Sample records for financial turbulence suggest

  1. Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Zand Analysis Utilities (TAU)TuningTurbulence

  2. Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H Gibson

    2012-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbulence patterns and fossil turbulence waves preserve and propagate energy and information about previous turbulence. Ignorance of fossil turbulence properties can be dangerous. Examples include the Osama bin Laden helicopter crash and the Air France 447 Airbus crash, both unfairly blamed on the pilots. Observations support the proposed definitions, and suggest even direct numerical simulations of turbulence require caution.

  3. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama

    2011-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived without assuming the separation of the time scales in accordance with Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successfully applied to Navier--Stokes turbulence. The kinetic equation of the weak turbulence theory is recovered from the DIA equations if the weak nonlinearity is assumed as an additional assumption. It suggests that the DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence.

  4. FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Financial & Business Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Financial & Business Services Presidential Briefing #12;FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Financial & Business Services (FBS) · FBS currently has approx. 140 employees · We) ­ Financial Solutions (6) ­ Travel, Training & Policy Development (6) #12;FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Our

  5. Financial Institutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A lending program begins with a financial institution that procures the funds they lend from a number of other sources.

  6. User Financial Account Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAbout UsUser2/20/13 User Financial

  7. Financial Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program provides financial support and technical assistance to states, local governments, and municipal utilities through the projects it manages.

  8. EXPECTATIONS AND SUGGESTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    odavis

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPECTATIONS AND SUGGESTIONS. STUDENTS SHOULD SPEND A MINIMUM OF 10 HOURS OF. COURSE WORK OUTSIDE OF CLASS PER WEEK

  9. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Carl H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begins with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretion on a spinning pair releases 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscosity and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, creating mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until a quark-gluon strong-force SF freeze-out. Gluon-viscosity anti-gravity ({\\Lambda}SF) exponentially inflates the fireball to preserve big bang turbulence information at scales larger than ct as the first fossil turbulence. Cosmic microwave background CMB temperature anisotropies show big bang turbulence fossils along with fossils of weak plasma turbulence triggered (10^12 s) as plasma viscous forces permit gravitational fragmentation on supercluster to galaxy mass scales (10^13 s). Turbulent morphologies and viscous-turbulent lengths a...

  10. TURBULENT FRBRNNING MVK130 Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TURBULENT FRBRNNING MVK130 Turbulent Combustion Pong: 3.0 Betygskala: TH Valfri fr: M4 to combustion, McGraw-Hill 1996. #12;

  11. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  12. ARM - VAP Suggestion Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap DocumentationProductsmwravgProductsaodmfrsraod1michProductsaodsasheniraodSuggestion Form

  13. TURBULENT FRBRNNING MVK 130 Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TURBULENT FRBRNNING MVK 130 Turbulent Combustion Antal pong: 3.0. Valfri fr: M4. Kursansvarig program med hnsyn till de modeller som anvnds. Litteratur S.R. Turns: An introduction to combustion, Mc

  14. Accepted, Nuclear Fusion, 1999 Turbulent Transport and Turbulence in Radiative I-Mode Plasmas in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Accepted, Nuclear Fusion, 1999 Turbulent Transport and Turbulence in Radiative I-Mode Plasmas vs. radiated fraction suggests a common underlying suppression mechanism. #12;Accepted, Nuclear of Physics University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta Canada, T6G 2J1 1/4/00 17:25 PM #12;Accepted, Nuclear

  15. FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Procurement &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Procurement & Payment Summary Accounts Payable Perry H. Hull #12;FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Agenda · Accounts Payable: Who we are...what we do... · Accounts Payable;FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Financial & Business Services #12;FINANCIAL & BUSINESS SERVICES Accounts

  16. Essays in Financial Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani, Reza

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Financial Economics 92:6691. [7] Chen, J. , H.G.Journal of Financial Economics 66:171205. [8] Harrison,Journal of Financial Economics 66:207239. [15] Keown,

  17. Financial Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first step in financing a street lighting retrofit is a detailed financial analysis. Because street lighting systems are designed to last ten or twenty years, or even longer, all aspects of first costs, ongoing expenses, and long-term savings are important. While a preliminary or first-level analysis can be used to determine such things as simple payback, rate of return, and cost of light, the results may neglect a number of important economic considerations, such as the time value of money, additional savings and expenses and their relative timing, and future energy price escalations. Hence a first-level analysis does not typically provide the end user with sufficient details to make a fully informed decision. For this reason, the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) recommends a full life cycle cost/benefit analysis (LCCBA).

  18. Financial Business Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The incumbent in this position will serve as a Financial Business Analyst in the Financial Information Systems organization of Finance. The incumbent is responsible for performing analytical and...

  19. Housing System Financial Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Housing System Financial Statements June 30, 2010 #12;FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY HOUSING SYSTEM's Housing Division's (Housing) financial performance provides an overview of the financial activities for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2010. Please read it in conjunction with Housing's financial statements

  20. Chief Financial Officer Responsibilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order sets forth requirements for operating the Department of Energy in full compliance with the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 and sets standards for sound financial management policies and practices, effective internal controls, accurate and timely financial information, and well-qualified financial managers. Cancels DOE O 520.1.

  1. Financial Management Oversight

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order defines requirements for effective financial management and adherence to DOE and applicable external financial management requirements and sets forth standards for ensuring the integrity and responsiveness of financial management and the accuracy and reliability of DOEs financial statements. Cancels DOE O 2200.13.

  2. Negotiating with Labor under Financial Distress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmelech, Efraim

    We analyze how firms renegotiate labor contracts to extract concessions from labor. While anecdotal evidence suggests that firms tend to renegotiate wages downward in times of financial distress, there is no empirical ...

  3. Turbulent flow in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2010-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

  4. Gravitational Collapse in Turbulent Molecular Clouds. II. Magnetohydrodynamical Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Heitsch; M. -M. Mac Low; R. S. Klessen

    2000-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic supersonic turbulence can only prevent local gravitational collapse if the turbulence is driven on scales smaller than the local Jeans lengths in the densest regions, a very severe requirement (Paper I). Magnetic fields have been suggested to support molecular clouds either magnetostatically or via magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Whereas the first mechanism would form sheet-like clouds, the second mechanism not only could exert a pressure onto the gas counteracting the gravitational forces, but could lead to a transfer of turbulent kinetic energy down to smaller spatial scales via MHD wave interactions. This turbulent magnetic cascade might provide sufficient energy at small scales to halt local collapse. We test this hypothesis with MHD simulations at resolutions up to 256^3 zones, done with ZEUS-3D. We first derive a resolution criterion for self-gravitating, magnetized gas: in order to prevent collapse of magnetostatically supported regions due to numerical diffusion, the minimum Jeans length must be resolved by four zones. Resolution of MHD waves increases this requirement to roughly six zones. We then find that magnetic fields cannot prevent local collapse unless they provide magnetostatic support. Weaker magnetic fields do somewhat delay collapse and cause it to occur more uniformly across the supported region in comparison to the hydrodynamical case. However, they still cannot prevent local collapse for much longer than a global free-fall time.

  5. Turbulent Compressibilty of Protogalactic Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Scalo; Anirban Biswas

    2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The star formation rate in galaxies should be related to the fraction of gas that can attain densities large enough for gravitational collapse. In galaxies with a turbulent interstellar medium, this fraction is controlled by the effective barotropic index $gamma = dlog P/dlog (rho)$ which measures the turbulent compressibility. When the cooling timescale is smaller than the dynamical timescale, gamma can be evaluated from the derivatives of cooling and heating functions, using the condition of thermal equilibrium. We present calculations of gamma for protogalaxies in which the metal abundance is so small that H_2 and HD cooling dominates. For a heating rate independent of temperature and proportional to the first power of density, the turbulent gas is relatively "hard", with $gamma >= 1$, at large densities, but moderately "soft", $gamma <= 0.8$, at densities below around $10^4 cm^(-3)$. At low temperatures the density probability distribution should fall ra pidly for densities larger than this value, which corresponds physically to the critical density at which collisional and radiative deexcitation rate s of HD are equal. The densities attained in turbulent protogalaxies thus depend on the relatively large deuterium abundance in our universe. We expect the same physical effect to occur in higher metallicity gas with different coolants. The case in which adiabatic (compressional) heating due to cloud collapse dominates is also discussed, and suggests a criterion for the maximum mass of Population III stars.

  6. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Israel, Daniel M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  7. Essays in financial economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severino Daz, Felipe

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis consists of three empirical essays in financial economics, examining the consequences of imperfect financial markets for households, small business and house prices. In the first chapter (co-authored with Meta ...

  8. Essays in Financial Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Sung Bin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Financial Economics, 67, 149 Asquith, P. and D.Journal of Financial Economics, 15, 6189. Back, K. and J.The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 113, 869902. Blanchard,

  9. Fractal dimension and turbulence in Giant HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caicedo-Ortiz, H E; Lpez-Bonilla, J; Castaeda, H O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the fractal dimensions of the Giant HII Regions Hubble X and Hubble V in NGC6822 using images obtained with the Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). These measures are associated with the turbulence observed in these regions, which is quantified through the velocity dispersion of emission lines in the visible. Our results suggest low turbulence behaviour.

  10. A note on dissipation in helical turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. D. Ditlevsen; P. Giuliani

    2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In helical turbulence a linear cascade of helicity accompanying the energy cascade has been suggested. Since energy and helicity have different dimensionality we suggest the existence of a characteristic inner scale, $\\xi=k_H^{-1}$, for helicity dissipation in a regime of hydrodynamic fully developed turbulence and estimate it on dimensional grounds. This scale is always larger than the Kolmogorov scale, $\\eta=k_E^{-1}$, and their ratio $\\eta / \\xi $ vanishes in the high Reynolds number limit, so the flow will always be helicity free in the small scales.

  11. Turbulence model of the cosmic structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Gaite

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kolmogorov approach to turbulence is applied to the Burgers turbulence in the stochastic adhesion model of large-scale structure formation. As the perturbative approach to this model is unreliable, here is proposed a new, non-perturbative approach, based on a suitable formulation of Kolmogorov's scaling laws. This approach suggests that the power-law exponent of the matter density two-point correlation function is in the range 1--1.33, but it also suggests that the adhesion model neglects important aspects of the gravitational dynamics.

  12. Standard Nine: Financial Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    105 Standard Nine: Financial Resources Overview The 1996 NEASC team report was critical of Brandeis's financial management, and focused on the need to increase financial resources, improve faculty and staff displays the University resource profile for FY1995 compared to the FY2005 profile. During this decade

  13. Turbulent protostellar discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Brandenburg

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Aspects of turbulence in protostellar accretion discs are being reviewed. The emergence of dead zones due to poor ionization and alternatives to the magneto-rotational instability are discussed. The coupling between dust and gas in protostellar accretion discs is explained and turbulent drag is compared with laminar drag in the Stokes and Epstein regimes. Finally, the significance of magnetic field generation in turbulent discs is emphasized in connection with driving outflows and with star-disc coupling.

  14. Meso-scale turbulence in living fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henricus H. Wensink; Jrn Dunkel; Sebastian Heidenreich; Knut Drescher; Raymond E. Goldstein; Hartmut Lwen; Julia M. Yeomans

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulence is ubiquitous, from oceanic currents to small-scale biological and quantum systems. Self-sustained turbulent motion in microbial suspensions presents an intriguing example of collective dynamical behavior amongst the simplest forms of life, and is important for fluid mixing and molecular transport on the microscale. The mathematical characterization of turbulence phenomena in active non-equilibrium fluids proves even more difficult than for conventional liquids or gases. It is not known which features of turbulent phases in living matter are universal or system-specific, or which generalizations of the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe them adequately. Here, we combine experiments, particle simulations, and continuum theory to identify the statistical properties of self-sustained meso-scale turbulence in active systems. To study how dimensionality and boundary conditions affect collective bacterial dynamics, we measured energy spectra and structure functions in dense Bacillus subtilis suspensions in quasi-2D and 3D geometries. Our experimental results for the bacterial flow statistics agree well with predictions from a minimal model for self-propelled rods, suggesting that at high concentrations the collective motion of the bacteria is dominated by short-range interactions. To provide a basis for future theoretical studies, we propose a minimal continuum model for incompressible bacterial flow. A detailed numerical analysis of the 2D case shows that this theory can reproduce many of the experimentally observed features of self-sustained active turbulence.

  15. Interstellar Turbulence, Cloud Formation and Pressure Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Vazquez-Semadeni

    1998-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss HD and MHD compressible turbulence as a cloud-forming and cloud-structuring mechanism in the ISM. Results from a numerical model of the turbulent ISM at large scales suggest that the phase-like appearance of the medium, the typical values of the densities and magnetic field strengths in the intercloud medium, as well as Larson's velocity dispersion-size scaling relation in clouds may be understood as consequences of the interstellar turbulence. However, the density-size relation appears to only hold for the densest simulated clouds, there existing a large population of small, low-density clouds, which, on the other hand, are hardest to observe. We then discuss several tests and implications of a fully dynamical picture of interstellar clouds. The results imply that clouds are transient, constantly being formed, distorted and disrupted by the turbulent velocity field, with a fraction of these fluctuations undergoing gravitational collapse. Simulated line profiles and estimated cloud lifetimes are consistent with observational data. In this scenario, we suggest it is quite unlikely that quasi-hydrostatic structures on any scale can form, and that the near pressure balance between clouds and the intercloud medium is an incidental consequence of the density field driven by the turbulence and in the presence of appropriate cooling, rather than a driving or confining mechanism.

  16. Turbulent Particle Acceleration in the Diffuse Cluster Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Eilek; J. C. Weatherall

    1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ particle acceleration is probably occuring in cluster radio haloes. This is suggested by the uniformity and extent of the haloes, given that spatial diffusion is slow and that radiative losses limit particle lifetimes. Stochastic acceleration by plasma turbulence is the most likely mechanism. Alfven wave turbulence has been suggested as the means of acceleration, but it is too slow to be important in the cluster environment. We propose, instead, that acceleration occurs via strong lower-hybrid wave turbulence. We find that particle acceleration will be effective in clusters if only a small fraction of the cluster energy density is in this form.

  17. Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion N. Peters Institut fur Technische Mechanik RWTH Aachen Turbulent Combustion: Introduction and Overview 1 1.1 Moment Methods in Modeling Turbulence with Combustion and Velocity Scales . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4 Regimes in Premixed Turbulent Combustion

  18. Reconnection events in two-dimensional Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donato, S.; Servidio, S.; Carbone, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Dmitruk, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and Instituto de Fisica de Buenos Aires, CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Shay, M. A.; Matthaeus, W. H. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Cassak, P. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistical study of magnetic reconnection events in two-dimensional turbulence has been performed by comparing numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Hall magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD). The analysis reveals that the Hall term plays an important role in turbulence, in which magnetic islands simultaneously reconnect in a complex way. In particular, an increase of the Hall parameter, the ratio of ion skin depth to system size, broadens the distribution of reconnection rates relative to the MHD case. Moreover, in HMHD the local geometry of the reconnection region changes, manifesting bifurcated current sheets and quadrupolar magnetic field structures in analogy to laminar studies, leading locally to faster reconnection processes in this case of reconnection embedded in turbulence. This study supports the idea that the global rate of energy dissipation is controlled by the large scale turbulence, but suggests that the distribution of the reconnection rates within the turbulent system is sensitive to the microphysics at the reconnection sites.

  19. Financial Networks Anna Nagurney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    in decision-making; constraints on resources: human, financial, natural, time, etc.; global reach of many, Transmission Lines Water, Gas, Oil, Electricity Anna Nagurney Financial Networks #12;Interstate Highway System Freight Network World Oil Routes Natural Gas Flows Network Systems Internet Traffic Anna Nagurney

  20. Financial Networks Anna Nagurney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    World Oil Routes Natural Gas Flows Network Systems Internet Traffic Anna Nagurney Financial Networks #12 Gothenburg University Gothenburg, Sweden and John F. Smith Memorial Professor Director Virtual Center, 2012 School of Business, Economics and Law Gothenburg University, Sweden Anna Nagurney Financial

  1. Three Essays on Financial Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Haonan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Financial Economics, February 2003, 67 (2), 217Journal of Financial Economics, March 2008, 87 (3), 706739.International Finance and Economics, 2008. Schiozer, Rafael

  2. Geothermal Technologies Office: Financial Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Geothermal Technologies Office: Financial Opportunities to someone by E-mail Share Geothermal...

  3. Stochastic superparameterization in quasigeostrophic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grooms, Ian, E-mail: grooms@cims.nyu.edu [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States); Majda, Andrew J., E-mail: jonjon@cims.nyu.edu [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States); Center for Prototype Climate Modelling, NYU-Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we expand and develop the authors' recent proposed methodology for efficient stochastic superparameterization algorithms for geophysical turbulence. Geophysical turbulence is characterized by significant intermittent cascades of energy from the unresolved to the resolved scales resulting in complex patterns of waves, jets, and vortices. Conventional superparameterization simulates large scale dynamics on a coarse grid in a physical domain, and couples these dynamics to high-resolution simulations on periodic domains embedded in the coarse grid. Stochastic superparameterization replaces the nonlinear, deterministic eddy equations on periodic embedded domains by quasilinear stochastic approximations on formally infinite embedded domains. The result is a seamless algorithm which never uses a small scale grid and is far cheaper than conventional SP, but with significant success in difficult test problems. Various design choices in the algorithm are investigated in detail here, including decoupling the timescale of evolution on the embedded domains from the length of the time step used on the coarse grid, and sensitivity to certain assumed properties of the eddies (e.g. the shape of the assumed eddy energy spectrum). We present four closures based on stochastic superparameterization which elucidate the properties of the underlying framework: a null hypothesis stochastic closure that uncouples the eddies from the mean, a stochastic closure with nonlinearly coupled eddies and mean, a nonlinear deterministic closure, and a stochastic closure based on energy conservation. The different algorithms are compared and contrasted on a stringent test suite for quasigeostrophic turbulence involving two-layer dynamics on a ?-plane forced by an imposed background shear. The success of the algorithms developed here suggests that they may be fruitfully applied to more realistic situations. They are expected to be particularly useful in providing accurate and efficient stochastic parameterizations for use in ensemble-based state estimation and prediction.

  4. WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    WHEN DOES FINANCIAL SECTOR (IN)STABILITY INDUCE FINANCIAL REFORMS? Susie LEE Ingmar SCHUMACHER (in)stability induce financial reforms? Susie Lee1 Ingmar Schumacher2 October 26, 2011 Abstract The article studies whether financial sector (in)stability had an effect on reforms in the fi- nancial sector

  5. Financial Highlights: Annual Report 1987.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal Columbia River Power System for the fiscal year ended September 30, 1987. This report covers: Financial highlights; Letter to the Secretary; The Financial Year in Review; Power Sales; Meeting the Region's Power Needs; Building for the Future; Regional Operations; BPA, the Council and Fish; 50th Anniversary; New Headquarters Building; Energizing the Community; Financial Section; Auditor's Report; and Financial Statements.

  6. Welfare gains from financial liberalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Robert

    Financial liberalization has been a controversial issue, as empirical evidence for growth enhancing

  7. Sudden Financial Arrest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caballero, Ricardo J.

    There are striking and terrifying similarities between the sudden failure of a heart and that of a financial system. In the medical literature, the former is referred to as sudden cardiac arrest. By analogy, I refer to its ...

  8. Essays in financial economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmans, Alex

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis consists of three essays in financial economics. Chapter 1 is entitled "Inside Debt." Existing theories advocate the use of cash and equity in executive compensation. However, recent empirical studies have ...

  9. Quantum ghost imaging through turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, P. Ben

    We investigate the effect of turbulence on quantum ghost imaging. We use entangled photons and demonstrate that for a specific experimental configuration the effect of turbulence can be greatly diminished. By decoupling ...

  10. Power spectra of outflow-driven turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moraghan, Anthony; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the power spectra of outflow-driven turbulence through high-resolution three-dimensional isothermal numerical simulations where the turbulence is driven locally in real-space by a simple spherical outflow model. The resulting turbulent flow saturates at an average Mach number of ~2.5 and is analysed through density and velocity power spectra, including an investigation of the evolution of the solenoidal and compressional components. We obtain a shallow density power spectrum with a slope of ~-1.2 attributed to the presence of a network of localised dense filamentary structures formed by strong shock interactions. The total velocity power spectrum slope is found to be ~-2.0, representative of Burgers shock dominated turbulence model. The density weighted velocity power spectrum slope is measured as ~-1.6, slightly less than the expected Kolmogorov scaling value (slope of -5/3) found in previous works. The discrepancy may be caused by the nature of our real space driving model and we suggest ther...

  11. COLLISIONLESS DAMPING AT ELECTRON SCALES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Dorland, W., E-mail: jason-tenbarge@uiowa.edu [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MA 20742-3511 (United States)

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissipation of turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma is governed by unknown kinetic mechanisms. Two candidates have been suggested to play an important role in the dissipation, collisionless damping via wave-particle interactions and dissipation in small-scale current sheets. High resolution spacecraft measurements of the turbulent magnetic energy spectrum provide important constraints on the dissipation mechanism. The limitations of popular fluid and hybrid numerical schemes for simulation of the dissipation of solar wind turbulence are discussed, and instead a three-dimensional kinetic approach is recommended. We present a three-dimensional nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation of solar wind turbulence at electron scales that quantitatively reproduces the exponential form of the turbulent magnetic energy spectrum measured in the solar wind. A weakened cascade model that accounts for nonlocal interactions and collisionless Landau damping also quantitatively agrees with the observed exponential form. These results establish that a turbulent cascade of kinetic Alfven waves that is terminated by collisionless Landau damping is sufficient to explain the observed magnetic energy spectrum in the dissipation range of solar wind turbulence.

  12. Turbulent Combustion Luc Vervisch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kern, Michel

    ;19 "Perfect" combustion modes: Fuel + Oxidizer () Products Engines, gas turbines... Laboratory experiment1 Turbulent Combustion Modeling Luc Vervisch INSA de Rouen, IUF, CORIA-CNRS Quelques problèmes rencontrés en chimie numérique : Hydrologie - Combustion - Atmosphère 16 décembre, INRIA Rocquencourt #12

  13. Quantum weak turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, Devashish [Department of Theoretical Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Calcutta 700032 (India)]. E-mail: tpds@mahendra.iacs.res.in; Sen, Siddhartha [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)]. E-mail: sen@maths.tcd.ie

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present manuscript dealing with large occupation of states of a quantum system, extends the study to the case of quantum weak turbulence. The quasiparticle spectrum, calculated for such a system, using a Green's function approach, establishes the dissipative and inertial regimes, hence a Kolmogorov type of picture.

  14. Unleashing a Tiger: Financial Deregulation in Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Michael S.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the movement toward financial deregulation that is occurringthe trend toward financial deregulation in Asia, see StevenA TIGER: FINANCIAL DEREGULATION IN TAIWAN Michael S.

  15. A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application to crack propagation at glacier beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Click Here for Full Article A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application to crack suggest that fluidinduced hydraulic fracture of an ice sheet from its bed sometimes occurs quickly. Citation: Tsai, V. C., and J. R. Rice (2010), A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application

  16. Acceleration statistics of solid particles in turbulent channel flow R. Zamansky, I. Vinkovic, and M. Gorokhovski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) suggesting that when particle inertia increases, particle acceler- ation variance decreases due to bothAcceleration statistics of solid particles in turbulent channel flow R. Zamansky, I. Vinkovic in near-wall turbulence Phys. Fluids 24, 035110 (2012) Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations

  17. Dispersed Phase of Non-Isothermal Particles in Rotating Turbulent Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandya, R V R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest certain effects, caused by interaction between rotation and gravitation with turbulence structure, for the cooling/heating of dispersed phase of non-isothermal particles in rotating turbulent fluid flows. These effects are obtained through the derivation of kinetic or probability density function based macroscopic equations for the particles. In doing so, for one-way temperature coupling, we also show that homogeneous, isotropic non-isothermal fluid turbulence does not influence the mean temperature (though it influences mean velocity) of the dispersed phase of particles settling due to gravitational force in the isotropic turbulence.

  18. harvard university financial report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that it is a realistic and affordable option. Education is fundamental to the future of individuals and the nation the president 3 financial highlights 8 annual report of the harvard management company 15 report of independent academic agenda. With an exceptionally strong leadership team now in place, planning is moving forward

  19. harvard university financial report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -oriented long- term planning for Harvard's future in Allston, and started developing priorities for our coming the president 3 financial overview 8 message from the ceo of harvard management company 13 report of independent important investments in the University's future as we prepared to celebrate Harvard's 375th anniversary. We

  20. harvard university financial report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    portfolio earned an invest- ment return of 11.0% and had a year-end value of $27.6 billion. In the wake the president 3 financial overview 8 message from the ceo of harvard management company 14 report of independent;3 harvarduniversityfinancialoverview In its fiscal year ended June 30, 2010, the University made significant progress in managing

  1. FINANCIAL AID FOR LAW SCHOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    FINANCIAL AID FOR LAW SCHOOL: A PRELIMINARY GUIDE LSAC.org #12;INTRODUCTION Legal education education is the financial aid office (or the website) of any LSAC-member law school. LSAC.org provides links to many law schools as well as several good sources of financial aid information. The cost

  2. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT FINANCIAL DOCUMENTATION FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    INTERNATIONAL STUDENT FINANCIAL DOCUMENTATION FORM This form is not an application for financial assistance. This form is REQUIRED before we can provide immigration documents, even if your government, photocopied or faxed supporting financial documents. **List your name as it appears on your passport** Family

  3. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT FINANCIAL DOCUMENTATION FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    INTERNATIONAL STUDENT FINANCIAL DOCUMENTATION FORM Please complete this form if you this form and supporting financial documents after you have received your admissions decision. To receive will come from that source. Please attach supporting financial support documents that are less than six

  4. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT FINANCIAL DOCUMENTATION FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    INTERNATIONAL STUDENT FINANCIAL DOCUMENTATION FORM Please complete this form if you this form and supporting financial documents after you have received your admissions decision. To receive will come from that source. Please attach original supporting financial support documents, issued in English

  5. Polymer Stretching by Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The stretching of a polymer chain by a large-scale chaotic flow is considered. The steady state which emerges as a balance of the turbulent stretching and anharmonic resistance of the chain is quantitatively described, i.e., the dependency on the flow parameters (Lyapunov exponent statistics) and the chain characteristics (the number of beads and the interbead elastic potential) is made explicit. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  6. Turbulent Reconnection and Its Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazarian, Alex; Vishniac, Ethan T; Kowal, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic reconnection is a process of magnetic field topology change, which is one of the most fundamental processes in magnetized plasmas. In most astrophysical environments the Reynolds numbers are large and therefore the transition to turbulence is inevitable. This turbulence must be taken into account for any theory of magnetic reconnection, since the initially laminar configurations can transit to the turbulence state, what is demonstrated by 3D high resolution numerical simulations. We discuss ideas of how turbulence can modify reconnection with the focus on the Lazarian & Vishniac (1999) reconnection model and present numerical evidence supporting the model and demonstrate that it is closely connected to the concept of Richardson diffusion and compatible with the Lagrangian dynamics of magnetized fluids. We point out that the Generalized Ohm's Law, that accounts for turbulent motion, predicts the subdominance of the microphysical plasma effects for a realistically turbulent media. We show that on o...

  7. Protostellar outflow-driven turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protostellar outflows crisscross the regions of star cluster formation, stirring turbulence and altering the evolution of the forming cluster. We model the stirring of turbulent motions by protostellar outflows, building on an observation that the scaling law of supersonic turbulence implies a momentum cascade analogous to the energy cascade in Kolmogorov turbulence. We then generalize this model to account for a diversity of outflow strengths, and for outflow collimation, both of which enhance turbulence. For a single value of its coupling coefficient the model is consistent with turbulence simulations by Li & Nakamura and, plausibly, with observations of the NGC 1333 cluster-forming region. Outflow-driven turbulence is strong enough to stall collapse in cluster-forming regions for several crossing times, relieving the mismatch between star formation and turbulent decay rates. The predicted line-width-size scaling implies radial density indices between -1 and -2 for regions supported by outflow-driven turbulence, with a tendency for steeper profiles in regions that are more massive or have higher column densities.

  8. Turbulence models of gravitational clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Gaite

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale structure formation can be modeled as a nonlinear process that transfers energy from the largest scales to successively smaller scales until it is dissipated, in analogy with Kolmogorov's cascade model of incompressible turbulence. However, cosmic turbulence is very compressible, and vorticity plays a secondary role in it. The simplest model of cosmic turbulence is the adhesion model, which can be studied perturbatively or adapting to it Kolmogorov's non-perturbative approach to incompressible turbulence. This approach leads to observationally testable predictions, e.g., to the power-law exponent of the matter density two-point correlation function.

  9. Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    turbulent methane combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. , 29:in premixed turbulent combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. ,for zero Mach number combustion. Combust. Sci. Technol. ,

  10. Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Bell.png Key Challenges: Development and application of...

  11. Ris-R-1188(EN) Turbulence and turbulence-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ris-R-1188(EN) Turbulence and turbulence- generated structural loading in wind turbine clusters af den internationale standard for vindmller, IEC61400-1 (2005). Ogs ekstrembelastninger under to ensure sufficient structural sustainability of the wind turbines exposed to "wind farm flow

  12. Turbulence production and turbulent pressure support in the intergalactic medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iapichino, L; Niemeyer, J C; Merklein, J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The injection and evolution of turbulence in the intergalactic medium is studied by means of mesh-based hydrodynamical simulations, including a subgrid scale (SGS) model for small-scale unresolved turbulence. The simulations show that the production of turbulence has a different redshift dependence in the intracluster medium (ICM) and the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM). We show that turbulence in the ICM is produced chiefly by merger-induced shear flows, whereas the production in the WHIM is dominated by shock interactions. Secondly, the effect of dynamical pressure support on the gravitational contraction has been studied. This turbulent support is stronger in the WHIM gas at baryon overdensities 1 < delta < 100, and less relevant for the ICM. Although the relative mass fraction of the gas with large vorticity is considerable (52% in the ICM), we find that for only about 10% in mass this is dynamically relevant, namely not associated to an equally large thermal pressure support. According to this...

  13. Simple Models for Turbulent Self-Regulation in Galaxy Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis Struck; Daniel C. Smith

    1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that turbulent heating, wave pressure and gas exchanges between different regions of disks play a dominant role in determining the preferred, quasi-equilibrium, self-similar states of gas disks on large-scales. We present simple families of analytic, thermohydrodynamic models for these global states, which include terms for turbulent pressure and Reynolds stresses. Star formation rates, phase balances, and hydrodynamic forces are all tightly coupled and balanced. The models have stratified radial flows, with the cold gas slowly flowing inward in the midplane of the disk, and with the warm/hot phases that surround the midplane flowing outward. The models suggest a number of results that are in accord with observation, as well as some novel predictions, including the following. 1) The large-scale gas density and thermal phase distributions in galaxy disks can be explained as the result of turbulent heating and spatial couplings. 2) The turbulent pressures and stresses that drive radial outflows in the warm gas also allow a reduced circular velocity there. This effect was observed by Swaters, Sancisi and van der Hulst in NGC 891, a particularly turbulent edge-on disk. The models predict that the effect should be universal in such disks. 3) They suggest that a star formation rate like the phenomenological Schmidt Law is the natural result of global thermohydrodynamical balance, and may not obtain in disks far from equilibrium. (Abridged)

  14. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  15. Gravitational Radiation From Cosmological Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur Kosowsky; Andrew Mack; Tinatin Kahniashvili

    2002-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection of energy into the early Universe on a given characteristic length scale will result in turbulent motions of the primordial plasma. We calculate the stochastic background of gravitational radiation arising from a period of cosmological turbulence, using a simple model of isotropic Kolmogoroff turbulence produced in a cosmological phase transition. We also derive the gravitational radiation generated by magnetic fields arising from a dynamo operating during the period of turbulence. The resulting gravitational radiation background has a maximum amplitude comparable to the radiation background from the collision of bubbles in a first-order phase transition, but at a lower frequency, while the radiation from the induced magnetic fields is always subdominant to that from the turbulence itself. We briefly discuss the detectability of such a signal.

  16. Wind Energy Applications of Unified and Dynamic Turbulence Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Stefan

    Wind Energy Applications of Unified and Dynamic Turbulence Models Stefan Heinz and Harish Gopalan applicable as a low cost alternative. 1 Introduction There is a growing interest in using wind energy suggests the possibility of providing 20% of the electricity in the U.S. by wind energy in 2030

  17. Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2008 115 Spurious oscillations to the discontinuity in the ratio of specific heats in the energy equation and suggested a means to overcome, the findings are summarized and an outlook for future work is outlined. 2. Numerical methods For simplicity

  18. Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter Print To split and copy DNA during replication, all cellular organisms use a multicomponent molecular machine known as the...

  19. Refinancing from a Financier's Perspective

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Refinancing from a Financier's Perspective Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Why Invest in UESC Projects? *...

  20. 2013 Financial Review

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment ActivitiesAge Refining Air1, 2015 Financial Review:

  1. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  2. Copyright 2005 The Financial Times Limited Financial Times (London, England)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright 2005 The Financial Times Limited Financial Times (London, England) July 11, 2005 Monday London Edition 1 SECTION: COMMENT; Pg. 19 LENGTH: 922 words HEADLINE: Hope and generosity can triumph, nudged the world closer to this prospect. With the backdrop of the bombs in London, the Gleneagles

  3. Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

  4. Learning Semantic Query Suggestions Edgar Meij1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Rijke, Maarten

    Learning Semantic Query Suggestions Edgar Meij1 , Marc Bron1 , Laura Hollink2 , Bouke Huurnink1 , and Maarten de Rijke1 1 ISLA, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 107, 1098 XG Amsterdam {edgar

  5. Suggestions for Genetic A.I.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drescher, Gary L.

    This paper presents suggestions for "Genetic A.I.": an attempt to model the genesis of intelligence in human infants, particularly as described by Piaget's theory of the Sensorimotor period. The paper includes a synopsis ...

  6. Suggestions for Organizing an Extension Homemakers Club.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cline, June

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )C l245.7 13 14ID __ 'SUGGESTIONS rr FOR ORGANIZING AN EXTENSION HOMEMAKERS CLUB LIB P.AR Y APR 20 1987 B?" h Texas Agricultural Extension Service ? The Texas A&M University System :~ Zerle L. Carpenter, Director ? College Station, Texas... Suggestions for Organizing ~ an Extension Homemakers Club June Cline* Extension Homemakers Clubs provide homemakers an opportunity for continuous informal education in a variety of areas relating to the home, family, community and country. An Extension...

  7. Nonclassical Velocity Statistics in a Turbulent Atomic Bose-Einstein Condensate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, A. C.; Barenghi, C. F.; Proukakis, N. P.; Youd, A. J.; Wacks, D. H. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent experiment Paoletti et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 154501 (2008)] monitored the motion of tracer particles in turbulent superfluid helium and inferred that the velocity components do not obey the Gaussian statistics observed in ordinary turbulence. Motivated by their experiment, we create a small 3D turbulent state in an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate, compute directly the velocity field, and find similar nonclassical power-law tails. We obtain similar results in 2D trapped and 3D homogeneous condensates, and in classical 2D vortex points systems. This suggests that non-Gaussian turbulent velocity statistics describe a fundamental property of quantum turbulence. We also track the decay of the vortex tangle in the presence of the thermal cloud.

  8. Montana State University 1 Financial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Spring EIND 354 - Engineering Probability and Statistics I 3 Professional Electives 3 ECNS 313Montana State University 1 Financial Engineering The Bachelor of Science in financial statistics and probability theory Financial economics with a solid background in classical economic theory

  9. FINANCIAL RISK MANAGER (FRM ) CERTIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    Dec 2013 (Save 30%) (Save 15%) Module 1 Foundation of Risk Management & Quantitative Analysis 1086FINANCIAL RISK MANAGER (FRM ) CERTIFICATION TRAINING PROGRAM 2014 JANUARY INTAKE 4 January to 10 1321 1552 Module 2 Financial Markets and Products & Valuation and Risk Models 1637 1985 2333 Module 3

  10. The Econometrics of Financial Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    The Econometrics of Financial Markets John Y. Campbell, Andrew W. Lo, and A. Craig Mac, in a review of The Econometrics of Financial Markets, winner of TIAA-CREF's 1997 Paul A. Samuelson AwardKinlay's The Econometrics of Finan- cial Markets made a bold leap forward by integrating theory and empirical work

  11. Personal Financial Harvard Medical School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulsson, Johan

    / shareholders #12;Knowledge "Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world [and behavior Understanding why we buy what we buy can help us make smart decisions in the future #12;Financial you the most in making progress toward your financial goals? Impulse buying Unplanned spending

  12. Essays in macroeconomics : information and financial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iovino, Luigi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies how information imperfections affect financial markets and the macroeconomy. Chapter 1 considers an economy where investors delegate their investment decisions to financial institutions that choose ...

  13. Application of wavelet multiresolution analysis to the study of self-similarity and intermittency of plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Zhang, W. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiresolution property of wavelet analysis makes it a powerful tool in describing turbulent signals. Plasma turbulence similar to its fluid turbulence counterpart shows a degree of self-similarity, intermittency, and multifractal. The multiresolution analysis technique based on a biorthogonal wavelet was applied to the Langmuir probe data to study the self-similarity and the intermittency of plasma fluctuations. The data were collected in the plasma edge region of the HT-7 superconducting tokamak. It is found that plasma turbulence is composed of multiscale eddies; these eddies are similar in structure between different scales; the coexistence of multiscale eddies results in the self-similarity in plasma fluctuations. Large-scale turbulence eddies intermittently burst out; the superposition of these large-scale eddies with those small ones is found responsible for the intermittency behavior. Success of utilizing wavelet multiresolution analysis in the HT-7 tokamak suggests it is a promising technique in the understanding of the turbulence structures.

  14. Turbulent transport phenomena in a channel with periodic rib turbulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liou, T.M.; Hwang, J.J.; Chen, S.H. (National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu (Taiwan))

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Periodic fully developed turbulent flow in a 2D channel with rib turbulators on two opposite walls has been studied numerically and experimentally. In numerical predictions, an algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model is adopted, and a smoothed hybrid central/skew upstream difference scheme is developed. In experiments, the laser-Doppler velocimetry and laser holographic interferometry are employed to measure the local flow and heat transfer characteristics. The results are obtained with the ratio of pitch to rib height 5, 10, 15, and 20, for Reynolds number of 3.3 x 10 exp 4 and are presented in terms of the reattachment length, mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy profiles, isotherm patterns, and distributions of local pressure recovery and Nusselt number. A detailed comparison with experimental data shows that the present calculations have an improvement over the previous work in the prediction of periodic ribbed-wall flow and heat transfer. In addition, regions susceptible to hot spots are identified by examining the distributions of the local Nusselt number. Furthermore, the enhancement of mean Nusselt number is documented in terms of relative contributions of the increased turbulence intensity and surface area provided by the ribs. 32 refs.

  15. Financial Statements 2009-10 55 Financial Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    2009-102 Placement Opportunities in the Faculty of Engineering and Design Financial Statements of sterling and the excellent reputation of both the University and the UK HE Sector have supported

  16. Introduction to statistical turbulence modelling. Overview, RWTH Aachen, 08./09.03.2010 Introduction to statistical turbulence modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transfer of Momentum Turbulent (Reynolds) stresses Heat Turbulent heat flux Mass Turbulent: Fundamental equations Averaging Flow equations Turbulence equations Part II: Characteristics, RWTH Aachen, 08.03.2010 Reynolds' experiment: Inject dye into pipe flow Observe filament at different

  17. Particle Acceleration by MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jungyeon Cho; A. Lazarian

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent advances in understanding of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence call for revisions in the picture of particle acceleration. We make use of the recently established scaling of slow and fast MHD modes in strong and weak MHD turbulence to provide a systematic study of particle acceleration in magnetic pressure (low-$\\beta$) and gaseous pressure (high-$\\beta$) dominated plasmas. We consider the acceleration by large scale compressions in both slow and fast particle diffusion limits. We compare the results with the acceleration rate that arises from resonance scattering and Transit-Time Damping (TTD). We establish that fast modes accelerate particles more efficiently than slow modes. We find that particle acceleration by pitch-angle scattering and TTD dominates acceleration by slow or fast modes when the spatial diffusion rate is small. When the rate of spatial diffusion of particles is high, we establish an enhancement of the efficiency of particle acceleration by slow and fast modes in weak turbulence. We show that highly supersonic turbulence is an efficient agent for particle acceleration. We find that even incompressible turbulence can accelerate particles on the scales comparable with the particle mean free path.

  18. Office of Chief Financial Officer

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order implements the provisions of the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 within the Department of Energy. Cancels SEN 34-91. Canceled by DOE O 520.1A.

  19. ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT Queen's University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    .............................................................................................. i The year in review ...............................................14 #12;Queen's University at Kingston - Annual Financial Report - September, 1999 1 THE YEAR IN REVIEW 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 0 100 200 300 400 500 All Other Tuition Fees Government Grants

  20. Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Treasury is accepting applications on the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, which has opened the fiscal year 2015 funding round for the CDFI Program...

  1. Financial Economies With Restricted Participation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aouani, Zaier

    2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ), Duffie and Shafer (1985) and Magill and Quinzii (1996). Financial economies with incomplete markets assume (in general) a symmetric participation structure, i.e. each consumer is confronted with the same restrictions on her portfolio trades. This is a...

  2. Financial crisis : through various perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joon Hee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2007 financial crisis can be viewed from various perspectives. First, it can be explained in a wider macroeconomic context, for example by looking at the housing bubble. Monetary policy can be explained according to ...

  3. Essays on financial market imperfections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ding, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of three chapters on financial market imperfections, in particular, information imperfections. Chapter 1 studies how the existence of a fixed cost per transaction faced by uninformed investors ...

  4. Political Embeddedness, Executive Autonomy, Corporate Characteristics, and Financial Malfeasance in Large Telecommunications Companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hannibal, Bryce

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    that may influence of unethical or illegal activity. The findings support organizational-political embeddedness theory, which suggests that differential social structures create dependencies, incentives, and opportunities to engage in financial...

  5. Title of dissertation: EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF TURBULENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF TURBULENT SUPERFLUID HELIUM Matthew S. Paoletti, Doctor of Philosophy, 2010 Dissertation directed by: Professor Daniel Lathrop. #12;EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF TURBULENT SUPERFLUID HELIUM by Matthew S. Paoletti Dissertation

  6. Turbulence and Magnetic Fields in Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss several categories of models which may explain the IMF, including the possible role of turbulence and magnetic fields.

  7. Turbulent breakage of ductile aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchioli, Cristian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study breakage rate statistics of small colloidal aggregates in non-homogeneous anisotropic turbulence. We use pseudo-spectral direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow and Lagrangian tracking to follow the motion of the aggregates, modelled as sub-Kolmogorov massless particles. We focus specifically on the effects produced by ductile rupture: This rupture is initially activated when fluctuating hydrodynamic stresses exceed a critical value, $\\sigma>\\sigma_{cr}$, and is brought to completion when the energy absorbed by the aggregate meets the critical breakage value. We show that ductile rupture breakage rates are significantly reduced with respect to the case of instantaneous brittle rupture (i.e. breakage occurs as soon as $\\sigma>\\sigma_{cr}$). These discrepancies are due to the different energy values at play as well as to the statistical features of energy distribution in the anisotropic turbulence case examined.

  8. Turbulent Transition in an Electromagnetically Levitated Droplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Turbulent Transition in an Electromagnetically Levitated Droplet Christina R. Rizer, Robert W a marked transition from laminar to turbulent flow, which can be observed by following the movement, will oscillate and break apart, marking the transition to turbulence. Using videos taken of these metal samples

  9. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qun

    Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump Qun Zhao, Shubhra Misra, Ib. A. Svendsen and James T of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump p.1/14 #12;Objective Our ultimate goal is to study the breaking waves. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump p.2/14 #12;A moving bore Qiantang Bore China (Courtesy of Dr J

  10. Stability, Energetics, and Turbulent Transport in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    fields" Department of Astrophysical Sciences Spring Colloquium Steve Cowley (UK Atomic Energy Authority of solar-wind turbulence" Chris Chen (UC Berkeley) 2:40pm "Energy spectra in MHD turbulenceStability, Energetics, and Turbulent Transport in Astrophysical, Fusion, and Solar Plasmas 8

  11. Turbulence transport with nonlocal interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linn, R.R.; Clark, T.T.; Harlow, F.H.; Turner, L.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This preliminary report describes a variety of issues in turbulence transport analysis with particular emphasis on closure procedures that are nonlocal in wave-number and/or physical space. Anomalous behavior of the transport equations for large scale parts of the turbulence spectrum are resolved by including the physical space nonlocal interactions. Direct and reverse cascade processes in wave-number space are given a much richer potential for realistic description by the nonlocal formulations. The discussion also describes issues, many still not resolved, regarding new classes of self-similar form functions.

  12. Gradual eddy-wave crossover in superfluid turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'vov, Victor S; Rudenko, Oleksii

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revise the theory of superfluid turbulence near the absolute zero of temperature and suggest a model with differential approximation for the energy fluxes in the k-space carried by the collective hydrodynamic motions of quantized vortex lines and by their individual uncorrelated motions known as Kelvin waves. The model predicts energy spectra of the hydrodynamic and the Kelvin waves components of the system, which experience a smooth crossover between different regimes of motion over a finite range of scales.

  13. Gradual eddy-wave crossover in superfluid turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor S. L'vov; Sergey V. Nazarenko; Oleksii Rudenko

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We revise the theory of superfluid turbulence near the absolute zero of temperature and suggest a model with differential approximation for the energy fluxes in the k-space carried by the collective hydrodynamic motions of quantized vortex lines and by their individual uncorrelated motions known as Kelvin waves. The model predicts energy spectra of the hydrodynamic and the Kelvin waves components of the system, which experience a smooth crossover between different regimes of motion over a finite range of scales.

  14. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

  15. The Numerical Simulation of Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Schmidt

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution, I give an overview of the various approaches toward the numerical modelling of turbulence, particularly, in the interstellar medium. The discussion is placed in a physical context, i. e. computational problems are motivated from basic physical considerations. Presenting selected examples for solutions to these problems, I introduce the basic ideas of the most commonly used numerical methods.

  16. Quantum Turbulence Matthew S. Paoletti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    critically review the diverse theoretical, computational, and experimental approaches from the point of view distinction between the velocity statistics of quantum and classical turbulence is exhibited and used of experimental observers. Similarities and differences between the general properties of classical and quantum

  17. Threats to financial system security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGovern, D.E.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The financial system in the United States is slowly migrating from the bricks and mortar of banks on the city square to branch banks, ATM`s, and now direct linkage through computers to the home. Much work has been devoted to the security problems inherent in protecting property and people. The impact of attacks on the information aspects of the financial system has, however, received less attention. Awareness is raised through publicized events such as the junk bond fraud perpetrated by Milken or gross mismanagement in the failure of the Barings Bank through unsupervised trading activities by Leeson in Singapore. These events, although seemingly large (financial losses may be on the order of several billion dollars), are but small contributors to the estimated $114 billion loss to all types of financial fraud in 1993. Most of the losses can be traced to the contribution of many small attacks perpetrated against a variety of vulnerable components and systems. This paper explores the magnitude of these financial system losses and identifies new areas for security to be applied to high consequence events.

  18. ash financial aspects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    > MyUCDavis portal available to PI to access financial information any time > Monitor budget and administer the financial Schladow, S. Geoffrey 76 Financial Policy Manual...

  19. Turbulence and magnetic field amplification from spiral SASI modes in core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endeve, Eirik [ORNL; Cardall, Christian Y [ORNL; Budiardja, Reuben D [ORNL; Blondin, John [ORNL; Mezzacappa, Anthony [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stationary accretion shock instability (SASI) plays a central role in modern simulations of the explosion phase of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). It may be key to realizing neutrino powered explosions, and possibly links birth properties of pulsars (e.g., kick, spin, and magnetic field) to supernova dynamics. Using high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic simulations, we study the development of turbulence, and subsequent amplification of magnetic fields in a simplified model of the post-bounce core-collapse supernova environment. Turbulence develops from secondary instabilities induced by the SASI. Our simulations suggest that the development of turbulence plays an important role for the subsequent evolution of the SASI. The turbulence also acts to amplify weak magnetic fields via a small-scale dynamo.

  20. The Turbulence Velocity Power Spectrum of Neutral Hydrogen in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chepurnov, Alexey; Lazarian, Alex; Stanimirovic, Snezana

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS) technique to calculate the velocity power spectrum of turbulence in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in 21cm emission. We have obtained a velocity spectral index of -3.85 and an injection scale of 2.3 kpc. The spectral index is steeper than the Kolmogorov index which is expected for shock-dominated turbulence which is in agreement with past works on the SMC gas dynamics. The injection scale of 2.3 kpc suggests that tidal interactions with the Large Magellanic Cloud are the dominate driver of turbulence in this dwarf galaxy. This implies turbulence maybe driven by multiple mechanisms in galaxies in addition to supernova injection and that galaxy-galaxy interactions may play an important role.

  1. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  2. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhihong

    2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  3. Money Matters for Students Financial Aid & Student Financial Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    website at: www.financialaid.fsu.edu Google Search Send private scholarships to Student Financial Services, include: FSUSN Terms of Scholarship #12;Bright Futures Academic Scholarship Maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA: Week 1: We enter Prepaid Billing on Blackboard Week 4: We Bill Prepaid Week 6-8: Prepaid remits payment

  4. On the role of stochastic Fermi acceleration in setting the dissipation scale of turbulence in the interstellar medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Robert I

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the dissipation by Fermi acceleration of magnetosonic turbulence in the Reynolds Layer of the interstellar medium. The scale in the cascade at which electron acceleration via stochastic Fermi acceleration (STFA) becomes comparable to further cascade of the turbulence defines the inner scale. For any magnetic turbulent spectra equal to or shallower than Goldreich-Sridhar this turns out to be $\\ge 10^{12}$cm, which is much larger than the shortest length scales observed in radio scintillation measurements. While STFA for such spectra then contradict models of scintillation which appeal directly to an extended, continuous turbulent cascade, such a separation of scales is consistent with the recent work of \\citet{Boldyrev2} and \\citet{Boldyrev3} suggesting that interstellar scintillation may result from the passage of radio waves through the galactic distribution of thin ionized boundary surfaces of HII regions, rather than density variations from cascading turbulence. The presence of STFA dissipation...

  5. Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

  6. Inclusion of turbulence in solar modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. H. Li; F. J. Robinson; P. Demarque; S. Sofia; D. B. Guenther

    2001-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The general consensus is that in order to reproduce the observed solar p-mode oscillation frequencies, turbulence should be included in solar models. However, until now there has not been any well-tested efficient method to incorporate turbulence into solar modeling. We present here two methods to include turbulence in solar modeling within the framework of the mixing length theory, using the turbulent velocity obtained from numerical simulations of the highly superadiabatic layer of the sun at three stages of its evolution. The first approach is to include the turbulent pressure alone, and the second is to include both the turbulent pressure and the turbulent kinetic energy. The latter is achieved by introducing two variables: the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass, and the effective ratio of specific heats due to the turbulent perturbation. These are treated as additions to the standard thermodynamic coordinates (e.g. pressure and temperature). We investigate the effects of both treatments of turbulence on the structure variables, the adiabatic sound speed, the structure of the highly superadiabatic layer, and the p-mode frequencies. We find that the second method reproduces the SAL structure obtained in 3D simulations, and produces a p-mode frequency correction an order of magnitude better than the first method.

  7. Financial Services Division of Administration & Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Financial Services Division of Administration & Finance (657) 278-2512 / Fax (714) 278: May Wong / Financial Services (CP-300). Instructions are at Questions? Email Directive11@fullerton.eduwww.finance

  8. Kuali Financial System Implementation Collector Interface Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Kuali Financial System Implementation Collector Interface Meeting December 17, 2008 Presenters of the Kuali Financial System (KFS) Collector Interface Format Differences from FRS Answer your questions #12 Collector File collector

  9. Financial Policy Manual RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES 2601 Departmental Scope & Responsibility;Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2601 DEPARTMENTAL SCOPE & RESPONSIBILITY Subject: Risk Management & Insurance Effective: December 1986 Revised: May 2011 Last Reviewed: March 2014 Resp. Office: Risk Management

  10. Technology innovation in financial services industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roxo da Fonseca, Gustavo J. C. (Gustavo Jos Costa), 1967-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last few decades, we have seen an enormous evolution in the financial services industry driven by technology innovations. Indeed, we cannot imagine the current financial system without electronic fund transfers, ...

  11. FINANCIAL INFORMATION SERVICES WWEEBB QQUUIICCKK TTIIPPSSOCTOBER 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINANCIAL INFORMATION SERVICES WWEEBB QQUUIICCKK TTIIPPSSOCTOBER 2006 Security to Web Applications How do I obtain security access to... Financial Information Library (FIL) Security is different for each Information Extract. To find security requirements, click on Details next to the Information

  12. A selective overview of nonparametric methods in financial econometrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jianqing

    A selective overview of nonparametric methods in financial econometrics Jianqing Fan Department a brief overview on the nonparametric techniques that are useful for financial econometric problems, securities regulation, proprietary trading, financial consulting and risk management. Financial econometrics

  13. Essays on the Financial Crisis and Globalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heart of the argument is that markets are not inherently stable and do not Essays on the Financial Crisis and

  14. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice addresses Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees.

  15. Summer 11 Adjustment Form Financial Aid Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    : ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ I certify that I have read and understand the requirements outlined on the Financial Aid web site

  16. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice addresses Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees.

  17. PRINCETON UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRINCETON UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL AID INFORMATION SUMMER SCHOOL EXPENSES SUMMER 2014 Currently enrolled Princeton undergraduates who will be attending summer school may qualify for a University loan listing the cost of tuition. Funding for Princeton Programs Information about campus and external funding

  18. Administration and Finance Financial Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Administration and Finance Financial Services P.O. Box 6808, Fullerton, CA 92834 / T 657. Jenkins Associate Vice President of Finance SUBJECT: Finance System Oracle Upgrade The CSUF Finance System is scheduled for an Oracle upgrade in September 2009. The CMS Finance System will be unavailable beginning

  19. Proton Kinetic Effects in Vlasov and Solar Wind Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Servidio, S; Valentini, F; Perrone, D; Califano, F; Chapman, S; Matthaeus, W H; Veltri, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic plasma processes have been investigated in the framework of solar wind turbulence, employing Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) simulations. The dependency of proton temperature anisotropy T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel} on the parallel plasma beta \\beta_{\\parallel}, commonly observed in spacecraft data, has been recovered using an ensemble of HVM simulations. By varying plasma parameters, such as plasma beta and fluctuation level, the simulations explore distinct regions of the parameter space given by T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel} and \\beta_{\\parallel}, similar to solar wind sub-datasets. Moreover, both simulation and solar wind data suggest that temperature anisotropy is not only associated with magnetic intermittent events, but also with gradient-type structures in the flow and in the density. This connection between non-Maxwellian kinetic effects and various types of intermittency may be a key point for understanding the complex nature of plasma turbulence.

  20. Shock-induced turbulent flow in baffle systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Reichenbach, H. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Kurzzeitdynamik - Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments are described on shock propagation through 2-D aligned and staggered baffle systems. Flow visualization was provided by shadow and schlieren photography, recorded by the Cranz-Schardin camera. Also single-frame, infinite-fringe, color interferograms were used. Intuition suggests that this is a rather simple 2-D shock diffraction problem. However, flow visualization reveals that the flow rapidly evolved into a complex 3-D turbulent mixing problem. Mushroom-shaped mixing regions blocked the flow into the next baffle orifice. Thus energy was transferred from the directed kinetic energy (induced by the shock) to rotational energy of turbulent mixing, and then dissipated by molecular effects. These processes dramatically dissipate the strength of the shock wave. The experiments provide an excellent test case that could be used to assess the accuracy of computer code calculations of such problems.

  1. Penetrative turbulence associated with mesoscale surface heat flux variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Jahrul M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article investigates penetrative turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer. Using a large eddy simulation approach, we study characteristics of the mixed layer with respect to surface heat flux variations in the range from 231.48 W/m$^2$ to 925.92 W/m$^2$, and observe that the surface heterogeneity on a spatial scale of $20$ km leads to downscale turbulent kinetic energy cascade. Coherent fluctuations of mesoscale horizontal wind is observed at 100m above the ground. Such a surface induced temporal oscillations in the horizontal wind suggest a rapid jump in mesocale wind forecasts, which is difficult to parameterize using traditional one-dimensional ensemble-mean models. Although the present work is idealized at a typical scale (20km) of surface heterogeneity, the results help develop effective subgrid scale parameterization schemes for classical weather forecasting mesoscale models.

  2. Financial Exclusion &Financial Exclusion & Poverty in Canada:Poverty in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    Financial Exclusion &Financial Exclusion & Poverty in Canada:Poverty in Canada: A Research Project Buckland, PhD Menno Simons CollegeMenno Simons College #12;2 J. Buckland: Fin Excl & Poverty in Canada Plan: Fin Excl & Poverty in Canada IntroductionIntroduction The Financial Exclusion andThe Financial

  3. Financial Aid Standards for SAP Page 1 Financial Aid Standards for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    funding. If a student does not meet the standards of academic progress, he/she will not be eligibleFinancial Aid Standards for SAP Page 1 Financial Aid Standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress Affects Your Financial Aid Eligibility Updated February 2012 #12;Financial Aid Standards for SAP Page 2

  4. Transport enhancement and suppression in turbulent magnetic reconnection: A self-consistent turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokoi, N. [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)] [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Higashimori, K.; Hoshino, M. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the enhancement of transport, turbulence is expected to contribute to the fast reconnection. However, the effects of turbulence are not so straightforward. In addition to the enhancement of transport, turbulence under some environment shows effects that suppress the transport. In the presence of turbulent cross helicity, such dynamic balance between the transport enhancement and suppression occurs. As this result of dynamic balance, the region of effective enhanced magnetic diffusivity is confined to a narrow region, leading to the fast reconnection. In order to confirm this idea, a self-consistent turbulence model for the magnetic reconnection is proposed. With the aid of numerical simulations where turbulence effects are incorporated in a consistent manner through the turbulence model, the dynamic balance in the turbulence magnetic reconnection is confirmed.

  5. Trading Away Financial Stability in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufts University

    Trading Away Financial Stability in Colombia: Capital Controls and the US-Colombia Trade Agreement@bu.edu #12;Trading Away Financial Stability in Colombia: Capital Controls and the US-Colombia Trade Agreement SerieBrief # 66 | Abril 2011 Trading Away Financial Stability in Colombia: Capital Controls and the US-Colombia

  6. financial report International Business Machines Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Management 50 Report of Independent Accountants 51 Management Discussion 52 Consolidated Financial Statements Earnings 64 Financial Position 65 Stockholders' Equity 66 Cash Flows 68 Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements A Significant Accounting Policies 69 B Accounting Changes 71 C Common Stock Split 72 D

  7. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2011 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 9339456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  8. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2013 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 9339456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  9. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2014 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 9339456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  10. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid Program 2012 A financial aid program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 9339456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Aid

  11. Job Dislocation Making Smart Financial Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Job Dislocation Making Smart Financial Choices after a Job Loss #12;Who We Are FINRA FINRA.workforceatm.org. #12;Job Dislocation MAKING SMART FINANCIAL CHOICES AFTER A JOB LOSS You may not be able to control in the event of unemployment; protect yourself when getting financial advice during a period of job dislocation

  12. Quantifying Turbulence for Tidal Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using newly collected data from a tidal power site in Puget Sound, WA, metrics for turbulence quantification are assessed and discussed. The quality of raw ping Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data for turbulence studies is evaluated against Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) data at a point. Removal of Doppler noise from the raw ping data is shown to be a crucial step in turbulence quantification. Excluding periods of slack tide, the turbulent intensity estimates at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed are 8% and 11% from the ADCP and ADV, respectively. Estimates of the turbulent dissipation rate are more variable, from 10e-3 to 10e-1 W/m^3. An example analysis of coherent Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) is presented.

  13. Improved detection of atmospheric turbulence with SLODAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Goodwin; Charles Jenkins; Andrew Lambert

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss several improvements in the detection of atmospheric turbulence using SLOpe Detection And Ranging (SLODAR). Frequently, SLODAR observations have shown strong ground-layer turbulence, which is beneficial to adaptive optics. We show that current methods which neglect atmospheric propagation effects can underestimate the strength of high altitude turbulence by up to ~ 30%. We show that mirror and dome seeing turbulence can be a significant fraction of measured ground-layer turbulence, some cases up to ~ 50%. We also demonstrate a novel technique to improve the nominal height resolution, by a factor of 3, called Generalized SLODAR. This can be applied when sampling high-altitude turbulence, where the nominal height resolution is the poorest, or for resolving details in the important ground-layer.

  14. Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Procurement and Financial...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Financial Assistance Regulations: Federal Acquisition Regulation Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation Department of Energy Financial Assistance Regulations Office...

  15. Turbulent heat transfer and friction in a square channel with discrete rib turbulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillin, Robert Dale

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TURBULENT HEAT TRANSFER AND FRICTION IN A SQUARE CHANNEL WITH DISCRETE RIB TURBULATORS A Thesis by ROBERT DALE iXIGMILLIN Subniitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AK. M L niversrty in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SGIE IGE Deceinber 1989 Major Subject' Mechanical Engineering TURBULENT HEAT TRANSFER AND FRICTION IN A SQUARE CHANNEL WITH DISCRETE RIB TURBULATORS A Thesrs by ROBERT DALE MCMILLI'V Approverl as to style and content...

  16. Mimicking a turbulent signal: sequential multiaffine processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; A. Crisanti; A. Vulpiani

    1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An efficient method for the construction of a multiaffine process, with prescribed scaling exponents, is presented. At variance with the previous proposals, this method is sequential and therefore it is the natural candidate in numerical computations involving synthetic turbulence. The application to the realization of a realistic turbulent-like signal is discussed in detail. The method represents a first step towards the realization of a realistic spatio-temporal turbulent field.

  17. Forest Fire Model as a Supercritical Dynamic Model in Financial Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Deokjae; Lee, Jeho; Kahng, B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, large-scale cascading failures in complex systems have garnered substantial attention. Such extreme events have been treated as an integral part of the self-organized criticality (SOC). Recent empirical work has suggested that some extreme events systematically deviate from the SOC paradigm, requiring a different theoretical framework. We shed additional theoretical light on this possibility by studying financial crisis. We build our model of financial crisis on the well-known forest fire model in scale-free networks. Our analysis shows a non-trivial scaling feature indicating supercritical behavior, which is independent of system size. Extreme events in the supercritical state result from bursting of a fat bubble, seeds of which are sown by a protracted period of a benign financial environment with few shocks. Our findings suggest that policymakers can control the magnitude of financial meltdowns by keeping the economy operating within reasonable duration of a benign environment.

  18. Turbulent diffusion and turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in stratified atmospheric flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elperin, Tov

    Turbulent diffusion and turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in stratified atmospheric flows M to the turbulent diffusion, and its potential impact on aerosol distribution. This phenomenon was predicted a nondiffusive flux of aerosols in the direction of the heat flux and results in formation of long-living aerosol

  19. Model for the spatio-temporal intermittency of the energy dissipation in turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Lepreti; Vincenzo Carbone; Pierluigi Veltri

    2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the intermittent behavior of turbulent energy dissipation processes both in space and time is often a relevant problem when dealing with phenomena occurring in high Reynolds number flows, especially in astrophysical and space fluids. In this paper, a dynamical model is proposed to describe the spatio-temporal intermittency of energy dissipation rate in a turbulent system. This is done by using a shell model to simulate the turbulent cascade and introducing some heuristic rules, partly inspired by the well known $p$-model, to construct a spatial structure of the energy dissipation rate. In order to validate the model and to study its spatially intermittency properties, a series of numerical simulations have been performed. These show that the level of spatial intermittency of the system can be simply tuned by varying a single parameter of the model and that scaling laws in agreement with those obtained from experiments on fully turbulent hydrodynamic flows can be recovered. It is finally suggested that the model could represent a useful tool to simulate the spatio-temporal intermittency of turbulent energy dissipation in those high Reynolds number astrophysical fluids where impulsive energy release processes can be associated to the dynamics of the turbulent cascade.

  20. Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion Processes in a DI Diesel Engine Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion...

  1. atmospheric optical turbulence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Atmospheric Turbulence and its Influence on Adaptive Optics Physics Websites Summary: Atmospheric Turbulence and its Influence on Adaptive Optics...

  2. Kinetic Theory of Turbulent Multiphase Phase | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solids particles interacting with a turbulent gas phase such as those in gasification rectors. Understanding the transport of heat and mass in turbulent flows, and...

  3. Interactions between financial and environmental networks in OECD countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruzzenenti, Franco; Ticci, Elisa; Vozzella, Pietro; Gabbi, Giampaolo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse a multiplex of networks between OECD countries during the decade 2002-2010, which consists of five financial layers, given by foreign direct investment, equity securities, short-term, long-term and total debt securities, and five environmental layers, given by emissions of N O x, P M 10 SO 2, CO 2 equivalent and the water footprint associated with international trade. We present a new measure of cross-layer correlations between flows in different layers based on reciprocity. For the assessment of results, we implement a null model for this measure based on the exponential random graph theory. We find that short-term financial flows are more correlated with environmental flows than long-term investments. Moreover, the correlations between reverse financial and environmental flows (i.e. flows of different layers going in opposite directions) are generally stronger than correlations between synergic flows (flows going in the same direction). This suggests a trade-off between financial and environmenta...

  4. Turbulent electron transport in edge pedestal by electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, R. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of) [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 (India); Jhang, Hogun [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)] [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of) [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); CMTFO and CASS, University of California, San Diego 92093-0424, California (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model for turbulent electron thermal transport at the edge pedestal in high (H)-mode plasmas based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. A quasi-linear analysis of electrostatic toroidal ETG modes shows that both turbulent electron thermal diffusivity and hyper-resistivity exhibits the Ohkawa scaling in which the radial correlation length of turbulence becomes the order of electron skin depth. Combination of the Ohkawa scales and the plasma current dependence results in a novel confinement scaling inside the pedestal region. It is also shown that ETG turbulence induces a thermoelectric pinch, which may accelerate the density pedestal formation.

  5. EPA's Financial and Technical Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perea, S. M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA?s Financial and Technical Resources Suzanna M. Perea, EPA Region VI CATEE Conference November 9, 2011 EPA?s Primary Role Where and how communities are built has a major impact on the environment and on public health. Many programs... are aimed at supporting activities that build more sustainable communities. Protecting Human Health and the Environment Smart Growth Implementation Assistance (SGIA) Grants http://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/sgia.htm Building Blocks Technical...

  6. Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. Furthermore, this report describes an experimental apparatus designed to test the effect of turbulence on fish, and defines its hydraulics. It gives the results of experiments in which three different fish species were exposed to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  7. Estimation of turbulence level and scale for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, D.C.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simplified method is presented for estimating onsite turbulence variance within the wind turbine layer for horizontal wind speed. The method is based principally on estimating the probability distribution of wind speed and assigning a variance to each mean wind speed based on surface roughness estimates. The model is not proposed as an alternative to onsite measurement and analysis, but rather as an adjunct to such a program. A revision of the Kaimal neutral u-component spectrum is suggested to apply to the mix of the stabilities occurring during operational winds. Values of integral length scale calculated from data analysis are shown to contradict the length scale model implicit in turbulence power spectra. Also, these calculated values are shown to be extremely sensitive to the length of the time series and the detrending method used. The analysis and modeling are extended to the rotational frame of reference for a horizontal-axis wind turbine by modeling the ratios of harmonic spike variances (1P, 2P, etc.) in the rotational spectrum to the Eulerian turbulence variance. 15 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krishna, Coimbatore R. (Mt. Sinai, NY); Milau, Julius S. (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  9. Fifteen Lectures on Laminar and Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Fifteen Lectures on Laminar and Turbulent Combustion N. Peters RWTH Aachen Ercoftac Summer School in Combustion Systems 1 Lecture 2: Calculation of Adiabatic Flame Temperatures and Chemical Equilibria 20: Laminar Diffusion Flames: Different Flow Geometries 156 Lecture 11: Turbulent Combustion: Introduction

  10. turbulent heat International Journal of Numerical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Wen-Wei

    flow behavior in a rectangular channel with streamwise-periodic ribs mounted on one of the principal. Nomenclature De = hydraulic diameter h = rib height H = channel height k = turbulent kinetic energy Nu = local June 1999 Accepted September 1999 Computation of enhanced turbulent heat transfer in a channel

  11. Turbulence of a Unidirectional Flow Bjorn Birnir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Bjrn

    -flying aircraft. Turbulent drag also prevents the design of more fuel-efficient cars and aircrafts. Turbulence plays a role in the heat trans- fer in nuclear reactors, causes drag in oil pipelines and influence and intrigued people for centuries. Five centuries ago a fluid engineer by the name of Leonardo da Vinci tackled

  12. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  13. Theory of laminated turbulence: open questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kartashova

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory of laminated turbulnece includes continuous layer of turbulence (statistical description, kinetic equations, Zakharov-Kolmogorov spectra, etc) AND discrete layer of turbulence (isolated groups of interacting waves, no statisticaldescription). This theory is presented, examples of possible applications are given, important open questions are formulated.

  14. Modelling of turbulent stratified flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darbyshire, Oliver Richard

    ) shows data with a negative correlation, (b) shows data with no correlation and (c) shows data with a positive correlation. . . . . . . . . 44 3.3 Flow chart of the SIMPLE algorithm. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.4 Schematic of the V... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 4.1 Comparison of predicted and measured velocities (m/s) and turbulence kinetic energy (m2/s2) for the cold flow ORACLES experiment. . . . . . 64 4.2 Comparison of cold flow results for the V-flame case. Mean axial velocity is shown on the left...

  15. Flame front configuration of turbulent premixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furukawa, Junichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Technical Coll. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [Tokyo Metropolitan Technical Coll. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Maruta, Kaoru [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Fluid Science] [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. of Fluid Science; Hirano, Toshisuke [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Chemical System Engineering] [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Chemical System Engineering

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study is performed to explore dependence of the wrinkle scale of propane-air turbulent premixed flames on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow, burner size, and mixture ratio. The wrinkle scales are examined and expressed in the frequency distribution of the radii of flame front curvatures. The average wrinkle scale depends not only on the characteristics of turbulence in the nonreacting flow but also on burner diameter and mixture ratio. The average wrinkle scale of a lean propane-air flame is larger than those of the near stoichiometric and rich flames. The smallest wrinkle scale of turbulent premixed flame is in the range of 0.75--1.0 mm, which is much larger than the Kolmogorov scale of turbulence in the nonreacting flow.

  16. Energy transfers in shell models for MHD turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lessinnes; M. K. Verma; D. Carati

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic procedure to derive shell models for MHD turbulence is proposed. It takes into account the conservation of ideal quadratic invariants such as the total energy, the cross-helicity and the magnetic helicity as well as the conservation of the magnetic energy by the advection term in the induction equation. This approach also leads to simple expressions for the energy exchanges as well as to unambiguous definitions for the energy fluxes. When applied to the existing shell models with nonlinear interactions limited to the nearest neighbour shells, this procedure reproduces well known models but suggests a reinterpretation of the energy fluxes.

  17. Financial Literacy Effectiveness in Central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Lauren Pheriche

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    literacy games (Visa 2013), and in-classroom settings for adults (Bauer et al. 2011) to name a few. Different audiences may have different financial goals, and their education should reflect that. Financial literacy should provide the right tools..., Shapiro, & Zia 2011). The knowledge component across different financial education courses is similar (Bauer et al. 2011; Braunstein & Welch 2002; Money Smart 2013; United States Department of the Treasury 2003). Savings, debt, and investing are shared...

  18. Great Plains Turbulence Environment: Its Origins, Impact, and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the known impacts of nocturnal turbulence on wind turbine performance and operations.

  19. Copyright 2003 The Financial Times Limited Financial Times (London,England)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright 2003 The Financial Times Limited Financial Times (London,England) October 15, 2003, Wednesday London Edition 1 SECTION: COMMENT; Pg. 21 LENGTH: 1116 words HEADLINE: The world must not let

  20. Copyright 1999 The Financial Times Limited Financial Times (London,England)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright 1999 The Financial Times Limited Financial Times (London,England) May 5, 1999, Wednesday LONDON EDITION 1 SECTION: COMMENT & ANALYSIS; Pg. 24 HEADLINE: A cure for indifference PERSONAL VIEW

  1. Turbulent Friction in Rough Pipes and the Energy Spectrum of the Phenomenological Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Gioia; Pinaki Chakraborty

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical experiments on turbulent friction in rough pipes were performed by J. Nikuradse in the 1930's. Seventy years later, they continue to defy theory. Here we model Nikuradse's experiments using the phenomenological theory of Kolmog\\'orov, a theory that is widely thought to be applicable only to highly idealized flows. Our results include both the empirical scalings of Blasius and Strickler, and are otherwise in minute qualitative agreement with the experiments; they suggest that the phenomenological theory may be relevant to other flows of practical interest; and they unveil the existence of close ties between two milestones of experimental and theoretical turbulence.

  2. Mesoscale flows in large aspect ratio simulations of turbulent compressible convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rincon; F. Lignieres; M. Rieutord

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a very large aspect ratio (42.6) numerical simulation of fully compressible turbulent convection in a polytropic atmosphere, and focus on the properties of large-scale flows. Mesoscale patterns dominate the turbulent energy spectrum. We show that these structures, which had already been observed in Boussinesq simulations by Cattaneo et al. (2001), have a genuine convective origin and do not result directly from collective interactions of the smaller scales of the flow, even though their growth is strongly affected by nonlinear transfers. If this result is relevant to the solar photosphere, it suggests that the dominant convective mode below the Sun's surface may be at mesoscales.

  3. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees. (Replaces DOE N 326.7).

  4. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Financial Assistance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - ARRAAttachment3.rtf FOIA Frequently Requested Documents: DE-EE0002884 Recovery Act - Integrated Algal Biorefinery (IABR) Financial Assistance Funding Opportunity Announcement...

  5. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (SF 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to persons employed at the GS-15 level and below, except for Schedule C appointees.

  6. Heating National Ignition Facility, Realistic Financial Planning...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    628 National Ignition Facility Realistic Financial Planning Rapid Modification are Essential Lessons Learned Report Apr 2010.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0236: Record of...

  7. THE DOE GUIDE TO FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as the Energy Policy Acts of 1992 and 2005 (EPAct), also provide authority for DOE to enter into financial assistance agreements. Generally, these statutes will identify the...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Public Health Service Financial...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) Investigators' financial conflicts of interest. 1.2 This corporate policy applies to all Sandia employees and persons working on...

  9. Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 FederalofE: BibliographyEnergyFinancial

  10. Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Departmentof Ohio EnvironmentalEnergy Market TransformationFinancial

  11. Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Departmentof Ohio EnvironmentalEnergy MarketFinancial Opportunities

  12. Realistic Financial Planning and Rapid

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuringDepartment of EnergyU.N.Realistic Financial

  13. 2014 Second Quarter Financial Review

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment ActivitiesAge Refining Air1, 2015 Financial4October

  14. Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Morris, V.R.; Tomich, S.D.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites. 9 refs., 10 figs.,

  15. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  16. Outflow Driven Turbulence in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan J. Carroll; Adam Frank; Eric G. Blackman; Andrew J. Cunningham; Alice C. Quillen

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we explore the relationship between protostellar outflows and turbulence in molecular clouds. Using 3-D numerical simulations we focus on the hydrodynamics of multiple outflows interacting within a parsec scale volume. We explore the extent to which transient outflows injecting directed energy and momentum into a sub-volume of a molecular cloud can be converted into random turbulent motions. We show that turbulence can readily be sustained by these interactions and show that it is possible to broadly characterize an effective driving scale of the outflows. We compare the velocity spectrum obtained in our studies to that of isotropically forced hydrodynamic turbulence finding that in outflow driven turbulence a power law is indeed achieved. However we find a steeper spectrum (beta ~ 3) is obtained in outflow driven turbulence models than in isotropically forced simulations (beta ~ 2). We discuss possible physical mechanisms responsible for these results as well and their implications for turbulence in molecular clouds where outflows will act in concert with other processes such as gravitational collapse.

  17. Universal turbulence on branes in holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koji Hashimoto; Mitsuhiro Nishida; Akihiko Sonoda

    2015-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    At a meson melting transition in holographic QCD, a weak turbulence of mesons was found with critical embeddings of probe D-branes in gravity duals. The turbulent mesons have a power-law energy distribution $\\varepsilon_n \\propto (\\omega_n)^\\alpha$ where $\\omega_n$ is the mass of the $n$-th excited resonance of the meson tower. In this paper, we find that the turbulence power $\\alpha$ is universal, irrespective of how the transition is driven, by numerically calculating the power in various static brane setups at criticality. We also find that the power $\\alpha$ depends only on the cone dimensions of the probe D-branes.

  18. Universal turbulence on branes in holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hashimoto, Koji; Sonoda, Akihiko

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At a meson melting transition in holographic QCD, a weak turbulence of mesons was found with critical embeddings of probe D-branes in gravity duals. The turbulent mesons have a power-law energy distribution $\\varepsilon_n \\propto (\\omega_n)^\\alpha$ where $\\omega_n$ is the mass of the $n$-th excited resonance of the meson tower. In this paper, we find that the turbulence power $\\alpha$ is universal, irrespective of how the transition is driven, by numerically calculating the power in various static brane setups at criticality. We also find that the power $\\alpha$ depends only on the cone dimensions of the probe D-branes.

  19. The Internal-Collision-Induced Magnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) Model of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent Fermi observation of GRB 080916C shows that the bright photosphere emission associated with a putative fireball is missing, which suggests a Poynting-flux-dominated outflow. We propose a model of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission in the Poynting-flux-dominated regime, namely, the Internal-Collision-induced MAgnetic Reconnection and Turbulence (ICMART) model. It is envisaged that the GRB central engine launches an intermittent, magnetically-dominated wind, and that in the GRB emission region, the ejecta is still moderately magnetized. Similar to the internal shock (IS) model, the mini-shells interact internally at the traditional internal shock radius. Most of these early collision have little energy dissipation, but serve to distort the ordered magnetic field lines. At a certain point, the distortion of magnetic field configuration reaches the critical condition to allow fast reconnection seeds to occur, which induce relativistic MHD turbulence in the interaction regions. The turbulence further...

  20. Permutation Entropy and Statistical Complexity Analysis of Turbulence in Laboratory Plasmas and the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weck, Peter J; Brown, Michael R; Wicks, Robert T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bandt-Pompe permutation entropy and the Jensen-Shannon statistical complexity are used to analyze fluctuating time series of three different plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence of ion saturation current fluctuations in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and fully-developed turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the WIND spacecraft. The entropy and complexity values are presented as coordinates on the CH plane for comparison among the different plasma environments and other fluctuation models. The solar wind is found to have the highest permutation entropy and lowest statistical complexity of the three data sets analyzed. Both laboratory data sets have larger values of statistical complexity, suggesting these systems have fewer degrees of freedom in their fluctuations, with SSX magnetic fluctuations having slightly less complexity than the LAPD edge fluctuations. The CH ...

  1. Short wavelength turbulence generated by shear in the quiescent H-mode edge on DIIID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rost, J. C.; Porkolab, M.; Dorris, J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A region of turbulence with large radial wavenumber (k{sub r}?{sub s}>1) is found in the high-shear portion of the plasma edge in Quiescent H-mode (QH-mode) on DIIID using the Phase Contrast Imaging (PCI) diagnostic. At its peak outside the minimum of the E{sub r} well, the turbulence exhibits large amplitude n{sup ~}/n?40%, with large radial wavenumber |k{sup }{sub r}/k{sup }{sub ?}|?11 and short radial correlation length L{sub r}/?{sub i}?0.2. The turbulence inside the E{sub r} well minimum is characterized by the opposite sign in radial wavenumber from that of turbulence outside the minimum, consistent with the expected effects of velocity shear. The PCI diagnostic provides a line-integrated measurement of density fluctuations, so data are taken during a scan of plasma position at constant parameters to allow the PCI to sample a range in k{sub r}/k{sub ?}. Analysis of the Doppler shift and plasma geometry allows the turbulence to be localized to a narrow region 3?mm inside the last closed flux surface, outside the minimum of the E{sub r} well. The turbulence amplitude and radial wavenumber and correlation length are determined by fitting the PCI results with a simple non-isotropic turbulence model with two regions of turbulence. These PCI observations, made in QH-mode, are qualitatively similar to those made in standard edge localized modes (ELM)-free H-mode and between ELMs, suggesting a similar role for large k{sub r} turbulence there.

  2. Coshcous turbulence and its thermalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jian-zhou [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Mark [SNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissipation rate {mu}[cosh(k/k{sub c}) - 1] in Fourier space, which reduces to the Newtonian viscosity dissipation rate {nu}k{sup 2} for small k/k{sub c}, can be scaled to make a hydrodynamic system either actually or potentially converge to its Galerkin truncation. The former case acquires convergence to the truncation at a finite wavenumber k{sub G}; the latter realizes as the wavenumber grows to infinity. Intermittency reduction and vitiation of extended self-similarity (ESS) in the partially thermalized regime of turbulence are confirmed and clarified. Onsager's pictures of intermittent versus nonintermittent flows are visualized from thermalized numerical fields, showing cleanly spotty versus mistily uniform properties, the latter of which destroys self-organization and so the ESS property.

  3. Two regimes of Turbulent Fragmentation and the stellar IMF from Primordial to Present Day Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Padoan; AAke Nordlund; Alexei G. Kritsuk; Michael L. Norman; Pak Shing Li

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Padoan and Nordlund model of the stellar initial mass function (IMF) is derived from low order statistics of supersonic turbulence, neglecting gravity (e.g. gravitational fragmentation, accretion and merging). In this work the predictions of that model are tested using the largest numerical experiments of supersonic hydrodynamic (HD) and magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence to date (~1000^3 computational zones) and three different codes (Enzo, Zeus and the Stagger Code). The model predicts a power law distribution for large masses, related to the turbulence energy power spectrum slope, and the shock jump conditions. This power law mass distribution is confirmed by the numerical experiments. The model also predicts a sharp difference between the HD and MHD regimes, which is recovered in the experiments as well, implying that the magnetic field, even below energy equipartition on the large scale, is a crucial component of the process of turbulent fragmentation. These results suggest that the stellar IMF of primordial stars may differ from that in later epochs of star formation, due to differences in both gas temperature and magnetic field strength. In particular, we find that the IMF of primordial stars born in turbulent clouds may be narrowly peaked around a mass of order 10 solar masses, as long as the column density of such clouds is not much in excess of 10^22 cm^-2.

  4. Transported PDF Modeling of Nonpremixed Turbulent CO/H-2/N-2 Jet Flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, xinyu; Haworth, D. C.; Huckaby, E. David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulent CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} (syngas) flames are simulated using a transported composition probability density function (PDF) method. A consistent hybrid Lagrangian particle/Eulerian mesh algorithm is used to solve the modeled PDF transport equation. The model includes standard k? turbulence, gradient transport for scalars, and Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST) mixing. Sensitivities of model results to variations in the turbulence model, the treatment of radiation heat transfer, the choice of chemical mechanism, and the PDF mixing model are explored. A baseline model reproduces the measured mean and rms temperature, major species, and minor species profiles reasonably well, and captures the scaling that is observed in the experiments. Both our results and the literature suggest that further improvements can be realized with adjustments in the turbulence model, the radiation heat transfer model, and the chemical mechanism. Although radiation effects are relatively small in these flames, consideration of radiation is important for accurate NO prediction. Chemical mechanisms that have been developed specifically for fuels with high concentrations of CO and H{sub 2} perform better than a methane mechanism that was not designed for this purpose. It is important to account explicitly for turbulencechemistry interactions, although the details of the mixing model do not make a large difference in the results, within reasonable limits.

  5. Fluctuation characteristics and transport properties of collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao Yong; Holod, Ihor; Zhang Wenlu; Lin Zhihong [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Klasky, Scott [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence is investigated by global gyrokinetic particle simulation. The zonal flow dominated by low frequency and short wavelength acts as a very important saturation mechanism. The turbulent eddies are mostly microscopic, but with a significant portion in the mesoscale. The ion heat transport is found to be diffusive and follows the local radial profile of the turbulence intensity. However, the electron heat transport demonstrates some nondiffusive features and only follows the global profile of the turbulence intensity. The nondiffusive features of the electron heat transport is further confirmed by nonlognormal statistics of the flux-surface-averaged electron heat flux. The radial and time correlation functions are calculated to obtain the radial correlation length and autocorrelation time. Characteristic time scale analysis shows that the zonal flow shearing time and eddy turnover time are very close to the effective decorrelation time, which suggests that the trapped electrons move with the fluid eddies. The fluidlike behaviors of the trapped electrons and the persistence of the mesoscale eddies contribute to the transition of the electron turbulent transport from gyro-Bohm scaling to Bohm scaling when the device size decreases.

  6. Financial Report 200708 Message from the President ...............................................4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    #12;Financial Report 200708 #12;3 Message from the President ...............................................4 Message from the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Message from the President #12;5 expanded existing financial aid and academic support programs and created

  7. Predicting financial distress using corporate efficiency and corporate governance measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiyong, Li

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Credit models are essential to control credit risk and accurately predicting bankruptcy and financial distress is even more necessary after the recent global financial crisis. Although accounting and financial information ...

  8. Compass Financial Stability and Savings Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    Compass Financial Stability and Savings Program Pilot Evaluation: Second Year Report April 2013 Prepared for Compass Working Capital Boston, MA Prepared by Delia Kimbrel, Research Associate Institute, MA #12;Compass Working Capital Compass Working Capital ("Compass") provides incentive-based financial

  9. The Future of Financial Risk Management: Lessons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    The Future of Financial Risk Management: Lessons Charles S. Tapiero, Topfer Chair Distinguished Professor of Financial Engineering and Technology Management Department of Finance and Risk Engineering NYU, leading risk managers to turn to qualitative stress testingto turn to qualitative stresstesting, 4

  10. Detailed Financial Procedures Page 1 of 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Ran

    Detailed Financial Procedures Page 1 of 3 Inventories and Disposals Background In accordance with Standing Financial Regulation, Heads of Departments are responsible for maintaining inventories for all disposals thereof. (Ref 8.03 & 8.06) Inventory Spreadsheet The following information should be recorded

  11. FINANCIAL ECONOMICS RESOURCE ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    ECONOMICS FINANCIAL ECONOMICS RESOURCE ECONOMICS AND POLICY Program of Study The School of Economics at the University of Maine provides excellent opportunities for graduate students to study applied economics, financial economics, and policy analysis. The School of Economics administers the Master

  12. 2011 Financial Report THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Accounting. Richelle L. Alamo Cost Analyst Michael A. Baker Financial Systems Analyst Suzanne M. Chizmar Chief Accountant Thomas F. Ewing Associate Controller Robert L. Hupp, II Financial Systems Analyst Jodi Report of Independent Auditors Management's Discussion and Analysis Consolidated Statements of Net Assets

  13. Tier II Canada Research Chair Financial Econometrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    Tier II Canada Research Chair in Financial Econometrics The University of Western Ontario Research Chair in the area of Financial Econometrics, at the rank of probationary (tenure-track) Assistant: Labour Economics, Macroeconomics, Micro Theory and Econometrics. Quantitative Finance is an area

  14. An introduction to financial econometrics Jianqing Fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lily

    An introduction to financial econometrics Jianqing Fan Department of Operation Research econometrics? This simple question does not have a simple answer. The boundary of such an interdisciplinary speaking, financial econometrics is to study quantitative problems arising from finance. It uses sta

  15. The Manchester Metropolitan University Financial Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The new Business School and Student Hub is an award-winning building constructed to the highest standards of energy efficiency and sustainable development. The building provides an inspirational learning and Financial Review The Governors submit the University's annual report and audited consolidated financial

  16. MANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS a Personal and Family Guide CENTER ON THE FAMILY #12;2 Managing Job Loss and Financial Stress The issues associated with losing one's job or having hours cut also have other assistance (e.g., job placement, resume preparation, retraining), of which you should

  17. Quasi-Periodic Oscillations from Magnetorotational Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Arras; Omer Blaes; Neal J. Turner

    2006-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the X-ray lightcurves of accreting neutron star and black hole binaries have been widely interpreted as being due to standing wave modes in accretion disks. These disks are thought to be highly turbulent due to the magnetorotational instability (MRI). We study wave excitation by MRI turbulence in the shearing box geometry. We demonstrate that axisymmetric sound waves and radial epicyclic motions driven by MRI turbulence give rise to narrow, distinct peaks in the temporal power spectrum. Inertial waves, on the other hand, do not give rise to distinct peaks which rise significantly above the continuum noise spectrum set by MRI turbulence, even when the fluid motions are projected onto the eigenfunctions of the modes. This is a serious problem for QPO models based on inertial waves.

  18. Aspects of Wave Turbulence in Preheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jos A. Crespo; H. P. de Oliveira

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we have studied the nonlinear preheating dynamics of the $\\frac{1}{4} \\lambda \\phi^4$ inflationary model. It is well established that after a linear stage of preheating characterized by the parametric resonance, the nonlinear dynamics becomes relevant driving the system towards turbulence. Wave turbulence is the appropriated description of this phase since matter distributions are fields instead of usual fluids. Therefore, turbulence develops due to the nonlinear interations of waves, here represented by the small inhomogeneities of the inflaton field. We present relevant aspects of wave turbulence such as the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum in frequency and wave number domains that indicates that there are a transfer of energy through scales. From the power spectrum of the matter energy density we were able to estimate the temperature of the thermalized system.

  19. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  20. Turbulent Fluxes in Stably Stratified Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'vov, Victor S; Rudenko, Oleksii; 10.1088/0031-8949/2008/T132/014010

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extended version of an invited talk given on the International Conference "Turbulent Mixing and Beyond". The dynamical and statistical description of stably stratified turbulent boundary layers with the important example of the stable atmospheric boundary layer in mind is addressed. Traditional approaches to this problem, based on the profiles of mean quantities, velocity second-order correlations, and dimensional estimates of the turbulent thermal flux run into a well known difficulty, predicting the suppression of turbulence at a small critical value of the Richardson number, in contradiction with observations. Phenomenological attempts to overcome this problem suffer from various theoretical inconsistencies. Here we present an approach taking into full account all the second-order statistics, which allows us to respect the conservation of total mechanical energy. The analysis culminates in an analytic solution of the profiles of all mean quantities and all second-order correlations removing t...

  1. Propagating and stationary superfluid turbulent fronts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castiglione, J.; Murphy, P.J.; Tough, J.T.; Hayot, F. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have observed that the critical heat current for the transition to superfluid turbulence in weakly nonuniform circular channels depends strongly on the flow direction. This observation is particularly surprising since no other property of the turbulence appears to have such a dependence. In a nonuniform channel the critical heat current is associated with a stationary front between the laminar and turbulent flow. The authors propose a new model for super-fluid turbulent fronts which explains the asymmetry of the critical heat currents in a simple way. The model is based on the subcritical nature of the transition, and the generic description of such a bifurcation by the Ginzburg-Landau equation. As a bonus, the model also explains a long-standing problem in superfluid physics-the nature of propagating fronts in uniform channels. The results of this analysis of both the uniform and nonuniform channel data also provide new information about the vortex line drift velocity.

  2. Turbulent round jet under gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yong Uk

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of a neutrally buoyant horizontal turbulent round jet under a wavy environment was investigated. Progressive waves with different wave amplitudes in an intermediate water depth were used. The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique...

  3. Inhomogeneous distribution of droplets in cloud turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhak Fouxon; Yongnam Park; Roei Harduf; Changhoon Lee

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We solve the problem of spatial distribution of inertial particles that sediment in turbulent flow with small ratio of acceleration of fluid particles to acceleration of gravity $g$. The particles are driven by linear drag and have arbitrary inertia. The pair-correlation function of concentration obeys a power-law in distance with negative exponent. Divergence at zero signifies singular distribution of particles in space. Independently of particle size the exponent is ratio of integral of energy spectrum of turbulence times the wavenumber to $g$ times numerical factor. We find Lyapunov exponents and confirm predictions by direct numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes turbulence. The predictions include typical case of water droplets in clouds. This significant progress in the study of turbulent transport is possible because strong gravity makes the particle's velocity at a given point unique.

  4. Consolidated financial statements for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following overview and accompanying audited financial statements have been prepared for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 to report the financial position and the results of operations of the Department of Energy. These statements include the consolidated Statement of Financial Position and the consolidated Statement of Operations and Changes in Net Position. The statements have been prepared in accordance with the Office of Management and Budget Bulletin No. 94-01, Form and Content for Agency Financial Statements, and were developed in accordance with the hierarchy of accounting standards described therein. The overview provides a narrative on the Department of Energy`s mission, activities, and accomplishments. Utilizing performance measures as the primary vehicle for communicating Departmental accomplishments and results, this overview discusses the most significant measures while others are discussed in the supplemental information to the financial statements.

  5. Concepts in strong Langmuir turbulence theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuBois, D.F.; Rose, H.A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the basic concepts of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) theory are reviewed. In SLT system, a major fraction of the turbulent energy is carried by local, time-dependent, nonlinear excitations called cavitons. Modulational instability, localization of Langmuir fields by density fluctuations, caviton nucleation, collapse, and burnout and caviton correlations are reviewed. Recent experimental evidence will be presented for SLT phenomena in the interaction of powerful HF waves with the ionosphere and in laser-plasma interaction experiments. 38 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Quantum light in the turbulent atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Semenov; W. Vogel

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonclassical properties of light propagating through the turbulent atmosphere are studied. We demonstrate by numerical simulation that the probability distribution of the transmission coefficient, which characterizes the effects of the atmosphere on the quantum state of light, can be reconstructed by homodyne detection. Nonclassical photon-statistics and, more generally, nonclassical Glauber-Sudarshan functions appear to be more robust against turbulence for weak light fields rather than for bright ones.

  7. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  8. Reaction and diffusion in turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, S.B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The motivation for this project is the need to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the technologically-important phenomenon of turbulent combustion. In nearly all applications in which fuel is burned-for example, fossil-fuel power plants, furnaces, gas-turbines and internal-combustion engines-the combustion takes place in a turbulent flow. Designers continually demand more quantitative information about this phenomenon-in the form of turbulent combustion models-so that they can design equipment with increased efficiency and decreased environmental impact. For some time the PI has been developing a class of turbulent combustion models known as PDF methods. These methods have the important virtue that both convection and reaction can be treated without turbulence-modelling assumptions. However, a mixing model is required to account for the effects of molecular diffusion. Currently, the available mixing models are known to have some significant defects. The major motivation of the project is to seek a better understanding of molecular diffusion in turbulent reactive flows, and hence to develop a better mixing model.

  9. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J. [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States); Center for Prototype Climate Modelling, NYU Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Grooms, Ian, E-mail: grooms@cims.nyu.edu [Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer St., New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse spacetime superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for eddy-permitting mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  10. Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number 1910-5149 Supporting Statement: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants OMB Control Number...

  11. Clean Energy Lending From the Financial Institution Perspective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lending From the Financial Institution Perspective (Chapter 8 of the Clean Energy Finance Guide, 3rd Edition) Clean Energy Lending From the Financial Institution Perspective...

  12. administration financial fallout: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    > MyUCDavis portal available to PI to access financial information any time > Monitor budget and administer the financial Schladow, S. Geoffrey 164 Washington University...

  13. Financial and Activity Report - October 30, 2009 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 30, 2009 Financial and Activity Report - October 30, 2009 DOEFinancialandActivityReport10302009.xls More Documents & Publications Financial and Activity Report - July...

  14. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    ;Consolidated Financial Statements March 31, 2010 Table of Contents Year in Review .............................................. 36 #12;Consolidated Financial Statements March 31, 2010 Page | 1 Year in Review The University

  15. au marche financier: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2012 OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL. Martin Inspector General Acronyms AFR Agency Financial Report Caltech California Institute of Technology Financial Officer OIG Office of...

  16. Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommenda...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy:...

  17. Approaches and Financial Models for Scaling up Norwegian Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Financial Models for Scaling up Norwegian Development Assistance to Clean Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Approaches and Financial Models for...

  18. INTERCHANGE RECONNECTION IN A TURBULENT CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappazzo, A. F.; Matthaeus, W. H. [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Ruffolo, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Servidio, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Velli, M., E-mail: rappazzo@udel.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic reconnection at the interface between coronal holes and loops, the so-called interchange reconnection, can release the hotter, denser plasma from magnetically confined regions into the heliosphere, contributing to the formation of the highly variable slow solar wind. The interchange process is often thought to develop at the apex of streamers or pseudo-streamers, near Y- and X-type neutral points, but slow streams with loop composition have been recently observed along fanlike open field lines adjacent to closed regions, far from the apex. However, coronal heating models, with magnetic field lines shuffled by convective motions, show that reconnection can occur continuously in unipolar magnetic field regions with no neutral points: photospheric motions induce a magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade in the coronal field that creates the necessary small scales, where a sheared magnetic field component orthogonal to the strong axial field is created locally and can reconnect. We propose that a similar mechanism operates near and around boundaries between open and closed regions inducing a continual stochastic rearrangement of connectivity. We examine a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model of a simplified interface region between open and closed corona threaded by a strong unipolar magnetic field. This boundary is not stationary, becomes fractal, and field lines change connectivity continuously, becoming alternatively open and closed. This model suggests that slow wind may originate everywhere along loop-coronal-hole boundary regions and can account naturally and simply for outflows at and adjacent to such boundaries and for the observed diffusion of slow wind around the heliospheric current sheet.

  19. The Nature of Subproton Scale Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Xia, Q; Perez, J C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of subproton scale fluctuations in the solar wind is an open question, partly because two similar types of electromagnetic turbulence can occur: kinetic Alfven turbulence and whistler turbulence. These two possibilities, however, have one key qualitative difference: whistler turbulence, unlike kinetic Alfven turbulence, has negligible power in density fluctuations. In this Letter, we present new observational data, as well as analytical and numerical results, to investigate this difference. The results show, for the first time, that the fluctuations well below the proton scale are predominantly kinetic Alfven turbulence, and, if present at all, the whistler fluctuations make up only a small fraction of the total energy.

  20. Evidence of critical balance in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation of kinetic plasma turbulence is performed to assess the applicability of critical balance to kinetic, dissipation scale turbulence. The analysis is performed in the frequency domain to obviate complications inherent in performing a local analysis of turbulence. A theoretical model of dissipation scale critical balance is constructed and compared to simulation results, and excellent agreement is found. This result constitutes the first evidence of critical balance in a kinetic turbulence simulation and provides evidence of an anisotropic turbulence cascade extending into the dissipation range. We also perform an Eulerian frequency analysis of the simulation data and compare it to the results of a previous study of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations.

  1. Numerical Investigation of Scaling Properties of Turbulent Premixed Flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer; A. R. Kerstein

    1997-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Gibson scaling and related properties of flame-surface geometry in turbulent premixed combustion are demonstrated using a novel computational model, Deterministic Turbulent Mixing (DTM). In DTM, turbulent advection is represented by a sequence of maps applied to the computational domain. The structure of the mapping sequence incorporates pertinent scaling properties of the turbulent cascade. Here, combustion in Kolmogorov turbulence (kinetic-energy cascade) and in Bolgiano-Obukhov convective turbulence (potential-energy cascade) is simulated. Implications with regard to chemical flames and astrophysical (thermonuclear) flames are noted.

  2. Finite-rate chemistry and transient effects in Direct Numerical Simulations of turbulent non-premixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahalingam, S. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Vervisch, L. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides, Numeriques (France)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of turbulent non-premixed flames including finite-rate chemistry and heat release effects were performed. Two chemical reaction models were considered: (1) a single-step global reaction model in which the heat release and activation energy parameters are chosen to model methane-air combustion, and (2) a two-step reaction model to simulate radical production and consumption and to compare against the single-step model. The model problem consists of the interaction between an initially unstrained laminar diffusion flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous turbulence. Conditions ranging from fast chemistry to the pure mixing limit were studied by varying a global Damkoehler number. Results suggest that turbulence-induced mixing acting along the stoichiometric line leads to a strong modification of the inner structure of the turbulent flame compared with a laminar strained flame, resulting in intermediate species concentrations well above the laminar prediction. This result is consistent with experimental observations. Comparison of the response of the turbulent flame structure due to changes in the scalar dissipation rate with a steady strained laminar flame reveals that unsteady strain rates experienced by the turbulent flame may be responsible for the observed high concentrations of reaction intermediates.

  3. Rossby and Drift Wave Turbulence and Zonal Flows: the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colm Connaughton; Sergey Nazarenko; Brenda Quinn

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima model and its extensions is presented. These simple nonlinear partial differential equations suggested for both Rossby waves in the atmosphere and also drift waves in a magnetically-confined plasma exhibit some remarkable and nontrivial properties, which in their qualitative form survive in more realistic and complicated models, and as such form a conceptual basis for understanding the turbulence and zonal flow dynamics in real plasma and geophysical systems. Two idealised scenarios of generation of zonal flows by small-scale turbulence are explored: a modulational instability and turbulent cascades. A detailed study of the generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability reveals that the dynamics of this zonal flow generation mechanism differ widely depending on the initial degree of nonlinearity. A numerical proof is provided for the extra invariant in Rossby and drift wave turbulence -zonostrophy and the invariant cascades are shown to be characterised by the zonostrophy pushing the energy to the zonal scales. A small scale instability forcing applied to the model demonstrates the well-known drift wave - zonal flow feedback loop in which the turbulence which initially leads to the zonal flow creation, is completely suppressed and the zonal flows saturate. The turbulence spectrum is shown to diffuse in a manner which has been mathematically predicted. The insights gained from this simple model could provide a basis for equivalent studies in more sophisticated plasma and geophysical fluid dynamics models in an effort to fully understand the zonal flow generation, the turbulent transport suppression and the zonal flow saturation processes in both the plasma and geophysical contexts as well as other wave and turbulence systems where order evolves from chaos.

  4. Email, 10/3, Online HW TECHNICAL SUGGESTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    odavis

    2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    information for easy reference. ... send you what information I have(SEE BELOW for many such suggestions), .... In the "Security" dialog box, click "Bookmarks.".

  5. Clustering of Aerosols in Atmospheric Turbulent Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; M. A. Liberman; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanism of formation of small-scale inhomogeneities in spatial distributions of aerosols and droplets associated with clustering instability in the atmospheric turbulent flow is discussed. The particle clustering is a consequence of a spontaneous breakdown of their homogeneous space distribution due to the clustering instability, and is caused by a combined effect of the particle inertia and a finite correlation time of the turbulent velocity field. In this paper a theoretical approach proposed in Phys. Rev. E 66, 036302 (2002) is further developed and applied to investigate the mechanisms of formation of small-scale aerosol inhomogeneities in the atmospheric turbulent flow. The theory of the particle clustering instability is extended to the case when the particle Stokes time is larger than the Kolmogorov time scale, but is much smaller than the correlation time at the integral scale of turbulence. We determined the criterion of the clustering instability for the Stokes number larger than 1. We discussed applications of the analyzed effects to the dynamics of aerosols and droplets in the atmospheric turbulent flow.

  6. Anisotropic turbulent model for solar coronal heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Bigot; S. Galtier; H. Politano

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Context : We present a self-consistent model of solar coronal heating, originally developed by Heyvaert & Priest (1992), in which we include the dynamical effect of the background magnetic field along a coronal structure by using exact results from wave MHD turbulence (Galtier et al. 2000). Aims : We evaluate the heating rate and the microturbulent velocity for comparison with observations in the quiet corona, active regions and also coronal holes. Methods :The coronal structures are assumed to be in a turbulent state maintained by the slow erratic motions of the magnetic footpoints. A description for the large-scale and the unresolved small-scale dynamics are given separately. From the latter, we compute exactly (or numerically for coronal holes) turbulent viscosites that are finally used in the former to close self-consistently the system and derive the heating flux expression. Results : We show that the heating rate and the turbulent velocity compare favorably with coronal observations. Conclusions : Although the Alfven wave turbulence regime is strongly anisotropic, and could reduce a priori the heating efficiency, it provides an unexpected satisfactory model of coronal heating for both magnetic loops and open magnetic field lines.

  7. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  8. Biophysical coupling between turbulence, veliger behavior, and larval supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Heidi L

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this thesis were to quantify the behavior of gastropod larvae (mud snails Ilyanassa obsoleta) in turbulence, and to investigate how that behavior affects larval supply in a turbulent coastal inlet. Gastropod ...

  9. Aeroelastic Analysis of Bridges: Effects of Turbulence and Aerodynamic Nonlinearities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    of bridges under turbulent winds. The nonlinear force model separates the aerodynamic force into low; Buffeting; Turbulence; Bridges; Wind forces; Aerodynamics. Introduction The aerodynamic performance under aerodynamic force model and associated time domain analysis framework for predicting the aeroelastic response

  10. Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

  11. Assessment of reduced mechanisms using One Dimensional Stochastic Turbulence model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chien, Li-Chun

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    turbulence model for a syngas jet flame. Proceeding of FallKerstein 2002), a turbulent syngas (CO/H2/NO) jet flame wasand DNS results of the syngas jet flame was recently done

  12. Coastal Microstructure: From Active Overturn to Fossil Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Pak Tao

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagram. This technique provides detailed information on the evolution of the turbulent patches from active overturns to fossilized scalar microstructures in the water column. Results from this study offer new evidence to support the fossil turbulence...

  13. Consider Installing Turbulators on Two- and Three-Pass Firetube...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    tip sheet outlines the benefits of turbulators on firetube boilers as part of optimized steam systems. STEAM TIP SHEET 25 Consider Installing Turbulators on Two- and Three-Pass...

  14. Financial and Activity Report- December 7, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  15. Financial and Activity Report- December 9, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  16. Financial and Activity Report- December 14, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  17. Financial and Activity Report- December 31, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  18. Financial and Activity Report- December 2, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  19. Financial and Activity Report- December 21, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  20. Financial and Activity Report- December 16, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  1. Confidential Financial Disclosure Reports (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive establishes requirements and responsibilities for Departmental elements and employees regarding filing Confidential Financial Disclosure Reports (OGE Form 450) in accordance with the Ethics in Government Act of 1978, as amended.

  2. AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Challenges Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural and Life Sciences OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2003 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College

  3. AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2001 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation and Outlook for Farm Products and Inputs Special Articles Outlook for the National Economy and Agricultural Policies Smart Growth and Wisconsin Agriculture The Wisconsin Agricultural Economy: A Broader

  4. Financial and Activity Report- September 28, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  5. Financial and Activity Report- October 28, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  6. Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designated EJ, EK, and EN.

  7. Financial and Activity Report- October 12, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  8. Financial and Activity Report- October 19, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  9. Financial and Activity Report- October 26, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  10. Financial and Activity Report- October 5, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  11. Financial and Technical Resources The HUD Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial and Technical Resources The HUD Perspective U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Jerry Jensen, HUD Fort Worth Regional Office CATEE Conference November 9, 2011 Partnership for Sustainable Communities: Livability...

  12. Do financial investors destabilize the oil price?

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Germany; e-mail: marco.lombardi@ecb.europa.eu 3 Department of Financial Economics, Ghent University, Woodrow Wilsonplein 5D, B-9000 Gent, Belgium; e-mail: ine.vanrobays@ugent.be...

  13. Draft Financial Operating Procedure Treasury Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Management in the Public Services: Code of Practice (the Code), as described in Section 4 of that Code part of the annual review of the financial governance framework) to PARC on the adequacy

  14. Learning connections in financial time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gartheeban, Ganeshapillai

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of modern financial theory is based upon the assumption that a portfolio containing a diversified set of equities can be used to control risk while achieving a good rate of return. The basic idea is to choose equities ...

  15. Financial Policy and Procedures for Reimbursable Work

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive establishes Department-wide financial policy and procedural guidance applicable to performing reimbursable work for other Federal agencies and with non-Federal Government entities, including foreign and commercial entities, State, and political subdivisions.

  16. Financial and Activity Report- Janurary 18, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  17. Financial and Activity Report- June 30, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Monthly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  18. Financial and Activity Report- February 1, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  19. Financial and Activity Report- February 8, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  20. Financial and Activity Report- April 30, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Monthly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  1. Financial and Activity Report- May 31, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Monthly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  2. Financial and Activity Report- Janurary 11, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  3. Financial and Activity Report- Janurary 4, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  4. Financial and Activity Report- February 22, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  5. Financial and Activity Report- December 31, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  6. Financial and Activity Report- Janurary 25, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  7. Financial and Activity Report- February 15, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  8. Financial and Activity Report- March 1, 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act. The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  9. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Universitat Heidelberg, Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); GSI, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); McLerran, Larry [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, RIKEN BNL Research Center Upton NY (United States); China Central Normal University, Physics Department, Wuhan (China); Pawlowski, Jan M [Universitat Heidelberg, Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); GSI, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany); Sexty, Denes [Universitat Heidelberg, Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany); GSI, ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of YangMills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  10. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dnes

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixedmorepoint of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of YangMills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.less

  11. Essays on monetary economics and financial economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sok Won

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ESSAYS ON MONETARY ECONOMICS AND FINANCIAL ECONOMICS A Dissertation by SOK WON KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR... OF PHILOSOPHY August 2006 Major Subject: Economics ESSAYS ON MONETARY ECONOMICS AND FINANCIAL ECONOMICS A Dissertation by SOK WON KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

  12. Poverty, Armed Conflict and Financial Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baddeley, Michelle

    flows. Armed conflict does not always contribute to financial instability. Magnusson and Wydick (2001) discuss efficiency of markets in 8 largest African stock markets in comparison with emerging stock markets in South East Asia and Latin America... of strategies is is determined by the relative benefits and costs of reversion to conflict (Collier and Hoeffler, 2004, pp. 8-10). High levels of military spending are associated with increased risk of renewed conflict. 3 POVERTY, CONFLICT AND FINANCIAL...

  13. Multigrid solution of incompressible turbulent flows by using two-equation turbulence models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, X.; Liu, C. [Front Range Scientific Computations, Inc., Denver, CO (United States); Sung, C.H. [David Taylor Model Basin, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of practical flows are turbulent. From the interest of engineering applications, simulation of realistic flows is usually done through solution of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and turbulence model equations. It has been widely accepted that turbulence modeling plays a very important role in numerical simulation of practical flow problem, particularly when the accuracy is of great concern. Among the most used turbulence models today, two-equation models appear to be favored for the reason that they are more general than algebraic models and affordable with current available computer resources. However, investigators using two-equation models seem to have been more concerned with the solution of N-S equations. Less attention is paid to the solution method for the turbulence model equations. In most cases, the turbulence model equations are loosely coupled with N-S equations, multigrid acceleration is only applied to the solution of N-S equations due to perhaps the fact the turbulence model equations are source-term dominant and very stiff in sublayer region.

  14. PDF Calculations of Turbulent Nonpremixed Flames with Local Extinction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a stochastic model of turbulence frequency, the Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST) mixing model, and the 16

  15. Physics of Stratocumulus Top (POST): turbulent mixing across capping inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vertical water potential horizontal wind, and turbulentof potential components of horizontal wind, and buoyantwater potential temperature, horizontal wind, and turbulent

  16. Query Suggestions for Mobile Search: Understanding Usage Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    Inc 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA shumeet@google.com ABSTRACT Entering search terms that users who were asked to enter queries on a search interface with query suggestions rated their workload heavily on suggestions if they are provided. Users who were asked to enter queries on a search interface

  17. A signature for turbulence driven magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S. [Aix-Marseille Universit, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345 Marseille (France); France-Japan Magnetic Fusion Laboratory, LIA 336 CNRS, Marseille (France); Poy, A. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Yagi, M. [Plasma Theory and Simulation Gr., JAEA, Rokkasho (Japan); Garbet, X. [IRFM, CEA, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the properties of magnetic islands arising from tearing instabilities that are driven by an interchange turbulence. We find that such islands possess a specific signature that permits an identification of their origin. We demonstrate that the persistence of a small scale turbulence maintains a mean pressure profile, whose characteristics makes it possible to discriminate between turbulence driven islands from those arising due to an unfavourable plasma current density gradient. We also find that the island poloidal turnover time, in the steady state, is independent of the levels of the interchange and tearing energy sources. Finally, we show that a mixing length approach is adequate to make theoretical predictions concerning island flattening in the island rotation frame.

  18. Closure models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Tarbell, J.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a simple procedure based on fast and slow reaction asymptotics has been employed to drive first-order closure models for the nonlinear reaction terms in turbulent mass balances from mechanistic models of turbulent mixing and reaction. The coalescence-redispersion (CRD) model, the interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) model, the three-environment (3E) model, and the four-environment (4E) model have been used to develop closure equations. The closure models have been tested extensively against experimental data for both single and multiple reactions. The closures based on slow asymptotics for the CRD, 3E and 4E models provide very good predictions of all of the experimental data, while other models available either in the literature or derived here are not adequate. The simple new closure equations developed in this paper may be useful in modeling systems involving turbulent mixing and complex chemical reactions.

  19. Interpreting Power Anisotropy Measurements in Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Schekochihin, A A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A relationship between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations is derived. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example in the solar wind. If fluctuations are anisotropic in shape then the ion gyroscale break point in spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind observations in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  20. Wave turbulence served up on a plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Cobelli; Philippe Petitjeans; Agnes Maurel; Vincent Pagneux; Nicolas Mordant

    2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave turbulence in a thin elastic plate is experimentally investigated. By using a Fourier transform profilometry technique, the deformation field of the plate surface is measured simultaneously in time and space. This enables us to compute the wavevector-frequency Fourier ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) spectrum of the full space-time deformation velocity. In the 3D ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) space, we show that the energy of the motion is concentrated on a 2D surface that represents a nonlinear dispersion relation. This nonlinear dispersion relation is close to the linear dispersion relation. This validates the usual wavenumber-frequency change of variables used in many experimental studies of wave turbulence. The deviation from the linear dispersion, which increases with the input power of the forcing, is attributed to weak non linear effects. Our technique opens the way for many new extensive quantitative comparisons between theory and experiments of wave turbulence.

  1. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  2. Cosmic-ray diffusion in magnetized turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tautz, R C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of cosmic-ray scattering in the turbulent electromagnetic fields of the interstellar medium and the solar wind is of great importance due to the variety of applications of the resulting diffusion coefficients. Examples are diffusive shock acceleration, cosmic-ray observations, and, in the solar system, the propagation of coronal mass ejections. In recent years, it was found that the simple diffusive motion that had been assumed for decades is often in disagreement both with numerical and observational results. Here, an overview is given of the interaction processes of cosmic rays and turbulent electromagnetic fields. First, the formation of turbulent fields due to plasma instabilities is treated, where especially the non-linear behavior of the resulting unstable wave modes is discussed. Second, the analytical and the numerical side of high-energy particle propagation will be reviewed by presenting non-linear analytical theories and Monte-Carlo simulations. For the example of the solar wind, the im...

  3. IUPUI Financial Success Planning Action Tool IUPUI Office of Student Financial Services / 420 University Boulevard / Campus Center Suite 250

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    IUPUI Financial Success Planning Action Tool IUPUI Office of Student Financial Services / 420 EXPENSES = $ #12;IUPUI Financial Success Planning Action Tool IUPUI Office of Student Financial Services Scholarships (see OneStart) X = Private Scholarships X = Other (ex. GI Bill, Tuition Reimbursement) X = FAMILY

  4. Spectrally condensed turbulence in thin layers and G. Falkovich2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkovich, Gregory

    on the underlying turbulence; it generates stronger non-Gaussianity and reduces the efficiency of the inverse energy School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia 2 turbulence, the effects of the bottom friction and of the spectral condensation of the turbulence energy

  5. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of kappa-epsilon modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy kappa, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation epsilon, for each material. Hence a set of kappa and epsilon equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both kappa and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe.

  6. Computational aspects of astrophysical MHD and turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Brandenburg

    2001-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The advantages of high-order finite difference scheme for astrophysical MHD and turbulence simulations are highlighted. A number of one-dimensional test cases are presented ranging from various shock tests to Parker-type wind solutions. Applications to magnetized accretion discs and their associated outflows are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the possibility of dynamo action in three-dimensional turbulent convection and shear flows, which is relevant to stars and astrophysical discs. The generation of large scale fields is discussed in terms of an inverse magnetic cascade and the consequences imposed by magnetic helicity conservation are reviewed with particular emphasis on the issue of alpha-quenching.

  7. Forcing-type-dependent stability of steady states in a turbulent swirling flow B. Saint-Michel,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Universit de

    states and reveal dynamical regimes that bear similarities with low-dimensional systems. We suggest statistical systems, and that it may be applicable to other turbulent systems. PACS numbers: 47.20.Ky, 05 of systems such as 2D Euler equations [3, 4], Blume-Emery-Griffiths model [5], and random graphs [6]. More

  8. On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean XIAOMING-inertial energy available for ocean mixing at depth is, at most, 0.1 TW. This confirms a recent suggestion energy source for the diapycnal mixing in the ocean required to maintain the meridional over- turning

  9. Study suggests same microbes may be present in oceans worldwide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are now integrating microbe data into these models. The study suggests an unexpected bonus to modelers, Gilbert said. "This way you don't have to calculate how these bacteria...

  10. The propagation of kinetic energy across scales in turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardesa, Jos I; Dong, Siwei; Jimnez, Javier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temporal study of energy transfer across length scales is performed in 3D numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow and isotropic turbulence, at Reynolds numbers in the range $Re_{\\lambda}=107-384$. The average time taken by perturbations in the energy flux to travel between scales is measured and shown to be additive, as inferred from the agreement between the total travel time from a given scale to the smallest dissipative motions, and the time estimated from successive jumps through intermediate scales. Our data suggests that the propagation of disturbances in the energy flux is independent of the forcing and that it defines a `velocity' that determines the energy flux itself. These results support that the cascade is, on average, a scale-local process where energy is continuously transmitted from one scale to the next in order of decreasing size.

  11. Final Report - Investigation of Intermittent Turbulence and Turbulent Structures in the Presence of Controlled Sheared Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Mark A. [University of New Mexico

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54898. The dynamics and generation of intermittent plasma turbulent structures, widely known as "blobs" have been studied in the presence of sheared plasma flows in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  12. Calculation of unsteady turbulent flow around obstacles using the large eddy simulation turbulence model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helton, Donald McLean

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The premise of the work presented here is to use a common analytical tool, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), along with a prevalent turbulence model, Large Eddy Simulation (LES), to study the flow past rectangular cylinders. In an attempt to use...

  13. Overview of the TurbSim Stochastic Inflow Turbulence Simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TurbSim stochastic inflow turbulence code was developed to provide a numerical simulation of a full-field flow that contains coherent turbulence structures that reflect the proper spatiotemporal turbulent velocity field relationships seen in instabilities associated with nocturnal boundary layer flows that are not represented well by the IEC Normal Turbulence Models (NTM). Its purpose is to provide the wind turbine designer with the ability to drive design code (FAST or MSC.ADAMS) simulations of advanced turbine designs with simulated inflow turbulence environments that incorporate many of the important fluid dynamic features known to adversely affect turbine aeroelastic response and loading.

  14. Pressure atomizer having multiple orifices and turbulent generation feature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VanBrocklin, Paul G. (Pittsford, NY); Geiger, Gail E. (Caledonia, NY); Moran, Donald James (Rochester, NY); Fournier, Stephane (Rochester, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure atomizer includes a silicon plate having a top surface and a bottom surface. A portion of the top surface defines a turbulent chamber. The turbulent chamber is peripherally bounded by the top surface of the plate. The turbulent chamber is recessed a predetermined depth relative to the top surface. The silicon plate further defines at least one flow orifice. Each flow orifice extends from the bottom surface of the silicon plate to intersect with and open into the turbulent chamber. Each flow orifice is in fluid communication with the turbulent chamber.

  15. Turbulent drag reduction through oscillating discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Daniel J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The changes of a turbulent channel flow subjected to oscillations of wall flush-mounted rigid discs are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number is $R_\\tau$=$180$, based on the friction velocity of the stationary-wall case and the half channel height. The primary effect of the wall forcing is the sustained reduction of wall-shear stress, which reaches a maximum of 20%. A parametric study on the disc diameter, maximum tip velocity, and oscillation period is presented, with the aim to identify the optimal parameters which guarantee maximum drag reduction and maximum net energy saving, computed by taking into account the power spent to actuate the discs. This may be positive and reaches 6%. The Rosenblat viscous pump flow is used to predict the power spent for disc motion in the turbulent channel flow and to estimate localized and transient regions over the disc surface subjected to the turbulent regenerative braking effect, for which the wall turbulence exerts work on the discs. The...

  16. AIAA-92-5101 Hypersonic Turbulent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    were ob- tained in a Mach 8, turbulent, cold flow p a d a11cxpan- sion corner subjected to shock of reduced fluctuation levels. Thcsc fea- tures may be exploited in inlet design by impinging thc cowl shock = undisturbed boundary layer pit = Pitot sh = shock U = upstream influcnce W = mean wall value 1, 2, 2', 3, 4 00

  17. 6 Scalar Turbulence within the Canopy Sublayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    Engineering, University of Brasilia, Brazil 4 Department of Hydraulics, Transport and Civil Infrastructure changes in turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate inside canopies, the relative importance of ejections that leads to scalar ramps is briefly discussed. The work draws upon a large number of flume, wind tunnel

  18. Energy Spectrum of Quasi-Geostrophic Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Constantin

    2002-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the energy spectrum of a quasi-geostrophic model of forced, rotating turbulent flow. We provide a rigorous a priori bound E(k) energy spectrum that is expected in a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes inverse cascade. Our bound provides theoretical support for the k^{-2} spectrum observed in recent experiments.

  19. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  20. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

  1. OF HEALTH CARE IN TURBULENT TIMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    FIXING THE FLOW OF HEALTH CARE IN TURBULENT TIMES INNOVATION REPORT 2014 #12;Since 2012, Algorithms facing health care today. We believe there's an unprecedented opportunity to invent a new vision for health care, and academic medicine is poised to lead the way. Algorithms for Innovations is designed

  2. Wave Packets and Turbulent Peter Jordan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    Wave Packets and Turbulent Jet Noise Peter Jordan1 and Tim Colonius2 1 Departement Fluides-control efforts is incomplete. Wave packets are intermittent, advecting disturbances that are correlated over review evidence of the existence, energetics, dynamics, and acous- tic efficiency of wave packets. We

  3. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  4. The Spatial Scaling Laws of Compressible Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Bohua

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter proposed spatial scaling laws of the density-weighted energy spectrum of compressible flow in terms of dissipation rate, wave number and the Mach number. The study has shown the compressible turbulence energy spectrum does not show the complete similarity, but incomplete similarity as $E(k,Ma)=(C+\\frac{D}{\\ln{Ma}})\

  5. Electron acceleration and turbulence in solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University College London

    , 2005 Free magnetic energy ~2 1032 ergs #12;"Standard" model of a solar flare/CME Solar corona T ~ 106 K Electron energies >10 MeV Proton energies >100 MeV Large solar flare releases about 1032 ergs (about halfElectron acceleration and turbulence in solar flares Eduard Kontar School of Physics and Astronomy

  6. Combustion-turbulence interaction in the turbulent boundary layer over a hot surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, T.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Robben, F.; Talbot, L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The turbulence-combustion interaction in a reacting turbulent boundary layer over a heated flat plate was studied. Ethylene/air mixture with equivalence ratio of 0.35 was used. The free stream velocity was 10.5 m/s and the wall temperature was 1250/sup 0/K. Combustion structures visualization was provided by high-speed schlieren photographs. Fluid density statistics were deduced from Rayleigh scattering intensity measurements. A single-component laser Doppler velocimetry system was used to obtain mean and root-mean-square velocity distributions, the Reynolds stress, the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulent kinetic energy diffusion, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by Reynolds stress. The combustion process was dominated by large-scale turbulent structures of the boundary layer. Combustion causes expansion of the boundary layer. No overall self-similarity is observed in either the velocity or the density profiles. Velocity fluctuations were increased in part of the boundary layer and the Reynolds stress was reduced. The turbulent kinetic energy diffusion pattern was changed significantly and a modification of the boundary layer assumption will be needed when dealing with this problem analytically. 11 figures, 1 table.

  7. A Dynamical Model of Plasma Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfven waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfven waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent casca...

  8. National resources for development -- a suggested decision model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Sam Sherrill

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 1973 Ma]or Sub]ect i Political Science NAT1ONAL RESOURCES FOR DEVELOPMENT ? A SUGGESTED DECISION MODEL A Thesis SAM SHERRILL HENRY, JR, Approved as to style and content by& ha rman of Comm ttee Gi uDP 'uu P Head of Depar ment Mem'ber Me... er December 19'73 ABSTRACT National Resources for Development -- A Suggested Decision Model (December 1973) Sam Sherrill Henry, Jr. , B. A. , Texas ARM University Directed bye Dr, Robert A. Bernstein This study is designed to analyze selected...

  9. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Limited, Singapore (Singapore)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  10. TURBULENCE IN THE OUTER REGIONS OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS. I. WEAK ACCRETION WITH NO VERTICAL MAGNETIC FLUX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Jacob B.; Armitage, Philip J.; Beckwith, Kris [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)] [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States); Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M., E-mail: jbsimon@jila.colorado.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use local numerical simulations to investigate the strength and nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks, where ambipolar diffusion is the dominant non-ideal MHD effect. The simulations include vertical stratification and assume zero net vertical magnetic flux. We employ a super time-stepping technique to ameliorate the Courant restriction on the diffusive time step. We find that in idealized stratified simulations, with a spatially constant ambipolar Elsasser number Am, turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) behaves in a similar manner as in prior unstratified calculations. Turbulence dies away for Am {<=} 1, and becomes progressively more vigorous as ambipolar diffusion is decreased. Near-ideal MHD behavior is recovered for Am {>=} 10{sup 3}. In the intermediate regime (10 {<=} Am {<=} 10{sup 3}) ambipolar diffusion leads to substantial increases in both the period of the MRI dynamo cycle and the characteristic scales of magnetic field structures. To quantify the impact of ambipolar physics on disk accretion, we run simulations at 30 AU and 100 AU that include a vertical Am profile based upon far-ultraviolet (FUV) ionized disk models. These models develop a vertically layered structure analogous to the Ohmic dead zone that is present at smaller radii. We find that, although the levels of surface turbulence can be strong (and consistent with constraints on turbulent line widths at these radii), the inferred accretion rates are at least an order of magnitude smaller than those observed in T Tauri stars. This discrepancy is very likely due to the assumption of zero vertical magnetic field in our simulations and suggests that vertical magnetic fields are essential for MRI-driven accretion in the outer regions of protoplanetary disks.

  11. COSMIC-RAY CURRENT-DRIVEN TURBULENCE AND MEAN-FIELD DYNAMO EFFECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogachevskii, Igor; Kleeorin, Nathan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Brandenburg, Axel [NORDITA, Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Eichler, David [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, POB 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that an {alpha} effect is driven by the cosmic-ray (CR) Bell instability exciting left-right asymmetric turbulence. Alfven waves of a preferred polarization have maximally helical motion, because the transverse motion of each mode is parallel to its curl. We show how large-scale Alfven modes, when rendered unstable by CR streaming, can create new net flux over any finite region, in the direction of the original large-scale field. We perform direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a magnetohydrodynamic fluid with a forced CR current and use the test-field method to determine the {alpha} effect and the turbulent magnetic diffusivity. As follows from DNS, the dynamics of the instability has the following stages: (1) in the early stage, the small-scale Bell instability that results in the production of small-scale turbulence is excited; (2) in the intermediate stage, there is formation of larger-scale magnetic structures; (3) finally, quasi-stationary large-scale turbulence is formed at a growth rate that is comparable to that expected from the dynamo instability, but its amplitude over much longer timescales remains unclear. The results of DNS are in good agreement with the theoretical estimates. It is suggested that this dynamo is what gives weakly magnetized relativistic shocks such as those from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) a macroscopic correlation length. It may also be important for large-scale magnetic field amplification associated with CR production and diffusive shock acceleration in supernova remnants (SNRs) and blast waves from GRBs. Magnetic field amplification by Bell turbulence in SNRs is found to be significant, but it is limited owing to the finite time available to the super-Alfvenicly expanding remnant. The effectiveness of the mechanisms is shown to be dependent on the shock velocity. Limits on magnetic field growth in longer-lived systems, such as the Galaxy and unconfined intergalactic CRs, are also discussed.

  12. Iso-topological relaxation, coherent structures, and Gaussian turbulence in two dimensional magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Isichenko; A. V. Gruzinov

    1996-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-time relaxation of ideal two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence subject to the conservation of two infinite families of constants of motion---the magnetic and the "cross" topology invariants--is examined. The analysis of the Gibbs ensemble, where all integrals of motion are respected, predicts the initial state to evolve into an equilibrium, stable coherent structure (the most probable state) and decaying Gaussian turbulence (fluctuations) with a vanishing, but always positive temperature. The non-dissipative turbulence decay is accompanied by decrease in both the amplitude and the length scale of the fluctuations, so that the fluctuation energy remains finite. The coherent structure represents a set of singular magnetic islands with plasma flow whose magnetic topology is identical to that of the initial state, while the energy and the cross topology invariants are shared between the coherent structure and the Gaussian turbulence. These conservation laws suggest the variational principle of iso-topological relaxation which allows us to predict the appearance of the final state from a given initial state. For a generic initial condition having X points in the magnetic field, the coherent structure has universal types of singularities: current sheets terminating at Y points. These structures, which are similar to those resulting from the 2D relaxation of magnetic field frozen into an ideally conducting viscous fluid, are observed in the numerical experiment of Biskamp and Welter. The Gibbs ensemble method developed in this work admits extension to other Hamiltonian systems with invariants not higher than quadratic in the highest-order-derivative variables. The turbulence in two dimensional Euler fluid is of a different nature: there the coherent structures are also formed, but the fluctuations about these structures are non-Gaussian.

  13. On the role of stochastic Fermi acceleration in setting the dissipation scale of turbulence in the interstellar medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert I Selkowitz; Eric G. Blackman

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the dissipation by Fermi acceleration of magnetosonic turbulence in the Reynolds Layer of the interstellar medium. The scale in the cascade at which electron acceleration via stochastic Fermi acceleration (STFA) becomes comparable to further cascade of the turbulence defines the inner scale. For any magnetic turbulent spectra equal to or shallower than Goldreich-Sridhar this turns out to be $\\ge 10^{12}$cm, which is much larger than the shortest length scales observed in radio scintillation measurements. While STFA for such spectra then contradict models of scintillation which appeal directly to an extended, continuous turbulent cascade, such a separation of scales is consistent with the recent work of \\citet{Boldyrev2} and \\citet{Boldyrev3} suggesting that interstellar scintillation may result from the passage of radio waves through the galactic distribution of thin ionized boundary surfaces of HII regions, rather than density variations from cascading turbulence. The presence of STFA dissipation also provides a mechanism for the non-ionizing heat source observed in the Reynolds Layer of the interstellar medium \\citep{Reynolds}. STFA accommodates the proper heating power, and the input energy is rapidly thermalized within the low density Reynolds layer plasma.

  14. SUGGESTIONS AND RESOURCES FOR ASSESSING STUDENT OUTCOMES AT UIUC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    SUGGESTIONS AND RESOURCES FOR ASSESSING STUDENT OUTCOMES AT UIUC November 2007 Student Outcomes Assessment Technical Assistance Center for Teaching Excellence For help with your unit assessment plans contact: John Ory CTE 249 Armory 3-3370 Portions of this document were adapted from the "Assessment

  15. 722012-13SuggestedCoursePlan INDUSTRIAL & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    . to Industrial Engineering ISE 220: Probability Concepts in Engr. ISE 225: Engineering Statistics I ISE 232L722012-13SuggestedCoursePlan INDUSTRIAL & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING FIRST YEAR FALL: 16 units SPRING: 15 and Thermodynamics PHYS 152L: Electricity and Magnetism CHEMISTRY / MATERIALS SCIENCE (4 UNITS) CHEM 105AL: General

  16. SUGGESTED BUSINESS ELECTIVES For College of Business Administration Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    SUGGESTED BUSINESS ELECTIVES For College of Business Administration Students Business electives consist of any business course taught in the college of Business Administration (ACCT, BA, ECON, FIN, HRT: Business Students are NOT eligible to take any 4400 or 4401 courses (i.e.: BA 4400, MANG 4400, MKT 4400

  17. A Suggested Format for Preparing a Thesis/Project Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    completion of the thesis/project and graduation of the student. The proposal should address the items's graduation plans? For any further guidance in this regard, the student must contact his/her Thesis/ProjectA Suggested Format for Preparing a Thesis/Project Proposal A thesis/project proposal must

  18. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BROADCAST COMMUNICATIONS (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BROADCAST COMMUNICATIONS (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS English Composition I 3 GE: Mathematics (MATH 0110 recommended) 3 COMM 0102 Survey of Broadcasting 3 COMM Production 4 COMM 1302 Media Advertising OR COMM 1401 Broadcasting Programming & Management 3 Minor Course 3

  19. 442013-14 Suggested Course Plan CHEMICAL (PETROLEUM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    442013-14 Suggested Course Plan CHEMICAL (PETROLEUM) FIRST YEAR FALL: 18 units SPRING: 18 units. to Chemical Engineering CHE 205: Numerical Methods in Chemical Engineering CHE 330: Chemical Engr: Chemical Reactor Analysis CHE 443: Viscous Flow CHE 444AL: Chemical Engineering Lab CHE 444bL: Chemical

  20. 482012-13SuggestedCoursePlan CHEMICAL (PETROLEUM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    482012-13SuggestedCoursePlan CHEMICAL (PETROLEUM) FIRST YEAR FALL: 18 units SPRING: 18 units SECOND. to Chemical Engineering CHE 205: Numerical Methods in Chemical Engineering CHE 330: Chemical Engr: Chemical Reactor Analysis CHE 443: Viscous Flow CHE 444AL: Chemical Engineering Lab CHE 444BL: Chemical

  1. CSE: Financial Engineering Track Robbin Tops, SAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Annika

    CSE: Financial Engineering Track Robbin Tops, SAM robbin.tops@sam.math.ethz.ch CSE: Financial Stochastic Processes: (Brownian Motion, L´evy processes) 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 -2.5 -2 -1-)Differential Equations: (Heat Equation) 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 Stochastic

  2. Locality and stability of the cascades of two-dimensional turbulence.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gkioulekas, Eleftherios - Department of Mathematics, University of Texas

    chemical combustion Stabilize plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor Propagation of laser through turbulence;Outline Why study turbulence? Brief overview of K41 theory (3D turbulence) Frisch reformulation of K41 theory. KLB theory (2D turbulence). My reformulation of Frisch to address 2D turbulence Locality

  3. Question of the Week: Do Energy-Related Financial Incentives...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Do Energy-Related Financial Incentives Prompt You to Be More Energy Efficient? Question of the Week: Do Energy-Related Financial Incentives Prompt You to Be More Energy Efficient?...

  4. Policy Flash 2009-01 Tips for Processing Financial Assistance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    09-01 Tips for Processing Financial Assistance Actions in STRIPES Policy Flash 2009-01 Tips for Processing Financial Assistance Actions in STRIPES Attached is Policy Flash 2009-01...

  5. Red Ink : open source financial analytics for people & communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Ryan (Ryan Michael)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Red Ink is an open source social-financial web-service that enables people to share, aggregate, analyze, visualize and publish their financial transactions as individuals and ad-hoc groups, through data sharing campaigns. ...

  6. Development and application of a photovoltaic financial model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Brad

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the relative immaturity of the solar farm industry, there are very few comprehensive financial models in use. I address this by developing a photovoltaic NPV financial model and apply the model to various base cases ...

  7. Fermilab | Director's Policy Manual | No. 15.000 Financial Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15.000 Rev. 0 Financial Management 2.0 Effective Date 1199 3.0 Scope This policy covers all financial activities carried out under the URA-DOE prime contract. 4.0 Applicability...

  8. Policy Flash 20 Acquisition Letter 2014-05/Financial Acquisition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    301 Contract Award letter FY2014 March 5.pdf Attachment 2A1 DOE Section 301 Financial Assistance Letter FY2014 March 5 2014.pdf Attachment 2A2 DOE Section 301 Financial Assistance...

  9. Determinants of Role Structure in Family Financial Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Dennis L.; Granbois, Donald H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variables determining the role of husband and wife in family financial management are explored based on in-home, personal interviews. Financial tasks reflecting implementation activities and two groupings of decision ...

  10. THREE ESSAYS ON MONITORING OF FINANCIAL REPORTING BY CORPORATE DIRECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yang

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent high-profile financial scandals and increasing instances of restatements focus public attention on the role of audit committees, auditors and CFOs in maintaining the integrity and quality of corporate financial ...

  11. Policy Title: Travel HARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY Responsible Office: UFS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Title: Travel HARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY Responsible Office: UFS Effective Date: July 1, 2010 Revision Date: July 14, 2010TRAVEL Policy Number: TR104 HARVARD UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL POLICY POLICY STATEMENT Harvard University reimburses for necessary and reasonable travel expenses

  12. Essays on time series and causality analysis in financial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zohrabyan, Tatevik

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial market and its various components are currently in turmoil. Many large corporations are devising new ways to overcome the current market instability. Consequently, any study fostering the understanding of financial ...

  13. Suggested Treatment of CHP Within an EERS Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittum, A.; Elliott, R. N.; Trombley, D.; Watson, S.

    Discussion Draft: Do not cite SUGGESTED TREATMENT OF CHP WITHIN AN EERS CONTEXT Anna Chittum Research Associate R. Neal Elliott, Ph.D., P.E. Associate Director for Research Dan Trombley Engineering Associate Suzanne Watson Policy... Director American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Washington, DC ABSTRACT Reliable monitoring and measurement of the energy savings resulting from the installation of combined heat and power (CHP) systems and power recovered from waste...

  14. Suggestions for Controlling Insects in Farm-Stored Grain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamman, Philip J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Infestations When storing grain in farm facilities, provide the least favorable conditions for insect development. Store clean, sound grain with 12 percent or less moisture content. Grain cot;ltaining more moisture at tracts insects, promotes mold growth...IUUL; Z TA24S.7 8873 NO.1410 Suggestions B-1410 for Controlling Insects ? In Farm-Stored Grain The Texas A&M University System ? Texas Agricultural Extension Service JUN 2 0 2002 Zerle L. Carpenter . Director College Station...

  15. Battling Golden Algae: Results suggest preventative lake management approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Danielle Supercinski Battling golden algae Results suggest preventative lake management approaches Golden algae blooms, or the explosive growth of algae, are known to be toxic, but recent #28;ndings from.... Bryan Brooks at Baylor University, working jointly, recently completed the Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative project studying the biology and ecology of golden algae (Prymnesium parvum) in Texas lakes. First appearing in Texas...

  16. Battling golden algae: Results suggest preventative lake managment approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Danielle Supercinski Battling golden algae Results suggest preventative lake management approaches Golden algae blooms, or the explosive growth of algae, are known to be toxic, but recent #28;ndings from.... Bryan Brooks at Baylor University, working jointly, recently completed the Lake Granbury and Lake Whitney Assessment Initiative project studying the biology and ecology of golden algae (Prymnesium parvum) in Texas lakes. First appearing in Texas...

  17. Collider shot setup for Run 2 observations and suggestions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annala, J.; Joshel, B.

    1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This note is intended to provoke discussion on Collider Run II shot setup. We hope this is a start of activities that will converge on a functional description of what is needed for shot setups in Collider Run II. We will draw on observations of the present shot setup to raise questions and make suggestions for the next Collider run. It is assumed that the reader has some familiarity with the Collider operational issues. Shot setup is defined to be the time between the end of a store and the time the Main Control Room declares colliding beams. This is the time between Tevatron clock events SCE and SCB. This definition does not consider the time experiments use to turn on their detectors. This analysis was suggested by David Finley. The operational scenarios for Run II will require higher levels of reliability and speed for shot setup. See Appendix I and II. For example, we estimate that a loss of 3 pb{sup {minus}1}/week (with 8 hour stores) will occur if shot setups take 90 minutes instead of 30 minutes. In other words: If you do 12 shots for one week and accept an added delay of one minute in each shot, you will loose more than 60 nb{sup {minus}1} for that week alone (based on a normal shot setup of 30 minutes). These demands should lead us to be much more pedantic about all the factors that affect shot setups. Shot setup will be viewed as a distinct process that is composed of several inter- dependent `components`: procedures, hardware, controls, and sociology. These components don`t directly align with the different Accelerator Division departments, but are topical groupings of the needed accelerator functions. Defining these components, and categorizing our suggestions within them, are part of the goal of this document. Of course, some suggestions span several of these components.

  18. Regulation of thermal conductivity in hot galaxy clusters by MHD turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus; Christopher S. Reynolds

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of thermal conduction in regulating the thermal behavior of cooling flows in galaxy clusters is reexamined. Recent investigations have shown that the anisotropic Coulomb heat flux caused by a magnetic field in a dilute plasma drives a dynamical instability. A long standing problem of cooling flow theory has been to understand how thermal conduction can offset radiative core losses without completely preventing them. In this Letter we propose that magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the heat flux instability regulates field-line insulation and drives a reverse convective thermal flux, both of which may mediate the stabilization of the cooling cores of hot clusters. This model suggests that turbulent mixing should accompany strong thermal gradients in cooling flows. This prediction seems to be supported by the spatial distribution of metals in the central galaxies of clusters, which shows a much stronger correlation with the ambient hot gas temperature gradient than with the parent stellar population.

  19. A laboratory demonstration of an LQG technique for correcting frozen flow turbulence in adaptive optics systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudy, Alexander; Srinath, Srikar; Ammons, S Mark; Gavel, Donald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the laboratory verification of a method for re- moving the effects of frozen-flow atmospheric turbulence using a Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller, also known as a Kalman Filter. This method, which we term "Predictive Fourier Control," can identify correlated atmospheric motions due to layers of frozen flow turbulence, and can predictively remove the effects of these correlated motions in real-time. Our laboratory verification suggests a factor of 3 improvement in the RMS residual wavefront error and a 10% improvement in measured Strehl of the system. We found that the RMS residual wavefront error was suppressed from 35.0 nm to 11.2 nm due to the use of Predictive Fourier Control, and that the far field Strehl improved from 0.479 to 0.520.

  20. Financial Metrics Data Collection Protocol, Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Wang, Na

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Brief description of data collection process and plan that will be used to collect financial metrics associated with sustainable design.

  1. Non-Linear Stochastic Fractional Programming Model of Financial ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of financial derivatives- II, Proceedings of International Conference on Business ... optimum allocation of recruitment in manpower planning, International Journal

  2. Financial health of the electric-utility industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following chapters are included: (1) financial health, (2) capital access, (3) causes of deterioration, and (4) implications. (MOW)

  3. West Virginia University 1 Financial Aid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Academic Progress Consequences of Withdrawal Satisfactory Academic Progress Students who wish to receive funds administered by the Financial Aid Office must make measurable academic progress toward completionD): 2.5 GPA Dentistry (DDS): 2.0 GPA Medicine (MD): no GPA determined Physical Therapy (DPT): 3

  4. Compass Financial Stability and Savings Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    Compass Financial Stability and Savings Program Pilot Evaluation: Final Report 1 April 2014 Prepared for Compass Working Capital Boston, MA Prepared by Delia Kimbrel, Research Associate Sandra Venner Brandeis University, Waltham, MA #12;2 Compass Working Capital ("Compass") provides incentive

  5. Matched asymptotic expansions in financial engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, Sam

    Matched asymptotic expansions in financial engineering Sam Howison OCIAM and Nomura Centre of the approach in `plain vanilla' option valuation, in valuation using a fast mean-reverting-stochastic expansions applied directly to stochastic processes of diffusion type is also proposed. Keywords: option

  6. AGRICULTURE, 2002 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2002 Current Wisconsin Farm Financial Conditions Situation of the Wisconsin Cranberry Industry Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics College of Agricultural-Extension #12;STATUS OF WISCONSIN AGRICULTURE, 2002 An Annual Report by: Department of Agricultural and Applied

  7. Banner Financial Aid Account Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Banner Financial Aid Account Request Form ETSU Office of Information Technology 424 Roy Nicks Hall, Box 70728 Johnson City, Tennessee 37614 (423) 439-4648 oithelp@etsu.edu This section for use ______________________________________________________________________________________ [last] [first] [middle] ETSU Domain Name ____________________@etsu.edu School / College

  8. STUDENT EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK Financial Aid Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    (413) 545-0801 (413) 545-1722 fax seo@finaid.umass.edu www.umass.edu/umfa/seo/ Updated 2013-2014 #12 Student Employment Office Financial Aid Services 243 Whitmore Building 413.545.0801 seo@finaid.umass.edu umass.edu/umfa/seo Paychecks Payroll Procedures Human Resources Employee Service Center 325 Whitmore

  9. Section 4 -Financial Information A. General Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    Section 4 - Financial Information A. General Information 1. All University Housing and Dining fees of Alaska campuses until the debt is paid in full. B. Security deposit 1. A security deposit is required performance of the agreement, and (2) for damages beyond normal wear and tear. The security deposit does

  10. UNDERGRADUATE FINANCIAL AID 220 West College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    UNDERGRADUATE FINANCIAL AID 220 West College REQUEST FOR SUMMER SAVINGS REPLACEMENT Do not mail _________ I was unable to meet my summer savings expectation for the reason(s) listed below and request __________________________________________ Date ____________ I worked but did not save the amount expected. Total Earnings $__________ Summer

  11. Financial Aid Information Professional Internship Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Financial Aid Information for Professional Internship Program (HRT 493 - 3 Credits) Students who for the full summer term. Students who wish to be considered full time while on internship should request this assistance from Susan Gruber before being enrolled for internship credits. This is entirely the student

  12. Financial and Technical Resources The HUD Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial and Technical Resources The HUD Perspective U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Jerry Jensen, HUD Fort Worth Regional Office CATEE Conference November 9, 2011 Partnership for Sustainable Communities: Livability... Principles 1. Provide more transportation choices. 2. Promote equitable, affordable housing. 3. Enhance economic competitiveness. 4. Support existing communities. 5. Coordinate policies and leverage investment. 6. Value communities and neighborhoods...

  13. West Virginia University 1 Financial Aid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    processed information, correct FAFSA data, and conduct other important business directly with the US To apply for financial aid, first apply for a US Department of Education student PIN and a parent PIN (if hours) as well as degree completion within 150% of the number of hours required for the degree

  14. West Virginia University 1 Financial Aid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    processed information, correct FAFSA data, and conduct other important business directly with the US. Application Process To apply for financial aid, first apply for a US Department of Education student PIN of a % of all attempted hours) as well as degree completion within 150% of the number of hours required

  15. Faster Valuation of Financial Derivatives S. Paskov \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methods with Monte Carlo methods on the valuation of financial derivatives. We use a CollateralizedFaster Valuation of Financial Derivatives S. Paskov \\Lambda Department of Computer Science Columbia financial instruments. Vast sums are spent annually on these methods. Monte Carlo methods use random (or

  16. UndergraduateFinancialAid Information and Application Instructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The Princeton Financial Aid Application on the Web To simplify the process of applying for financial aid, Princeton has developed its own aid application on the Web. The Princeton Financial Aid Application (PFAA to view it on the Web, but any new information must be sent by letter, fax or email. We will provide

  17. Turbulence and its effects upon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneller, J. P.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Patton, K. M. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    As a neutrino passes through turbulent matter, large amplitude transitions between its eigenstates can occur. These transitions can be modeled as like those of an irradiated polarized atom and we investigate this connection both analytically and numerically. We find a simple theory that makes use of the Rotating Wave Approximation can make predictions for the amplitudes and wavelengths of the transitions that agree very well with those from the numerical solutions.

  18. Simulation of spherically expanding turbulent premixed flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, I.; Swaminathan, N.

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    canonically im- portant configuration and its investigation is helpful to understand combustion in prac- tical devices such as the spark ignited internal combustion engine, modern stratified charge engines and accidental explosions of fuel vapour cloud... Simulation of spherically expanding turbulent premixed flames I. Ahmed, N. Swaminathan? Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, UK. ?Corresponding author: Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Trumpington...

  19. Optical Turbulence Characterization at LAMOST Site: Observations and Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, L -Y; Yao, Y -Q; Vernin, J; Chadid, M; Wang, H -S; Yin, J; Wang, Y -P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric optical turbulence seriously limits the performance of high angular resolution instruments. An 8-night campaign of measurements was carried out at the LAMOST site in 2011, to characterize the optical turbulence. Two instruments were set up during the campaign: a Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) used to measure the total atmospheric seeing, and a Single Star Scidar (SSS) to measure the vertical profiles of the turbulence C_n^2(h) and the horizontal wind velocity V(h). The optical turbulence parameters are also calculated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Trinquet-Vernin model, which describes optical effects of atmospheric turbulence by using the local meteorological parameters. This paper presents assessment of the optical parameters involved in high angular resolution astronomy. Its includes seeing, isoplanatic angle, coherence time, coherence etendue, vertical profiles of optical turbulence intensity _n^2(h)$ and horizontal wind speed V(h). The median...

  20. Bankers in the Ivory Tower: The Financialization of Governance at the University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, Charlie; Goldstein, Adam; Habinek, Jacob; Kumar, Mukul; Stover, Tamera Lee; Roehrkasse, Alex

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bankers in the Ivory Tower: The Financialization ofBankers in the Ivory Tower: The Financialization of

  1. Continuous representation for shell models of turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei A. Mailybaev

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we construct and analyze continuous hydrodynamic models in one space dimension, which are induced by shell models of turbulence. After Fourier transformation, such continuous models split into an infinite number of uncoupled subsystems, which are all identical to the same shell model. The two shell models, which allow such a construction, are considered: the dyadic (Desnyansky--Novikov) model with the intershell ratio $\\lambda = 2^{3/2}$ and the Sabra model of turbulence with $\\lambda = \\sqrt{2+\\sqrt{5}} \\approx 2.058$. The continuous models allow understanding various properties of shell model solutions and provide their interpretation in physical space. We show that the asymptotic solutions of the dyadic model with Kolmogorov scaling correspond to the shocks (discontinuities) for the induced continuous solutions in physical space, and the finite-time blowup together with its viscous regularization follow the scenario similar to the Burgers equation. For the Sabra model, we provide the physical space representation for blowup solutions and intermittent turbulent dynamics.

  2. Forecasting Turbulent Modes with Nonparametric Diffusion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyrus Berry; John Harlim

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a nonparametric diffusion modeling approach for forecasting partially observed noisy turbulent modes. The proposed forecast model uses a basis of smooth functions (constructed with the diffusion maps algorithm) to represent probability densities, so that the forecast model becomes a linear map in this basis. We estimate this linear map by exploiting a previously established rigorous connection between the discrete time shift map and the semi-group solution associated to the backward Kolmogorov equation. In order to smooth the noisy data, we apply diffusion maps to a delay embedding of the noisy data, which also helps to account for the interactions between the observed and unobserved modes. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most predictable component of the dynamics. The resulting model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and in the observation noise limit. We will show numerical examples on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Fourier modes of the energy conserving Truncated Burgers-Hopf (TBH) model, the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes, and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. In these examples, forecasting skills of the nonparametric diffusion model are compared to a wide-range of stochastic parametric modeling approaches, which account for the nonlinear interactions between the observed and unobserved modes with white and colored noises.

  3. Fusion Rules in Turbulent Systems with Flux Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor L'vov; Itamar Procaccia

    1995-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion rules in turbulence specify the analytic structure of many-point correlation functions of the turbulent field when a group of coordinates coalesce. We show that the existence of flux equilibrium in fully developed turbulent systems combined with a direct cascade induces universal fusion rules. In certain examples these fusion rules suffice to compute the multiscaling exponents exactly, and in other examples they give rise to an infinite number of scaling relations that constrain enormously the structure of the allowed theory.

  4. Massively Parallel Spectral Element Large Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Channel Using Wall Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabau, Joshua I

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wall-bounded turbulent flows are prevalent in engineering and industrial applications. Walls greatly affect turbulent characteristics in many ways including production and propagation of turbulent stresses. While computational fluid dynamics can...

  5. Civil War and Human Development: Impacts of Finance and Financial Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baddeley, Michelle

    and Latin America; their results suggest that emerging African markets are no less efficient than other emerging markets even though generally these countries are more conflict ridden. Assessing the empirical evidence on the comparative efficiency... . 6 benefits and costs of reversion to conflict and high levels of military spending are associated with increased risk of renewed conflict (Collier and Hoeffler, 2004). 2.2 War exacerbates financial instability and uncertainty...

  6. Hot Particle and Turbulent Transport Effects on Resistive Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, Dylan P.

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project included two main thrusts; energetic particle effects on resistive MHD modes in tokamaks, and turbulence interactions with tearing modes in simplified geometry.

  7. Sandia Energy - The CRF's Turbulent Combustion Lab (TCL) Captures...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CRF's Turbulent Combustion Lab (TCL) Captures the Moment of Hydrogen Ignition Home Energy Transportation Energy CRF Facilities News News & Events Research & Capabilities The CRF's...

  8. Sandia Energy - Measuring Inflow and Wake Flow Turbulence Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that characterizes inflow and wake flow velocity and turbulence around a vertical axis turbine deployed at the Roza Canal, Yakima, Washington. The ADV was mounted on a...

  9. ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    experts in turbulent- flow simulation, computational mathematics, and high-performance computing. Building upon previous ASCR workshops on exascale computing, participants...

  10. aperiodic magnetic turbulence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    star formation and the interstellar medium. The density, pressure, and temperature distribution in a turbulent interstellar medium is described in comparison to a medium dominated...

  11. alfven wave turbulence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from 1 Solar Radius to 1 AU: an Analytical Treatment CERN Preprints Summary: We study the propagation, reflection, and turbulent dissipation of Alfven waves in coronal holes and...

  12. astrophysical turbulent plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jens Juul Rasmussen Association EURATOM - Ris National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Research, OPL - 128 DK - 4000 Roskilde, Denmark October 14, 2004 The turbulent...

  13. Scientists use plasma shaping to control turbulence in stellarators...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists use plasma shaping to control turbulence in stellarators By John Greenwald By John Greenwald October 21, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Magnetic...

  14. Gyrokinetic simulations of turbulent transport in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Barrett Neil [Dartmouth] [Dartmouth

    2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for a DOE award that was targeted at understanding and simulating turbulence and transport in plasma fusion devices such as tokamaks.

  15. Advanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization and flow characterization within full scale conventional hydropower systems, at marine and hydrokinetic

  16. A sufficient condition for Gaussian departure in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniela Tordella; Michele Iovieno; Peter Roger Bailey

    2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of two isotropic turbulent fields of equal integral scale but different kinetic energy generates the simplest kind of inhomogeneous turbulent field. In this paper we present a numerical experiment where two time decaying isotropic fields of kinetic energies $E_1$ and $E_2$ initially match over a narrow region. Within this region the kinetic energy varies as a hyperbolic tangent. The following temporal evolution produces a shearless mixing. The anisotropy and intermittency of velocity and velocity derivative statistics is observed. In particular the asymptotic behavior in time and as a function of the energy ratio $E_1/E_2 \\to \\infty$ is discussed. This limit corresponds to the maximum observable turbulent energy gradient for a given $E_1$ and is obtained through the limit $E_2 \\to 0$. A field with $E_1/E_2 \\to \\infty$ represents a mixing which could be observed near a surface subject to a very small velocity gradient separating two turbulent fields, one of which is nearly quiescent. In this condition the turbulent penetration is maximum and reaches a value equal to 1.2 times the nominal mixing layer width. The experiment shows that the presence of a turbulent energy gradient is sufficient for the appearance of intermittency and that during the mixing process the pressure transport is not negligible with respect to the turbulent velocity transport. These findings may open the way to the hypothesis that the presence of a gradient of turbulent energy is the minimal requirement for Gaussian departure in turbulence.

  17. The future of financial markets and regulation: What Strategy for Europe? The Future of Financial Markets and Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The future of financial markets and regulation: What Strategy for Europe? 1 The Future of Financial Markets and Regulation: What Strategy for Europe? Jean-Baptiste Goss1 Dominique Plihon2 Abstract This article provides insight into the future of financial markets and regulation in order to define what would

  18. Membrane proteomics of phagosomes suggests a connection to autophagy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Wenqing; Sheu, Leslie; Liu, Jun; Smart, Brian; Petzold, Christopher J.; Hsieh, Tsung-yen; Pitcher, Austin; Keasling*, Jay D.; Bertozzi*, Carolyn R.

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Phagocytosis is the central process by which macrophage cellsinternalize and eliminate infectious microbes as well as apoptoticcells. During maturation, phagosomes containing engulfed particlesfuse with various endosomal compartments through theaction of regulatory molecules on the phagosomal membrane. Inthis study, we performed a proteomic analysis of the membranefraction from latex bead-containing (LBC) phagosomes isolatedfrom macrophages. The profile, which comprised 546 proteins,suggests diverse functions of the phagosome and potential connectionsto secretory processes, toll-like receptor signaling, andautophagy. Many identified proteins were not previously knownto reside in the phagosome. We characterized several proteins inLBC phagosomes that change in abundance on induction of autophagy,a process that has been previously implicated in the hostdefense against microbial pathogens. These observations suggestcrosstalk between autophagy and phagocytosis that may be relevantto the innate immune response of macrophages.

  19. Dependence of the L- to H-mode Power Threshold on Toroidal Rotation and the Link to Edge Turbulence Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKee, G; Gohil, P; Schlossberg, D; Boedo, J; Burrell, K; deGrassie, J; Groebner, R; Makowski, M; Moyer, R; Petty, C; Rhodes, T; Schmitz, L; Shafer, M; Solomon, W; Umansky, M; Wang, G; White, A; Xu, X

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The injected power required to induce a transition from L-mode to H-mode plasmas is found to depend strongly on the injected neutral beam torque and consequent plasma toroidal rotation. Edge turbulence and flows, measured near the outboard midplane of the plasma (0.85 < r/a < 1.0) on DIII-D with the high-sensitivity 2D beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system, likewise vary with rotation and suggest a causative connection. The L-H power threshold in plasmas with the ion {del}B drift away from the X-point decreases from 4-6 MW with co-current beam injection, to 2-3 MW with near zero net injected torque, and to <2 MW with counter injection. Plasmas with the ion {del}B drift towards the X-point exhibit a qualitatively similar though less pronounced power threshold dependence on rotation. 2D edge turbulence measurements with BES show an increasing poloidal flow shear as the L-H transition is approached in all conditions. At low rotation, the poloidal flow of turbulent eddies near the edge reverses prior to the L-H transition, generating a significant poloidal flow shear that exceeds the measured turbulence decorrelation rate. This increased poloidal turbulence velocity shear may facilitate the L-H transition. No such reversal is observed in high rotation plasmas. The poloidal turbulence velocity spectrum exhibits a transition from a Geodesic Acoustic Mode zonal flow to a higher-power, lower frequency, zero-mean-frequency zonal flow as rotation varies from co-current to balanced during a torque scan at constant injected neutral beam power, perhaps also facilitating the L-H transition. This reduced power threshold at lower toroidal rotation may benefit inherently low-rotation plasmas such as ITER.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric turbulence Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: by dissipation of the turbulent energy and tur- bulent eddies will transport heat to different atmospheric re... ., MST radar studies of wind and turbulence in the...

  1. The Temperature of Interstellar Clouds from Turbulent Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liubin Pan; Paolo Padoan

    2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the effect of turbulent heating in the thermal balance of interstellar clouds, we develop an extension of the log-Poisson intermittency model to supersonic turbulence. The model depends on a parameter, d, interpreted as the dimension of the most dissipative structures. By comparing the model with the probability distribution of the turbulent dissipation rate in a simulation of supersonic and super-Alfvenic turbulence, we find a best-fit value of d=1.64. We apply this intermittency model to the computation of the mass-weighted probability distribution of the gas temperature of molecular clouds, high-mass star-forming cores, and cold diffuse HI clouds. Our main results are: i) The mean gas temperature in molecular clouds can be explained as the effect of turbulent heating alone, while cosmic ray heating may dominate only in regions where the turbulent heating is low; ii) The mean gas temperature in high-mass star-forming cores with typical FWHM of ~6 km/s (corresponding to a 1D rms velocity of 2.5 km/s) may be completely controlled by turbulent heating, which predicts a mean value of approximately 36 K, two to three times larger than the mean gas temperature in the absence of turbulent heating; iii) The intermittency of the turbulent heating can generate enough hot regions in cold diffuse HI clouds to explain the observed CH+ abundance, if the rms velocity on a scale of 1 pc is at least 3 km/s, in agreement with previous results based on incompressible turbulence. Because of its importance in the thermal balance of molecular clouds and high-mass star-forming cores, the process of turbulent heating may be central in setting the characteristic stellar mass and in regulating molecular chemical reactions.

  2. Adaptive LES Methodology for Turbulent Flow Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oleg V. Vasilyev

    2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Although turbulent flows are common in the world around us, a solution to the fundamental equations that govern turbulence still eludes the scientific community. Turbulence has often been called one of the last unsolved problem in classical physics, yet it is clear that the need to accurately predict the effect of turbulent flows impacts virtually every field of science and engineering. As an example, a critical step in making modern computational tools useful in designing aircraft is to be able to accurately predict the lift, drag, and other aerodynamic characteristics in numerical simulations in a reasonable amount of time. Simulations that take months to years to complete are much less useful to the design cycle. Much work has been done toward this goal (Lee-Rausch et al. 2003, Jameson 2003) and as cost effective accurate tools for simulating turbulent flows evolve, we will all benefit from new scientific and engineering breakthroughs. The problem of simulating high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows of engineering and scientific interest would have been solved with the advent of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) techniques if unlimited computing power, memory, and time could be applied to each particular problem. Yet, given the current and near future computational resources that exist and a reasonable limit on the amount of time an engineer or scientist can wait for a result, the DNS technique will not be useful for more than 'unit' problems for the foreseeable future (Moin & Kim 1997, Jimenez & Moin 1991). The high computational cost for the DNS of three dimensional turbulent flows results from the fact that they have eddies of significant energy in a range of scales from the characteristic length scale of the flow all the way down to the Kolmogorov length scale. The actual cost of doing a three dimensional DNS scales as Re{sup 9/4} due to the large disparity in scales that need to be fully resolved. State-of-the-art DNS calculations of isotropic turbulence have recently been completed at the Japanese Earth Simulator (Yokokawa et al. 2002, Kaneda et al. 2003) using a resolution of 40963 (approximately 10{sup 11}) grid points with a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of 1217 (Re {approx} 10{sup 6}). Impressive as these calculations are, performed on one of the world's fastest super computers, more brute computational power would be needed to simulate the flow over the fuselage of a commercial aircraft at cruising speed. Such a calculation would require on the order of 10{sup 16} grid points and would have a Reynolds number in the range of 108. Such a calculation would take several thousand years to simulate one minute of flight time on today's fastest super computers (Moin & Kim 1997). Even using state-of-the-art zonal approaches, which allow DNS calculations that resolve the necessary range of scales within predefined 'zones' in the flow domain, this calculation would take far too long for the result to be of engineering interest when it is finally obtained. Since computing power, memory, and time are all scarce resources, the problem of simulating turbulent flows has become one of how to abstract or simplify the complexity of the physics represented in the full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations in such a way that the 'important' physics of the problem is captured at a lower cost. To do this, a portion of the modes of the turbulent flow field needs to be approximated by a low order model that is cheaper than the full NS calculation. This model can then be used along with a numerical simulation of the 'important' modes of the problem that cannot be well represented by the model. The decision of what part of the physics to model and what kind of model to use has to be based on what physical properties are considered 'important' for the problem. It should be noted that 'nothing is free', so any use of a low order model will by definition lose some information about the original flow.

  3. Financial Recovery: Homeowner's Property Insurance Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granovsky, Nancy L.

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    - owner?s property insurance. Does my property insurance cover water damage? Basic property policies do not insure against flood damage. Homeown- ers have to rely on flood coverage purchased separately through FEMA?s National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP... ER-035 9-23 Financial Recovery: Homeowner?s Property Insurance Issues Nancy L. Granovsky, Professor and Extension Family Economics Specialist, The Texas A&M University System People affected by hurricanes have many questions about their home...

  4. Computer models for evaluating financial decision alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, James Carroll

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    973 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering COMPUTER MODELS FOR EVALUATING FINANCIAL DECISION ALTERNATIVES A Thesis by JAMES CARROLL CHRISTIAN Approved as to style and content by: . '; . . i', , ( (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Depar n... of this research is to bridge this gap by de- veloping the methodology necessary to solve personal finance problems in a quantitative method through the application of engineering economy principles. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to express my sincere...

  5. Active Financial Assistance Letters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartment ofATVM LoanActive Financial Assistance Letters Active

  6. Turbulence and Sound-field POD Analysis of a Turbulent Jet J. B. Freund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    Division of Engineering and Applied Science California Institute of Technology colonius-validated direct numerical simulation database. Norms are defined based on near-field volume integrals of pressure, turbulence kinetic energy, streamwise velocity, and total enthalpy, two-dimensional integrals of streamswise

  7. Sub-Alfvenic Non-Ideal MHD Turbulence Simulations with Ambipolar Diffusion: I. Turbulence Statistics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, R I; Li, P S; McKee, C F; Fisher, R

    2008-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Most numerical investigations on the role of magnetic fields in turbulent molecular clouds (MCs) are based on ideal magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD). However, MCs are weakly ionized, so that the time scale required for the magnetic field to diffuse through the neutral component of the plasma by ambipolar diffusion (AD) can be comparable to the dynamical time scale. We have performed a series of 256{sup 3} and 512{sup 3} simulations on supersonic but sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems with AD using the Heavy-Ion Approximation developed in Li et al. (2006). Our calculations are based on the assumption that the number of ions is conserved, but we show that these results approximately apply to the case of time-dependent ionization in molecular clouds as well. Convergence studies allow us to determine the optimal value of the ionization mass fraction when using the heavy-ion approximation for low Mach number, sub-Alfvenic turbulent systems. We find that ambipolar diffusion steepens the velocity and magnetic power spectra compared to the ideal MHD case. Changes in the density PDF, total magnetic energy, and ionization fraction are determined as a function of the AD Reynolds number. The power spectra for the neutral gas properties of a strongly magnetized medium with a low AD Reynolds number are similar to those for a weakly magnetized medium; in particular, the power spectrum of the neutral velocity is close to that for Burgers turbulence.

  8. R-modes in Neutron Stars with Crusts: Turbulent Saturation, Spin-down, and Crust Melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanqin Wu; Christopher D. Matzner; Phil Arras

    2000-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Rossby waves (r-modes) have been suggested as a means to regulate the spin periods of young or accreting neutron stars, and also to produce observable gravitational wave radiation. R-modes involve primarily transverse, incompressive motions of the star's fluid core. However, neutron stars gain crusts early in their lives: therefore, r-modes also imply shear in the fluid beneath the crust. We examine the criterion for this shear layer to become turbulent, and derive the rate of dissipation in the turbulent regime. Unlike dissipation from a viscous boundary layer, turbulent energy loss is nonlinear in mode energy and can therefore cause the mode to saturate at amplitudes typically much less than unity. This energy loss also reappears as heat below the crust. We study the possibility of crust melting as well as its implications for the spin evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries. Lastly, we identify some universal features of the spin evolution that may have observational consequences.

  9. Constraints on Stirring and Dissipation of MHD Turbulence in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shantanu Basu; Chigurupati Murali

    2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss constraints on the rates of stirring and dissipation of MHD turbulence in molecular clouds. Recent MHD simulations suggest that turbulence in clouds decays rapidly, thus providing a significant source of energy input, particularly if driven at small scales by, for example, bipolar outflows. We quantify the heating rates by combining the linewidth-size relations, which describe global cloud properties, with numerically determined dissipation rates. We argue that, if cloud turbulence is driven on small internal scales, the $^{12}$CO flux (enhanced by emission from weakly supersonic shocks) will be much larger than observed; this, in turn, would imply excitation temperatures significantly above observed values. We reach two conclusions: (1) small-scale driving by bipolar outflows cannot possibly account for cloud support and yield long-lived clouds, unless the published MHD dissipation rates are seriously overestimated; (2) driving on large scales (comparable to the cloud size) is much more viable from an energetic standpoint, and if the actual net dissipation rate is only slightly lower than what current MHD simulations estimate, then the observationally inferred lifetimes and apparent virial equilibrium of molecular clouds can be explained.

  10. THE COLUMN DENSITY VARIANCE IN TURBULENT INTERSTELLAR MEDIA: A FRACTAL MODEL APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seon, Kwang-Il, E-mail: kiseon@kasi.re.kr [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Astronomy and Space Science Major, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractional Brownian motion structures are used to investigate the dependency of column density variance ({sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnN}) in the turbulent interstellar medium on the variance of three-dimensional density ({sigma}{sup 2}{sub ln{rho}}) and the power-law slope of the density power spectrum. We provide quantitative expressions to infer the three-dimensional density variance, which is not directly observable, from the observable column density variance and spectral slope. We also investigate the relationship between the column density variance and sonic Mach number (M{sub s}) in the hydrodynamic (HD) regime by assuming the spectral slope and density variance to be functions of sonic Mach number, as obtained from the HD turbulence simulations. They are related by the expression {sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnN} = A{sigma}{sub ln{rho}} {sup 2} = Aln (1 + b {sup 2} M{sup 2}{sub s}), suggested by Burkhart and Lazarian for the magnetohydrodynamic case. The proportional constant A varies from Almost-Equal-To 0.2 to Almost-Equal-To 0.4 in the HD regime as the turbulence forcing parameter b increases from 1/3 (purely solenoidal forcing) to 1 (purely compressive forcing). It is also discussed that the parameter A is lowered in the presence of a magnetic field.

  11. Electrostatic dynamo in reversed field pinch plasmas: simple common fundamental nature of laminar and turbulent regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonfiglio, D.; Cappello, S. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla fusione, Padova (Italy); Escande, D. F. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla fusione, Padova (Italy); CNRS-Universite de Provence, Marseille (France)

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical modelling, the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) has been found to develop turbulent or laminar regimes switching from the former to the latter in a continuous way depending on the strength of dissipative forces. The laminar solution corresponds to a simple global helical deformation of the current channel. A helically-modulated electrostatic field arises in order to account for the helical modulation of the current density along magnetic field lines. The associated electrostatic drift yields the main component of the dynamo velocity field. The continuity of the transition between the two regimes suggests that the simple laminar helical solution can provide a fruitful intuitive description of the RFP dynamo in general. In fact, the electrostatic drift remains the main component of the dynamo velocity field in the non-stationary turbulent regime for a sustained RFP. We show that the same dynamo action, due to the electrostatic drift, is provided either by one single mode and its harmonics, as in the laminar regime, or by a rich spectrum of modes with the action of full nonlinear coupling, as in the turbulent one. Here, we review our previous work and present new elements to clarify the physics of the RFP dynamo. Many of the MHD predictions are in good agreement with experimental findings.

  12. User Financial Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAbout UsUser2/20/13 User

  13. The Turbulent Alfvenic Aurora C. C. Chaston,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    The Turbulent Alfvenic Aurora C. C. Chaston,1 C. Salem,1 J. W. Bonnell,1 C. W. Carlson,1 R. E) It is demonstrated from observations that the Alfvenic aurora may be powered by a turbulent cascade transverse acceleration of electrons from near-Earth space to form the aurora. We find that regions of Alfven wave

  14. Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    -to-cycle variations in internal combustion engines (Richard et al. 2007). The unresolved flame/turbulence in models for turbulent premixed combustion By D. Veynante, T. Schmitt, M. Boileau AND V. Moureau Very few attempts have been made to implement dynamic combustion models in large eddy simulations, whereas

  15. ANISOTROPY LENGTHENS THE DECAY TIME OF TURBULENCE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Charles E.; McKee, Christopher F.; Klein, Richard I. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of isothermal turbulence with velocity anisotropy is investigated using computational simulations and synthetic observations. We decompose the turbulence into isotropic and anisotropic components with total velocity dispersions {sigma}{sub iso} and {sigma}{sub ani}, respectively. We find that the decay rate of the turbulence depends on the crossing time of the isotropic component only. A cloud of size L with significant anisotropy in its turbulence has a dissipation time, t{sub diss} = L/(2{sigma}{sub iso}). This translates into turbulent energy decay rates on the cloud scale that can be much lower for anisotropic turbulence than for isotropic turbulence. To help future observations determine whether observed molecular clouds have the level of anisotropy required to maintain the observed level of turbulence over their lifetimes, we performed a principal component analysis on our simulated clouds. Even with projection effects washing out the anisotropic signal, there is a measurable difference in the axis-constrained principal component analysis performed in directions parallel and perpendicular to the direction of maximum velocity dispersion. When this relative difference, {psi}, is 0.1, there is enough anisotropy for the dissipation time to triple the expected isotropic value. We provide a fit for converting {psi} into an estimate for the dissipation time, t{sub diss}.

  16. Modeling of combustion noise spectrum from turbulent premixed flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Modeling of combustion noise spectrum from turbulent premixed flames Y. Liu, A. P. Dowling, T. D, Nantes, France 2321 #12;Turbulent combustion processes generate sound radiation due to temporal changes, this temporal correlation and its role in the modeling of combustion noise spectrum are studied by analyzing

  17. AIAA980057 RELATING TURBULENCE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LOADS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    AIAA­98­0057 RELATING TURBULENCE TO WIND TURBINE BLADE LOADS: PARAMETRIC STUDY WITH MULTIPLE that is most useful in estimating fatigue loads on wind turbine blades. The histograms of rainflow counted turbulence measures---can be used to estimate fatigue loads on wind turbine blades. We first de­ scribe

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE Development and characterization of a variable turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    (7):10371048, 2009), where variable blockage ratio slots are located upstream of a contoured nozzle. Vortical A Nozzle exit area E Power spectral density ReD Geometric Reynolds number Rel Turbulent Reynolds number SLRESEARCH ARTICLE Development and characterization of a variable turbulence generation system A

  19. Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2001 3 Large-eddy simulation of gas turbine, and solver capable of performing large-eddy simulation in geometries as complex as the combustor of a gas-turbine' grids encountered in complex geometries such as the Pratt & Whitney combustor. Turbulent validations

  20. Taming turbulence in magnetized plasmas: from fusion energy to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    occurs (fusion of particle beams will not work...) Thermonuclear fusion in a confined plasma (T~10 keTaming turbulence in magnetized plasmas: from fusion energy to black hole accretion disks Troy?: In fusion plasmas turbulent leakage of heat and particles is a key issue. Sheared flow can suppress

  1. Center for Turbulence Research Proceedings of the Summer Program 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    streaks which are observed to breakdown into turbulent spots are differentiated from innocuous events the conventionally reported values of urms. Furthermore the streaks responsible for breakdown to turbulence have instability analysis of Vaughan & Zaki (2011). Regardless of the mechanism which leads to breakdown

  2. Numerical simulation of turbulent jet primary breakup in Diesel engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helluy, Philippe

    Numerical simulation of turbulent jet primary breakup in Diesel engines Peng Zeng1 Marcus Herrmann" IRMA Strasbourg, 23.Jan.2008 #12;Introduction DNS of Primary Breakup in Diesel Injection Phase Transition Modeling Turbulence Modeling Summary Outline 1 Introduction 2 DNS of Primary Breakup in Diesel

  3. RESEARCH ARTICLE Particles for tracing turbulent liquid helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Particles for tracing turbulent liquid helium Gregory P. Bewley K. R of local flow velocities in turbulent liquid helium, using tracer particles. We survey and evaluate, we note that cryogenic helium is attractive for experimental studies because its kinematic viscosity

  4. Turbulence-Chemistry Interaction in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    alternatives to traditional petroleum and natural gas fuels. Burning under lean condi- tions reduces of conditions expected from gas turbine combustors. At these higher turbulence in- tensities, hydrogen flamesTurbulence-Chemistry Interaction in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Combustion A. J. Aspden1,2 , M. S. Day2

  5. Evolution of isolated turbulent trailing vortices Karthik Duraisamy1,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    Evolution of isolated turbulent trailing vortices Karthik Duraisamy1,a and Sanjiva K. Lele2,b 1 evolution of a low swirl-number turbulent Batchelor vortex is studied using pseudospectral direct numerical application of boundary conditions. The physics of the evolution is investigated with an emphasis

  6. Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    in a supersonic turbulent crossflow By S. Kawai AND S. K. Lele 1. Motivation and objectives Important recent load, etc. Jet mixing in a supersonic crossflow (JISC) is a type of flow where compressible LES can, the enhancement of supersonic turbulent mixing of jet fuel and crossflow air is a critical issue in developing

  7. Heat release response of acoustically forced turbulent premixed flamesrole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieuwen, Timothy C.

    Heat release response of acoustically forced turbulent premixed flamesrole of kinematic surface to coherent forcing and turbulent fluctuations are coupled even at linear order in coherent forcing amplitude, ea, due to flame propagation (kinematic restoration). This coupling effectively causes

  8. Incloud turbulence structure of marine stratocumulus N. Riemer,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of turbulent kinetic energy is dominantly driven by wind shear. Citation: Ching, J., N. Riemer, M. Dunn, and M3 Received 10 August 2010; revised 14 September 2010; accepted 20 September 2010; published 6) in July 2005, and identifies the dominant sources of turbulent kinetic energy. We used vertical veloc- ity

  9. Autoignition in turbulent two-phase flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borghesi, Giulio

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and spatial evolution of the macroscopic properties of the flow. These equations will be given in Chapter 2 and are known as the Navier-Stokes equa- tions. Depending on the application considered, different numerical techniques for solving the Navier... clusters worldwide will lead to a relaxation of these constraints in the future: simulations of flows with values of Re up to O(103) are starting to become common, and, in recent years, a turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame with a jet Reynolds number of 11...

  10. Stretching of polymers in a turbulent environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Eckhardt; Jochen Kronjaeger; Joerg Schumacher

    2002-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of polymers with small-scale velocity gradients can trigger a coil-stretch transition in the polymers. We analyze this transition within a direct numerical simulation of shear turbulence with an Oldroyd-B model for the polymer. In the coiled state the lengths of polymers are distributed algebraically with an exponent alpha=2 gamma-1/De, where gamma is a characteristic stretching rate of the flow and De the Deborah number. In the stretched state we demonstrate that the length distribution of the polymers is limited by the feedback to the flow.

  11. Acceleration statistics of heavy particles in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bec; L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; M. Cencini; A. Lanotte; S. Musacchio; F. Toschi

    2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of direct numerical simulations of heavy particle transport in homogeneous, isotropic, fully developed turbulence, up to resolution $512^3$ ($R_\\lambda\\approx 185$). Following the trajectories of up to 120 million particles with Stokes numbers, $St$, in the range from 0.16 to 3.5 we are able to characterize in full detail the statistics of particle acceleration. We show that: ({\\it i}) The root-mean-squared acceleration $a_{\\rm rms}$ sharply falls off from the fluid tracer value already at quite small Stokes numbers; ({\\it ii}) At a given $St$ the normalised acceleration $a_{\\rm rms}/(\\epsilon^3/\

  12. Lyapunov exponents of heavy particles in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremie Bec; Luca Biferale; Guido Boffetta; Massimo Cencini; Stefano Musacchio; Federico Toschi

    2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Lyapunov exponents of heavy particles and tracers advected by homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows are investigated by means of direct numerical simulations. For large values of the Stokes number, the main effect of inertia is to reduce the chaoticity with respect to fluid tracers. Conversely, for small inertia, a counter-intuitive increase of the first Lyapunov exponent is observed. The flow intermittency is found to induce a Reynolds number dependency for the statistics of the finite time Lyapunov exponents of tracers. Such intermittency effects are found to persist at increasing inertia.

  13. Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success Stories Touching TheCapture Turbulence in the

  14. Correlation of flame speed with stretch in turbulent premixed methane/air flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.H.; Im, Hong G.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the flamelet approach of turbulent premixed combustion, the flames are modeled as a wrinkled surface whose propagation speed, termed the {open_quotes}displacement speed,{close_quotes} is prescribed in terms of the local flow field and flame geometry. Theoretical studies suggest a linear relation between the flame speed and stretch for small values of stretch, S{sub L}/S{sub L}{sup 0} = 1 - MaKa, where S{sub L}{sup 0} is the laminar flame speed, Ka = {kappa}{delta}{sub F}/S{sub L}{sup 0} is the nondimensional stretch or the Karlovitz number, and Ma = L/{delta}{sub F} is the Markstein number. The nominal flame thickness, {delta}{sub F}, is determined as the ratio of the mass diffusivity of the unburnt mixture to the laminar flame speed. Thus, the turbulent flame model relies on an accurate estimate of the Markstein number in specific flame configurations. Experimental measurement of flame speed and stretch in turbulent flames, however, is extremely difficult. As a result, measurement of flame speeds under strained flow fields has been made in simpler geometries, in which the effect of flame curvature is often omitted. In this study we present results of direct numerical simulations of unsteady turbulent flames with detailed methane/air chemistry, thereby providing an alternative method of obtaining flame structure and propagation statistics. The objective is to determine the correlation between the displacement speed and stretch over a broad range of Karlovitz numbers. The observed response of the displacement speed is then interpreted in terms of local tangential strain rate and curvature effects. 13 refs., 3 figs.

  15. The energetic coupling of scales in gyrokinetic plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teaca, Bogdan, E-mail: bogdan.teaca@coventry.ac.uk [Applied Mathematics Research Centre, Coventry University, Coventry CV1 5FB (United Kingdom); Max-Planck fr Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Gttingen (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics (Germany); Navarro, Alejandro Ban, E-mail: alejandro.banon.navarro@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Jenko, Frank, E-mail: frank.jenko@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics (Germany)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In magnetized plasma turbulence, the couplings of perpendicular spatial scales that arise due to the nonlinear interactions are analyzed from the perspective of the free-energy exchanges. The plasmas considered here, with appropriate ion or electron adiabatic electro-neutrality responses, are described by the gyrokinetic formalism in a toroidal magnetic geometry. Turbulence develops due to the electrostatic fluctuations driven by temperature gradient instabilities, either ion temperature gradient (ITG) or electron temperature gradient (ETG). The analysis consists in decomposing the system into a series of scale structures, while accounting separately for contributions made by modes possessing special symmetries (e.g., the zonal flow modes). The interaction of these scales is analyzed using the energy transfer functions, including a forward and backward decomposition, scale fluxes, and locality functions. The comparison between the ITG and ETG cases shows that ETG turbulence has a more pronounced classical turbulent behavior, exhibiting a stronger energy cascade, with implications for gyrokinetic turbulence modeling.

  16. Fusion Rules and Conditional Statistics in Turbulent Advection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emily S. C. Ching; Victor S. L'vov; Itamar Procaccia

    1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion rules in turbulence address the asymptotic properties of many-point correlation functions when some of the coordinates are very close to each other. Here we put to experimental test some non-trivial consequences of the fusion rules for scalar correlations in turbulence. To this aim we examine passive turbulent advection as well as convective turbulence. Adding one assumption to the fusion rules one obtains a prediction for universal conditional statistics of gradient fields. We examine the conditional average of the scalar dissipation field $\\left$ for $R$ in the inertial range, and find that it is linear in $T(\\B.r+\\B.R)-T(\\B.r)$ with a fully determined proportionality constant. The implications of these findings for the general scaling theory of scalar turbulence are discussed.

  17. Forced turbulence in thermally bistable gas: A parameter study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seifried, D; Niemeyer, J C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: The thermal instability is one of the dynamical agents for turbulence in the diffuse interstellar medium, where both, turbulence and thermal instability interact in a highly non-linear manner. Aims: We study basic properties of turbulence in thermally bistable gas for variable simulation parameters. The resulting cold gas fractions can be applied as parameterisation in simulations on galactic scales. Methods: Turbulent flow is induced on large scales by means of compressive stochastic forcing in a periodic box. The compressible Euler equations with constant UV heating and a parameterised cooling function are solved on uniform grids. We investigate several values of the mean density of the gas and different magnitudes of the forcing. For comparison with other numerical studies, solenoidal forcing is applied as well. Results: After a transient phase, we observe that a state of statistically stationary turbulence is approached. Compressive forcing generally produces a two-phase medium, with a decreasing...

  18. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munroe, James R., E-mail: jmunroe@mun.ca [Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Newfoundland A1B 3X7 (Canada); Sutherland, Bruce R., E-mail: bsuther@ualberta.ca [Departments of Physics and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  19. Ignition of hydrogen/air mixing layer in turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autoignition of a scalar hydrogen/air mixing layer in homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation. An initial counterflow of unmixed nitrogen-diluted hydrogen and heated air is perturbed by two-dimensional homogeneous turbulence. The temperature of the heated air stream is chosen to be 1,100 K which is substantially higher than the crossover temperature at which the rates of the chain branching and termination reactions become equal. Three different turbulence intensities are tested in order to assess the effect of the characteristic flow time on the ignition delay. For each condition, a simulation without heat release is also performed. The ignition delay determined with and without heat release is shown to be almost identical up to the point of ignition for all of the turbulence intensities tested, and the predicted ignition delays agree well within a consistent error band. It is also observed that the ignition kernel always occurs where hydrogen is focused, and the peak concentration of HO{sub 2} is aligned well with the scalar dissipation rate. The dependence of the ignition delay on turbulence intensity is found to be nonmonotonic. For weak to moderate turbulence the ignition is facilitated by turbulence via enhanced mixing, while for stronger turbulence, whose timescale is substantially smaller than the ignition delay, the ignition is retarded due to excessive scalar dissipation, and hence diffusive loss, at the ignition location. However, for the wide range of initial turbulence fields studied, the variation in ignition delay due to the corresponding variation in turbulence intensity appears to be quite small.

  20. Turbulence structure of the surface layer Boun 2247-03D TURBULENCE STRUCTURE OF THE UNSTABLE ATMOSPHERIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moncrieff, John B.

    to the creation of emerging TEAL structures to the power passing down the Richardson cascade in the outer layer-Obukhov similarity, self-organizing systems 1. Introduction In convective boundary layers the structureTurbulence structure of the surface layer Boun 2247-03D TURBULENCE STRUCTURE OF THE UNSTABLE

  1. Transition radiation in turbulent astrophysical medium. Application to solar radio bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory D. Fleishman; Dale E. Gary; Gelu M. Nita

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern observations and models of various astrophysical objects suggest that many of their physical parameters fluctuate substantially at different spatial scales. The rich variety of the emission processes, including Transition Radiation but not limited to it, arising in such turbulent media constitutes the scope of Stochastic Theory of Radiation. We review general approaches applied in the stochastic theory of radiation and specific methods used to calculate the transition radiation produced by fast particles in the magnetized randomly inhomogeneous plasma. The importance of the theory of transition radiation for astrophysics is illustrated by one example of its detailed application to a solar radio burst, including specially designed algorithms of the spectral forward fitting.

  2. Anomalous scalings in differential models of turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Thalabard; Sergey Nazarenko; Sebastien Galtier; Medvedev Sergey

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential models for hydrodynamic, passive-scalar and wave turbulence given by nonlinear first- and second-order evolution equations for the energy spectrum in the $k$-space were analysed. Both types of models predict formation an anomalous transient power-law spectra. The second-order models were analysed in terms of self-similar solutions of the second kind, and a phenomenological formula for the anomalous spectrum exponent was constructed using numerics for a broad range of parameters covering all known physical examples. The first-order models were examined analytically, including finding an analytical prediction for the anomalous exponent of the transient spectrum and description of formation of the Kolmogorov-type spectrum as a reflection wave from the dissipative scale back into the inertial range. The latter behaviour was linked to pre-shock/shock singularities similar to the ones arising in the Burgers equation. Existence of the transient anomalous scaling and the reflection-wave scenario are argued to be a robust feature common to the finite-capacity turbulence systems. The anomalous exponent is independent of the initial conditions but varies for for different models of the same physical system.

  3. Caviton dynamics in strong Langmuir turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuBois, D.; Rose, H.A.; Russell, D.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies based on long time computer simulations of Langmuir turbulence as described by Zakharov's model will be reviewed. These show that for strong to moderate ion sound samping the turbulent energy is dominantly in nonlinear ''caviton'' excitations which are localized in space and time. A local caviton model will be presented which accounts for the nucleation-collapse-burnout cycles of individual cavitons as well as their space-time correlations. This model is in detailed agreement with many features of the electron density fluctuation spectra in the ionosphere modified by powerful hf waves as measured by incoherent scatter radar. Recently such observations have verified a prediction of the theory that ''free'' Langmuir waves are emitted in the caviton collapse process. These observations and theoretical considerations also strongly imply that cavitons in the heated ionosphere, under certain conditions, evolve to states in which they are ordered in space and time. The sensitivity of the high frequency Langmuir field dynamics to the low frequency ion density fluctuations and the related caviton nucleation process will be discussed. 40 refs., 19 figs.

  4. Dynamics of cavitons in strong Langmuir turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuBois, D.F.; Rose, H.A.; Russell, D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies of Langmuir turbulence as described by Zakharov's model will be reviewed. For parameters of interest in laser-plasma experiments and for ionospheric hf heating experiments a significant fraction of the turbulent energy is in nonlinear caviton'' excitations which are localized in space and time. A local caviton model will be presented which accounts for the nucleation-collapse-burnout cycles of individual cavitons as well as their space-time correlations. This model is in detailed agreement with many features of the electron density fluctuation spectra in the ionosphere modified by powerful hf waves as measured by incoherent scatter radar. Recently such observations have verified a prediction of the theory that free'' Langmuir waves are emitted in the caviton collapse process. Observations and theoretical considerations also imply that when the pump frequency is slightly lower than the ambient electron plasma frequency cavitons may evolve to states in which they are ordered in space and time. The sensitivity of the high frequency Langmuir field dynamics to the low frequency ion density fluctuations and the related caviton nucleation process will be discussed. 42 refs., 12 figs.

  5. Impact of Financial Structure on the Cost of Solar Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.; Bird, L.; Schwabe, P.; Cory, K.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To stimulate investment in renewable energy generation projects, the federal government developed a series of support structures that reduce taxes for eligible investors--the investment tax credit, the production tax credit, and accelerated depreciation. The nature of these tax incentives often requires an outside investor and a complex financial arrangement to allocate risk and reward among the parties. These financial arrangements are generally categorized as 'advanced financial structures.' Among renewable energy technologies, advanced financial structures were first widely deployed by the wind industry and are now being explored by the solar industry to support significant scale-up in project development. This report describes four of the most prevalent financial structures used by the renewable sector and evaluates the impact of financial structure on energy costs for utility-scale solar projects that use photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies.

  6. Evidence of Shock-Driven Turbulence in the Solar Chromosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Reardon; F. Lepreti; V. Carbone; A. Vecchio

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the acoustic properties of the solar chromosphere in the high-frequency regime using a time sequence of velocity measurements in the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm line taken with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS). We concentrate on quiet-Sun behavior, apply Fourier analysis, and characterize the observations in terms of the probability density functions (PDFs) of velocity increments. We confirm the presence of significant oscillatory fluctuation power above the cutoff frequency and find that it obeys a power-law distribution with frequency up to our 25 mHz Nyquist limit. The chromospheric PDFs are non-Gaussian and asymmetric and they differ among network, fibril, and internetwork regions. This suggests that the chromospheric high-frequency power is not simply the result of short-period waves propagating upward from the photosphere but rather is the signature of turbulence generated within the chromosphere from shock oscillations near the cutoff frequency. The presence of this pervasive and broad spectrum of motions in the chromosphere is likely to have implications for the excitation of coronal loop oscillations.

  7. Analyses of the stable isotopic record for carbon, nitrogen and sulphur have suggested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkowski, Paul G.

    waters receive sufficient solar energy to support photo- synthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria be related to specific geological indices, such as sea-level8 and ocean-thermal9 structures that are climate-driven6 . In this Perspective, we consider the climate-driven processes that influence turbulent mixing

  8. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents 5 years (1990--94) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented. Composite tables present: Aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, financial indicators, electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data.

  9. Panel 2, Modeling the Financial and System Benefits of Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling the Financial and System Benefits of Energy Storage Applications in Distribution Systems Patrick Balducci, Senior Economist, Pacific NW National Laboratory Hydrogen Energy...

  10. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1993 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents five years (1989 to 1993) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, the Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities, filed on a fiscal basis.

  11. Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Owners or operators are required to provide financial assurance for in situ uranium sites. This money is required for: decommissioning, decontamination, demolition, and waste disposal for buildings...

  12. Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carrots for Utilities:...

  13. Financial Vehicles within an Integrated Energy Efficiency Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Financial mechanisms within Integrated Energy Efficiency Programs Every successful energy efficiency program depends on four functional pillars - Demand Creation - Workforce...

  14. Optimisation of physical and financial power purchase portfolios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorden Spangardt

    2002-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 18, 2002 ... Optimisation of physical and financial power purchase portfolios. Gorden Spangardt (spa ***at*** umsicht.fhg.de) Michael Lucht (luc ***at***...

  15. CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy Innovations to Support Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to Support Energy Efficiency: Energy Performance Contracting and On-Bill Financing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy...

  16. AUAARHUS UNIVERSITY Travel claim -credit card Financial Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Financial Control 16-06-2014 Page 3 of 15 Country: Danmark A list of favourites is created as users use

  17. UNEP-GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Financial Risk Management 1 "This UNEPGEF targeted research project aims to catalyse new thinking in the risk management area, examining existing instruments and approaches and...

  18. TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director, Contract and Financial...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    revised Guide for Financial Assistance. The Guide has been updated to reflect changes to web sites, organization names, systems, and DOE policies and practices since the guide was...

  19. BetterBuildings Webinar Transcription - Financial Vehicles within...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Financial Institution Partners Transcript.doc Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Home Accomplishments History Better Buildings Partners Stories Interviews Videos Contact Us...

  20. act chief financial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology Websites Summary: AUTHORIZATION TO RELEASE FINANCIAL INFORMATION The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA written consent from the student. By signing...

  1. Financial Institution Request for Proposals and Selection Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A state or local government typically conducts a competitive procurement procedure to award loan loss reserve (LLR) funds to a financial institution partner. The request for proposals (RFP)...

  2. Envisory Financial Risk Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJump to:EmminolEntergyEnvisory Financial Risk Management Jump to:

  3. LPO Financial Performance Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLED Lighting5-15Trade |VesselLPO Financial

  4. Selected Past Financial Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle|Security Enforcement Documentsis NotSelectFinancial

  5. STEP Financial Incentives Summary | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDERSTATE ENERGY PROGRAMJuly 2012STEM7Financial

  6. User Financial Accounts | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon4. UraniumUsedFacilities HighFinancial

  7. Financial Opportunities Delete Me | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALbyFinancial Opportunities Delete

  8. FY 2006 Financial Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager6-OPAMGuiding DocumentsAppropriation (dollars6 Financial

  9. FY 2009 Financial Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager6-OPAMGuidingScience Nuclear08Statistical9 Financial

  10. Distributed Energy Financial Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan: EnergyTracer-Determined ResidenceFinancial Group

  11. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flows: Experimental Studies on the Turbulence of Multiphase Plumes and Tidal Vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Duncan Burnette

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Akker 1999), and ocean CO2 sequestration (Adams and Wannamaker 2005; Adams and Wannamaker 2006). In particular, ocean CO2 sequestration has been noted by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in its 2005 special report on Carbon Dioxide... for direct carbon sequestration in the oceans have been considered as a means to mitigate the effects on global warming of burning fossil fuels. While the concept of CO2 sequestration is promising, the turbulent structures in multiphase plumes...

  12. Wavelet analyses using parallel computing for plasma turbulence studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujisawa, A.; Inagaki, S.; Matsuoka, K.; Itoh, S.-I. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics and Itoh Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Shimizu, A.; Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho, Toki-shi 509-52 (Japan); Nagashima, Y.; Yamada, T. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wavelet analyses have been carried out, using a cluster of personal computer, on the signal of electric field fluctuations measured with heavy ion beam probes in the compact helical system stellarator. The results have revealed the intermittent characteristics of turbulence and of the nonlinear couplings between elemental waves of turbulence. The usage of parallel computing is found to successfully reduce the calculation time as inversely proportional to the CPU number used the cluster, which shows the nature of 'embarrassingly parallel computation'. The present example of the wavelet analyses clearly demonstrates the importance of the advanced analyzing methods and the parallel computation for the modern studies of plasma turbulence.

  13. Analytic Model of the Universal Structure of Turbulent Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor S. L'vov; Itamar Procaccia; Oleksii Rudenko

    2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulent boundary layers exhibit a universal structure which nevertheless is rather complex, being composed of a viscous sub-layer, a buffer zone, and a turbulent log-law region. In this letter we present a simple analytic model of turbulent boundary layers which culminates in explicit formulae for the profiles of the mean velocity, the kinetic energy and the Reynolds stress as a function of the distance from the wall. The resulting profiles are in close quantitative agreement with measurements over the entire structure of the boundary layer, without any need of re-fitting in the different zones.

  14. Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

  15. Compressive turbulent cascade and heating in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marino, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Ponte Bucci 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Sorriso-Valvo, L. [Liquid Crystal Laboratory, INFM/CNR, Ponte Bucci 33B, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Carbone, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Ponte Bucci 31C, I-87036 Rende (Italy); Noullez, A. [University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Bruno, R. [INAF-Istituto Fisica Spazio Interplanetario, Rome (Italy)

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbulent energy cascade has been recently identified in high-latitude solar wind data samples by using a Yaglom-like relation. However, analogous scaling law, suitably modified to take into account compressible fluctuations, has been observed in a much more extended fraction of the same data set recorded by the Ulysses spacecraft. Thus, it seems that large scale density fluctuations, despite their low amplitude, play a major role in the basic scaling properties of turbulence. The compressive turbulent cascade, moreover, seems to be able to supply the energy needed to account for the local heating of the non-adiabatic solar wind.

  16. Forecasting stratospheric clear-air turbulence by discriminant analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Robert Earl

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Discriminant Analysis. (December lg73) Robert Earl Cox, A. B. , Dartmouth College Directed by: Dr. Jam s R. Scoggins The appllca'bili. ty of the statis! ical method of discriminart sna1ysis Lo the prediction of clear-air turbulence over the western Unixed... turbulent and non-turbulent: regions of the stratosphere. The results show that the predictive periormance of most discriminant functions i. s optimized between 45, 000 and 55, 000 ft. The four best discriminant functions of the dependent sample (XB-70...

  17. Large scale properties in turbulent spherically symmetric accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnab K. Ray; J. K. Bhattacharjee

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of turbulence in a spherically symmetric accreting system has been studied on very large spatial scales of the system. This is also a highly subsonic flow region and here the accreting fluid has been treated as nearly incompressible. It has been shown here that the coupling of the mean flow and the turbulent fluctuations, gives rise to a scaling relation for an effective "turbulent viscosity". This in turn leads to a dynamic scaling for sound propagation in the accretion process. As a consequence of this scaling, the sonic horizon of the transonic inflow solution is shifted inwards, in comparison with the inviscid flow.

  18. Collective neutrino oscillations in turbulent backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, Giles; Adams, Jenni; Seunarine, Suruj [University of Canterbury, Christchurch (New Zealand); University of the West Indies, Bridgetown (Barbados)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Kolmogorov turbulence model, we investigate the effects of fluctuations in matter and neutrino density in the region near a supernova core on the flavor oscillations of neutrinos emitted in the core collapse in a single-angle, two-flavor approximation. Deviation from a smooth background neutrino density causes significant alterations in the final flavor state of the neutrino ensemble after 400 km, but even very large fluctuations in the matter density do not strongly affect the state of the neutrinos after the collective phase. In both cases, there is a strong effect on the neutrino flavor evolution at intermediate radii, with the flavor evolution becoming much more chaotic. The effect of fluctuations also depends strongly on the initial neutrino spectra. We conclude that the true neutrino fluxes arriving at Earth from core-collapse supernova could differ considerably from predictions of neutrino fluxes based on approximate models with smoothly decreasing matter and neutrino densities.

  19. Nonlinear parallel momentum transport in strong turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lu; Diamond, P H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most existing theoretical studies of momentum transport focus on calculating the Reynolds stress based on quasilinear theory, without considering the \\emph{nonlinear} momentum flux-$$. However, a recent experiment on TORPEX found that the nonlinear toroidal momentum flux induced by blobs makes a significant contribution as compared to the Reynolds stress [Labit et al., Phys. Plasmas {\\bf 18}, 032308 (2011)]. In this work, the nonlinear parallel momentum flux in strong turbulence is calculated by using three dimensional Hasegawa-Mima equation. It is shown that nonlinear diffusivity is smaller than quasilinear diffusivity from Reynolds stress. However, the leading order nonlinear residual stress can be comparable to the quasilinear residual stress, and so could be important to intrinsic rotation in tokamak edge plasmas. A key difference from the quasilinear residual stress is that parallel fluctuation spectrum asymmetry is not required for nonlinear residual stress.

  20. TURBULENT CHARACTERISTICS IN THE INTENSITY FLUCTUATIONS OF A SOLAR QUIESCENT PROMINENCE OBSERVED BY THE HINODE SOLAR OPTICAL TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonardis, E.; Chapman, S. C.; Foullon, C. [Centre for Fusion Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We focus on Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) calcium II H-line observations of a solar quiescent prominence (QP) that exhibits highly variable dynamics suggestive of turbulence. These images capture a sufficient range of scales spatially ({approx}0.1-100 arcsec) and temporally ({approx}16.8 s-4.5 hr) to allow the application of statistical methods used to quantify finite range fluid turbulence. We present the first such application of these techniques to the spatial intensity field of a long-lived solar prominence. Fully evolved inertial range turbulence in an infinite medium exhibits multifractal scale invariance in the statistics of its fluctuations, seen as power-law power spectra and as scaling of the higher order moments (structure functions) of fluctuations which have non-Gaussian statistics; fluctuations {delta}I(r, L) = I(r + L) - I(r) on length scale L along a given direction in observed spatial field I have moments that scale as ({delta}I(r, L){sup p}) {approx} L{sup {zeta}(p)}. For turbulence in a system that is of finite size, or that is not fully developed, one anticipates a generalized scale invariance or extended self-similarity (ESS) ({delta}I(r, L){sup p}) {approx} G(L){sup {zeta}(p)}. For these QP intensity measurements we find scaling in the power spectra and ESS. We find that the fluctuation statistics are non-Gaussian and we use ESS to obtain ratios of the scaling exponents {zeta}(p): these are consistent with a multifractal field and show distinct values for directions longitudinal and transverse to the bulk (driving) flow. Thus, the intensity fluctuations of the QP exhibit statistical properties consistent with an underlying turbulent flow.

  1. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  2. EXHIBIT A: CRADA, WFO, PUA and NPUA Comparison Table, with suggested...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EXHIBIT A: CRADA, WFO, PUA and NPUA Comparison Table, with suggested changes EXHIBIT A: CRADA, WFO, PUA and NPUA Comparison Table, with suggested changes Suggested changes to the...

  3. Annual Financial Report 2010 Cover photographs by Marco Sanchez with UCSF Documents, Media & Mail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    Annual Financial Report 2010 #12;Cover photographs by Marco Sanchez with UCSF Documents, Media from the Associate Vice Chancellor Finance 3 Management's Discussion and Analysis 13 FinancialCoopers,whosereportistransmittedtotheRegents. TheaccompanyingFinancialStatementsandManagement'sDiscussionandAnalysis detailonlylocalcampusactivity

  4. On Pablo Triana's "The Flawed Math of Financial Models"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shreve, Steven E.

    - wide financial crisis on "quants" in the finance industry and the programs that educate them. Mr. Pablo quant takes to heart Albert Einstein's words, "As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality the financial crisis, we have invited participants in the crisis to speak in detail to our students about deals

  5. University of Pittsburgh FINANCIAL GUIDELINE Subject: Allowability of Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    University of Pittsburgh FINANCIAL GUIDELINE Subject: Allowability of Costs I. Scope This guideline establishes the requirements for determining the allowability of direct and indirect costs on the financial to ensure the allowability of the direct and indirect costs recorded on their sponsored projects

  6. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 2009/10 1 UNIVERSITY OF KENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    's Public Benefit Statement 4 - 7 Operating and Financial Review 8 - 20 Corporate Governance Statement 21 Remuneration Committee: Valerie Marshall Safety, Health and Environment Executive Committee: Professor Keith-Chancellor chairs the Joint Committee for Honorary Degrees, a joint committee of Senate and Council. #12;FINANCIAL

  7. Financial Bilateral Contract Negotiation in Wholesale Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    1 Financial Bilateral Contract Negotiation in Wholesale Electricity Markets Using Nash Bargaining and a load-serving entity in a wholesale electric power market with congestion managed by locational marginal and price biases. Index Terms--Wholesale electricity market, financial bilateral contract, negotiation

  8. Office of Student Financial Aid Master of Public Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ,184 Books & Supplies 1,200 1,200 Room & Board (off campus) 9,990 9,990 Miscellaneous 2,556 2,556 Health careOffice of Student Financial Aid Master of Public Health Eligibility In order to receive loan funds and/or work-study assistance through the Office of Student Financial Aid, a master of public health

  9. Modeling and Management of Nonlinear Dependencies Copulas in Dynamic Financial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universitt

    an important tool for decision making and an essential part of enterprise risk management (ERM), particularly. Keywords: Non-Life Insurance, Risk Management, Dynamic Financial Analysis, Co- pulas, PerformanceModeling and Management of Nonlinear Dependencies Copulas in Dynamic Financial Analysis Martin

  10. Single Machine Scheduling with a Non-renewable Financial Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magdeburg, Universität

    Single Machine Scheduling with a Non-renewable Financial Resource Evgeny R. Gafarov a , Alexander A with a non-renewable resource. For example, money or fuel provide natural examples of such a non-renewable resource. Such problems with a non-renewable resource are also referred to as financial scheduling problems

  11. Financial statistics of major publicly owned electric utilities, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Financial Statistics of Major Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes relating to publicly owned electric utility issues.

  12. Financial Statements for the year ended 31 July 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandara, Arosha

    Statement of Principal Accounting Policies 30 Consolidated Income and Expenditure Account 34 Consolidated Statement of Recognised Gains and Losses 35 Balance Sheets 36 Consolidated Cash Flow Statement 37 Notes to the Accounts 38 Principal Advisors 60 #12;THE OPEN UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS Financial Statements 2010

  13. Financial Statements for the year ended 31 July 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandara, Arosha

    ' Report 28 Statement of Principal Accounting Policies 30 Consolidated Income and Expenditure Account 34 Consolidated Statement of Recognised Gains and Losses 35 Balance Sheets 36 Consolidated Cash Flow Statement 37 Notes to the Accounts 38 Principal Advisors 59 #12;THE OPEN UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS Financial

  14. Integer-valued Levy processes and low latency financial econometrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    Integer-valued Levy processes and low latency financial econometrics Ole E. Barndorff Abstract Motivated by features of low latency data in financial econometrics we study in detail integer- valued Levy processes as the basis of price processes for high frequency econometrics. We propose using

  15. Inhomogeneous Financial Networks and Contagious Links Hamed Amini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inhomogeneous Financial Networks and Contagious Links Hamed Amini and Andreea Minca October 31 of `contagious links', where a contagious link leads to the default of a bank following the default of its, Default Contagion, Financial Stability, Contagious Links, Phase Transitions, Complex Networks

  16. Optimization of a Telecommunication Network with Financial Considerations1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization of a Telecommunication Network with Financial Considerations1 M. M. Ali School- work placement. In order to optimally place the network and to ensure that the network is realistic estimation, optimization of the network placement and financial optimization. A digital representation

  17. Optimization of a Telecommunication Network with Financial Considerations 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization of a Telecommunication Network with Financial Considerations 1 M. M. Ali School­ work placement. In order to optimally place the network and to ensure that the network is realistic estimation, optimization of the network placement and financial optimization. A digital representation

  18. Annual Report 2008 -- Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Jeffrey

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    It is with great pleasure that I present to you the 2008 Chief Financial Officer's Annual Report. The data included in this report has been compiled from the Budget Office, the Controller, Procurement and Property Management and the Sponsored Projects Office. Also included are some financial comparisons with other DOE Laboratories and a glossary of commonly used acronyms.

  19. Solar Wind Electrons and Langmuir Turbulence , D.E. Larson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    electron VDFs contain high-energy tail [9] which is typically described as thermal core plus superthermal are in dynamical equilibrium with quasi-thermal noise turbulence. Customary theories of superthermal electrons

  20. NUMERICAL MODELING OF TURBULENT FLOW IN A COMBUSTION TUNNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, A.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1VJcDonald, H. (1979) Combustion r 1 iodeJing in Two and1979) Practical Turbulent-Combustion Interaction Models forInternation on Combustors. Combustion The 17th Symposium