienhouse, E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Schweitzer, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Schuler, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Shipman, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Siebenlist, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Strand, W. G. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilcox, H. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wilhelmi, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Established within DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-) 2 program, with support from ASCR and BER, the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) is a consortium of seven laboratories (Argonne National Laboratory [ANL], Los Alamos National Laboratory [LANL], Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [LBNL], Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], National Center for Atmospheric Research [NCAR], Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL], and Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory [PMEL]), and two institutes (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [RPI] and the University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute [USC/ISI]). The consortium’s mission is to provide climate researchers worldwide with a science gateway to access data, information, models, analysis tools, and computational capabilities required to evaluate extreme-scale data sets. Its stated goals are to (1) make data more useful to climate researchers by developing collaborative technology that enhances data usability; (2) meet the specific needs that national and international climate projects have for distributed databases, data access, and data movement; (3) provide a universal and secure web-based data access portal for broad-based multi-model data collections; and (4) provide a wide range of climate data-analysis tools and diagnostic methods to international climate centers and U.S. government agencies. To this end, the ESG-CET is working to integrate all highly publicized climate data sets—from climate simulations to observations—using distributed storage management, remote high-performance units, high-bandwidth wide-area networks, and user desktop platforms in a collaborative problem-solving environment.

  14. Project Finance and Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Project Finance and Investments Chris Cassidy, National Business Renewable Energy Advisor, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  15. Health Capital and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Sara Bryant

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capital and Finance by Sara Bryant Holland A dissertationCopyright 2010 by Sara Bryant Holland Abstract Healthand Finance by Sara Bryant Holland Doctor of Philosophy in

  16. Is There Still Time to Avoid `Dangerous Anthropogenic Interference' with Global Climate?*#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    curve', measuring both the pulse of Nature and a steadily rising human impact on atmospheric composition's temperature, with rapid global warming over the past 30 years, is now passing through the peak level infrastructure that may be built within a decade will make it impractical to keep further global warming under 1

  17. Paleoproterozoic snowball Earth: Extreme climatic and geochemical global change and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biological productivity, melting of the oceanic ice would also have induced a cyanobacterial bloom, leading iron formations and cap carbonates. Although global glaciation would have dras- tically curtailed glaciation: An ice-albedo feedback will drive a run-away glaciation (8) resulting in 500­1,500 m of global

  18. AdministrAtion And FinAnce mission stAtement Administration and Finance exists to support the strategic mission of Northern Kentucky University by providing quality service through sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, Richard L.

    20132013 AdministrAtion And FinAnce mission stAtement Administration and Finance exists to support within Administration and Finance are committed to the development, implementation, and continuous of Northern Kentucky University. Administration and Finance strives to provide a climate conducive

  19. Global Climatic and Stable Isotopic Correlations During the Early Permian (Cisuralian)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noret, Jordan R.

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    for environmental policy decisions. 1.1 Significance of the early Permian climate During the early Permian (~300-270 Ma), Earth?s climate shifted from one similar to the present day to one much warmer, from having abundant glaciers to having few or possibly... at Texas A&M University, USA, with the help of Dr. Boris Chuvashov, a geologist with the Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Specimens collected were assigned to stratigraphic ?horizons?, roughly the Russian equivalent to U.S. formations...

  20. Climate Action Plan (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizing the profound implications that global warming and climate variation could have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Montana, the Climate Change Advisory Committee (CCAC)...

  1. Essays in Social Status and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barradale, Nigel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Intertemporal Preferences Key Words: Consumer Finance;Household Finance;Experimental Finance; Social Status; Discounting;

  2. Vol. 16, No. 2 May 2006Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment World Climate Research Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's climate system is an energy cycle that converts absorbed solar radiation into heat and associated, its rapid rotation, and its elliptical orbit about the sun, the solar heating is neither uniform nor ARE A NET SINK OF ENERGY Left panel shows zonal, seasonal average generation of available potential energy

  3. o meet the challenges of global climate change, greenhouse-gas emissions must

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    . Emissions from fossil fuels are the largest contributor to the anthropo- genic greenhouse effect, so . In my view, it is therefore an attractive target for energy subsidies and for inclusion in the global

  4. Post-doctoral Position Title Quantify the net global climate impacts of past and future land-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pouyanne, Nicolas

    objective is to make this protocol widely available so that other earth system modeling groups outside uses and land use changes in global earth system models, and test the impact of various implementation

  5. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  6. International and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Tony

    MSc International Accounting and Finance #12;What is International Accounting and Finance and why involved. Why study International Accounting and Finance at Stirling? One In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, the University of Stirling's division of Accounting and Finance was rated first equal

  7. Accountancy Accountancy and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Tony

    BAcc(Hons) Accountancy BA(Hons) Finance BAcc(Hons) Accountancy and Finance Does it add up? Invest job in your chosen financial career #12;Did you know? · BAcc(Hons)Accountancy andtheBA(Hons)Finance demonstrateyourstrengths andconnectwithfinancial employersworldwide. Why Study Accountancy and Finance? Accountancy

  8. Economics issues in global climate change: Agriculture forestry and natural resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, J.; Anderson, M. (eds.)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a collection of 26 papers from a 1990 conference concerning the interface between greenhouse warming and agriculture and forestry. Areas of particular emphasis include methane's importance as a greenhouse gas and agricultural production of methane; agriculture's importance as a response to climatic change; forestry as a potentially powerful abatement method, because forests sequester carbon as part of their natural growth. The book is divided into three parts. First, the implications of examining the full set of greenhouse gases versus just looking at carbon dioxide are discussed. Second, the role of agriculture and forestry in producing greenhouse gases is covered. Third, a series of articles tackles the difficult task of measuring the damages to agriculture that would result if climates do change.

  9. Global Climate network evolves with North Atlantic Oscillation phases: Coupling to Southern Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guez, Oded; Berezin, Yehiel; Wang, Yang; Havlin, Shlomo

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a network from climate records of atmospheric temperature at surface level, at different geographical sites in the globe, using reanalysis data from years 1948-2010. We find that the network correlates with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), both locally in the north Atlantic, and through coupling to the southern Pacific Ocean. The existence of tele-connection links between those areas and their stability over time allows us to suggest a possible physical explanation for this phenomenon.

  10. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE...Furthermore, there is strong scientific evidence that climate change will disrupt the global economy, environment and society a growing population in a changing climate is, therefore, a major global challenge. Changes in climate

  11. Global Climate Modeling of the Martian water cycle with improved microphysics and radiatively active water ice clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro, Thomas; Forget, François; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Montmessin, Franck

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative effects of water ice clouds have noteworthy consequences on the Martian atmosphere, its thermal structure and circulation. Accordingly, the inclusion of such effects in the LMD Mars Global Climate Model (GCM) greatly modifies the simulated Martian water cycle. The intent of this paper is to address the impact of radiatively active clouds on atmospheric water vapor and ice in the GCM and improve its representation. We propose a new enhanced modeling of the water cycle, consisting of detailed cloud microphysics with dynamic condensation nuclei and a better implementation of perennial surface water ice. This physical modeling is based on tunable parameters. This new version of the GCM is compared to the Thermal Emission Spectrometer observations of the water cycle. Satisfying results are reached for both vapor and cloud opacities. However, simulations yield a lack of water vapor in the tropics after Ls=180{\\deg} which is persistent in simulations compared to observations, as a consequence of aphelion c...

  12. The Tropical Atmospheric El Nio Signal in Satellite Precipitation Data and a Global Climate Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ABSTRACT Aspects of the tropical atmospheric response to El Niño related to the global energy and water and the Advanced Micro- wave Scanning Radiometer-E and simulations from the Goddard Institute for Space Studies are highly correlated, but anomalies in stratiform­convective rainfall partitioning in the two datasets

  13. A simple object-oriented and open source model for scientific and policy analyses of the global climate system–Hector v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartin, Corinne A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Schwarber, Adria; Link, Robert P.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple climate models play an integral role in policy and scientific communities. They are used for climate mitigation scenarios within integrated assessment models, complex climate model emulation, and uncertainty analyses. Here we describe Hector, an open source, object-oriented, simple global climate carbon-cycle model. This model runs essentially instantaneously while still representing the most critical global scale earth system processes. Hector has three main carbon pools: an atmosphere, land, and ocean. The model’s terrestrial carbon cycle includes respiration and primary production, accommodating arbitrary geographic divisions into, e.g., ecological biomes or political units. Hector’s actively solves the inorganic carbon system in the surface ocean, directly calculating air-sea fluxes of carbon and ocean pH. Hector reproduces the global historical trends of atmospheric [CO2] and surface temperatures. The model simulates all four Representative Concentration Pathways with high correlations (R >0.7) with current observations, MAGICC (a well-known simple climate model), and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5. Hector is freely available under an open source license, and its modular design will facilitate a broad range of research in various areas.

  14. Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, Willy R.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

  15. NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 2 | NOVEMBER 2012 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 775 vidence is clear that Earth's global average climate has warmed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 2 | NOVEMBER 2012 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 775 E vidence anthropogenic climate change on timescales of a few decades and spatial scales smaller than continen- tal2 in climate change projections are due to model shortcomings, and it is sometimes confidently asserted

  16. Sensitivity of Remote Aerosol Distributions to Representation of Cloud-Aerosol Interactions in a Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hailong; Easter, Richard C.; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Ghan, Steven J.; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun; Vinoj, V.

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Many global aerosol and climate models, including the widely used Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), have large biases in predicting aerosols in remote regions such as upper troposphere and high latitudes. In this study, we conduct CAM5 sensitivity simulations to understand the role of key processes associated with aerosol transformation and wet removal affecting the vertical and horizontal long-range transport of aerosols to the remote regions. Improvements are made to processes that are currently not well represented in CAM5, which are guided by surface and aircraft measurements together with results from a multi-scale aerosol-climate model (PNNL-MMF) that explicitly represents convection and aerosol-cloud interactions at cloud-resolving scales. We pay particular attention to black carbon (BC) due to its importance in the Earth system and the availability of measurements. We introduce into CAM5 a new unified scheme for convective transport and aerosol wet removal with explicit aerosol activation above convective cloud base. This new implementation reduces the excessive BC aloft to better simulate observed BC profiles that show decreasing mixing ratios in the mid- to upper-troposphere. After implementing this new unified convective scheme, we examine wet removal of submicron aerosols that occurs primarily through cloud processes. The wet removal depends strongly on the sub-grid scale liquid cloud fraction and the rate of conversion of liquid water to precipitation. These processes lead to very strong wet removal of BC and other aerosols over mid- to high latitudes during winter months. With our improvements, the Arctic BC burden has a10-fold (5-fold) increase in the winter (summer) months, resulting in a much better simulation of the BC seasonal cycle as well. Arctic sulphate and other aerosol species also increase but to a lesser extent. An explicit treatment of BC aging with slower aging assumptions produces an additional 30-fold (5-fold) increase in the Arctic winter (summer) BC burden. This BC aging treatment, however, has minimal effect on other under-predicted species. Interestingly, our modifications to CAM5 that aim at improving prediction of high-latitude and upper tropospheric aerosols also produce much better AOD and AAOD over various other regions globally when compared to multi-year AERONET retrievals. The improved aerosol distributions have impacts on other aspects of CAM5, improving the simulation of global mean liquid water path and cloud forcing.

  17. Decision-making in Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, Arpad

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the global warming effect associated with electricityin Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potentialin Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential

  18. Incorporating Urban Systems in Global Climate Models: The Role of GIScience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feddema, Johannes J.

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    0.92 brick 0.7 1360.0 0.3 1700 800 0.9 mud 1.0 1456.0 0.3 1820 800 0.9 wood 0.1 1127.5 0.5 550 2050 0.87 glass 0.9 2100.0 0.08 2500 840 0.91 stone 2.6 2310.0 0.275 2750 840 0.92 adobe 1.0 1456.0 0.3 1820 800 0.91 rubble 0.8 950 0.275 1900 500 0..., Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC02- 97ER62402, by the National Science Foundation grant numbers ATM-0107404, and ATM-0413540, the NCAR Weather and Climate Impact Assessment Science Initiative, and the University of Kansas, Center for Research. Motivation...

  19. Administration and Finance Vice President /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Administration and Finance Vice President / Chief Financial Officer / CMS Executive Sponsor Opportunity & Employee Relations Director Finance Associate Vice President Manager, Special Projects Finance Support Director Bursar's Office Bursar Administration & Finance Division Organizational Chart

  20. Perella Department of Finance Skill Specializations Applicable to Finance Careers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    Perella Department of Finance Skill Specializations Applicable to Finance Careers Corporate Finance Real Estate Developers; Appraisers; Banks Non-Finance and Miscellaneous Finance Focused Jobs including Students with good computational and computing skills coupled with a solid background in finance, economics

  1. U.S. Global Change Research Program publishes "National Climate Assessment"

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas2022WindUProject | OpenU.S.report

  2. GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE: SOME IMPLICATIONS, OPPORTUNITIES. AND CHALLENGES FOR U.S. FORESTRY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFunding OpportunityF G F ! ( !|ResearchGLOBAL

  3. Local Public Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cite this article Quigley, John M. "local public finance."HE N EW P ALGRAVE ) By John M. Quigley May 2008 These paperslocal public finance John M. Quigley From The New Palgrave

  4. Alternative Financing Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This directive provides guidance for identification, planning and approval of alternatively-financed projects. Alternative Financing ("AF") is a process whereby DOE and its operational elements obtain the use of privately-developed capital assets through lease.

  5. Bond Financing (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bond financing is available to eligible businesses through the New Jersey Economic Development Authority, in the amount of $500,000 to $10 million. The bonds can be used to finance capital...

  6. Energy Efficiency Financing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information and examples of state financing for energy efficiency programs, with descriptions on implementation methods and concerns.

  7. Business, management and finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Business, management and finance Essentials Taught degrees Masters in Business Administration (MBA) MSc in Banking and Finance MSc in Corporate and Financial Risk Management MSc in Financial Mathematics in International Accounting and Corporate Governance MSc in International Finance MSc in International Management

  8. in Economics and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Master's in Economics and Finance ­ #12;2 3 "A research-centred institution with a personal REASONS TO STUDY The Master's in Economics and Finance programme targets students wishing to obtain a comprehensive and rigorous education in Economics and Finance. It emphasizes the complementary nature

  9. Do Coupled Climate Models Correctly SImulate the Upward Branch of the Deept Ocean Global Conveyor?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarmiento, Jorge L; Downes, Stephanie; Bianchi, Daniele

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The large-scale meridional overturning circulation (MOC) connects the deep ocean, a major reservoir of carbon, to the other components of the climate system and must therefore be accurately represented in Earth System Models. Our project aims to address the specific question of the pathways and mechanisms controlling the upwelling branch of the MOC, a subject of significant disagreement between models and observational syntheses, and among general circulation models. Observations of these pathways are limited, particularly in regions of complex hydrography such as the Southern Ocean. As such, we rely on models to examine theories of the overturning circulation, both physically and biogeochemically. This grant focused on a particular aspect of the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) where there is currently significant disagreement between models and observationally based analyses of the MOC, and amongst general circulation models. In particular, the research focused on addressing the following questions: 1. Where does the deep water that sinks in the polar regions rise to the surface? 2. What processes are responsible for this rise? 3. Do state-of-the-art coupled GCMs capture these processes? Our research had three key components: observational synthesis, model development and model analysis. In this final report we outline the key results from these areas of research for the 2007 to 2012 grant period. The research described here was carried out primarily by graduate student, Daniele Bianchi (now a Postdoc at McGill University, Canada), and Postdoc Stephanie Downes (now a Research Fellow at The Australian national University, Australia). Additional support was provided for programmers Jennifer Simeon as well as Rick Slater.

  10. Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

  11. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2°C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2°C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 2030–2050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  12. Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) Interdisciplinary Science Workshop: Decadal Climate Prediction; Aspen, CO; June 22-28, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katzenberger, John

    2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Decadal prediction lies between seasonal/interannual forecasting and longer-term climate change projections, and focuses on time-evolving regional climate conditions over the next 10?30 yr. Numerous assessments of climate information user needs have identified this time scale as being important to infrastructure planners, water resource managers, and many others. It is central to the information portfolio required to adapt effectively to and through climatic changes.

  13. Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008). "Accountability of networked climate governance: Therise of transnational climate partnerships." GlobalBoard. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: a

  14. Bringing climate change down to earth : science and participation in Canadian and Australian climate change campaigns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padolsky, Miriam Elana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about Global Climate Change. Public Understanding of ScienceFoundation. 2005a. Climate Change: A Matter of SurvivalFoundation. 2005b. Climate Change > Actions 2005 [cited 10

  15. The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary., 38, L08704, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL046773. 1. Introduction [2] Climate change and human activities and Fung [2008] found that climate and land use change play more important roles than the stomatal closure

  16. CO2 threshold for millennial-scale oscillations in the climate system: implications for global warming scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meissner, Katrin Juliane

    conditions, some records of the recent climate history indicate that millennial oscillations are also part intervals (Bond et al. 1997). The cause of these abrupt changes in climate is still under investigation: whereas most climate scientists see changes in the strength of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation

  17. Perspectives on Project Finance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspectives on Project Finance Perspectives on Project Finance Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Perspectives on Project Finance John May, Managing Partner, Stern...

  18. Accounting and Finance Is Accounting and Finance right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Accounting and Finance Is Accounting and Finance right for me? A degree in Accounting and/or Finance will suit you if you have an interest in the banking, investment banking or finance sector an Accounting and/or Finance degree are wide- ranging and provide a good basis for employment in almost any

  19. MSc Finance What is Finance and why is it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Tony

    MSc Finance #12;What is Finance and why is it important? Finance may be briefly summed up techniques developed by the finance industry is an essential foundation for financial decision-making in the modern world. In this course, the principal focus is on corporate finance, and the discipline is examined

  20. M.Sc. Finance M.Sc. Investment and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    M.Sc. Finance M.Sc. Investment and Finance M.Sc. International Banking and Finance and M.Sc. International Accounting and Finance 2014-15 Introductory Meeting Information Welcome to the full-time postgraduate taught programmes for the Department of Accounting and Finance at the University of Strathclyde

  1. FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION EOC Title: Finance/Admin Section Chief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Matthew P.

    FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION EOC Title: Finance/Admin Section Chief General Description The Finance and for supervising members of the Finance/Administration Section. Key Role & Responsibilities · Coordinate all for Command and General Staff for Complex Incidents Training for Section Chiefs · Finance/Admin Section Chief

  2. Rutgers Business School Corporate Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Rutgers Business School Corporate Finance Fall 2014 Instructor: Vikram Nanda Office: 5186 to the basic and current research questions and methods ­ theoretical and empirical ­ in corporate finance areas in corporate finance. Among these: · Tirole, Corporate Finance · Finance Handbooks such as: Jarrow

  3. Administration and Finance Financial Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Administration and Finance Financial Services P.O. Box 6808, Fullerton, CA 92834 / T 657. Jenkins Associate Vice President of Finance SUBJECT: Finance System Oracle Upgrade The CSUF Finance System is scheduled for an Oracle upgrade in September 2009. The CMS Finance System will be unavailable beginning

  4. What does the 2°C Target Imply for a Global Climate Agreement in 2020? The LIMITS Study on Durban Action Platform Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegler, Elmar; Tavoni, Massimo; Aboumahboub, Tino; Luderer, Gunnar; Calvin, Katherine V.; DeMaere, Gauthier; Krey, Volker; Riahi, Keywan; Rosler, Hilke; Schaeffer, Michiel; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a novel and comprehensive model?based assessment of possible outcomes of the Durban Platform negotiations with a focus on emissions reduction requirements, the consistency with the 2°C target and global economic impacts. The Durban Action scenarios investigated in the LIMITS study—all assuming the implementation of comprehensive global emission reductions after 2020, but assuming different 2020 emission reduction levels and different long?term stabilization targets—show that the probability of exceeding the 2°C limit increases with stabilization target from below one third for 450?470 ppm to 40?60% for 490?510 ppm in 2100. Global time?averaged economic costs of the Durban Action scenarios are limited across models, and are largely unaffected by the stringency of 2020 pledges. By contrast, the economic impact of delaying action beyond 2030 is much stronger on transitional costs. The main significance of short term action in the period 2010?2030 lies in preparing the ground for steep emissions reductions thereafter by inducing global emissions to peak and decline. The institutional challenges of all scenarios with fragmented near?term climate policy can be expected to be high as reflected in a steep rise of carbon prices and decarbonization rates until 2040. We conclude that an agreement on comprehensive emissions reductions to be implemented from 2020 onwards has particular significance for meeting long term climate policy objectives.

  5. Development of Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerant Solutions for Commercial Refrigeration Systems using a Life Cycle Climate Performance Design Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL] [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial refrigeration systems are known to be prone to high leak rates and to consume large amounts of electricity. As such, direct emissions related to refrigerant leakage and indirect emissions resulting from primary energy consumption contribute greatly to their Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP). In this paper, an LCCP design tool is used to evaluate the performance of a typical commercial refrigeration system with alternative refrigerants and minor system modifications to provide lower Global Warming Potential (GWP) refrigerant solutions with improved LCCP compared to baseline systems. The LCCP design tool accounts for system performance, ambient temperature, and system load; system performance is evaluated using a validated vapor compression system simulation tool while ambient temperature and system load are devised from a widely used building energy modeling tool (EnergyPlus). The LCCP design tool also accounts for the change in hourly electricity emission rate to yield an accurate prediction of indirect emissions. The analysis shows that conventional commercial refrigeration system life cycle emissions are largely due to direct emissions associated with refrigerant leaks and that system efficiency plays a smaller role in the LCCP. However, as a transition occurs to low GWP refrigerants, the indirect emissions become more relevant. Low GWP refrigerants may not be suitable for drop-in replacements in conventional commercial refrigeration systems; however some mixtures may be introduced as transitional drop-in replacements. These transitional refrigerants have a significantly lower GWP than baseline refrigerants and as such, improved LCCP. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the tradeoffs between refrigerant GWP, efficiency and capacity.

  6. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011 J. Hansen, M. Sato, coincident with increased global warming. The most dramatic and important change of the climate dice change is the natural variability of climate. How can a person discern long-term climate change, given

  7. --Finance Home Yahoo! Help AFX News on Yahoo! Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - -Finance Home Yahoo! Help AFX News on Yahoo! Finance quote news London Go Symbol Lookup Monday Messenger | Yahoo! Finance- Page 1 of 1http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/050411/323/fg2hp.html #12;

  8. --Finance Home Yahoo! Help AFX News on Yahoo! Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - -Finance Home Yahoo! Help AFX News on Yahoo! Finance quote news London Go Symbol Lookup Monday. The EU plans to finance 40 pct of the total. bpi-aud/jit-jfs/km/jlw · More From > Previous article

  9. Review of ESPC Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document serves as a form for use in documenting a review of project financing in an energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

  10. Essays in entrepreneurial finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanda, Ramana

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing belief that countries with better financing environments are associated with higher economic growth because they facilitate entrepreneurship and hence the Schumpeterian process of 'creative destruction'. ...

  11. Project Finance Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Project Finance Case Studies and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  12. Sandia Energy - Finance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solutions allows project developers access to lower cost and more abundant capital for solar project finance. In order for insurance companies to enter this new market, they...

  13. Finance Idol Word Cloud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This word cloud represents the topics discussed during the Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs breakout session at the SunShot Grand Challenge.

  14. Financing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    nationwide to design and implement innovative financing programs that offer consumers low-cost, long-term loans-with the goal of making energy efficiency upgrades more...

  15. Three Essays in Empirical Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahluwalia, Saurabh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalies, Journal of Finance 51: Foster, G. , C. Olsen, andJournal of Business, Finance and Accounting 30, 771–797.investors, Journal of Finance 55, 773-806. Barber, Brad M. ,

  16. Essays in Macroeconomics and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khramov, Vadim

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    economies. ” Journal of Finance 39, pages 77-92. Vasicek,Interest Rate. ” Journal of Finance, Vol. 47, No. 3 Chernov,of Economics. B.A. (Finance), Higher School of Economics.

  17. Systemic risk in consumer finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poon, Martha

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceSystemic risk in consumer finance Martha Poon, NYU At the

  18. Monica Rimai Vice President, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Wim Wiewel President Monica Rimai Vice President, Finance & Administration Michael "Torre" Chisholm President, University Budget & Finance Phillip Zerzan Director, Campus Public Safety Sharon Blanton Director for Planning, Construction & Real Estate Don Forsythe Executive Director for Capital Finance

  19. Essays in Behavioral Corporate Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Hui

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and practice of corporate finance: evidence from the field,Journal of Applied Corporate Finance 15, 8–23. 18. Graham,governance, Journal of Finance 63, 2737–2784. 21. Hackbarth,

  20. Changing Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and a wide range of academic areas are investigating the different compo- nents. More recently, they are taking information gleaned from the global climate models and applying them to research questions pertaining to Texas. Dr. Bruce Mc...Carl, Regents Professor of agricultural economics at Texas A&M University, has researched the economics of climate change for the last 20 years. McCarl, as a lead CHANGING CLIMATES tx H2O | pg. McCarl ] tx H2O | pg. 4 Changing Climates author...

  1. programs in climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

  2. Geothermal Financing Workbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battocletti, E.C.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared to help small firm search for financing for geothermal energy projects. There are various financial and economics formulas. Costs of some small overseas geothermal power projects are shown. There is much discussion of possible sources of financing, especially for overseas projects. (DJE-2005)

  3. Records Management Administration & Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    SUBJECT: Records Management Administration & Finance Number: 4010 Effective Date: 02 applies to the retention and disposal of public records. The university records management liaison officer for Administration and Finance,will provide liaison and assistance in allphases of the records management process

  4. Solar thermal financing guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

  5. ADMINSTRATION & FINANCE Senior Vice President

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    ADMINSTRATION & FINANCE Senior Vice President DR. JEFFREY SCOTT FINANCIAL SERVICES Associate Vice ORGANIZATIONS FINANCE Director AMY HERRON General Accounting and Reporting Capital Assets Accounting Financial

  6. An investigation of the sub-grid variability of trace gases and aerosols for global climate modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    One fundamental property and limitation of grid based models is their inability to identify spatial details smaller than the grid cell size. While decades of work have gone into developing sub-grid treatments for clouds and land surface processes in climate models, the quantitative understanding of sub-grid processes and variability for aerosols and their precursors is much poorer. In this study, WRF-Chem is used to simulate the trace gases and aerosols over central Mexico during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign, with multiple spatial resolutions and emission/terrain scenarios. Our analysis focuses on quantifying the sub-grid variability (SGV) of trace gases and aerosols within a typical global climate model grid cell, i.e. 75x75 km2. Our results suggest that a simulation with 3-km horizontal grid spacing adequately reproduces the overall transport and mixing of trace gases and aerosols downwind of Mexico City, while 75-km horizontal grid spacing is insufficient to represent local emission and terrain-induced flows along the mountain ridge, subsequently affecting the transport and mixing of plumes from nearby sources. Therefore, the coarse model grid cell average may not correctly represent aerosol properties measured over polluted areas. Probability density functions (PDFs) for trace gases and aerosols show that secondary trace gases and aerosols, such as O3, sulfate, ammonium, and nitrate, are more likely to have a relatively uniform probability distribution (i.e. smaller SGV) over a narrow range of concentration values. Mostly inert and long-lived trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC, are more likely to have broad and skewed distributions (i.e. larger SGV) over polluted regions. Over remote areas, all trace gases and aerosols are more uniformly distributed compared to polluted areas. Both CO and O3 SGV vertical profiles are nearly constant within the PBL during daytime, indicating that trace gases are very efficiently transported and mixed vertically by turbulence. But, simulated horizontal variability indicates that trace gases and aerosols are not well mixed horizontally in the PBL. During nighttime the SGV for trace gases is maximum at the surface, and quickly decreases with height. Unlike the trace gases, the SGV of BC and secondary aerosols reaches a maximum at the PBL top during the day. The SGV decreases with distance away from the polluted urban area, has a more rapid decrease for long-lived trace gases and aerosols than for secondary ones, and is greater during daytime than nighttime. The SGV of trace gases and aerosols is generally larger than for meteorological quantities. Emissions can account for up to 50% of the SGV over urban areas such as Mexico City during daytime for less-reactive trace gases and aerosols, such as CO and BC. The impact of emission spatial variability on SGV decays with altitude in the PBL and is insignificant in the free troposphere. The emission variability affects SGV more significantly during daytime (rather than nighttime) and over urban (rather than rural or remote) areas. The terrain, through its impact on meteorological fields such as wind and the PBL structure, affects dispersion and transport of trace gases and aerosols and their SGV.

  7. Climate Leadership Conference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Climate Leadership Conference is your annual exchange for addressing global climate change through policy, innovation, and business solutions. Forward-thinking lead­ers from busi­ness, gov­ern...

  8. Long-Term Regional Climate Simulations Driven by Two Global Reanalyses and a GCM for the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Bian, Xindi; Qian, Yun

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To take advantage of recent development in the NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5), an effort has been organized to develop and evaluate an MM5-based community regional climate model. Several modifications such as the implementation of the PNNL subgrid parameterization of orographic precipitation, representation of cloud-radiation interaction, and additional output capabilities have been made to the recently released MM5 Version 3.4. To evaluate the model, several long-term simulations have been performed over the western U.S. These simulations were driven by the NCEP/NCAR and ECMWF reanalyses respectively for 20 and 13 years beginning at 1980. The western U.S. is marked by diverse topographic features and varied climate conditions such as the maritime climate in the coastal area and the semi-arid climate in the southwest. We will present results based on two domain configurations: a nested domain with a fine domain covering the western U.S. at 40 km resolution, and a single domain at 60 km resolution with the subgrid orographic precipitation scheme applied in the western U.S. Analyses are being performed to evaluate the simulations of the averaged climate and interannual variability and examine the model sensitivity to different boundary conditions. Our analyses focus on the relationships between large-scale circulation and regional climate features, surface energy and water budgets, orographic precipitation, and hydrologic conditions within selected river basins. Regional simulations are also being performed using large-scale conditions simulated by the NCAR/DOE Parallel Climate Model (PCM). The regional model was used to downscale the ensemble PCM climate change scenarios for periods of 10-20 years in the current and future climate. Results will be analyzed to study the impacts of greenhouse warming on regional water resources in the western U.S.

  9. Financing Sustainable EnergyFinancing Sustainable Energy City of Berkeley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Financing Sustainable EnergyFinancing Sustainable Energy City of Berkeley #12;Source of Green House for Sustainable EnergyFramework for Sustainable Energy Financing District · Adopted new Special Tax Financing Law indebtedness by unanimous consent of property owner #12;Framework for Sustainable Energy

  10. Financing Watershed Implementation Tools for Implementing the Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " financing · Guidebook of Financing Tools · Brownfield redevelopment financing · Financial & management

  11. The Influence on Climate Change of Differing Scenarios for Future Development Analyzed Using the MIT Integrated Global System Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinn, Ronald G.

    A wide variety of scenarios for future development have played significant roles in climate policy discussions. This paper presents projections of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations, sea level rise due to thermal expansion ...

  12. VICE PRESIDENT FINANCE, RESOURCES & OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    VICE PRESIDENT FINANCE, RESOURCES & OPERATIONS PIERRE OUILLET EA to VP Carolina Cerna ASSOCIATE VP ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE OKANAGAN CAMPUS Jackie Podger Michael Shakespeare (Interim) ASSOCIATE VP CAMPUS Dennis Silva FINANCE UBCO Carla Waters FINANCE UBCO Carla Waters BUDGET AND MGMT REPORTING Andrew Glynn

  13. Finance Degree Curriculum Information Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Finance Degree Curriculum Information Sheet 33:010:275-Intro. to Managerial Accounting (3) (pre-req: 33:010:272) 33:011:300-Business Forum (2) 33:390:310-Financial Management for Finance Majors (3)* 33:390:400-Corporate Finance (3) (pre-req: 33:390:310) 4 Finance electives (12) * Beginning Fall 2013

  14. Networks in Finance Anna Nagurney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Chapter 1 Networks in Finance Anna Nagurney Department of Finance and Operations Management as Chapter 17 in the Handbook on IT and Finance, D. Seese, C. Weinhardt, and F. Schlottmann, Editors, Springer (2008), Berlin, Germany. Summary. This handbook chapter traces the history of networks in finance

  15. Climate Finance Options Platform | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityClean EconomyLLCInformation Exchange

  16. Climate Financing Options | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityClean EconomyLLCInformation ExchangeOptions

  17. Climate Financing for Cities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDatasetCity ofClarkEnergy -ProjectClimatefor

  18. FOOTPRINTS OF IRELAND: HERITAGE AND LANDSCAPE Globally and nationally, we seem to be faced with significant challenges; climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 FOOTPRINTS OF IRELAND: HERITAGE AND LANDSCAPE Globally and nationally, we seem to be faced, religious and economic changes across time. Archaeological, historical and scientific research often reveals

  19. Financing energy efficiency projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S.J.; Weisman, J.C. [Hansen Associates (United States)

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Getting an energy project financed should be a shared effort between the ESCO and the customer, but the perspectives are different. It is the ESCO`s responsibility to put together a bankable project. The ESCO typically arranges the financing. Its reputation and history often add surety, which offers financiers added confidence. The customer usually incurs the debt and needs to know the financing options available. This article first addresses what constitutes a bankable project from the ESCO perspective. Then, the types of financing available to owners are explored. ESCOs, who have been in this business for a few years, remember knocking on the financial doors until their knuckles were bloody. Today, the financiers knock on the ESCO doors...if, and it`s a big IF, ESCOs can put together bankable projects.

  20. Local Public Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24. How to cite this article Quigley, John M. "local publicEW P ALGRAVE ) By John M. Quigley May 2008 These papers arelocal public finance John M. Quigley From The New Palgrave

  1. Computational Finance Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MS Degree in Mathematics with Specialization in Computational Finance ... Methods of Applied Mathematics: 3 or more credits from the following list:MA 611, CS 514, ... Computer Science, Agricultural Economics, and Industrial Engineering.

  2. Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

  3. A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical and humid climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical to determine luminous efficacy under different sky conditions. A comparison between these empirical constants. Keywords Global and diffuse luminous efficacy, different sky conditions, solar irradiance, solar

  4. Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program. A comprehensive plan. Part I. The global carbon cycle and climatic effects of increasing carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial plans for research of the carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) and climate issue were prepared in 1978 and were reviewed extensively at that time by federal agencies and members of the scientific community. Since then the plans have been used to guide early phases of the Department of Energy's and the nation's efforts related to this issue. This document represents a revision of the 1978 plan to (a) reflect recent ideas and strategies for carbon cycle research, and (b) expand the scope of research on climatic responses to increasing atmospheric concentrations of CO/sub 2/. The revised plan takes into account a number of investigations already being supported by various agencies, and it attempts to build on or add to existing research where there is a crucial need for information directly related to the CO/sub 2/ issue. It should be recognized that this document is the first section of a comprehensive plan on the overall consequences of increasing concentrations of CO/sub 2/, and includes guidelines for research on the Global Carbon Cycle and Climatic Effects of Increasing CO/sub 2/.

  5. Global Capital Finance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting Jump to:Echo, Maryland:Glenwillow, Ohio:|Americas LLC

  6. Finance 101 Student Organization Funding Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finance 101 Student Organization Funding Workshop #12;Finance Committee Mission Statement successful events Finance Committee Goals 2012-2013 2 #12;ASI Budget Allowance 5% Business & Administration

  7. Finance and Administration Florida State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Finance and Administration Florida State University President Senior Vice President Finance for ERP Sustainability * Reports to Provost and VP for Academic Affairs, indirectly to VP for Finance

  8. Improving Efficiency and Equity in Transportation Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fueling Transportation Finance. ” Ian W. H. Parry andFueling Transportation Finance. ” Transportation ResearchFueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax •

  9. Essays in Finance and Environmental Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    statistics from the Survey of Consumer Finances . . . . . .Publications. [4] Campbell, J. Y. 2006. Household Finance.Journal of Finance 61:1553–1604. [5] Canner, N. , N. G.

  10. Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    'Novel' Financing Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential for 'Novel' Financing Models...

  11. Essays on Municipal Public Finance in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Rachel Elizabeth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Municipal Public Finance in Brazil By Rachel Elizabethon Municipal Public Finance in Brazil by Rachel Elizabethlocal public finance in Brazil, with a focus on how federal

  12. BPA prepares for a changing climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    both generally and as part of events such as El Nio. Evidence of global and regional climate change is mounting. The recently released National Climate Assessment confirmed...

  13. THE APPLICATION OF A STATISTICAL DOWNSCALING PROCESS TO DERIVE 21{sup ST} CENTURY RIVER FLOW PREDICTIONS USING A GLOBAL CLIMATE SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, D.; Chen, K. F.

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in coming decades depends, in part, on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to alter river flows from their current values, possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. Reliable climate projections are therefore critical to predicting the future water supply for the United States. These projections cannot be provided solely by global climate models (GCMs), however, as their resolution is too coarse to resolve the small-scale climate changes that can affect hydrology, and hence water supply, at regional to local scales. A process is needed to ‘downscale’ the GCM results to the smaller scales and feed this into a surface hydrology model to help determine the ability of rivers to provide adequate flow to meet future needs. We apply a statistical downscaling to GCM projections of precipitation and temperature through the use of a scaling method. This technique involves the correction of the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the GCM-derived temperature and precipitation results for the 20{sup th} century, and the application of the same correction to 21{sup st} century GCM projections. This is done for three meteorological stations located within the Coosa River basin in northern Georgia, and is used to calculate future river flow statistics for the upper Coosa River. Results are compared to the historical Coosa River flow upstream from Georgia Power Company’s Hammond coal-fired power plant and to flows calculated with the original, unscaled GCM results to determine the impact of potential changes in meteorology on future flows.

  14. Response of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Karenia brevis to Current and Projected Environmental Conditions: Salinity and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Errera, Reagan Michelle

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    , increasing production ?44%. Ecosystem changes due to climate change have increased the production of toxins in other HAB species; here we examined the impact on K. brevis. We have shown that modification of pCO2 level and temperature did not influence...

  15. Global Economic Effects of Changes in Crops, Pasture, and Forests due to Changing Climate, Carbon Dioxide, and Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John M.

    Multiple environmental changes will have consequences for global vegetation. To the extent that crop yields and pasture and forest productivity are affected there can be important economic consequences. We examine the ...

  16. Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change climate extremes and change impacts. Uncertainties in process studies, climate models, and associated

  17. Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994 that will address climate change. Scientists tell us that the climate of the earth is warming, and that the warming into the foundation of the world economy and into the everyday things we do (driving) and use (electricity). Thus

  18. Bringing simulation to implementation: Presentation of a global approach in the design of passive solar buildings under humid tropical climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garde, François; Celaire, Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 1995, a DSM pilot initiative has been launched in the French islands of Guadeloupe and Reunion through a partnership between several public and private partners (the French Public Utility EDF, the University of Reunion Island, low cost housing companies, architects, energy consultants, etc...) to set up standards to improve thermal design of new residential buildings in tropical climates. This partnership led to defining optimized bio-climatic urban planning and architectural designs featuring the use of passive cooling architectural principles (solar shading, natural ventilation) and components, as well as energy efficient systems and technologies. The design and sizing of each architectural component on internal thermal comfort in building has been assessed with a validated thermal and airflow building simulation software (CODYRUN). These technical specifications have been edited in a reference document which has been used to build over 300 new pilot dwellings through the years 1996-1998 in Reunion...

  19. Department 2 Taxation, Accounting and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellebrand, Sybille

    Department 2 Taxation, Accounting and Finance #12;Department 2: Taxation, Accounting and Finance 2, Investition #12;Department 2: Taxation, Accounting and Finance 3 Übersicht Lehrstühle des Department 2 Prof #12;Department 2: Taxation, Accounting and Finance 4 Finanzwirtschaft und Bankbetriebslehre

  20. Finance and Enterprises Office February 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Vincent W. L.

    Finance and Enterprises Office February 2014 Office Management Student matters Insurance HKU SPACE Planning & Management Associate Director of Finance ----------------------------------- Antony Hui Associate Director of Finance ----------------------------------- Edmund Li Assistant Director of Finance

  1. Renewable Energy Project Financing: Impacts of the Financial Crisis and Federal Legislation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwabe, P.; Cory, K.; Newcomb, J.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraordinary financial market conditions have disrupted the flows of equity and debt investment into U.S. renewable energy (RE) projects since the fourth quarter of 2008. The pace and structure of renewable energy project finance has been reshaped by a combination of forces, including the financial crisis, global economic recession, and major changes in federal legislation affecting renewable energy finance. This report explores the impacts of these key market events on renewable energy project financing and development.

  2. QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    QUESTIONS ABOUT GLOBAL WARMING ¥IS IT REAL? ¥IS IT IMPORTANT? ¥WHAT IS IT DUE TO? ¥HOW MUCH MORE in the atmosphere, giving Earth its temperate climate. Global Atmosphere, Global Warming GLOBAL TEMPERATURE TREND IS THIS CARBON DIOXIDE COMING FROM? Other sources are home heating and electric power production. WE ARE ALL

  3. Guidebook to Geothermal Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, J. P.; Meurice, J.; Wobus, N.; Stern, F.; Duaime, M.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidebook is intended to facilitate further investment in conventional geothermal projects in the United States. It includes a brief primer on geothermal technology and the most relevant policies related to geothermal project development. The trends in geothermal project finance are the focus of this tool, relying heavily on interviews with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. Using the information provided, developers and investors may innovate in new ways, developing partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal projects in this dynamic and evolving marketplace.

  4. Financing Solutions | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    energy puzzle can be daunting, especially when it comes to financing. With that in mind this website aims to provide an overview of financing as it pertains to state, local,...

  5. Michigan Saves- Business Energy Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Michigan Saves is a non-profit that offers financing options for energy efficiency improvements throughout Michigan. The Business Energy Financing Program was started with seed funding from the...

  6. S53juNE 2010STATE OFTHE CLIMATE IN 2009 | 3. GLOBAL OCEANS--J. M. Levy, ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    's energy budget. · Ocean heat fluxes played a dual role in the dynamics of large-scale SST anomalies Niño a considerable build up of heat was observed in the upper equatorial Pacific Ocean. Global integrals of upper-ocean heat content for the last several years have reached values consistently higher

  7. S53JULY 2010STATE OFTHE CLIMATE IN 2009 | 3. Global oceans--J. M. Levy, Ed.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's energy budget. · Ocean heat fluxes played a dual role in the dynamics of large-scale SST anomalies. Heat Niño a considerable build up of heat was observed in the upper equatorial Pacific Ocean. Global integrals of upper-ocean heat content for the last several years have reached values consistently higher

  8. An open letter to the 2008 presidential candidates: get the facts right on what's responsible for global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, Henry R.

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The two remaining presidential candidates have adopted policies for reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions that address factors that are mistakenly held responsible as the primary cause of global warming. Here's what they need to keep in mind in order to craft genuinely efficacious policies. (author)

  9. Finance Degree Curriculum Information Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Finance Degree Curriculum Information Sheet Business Core 33:010:275-Intro. to Managerial:390:310-Financial Management for Finance Majors (3)* 33:620:301-Intro to Management (3)** 33:620:302-Management Management (3) Required Finance Courses 33:390:380-Investment Analysis (3) (pre-req: 33:390:310) 33

  10. Accounting & Finance (BAcc) Induction 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    Accounting & Finance (BAcc) Induction 2014 Monday 15 September 2014 Induction Programme: 0945] Welcome from the Business School and Accounting & Finance 1000 The Accountancy Degrees 1015 Programme & 3 on Level 4 Accounting & Finance Bldg Tuesday 16 September 2014 Advising Session Lunch (provided

  11. Simon Gervais Professor of Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    Simon Gervais Professor of Finance Faculty CoDirector of the Center for Financial Excellence Simon Gervais is a Full Professor of Finance at The Fuqua School of Business. Prior to joining Fuqua in 2003, he was an Assistant Professor of Finance at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania

  12. Global Development Our Responsibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of expertise cover urgent global issues such as food production, energy supply, climate change, biodiversity e ort to address urgent global issues particularly a ecting developing countries e.g. climate change of Communication, 2012 · Project Leader: Karin Nilsson · Graphic Design: Viktor Wrange & Michael Kvick Cover Photo

  13. Economics & Finance Degree options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    98 Economics & Finance Degree options MA or BSc (Single Honours Degrees) Applied Economics Economics Financial Economics BA (International Honours Degree) Economics (See page 51) MA or BSc (Joint Honours Degrees) Economics and one of: Geography Management Mathematics MA (Joint Honours Degrees

  14. PREVIOUS ARTICLE Who Finances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    Energy -- all Kleiner Perkins portfolio companies. Mark Kerstens, Solexel's chief sales and marketingPREVIOUS ARTICLE Who Finances Residential Solar in... NEXT ARTICLE Two Charts That Illustrate the... Solexel, Thin-Silicon Solar Startup, Lands $31M More in VC Funding More than $200 million in funding so

  15. Computing for Finance

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing ? from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained with UBS for the past 9 years. During his tenure at UBS, he has had a number of leadership roles within IT in development, support and architecture. In 2006 Michael relocated to Switzerland to take up his current role as head of the UBS IB Technical Council, responsible for the overall technology strategy and vision of the Investment Bank. One of Michael's key responsibilities is to manage the UBS High Performance Computing Research Lab and he has been involved in a number of initiatives in the HPC space. 2. Grid in the Commercial WorldFred Gedling, Chief Technology Officer EMEA and Senior Vice President Global Services, DataSynapse Grid computing gets mentions in the press for community programs starting last decade with "Seti@Home". Government, national and supranational initiatives in grid receive some press. One of the IT-industries' best-kept secrets is the use of grid computing by commercial organizations with spectacular results. Grid Computing and its evolution into Application Virtualization is discussed and how this is key to the next generation data center. Speaker Bio: Fred Gedling holds the joint roles of Chief Technology Officer for EMEA and Senior Vice President of Global Services at DataSynapse, a global provider of application virtualisation software. Based in London and working closely with organisations seeking to optimise their IT infrastructures, Fred offers unique insights into the technology of virtualisation as well as the methodology of establishing ROI and rapid deployment to the immediate advantage of the business. Fred has more than fifteen years experience of enterprise middleware and high-performance infrastructures. Prior to DataSynapse he worked in high performance CRM middleware and was the CTO EMEA for New Era of Networks (NEON) during the rapid growth of Enterprise Application Integration. His 25-year career in technology also includes management positions at Goldman Sachs and Stratus Computer. Fred holds a First Class Bsc (Hons) degree in Physics with Astrophysics from the University of Leeds and had the privilege o

  16. Computing for Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing – from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained with UBS for the past 9 years. During his tenure at UBS, he has had a number of leadership roles within IT in development, support and architecture. In 2006 Michael relocated to Switzerland to take up his current role as head of the UBS IB Technical Council, responsible for the overall technology strategy and vision of the Investment Bank. One of Michael's key responsibilities is to manage the UBS High Performance Computing Research Lab and he has been involved in a number of initiatives in the HPC space. 2. Grid in the Commercial WorldFred Gedling, Chief Technology Officer EMEA and Senior Vice President Global Services, DataSynapse Grid computing gets mentions in the press for community programs starting last decade with "Seti@Home". Government, national and supranational initiatives in grid receive some press. One of the IT-industries' best-kept secrets is the use of grid computing by commercial organizations with spectacular results. Grid Computing and its evolution into Application Virtualization is discussed and how this is key to the next generation data center. Speaker Bio: Fred Gedling holds the joint roles of Chief Technology Officer for EMEA and Senior Vice President of Global Services at DataSynapse, a global provider of application virtualisation software. Based in London and working closely with organisations seeking to optimise their IT infrastructures, Fred offers unique insights into the technology of virtualisation as well as the methodology of establishing ROI and rapid deployment to the immediate advantage of the business. Fred has more than fifteen years experience of enterprise middleware and high-performance infrastructures. Prior to DataSynapse he worked in high performance CRM middleware and was the CTO EMEA for New Era of Networks (NEON) during the rapid growth of Enterprise Application Integration. His 25-year career in technology also includes management positions at Goldman Sachs and Stratus Computer. Fred holds a First Class Bsc (Hons) degree in Physics with Astrophysics from the University of Leeds and had the privilege

  17. Climate Change and Place Roundtable Discussion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Urban Development and Climate Change,” 2007. The fullThink about what runaway climate change would mean where youWorld Changing Seattle, WA Climate change is global in scale

  18. Introduction to Climate The Role Played by the Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    Introduction to Climate January 16, 2012 2 / 63 #12;Global Warming Abrupt Climate Change Ice Age: as a Consequence of Global Warming? Global warming is a contemporary fact. The Earth has undergone many sudden and abrupt Warming Abrupt Climate Change Ice Age: as a Consequence of Global Warming? Global warming

  19. Iowa Climate Change Briefing and Discussion -Monday February 16 The University of Iowa Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research and a variety of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    Iowa Climate Change Briefing and Discussion - Monday February 16 The University of Iowa Center to a climate change briefing and discussion to highlight the recent report of the Iowa Climate Change Advisory Council. The meeting will be an opportunity to learn more about climate change science its potential

  20. Global Warming: Is There Still Time to Avoid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Global Warming: Is There Still Time to Avoid Disastrous Human -Made Climate Change? i.e. Have We simulations. (B) Simulated and observed surface temperature change. #12;21st Century Global Warming Climate) Simulated Global Warming Warming

  1. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)���¢��������s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9�������°��������2.5�������° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1�������° x 1�������°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 �������µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4�������º by 5�������º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between ���¢��������clean marine���¢������� aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses

  2. ISSN 1745-9648 Financing Renewable Energy through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    suppliers. The liberalisation of the electricity has coincided with mounting concerns about global warming tariffs. Accordingly, green electricity tariffs are product innovations whereby the electricity supplyISSN 1745-9648 Financing Renewable Energy through Household Adoption of Green Electricity Tariffs

  3. Climate Action Plan (New Mexico)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizing the profound implications that global warming and climate variation could have on the economy, environment and quality of life in the Southwest, New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Climate change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research effort. Created to help resolve scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, ARM focuses on studying the role of clouds and aerosols in atmospheric and...

  5. Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Yi

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-GTRC-05596 11/24/2104 Collaborative Research: Process-Resolving Decomposition of the Global Temperature Response to Modes of Low Frequency Variability in a Changing Climate PI: Dr. Yi Deng (PI) School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Georgia Institute of Technology 404-385-1821, yi.deng@eas.gatech.edu El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Annular Modes (AMs) represent respectively the most important modes of low frequency variability in the tropical and extratropical circulations. The projection of future changes in the ENSO and AM variability, however, remains highly uncertain with the state-of-the-science climate models. This project conducted a process-resolving, quantitative evaluations of the ENSO and AM variability in the modern reanalysis observations and in climate model simulations. The goal is to identify and understand the sources of uncertainty and biases in models’ representation of ENSO and AM variability. Using a feedback analysis method originally formulated by one of the collaborative PIs, we partitioned the 3D atmospheric temperature anomalies and surface temperature anomalies associated with ENSO and AM variability into components linked to 1) radiation-related thermodynamic processes such as cloud and water vapor feedbacks, 2) local dynamical processes including convection and turbulent/diffusive energy transfer and 3) non-local dynamical processes such as the horizontal energy transport in the oceans and atmosphere. In the past 4 years, the research conducted at Georgia Tech under the support of this project has led to 15 peer-reviewed publications and 9 conference/workshop presentations. Two graduate students and one postdoctoral fellow also received research training through participating the project activities. This final technical report summarizes key scientific discoveries we made and provides also a list of all publications and conference presentations resulted from research activities at Georgia Tech. The main findings include: 1) the distinctly different roles played by atmospheric dynamical processes in establishing surface temperature response to ENSO at tropics and extratropics (i.e., atmospheric dynamics disperses energy out of tropics during ENSO warm events and modulate surface temperature at mid-, high-latitudes through controlling downward longwave radiation); 2) the representations of ENSO-related temperature response in climate models fail to converge at the process-level particularly over extratropics (i.e., models produce the right temperature responses to ENSO but with wrong reasons); 3) water vapor feedback contributes substantially to the temperature anomalies found over U.S. during different phases of the Northern Annular Mode (NAM), which adds new insight to the traditional picture that cold/warm advective processes are the main drivers of local temperature responses to the NAM; 4) the overall land surface temperature biases in the latest NCAR model (CESM1) are caused by biases in surface albedo while the surface temperature biases over ocean are related to multiple factors including biases in model albedo, cloud and oceanic dynamics, and the temperature biases over different ocean basins are also induced by different process biases. These results provide a detailed guidance for process-level model turning and improvement, and thus contribute directly to the overall goal of reducing model uncertainty in projecting future changes in the Earth’s climate system, especially in the ENSO and AM variability.

  6. Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Topic OverviewFinancing green infrastructure is critical to taking projects from planning to implementation and beyond, including sustaining operations and maintenance. This 90-minute webcast will...

  7. Local Option- Commercial PACE Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 2012, Connecticut passed legislation enabling Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy financing (C-PACE), targeting commercial, industrial and multifamily property owners.  C-PACE is a ...

  8. Finance is the study of the acquisition, distribution, and flow of funds. Finance professionals analyze capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5/2013 FINANCE Finance is the study of the acquisition, distribution, and flow of funds. Finance, lending money and investing money. Financial professionals may work with individuals (personal finance), businesses (corporate finance) and within government agencies (public finance). Financial service job

  9. Climate Change Impacts in the Amazon. Review of scientific literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Amazon's hydrological cycle is a key driver of global climate, and global climate is therefore sensitive to changes in the Amazon. Climate change threatens to substantially affect the Amazon region, which in turn is expected to alter global climate and increase the risk of biodiversity loss. In this literature review the following subjects can be distinguished: Observed Climatic Change and Variability, Predicted Climatic Change, Impacts, Forests, Freshwater, Agriculture, Health, and Sea Level Rise.

  10. Essays on Macroeconomics and International Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Gewei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    investment flows. Journal of Finance 52(5):1851–80. Calvo,mutual funds. Journal of Finance 45(2):497–521. Dvo?r´ak,Indonesia. Journal of Finance 60(2):817–839. Eichenbaum,

  11. Essays in technology adoption and corporate finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Pratish

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 Form Follows Finance 3.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . 3.2Journal of Banking &; Finance 33.4, pp. 694 –700. Cochrane,of Investment”. In: Journal of Finance 61, pp. 139–170.

  12. Essays on consumption cycles and corporate finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Issler, Paulo Floriano

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In: The Journal of Finance 41.1, pp. 19–37. Flannery, Markand practice of corporate finance: evidence from the field”.Issues”. In: Journal of Finance 51.5, pp. 1809–33. Hamilton,

  13. Lease Financing Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron 9 5 -ofLearning from RomanLease-Financing-Program

  14. Sandia Energy - Finance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergyFailure Mode andFinance Home

  15. Cool Farming: Climate impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Cool Farming: Climate impacts of agriculture and mitigation potential greenpeace.org Campaigningfor meat categories as well as milk and selected plant products for comparison. 36 Figure 1: Total global

  16. Climate Action Plan (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recognizing the implications that global climate change may have on the economy, environment and quality of life in Minnesota, Governor Tim Pawlenty signed into law the 2007 Next Generation Energy...

  17. arm program climate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center is leading NOAA Center Veach-Baley Federal Building 151 Patton Avenue Asheville, North Carolina Climate Data Record 11 AWI Conference on Global Climate Change Conference...

  18. animations climate change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994 that will address climate...

  19. avoid climate change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes 12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature 12; Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing...

  20. Climate Change and Indiana Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contribute to changes in global climate patterns. Global warming can occur from a variety of causes, both, rainfall or winds) sustained over several decades or longer. Global Warming: An increase in the average natural and human induced. #12;7/23/2009 3 A Brief History of "Global Warming" Source: National Center

  1. Vice President/CFO Administration and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Vice President/CFO Administration and Finance Danny C. Kim Associate Vice President Facilities Management Tinnah Medina Director Facilities Operations Willem van der Pol Manager Finance & Admin Services

  2. Financing Small Business Upgrades | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary More Documents & Publications Midcourse Refinements of Financing Strategies Finance Peer Exchange Kickoff Call Strategies for Marketing and Driving Demand for Commercial...

  3. Comprehensive Energy Projects (CEP) and Innovative Financing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comprehensive Energy Projects (CEP) and Innovative Financing Comprehensive Energy Projects (CEP) and Innovative Financing Presented at the Technology Transition Corporation and...

  4. Financing Mechanisms for Renewable Energy Projects | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financing Mechanisms for Renewable Energy Projects Financing Mechanisms for Renewable Energy Projects On December 5, 2013, the White House released Federal Leadership on Energy...

  5. Commercial Solar Hot Water Financing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A variety of financing options will be available depending on the project, including power purchase agreements or energy service agreements. A third party will finance the construction, maintenan...

  6. Financing Watershed Implementation Tools for Implementing the Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Guidebook of Financing Tools · Brownfield redevelopment financing · Financial & management capacity

  7. Department of Finance Programs and Majors STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    Department of Finance Programs and Majors STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS Finance & Investment Society http students http://cbaweb.sdsu.edu/finance/aef AVAILABLE BUSINESS/FINANCIAL DATA Bloomberg Terminals (Wells PROGRAMS Undergraduate majors: Finance; Financial Services; Real Estate Graduate programs: Finance

  8. Development and application of WRF3.3-CLM4crop to study of agriculture - climate interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yaqiong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Climate Change and United-States Agriculture, Nature,climate modeling Land surface modeling Agriculture and climate interaction Land use change

  9. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  10. Global ClimateGlobal Climate meets dynamics inmeets dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    texture.texture. Here we will go to high latitudes for examples, whereHere we will go to high latitudes Arctic basin. From satellite passive microwave radiometer.meter. #12;Beneath the ocean surface, moisture flux, heat fluxwinds, moisture flux, heat flux meridionalmeridional energy transportenergy

  11. HOMEOWNERS GUIDE TO SOLAR FINANCING

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy States Alliance has released a guide to help homeowners navigate the complex landscape of residential solar PV system financing. The free online publication helps help homeowners make sound decisions and select the best financing option for their needs. The guide describes leases, loans, and power purchase agreements (PPAs) and explains the advantages and disadvantages of each, as well as how they compare to a direct cash purchase. It clarifies key solar financing terms and provides a list of questions homeowners should ask before deciding if and how to proceed with installing a solar system.

  12. Georgia Southern University Business and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Georgia Southern University Business and Finance Organization Chart 2013-2014 FINAL: September 18, 2013 R:\\Work\\Common\\Org Charts\\Rev2014\\ Business & Finance Produced: Strategic Research & Analysis/KBM President Vice President for Business and Finance Associate Vice President for Finance Associate Vice

  13. Finance and Administration Organization FRANCINE G. MCNAIRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Finance and Administration Organization PRESIDENT FRANCINE G. MCNAIRY VICE PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE CONTRACTING RUTH SHEETZ ASSISTANT TO THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION ELIZABETH W. KAREVICIUS PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION KENNETH E. DEARSTYNE JR. CONTROLLER TEH P. KRAJAN SENIOR ACCOUNTANT

  14. FUN WITH FINANCE JULY 27, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    FUN WITH FINANCE JULY 27, 2010 07/28/2010 Rev. A July 2010 RO ConferenceFun with Finance. A 2 July 2010 RO ConferenceFun with Finance (Panchisin) #12;Expected Learning Outcomes · University 2010 RO ConferenceFun with Finance (Panchisin) 3 #12;07/28/2010 Rev. A July 2010 RO Conference

  15. Ankur Pareek Assistant Professor of Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    1 Ankur Pareek Assistant Professor of Finance Rutgers Business School 1 Washington Park Newark, NJ Professor of Finance, Rutgers Business School, September 2009- Present Education Ph.D. Finance Yale University December 2009 M.S. Finance London School of Economics December 2004 M.Tech Mechanical Engineering

  16. Master of Science in Banking and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Luxembourg School of Finance ­ Master of Science in Banking and Finance ­ FACULTYOFLAW School of Finance. In its seven years of existence, the University of Luxembourg has earned a place in Luxembourg's intellectual, economic and cultural life. This is particularly so in the area of finance

  17. Montana State University 1 Finance Minor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Finance Minor The Finance minor is open to all students, with the exception of students pursuing a business degree with the Finance option. Program objectives include · To provide flexibility to design one's own program through choice of electives Students seeking the Finance

  18. TOP VALUEIN THE NATION --Kiplinger's Personal Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    TOP VALUEIN THE NATION --Kiplinger's Personal Finance and The Princeton Review HOW TO FINANCE YOUR's public -- a price that says value. Many students look for ways to finance their cost of attendance. Binghamton can assist you with understanding financing options including student and parent loans

  19. FINANCE DEPARTMENT Office Hours Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    FINANCE DEPARTMENT Office Hours Fall 2014 NAME OFFICE HOURS COURSE # COURSE TITLE DAY TIME ROOM-1515 and by appointment FIN 323.8 FIN 323.9 FIN 323.11 FIN 326.1 Fundamentals of Finance Fundamentals of Finance Fundamentals of Finance Financial Institution Mgt TTH TTH TH TTH 0930-1045 1100-1215 1600-1840 1230-1345 GMCS

  20. Project Development and Finance: Capabilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capabilities overview of NREL's Project Finance and Development Group within the Deployment and Market Transformation Directorate.

  1. Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides information on Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative (CE+BFI). CE+BFI brings together public infrastructure finance agencies, clean energy public fund managers and institutional investors across the country to explore how to raise capital at scale for clean energy development through bond financing. Author: Clean Energy and Bond Finance Initiative

  2. Administration and Finance Weekly Activity Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Administration and Finance Weekly Activity Report Week Ending: February 28, 2014 · Administration and Finance Website ­ The website for Administration and Finance has been successfully migrated into NMSU Administration and Finance forms page. · New Collections System ­ Working in conjunction with the University

  3. Doctoral Program in Finance: Curriculum Fall FIN 7935 Finance Research Forum (1 credit hour)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foroosh, Hassan

    Doctoral Program in Finance: Curriculum First Year Fall FIN 7935 Finance Research Forum (1 credit of Finance Spring FIN 7935 Finance Research Forum (1 credit hour) ECO 6424 Econometrics I ECO 7116 Microeconomic Theory II FIN 7807 Seminar in Corporate Finance Attend FCTL Teaching Workshop for Doctoral

  4. Linear analysis of surface temperature dynamics and climate sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wei

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral properties of global surface temperature and uncertainties of global climate sensitivity are explored in this work through the medium of Energy Balance Climate Models (EBCMs) and observational surface temperature data. In part I, a complete...

  5. Linear analysis of surface temperature dynamics and climate sensitivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wei

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral properties of global surface temperature and uncertainties of global climate sensitivity are explored in this work through the medium of Energy Balance Climate Models (EBCMs) and observational surface temperature data. In part I, a complete...

  6. Essays on development and finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Shawn (Shawn Allen)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a collection of three empirical essays on economic development and finance. Chapter 1 examines how politicians influence the lending decisions of government owned- banks, particularly whether government ...

  7. Bond Financing Program (New Hampshire)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BFA’s Bond Financing Program offers tax-exempt and taxable bonds for fixed-asset expansion projects. Industrial development revenue bonds can be used by manufacturers for the acquisition,...

  8. Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nuclear Decommissioning Financing Act calls for the establishment of a tax-exempt, tax-deductible decommissioning fund by the licensee of any nuclear power generating facility to pay for the...

  9. Financing Co-generation Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    profit generated by energy intensive industries will not be sufficient to provide the capital required for both normal business expansion and energy conservation projects. Debt financing for energy saving equipment will adversely impact balance sheet...

  10. Economic Inducement Financing Program (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Companies relocating to or expanding within the state are eligible for CDA direct loans up to $5 million through its Economic Inducement Financing Program. proceeds may be used for working capital...

  11. Local Option- Clean Energy Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most...

  12. Innovative financing survey: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, R.L.

    1986-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents the current knowledge and utilization of Innovative Financing techniques of Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) subgrantees, a sample of Institutional Conservation Program (ICP) grantees, Public Service Commissions (PSC) and selected utilities broadly distributed in the country. The survey inquired essentially about their organizational use and familiarity with the following innovative financing methods: Direct Loan, Loan Interest Reduction, Lease, Lease Purchase, Shared Savings, Energy Service Contracts, Conservation Incentives and Guaranteed Cash Flow. Whatever their characteristics, urban or rural, schools or hospitals, gas and electric utilities of differing ownership types, large or small states, respondents indicated a marginal awareness and utilization of the eight major financing methods. Even though their awareness and use is uneven with respect to their characteristics, certain trends emerge which display an overall lack of application of most of these financing techniques to enhance the program use of grant funds.

  13. Essays in real estate finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bokhari, Sheharyar Javaid

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is a collection of three essays in real estate finance. In the first essay, we observe that between 1985 and 2007, the share of household mortgage debt as a proportion of the total value of housing in the ...

  14. Geothermal Outreach and Project Financing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth Battocletti

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The ?Geothermal Outreach and Project Financing? project substantially added to the understanding of geothermal resources, technology, and small business development by both the general public as well as those in the geothermal community.

  15. Sandia Energy - Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AtomisticFig1 Permalink Gallery Atomistic Molecular Dynamics of Ion-Containing Polymers Highlights - HPC Atomistic Molecular Dynamics of Ion-Containing Polymers In the quest...

  16. Sandia Energy - Global Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInAppliedEnergyGeothermal Home

  17. Climate impact metrics for energy technology evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Morgan Rae

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate change mitigation potential of energy technologies depends on how their lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions compare to global climate stabilization goals. Current methods for comparing technologies, which assess ...

  18. Implications of Climate Science for Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, H.D.

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change presents the greatest challenge ever faced by our domestic and international institutions, and a great deal of the difficulty lies in the science of the issue. Because human influence on global climate differs ...

  19. Challenges of Adapting to a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurd, Brian H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Global Climate Change on Agriculture: An Interpretiveon U.S. Agriculture, in THE IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON THEclimate change and the potential roles for adaptation are more severe for ecosystems than they are for managed systems like agriculture.

  20. Finance is the art and science of managing money. A semester-long finance class (BFIN 409) allows you

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    FINANCE Finance is the art and science of managing money. OPTION A semester-long finance class.S. IN BUSINESS What is Finance? What Finance Classes are Offered at MSU? Commercial Bank Management Entrepreneurial Finance Financial Markets & Institutions Financial Statement Analysis International Finance Intro

  1. Independent Directors and Board Control in Venture Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broughman, Brian

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of venture capital finance. Journal of Law, Economics, andventures. Journal of Finance 60, 2513-2549. Dewatripont,venture capital. Journal of Finance 50, Grossman, S. , Hart,

  2. Finance Peer Exchange Kickoff Call | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Finance Peer Exchange Kickoff Call Finance Peer Exchange Kickoff Call BetterBuildings Financing Peer Exchange Kickoff Call, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, April 28, 2011. Call...

  3. Finance at Center Stage: Some Lessons of the Euro Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obstfeld, Maurice

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crisis: Have the Rules of Finance Changed?  Singapore: Ready or Not?  Essays in International Finance No.  209.  Princeton, NJ: International Finance Section, Department of 

  4. Finance and Labor: Perspectives on Risk, Inequality, and Democracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Sanford

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    George Clarke et al. , “Finance and Income Inequality: WhatKunt, and Ross Levine, “Finance, Inequality, and the Poor,”10 Journal of Empirical Finance (2003); Pinelopi Goldberg

  5. Federal Energy and Water Efficiency Project Financing | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Energy and Water Efficiency Project Financing Federal Energy and Water Efficiency Project Financing The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers financing options...

  6. Clean Energy Finance Guide, Chapter 12: Commercial Property-Assessed...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Guide, Chapter 12: Commercial Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing Clean Energy Finance Guide, Chapter 12: Commercial Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) Financing...

  7. Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets formerly New Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets formerly New Energy Finance Carbon Markets Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets (formerly...

  8. Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

  9. Needed : a realistic strategy for global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.; Schmalensee, Richard.

    Through a brief look at the science and economics of climate, the authors show that if climate change turns out to be a serious threat, an effective response will require a substantial and very long-term global effort. ...

  10. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Magnesium

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Leading magnesium producers and casting companies are working with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to alleviate the global environmental threat of climate...

  11. MSc Climate Change A cross-disciplinary degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    MSc Climate Change A cross-disciplinary degree www.geog.ucl.ac.uk/climate LONDON'S GLOBAL of climatic change and to develop adaptation strategies. The UCL MSc Climate Change provides rigorous scientific and vocational training for the next generation of climate change professionals. Students

  12. Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    RESEARCH PAPER Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems Enric Batllori1 Climate change, climate uncertainty, fire-climate relationship, fire shifts, Mediterranean biome Mediterranean biome and identify potential shifts in fire activity under an ensemble of global climate

  13. Category 1: World's best journals Journal of Banking and Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhengjun

    Category 1: World's best journals Journal of Banking and Finance Journal of Finance Journal: Leading specialist journals Financial Analysts Journal Financial Management Journal of Business Finance and Accounting Journal of Empirical Finance Journal of Financial Econometrics Journal of Financial Education

  14. UNIVERSITY OF CANTERBURY DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND FINANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    1 UNIVERSITY OF CANTERBURY DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS AND FINANCE UNDERGRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE and Finance ______________________ 6 Where is the Department of Economics and Finance? __________________________________________________________ 6 Studying Economics and Finance ___________________________________________________ 7 What

  15. Financial Services Division of Administration & Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Financial Services Division of Administration & Finance (657) 278-2512 / Fax (714) 278: May Wong / Financial Services (CP-300). Instructions are at Questions? Email Directive11@fullerton.eduwww.finance

  16. Third Party Financing of Alternate Energy Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, A. C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dean Witter Reynolds has been actively involved in all aspects of project financing. This paper discusses the needs and concerns of equity investors and lenders in financing energy projects. The paper reviews types of available loans, interested...

  17. Local Option- Commercial PACE Financing (Utah)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Senate Bill 221 of 2013 authorizes local governments to adopt Commercial* Property Assessed Clean Energy (C-PACE) financing programs. C-PACE allows property owners to finance energy efficiency and...

  18. Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vehicle for Residential PV Installations: Opportunities andfor Financing Residential PV Systems Mark Bolinger, Lawrencefor residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing

  19. Financing Advanced Biofuels, Biochemicals And Biopower In Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financing Advanced Biofuels, Biochemicals And Biopower In Integrated Biorefineries Financing Advanced Biofuels, Biochemicals And Biopower In Integrated Biorefineries Afternoon...

  20. Model Financing Solicitation for Energy Savings Performance Contracts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Innovative Financing Solutions: Finding Money for Your Energy Efficiency Projects Association for Governmental Leasing & Finance (AGLF) ESPC...

  1. Effect of the potential melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the Meridional Overturning Circulation and global climate in the future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Weiqing

    Effect of the potential melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet on the Meridional Overturning February 2011 Keywords: Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation Sea level Greenland Ice Sheet Global of the Greenland Ice Sheet since the mid-1990s. This increased ice sheet mass loss might be an evidence of global

  2. FINANCE AND FINANCE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE November 22, 2011 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    FINANCE AND FINANCE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE November 22, 2011 Page 1 FINANCE AND AUDIT COMMITTEE The primary responsibility for the financial reporting of the Finance and Audit Committee is to assist the Board in fulfilling its obligations and oversight

  3. Finance E-Newsletter CFO's Message

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finance E-Newsletter June 2009 CFO's Message Dear Colleagues, Happy New Fiscal Year! As we close FY. On an operational level, several initiatives aimed at improving the services that Finance provides to the community-standing pillars of SEAS Finance: Lipoi Finau and Ruth DeMone who, after respectively 17 and 41 years of service

  4. Finance forum.........................2 LTAP Roads Scholars.............3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    · Finance forum.........................2 · LTAP Roads Scholars.............3 · CTS Executive on page 3 Value capture continued on page 2 Current funding and finance mechanisms for transportation face completed research project led by CTS. "The project provides new financing meth- ods that are not currently

  5. Finance E-Newsletter September 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finance E-Newsletter September 2009 CFO's Message Dear Colleagues, A big section of the June issue and the resulting temporary re-organization of Finance with a reduced staff. Further information on the staff re is at providing you with relevant information about SEAS finances. To that effect, could you please answer

  6. Finance, IT Operations & Information Security Dear Colleagues,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Finance, IT Operations & Information Security Dear Colleagues, It is hard not to be mindful with the guidance of their senior administrators. The re-organization in some of the finance offices continues the intranet site. #12;2 Harry Dumay, PhD MBA Chief Financial Officer/ Associate Dean for Finance

  7. UNLV FINANCE DEPARTMENT ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    UNLV FINANCE DEPARTMENT ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY Academic integrity and ethical behavior are cornerstones of a high quality educational environment and the Finance Department fully embraces the University dishonesty will be kept in the Finance Department. An individual with a second violation of our academic

  8. QUI FINANCE LA RECHERCHE L'UNIGE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halazonetis, Thanos

    QUI FINANCE LA RECHERCHE À L'UNIGE? Impôt cantonal Département de l'instruction publique Impôt'Union européenne 63 % 20 % 6 % Posez-nous vos questions... · Comment ces financements couvrent-ils les besoins des chercheurs? Comment financer de grands équipements? · Comment les chercheurs font-ils pour obtenir des

  9. Economics & Finance press.princeton.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    Economics & Finance 2012 press.princeton.edu #12;TEXT Professors who wish to consider a book from & Research 18 Game Theory 22 Finance 23 Econometrics, Mathematical & Applied Economics 26 Political Economy page 25 see page 3 see page 12 see page 20 Contents #12;press.princeton.edu 1 forThcoming Finance

  10. Office of Finance and Administration Margaret Ferguson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Office of Finance and Administration Margaret Ferguson Associate Dean College of Agriculture Center Jeanine Masse Director Budget & Finance Mark Pluchino Director Sr. Associate Deans Jan Nyrop / Max Ecology Finance and Administration Laurie Coffin Administrative Assistant Other: Angie Putnam-OAP Betty

  11. Finance Division EXTRA MILE AWARD PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crews, Stephen

    Finance Division EXTRA MILE AWARD PROGRAM Nomination Form Instructions Any fulltime or parttime permanent or temporary SPA employee within the Finance Division who works 20 or more provided. The seven major departments within the Finance Division to choose from are described below

  12. Personal Finance Make Your Money Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Mark

    Personal Finance Make Your Money Matter Name: Registration number: Department: Year of study of your portfolio. #12;Personal Finance Make Your Money Matter2 Contents Timetable Page 3 Introduction 16 #12;Personal Finance Make Your Money Matter3 Timetable Friday 6.00 pm Introduction

  13. User Guide for San José Finance Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This user guide is intended primarily for the finance tool itself rather than an introduction to photovoltaics (PV) and PV finance. Users who do not have a basic understanding of PV systems, terminology, and financing structures are encouraged to review the documents referenced at the end of the guide...

  14. DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE College of Business Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE College of Business Administration San Diego State University COMPARISON.E. ("Exploration") 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 Total Upper Division Units 56 54 49-50 49 52 52 56 FINANCE MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Economics 3 MGT 350 Mgt. and Org. Behavior 3 FIN 325 Intermediate Finance 4 MGT 405 Int'l. Bus. Strat

  15. ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusu, Adrian

    ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Chapter 1 POLICY DEVELOPMENT & IMPLEMENTATION................................................................................. 3 #12;ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Chapter 1 POLICY DEVELOPMENT & IMPLEMENTATION Revision Date: 1/26/10 1.01 PURPOSE AND USE OF THE MANUAL This Administration and Finance Policies

  16. Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2012 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report for the year ended 30 September 2012 Report of the Directors

  17. Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2010 Details 16 Wellcome Trust Finance plc | Contents | 1 #12;Activities The principal activity of Wellcome Trust Finance plc (the "Company") is to issue and invest in financial instruments e.g. shares, bonds

  18. Annual Report Wellcome Trust Finance plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle upon Tyne, University of

    Annual Report Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements 2011 #12;#12;Wellcome Trust Finance plc | | 01 Contents Directors' Report 02 Independent Auditors' Report 05 Profit Administrative Details 15 #12;02 | Wellcome Trust Finance plc | Directors' Report Directors' Report for the year

  19. Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2013 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report For the year ended 30 September 2013 Report of the Directors

  20. Postgraduate placements in: Computational Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    ) by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings in 2012. We were placed 1st in the UK and Europe, and 9, including in energy, transport, medicine and finance. #12;Guidance for employers ­ Employers should. · Ensure that Health and Safety regulations are complied with during the placement, and organise

  1. Perception of climate change James Hansena,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    the significance of human- made global warming. Actions to stem emissions of the gases that cause global warming the season when climate change will have its biggest impact on humanity. Global warming causes spring warmth global warming. The distribution of seasonal mean temperature anomalies has shifted toward higher tempera

  2. Copyright 2009 IBM Global Business Services Preparing for IFRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), as approved by the International Accounting Standards Board technology for IFRS International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) projects typically start into an Integrated Finance Organization (IFO) while the larger organization moves towards a Globally Integrated

  3. "Global warming and global cooling are physical phenomenon. But the battle over these real or presumed developments is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    "Global warming and global cooling are physical phenomenon. But the battle over these real of catastrophic global warming the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people" What is climate change we have ever seen" What is climate change? Lord Nicholas Stern, October 2006 #12;"Global warming

  4. Why finance? Finance is critical for all aspects of business. The finance major focuses on the processes, markets, institutions and instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    Why finance? Finance is critical for all aspects of business. The finance major focuses of Finance in the Spears School of Business at OSU, you will graduate with an understanding of the financial system and the theoretical framework, analytical tools, and business techniques used in finance positions

  5. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes that the most genetically diverse populations are the ones most at risk from climate change, so that global warming will erode the species' genetic variability faster than it curtails the species' geographic

  6. Global warming elucidated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, S. [Global Warming International Center, Woodridge, IL (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meaning of global warming and its relevance to everyday life is explained. Simple thermodynamics is used to predict an oscillatory nature of the change in climate due to global warming. Global warming causes extreme events and bad weather in the near term. In the long term it may cause the earth to transition to another equilibrium state through many oscillation in climatic patterns. The magnitudes of these oscillations could easily exceed the difference between the end points. The author further explains why many no longer fully understands the nature and magnitudes of common phenomena such as storms and wind speeds because of these oscillations, and the absorptive properties of clouds. The author links the increase in duration of the El Nino to global warming, and further predicts public health risks as the earth transitions to another equilibrium state in its young history.

  7. Schrödinger group and quantum finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan M. Romero; Ulises Lavana; Elio Martínez

    2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the one dimensional free particle symmetries, the quantum finance symmetries are obtained. Namely, it is shown that Black-Scholes equation is invariant under Schr\\"odinger group. In order to do this, the one dimensional free non-relativistic particle and its symmetries are revisited. To get the Black-Scholes equation symmetries, the particle mass is identified as the inverse of square of the volatility. Furthermore, using financial variables, a Schr\\"odinger algebra representation is constructed.

  8. Farm Mortgage Financing in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Virgil P. (Virgil Porter)

    1925-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POULTRY HUSBANDRY R. M. SHERWOOD, M. S., Chief MAIN STATION FARM D. T. KILLOUGH, B. S., Superintendent STATE APICULTURAL RESEARCH LAB- ORATORY (San Antonio) H. B. PARKS. B. S.. Apiculturist in Charge State Eritomologist A. H. ALEX. B. S.. Queen... Mortgage and ~nvestmeni combany of San Antonio, Texas. The names of the prospective borrower and the inspector were purposely omitted by the company. FARM MORTGAGE FINANCING IN TEXAS 2 1 commodities it will produce, but the prices of these products...

  9. Alternative Financing for Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevino, E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative Financing for Energy Efficiency • Eddy Trevino • Matt Golden – – Investor Confidence Project • Josh Briggs – QECBs • Michael Flores – High Performance New Construction • Denise Malloy – Performance Contracting for Public Sector... Improvement Projects ESL-KT-13-12-37 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Texas LoanSTAR Program 12/18/13 Maximizing Energy Efficiency while Protecting the Environment ESL-KT-13-12-37 CATEE 2013: Clean Air...

  10. Alternative Financing for Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevino, E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alternative Financing for Energy Efficiency • Eddy Trevino • Matt Golden – – Investor Confidence Project • Josh Briggs – QECBs • Michael Flores – High Performance New Construction • Denise Malloy – Performance Contracting for Public Sector... Improvement Projects ESL-KT-13-12-37 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Texas LoanSTAR Program 12/18/13 Maximizing Energy Efficiency while Protecting the Environment ESL-KT-13-12-37 CATEE 2013: Clean Air...

  11. Smart Financing for Smart Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -11-29 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Smart Financing Models: Bringing it all together Through Government Based Options Through Rebates & Incentives Through Public Private Partnering Through Revenue Generating... Programs (leveraging 20Confidential Property of Schneider Electric smart technology) ESL-KT-14-11-29 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Government Based Options • Will continue to be the dominant source...

  12. 194 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / JULY/AUGUST 1999 INDICATORS OF IMPACTS OF GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE ON U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    194 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / JULY/AUGUST 1999 INDICATORS OF IMPACTS of the indicators, regional reservoir storage vulnerability, is a particularly useful index summarizing (U.S.) to investigate the integrated impacts of potential global warming on water resources. Impacts

  13. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ringler, Todd; Collins, William D.; Taylor, Mark; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tools for predicting the evolution of the climate system. Through decades of development, GCMs have demonstrated useful skill in simulating climate at continental to global scales. However, large uncertainties remain in projecting climate change at regional scales, which limit our ability to inform decisions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. To bridge this gap, different modeling approaches including nested regional climate models (RCMs), global stretch-grid models, and global high-resolution atmospheric models have been used to provide regional climate simulations (Leung et al. 2003). In previous efforts to evaluate these approaches, isolating their relative merits was not possible because factors such as dynamical frameworks, physics parameterizations, and model resolutions were not systematically constrained. With advances in high performance computing, it is now feasible to run coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs at horizontal resolution comparable to what RCMs use today. Global models with local refinement using unstructured grids have become available for modeling regional climate (e.g., Rauscher et al. 2012; Ringler et al. 2013). While they offer opportunities to improve climate simulations, significant efforts are needed to test their veracity for regional-scale climate simulations.

  14. Knowledge Action Networks: Connecting regional climate change assessments to local action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennel, Charles; Daultrey, Sally

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts of Climate Change on Water In Africa, Cambridge (2009, a workshop of the Global Water Initiative. ConferenceCalifornia, San Diego; Global Water Initiative, University

  15. One Year into President's Climate Action Plan, Finance Playing an

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf

  16. Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEuropeStrat.pdfInactive Jump to: navigation,Valley,Countries |

  17. Georgia-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown,JumpValley near|Information(CTI

  18. Brazil-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthbyBostonBrattleboro, Vermont: Energy(CTI PFAN) | Open Energy

  19. Cameroon-Climate Technology Initiative Private Financing Advisory Network

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL GasPermits Manual Jump to:(RECP) inCounty,(CTI PFAN) | Open

  20. El Salvador-Climate Finance Readiness Programme | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to: navigation, search ToolEcowareEkisolar