National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for financial turbulence suggest

  1. Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H Gibson

    2012-11-25

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbulence patterns and fossil turbulence waves preserve and propagate energy and information about previous turbulence. Ignorance of fossil turbulence properties can be dangerous. Examples include the Osama bin Laden helicopter crash and the Air France 447 Airbus crash, both unfairly blamed on the pilots. Observations support the proposed definitions, and suggest even direct numerical simulations of turbulence require caution.

  2. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama

    2011-05-08

    In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived without assuming the separation of the time scales in accordance with Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successfully applied to Navier--Stokes turbulence. The kinetic equation of the weak turbulence theory is recovered from the DIA equations if the weak nonlinearity is assumed as an additional assumption. It suggests that the DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence.

  3. Financial Institutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A lending program begins with a financial institution that procures the funds they lend from a number of other sources.

  4. Financial Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program provides financial support and technical assistance to states, local governments, and municipal utilities through the projects it manages.

  5. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  6. Soybean Insect Control Suggestions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Protecting Bees and Other Pollinators from Insecticides .............................. 10 Policy Statement for Making Chemical Control Recommendations ....................... 11 Soybean Insect Control Suggestions (chart) ... 12 Conversion Table... and maximum coverage. When making any insecticide applications, follow label directions. Refer to the ((Protecting Bees and other Pollinators from Insecticides" section of this bulletin to avoid bee losses. Biological Insecticides ':,.,.dcillus...

  7. Sandia Energy - Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combustion Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Reacting Flow Experiments Turbulent Combustion Turbulent CombustionAshley Otero2015-10-30T01:39:47+00...

  8. ARM - VAP Suggestion Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow,ProductstoacessProductsrlprofrlprofmerge1turn DocumentationSuggestion Form

  9. Turbulence Induced Transport in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldas, I. L.; Marcus, F. A.; Heller, M. V. A. P.; Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, A. M. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Viana, R. L.; Lopes, S. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Morrison, P. J.; Horton, W. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States); Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2006-12-04

    This report is concerned with plasma edge turbulence and its relation to anomalous particle transport in tokamaks. First, experimental evidence of turbulence driven particle transport and measurements of the gradients of the equilibrium profiles in the Brazilian tokamaks TBR and TCABR are presented. Next, diffusion in a two drift-wave system is discussed. In this nonintegrable system, particle transport is associated with the onset of chaotic orbits. Finally, numerical evidence suggesting that a nonlinear three-mode interaction could contribute to the intermittent plasma fluctuations observed in tokamaks is presented.

  10. International financial contagion: what do we know?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dungey, Mardi; Tambakis, Demosthenes N

    changes may exhibit positive feedback in periods of market stress. This highlights the possibility of spillover effects and contagion occurring at the microstructure level during market turbulence. Moreover, such contagion is entirely consistent... -602. Masson, P. 1999b. “Contagion: Monsoonal Effects, Spillovers, and Jumps Between Multiple Equilibria”, in Agenor, P.R., Miller, M., Vines, D. and Weber, A. (eds.), The Asian Financial Crisis: Causes, Contagion and Consequences, Cambridge ,UK: Cambridge...

  11. Turbulent flow in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2010-06-05

    We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

  12. Quantum Gravity and Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishnu Jejjala; Djordje Minic; Y. Jack Ng; Chia-Hsiung Tze

    2010-05-18

    We apply recent advances in quantum gravity to the problem of turbulence. Adopting the AdS/CFT approach we propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. In the gravitational context, turbulence is intimately related to the properties of spacetime, or quantum, foam.

  13. Gravitational Collapse in Turbulent Molecular Clouds. II. Magnetohydrodynamical Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Heitsch; M. -M. Mac Low; R. S. Klessen

    2000-09-14

    Hydrodynamic supersonic turbulence can only prevent local gravitational collapse if the turbulence is driven on scales smaller than the local Jeans lengths in the densest regions, a very severe requirement (Paper I). Magnetic fields have been suggested to support molecular clouds either magnetostatically or via magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. Whereas the first mechanism would form sheet-like clouds, the second mechanism not only could exert a pressure onto the gas counteracting the gravitational forces, but could lead to a transfer of turbulent kinetic energy down to smaller spatial scales via MHD wave interactions. This turbulent magnetic cascade might provide sufficient energy at small scales to halt local collapse. We test this hypothesis with MHD simulations at resolutions up to 256^3 zones, done with ZEUS-3D. We first derive a resolution criterion for self-gravitating, magnetized gas: in order to prevent collapse of magnetostatically supported regions due to numerical diffusion, the minimum Jeans length must be resolved by four zones. Resolution of MHD waves increases this requirement to roughly six zones. We then find that magnetic fields cannot prevent local collapse unless they provide magnetostatic support. Weaker magnetic fields do somewhat delay collapse and cause it to occur more uniformly across the supported region in comparison to the hydrodynamical case. However, they still cannot prevent local collapse for much longer than a global free-fall time.

  14. Essays in Financial Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shabani, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Financial Economics 92:66–91. [7] Chen, J. , H.G.Journal of Financial Economics 66:171–205. [8] Harrison,Journal of Financial Economics 66:207–239. [15] Keown,

  15. 2013 Financial Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focuses on the financial and operating trends of 120 oil and natural gas companies ("energy companies"). * The data come from public financial statements each company submits to...

  16. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING (Suggested 4 Year Plan) YEAR 1, 1ST TERM CREDITS YEAR 1, 2ND TERM 32 YEAR 2, 1ST TERM CREDITS YEAR 2, 2ND TERM CREDITS ACCT 0201 Financial Accounting Concepts 4 ACCT term 14 Credits per term 16 Credits per academic year 30 YEAR 3, 1ST TERM CREDITS YEAR 3, 2ND TERM

  17. Chief Financial Officer Responsibilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-11-21

    The Order sets forth requirements for operating the Department of Energy in full compliance with the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 and sets standards for sound financial management policies and practices, effective internal controls, accurate and timely financial information, and well-qualified financial managers. Supersedes DOE O 520.1.

  18. Financial Management Oversight

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-31

    The Order defines requirements for effective financial management and adherence to DOE and applicable external financial management requirements and sets forth standards for ensuring the integrity and responsiveness of financial management and the accuracy and reliability of DOEs financial statements. Supersedes DOE O 2200.13.

  19. Housing -Honors Financial Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Housing - Honors Financial Statements June 30, 2013 #12;FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY HOUSING SYSTEM University's Housing Division's (Honors) financial performance provides an overview of the financial activities for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. Please read it in conjunction with Housing's financial

  20. Housing -Honors Financial Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Housing - Honors Financial Statements June 30, 2012 #12;FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY HOUSING SYSTEM University's Housing Division's (Honors) financial performance provides an overview of the financial activities for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. Please read it in conjunction with Housing's financial

  1. Housing System Financial Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Housing System Financial Statements June 30, 2010 #12;FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY HOUSING SYSTEM's Housing Division's (Housing) financial performance provides an overview of the financial activities for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2010. Please read it in conjunction with Housing's financial statements

  2. Hindered energy cascade in highly helical isotropic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepanov, Rodion; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The conventional approach to the turbulent energy cascade, based on Richardson-Kolmogorov phenomenology, ignores the topology of emerging vortices, which is related to the helicity of the turbulent flow. It is generally believed that helicity can play a significant role in turbulent systems, e.g., supporting the generation of large-scale magnetic fields, but its impact on the energy cascade to small scales has never been observed. We suggest for the first time a generalized phenomenology for isotropic turbulence with an arbitrary spectral distribution of the helicity. We discuss various scenarios of direct turbulent cascades with new helicity effect, which can be interpreted as a hindering of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that the efficiency of non-linear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. We confirm our phenomenology by high Reynolds number numerical simulations based on a shell model of helical turbulence. The energy in...

  3. Meso-scale turbulence in living fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henricus H. Wensink; Jörn Dunkel; Sebastian Heidenreich; Knut Drescher; Raymond E. Goldstein; Hartmut Löwen; Julia M. Yeomans

    2012-08-21

    Turbulence is ubiquitous, from oceanic currents to small-scale biological and quantum systems. Self-sustained turbulent motion in microbial suspensions presents an intriguing example of collective dynamical behavior amongst the simplest forms of life, and is important for fluid mixing and molecular transport on the microscale. The mathematical characterization of turbulence phenomena in active non-equilibrium fluids proves even more difficult than for conventional liquids or gases. It is not known which features of turbulent phases in living matter are universal or system-specific, or which generalizations of the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe them adequately. Here, we combine experiments, particle simulations, and continuum theory to identify the statistical properties of self-sustained meso-scale turbulence in active systems. To study how dimensionality and boundary conditions affect collective bacterial dynamics, we measured energy spectra and structure functions in dense Bacillus subtilis suspensions in quasi-2D and 3D geometries. Our experimental results for the bacterial flow statistics agree well with predictions from a minimal model for self-propelled rods, suggesting that at high concentrations the collective motion of the bacteria is dominated by short-range interactions. To provide a basis for future theoretical studies, we propose a minimal continuum model for incompressible bacterial flow. A detailed numerical analysis of the 2D case shows that this theory can reproduce many of the experimentally observed features of self-sustained active turbulence.

  4. Interstellar Turbulence, Cloud Formation and Pressure Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrique Vazquez-Semadeni

    1998-10-23

    We discuss HD and MHD compressible turbulence as a cloud-forming and cloud-structuring mechanism in the ISM. Results from a numerical model of the turbulent ISM at large scales suggest that the phase-like appearance of the medium, the typical values of the densities and magnetic field strengths in the intercloud medium, as well as Larson's velocity dispersion-size scaling relation in clouds may be understood as consequences of the interstellar turbulence. However, the density-size relation appears to only hold for the densest simulated clouds, there existing a large population of small, low-density clouds, which, on the other hand, are hardest to observe. We then discuss several tests and implications of a fully dynamical picture of interstellar clouds. The results imply that clouds are transient, constantly being formed, distorted and disrupted by the turbulent velocity field, with a fraction of these fluctuations undergoing gravitational collapse. Simulated line profiles and estimated cloud lifetimes are consistent with observational data. In this scenario, we suggest it is quite unlikely that quasi-hydrostatic structures on any scale can form, and that the near pressure balance between clouds and the intercloud medium is an incidental consequence of the density field driven by the turbulence and in the presence of appropriate cooling, rather than a driving or confining mechanism.

  5. Essays in Financial Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Sung Bin

    2012-01-01

    Journal of Financial Economics, 67, 149– Asquith, P. and D.Journal of Financial Economics, 15, 61–89. Back, K. and J.The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 113, 869–902. Blanchard,

  6. Yale University Student Financial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Daeyeol

    · Financial Holds · Billing Address · NetID and Password · Third-Party Billing · Tuition Rebate and Refund

  7. Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion N. Peters Institut f¨ur Technische Mechanik RWTH Aachen Turbulent Combustion: Introduction and Overview 1 1.1 Moment Methods in Modeling Turbulence with Combustion and Velocity Scales . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4 Regimes in Premixed Turbulent Combustion

  8. Financial Policy Manual ACCOUNTING POLICIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 ACCOUNTING POLICIES 1101 General Accounting Policy ­ University Financial Activity 1102 General Accounting Policy ­ Financial Resources 1103 Accounting System Maintenance ACCOUNTING - UNIVERSITY FINANCIAL ACTIVITY Effective: December 1986 Revised: May 2006 Last Reviewed: March

  9. COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS Suggested Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Sophomore Year ­ 3rd Semester Senior Year ­ 7th Semester *ACC 2100 (must make a "C-" or better) *ECO 2030COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 2011-2012 BSBA Suggested Schedule Freshman Year ­ 1st Semester Junior Year ­ 5th Semester *ENG 1000 (must make a "C" or better) UCO 1200 (First Year Seminar) Gen. Ed

  10. RELAXATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Servidio, S.; Carbone, V.; Gurgiolo, C.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-07-10

    Based on global conservation principles, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation theory predicts the existence of several equilibria, such as the Taylor state or global dynamic alignment. These states are generally viewed as very long-time and large-scale equilibria, which emerge only after the termination of the turbulent cascade. As suggested by hydrodynamics and by recent MHD numerical simulations, relaxation processes can occur during the turbulent cascade that will manifest themselves as local patches of equilibrium-like configurations. Using multi-spacecraft analysis techniques in conjunction with Cluster data, we compute the current density and flow vorticity and for the first time demonstrate that these localized relaxation events are observed in the solar wind. Such events have important consequences for the statistics of plasma turbulence.

  11. Suggestions on photons and fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Alvargonzalez; L. S. Soto

    2009-04-17

    In this paper we suggest a configuration of photons consistent with a spin $\\hbar$, and a configuration of the fermions coherent with a spin $\\hbar/2$. These suggested configurations open the way to further analyses which lead to the following conclusions: - There cannot exist elementary particles of spin $\\hbar/2$ with a mass inferior to $1m_e$ or with a radius greater than $1l_e$. - The electrostatic force derives from the centrifugal forces inherent to the spin and are propagated by photons. - The derivation of the electrostatic force explains the existence of positive and negative charges and Coulomb's law. - The enormous differences between the centrifugal forces and the centripetal forces at the surface of the protons give rise to quantic fluctuations of space which generate the energy flows necessary for equilibrium. These energy flows can explain gravitation and the strong force. - The mass of the proton, $m_p$, and the mass of the neutron, $m_n$, must each have a concrete value required for the cohesion of the atomic nuclei. The suggested hypoteses show that the relation $m_n/m_p$ must be very slightly greater than 1.00, and that, by a first approximation, both $m_n$ and $m_p$ must be slightly less than 1851 $m_e$. - There are no "gravitons" and no "gluons"; the "messenger particles" are always the very real photons.

  12. Observations of Edge Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edge Turbulence near the X-point of Alcator C-Mod APS-2007 (1) J.L. Terry, S.J. Zweben*, B. LaBombard, I. Cziegler, O. Grulke + , D.P. Stotler* MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion...

  13. Reconnection events in two-dimensional Hall magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donato, S.; Servidio, S.; Carbone, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Dmitruk, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires and Instituto de Fisica de Buenos Aires, CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Shay, M. A.; Matthaeus, W. H. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Cassak, P. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    The statistical study of magnetic reconnection events in two-dimensional turbulence has been performed by comparing numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and Hall magnetohydrodynamics (HMHD). The analysis reveals that the Hall term plays an important role in turbulence, in which magnetic islands simultaneously reconnect in a complex way. In particular, an increase of the Hall parameter, the ratio of ion skin depth to system size, broadens the distribution of reconnection rates relative to the MHD case. Moreover, in HMHD the local geometry of the reconnection region changes, manifesting bifurcated current sheets and quadrupolar magnetic field structures in analogy to laminar studies, leading locally to faster reconnection processes in this case of reconnection embedded in turbulence. This study supports the idea that the global rate of energy dissipation is controlled by the large scale turbulence, but suggests that the distribution of the reconnection rates within the turbulent system is sensitive to the microphysics at the reconnection sites.

  14. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Global Turbulent Transport Properties in Tokamak Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W.X.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.; Ethier, S.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Rewoldt, G.; Hahm, T.S.; Manickam, J.

    2006-01-01

    A general geometry gyro-kinetic model for particle simulation of plasma turbulence in tokamak experiments is described. It incorporates the comprehensive influence of noncircular cross section, realistic plasma profiles, plasma rotation, neoclassical (equilibrium) electric fields, and Coulomb collisions. An interesting result of global turbulence development in a shaped tokamak plasma is presented with regard to nonlinear turbulence spreading into the linearly stable region. The mutual interaction between turbulence and zonal flows in collisionless plasmas is studied with a focus on identifying possible nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows. A bursting temporal behavior with a period longer than the geodesic acoustic oscillation period is observed even in a collisionless system. Our simulation results suggest that the zonal flows can drive turbulence. However, this process is too weak to be an effective zonal flow saturation mechanism.

  15. User Financial Account Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the financial officer of your institution) to: Jackie Kerlegan (SSRL) or Theresa Wong (LCLS) User Research Administration, MS 99 User Research Administration, MS 99 SLAC...

  16. Multidimensional turbulence spectra -identifying properties of turbulent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevlahan, Nicholas

    Sweden 2 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4K1, Canada * E turbulent structures are presented. Results from analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy in turbulent energy associated with a coherent vortex defined using different vortex identification methods

  17. Quantum ghost imaging through turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, P. Ben

    We investigate the effect of turbulence on quantum ghost imaging. We use entangled photons and demonstrate that for a specific experimental configuration the effect of turbulence can be greatly diminished. By decoupling ...

  18. Financial Reporting Organizational Chart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    , Internal Financial Reporting Chiu Szeto Asset Management Team Lead Ed Lee Asset Management Analyst Joanne Kuang Asset Management Analyst Kevin Tsui Asset Management Admin. Christina Wright Asset Management (Finance) Les Tochor Director, Financial Reporting Brad Klaiber General Ledger Manager, General Ledger

  19. Washington University Financial Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Gregory

    Washington University Financial Statements June 30, 2011 and 2010 #12;Washington University Index: (314) 206-8514, www.pwc.com/us To the Board of Trustees of Washington University In our opinion fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Washington University (the "University

  20. Characterization of Relativistic MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, David

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand if and how the characteristics of relativistic MHD turbulence may differ from those of nonrelativistic MHD turbulence. We accomplish this by studying the invariants in the relativistic case and comparing them to what we know of nonrelativistic turbulence. Although much work has been done to understand the dynamics of nonrelativistic systems (mostly for ideal incompressible fluids), there is minimal literature explicitly describing the dynamics of relativistic MHD turbulence. Many authors simply assume that relativistic turbulence has the same invariants and obeys the same inverse energy cascade as non-relativistic systems.

  1. Three Essays on Financial Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Haonan

    2011-01-01

    Journal of Financial Economics, February 2003, 67 (2), 217–Journal of Financial Economics, March 2008, 87 (3), 706–739.International Finance and Economics, 2008. Schiozer, Rafael

  2. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Global properties and internal flame structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    We study the dynamics and properties of a turbulent flame, formed in the presence of subsonic, high-speed, homogeneous, isotropic Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system. Direct numerical simulations are performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture. The system being modeled represents turbulent combustion with the Damkoehler number Da=0.05 and with the turbulent velocity at the energy injection scale 30 times larger than the laminar flame speed. The simulations show that flame interaction with high-speed turbulence forms a steadily propagating turbulent flame with a flame brush width approximately twice the energy injection scale and a speed four times the laminar flame speed. A method for reconstructing the internal flame structure is described and used to show that the turbulent flame consists of tightly folded flamelets. The reaction zone structure of these is virtually identical to that of the planar laminar flame, while the preheat zone is broadened by approximately a factor of two. Consequently, the system evolution represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. The turbulent cascade fails to penetrate the internal flame structure, and thus the action of small-scale turbulence is suppressed throughout most of the flame. Finally, our results suggest that for stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixtures, any substantial flame broadening by the action of turbulence cannot be expected in all subsonic regimes. (author)

  3. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  4. Financial Policy Manual 2137 REVISED FINAL FINANCIAL REPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2137 REVISED FINAL FINANCIAL REPORTS Effective: November 2003 Last Services PURPOSE: To ensure that the revised final financial reports are submitted so as to mitigate any of revised final financial reports is generally discouraged but may be necessary in cases that benefit

  5. Financial Policy Manual 2126 INTERIM & FINAL FINANCIAL REPORTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2126 INTERIM & FINAL FINANCIAL REPORTS Effective: Dec. 1986 Last the timely submission of financial reports of expenditures. POLICY 1. Research Services is responsible for the preparation and submission of interim and final financial reports required under sponsored project agreements

  6. Financial Policy Manual 1102 GENERAL ACCOUNTING POLICY -FINANCIAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 1102 GENERAL ACCOUNTING POLICY - FINANCIAL RESOURCES Effective: Comptroller PURPOSE The primary purpose of the accounting system is to account for resources in accordance Financials (BEN), the financial accounting system, will be maintained in accordance with the principles

  7. Montana State University 1 Financial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Montana State University 1 Financial Engineering The Bachelor of Science in Financial Engineering (FE) is a multidisciplinary major that emphasizes the creation of new financial economic with this objective, financial engineering majors undertake rigorous training in financial economics, engineering

  8. Sudden Financial Arrest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caballero, Ricardo J.

    There are striking and terrifying similarities between the sudden failure of a heart and that of a financial system. In the medical literature, the former is referred to as sudden cardiac arrest. By analogy, I refer to its ...

  9. Essays in financial economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmans, Alex

    2007-01-01

    This thesis consists of three essays in financial economics. Chapter 1 is entitled "Inside Debt." Existing theories advocate the use of cash and equity in executive compensation. However, recent empirical studies have ...

  10. Financial Networks Anna Nagurney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Gothenburg University Gothenburg, Sweden and John F. Smith Memorial Professor Director ­ Virtual Center themselves, such as the Internet with electric power networks, financial networks, and transportation Cables Radio Links Voice, Data, Video Energy Pumping Stations, Plants Pipelines, Transmission Lines Water

  11. Essays in financial economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ru, Hong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    This thesis considers three empirical essays on financial economics. The first chapter examines the effect of government credit on firm investment, employment, debt, profitability, and survival by using unique data from ...

  12. Project financial evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The project financial section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes structures and models to support the technical and economic status of emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  13. Essays on financial economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas Mendoza, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This thesis consists of three independent essays on Financial Economics. In chapter one I investigate the possible mispricing of European-style options in the Mexican Stock Exchange. The source of this problem is that when ...

  14. FISCAL YEAR 20042005 FINANCIAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrag, Daniel

    FISCAL YEAR 2004­2005 FINANCIAL REPORT to the board of overseers of HARVARD COLLEGE #12;2 Letter Financial statements 55 Supplemental information #12;renovations at schlesinger library The Radcliffe Harvard University's financial report for fiscal 2005. It was a strong year financially. The University

  15. Polymer Stretching by Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael

    2000-05-15

    The stretching of a polymer chain by a large-scale chaotic flow is considered. The steady state which emerges as a balance of the turbulent stretching and anharmonic resistance of the chain is quantitatively described, i.e., the dependency on the flow parameters (Lyapunov exponent statistics) and the chain characteristics (the number of beads and the interbead elastic potential) is made explicit. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Financial Market Modeling with Quantum Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonçalves, Carlos Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Econophysics has developed as a research field that applies the formalism of Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics to address Economics and Finance problems. The branch of Econophysics that applies of Quantum Theory to Economics and Finance is called Quantum Econophysics. In Finance, Quantum Econophysics' contributions have ranged from option pricing to market dynamics modeling, behavioral finance and applications of Game Theory, integrating the empirical finding, from human decision analysis, that shows that nonlinear update rules in probabilities, leading to non-additive decision weights, can be computationally approached from quantum computation, with resulting quantum interference terms explaining the non-additive probabilities. The current work draws on these results to introduce new tools from Quantum Artificial Intelligence, namely Quantum Artificial Neural Networks as a way to build and simulate financial market models with adaptive selection of trading rules, leading to turbulence and excess ku...

  17. Few-Freedom Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Chirikov; V. G. Davidovsky

    2000-06-15

    The results of numerical experiments on the structure of chaotic attractors in the Khalatnikov - Kroyter model of two freedoms are presented. This model was developed for a qualitative description of the wave turbulence of the second sound in helium. The attractor dimension, size, and the maximal Lyapunov exponent in dependence on the single dimensionless parameter $F$ of the model are found and discussed. The principal parameter $F$ is similar to the Reynolds number in hydrodynamic turbulence. We were able to discern four different attractors characterized by a specific critical value of the parameter ($F=F_{cr}$), such that the attractor exists for $F>F_{cr}$ only. A simple empirical relation for this dependence on the argument ($F-F_{cr}$) is presented which turns out to be universal for different attractors with respect to the dimension and dimensionless Lyapunov exponents. Yet, it differs as to the size of attractor. In the main region of our studies the dependence of all dimensionless characteristics of the chaotic attractor on parameter $F$ is very slow (logarithmic) which is qualitatively different as compared to that of a multi-freedom attractor, e.g., in hydrodynamic turbulence (a power law). However, at very large $F\\sim 10^7$ the transition to a power-law dependence has been finally found, similar to the multi-freedom attractor. Some unsolved problems and open questions are also discussed.

  18. Refined critical balance in strong Alfvenic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mallet; A. A. Schekochihin; B. D. G. Chandran

    2015-08-24

    We present numerical evidence that in strong Alfvenic turbulence, the critical balance principle---equality of the nonlinear decorrelation and linear propagation times---is scale invariant, in the sense that the probability distribution of the ratio of these times is independent of scale. This result only holds if the local alignment of the Elsasser fields is taken into account in calculating the nonlinear time. At any given scale, the degree of alignment is found to increase with fluctuation amplitude, supporting the idea that the cause of alignment is mutual dynamical shearing of Elsasser fields. The scale-invariance of critical balance (while all other quantities of interest are strongly intermittent, i.e., have scale-dependent distributions) suggests that it is the most robust of the scaling principles used to describe Alfvenic turbulence. The quality afforded by situ fluctuation measurements in the solar wind allows for direct verification of this fundamental principle.

  19. Internal waves generated from a turbulent mixed region K. Dohan and B. R. Sutherlanda)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal waves generated from a turbulent mixed region K. Dohan and B. R. Sutherlanda) Department is a turbulent layer overlying the seasonal ther- mocline and it has been suggested that internal waves generated for additional generation of internal waves and may add to the enhanced mixing. Mixing box experiments4

  20. A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application to crack propagation at glacier beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Victor C.

    Click Here for Full Article A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application to crack suggest that fluidinduced hydraulic fracture of an ice sheet from its bed sometimes occurs quickly. Citation: Tsai, V. C., and J. R. Rice (2010), A model for turbulent hydraulic fracture and application

  1. Eddy fluxes in baroclinic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Andrew F.

    2006-01-01

    cant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred2006: An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the

  2. Sandia Energy - Applied Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and they form the basis for the creation of validated submodels that bridge fundamental energy sciences with applied device engineering and optimization. Turbulent-combustion-lab...

  3. Financial Overview And Monthly Financial Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |Final Report DocumentRatesFinancial Opportunities6, 2014

  4. Financial Overview And Monthly Financial Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |Final Report DocumentRatesFinancial Opportunities6,

  5. Evidence for internal structures of spiral turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-12-21

    Dec 22, 2009 ... ary laminar-turbulent pattern in plane Couette flow. ... flow internal to the turbulent and laminar spirals, and unique ... 2 ( is the fluid density).

  6. Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Berkeley Lab visualizations could help scientists forecast destructive space weather...

  7. Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    turbulent methane combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. , 29:in premixed turbulent combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. ,for zero Mach number combustion. Combust. Sci. Technol. ,

  8. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  9. Energy spectra in bubbly turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, Vivek N; Ramos, Fabio Ernesto Mancilla; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We conduct experiments in a turbulent bubbly flow to study the unknown nature of the transition between the classical -5/3 energy spectrum scaling for a single-phase turbulent flow and the -3 scaling for a swarm of bubbles rising in a quiescent liquid and of bubble-dominated turbulence. The bubblance parameter, b, which measures the ratio of the bubble-induced kinetic energy to the kinetic energy induced by the turbulent liquid fluctuations before bubble injection, is used to characterise the bubbly flow. We vary b from $b = \\infty$ (pseudo-turbulence) to b = 0 (single-phase flow) over 2-3 orders of magnitude: ~O(0.01, 0.1, 5) to study its effect on the turbulent energy spectrum and liquid velocity fluctuations. The experiments are conducted in a multi-phase turbulent water tunnel with air bubbles of diameters 2-4 mm and 3-5 mm. An active-grid is used to generate nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in the liquid flow. The liquid speeds and gas void fractions are varied to achieve the above mentioned b...

  10. Turbulent Flame Propagation Characteristics of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitzman, Jerry; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2014-09-30

    This final report describes the results of an effort to better understand turbulent flame propagation, especially at conditions relevant to gas turbines employing fuels with syngas or hydrogen mixtures. Turbulent flame speeds were measured for a variety of hydrogen/carbon monoxide (H2/CO) and hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) fuel mixtures with air as the oxidizer. The measurements include global consumption speeds (ST,GC) acquired in a turbulent jet flame at pressures of 1-10 atm and local displacement speeds (ST,LD) acquired in a low-swirl burner at atmospheric pressure. The results verify the importance of fuel composition in determining turbulent flame speeds. For example, different fuel-air mixtures having the same unstretched laminar flame speed (SL,0) but different fuel compositions resulted in significantly different ST,GC for the same turbulence levels (u'). This demonstrates the weakness of turbulent flame speed correlations based simply on u'/SL,0. The results were analyzed using a steady-steady leading points concept to explain the sensitivity of turbulent burning rates to fuel (and oxidizer) composition. Leading point theories suggest that the premixed turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at the flame brush leading edge, or, in other words, by the flamelets that advance farthest into the unburned mixture (the so-called leading points). For negative Markstein length mixtures, this is assumed to be close to the maximum stretched laminar flame speed (SL,max) for the given fuel-oxidizer mixture. For the ST,GC measurements, the data at a given pressure were well-correlated with an SL,max scaling. However the variation with pressure was not captured, which may be due to non-quasi-steady effects that are not included in the current model. For the ST,LD data, the leading points model again faithfully captured the variation of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of fuel-compositions and turbulence intensities. These results provide evidence that the leading points model can provide useful predictions of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of operating conditions and flow geometries.

  11. Simple Models for Turbulent Self-Regulation in Galaxy Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis Struck; Daniel C. Smith

    1999-07-29

    We propose that turbulent heating, wave pressure and gas exchanges between different regions of disks play a dominant role in determining the preferred, quasi-equilibrium, self-similar states of gas disks on large-scales. We present simple families of analytic, thermohydrodynamic models for these global states, which include terms for turbulent pressure and Reynolds stresses. Star formation rates, phase balances, and hydrodynamic forces are all tightly coupled and balanced. The models have stratified radial flows, with the cold gas slowly flowing inward in the midplane of the disk, and with the warm/hot phases that surround the midplane flowing outward. The models suggest a number of results that are in accord with observation, as well as some novel predictions, including the following. 1) The large-scale gas density and thermal phase distributions in galaxy disks can be explained as the result of turbulent heating and spatial couplings. 2) The turbulent pressures and stresses that drive radial outflows in the warm gas also allow a reduced circular velocity there. This effect was observed by Swaters, Sancisi and van der Hulst in NGC 891, a particularly turbulent edge-on disk. The models predict that the effect should be universal in such disks. 3) They suggest that a star formation rate like the phenomenological Schmidt Law is the natural result of global thermohydrodynamical balance, and may not obtain in disks far from equilibrium. (Abridged)

  12. The turbulent/non-turbulent interface at the outer boundary of a self-similar turbulent jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    The turbulent/non-turbulent interface at the outer boundary of a self-similar turbulent jet J-similar turbulent jet at Re=2·103 is investigated ex- perimentally by means of combined particle image velo- cimetry (PIV) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. The jet fluid contains a fluorescent dye so

  13. FISCAL YEAR 20032004 FINANCIAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrag, Daniel

    's financial health remains strong due in large measure to recent operational reviews and restructuring throughout the University. These efforts have allowed the University to achieve greater efficiencies and significant financial savings, p

  14. Financial Networks Anna Nagurney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Freight Network World Oil Routes Natural Gas Flows Network Systems Internet Traffic Anna Nagurney in decision-making; constraints on resources: human, financial, natural, time, etc.; global reach of many of Networks Today large-scale nature and complexity of network topology; congestion, which leads

  15. EERE Financial Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-19

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) works with business, industry, universities, and others to increase the use of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. One way EERE encourages the growth of these technologies is by offering financial assistance opportunities for their development and demonstration.

  16. Budgeting for Financial Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Process 1. Preparation and Planning 2. Review and Approval 3. Budget Execution 4. Financial · Major Fund Groups: o Resident Instruction - see below* o Each "B" Unit ­ Georgia Tech Research Institute · Expenditure · Payment 13 Sequence of Budget Commitments · Budget approved by President, Dean, department head

  17. harvard university financial report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that it is a realistic and affordable option. Education is fundamental to the future of individuals and the nation the president 3 financial highlights 8 annual report of the harvard management company 15 report of independent academic agenda. With an exceptionally strong leadership team now in place, planning is moving forward

  18. Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancial Opportunities Financial Opportunities TheFinancialFinancial

  19. Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2008 115 Spurious oscillations to the discontinuity in the ratio of specific heats in the energy equation and suggested a means to overcome, the findings are summarized and an outlook for future work is outlined. 2. Numerical methods For simplicity

  20. Department of Economics Financial Aid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    Department of Economics Financial Aid: Availability and Requirements in the Department of Economics The Department of Economics has several sources of financial aid for domestic and international students Assistantships in the Department of Economics The predominant form of financial aid is the graduate research

  1. FINANCIAL GUIDE USGS EMPLOYEES #36

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conflict of Interest Policy C. Organic Act Financial Interest Prohibitions D. USGS Conflict of Interest on holding financial interests "in the lands or mineral wealth of the region under survey" by the USGS O U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY (USGS) FINANCIAL GUIDE FOR USGS EMPLOYEES #36 This guide explains the laws

  2. The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectral Scaling on the Heating of the Solar Wind C. S. Ng), Kraichnan (1965) #12;Solar wind turbulence model The steady state solar wind turbulence model developed wind with uniform speed Vsw 1D (radial position r) Turbulence characterized by two fields

  3. Memory effects in turbulent transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Hubbard; Axel Brandenburg

    2009-11-13

    In the mean-field theory of magnetic fields, turbulent transport, i.e. the turbulent electromotive force, is described by a combination of the alpha effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion, which are usually assumed to be proportional respectively to the mean field and its spatial derivatives. For a passive scalar there is just turbulent diffusion, where the mean flux of concentration depends on the gradient of the mean concentration. However, these proportionalities are approximations that are valid only if the mean field or the mean concentration vary slowly in time. Examples are presented where turbulent transport possesses memory, i.e. where it depends crucially on the past history of the mean field. Such effects are captured by replacing turbulent transport coefficients with time integral kernels, resulting in transport coefficients that depend effectively on the frequency or the growth rate of the mean field itself. In this paper we perform numerical experiments to find the characteristic timescale (or memory length) of this effect as well as simple analytical models of the integral kernels in the case of passive scalar concentrations and kinematic dynamos. The integral kernels can then be used to find self-consistent growth or decay rates of the mean fields. In mean-field dynamos the growth rates and cycle periods based on steady state values of alpha effect and turbulent diffusivity can be quite different from the actual values.

  4. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  5. Endogenous Market Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tambakis, Demosthenes N

    across financial markets and what starts as an asset-specific crisis may end up having very costly systemic repercussions; see Borio (2003), Cifuentes, Ferrucci and Shin (2004), Cohen and Shin (2003b), Longstaff (2001), and Gennotte and Leland (1990... in stock returns”, Quarterly Journal of Economics 108: 905-39. [6] Cifuentes, R., G. Ferrucci and H.-S. Shin 2004. “Liquidity risk and con- tagion”, Bank of England Working Paper 264. [7] Cohen, B. and H.-S. Shin 2003a. “Positive feedback trading under...

  6. Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

    2008-05-06

    We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

  7. Turbulence transport modeling of the temporal outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.; Dosch, A.

    2014-09-20

    The solar wind can be regarded as a turbulent magnetofluid, evolving in an expanding solar wind and subject to turbulent driving by a variety of in situ sources. Furthermore, the solar wind and the drivers of turbulence are highly time-dependent and change with solar cycle. Turbulence transport models describing low-frequency magnetic and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind have so far neglected solar cycle effects. Here we consider the effects of solar cycle variability on a turbulence transport model developed by Zank et al. This model is appropriate for the solar wind beyond about 1 AU, and extensions have described the steady-state dependence of the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature throughout the outer heliosphere. We find that the temporal solar wind introduces a periodic variability, particularly beyond ?10 AU, in the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature. The variability is insufficient to account for the full observed variability in these quantities, but we find that the time-dependent solutions trace the steady-state solutions quite well, suggesting that the steady-state models are reasonable first approximations.

  8. Improving Air Traffic Management through Agent Suggestions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumer, Kagan

    air traffic flow problem (de- scribed in [4]). 2. SUGGESTION AGENTS Though the system performanceImproving Air Traffic Management through Agent Suggestions (Extended Abstract) Adrian Agogino USCS.tumer@oregonstate.edu ABSTRACT Providing intelligent automation to manage the continu- ously increasing flow of air traffic

  9. Turbulent AGN tori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schartmann; K. Meisenheimer; H. Klahr; M. Camenzind; S. Wolf; Th. Henning

    2008-08-05

    Recently, the MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (MIDI) at the VLTI has shown that dust tori in the two nearby Seyfert galaxies NGC 1068 and the Circinus galaxy are geometrically thick and can be well described by a thin, warm central disk, surrounded by a colder and fluffy torus component. By carrying out hydrodynamical simulations with the help of the TRAMP code (Klahr et al. 1999), we follow the evolution of a young nuclear star cluster in terms of discrete mass-loss and energy injection from stellar processes. This naturally leads to a filamentary large scale torus component, where cold gas is able to flow radially inwards. The filaments open out into a dense and very turbulent disk structure. In a post-processing step, we calculate observable quantities like spectral energy distributions or images with the help of the 3D radiative transfer code MC3D (Wolf 2003). Good agreement is found in comparisons with data due to the existence of almost dust-free lines of sight through the large scale component and the large column densities caused by the dense disk.

  10. Suggestions for Genetic A.I.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drescher, Gary L.

    This paper presents suggestions for "Genetic A.I.": an attempt to model the genesis of intelligence in human infants, particularly as described by Piaget's theory of the Sensorimotor period. The paper includes a synopsis ...

  11. Communication and Cancer Suggestions for Navigating Relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brent, Roger

    Communication and Cancer Suggestions for Navigating Relationships During and After Cancer Moving · Increased attention to the effect of communication · Increased awareness of communication styles · Introduction to theories about communication · Consider communication patterns in relationships · Resources

  12. Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Suggested Approaches for Probabilistic Flooding Hazard Assessment Ahmed “Jemie” Dababneh, Ph.D., P.E. and Jeffrey Oskamp, E.I.T. Presentation for U.S. Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 22, 2014

  13. Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancial Opportunities Financial Opportunities TheFinancial

  14. Realistic Financial Planning and Rapid

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Realistic Financial Planning and Rapid Modification to Project Execution are Essential PMLL Identifier: PMLL-2010-LLNL-NIF-0001 (Source: User Submitted) Validator: Victoria Pratt...

  15. Financial Policy Manual 1103 ACCOUNTING SYSTEM MAINTENANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 1103 ACCOUNTING SYSTEM MAINTENANCE Effective: December 1986 Revised Maintenance of BEN Financials (BEN), the financial accounting system is necessary to ensure financial accounting and reporting integrity. POLICY 1. Financial Systems is responsible for the maintenance of BEN. 2

  16. Effect of Turbulence Fluctuations on Surface Heating Rate in Hypersonic Turbulent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    Effect of Turbulence Fluctuations on Surface Heating Rate in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers the effect of turbulence fluctuations on surface heating rate by conducting direct numerical simulations (DNS subtle influence on the mean heating rate. We also find that the effect of turbulence

  17. Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers Lian reaction. The influence of chemical reactions on temperature fluctuation variance, Reynolds stresses that the recombination reaction enhances turbulence, while the dissociation reaction damps turbulence. Chemical reactions

  18. 3 - 4 Turbulent combustion Princeton.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    speed (s T ) Turbulent RMS velocity in the fresh gas (u') Low turbulence zone s T a u' Bending zone Quenching l i m i t s L 0 Problem: these functions are configuration...

  19. Active skin for turbulent drag reduction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani, Raghavendran

    2002-01-01

    capitalizes on recent advances in active turbulent drag reduction and active material based actuation to develop an active or "smart" skin for turbulent drag reduction in realistic flight conditions. The skin operation principle is based on computational...

  20. Afterburning in spherical premixed turbulent explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, D.; Lawes, M.; Scott, M.J. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Mushi, E.M.J. )

    1994-12-01

    During the early stages of spherical turbulent flame propagation, more than half of the gas behind the visible flame front may be unburned. Previous models of the afterburning of the gas behind the apparent flame front have been extended in the present work, to include the effects of flame quenching, consequent upon localized flame stretch. The predictions of the model cover, the spatial and temporal variations of the fraction burned, the flame propagation rate, and the mass burning rate. They are all in dimensionless form and are well supported by associated experimental measurements in a fan-stirred bomb with controlled turbulence. The proportion of the gas that is unburned decreases with time and increases with the product of the Karlovitz stretch factor and the Lewis number. Simultaneous photographs were taken of the spherical schlieren image and of that due to Mie scattering from small seed particles in a thin laser sheet that sectioned the spherical flame. These clearly showed the amount of unburned gas within the sphere and, along with other evidence suggest laminar flamelet burning across a scale of distance which is close to the Taylor confirm the predictions of the fraction of gas unburned and of the rate at which it is burning.

  1. Population genetic analyses suggest that the Eucalyptus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Population genetic analyses suggest that the Eucalyptus fungal pathogen Ceratocystis fimbriata has , Brenda D. Wingfield a , Gilbert N. Kamgan b and Michael J. Wingfield a Introduction Eucalyptus species, with Eucalyptus comprising about 40% of the total area.3 This is an important crop that sustains large pulp, sawn

  2. Financial Policy Manual INVESTMENT POLICIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    that aims to maximize total return from both current income and capital appreciation without excessive risk Reporting 1605 Spending Rule 1606 Charges to Investment Income 1607 Unrestricted Endowment #12;Financial Funds with cash balances derived from external gifts or donations, will earn TIF income. #12;Financial

  3. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qun

    Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump Qun Zhao, Shubhra Misra, Ib. A. Svendsen and James T of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump ­ p.1/14 #12;Objective Our ultimate goal is to study the breaking waves. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump ­ p.2/14 #12;A moving bore Qiantang Bore China (Courtesy of Dr J

  4. Wyoming’s “Rosy” Financial Picture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuhmann, Robert A.; Skopek, Tracy A.

    2012-01-01

    Wyoming’s “Rosy” Financial Picture Abstract: As a non-budgetWyoming’s “Rosy” Financial Picture Table A2: Summary ofs “Rosy” Financial Picture Perhaps the most disheartening

  5. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S.

    2005-07-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

  6. Elastic wave-turbulence and intermittency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chibbaro, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Weak Wave Turbulence is a powerful theory to predict statistical observables of diverse relevant physical phenomena, such as ocean waves, magnetohydrodynamics and nonlinear optics. The theory is based upon an asymptotic closure permitted in the limit of small nonlinearity. Here, we explore the possible deviations from this mean-field framework, in terms of anomalous scaling, focusing on the case of elastic plates. We establish the picture of the possible behaviors at varying the extent of nonlinearity, and we show that the mean-field theory is appropriate when all excited scales remain dominated by linear dynamics. The other picture is non-trivial and our results suggest that, when large scales contain much energy, the cascade sustains extreme events at small scales and the system displays intermittency.

  7. Protein Structure Suggests Role as Molecular Adapter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProtein Dynamics Hit the BigProtein Structure Suggests

  8. Financial Statements 2009-10 55 Financial Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    2009-102 Placement Opportunities in the Faculty of Engineering and Design Financial Statements of sterling and the excellent reputation of both the University and the UK HE Sector have supported

  9. The Turbulence Velocity Power Spectrum of Neutral Hydrogen in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chepurnov, Alexey; Lazarian, Alex; Stanimirovic, Snezana

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of the Velocity Coordinate Spectrum (VCS) technique to calculate the velocity power spectrum of turbulence in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) in 21cm emission. We have obtained a velocity spectral index of -3.85 and an injection scale of 2.3 kpc. The spectral index is steeper than the Kolmogorov index which is expected for shock-dominated turbulence which is in agreement with past works on the SMC gas dynamics. The injection scale of 2.3 kpc suggests that tidal interactions with the Large Magellanic Cloud are the dominate driver of turbulence in this dwarf galaxy. This implies turbulence maybe driven by multiple mechanisms in galaxies in addition to supernova injection and that galaxy-galaxy interactions may play an important role.

  10. Turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow at transitional Reynolds numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsukahara, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent channel flow with heat transfer was performed at very low Reynolds numbers. Two different thermal boundary conditions were studied, and temperature was considered as a passive scalar. The computations were carried out with huge computational boxes (up to 327.7 x 2 x 128 in the streamwise, wall-normal, and spanwise directions, respectively). The emphases of this paper are to investigate the large-scale structure (puff) in the intermittent-turbulent flow including the scalar fields and to provide the values of the transitional and critical Reynolds numbers, below which the turbulent flow becomes intermittent and laminar, respectively. The statistics, such as the skin friction and the Stanton number, were also examined: they suggest that the puff should be effective in sustaining turbulence and in heat transfer enhancement.

  11. Business and Operations Financial Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Business and Operations Financial Planning Resource Allocation Human Resources Administrative Organizations Dean on Call Games Center Campus Programs Title IX Investigation Parent and Family Outreach Main Store Recreation and Education Scholarships Stadium Facilities and Operations Student Accommodations

  12. Office of Chief Financial Officer

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-19

    This Order implements the provisions of the Chief Financial Officers Act of 1990 within the Department of Energy. Cancels SEN 34-91. Canceled by DOE O 520.1A.

  13. Financial Innovation and Portfolio Risks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simsek, Alp

    I illustrate the effect of financial innovation on portfolio risks by using an example with risk-sharing needs and belief disagreements. I consider two types of innovation: product innovation, formalized as an expansion ...

  14. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  15. Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancial Opportunities Financial Opportunities The Department of

  16. Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancial Opportunities Financial Opportunities The Department

  17. Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancial Opportunities Financial Opportunities The

  18. Stressed, Not Frozen: The Federal Funds Market in the Financial Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afonso, Gara

    We examine the importance of liquidity hoarding and counterparty risk in the U.S. overnight interbank market during the financial crisis of 2008. Our findings suggest that counterparty risk plays a larger role than does ...

  19. Turbulent equipartitions in two dimensional drift convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isichenko, M.B.; Yankov, V.V.

    1995-07-25

    Unlike the thermodynamic equipartition of energy in conservative systems, turbulent equipartitions (TEP) describe strongly non-equilibrium systems such as turbulent plasmas. In turbulent systems, energy is no longer a good invariant, but one can utilize the conservation of other quantities, such as adiabatic invariants, frozen-in magnetic flux, entropy, or combination thereof, in order to derive new, turbulent quasi-equilibria. These TEP equilibria assume various forms, but in general they sustain spatially inhomogeneous distributions of the usual thermodynamic quantities such as density or temperature. This mechanism explains the effects of particle and energy pinch in tokamaks. The analysis of the relaxed states caused by turbulent mixing is based on the existence of Lagrangian invariants (quantities constant along fluid-particle or other orbits). A turbulent equipartition corresponds to the spatially uniform distribution of relevant Lagrangian invariants. The existence of such turbulent equilibria is demonstrated in the simple model of two dimensional electrostatically turbulent plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The turbulence is prescribed, and the turbulent transport is assumed to be much stronger than the classical collisional transport. The simplicity of the model makes it possible to derive the equations describing the relaxation to the TEP state in several limits.

  20. Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-03-26

    Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

  1. On the role of stochastic Fermi acceleration in setting the dissipation scale of turbulence in the interstellar medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Robert I

    2007-01-01

    We consider the dissipation by Fermi acceleration of magnetosonic turbulence in the Reynolds Layer of the interstellar medium. The scale in the cascade at which electron acceleration via stochastic Fermi acceleration (STFA) becomes comparable to further cascade of the turbulence defines the inner scale. For any magnetic turbulent spectra equal to or shallower than Goldreich-Sridhar this turns out to be $\\ge 10^{12}$cm, which is much larger than the shortest length scales observed in radio scintillation measurements. While STFA for such spectra then contradict models of scintillation which appeal directly to an extended, continuous turbulent cascade, such a separation of scales is consistent with the recent work of \\citet{Boldyrev2} and \\citet{Boldyrev3} suggesting that interstellar scintillation may result from the passage of radio waves through the galactic distribution of thin ionized boundary surfaces of HII regions, rather than density variations from cascading turbulence. The presence of STFA dissipation...

  2. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhihong

    2013-12-18

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  3. Spatial confinement of the IBEX Ribbon: A dominant turbulence mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isenberg, Philip A.

    2014-05-20

    The narrow ribbon of enhanced energetic neutral atom flux observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer spacecraft has prompted numerous ideas to explain its structure and properties. One of these ideas is the 'neutral solar wind' scenario, which identifies the source particles as pickup protons in the local interstellar medium originating in solar wind charge-exchange interactions. This scenario has been thought to require unrealistically weak pitch-angle scattering of the pickup protons to explain the narrow structure. Recently, Schwadron and McComas suggested that this structure could result from a spatial retention of the pickup protons, rather than from a restricted pitch-angle distribution. Here, we present a physically motivated, quantitative mechanism to produce such a spatial configuration. This mechanism is based on the 'dominant turbulence' assumption, which can be applied where the production of new pickup protons is slow, and has been used to successfully explain the level of turbulent heating observed in the outer solar wind. This formalism predicts a pickup isotropization process which adds or subtracts energy from the ambient turbulent fluctuations, depending on the initial pitch angle of the pickup protons. We show that a simple model of this process can yield a ribbon structure in qualitative agreement with the observations. The results of this simple model are not yet quantitatively satisfactory, but we suggest several improvements which may reduce the quantitative discrepancy.

  4. Simulation of microtearing turbulence in national spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Bell, R. E.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Ren, Y.; Candy, J.; Nevins, W. M.; Wang, E.; Zhang, J.; Crocker, N. A.; Yuh, H.

    2012-05-15

    Thermal energy confinement times in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) dimensionless parameter scans increase with decreasing collisionality. While ion thermal transport is neoclassical, the source of anomalous electron thermal transport in these discharges remains unclear, leading to considerable uncertainty when extrapolating to future spherical tokamak (ST) devices at much lower collisionality. Linear gyrokinetic simulations find microtearing modes to be unstable in high collisionality discharges. First non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing turbulence in NSTX show they can yield experimental levels of transport. Magnetic flutter is responsible for almost all the transport ({approx}98%), perturbed field line trajectories are globally stochastic, and a test particle stochastic transport model agrees to within 25% of the simulated transport. Most significantly, microtearing transport is predicted to increase with electron collisionality, consistent with the observed NSTX confinement scaling. While this suggests microtearing modes may be the source of electron thermal transport, the predictions are also very sensitive to electron temperature gradient, indicating the scaling of the instability threshold is important. In addition, microtearing turbulence is susceptible to suppression via sheared E Multiplication-Sign B flows as experimental values of E Multiplication-Sign B shear (comparable to the linear growth rates) dramatically reduce the transport below experimental values. Refinements in numerical resolution and physics model assumptions are expected to minimize the apparent discrepancy. In cases where the predicted transport is strong, calculations suggest that a proposed polarimetry diagnostic may be sensitive to the magnetic perturbations associated with the unique structure of microtearing turbulence.

  5. Penetrative turbulence associated with mesoscale surface heat flux variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Jahrul M

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates penetrative turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer. Using a large eddy simulation approach, we study characteristics of the mixed layer with respect to surface heat flux variations in the range from 231.48 W/m$^2$ to 925.92 W/m$^2$, and observe that the surface heterogeneity on a spatial scale of $20$ km leads to downscale turbulent kinetic energy cascade. Coherent fluctuations of mesoscale horizontal wind is observed at 100m above the ground. Such a surface induced temporal oscillations in the horizontal wind suggest a rapid jump in mesocale wind forecasts, which is difficult to parameterize using traditional one-dimensional ensemble-mean models. Although the present work is idealized at a typical scale (20km) of surface heterogeneity, the results help develop effective subgrid scale parameterization schemes for classical weather forecasting mesoscale models.

  6. Improved detection of atmospheric turbulence with SLODAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Goodwin; Charles Jenkins; Andrew Lambert

    2007-06-19

    We discuss several improvements in the detection of atmospheric turbulence using SLOpe Detection And Ranging (SLODAR). Frequently, SLODAR observations have shown strong ground-layer turbulence, which is beneficial to adaptive optics. We show that current methods which neglect atmospheric propagation effects can underestimate the strength of high altitude turbulence by up to ~ 30%. We show that mirror and dome seeing turbulence can be a significant fraction of measured ground-layer turbulence, some cases up to ~ 50%. We also demonstrate a novel technique to improve the nominal height resolution, by a factor of 3, called Generalized SLODAR. This can be applied when sampling high-altitude turbulence, where the nominal height resolution is the poorest, or for resolving details in the important ground-layer.

  7. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-06

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shockdriven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  8. Wave turbulence buildup in a vibrating plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auliel, Maria Ines; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    We report experimental and numerical results on the buildup of the energy spectrum in wave turbulence of a vibrating thin elastic plate. Three steps are observed: first a short linear stage, then the turbulent spectrum is constructed by the propagation of a front in wave number space and finally a long time saturation due to the action of dissipation. The propagation of a front at the second step is compatible with scaling predictions from the Weak Turbulence Theory.

  9. An overview of potential financial bubbles in the US financial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadalla, Marco Antonio V. (Marco Antonio Vieira)

    2013-01-01

    Financial bubbles have presented a challenge for the financial markets for a long time and caused steep losses for many investors. This thesis has two main goals relating to financial bubbles. The first is to try to determine ...

  10. Flame Surface Fractal Characteristics in Premixed Turbulent Combustion at High Turbulence Intensities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Flame Surface Fractal Characteristics in Premixed Turbulent Combustion at High Turbulence of the flame surfaces in premixed turbulent combustion, the fractal approach is considered to be one with diameters of 11.2 and 22.4 mm, with flames of propane­air with equivalence ratios of 0.8 and 1

  11. The Origin of Molecular Cloud Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padoan, Paolo; Haugboelle, Troels; Nordlund, Ake

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in molecular clouds (MCs), but its origin is still unclear because MCs are usually assumed to live longer than the turbulence dissipation time. It has been shown that interstellar medium (ISM) turbulence is likely driven by SN explosions, but it has never been demonstrated that SN explosions can establish and maintain a turbulent cascade inside MCs consistent with the observations. In this work, we carry out a simulation of SN-driven turbulence in a volume of (250 pc)^3, specifically designed to test if SN driving alone can be responsible for the observed turbulence inside MCs. We find that SN driving establishes velocity scaling consistent with the usual scaling laws of supersonic turbulence. This also means that previous idealized simulations of MC turbulence, driven with a random, large-scale volume force, were correctly adopted as appropriate models for MC turbulence, despite the artificial driving. We also find the same scaling laws extend to the interior of MCs, and their normal...

  12. Turbulent Supersonic Channel Flow: Direct Numerical Simulation and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Stefan

    modeling: the turbulence frequency production mechanism, wall damping effects on turbulence model frequency production mechanisms and wall damping effects may be explained very well on the basis, Chik w = wall viscosity = kinematic viscosity, = T = turbulent kinematic viscosity, Ck d = pressure

  13. ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale: Opportunities and Challenges ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale: Opportunities and Challenges...

  14. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspden, Andrew J; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720 (Authors 1, 2 & 3); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Author 4); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (Author 5)

    2008-01-01

    dynamics of turbulent thermonuclear ?ames are essential tostudy of turbulent thermonuclear ? ames that explores aadapted to the study of thermonuclear ?ames, as described in

  15. Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion Processes in a DI Diesel Engine Assessment of Combustion and Turbulence Models for the Simulation of Combustion...

  16. Can we characterize turbulence in premixed flames?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipatnikov, A.N. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, 412 96 (Sweden)

    2009-06-15

    Modeling of premixed turbulent combustion involves averaging reaction rates in turbulent flows. The focus of most approaches to resolving this problem has been placed on determining the dependence of the mean rate w of product creation on the laminar flame speed S{sub L}, the rms turbulence velocity u', etc. The goal of the present work is to draw attention to another issue: May the input quantity u{sup '} for a model of w= w(u'/S{sub L},..) be considered to be known? The point is that heat release substantially affects turbulence and, hence, turbulence characteristics in premixed flames should be modeled. However, standard moment methods for numerically simulating turbulent flows do not allow us to evaluate the true turbulence characteristics in a flame. For instance, the Reynolds stresses in premixed flames are affected not only by turbulence itself, but also by velocity jump across flamelets. A common way to resolving this problem consists of considering the Reynolds stresses conditioned on unburned (or burned) mixture to be the true turbulence characteristics. In the present paper, this widely accepted but never proved hypothesis is put into question, first, by considering simple model constant-density problems (flame motion in an oscillating one-dimensional laminar flow; flame stabilized in a periodic shear, one-dimensional, laminar flow; turbulent mixing). In all the cases, the magnitude of velocity fluctuations, calculated using the conditioned Reynolds stresses, is affected by the intermittency of reactants and products and, hence, is not the true rms velocity. Second, the above claim is further supported by comparing balance equations for the mean and conditioned Reynolds stresses. The conditioned Reynolds stresses do not characterize the true turbulence in flames, because conditional averaging cuts off flow regions characterized by either high or low velocities. (author)

  17. Turbulent electron transport in edge pedestal by electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, R.; Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 ; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.; CMTFO and CASS, University of California, San Diego 92093-0424, California

    2013-11-15

    We present a model for turbulent electron thermal transport at the edge pedestal in high (H)-mode plasmas based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. A quasi-linear analysis of electrostatic toroidal ETG modes shows that both turbulent electron thermal diffusivity and hyper-resistivity exhibits the Ohkawa scaling in which the radial correlation length of turbulence becomes the order of electron skin depth. Combination of the Ohkawa scales and the plasma current dependence results in a novel confinement scaling inside the pedestal region. It is also shown that ETG turbulence induces a thermoelectric pinch, which may accelerate the density pedestal formation.

  18. Bi-Directional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfv\\'enic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, H; Viñas, A F

    2013-01-01

    The observed sub-proton scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quite-time suggest them as possible source of free energy to drive the turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how free energy in energetic electrons, released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfv\\'enic and whistler waves are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  19. Money Matters for Students Financial Aid & Student Financial Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    website at: www.financialaid.fsu.edu Google Search Send private scholarships to Student Financial Services, include: FSUSN Terms of Scholarship #12;Bright Futures Academic Scholarship Maintain a 3.0 cumulative GPA: Week 1: We enter Prepaid Billing on Blackboard Week 4: We Bill Prepaid Week 6-8: Prepaid remits payment

  20. Sandia Energy - Applied Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni >ScientificApplied Turbulent Combustion Home

  1. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  2. Turbulence of a Unidirectional Flow Bjorn Birnir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Björn

    -flying aircraft. Turbulent drag also prevents the design of more fuel-efficient cars and aircrafts. Turbulence plays a role in the heat trans- fer in nuclear reactors, causes drag in oil pipelines and influence and intrigued people for centuries. Five centuries ago a fluid engineer by the name of Leonardo da Vinci tackled

  3. Fifteen Lectures on Laminar and Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Fifteen Lectures on Laminar and Turbulent Combustion N. Peters RWTH Aachen Ercoftac Summer School in Combustion Systems 1 Lecture 2: Calculation of Adiabatic Flame Temperatures and Chemical Equilibria 20: Laminar Diffusion Flames: Different Flow Geometries 156 Lecture 11: Turbulent Combustion: Introduction

  4. Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odeh, Mufeed.

    2002-03-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. Furthermore, this report describes an experimental apparatus designed to test the effect of turbulence on fish, and defines its hydraulics. It gives the results of experiments in which three different fish species were exposed to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  5. Anisotropic Formation of Magnetized Cores in Turbulent Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Che-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In giant molecular clouds (GMCs), shocks driven by converging turbulent flows create high-density, strongly-magnetized regions that are locally sheetlike. In previous work, we showed that within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form by gathering material along the magnetic field lines. Here, we extend the parameter space of our three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations. We confirm the anisotropic core formation model we previously proposed, and quantify the dependence of median core properties on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that bound core properties are set by the total dynamic pressure (dominated by large-scale turbulence) and thermal sound speed c_s in GMCs, independent of magnetic field strength. For models with Mach number between 5 and 20, the median core masses and radii are comparable to the critical Bonnor-Ebert mass and radius defined using the dynamic pressure for P_ext. Our results corres...

  6. Turbulent Convection in Stellar Interiors. II. The Velocity Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Arnett; Casey Meakin; P. A. Young

    2008-11-25

    We analyze stellar convection with the aid of 3D hydrodynamic simulations, introducing the turbulent cascade into our theoretical analysis. We devise closures of the Reynolds-decomposed mean field equations by simple physical modeling of the simulations (we relate temperature and density fluctuations via coefficients); the procedure (CABS, Convection Algorithms Based on Simulations) is terrestrially testable and is amenable to systematic improvement. We develop a turbulent kinetic energy equation which contains both nonlocal and time dependent terms, and is appropriate if the convective transit time is shorter than the evolutionary time scale. The interpretation of mixing-length theory (MLT) as generally used in astrophysics is incorrect; MLT forces the mixing length to be an imposed constant. Direct tests show that the damping associated with the flow is that suggested by Kolmogorov. The eddy size is approximately the depth of the convection zone, and this dissipation length corresponds to the "mixing length". New terms involving local heating by turbulent dissipation should appear in the stellar evolution equations. The enthalpy flux ("convective luminosity") is directly connected to the buoyant acceleration, and hence the velocity scale. MLT tends to systematically underestimate this velocity scale. Quantitative comparison with a variety of 3D simulations reveals a previously recognized consistency. Examples of application to stellar evolution will be presented in subsequent papers in this series.

  7. Water in protoplanetary disks: Deuteration and turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Nomura, Hideko; Hersant, Franck; Wakelam, Valentine

    2013-12-10

    We investigate water and deuterated water chemistry in turbulent protoplanetary disks. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking turbulent mixing in a vertical direction. Water near the midplane is transported to the disk atmosphere by turbulence and is destroyed by photoreactions to produce atomic oxygen, while the atomic oxygen is transported to the midplane and reforms water and/or other molecules. We find that this cycle significantly decreases column densities of water ice at r ? 30 AU, where dust temperatures are too high to reform water ice effectively. The radial extent of such region depends on the desorption energy of atomic hydrogen. Our model indicates that water ice could be deficient even outside the sublimation radius. Outside this radius, the cycle decreases the deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio of water ice from ?2 × 10{sup –2}, which is set by the collapsing core model, to 10{sup –4}-10{sup –2} in 10{sup 6} yr, without significantly decreasing the water ice column density. The resultant D/H ratios depend on the strength of mixing and the radial distance from the central star. Our finding suggests that the D/H ratio of cometary water (?10{sup –4}) could be established (i.e., cometary water could be formed) in the solar nebula, even if the D/H ratio of water ice delivered to the disk was very high (?10{sup –2}).

  8. Meso-scale turbulence in living fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wensink, Henricus H; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Drescher, Knut; Goldstein, Raymond E; Löwen, Hartmut; Yeomans, Julia M

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous, from oceanic currents to small-scale biological and quantum systems. Self-sustained turbulent motion in microbial suspensions presents an intriguing example of collective dynamical behavior amongst the simplest forms of life, and is important for fluid mixing and molecular transport on the microscale. The mathematical characterization of turbulence phenomena in active non-equilibrium fluids proves even more difficult than for conventional liquids or gases. It is not known which features of turbulent phases in living matter are universal or system-specific, or which generalizations of the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe them adequately. Here, we combine experiments, particle simulations, and continuum theory to identify the statistical properties of self-sustained meso-scale turbulence in active systems. To study how dimensionality and boundary conditions affect collective bacterial dynamics, we measured energy spectra and structure functions in dense Bacillus subtilis su...

  9. Numerical simulations of strong incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, J.; Cattaneo, F.; Perez, J. C.; Boldyrev, S.

    2012-05-15

    Magnetised plasma turbulence pervades the universe and is likely to play an important role in a variety of astrophysical settings. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest theoretical framework in which phenomenological models for the turbulent dynamics can be built. Numerical simulations of MHD turbulence are widely used to guide and test the theoretical predictions; however, simulating MHD turbulence and accurately measuring its scaling properties is far from straightforward. Computational power limits the calculations to moderate Reynolds numbers and often simplifying assumptions are made in order that a wider range of scales can be accessed. After describing the theoretical predictions and the numerical approaches that are often employed in studying strong incompressible MHD turbulence, we present the findings of a series of high-resolution direct numerical simulations. We discuss the effects that insufficiencies in the computational approach can have on the solution and its physical interpretation.

  10. Financial Policy Manual RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES 2601 Departmental Scope & Responsibility;Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2601 DEPARTMENTAL SCOPE & RESPONSIBILITY Subject: Risk Management & Insurance Effective: December 1986 Revised: May 2011 Last Reviewed: March 2014 Resp. Office: Risk Management

  11. FINANCIAL INFORMATION SERVICES WWEEBB QQUUIICCKK TTIIPPSSOCTOBER 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINANCIAL INFORMATION SERVICES WWEEBB QQUUIICCKK TTIIPPSSOCTOBER 2006 Security to Web Applications How do I obtain security access to... Financial Information Library (FIL) Security is different for each Information Extract. To find security requirements, click on Details next to the Information

  12. Financial Services Division of Administration & Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Financial Services Division of Administration & Finance (657) 278-2512 / Fax (714) 278: May Wong / Financial Services (CP-300). Instructions are at Questions? Email Directive11@fullerton.eduwww.finance

  13. Essays in Financial Economics and Industrial Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studart, Marcus Eduardo Mathias

    2015-01-01

    risk. Journal of Financial Economics, 77(2):375–410, 2005.spread. Journal of financial Economics, 17(2):223–249, 1986.reputational commitment. Economics Letters, 89(2):167–173,

  14. Fermilab | Fermilab at Work | Web Form | FAW Website Suggestions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FAW Website Suggestions Submit your FAW website suggestion using the form below. All fields are required. Which FAW page is this suggestion for? Main FAW page Work Resources...

  15. Summer 11 Adjustment Form Financial Aid Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    : ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ I certify that I have read and understand the requirements outlined on the Financial Aid web site

  16. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-01

    This Notice addresses Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees.

  17. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-10-01

    This Notice addresses Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees.

  18. Webtrends Archives by Fiscal Year — Financial Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From the EERE Web Statistics Archive: Corporate sites, Webtrends archives for the Financial Opportunities site by fiscal year.

  19. FINANCIAL OVERVIEW UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    FINANCIAL OVERVIEW UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORT 2008­09 #12;UNIVERSITYOFCALIFORNIA,SANDIEGO 2 In fiscal year 2008­09, UC San Diego elected not to publish its annual financial report of UC San Diego by tracing the university's remarkable past, its recent achievements, and its campuswide

  20. Internal waves generated from a turbulent mixed region K. Dohan and B. R. Sutherland a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Internal waves generated from a turbulent mixed region K. Dohan and B. R. Sutherland a) Department suggested that internal waves generated at the base of this region may act as a source of energy driving over rough topography may be re­ sponsible for additional generation of internal waves and may add

  1. Energy transfers in shell models for MHD turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Lessinnes; M. K. Verma; D. Carati

    2008-07-31

    A systematic procedure to derive shell models for MHD turbulence is proposed. It takes into account the conservation of ideal quadratic invariants such as the total energy, the cross-helicity and the magnetic helicity as well as the conservation of the magnetic energy by the advection term in the induction equation. This approach also leads to simple expressions for the energy exchanges as well as to unambiguous definitions for the energy fluxes. When applied to the existing shell models with nonlinear interactions limited to the nearest neighbour shells, this procedure reproduces well known models but suggests a reinterpretation of the energy fluxes.

  2. Great Plains Turbulence Environment: Its Origins, Impact, and Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.

    2006-12-01

    This paper summarizes the known impacts of nocturnal turbulence on wind turbine performance and operations.

  3. Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the major radius were measured using the recently upgraded phase-contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic 4. The 32 vertical chords of the PCI system (see Fig. 1 (a)) enables the...

  4. Forest Fire Model as a Supercritical Dynamic Model in Financial Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Deokjae; Lee, Jeho; Kahng, B

    2015-01-01

    Recently, large-scale cascading failures in complex systems have garnered substantial attention. Such extreme events have been treated as an integral part of the self-organized criticality (SOC). Recent empirical work has suggested that some extreme events systematically deviate from the SOC paradigm, requiring a different theoretical framework. We shed additional theoretical light on this possibility by studying financial crisis. We build our model of financial crisis on the well-known forest fire model in scale-free networks. Our analysis shows a non-trivial scaling feature indicating supercritical behavior, which is independent of system size. Extreme events in the supercritical state result from bursting of a fat bubble, seeds of which are sown by a protracted period of a benign financial environment with few shocks. Our findings suggest that policymakers can control the magnitude of financial meltdowns by keeping the economy operating within reasonable duration of a benign environment.

  5. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  6. Outflow Driven Turbulence in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan J. Carroll; Adam Frank; Eric G. Blackman; Andrew J. Cunningham; Alice C. Quillen

    2008-05-30

    In this paper we explore the relationship between protostellar outflows and turbulence in molecular clouds. Using 3-D numerical simulations we focus on the hydrodynamics of multiple outflows interacting within a parsec scale volume. We explore the extent to which transient outflows injecting directed energy and momentum into a sub-volume of a molecular cloud can be converted into random turbulent motions. We show that turbulence can readily be sustained by these interactions and show that it is possible to broadly characterize an effective driving scale of the outflows. We compare the velocity spectrum obtained in our studies to that of isotropically forced hydrodynamic turbulence finding that in outflow driven turbulence a power law is indeed achieved. However we find a steeper spectrum (beta ~ 3) is obtained in outflow driven turbulence models than in isotropically forced simulations (beta ~ 2). We discuss possible physical mechanisms responsible for these results as well and their implications for turbulence in molecular clouds where outflows will act in concert with other processes such as gravitational collapse.

  7. The spatio-temporal spectrum of turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    di Leoni, P Clark; Mininni, P D

    2015-01-01

    Identification and extraction of vortical structures and of waves in a disorganized flow is a mayor challegen in the study of turbulence. We present a study of the spatio-temporal behavior of turbulent flows in the presence of different restitutive forces. We show how to compute and analyze the spatio-temporal spectrum from data stemming from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments. Four cases are considered: homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, rotating turbulence, stratified turbulence, and water wave turbulence. For homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of random sweeping. For rotating and for stratified turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of the waves, quantification of the energy in the waves and in the turbulent eddies, and identification of physical mechanisms such as Doppler shift and wave absorption in critical layers. Finally, in water wave turbulence the spectrum shows a transition from gravity-capillary waves to bound waves as the amplit...

  8. Mesoscale flows in large aspect ratio simulations of turbulent compressible convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rincon; F. Lignieres; M. Rieutord

    2006-11-28

    We present the results of a very large aspect ratio (42.6) numerical simulation of fully compressible turbulent convection in a polytropic atmosphere, and focus on the properties of large-scale flows. Mesoscale patterns dominate the turbulent energy spectrum. We show that these structures, which had already been observed in Boussinesq simulations by Cattaneo et al. (2001), have a genuine convective origin and do not result directly from collective interactions of the smaller scales of the flow, even though their growth is strongly affected by nonlinear transfers. If this result is relevant to the solar photosphere, it suggests that the dominant convective mode below the Sun's surface may be at mesoscales.

  9. Interactions between financial and environmental networks in OECD countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruzzenenti, Franco; Ticci, Elisa; Vozzella, Pietro; Gabbi, Giampaolo

    2015-01-01

    We analyse a multiplex of networks between OECD countries during the decade 2002-2010, which consists of five financial layers, given by foreign direct investment, equity securities, short-term, long-term and total debt securities, and five environmental layers, given by emissions of N O x, P M 10 SO 2, CO 2 equivalent and the water footprint associated with international trade. We present a new measure of cross-layer correlations between flows in different layers based on reciprocity. For the assessment of results, we implement a null model for this measure based on the exponential random graph theory. We find that short-term financial flows are more correlated with environmental flows than long-term investments. Moreover, the correlations between reverse financial and environmental flows (i.e. flows of different layers going in opposite directions) are generally stronger than correlations between synergic flows (flows going in the same direction). This suggests a trade-off between financial and environmenta...

  10. Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services » ProgramPolicy andResearchData | DepartmentFinancial

  11. Nonlinear and linear timescales near kinetic scales in solar wind turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Shay, M. A.; Oughton, S.; Osman, K. T.; Chapman, S. C.; Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Gary, S. P.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.

    2014-08-01

    The application of linear kinetic treatments to plasma waves, damping, and instability requires favorable inequalities between the associated linear timescales and timescales for nonlinear (e.g., turbulence) evolution. In the solar wind these two types of timescales may be directly compared using standard Kolmogorov-style analysis and observational data. The estimated local (in scale) nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic cascade times, evaluated as relevant kinetic scales are approached, remain slower than the cyclotron period, but comparable to or faster than the typical timescales of instabilities, anisotropic waves, and wave damping. The variation with length scale of the turbulence timescales is supported by observations and simulations. On this basis the use of linear theory—which assumes constant parameters to calculate the associated kinetic rates—may be questioned. It is suggested that the product of proton gyrofrequency and nonlinear time at the ion gyroscales provides a simple measure of turbulence influence on proton kinetic behavior.

  12. Multi-Spacecraft Measurement of Turbulence within a Magnetic Reconnection Jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C; Khotyaintsev, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between magnetic reconnection and plasma turbulence is investigated using multipoint in-situ measurements from the Cluster spacecraft within a high-speed reconnection jet in the terrestrial magnetotail. We show explicitly that work done by electromagnetic fields on the particles, $\\mathbf{J}\\cdot\\mathbf{E}$, has a non-Gaussian distribution and is concentrated in regions of high electric current density. Hence, magnetic energy is converted to kinetic energy in an intermittent manner. Furthermore, we find the higher-order statistics of magnetic field fluctuations generated by reconnection are characterized by multifractal scaling on magnetofluid scales and non-Gaussian global scale invariance on kinetic scales. These observations suggest $\\mathbf{J}\\cdot\\mathbf{E}$ within the reconnection jet has an analogue in fluid-like turbulence theory in that it proceeds via coherent structures generated by an intermittent cascade. This supports the hypothesis that turbulent dissipation is highly nonunifor...

  13. Understanding and modeling turbulent fluxes and entrainment in a gravity current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odier, P; Ecke, R E

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current flowing on an inclined plane. The turbulent transport of momentum and density can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and density are found to scale quadratically with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient, the square of the mixing length, is approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow ($\\epsilon$/$\\partial$ z u^3)^1/2. We also study the fluctuations of the momentum and density turbulent fluxes, showing how they relate to mixing and to the entrainment/detrainment balance. We suggest a quantitative measure of local entrainment and detrainment derived from observed conditional correlations of density flux and density or vertical velocity fluctuations.

  14. Effects of polymer additives in the bulk of turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yi-Chao; Funfschilling, Denis; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ni, Rui; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence that a minute amount of polymer additives can significantly enhance heat transport in the bulk region of turbulent thermal convection. The effects of polymer additives are found to be the \\textit{suppression} of turbulent background fluctuations that give rise to incoherent heat fluxes that make no net contribution to heat transport, and at the same time to \\textit{increase} the coherency of temperature and velocity fields. The suppression of small-scale turbulent fluctuations leads to more coherent thermal plumes that result in the heat transport enhancement. The fact that polymer additives can increase the coherency of thermal plumes is supported by the measurements of a number of local quantities, such as the extracted plume amplitude and width, the velocity autocorrelation functions and the velocity-temperature cross-correlation coefficient. The results from local measurements also suggest the existence of a threshold value for the polymer concentration, only above which c...

  15. Inhomogeneous distribution of droplets in cloud turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhak Fouxon; Yongnam Park; Roei Harduf; Changhoon Lee

    2014-10-30

    We solve the problem of spatial distribution of inertial particles that sediment in turbulent flow with small ratio of acceleration of fluid particles to acceleration of gravity $g$. The particles are driven by linear drag and have arbitrary inertia. The pair-correlation function of concentration obeys a power-law in distance with negative exponent. Divergence at zero signifies singular distribution of particles in space. Independently of particle size the exponent is ratio of integral of energy spectrum of turbulence times the wavenumber to $g$ times numerical factor. We find Lyapunov exponents and confirm predictions by direct numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes turbulence. The predictions include typical case of water droplets in clouds. This significant progress in the study of turbulent transport is possible because strong gravity makes the particle's velocity at a given point unique.

  16. Turbulent round jet under gravity waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Yong Uk

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of a neutrally buoyant horizontal turbulent round jet under a wavy environment was investigated. Progressive waves with different wave amplitudes in an intermediate water depth were used. The Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique...

  17. Equilibration of an atmosphere by geostrophic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansen, Malte F. (Malte Friedrich)

    2013-01-01

    A major question for climate studies is to quantify the role of turbulent eddy fluxes in maintaining the observed atmospheric mean state. It has been argued that eddy fluxes keep the mid-latitude atmosphere in a state that ...

  18. Selected problems in turbulence theory and modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Eun-Hwan

    2004-09-30

    pressure-strain correlation is investigated and constraining criteria for the rapid pressure-strain correlation models are developed. In the last topic, "unsteady computation of turbulent flow past a square cylinder using partially-averaged Navier...

  19. Aspects of wave turbulence in preheating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crespo, José A.; De Oliveira, H.P., E-mail: jaacrespo@gmail.com, E-mail: oliveira@dft.if.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Física - Departamento de Física Teórica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 20550-013 Brazil. (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    In this work we have studied the nonlinear preheating dynamics of several inflationary models. It is well established that after a linear stage of preheating characterized by the parametric resonance, the nonlinear dynamics becomes relevant driving the system towards turbulence. Wave turbulence is the appropriated description of this phase since the matter contents are fields instead of usual fluids. Turbulence develops due to the nonlinear interations of waves, here represented by the small inhomogeneities of the scalar fields. We present relevant aspects of wave turbulence such as the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum in frequency and wave number that indicates the energy transfer through scales. From the power spectrum of the matter energy density we were able to estimate the temperature of the thermalized system.

  20. Laminated Wave Turbulence: Generic Algorithms I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kartashova; A. Kartashov

    2006-09-07

    The model of laminated wave turbulence presented recently unites both types of turbulent wave systems - statistical wave turbulence (introduced by Kolmogorov and brought to the present form by numerous works of Zakharov and his scientific school since nineteen sixties) and discrete wave turbulence (developed in the works of Kartashova in nineteen nineties). The main new feature described by this model is the following: discrete effects do appear not only in the long-wave part of the spectral domain (corresponding to small wave numbers) but all through the spectra thus putting forth a novel problem - construction of fast algorithms for computations in integers of order $10^{12}$ and more. In this paper we present a generic algorithm for polynomial dispersion functions and illustrate it by application to gravity and planetary waves.

  1. TIDAL TURBULENCE SPECTRA FROM A COMPLIANT MOORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Jim; Kilcher, Levi; Richmond, Marshall C.; Talbert, Joe; deKlerk, Alex; Polagye, Brian; Guerra, Maricarmen; Cienfuegos, Rodrigo

    2013-06-13

    A compliant mooring to collect high frequency turbulence data at a tidal energy site is evaluated in a series of short demon- stration deployments. The Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM) improves upon recent bottom-mounted approaches by suspend- ing Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters (ADVs) at mid-water depths (which are more relevant to tidal turbines). The ADV turbulence data are superior to Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data, but are subject to motion contamination when suspended on a mooring in strong currents. In this demonstration, passive stabilization is shown to be sufficient for acquiring bulk statistics of the turbulence, without motion correction. With motion cor- rection (post-processing), data quality is further improved; the relative merits of direct and spectral motion correction are dis- cussed.

  2. Energy dissipation processes in solar wind turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y; Feng, X S; Xu, X J; Zhang, J; Sun, T R; Zuo, P B

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation cannot be ultimately achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind magnetic reconnection region. We find that the magnetic reconnection region shows a unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for the intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a magnetic reconnection site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy...

  3. Dissipation via Landau Damping in Two- and Three-Dimensional Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tak Chu; Klein, Kristopher G; TenBarge, Jason M

    2015-01-01

    Plasma turbulence is ubiquitous in space and astrophysical plasmas, playing an important role in plasma energization, but the physical mechanisms that lead to dissipation of the turbulent energy remain to be definitively identified. This work addresses the fundamental physics of turbulent dissipation by examining the velocity-space structure that develops as a result of the collisionless interaction between the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations and the particles in a low beta plasma. Both two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations show an electron velocity-space signature qualitatively similar to that of the linear Landau damping of Alfv\\'en waves in a 3D linear simulation. This evidence strongly suggests that the turbulent energy is transferred by Landau damping to electrons in low beta plasmas in both 2D and 3D, making possible the ultimate irreversible heating of the plasma. Although, in the 2D case with no variation along the equilibrium magnetic field, it may be expecte...

  4. Fluctuation characteristics and transport properties of collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao Yong; Holod, Ihor; Zhang Wenlu; Lin Zhihong [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Klasky, Scott [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    The collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence is investigated by global gyrokinetic particle simulation. The zonal flow dominated by low frequency and short wavelength acts as a very important saturation mechanism. The turbulent eddies are mostly microscopic, but with a significant portion in the mesoscale. The ion heat transport is found to be diffusive and follows the local radial profile of the turbulence intensity. However, the electron heat transport demonstrates some nondiffusive features and only follows the global profile of the turbulence intensity. The nondiffusive features of the electron heat transport is further confirmed by nonlognormal statistics of the flux-surface-averaged electron heat flux. The radial and time correlation functions are calculated to obtain the radial correlation length and autocorrelation time. Characteristic time scale analysis shows that the zonal flow shearing time and eddy turnover time are very close to the effective decorrelation time, which suggests that the trapped electrons move with the fluid eddies. The fluidlike behaviors of the trapped electrons and the persistence of the mesoscale eddies contribute to the transition of the electron turbulent transport from gyro-Bohm scaling to Bohm scaling when the device size decreases.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  6. Reaction and diffusion in turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, S.B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The motivation for this project is the need to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the technologically-important phenomenon of turbulent combustion. In nearly all applications in which fuel is burned-for example, fossil-fuel power plants, furnaces, gas-turbines and internal-combustion engines-the combustion takes place in a turbulent flow. Designers continually demand more quantitative information about this phenomenon-in the form of turbulent combustion models-so that they can design equipment with increased efficiency and decreased environmental impact. For some time the PI has been developing a class of turbulent combustion models known as PDF methods. These methods have the important virtue that both convection and reaction can be treated without turbulence-modelling assumptions. However, a mixing model is required to account for the effects of molecular diffusion. Currently, the available mixing models are known to have some significant defects. The major motivation of the project is to seek a better understanding of molecular diffusion in turbulent reactive flows, and hence to develop a better mixing model.

  7. Diffusion Processes in Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Lazarian

    2007-07-05

    We study of the effect of turbulence on diffusion processes within magnetized medium. While we exemplify our treatment with heat transfer processes, our results are quite general and are applicable to different processes, e.g. diffusion of heavy elements. Our treatment is also applicable to describing the diffusion of cosmic rays arising from magnetic field wandering. In particular, we find that when the energy injection velocity is smaller than the Alfven speed the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the opposite regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale $l_A$ at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path $\\lambda$ is larger than $l_A$, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective transport, that can provide effective diffusivity. For clusters of galaxies, we find that the turbulence is the most important agent for heat transfer. We also show that the domain of applicability of the subdiffusion concept is rather limited.

  8. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Grooms, Ian

    2014-08-15

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse space–time superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for “eddy-permitting” mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades.

  9. SUR LES CASCADES D'ENERGIE EN ECOULEMENTS TURBULENTS CASCADE OF ENERGY IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosa, Ricardo M. S.

    SUR LES CASCADES D'´ENERGIE EN ´ECOULEMENTS TURBULENTS CASCADE OF ENERGY IN TURBULENT FLOWS CIPRIAN energy is transferred from low wave number modes to high wave number modes (L. Onsager (1945)). Such a transfer of energy occurs in a spectral range beyond that of injection of energy, and it underlies the so

  10. Turbulent Jets SUMMARY: This chapter is concerned with turbulent jets, namely their overall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    Chapter 9 Turbulent Jets SUMMARY: This chapter is concerned with turbulent jets, namely their overall shape and velocity structure. The first jets being considered are those penetrating in homogeneous terminology. Continuous Intermittent injection injection Momentum only Jet Puff Buoyancy only Plume Thermal

  11. INTERCHANGE RECONNECTION IN A TURBULENT CORONA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappazzo, A. F.; Matthaeus, W. H. [Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Ruffolo, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Servidio, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, I-87036 Cosenza (Italy); Velli, M., E-mail: rappazzo@udel.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    Magnetic reconnection at the interface between coronal holes and loops, the so-called interchange reconnection, can release the hotter, denser plasma from magnetically confined regions into the heliosphere, contributing to the formation of the highly variable slow solar wind. The interchange process is often thought to develop at the apex of streamers or pseudo-streamers, near Y- and X-type neutral points, but slow streams with loop composition have been recently observed along fanlike open field lines adjacent to closed regions, far from the apex. However, coronal heating models, with magnetic field lines shuffled by convective motions, show that reconnection can occur continuously in unipolar magnetic field regions with no neutral points: photospheric motions induce a magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade in the coronal field that creates the necessary small scales, where a sheared magnetic field component orthogonal to the strong axial field is created locally and can reconnect. We propose that a similar mechanism operates near and around boundaries between open and closed regions inducing a continual stochastic rearrangement of connectivity. We examine a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model of a simplified interface region between open and closed corona threaded by a strong unipolar magnetic field. This boundary is not stationary, becomes fractal, and field lines change connectivity continuously, becoming alternatively open and closed. This model suggests that slow wind may originate everywhere along loop-coronal-hole boundary regions and can account naturally and simply for outflows at and adjacent to such boundaries and for the observed diffusion of slow wind around the heliospheric current sheet.

  12. Financial Opportunities - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah861MayArtQuestionsFieldFiji0AssistanceFinancial

  13. Related Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related Financial Opportunities The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program is a partnership among these DOE program offices: Energy Efficiency and...

  14. Exam FM Sample Solutions Financial Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Society of Actuaries

    2014-10-22

    Financial Economics. June 2014 changes. Questions 1-30 are from the prior version of this document. They have been edited to conform more closely to current ...

  15. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-01

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees. (Replaces DOE N 326.7).

  16. RETHINKING THE FINANCIAL NETWORK Andrew G Haldane*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    ) was recorded in Guangdong Province, China. Panic ensued. Uncertainty about its causes and contagious. Panic ensued. Uncertainty about its causes and contagious consequences brought many financial markets

  17. January 24, 2006 Financial Management Committee Handouts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agency Financial Information 4th Quarter Review Report ID: 0070FY09 Federal Columbia River Power System Statement of Revenues and Expenses Data Source: EPM Data Warehouse...

  18. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (SF 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to persons employed at the GS-15 level and below, except for Schedule C appointees.

  19. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  20. Examining A Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer at Low Reynolds Number 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semper, Michael Thomas

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of the current study was to answer several questions related to hypersonic, low Reynolds number, turbulent boundary layers, of which available data related to turbulence quantities is scarce. To that end, a ...

  1. MICROWAVE IMAGING REFLECTOMETRY FOR THE VISUALIZATION OF TURBULENCE IN TOKAMAKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 MICROWAVE IMAGING REFLECTOMETRY FOR THE VISUALIZATION OF TURBULENCE IN TOKAMAKS E. Mazzucato of density fluctuations in tokamaks. The proposed method is based on microwave reflectometry and consists are discussed. Key words: Tokamak, anomalous transport, turbulent fluctuations, microwave imaging reflectometry

  2. Microwave imaging reflectometry for the visualization of turbulence in tokamaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzucato, Ernesto

    Microwave imaging reflectometry for the visualization of turbulence in tokamaks E. Mazzucato describes the results of an extensive numerical study of microwave reflectometry in tokamaks showing scheme for the global visualization of turbulent fluctuations in tokamaks is described. 1. Introduction

  3. Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

  4. Turbulence and internal waves in tidal flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta

    2012-01-01

    M. C. 2006 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence atcant loss of low-mode tidal energy at 28.9 ? . Geophys. Res.of turbulent kinetic energy over a tidal cycle. Maximum T KE

  5. Biophysical coupling between turbulence, veliger behavior, and larval supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Heidi L

    2005-01-01

    The goals of this thesis were to quantify the behavior of gastropod larvae (mud snails Ilyanassa obsoleta) in turbulence, and to investigate how that behavior affects larval supply in a turbulent coastal inlet. Gastropod ...

  6. Evolution of an initially turbulent stratified shear layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brucker, Kyle A.; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2007-01-01

    the turbulent kinetic energy and potential energy are givenbe- tween potential and kinetic energy, is not positive de?kinetic energy that may be trans- ferred to turbulent potential energy.

  7. Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

  8. Small-Scale Forcing of a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorkowski, Thomas

    In order to understand the effect of small scale forcing on turbulent flows and its implications on control, an experimental investigation is made into the forcing of the inertial scales in the wall region of a turbulent ...

  9. THE FATE OF PLANETESIMALS IN TURBULENT DISKS WITH DEAD ZONES. I. THE TURBULENT STIRRING RECIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okuzumi, Satoshi [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ormel, Chris W., E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Turbulence in protoplanetary disks affects planet formation in many ways. While small dust particles are mainly affected by the aerodynamical coupling with turbulent gas velocity fields, planetesimals and larger bodies are more affected by gravitational interaction with gas density fluctuations. For the latter process, a number of numerical simulations have been performed in recent years, but a fully parameter-independent understanding has not been yet established. In this study, we present simple scaling relations for the planetesimal stirring rate in turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability (MRI), taking into account the stabilization of MRI due to ohmic resistivity. We begin with order-of-magnitude estimates of the turbulence-induced gravitational force acting on solid bodies and associated diffusion coefficients for their orbital elements. We then test the predicted scaling relations using the results of recent ohmic-resistive MHD simulations by Gressel et al. We find that these relations successfully explain the simulation results if we properly fix order-of-unity uncertainties within the estimates. We also update the saturation predictor for the density fluctuation amplitude in MRI-driven turbulence originally proposed by Okuzumi and Hirose. Combination of the scaling relations and saturation predictor allows us to know how the turbulent stirring rate of planetesimals depends on disk parameters such as the gas column density, distance from the central star, vertical resistivity distribution, and net vertical magnetic flux. In Paper II, we apply our recipe to planetesimal accretion to discuss its viability in turbulent disks.

  10. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-07-28

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  11. Fractal Potential Flows: An Idealized Model for Fully Developed Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    József Vass

    2014-09-22

    Fully Developed Turbulence (FDT) is a theoretical asymptotic phenomenon which can only be approximated experimentally or computationally, so its defining characteristics are hypothetical. It is considered to be a chaotic stationary flow field, with self-similar fractalline features. A number of approximate models exist, often exploiting this self-similarity. The idealized mathematical model of Fractal Potential Flows is hereby presented, and linked philosophically to the phenomenon of FDT on a free surface, based on its experimental characteristics. The model hinges on the recursive iteration of a fluid dynamical transfer operator. The existence of its unique attractor - called the invariant flow - is shown in an appropriate function space, which will serve as our suggested model for the FDT flow field. Its sink singularities are shown to form an IFS fractal, explicitly resolving Mandelbrot's Conjecture. Meanwhile an isometric isomorphism is defined between flows and probability measures, hinting at a wealth of future research. The inverse problem of representing turbulent flow fields with this model is discussed in closing, along with explicit practical considerations for experimental verification and visualization.

  12. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasenzer, Thomas [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretische Physik; GSI-Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Inst. (EMMI); McLerran, Larry [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). RIKEN Research Center and Physics Dept.; China Central Normal Univ., Wuhan (China). Physics Dept.; Pawlowski, Jan M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretische Physik; GSI-Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Inst. (EMMI); Sexty, Dénes [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Theoretische Physik; GSI-Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Inst. (EMMI)

    2014-10-01

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  13. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-07-28

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixedmore »point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.« less

  14. New Mexico State University Financial Information Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    New Mexico State University Financial Information Processing Official Hiring Organization signatures as policy requires. For Academic changes, see New Mexico State University Policy Manual-Mail Parent Short Description Page 2 of 2 Reset New Mexico State University Financial Information Processing

  15. 13 14 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS APRIL 30 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    . The information in this report is meant to provide the reader with financial information for the fiscal year ended's consolidated activities over the 2013-14 fiscal year, and show that the university has recovered from the 2008 April 30, 2014. Other documents that provide additional information on the financial situation

  16. Extremal Financial Risk Models and Portfolio Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhengjun

    Extremal Financial Risk Models and Portfolio Evaluation Zhengjun Zhang Department of Statistics assets. An important application of the proposed method is to calculate VaRs (Value at Risk) and evaluate, financial risk, portfolio evaluation. 2000 Mathematics Subject Classification: 60G70, 62G32, 62P20. 0 #12

  17. BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    BYU Salt Lake Center Financial Assistance Program 2015 A financial assistance program of the Brigham Young University Division of Continuing Education BYU Salt Lake Center 345 West North Temple Street 3 Triad Center Salt Lake City, UT 84180 Fax: (801) 933­9456 Email: slc@byu.edu #12;BYU Salt Lake

  18. HMS Second-Year Financial Aid Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodrich, Lisa V.

    /BS Waivers Resident Tutors #12;3rd Year Budget 2014-15 3rd Year Budget is 12 months! Complete cash advance NOTE: Step2b Clinical Skills Exam fee included in 3rd year budget with travel expenses added in 4thHMS Second-Year Financial Aid Update February 2014 #12;Today's Agenda 2014-15 Financial Aid

  19. Do financial investors destabilize the oil price?

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    N E 2 011 by Marco J. Lombardi and Ine Van Robays DO FINANCIAL INVESTORS DESTABILIZE THE OIL PRICE? WO R K I N G PA P E R S E R I E S N O 13 4 6 J U N E 2011 DO FINANCIAL...

  20. The Future of Financial Risk Management: Lessons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aronov, Boris

    The Future of Financial Risk Management: Lessons Charles S. Tapiero, Topfer Chair Distinguished Professor of Financial Engineering and Technology Management Department of Finance and Risk Engineering NYU, leading risk managers to turn to qualitative stress testingto turn to qualitative stresstesting, 4

  1. Office for Student Financial Affairs UF handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    Gator Aid Office for Student Financial Affairs 2015-2016 UF handbook oF Financial aid #12;2 UF in this handbook. However, contents are subject to change without notice because of changing federal and state and subject to revision. The Gator Aid Handbook is available upon request in alternative formats for students

  2. FINANCIAL ECONOMICS RESOURCE ECONOMICS AND POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    ECONOMICS FINANCIAL ECONOMICS RESOURCE ECONOMICS AND POLICY Program of Study The School of Economics at the University of Maine provides excellent opportunities for graduate students to study applied economics, financial economics, and policy analysis. The School of Economics administers the Master

  3. An introduction to financial econometrics Jianqing Fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jianqing

    ) and energy companies may decide to purchase the financial derivatives based on the temperature. An important the last three decades, enormous number of new financial products have been created to meet customers; to reduce the risk of weather exposures, amuse parks (too hot or too cold reduces the number of visitors

  4. Financial Sustainability of International River Basin Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, Aaron

    Financial Sustainability of International River Basin Organizations Final Report #12;Published by financing of a sample of African, Asian and European River Basin Organizations (RBOs). Its focus contributions to cov- er their regular run-ning costs. To a degree, the financial challenges some African RBOs

  5. Financial Sustainability and Efficiency in Full Economic Costing of Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    1 Financial Sustainability and Efficiency in Full Economic Costing of Research in UK Higher ............................................................................................................................................ 8 THE WIDER CONTEXT: PRESSURES ON COSTS AND FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY............. 10 FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY OF RESEARCH IN HIGHER EDUCATION....................................... 12 Income and expenditure

  6. The Inherent Inefficiency of Simultaneously Feasible Financial Transmission Rights Auctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such convergence. Index Terms-- financial transmission right, electricity auction, simultaneous feasibilityThe Inherent Inefficiency of Simultaneously Feasible Financial Transmission Rights Auctions Shi as financial transmission rights (FTRs), resulting from centralized auctions conducted by Independent System

  7. Closure models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Tarbell, J.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    In this paper, a simple procedure based on fast and slow reaction asymptotics has been employed to drive first-order closure models for the nonlinear reaction terms in turbulent mass balances from mechanistic models of turbulent mixing and reaction. The coalescence-redispersion (CRD) model, the interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) model, the three-environment (3E) model, and the four-environment (4E) model have been used to develop closure equations. The closure models have been tested extensively against experimental data for both single and multiple reactions. The closures based on slow asymptotics for the CRD, 3E and 4E models provide very good predictions of all of the experimental data, while other models available either in the literature or derived here are not adequate. The simple new closure equations developed in this paper may be useful in modeling systems involving turbulent mixing and complex chemical reactions.

  8. Turbulent density fluctuations in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingale, Madhusudan

    2015-01-01

    Treatments of the radio scattering due to density turbulence in the solar wind typically employ asymptotic approximations to the phase structure function. We use a general structure function (GSF) that straddles the asymptotic limits and quantify the relative error introduced by the approximations. We show that the regimes where GSF predictions are accurate than those of its asymptotic approximations is not only of practical relevance, but are where inner scale effects influence the estimate of the scatter-broadening. Thus we propose that GSF should henceforth be used for scatter broadening calculations and estimates of quantities characterizing density turbulence in the solar corona and solar wind. In the next part of this thesis we use measurements of density turbulence in the solar wind from previously publish observations of radio wave scattering and interplanetary scintillations. Density fluctuations are inferred using the GSF for radio scattering data and existing analysis methods for IPS. Assuming that...

  9. Interpreting Power Anisotropy Measurements in Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Schekochihin, A A

    2009-01-01

    A relationship between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations is derived. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example in the solar wind. If fluctuations are anisotropic in shape then the ion gyroscale break point in spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind observations in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  10. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  11. A signature for turbulence driven magnetic islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agullo, O.; Muraglia, M.; Benkadda, S. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345 Marseille (France); France-Japan Magnetic Fusion Laboratory, LIA 336 CNRS, Marseille (France); Poyé, A. [Univ. Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Yagi, M. [Plasma Theory and Simulation Gr., JAEA, Rokkasho (Japan); Garbet, X. [IRFM, CEA, St-Paul-Lez-Durance 13108 (France); Sen, A. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-09-15

    We investigate the properties of magnetic islands arising from tearing instabilities that are driven by an interchange turbulence. We find that such islands possess a specific signature that permits an identification of their origin. We demonstrate that the persistence of a small scale turbulence maintains a mean pressure profile, whose characteristics makes it possible to discriminate between turbulence driven islands from those arising due to an unfavourable plasma current density gradient. We also find that the island poloidal turnover time, in the steady state, is independent of the levels of the interchange and tearing energy sources. Finally, we show that a mixing length approach is adequate to make theoretical predictions concerning island flattening in the island rotation frame.

  12. Wave turbulence served up on a plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Cobelli; Philippe Petitjeans; Agnes Maurel; Vincent Pagneux; Nicolas Mordant

    2009-10-28

    Wave turbulence in a thin elastic plate is experimentally investigated. By using a Fourier transform profilometry technique, the deformation field of the plate surface is measured simultaneously in time and space. This enables us to compute the wavevector-frequency Fourier ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) spectrum of the full space-time deformation velocity. In the 3D ($\\mathbf k, \\omega$) space, we show that the energy of the motion is concentrated on a 2D surface that represents a nonlinear dispersion relation. This nonlinear dispersion relation is close to the linear dispersion relation. This validates the usual wavenumber-frequency change of variables used in many experimental studies of wave turbulence. The deviation from the linear dispersion, which increases with the input power of the forcing, is attributed to weak non linear effects. Our technique opens the way for many new extensive quantitative comparisons between theory and experiments of wave turbulence.

  13. Consolidated financial statements for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The following overview and accompanying audited financial statements have been prepared for Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 to report the financial position and the results of operations of the Department of Energy. These statements include the consolidated Statement of Financial Position and the consolidated Statement of Operations and Changes in Net Position. The statements have been prepared in accordance with the Office of Management and Budget Bulletin No. 94-01, Form and Content for Agency Financial Statements, and were developed in accordance with the hierarchy of accounting standards described therein. The overview provides a narrative on the Department of Energy`s mission, activities, and accomplishments. Utilizing performance measures as the primary vehicle for communicating Departmental accomplishments and results, this overview discusses the most significant measures while others are discussed in the supplemental information to the financial statements.

  14. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of kappa-epsilon modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy kappa, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation epsilon, for each material. Hence a set of kappa and epsilon equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both kappa and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe.

  15. Turbulence Intensity Comparisons for Pipes with/without Welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Turbulence Intensity Comparisons for Pipes with/without Welds Oct. 24, 2012 Yan Zhan 1 #12;Outline · Line Plot of TI at the Pipe Exit · Contour of Turbulence Intensity (Page 4 - 9) ­ with a weld - 3.2M ­ with a weld ­ 2.5M · Contour of Turbulence Intensity (Page 10 - 15) ­ with a weld - 3.2M ­ without a weld ­ 3

  16. Turbulent Wind Fields for Gaseous Phenomena Eugene Fiume 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Turbulent Wind Fields for Gaseous Phenomena Jos Stam Eugene Fiume 0 Department of Computer Science of smoke, steam, mist and water re­ acting to a turbulent field such as wind is an attractive, and realistic illumina­ tion. We present a model for turbulent wind flow having a deterministic component

  17. The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectra and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectra and Pickup Ions on the Heating of the Solar Wind ADimensionless parameter: [Iroshnikov 1963, Kraichnan 1965] #12;Solar wind turbulence model The steady state solar wind turbulence model developed by [Matthaeus et al. 1994, 1996] and later developments: Steady

  18. Intermittency in Turbulent Diffusion Models with a Mean Gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majda, Andrew J.

    Intermittency in Turbulent Diffusion Models with a Mean Gradient Andrew J Majda and Xin T TongE30, 62G32 Submitted to: Nonlinearity 1. Introduction Turbulent diffusion is the transportation and diffusion. Its application ranges from the spread of hazardous plumes and mixing properties of turbulent

  19. Forecasting wind speed financial return

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of wind speed is very important when dealing with the production of energy through wind turbines. In this paper, we show a new nonparametric model, based on semi-Markov chains, to predict wind speed. Particularly we use an indexed semi-Markov model that has been shown to be able to reproduce accurately the statistical behavior of wind speed. The model is used to forecast, one step ahead, wind speed. In order to check the validity of the model we show, as indicator of goodness, the root mean square error and mean absolute error between real data and predicted ones. We also compare our forecasting results with those of a persistence model. At last, we show an application of the model to predict financial indicators like the Internal Rate of Return, Duration and Convexity.

  20. Computational aspects of astrophysical MHD and turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Brandenburg

    2001-09-27

    The advantages of high-order finite difference scheme for astrophysical MHD and turbulence simulations are highlighted. A number of one-dimensional test cases are presented ranging from various shock tests to Parker-type wind solutions. Applications to magnetized accretion discs and their associated outflows are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the possibility of dynamo action in three-dimensional turbulent convection and shear flows, which is relevant to stars and astrophysical discs. The generation of large scale fields is discussed in terms of an inverse magnetic cascade and the consequences imposed by magnetic helicity conservation are reviewed with particular emphasis on the issue of alpha-quenching.

  1. Approaches and Financial Models for Scaling up Norwegian Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Financial Models for Scaling up Norwegian Development Assistance to Clean Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Approaches and Financial...

  2. UNEP-GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNEP-GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Name UNEP-GEF Renewable Energy Project Financial Risk Management in...

  3. Clean Energy Lending From the Financial Institution Perspective...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Lending From the Financial Institution Perspective (Chapter 8 of the Clean Energy Finance Guide, 3rd Edition) Clean Energy Lending From the Financial Institution...

  4. Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommenda...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research Policy: Recommendations to the NRC Committee on Research Universities Regulatory and Financial Reform of Federal Research...

  5. Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Procurement and Financial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Procurement and Financial Assistance Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Procurement and Financial Assistance The Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Procurement...

  6. Financial Incentives Available for Facilities Affected by the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financial Incentives Available for Facilities Affected by the US EPA Boiler MACT Proposed Rule, December 2012 Financial Incentives Available for Facilities Affected by the US EPA...

  7. Final Report - Investigation of Intermittent Turbulence and Turbulent Structures in the Presence of Controlled Sheared Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Mark A.

    2013-06-27

    Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54898. The dynamics and generation of intermittent plasma turbulent structures, widely known as "blobs" have been studied in the presence of sheared plasma flows in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  8. The propagation of kinetic energy across scales in turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardesa, José I; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A temporal study of energy transfer across length scales is performed in 3D numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow and isotropic turbulence, at Reynolds numbers in the range $Re_{\\lambda}=107-384$. The average time taken by perturbations in the energy flux to travel between scales is measured and shown to be additive, as inferred from the agreement between the total travel time from a given scale to the smallest dissipative motions, and the time estimated from successive jumps through intermediate scales. Our data suggests that the propagation of disturbances in the energy flux is independent of the forcing and that it defines a `velocity' that determines the energy flux itself. These results support that the cascade is, on average, a scale-local process where energy is continuously transmitted from one scale to the next in order of decreasing size.

  9. Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topoisomerase II Structure Suggests Novel DNA Cleavage Mechanism Print Type II topoisomerases are molecular machines that regulate DNA supercoiling and separate interlocked...

  10. Diffusive Migration of Low-Mass Proto-planets in Turbulent Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric T. Johnson; Jeremy Goodman; Kristen Menou

    2006-04-28

    Torque fluctuations due to magnetorotational turbulence in proto-planetary disks may greatly influence the migration patterns and survival probabilities of nascent planets. Provided that the turbulence is a stationary stochastic process with finite amplitude and correlation time, the resulting diffusive migration can be described with a Fokker-Planck equation, which we reduce to an advection-diffusion equation. We calibrate the coefficients with existing turbulent-disk simulations and mean-migration estimates, and solve the equation both analytically and numerically. Diffusion tends to dominate over advection for planets of low-mass and those in the outer regions of proto-planetary disks, whether they are described by the Minimum Mass Solar Nebula (MMSN) or by T-Tauri alpha disks. Diffusion systematically reduces the lifetime of most planets, yet it allows a declining fraction of them to survive for extended periods of time at large radii. Mean planet lifetimes can even be formally infinite (e.g. in an infinite steady MMSN), though median lifetimes are always finite. Surviving planets may linger near specific radii where the combined effects of advection and diffusion are minimized, or at large radii, depending on model specifics. The stochastic nature of migration in turbulent disks challenges deterministic planet formation scenarios and suggests instead that a wide variety of planetary outcomes are possible from similar initial conditions. This would contribute to the diversity of (extrasolar) planetary systems.

  11. Pressure atomizer having multiple orifices and turbulent generation feature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VanBrocklin, Paul G. (Pittsford, NY); Geiger, Gail E. (Caledonia, NY); Moran, Donald James (Rochester, NY); Fournier, Stephane (Rochester, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A pressure atomizer includes a silicon plate having a top surface and a bottom surface. A portion of the top surface defines a turbulent chamber. The turbulent chamber is peripherally bounded by the top surface of the plate. The turbulent chamber is recessed a predetermined depth relative to the top surface. The silicon plate further defines at least one flow orifice. Each flow orifice extends from the bottom surface of the silicon plate to intersect with and open into the turbulent chamber. Each flow orifice is in fluid communication with the turbulent chamber.

  12. Wave Packets and Turbulent Peter Jordan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    Wave Packets and Turbulent Jet Noise Peter Jordan1 and Tim Colonius2 1 D´epartement Fluides-control efforts is incomplete. Wave packets are intermittent, advecting disturbances that are correlated over review evidence of the existence, energetics, dynamics, and acous- tic efficiency of wave packets. We

  13. Shear Turbulence: Onset and Structure Fabian Waleffe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebovitz, Norman

    filament in laminar flow (a), and the rapid mixing of the dye and water when the Reynolds number is larger and reproduces the seminal experiments of Osborne Reynolds [24] on the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in a pipe, illustrated in Fig. 1. The 2011 Annual Review 1 #12;of Fluid Mechanics article by Tom Mullin [21

  14. Remote optical turbulence sensing: present Andrei Tokovinin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokovinin, Andrei A.

    . model Detector Data products Rytov approx. Biases Amplitude U(x,y, ,t) Figure 1: Remote optical the turbulent volume. Bright stars (one, two, or several) are most convenient ROTS sources available at no cost of these solar-system bodies pre-selects the light path (a ROTS can only work when the source is visible

  15. Orientation of eddy fluxes in geostrophic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

    of potential vorticity (PV) in geostrophic turbulence. We take two different points of view, a classical of the eddy flux of PV with the appropriate mean gradient or the large-scale gradient of PV is required-temporal characteristics of the flow. One way to improve on this is to adopt unsteady RA. In this case, averages

  16. CHAPTER ____ THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE: TURBULENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Transport processes at gas-liquid interfaces are of importance in a number of areas, such as for equipment be generated by heat losses that give rise to natural convective motions on the liquid side. In the second winds, the turbulence is not only due to shear, but also due to natural convection on the liquid side

  17. Interplay between confinement, turbulence and magnetic topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    Alcator C-Mod Interplay between confinement, turbulence and magnetic topology Nils P. Basse, S. Zoletnik1, W. L. Rowan2 et al. MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center 1KFKI-RMKI, Euratom Association, Budapest, Hungary 2Fusion Research Center, University of Texas at Austin This idea originates from density

  18. Turbulent drag reduction through oscillating discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The changes of a turbulent channel flow subjected to oscillations of wall flush-mounted rigid discs are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number is $R_\\tau$=$180$, based on the friction velocity of the stationary-wall case and the half channel height. The primary effect of the wall forcing is the sustained reduction of wall-shear stress, which reaches a maximum of 20%. A parametric study on the disc diameter, maximum tip velocity, and oscillation period is presented, with the aim to identify the optimal parameters which guarantee maximum drag reduction and maximum net energy saving, computed by taking into account the power spent to actuate the discs. This may be positive and reaches 6%. The Rosenblat viscous pump flow is used to predict the power spent for disc motion in the turbulent channel flow and to estimate localized and transient regions over the disc surface subjected to the turbulent regenerative braking effect, for which the wall turbulence exerts work on the discs. The...

  19. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2007-01-01

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

  20. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  1. A Fresh Approach to Turbulence towards Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impact on energy consumption and CO2 emissions in the transport sector, particularly commercial aviation in a variety of systems relevant to stable isotope analysis, including CO2 , N2 O, and methane. We leverage. Theoretical interests aside, flow turbulence has numerous practical implications in the real world, making its

  2. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  3. Combustion-turbulence interaction in the turbulent boundary layer over a hot surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, T.T.; Cheng, R.K.; Robben, F.; Talbot, L.

    1982-01-01

    The turbulence-combustion interaction in a reacting turbulent boundary layer over a heated flat plate was studied. Ethylene/air mixture with equivalence ratio of 0.35 was used. The free stream velocity was 10.5 m/s and the wall temperature was 1250/sup 0/K. Combustion structures visualization was provided by high-speed schlieren photographs. Fluid density statistics were deduced from Rayleigh scattering intensity measurements. A single-component laser Doppler velocimetry system was used to obtain mean and root-mean-square velocity distributions, the Reynolds stress, the streamwise and the cross-stream turbulent kinetic energy diffusion, and the production of turbulent kinetic energy by Reynolds stress. The combustion process was dominated by large-scale turbulent structures of the boundary layer. Combustion causes expansion of the boundary layer. No overall self-similarity is observed in either the velocity or the density profiles. Velocity fluctuations were increased in part of the boundary layer and the Reynolds stress was reduced. The turbulent kinetic energy diffusion pattern was changed significantly and a modification of the boundary layer assumption will be needed when dealing with this problem analytically. 11 figures, 1 table.

  4. On-line supplement: The Turbulence Parameterization Scheme The turbulence scheme used in this work is adapted from a more comprehensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yanping

    On-line supplement: The Turbulence Parameterization Scheme The turbulence scheme used in this work-gradient turbulent transfer processes for cloud-free conditions. Throughout this supplement w denotes vertical

  5. Query Suggestions for Mobile Search: Understanding Usage Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Inc 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA shumeet@google.com ABSTRACT Entering search terms that users who were asked to enter queries on a search interface with query suggestions rated their workload heavily on suggestions if they are provided. Users who were asked to enter queries on a search interface

  6. Learning connections in financial time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gartheeban, Ganeshapillai

    2014-01-01

    Much of modern financial theory is based upon the assumption that a portfolio containing a diversified set of equities can be used to control risk while achieving a good rate of return. The basic idea is to choose equities ...

  7. University of Nevada, Reno Financial Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to as capital assets, is reflected in the financial statements as depreciation, which amortizes the cost in investments and an increase in capital assets of $6.6 million. · Liabilities increased by $49.3 million due

  8. Financial Conflict of Interest Policy A. OVERVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to conducting research in a manner that promotes the integrity of the research and maintains the public trust external commitments or significant financial interests of any person(s) with involvement in the design

  9. Essays on amplification mechanisms in financial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Maggio, Marco, 1985-

    2013-01-01

    In Chapter 1, I explore how speculators can destabilize financial markets by amplifying negative shocks in periods of market turmoil, and confirm the main predictions of the theoretical analysis using data on money market ...

  10. Confidential Financial Disclosure Reports (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-12-09

    The directive establishes requirements and responsibilities for Departmental elements and employees regarding filing Confidential Financial Disclosure Reports (OGE Form 450) in accordance with the Ethics in Government Act of 1978, as amended.

  11. Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-20

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designated EJ, EK, and EN.

  12. Financial and Activity Report- December 14, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  13. Financial and Activity Report- December 7, 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  14. Financial Policy and Procedures for Reimbursable Work

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-08-15

    The directive establishes Department-wide financial policy and procedural guidance applicable to performing reimbursable work for other Federal agencies and with non-Federal Government entities, including foreign and commercial entities, State, and political subdivisions.

  15. Financial and Activity Report- December 21, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  16. Financial and Activity Report- February 15, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  17. Financial and Activity Report- December 31, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  18. Financial and Activity Report- March 1, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  19. Financial and Activity Report- Janurary 11, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  20. Financial and Activity Report- Janurary 18, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  1. Financial and Activity Report- May 31, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Monthly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  2. Financial and Activity Report- February 1, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  3. Financial and Activity Report- April 30, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Monthly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  4. Financial and Activity Report- June 30, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Monthly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  5. Financial and Activity Report- February 8, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  6. Financial and Activity Report- February 22, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  7. Financial and Activity Report- Janurary 25, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  8. Financial and Activity Report- Janurary 4, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Weekly Financial and Activity Reports section includes the Department of Energy's weekly report on spending and major actions related to the Recovery Act.  The "Weekly Update" tab includes...

  9. Modeling dependencies in Financial Risk Management BMI Master Thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhulai, Sandjai

    Copulas Modeling dependencies in Financial Risk Management BMI Master Thesis #12;Modeling dependencies in financial risk management 2 #12;Modeling dependencies in financial risk management 3 Preface integrated in the study. For the purpose of extending my knowledge on Financial Risk Management

  10. Carbon stable isotopes suggest that hippopotamus-vectored nutrients subsidize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewison, Rebecca

    Carbon stable isotopes suggest that hippopotamus-vectored nutrients subsidize aquatic consumers that hippopotamus-vectored nutrients subsidize aquatic consumers in an East African river. Ecosphere 6(4):52. http

  11. On the role of stochastic Fermi acceleration in setting the dissipation scale of turbulence in the interstellar medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert I Selkowitz; Eric G. Blackman

    2007-07-31

    We consider the dissipation by Fermi acceleration of magnetosonic turbulence in the Reynolds Layer of the interstellar medium. The scale in the cascade at which electron acceleration via stochastic Fermi acceleration (STFA) becomes comparable to further cascade of the turbulence defines the inner scale. For any magnetic turbulent spectra equal to or shallower than Goldreich-Sridhar this turns out to be $\\ge 10^{12}$cm, which is much larger than the shortest length scales observed in radio scintillation measurements. While STFA for such spectra then contradict models of scintillation which appeal directly to an extended, continuous turbulent cascade, such a separation of scales is consistent with the recent work of \\citet{Boldyrev2} and \\citet{Boldyrev3} suggesting that interstellar scintillation may result from the passage of radio waves through the galactic distribution of thin ionized boundary surfaces of HII regions, rather than density variations from cascading turbulence. The presence of STFA dissipation also provides a mechanism for the non-ionizing heat source observed in the Reynolds Layer of the interstellar medium \\citep{Reynolds}. STFA accommodates the proper heating power, and the input energy is rapidly thermalized within the low density Reynolds layer plasma.

  12. Locality and stability of the cascades of two-dimensional turbulence.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gkioulekas, Eleftherios - Department of Mathematics, University of Texas

    chemical combustion Stabilize plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor Propagation of laser through turbulence;Outline Why study turbulence? Brief overview of K41 theory (3D turbulence) Frisch reformulation of K41 theory. KLB theory (2D turbulence). My reformulation of Frisch to address 2D turbulence Locality

  13. DUST TRANSPORT IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS THROUGH TURBULENCE AND SETTLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, N. J.; Carballido, A. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Sano, T., E-mail: neal.turner@jpl.nasa.go [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    We apply ionization balance and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations to investigate whether magnetic activity moderated by recombination on dust grains can account for the mass accretion rates and the mid-infrared spectra and variability of protostellar disks. The MHD calculations use the stratified shearing-box approach and include grain settling and the feedback from the changing dust abundance on the resistivity of the gas. The two-decade spread in accretion rates among solar-mass T Tauri stars is too large to result solely from variations in the grain size and stellar X-ray luminosity, but can plausibly be produced by varying these parameters together with the disk magnetic flux. The diverse shapes and strengths of the mid-infrared silicate bands can come from the coupling of grain settling to the distribution of the magnetorotational turbulence, through the following three effects. First, recombination on grains 1 mum or smaller yields a magnetically inactive dead zone extending more than two scale heights from the midplane, while turbulent motions in the magnetically active disk atmosphere overshoot the dead zone boundary by only about one scale height. Second, grains deep in the dead zone oscillate vertically in wave motions driven by the turbulent layer above, but on average settle at the rates found in laminar flow, so that the interior of the dead zone is a particle sink and the disk atmosphere will become dust-depleted unless resupplied from elsewhere. Third, with sufficient depletion, the dead zone is thinner and mixing dredges grains off the midplane. The last of these processes enables evolutionary signatures such as the degree of settling to sometimes decrease with age. The MHD results also show that the magnetic activity intermittently lifts clouds of small grains into the atmosphere. Consequently the photosphere height changes by up to one-third over timescales of a few orbits, while the extinction along lines of sight grazing the disk surface varies by factors of 2 over times down to a tenth of an orbit. We suggest that the changing shadows cast by the dust clouds on the outer disk are a cause of the daily to monthly mid-infrared variability found in many young stars.

  14. Transition to turbulence in duct flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biau, Damien; Bottaro, Alessandro; 10.1017/S0022112007009536

    2010-01-01

    The transition of the flow in a duct of square cross-section is studied. Like in the similar case of the pipe flow, the motion is linearly stable for all Reynolds numbers; this flow is thus a good candidate to investigate the 'bypass' path to turbulence. Initially the so-called 'linear optimal perturbation problem' is formulated and solved, yielding optimal disturbances in the form of longitudinal vortices. Such optimals, however, fail to elicit a significant response from the system in the nonlinear regime. Thus, streamwise-inhomogeneous, sub-optimal disturbances are focussed upon; nonlinear quadratic interactions are immediately evoked by such initial perturbations and an unstable streamwise-homogeneous large amplitude mode rapidly emerges. The subsequent evolution of the flow, at a value of the Reynolds number at the edge between fully developed turbulence and relaminarization, shows the alternance of patterns with two pairs of large scale vortices near opposing parallel walls. Such edge states bear a rese...

  15. Vortex Tubes of Turbulent Solar Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitiashvili, I N; Mansour, N N; Lele, S K; Wray, A A

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of turbulent properties of solar convection is extremely important for understanding of the multi-scale dynamics observed on the solar surface. In particular, recent high-resolution observations revealed ubiquitous vortical structures, and numerical simulations demonstrated links between the vortex tube dynamics and magnetic field organization, and also importance of vortex tube interactions in the mechanism of acoustic wave excitation on the Sun. In this paper we investigate mechanisms of formation of vortex tubes in highly-turbulent convective flows near the solar surface by using realistic radiative hydrodynamic LES simulations. Analysis of data, obtained by the simulations, indicates two basic processes of the vortex tube formation: 1) development of small-scale convective instability inside convective granules, and 2) a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability of shearing flows in intergranular lanes. Our analysis shows that vortex stretching during these processes is a primary source of generatio...

  16. Optical Intensity Interferometry through Atmospheric Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Kian Tan; Aik Hui Chan; Christian Kurtsiefer

    2015-12-29

    Conventional ground-based astronomical observations suffer from image distortion due to atmospheric turbulence. This can be minimized by choosing suitable geographic locations or adaptive optical techniques, and avoided altogether by using orbital platforms outside the atmosphere. One of the promises of optical intensity interferometry is its independence from atmospherically induced phase fluctuations. By performing narrowband spectral filtering on sunlight and conducting temporal intensity interferometry using actively quenched avalanche photon detectors (APDs), the Solar $g^{(2)}(\\tau)$ signature was directly measured. We observe an averaged photon bunching signal of $g^{(2)}(\\tau) = 1.693 \\pm 0.003$ from the Sun, consistently throughout the day despite fluctuating weather conditions, cloud cover and elevation angle. This demonstrates the robustness of the intensity interferometry technique against atmospheric turbulence and opto-mechanical instabilities, and the feasibility to implement measurement schemes with both large baselines and long integration times.

  17. Climate Information Needs for Financial Decision Making

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, Paul

    2013-11-19

    Climate Information Needs for Financial Decision Making (Final Report) This Department of Energy workshop award (grant #DE-SC0008480) provided primary support for the American Meteorological Society’s study on climate information needs for financial decision making. The goal of this study was to help advance societal decision making by examining the implications of climate variability and change on near-term financial investments. We explored four key topics: 1) the conditions and criteria that influence returns on investment of major financial decisions, 2) the climate sensitivity of financial decisions, 3) climate information needs of financial decision makers, and 4) potential new mechanisms to promote collaboration between scientists and financial decision makers. Better understanding of these four topics will help scientists provide the most useful information and enable financial decision makers to use scientific information most effectively. As a result, this study will enable leaders in business and government to make well-informed choices that help maximize long-term economic success and social wellbeing in the United States The outcomes of the study include a workshop, which brought together leaders from the scientific and financial decision making communities, a publication of the study report, and a public briefing of the results to the policy community. In addition, we will present the results to the scientific community at the AMS Annual Meeting in February, 2014. The study results were covered well by the media including Bloomberg News and E&E News. Upon request, we also briefed the Office of Science Technology Policy (OSTP) and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) on the outcomes. We presented the results to the policy community through a public briefing in December on Capitol Hill. The full report is publicly available at www.ametsoc.org/cin. Summary of Key Findings The United States invests roughly $1.5 trillion U.S. dollars (USD) in capital assets each year across the public and private sectors (Orszag 2008; United States Census Bureau 2013). Extreme weather events create and exacerbate risks to these financial investments by contributing to: • Direct physical impacts on the investments themselves • Degradation of critical supporting infrastructure • Changes in the availability of key natural resources • Changes to workforce availability or capacity • Changes in the customer base • Supply chain disruptions • Legal liability • Shifts in the regulatory environment • Reductions in credit ratings Even small changes in weather can impact operations in critical economic sectors. As a result, maximizing returns on financial investments depends on accurately understanding and effectively accounting for these risks. Climate variability and change can either exacerbate existing risks or cause new sources of risk to emerge. Managing these risks most effectively will depend on scientific advances and increases in the capacity of financial decision makers to use the scientific knowledge that results. Barriers to using climate information must also be overcome. This study proposes three predefined levels of certainty for communicating about weather and climate risks: 1) possible (i.e., unknown likelihood or less than 50% chance of occurrence), 2) probable (greater than 50% chance of occurrence), and 3) effectively certain (at least 95% chance of occurrence). For example, it is effectively certain that a change in climate will alter weather patterns. It is probable that climate warming will cause increases in the intensity of some extreme events. It is possible that climate change will cause major and widespread disruptions to key planetary life-support services. Key recommendations of this study: 1) Identify climate-related risks and opportunities for financial decision making. 2) Create a framework to translate scientific information in clear and actionable terms for financial decision makers. 3) Analyze existing climate assessments and translate projected impacts into possible, probable,

  18. Entrainment in two coalescing axisymmetric turbulent plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cenedese, Claudia; Linden, P. F.

    2014-07-11

    , K. G. & Rona, P. A. 1989 A model of an atlantic and pacific hydrothermal plume. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans 94 (C5), 6213–6220. Turner, J. S. 1979 Buoyancy Effects in Fluids. New York: Cambridge University Press. Xu, Y., Rignot, E., Fenty... close together, and the depth at which the coalescing plumes reach their neutral buoyancy level and intrude horizontally in the stratified atmosphere de- pends on the details of this interaction. Buoyant turbulent plumes are produced around oceanic...

  19. Turbulence and its effects upon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneller, J. P.; McLaughlin, G. C.; Patton, K. M. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-06-24

    As a neutrino passes through turbulent matter, large amplitude transitions between its eigenstates can occur. These transitions can be modeled as like those of an irradiated polarized atom and we investigate this connection both analytically and numerically. We find a simple theory that makes use of the Rotating Wave Approximation can make predictions for the amplitudes and wavelengths of the transitions that agree very well with those from the numerical solutions.

  20. Electromagnetic Transport From Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, W; Kaye, S M; Nevins, W M; Wang, E; Bell, R E; Hammett, G W; LeBlanc, B P; Mikkelsen, D R

    2011-03-23

    This Letter presents non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high beta discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  1. Running Financial Reports For help email Financial.Reports@dartmouth.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 IRA Basic Running Financial Reports For help email Financial.Reports@dartmouth.edu Updated 6-7-2013 #12;2 Training Index Part I Introduction to the IRA Reporting Tool IRA Resources (3) Logging onto the system (4) Navigating the Dashboard (5-9) Running Reports (10-11) Working with Reports (12

  2. Turbulent Energy Transport in Nonradiative Accretion Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus

    2003-09-24

    Just as correlations between fluctuating radial and azimuthal velocities produce a coherent stress contributing to the angular momentum transport in turbulent accretion disks, correlations in the velocity and temperature fluctuations produce a coherent energy flux. This nonadvective energy flux is always of secondary importance in thin radiative disks, but cannot be neglected in nonradiative flows, in which it completes the mean field description of turbulence. It is, nevertheless, generally ignored in accretion flow theory, with the exception of models explicitly driven by thermal convection, where it is modeled phenomenologically. This flux embodies both turbulent thermal convection as well as wave transport, and its presence is essential for a proper formulation of energy conservation, whether convection is present or not. The sign of the thermal flux is likely to be outward in real systems, but the restrictive assumptions used in numerical simulations may lead to inward thermal transport, in which case qualitatively new effects may be exhibited. We find, for example, that a static solution would require inward, not outward, thermal transport. Even if it were present, thermal convection would be unlikely to stifle accretion, but would simply add to the outward rotational energy flux that must already be present.

  3. Plasma Turbulence in the Local Bubble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven R. Spangler

    2008-06-05

    Turbulence in the Local Bubble could play an important role in the thermodynamics of the gas that is there. The best astronomical technique for measuring turbulence in astrophysical plasmas is radio scintillation. Measurements of the level of scattering to the nearby pulsar B0950+08 by Philips and Clegg in 1992 showed a markedly lower value for the line-of-sight averaged turbulent intensity parameter $$ than is observed for other pulsars, consistent with radio wave propagation through a highly rarefied plasma. In this paper, we discuss the observational progress that has been made since that time. At present, there are four pulsars (B0950+08, B1133+16, J0437-4715, and B0809+74) whose lines of sight seem to lie mainly within the local bubble. The mean densities and line of sight components of the interstellar magnetic field along these lines of sight are smaller than nominal values for pulsars, but not by as much expected. Three of the four pulsars also have measurements of interstellar scintillation. The value of the parameter $$ is smaller than normal for two of them, but is completely nominal for the third. This inconclusive status of affairs could be improved by measurements and analysis of ``arcs'' in ``secondary spectra'' of pulsars.

  4. Forecasting Turbulent Modes with Nonparametric Diffusion Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyrus Berry; John Harlim

    2015-01-27

    This paper presents a nonparametric diffusion modeling approach for forecasting partially observed noisy turbulent modes. The proposed forecast model uses a basis of smooth functions (constructed with the diffusion maps algorithm) to represent probability densities, so that the forecast model becomes a linear map in this basis. We estimate this linear map by exploiting a previously established rigorous connection between the discrete time shift map and the semi-group solution associated to the backward Kolmogorov equation. In order to smooth the noisy data, we apply diffusion maps to a delay embedding of the noisy data, which also helps to account for the interactions between the observed and unobserved modes. We show that this delay embedding biases the geometry of the data in a way which extracts the most predictable component of the dynamics. The resulting model approximates the semigroup solutions of the generator of the underlying dynamics in the limit of large data and in the observation noise limit. We will show numerical examples on a wide-range of well-studied turbulent modes, including the Fourier modes of the energy conserving Truncated Burgers-Hopf (TBH) model, the Lorenz-96 model in weakly chaotic to fully turbulent regimes, and the barotropic modes of a quasi-geostrophic model with baroclinic instabilities. In these examples, forecasting skills of the nonparametric diffusion model are compared to a wide-range of stochastic parametric modeling approaches, which account for the nonlinear interactions between the observed and unobserved modes with white and colored noises.

  5. Influence of suprathermal background electrons on strong auroral double layers: Laminar and turbulent regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.; Sen, N. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    A series of one-dimensional Vlasov simulations [Newman et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 072902 (2008), this issue] show that a sufficiently dense and hot suprathermal electron population can stabilize strong laminar double layers over long periods while regulating their strength and velocity. When suprathermals are less dense or absent, the double layers tend to be sporadic and turbulent. A detailed comparison of the laminar and turbulent regimes reveals that the disruption of the laminar state can be triggered by kinetically modified Buneman instabilities on the low-potential side of the double layer, and by density perturbations that develop into nonlinear coherent shocklike structures on the high-potential side. These findings suggest that the suprathermal electrons may be responsible for suppressing both of these routes to disruption of the laminar state.

  6. Regulation of thermal conductivity in hot galaxy clusters by MHD turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus; Christopher S. Reynolds

    2008-06-05

    The role of thermal conduction in regulating the thermal behavior of cooling flows in galaxy clusters is reexamined. Recent investigations have shown that the anisotropic Coulomb heat flux caused by a magnetic field in a dilute plasma drives a dynamical instability. A long standing problem of cooling flow theory has been to understand how thermal conduction can offset radiative core losses without completely preventing them. In this Letter we propose that magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the heat flux instability regulates field-line insulation and drives a reverse convective thermal flux, both of which may mediate the stabilization of the cooling cores of hot clusters. This model suggests that turbulent mixing should accompany strong thermal gradients in cooling flows. This prediction seems to be supported by the spatial distribution of metals in the central galaxies of clusters, which shows a much stronger correlation with the ambient hot gas temperature gradient than with the parent stellar population.

  7. Nature of turbulent transport across sheared zonal flows: insights from gyro-kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Raul [ORNL; Newman, David E [University of Alaska; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel [JNL Scientific, Inc., Casa Grande, AZ; Decyk, Viktor [University of California, Los Angeles

    2011-01-01

    The traditional view regarding the reduction of turbulence-induced transport across a stable sheared flow invokes a reduction of the characteristic length scale in the direction perpendicular to the flow as a result of the shearing and stretching of eddies caused by the differential pull exerted in the direction of the flow. A reduced effective transport coefficient then suffices to capture the reduction, that can then be readily incorporated into a transport model. However, recent evidence from gyrokinetic simulations of the toroidal ion-temperature-gradient mode suggests that the dynamics of turbulent transport across sheared flows changes in a more fundamental manner, and that the use of reduced effective transport coefficients fails to capture the full dynamics that may exhibit both subdiffusion and non-Gaussian statistics. In this contribution, after briefly reviewing these results, we propose some candidates for the physical mechanisms responsible for endowing transport with such non-diffusive characteristics, backing these proposals with new numerical gyrokinetic data

  8. Features of collisionless turbulence in the intracluster medium from simulated Faraday Rotation maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakwacki, M S; Santos-Lima, R; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Falceta-Gonçalves, D A

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the intracluster medium (ICM) in galaxy clusters suggest for the presence of turbulence and the magnetic fields existence has been proved through observations of Faraday Rotation and synchrotron emission. The ICM is also known to be filled by a rarefied weakly collisional plasma. In this work we study the possible signatures left on Faraday Rotation maps by collisionless instabilities. For this purpose we use a numerical approach to investigate the dynamics of the turbulence in collisionless plasmas based on an magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) formalism taking into account different levels of pressure anisotropy. We consider models covering the sub/super-Alfv\\'enic and trans/supersonic regimes, one of them representing the fiducial conditions corresponding to the ICM. From the simulated models we compute Faraday Rotation maps and analyze several statistical indicators in order to characterize the magnetic field structure and compare the results obtained with the collisionless model to those obtaine...

  9. Model turbulent floods with the Smagorinski large eddy closure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Roberts; D. J. Georgiev; D. V. Strunin

    2008-05-21

    Floods, tides and tsunamis are turbulent, yet conventional models are based upon depth averaging inviscid irrotational flow equations. We propose to change the base of such modelling to the Smagorinksi large eddy closure for turbulence in order to appropriately match the underlying fluid dynamics. Our approach allows for large changes in fluid depth to cater for extreme inundations. The key to the analysis underlying the approach is to choose surface and bed boundary conditions that accommodate a constant turbulent shear as a nearly neutral mode. Analysis supported by slow manifold theory then constructs a model for the coupled dynamics of the fluid depth and the mean turbulent lateral velocity. The model resolves the internal turbulent shear in the flow and thus may be used in further work to rationally predict erosion and transport in turbulent floods.

  10. The deterministic chaos and random noise in turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Hai-Feng Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2014-06-01

    A turbulent flow is usually treated as a superposition of coherent structure and incoherent turbulence. In this paper, the largest Lyapunov exponent and the random noise in the near field of round jet and plane jet are estimated with our previously proposed method of chaotic time series analysis [T. L. Yao, et al., Chaos 22, 033102 (2012)]. The results show that the largest Lyapunov exponents of the round jet and plane jet are in direct proportion to the reciprocal of the integral time scale of turbulence, which is in accordance with the results of the dimensional analysis, and the proportionality coefficients are equal. In addition, the random noise of the round jet and plane jet has the same linear relation with the Kolmogorov velocity scale of turbulence. As a result, the random noise may well be from the incoherent disturbance in turbulence, and the coherent structure in turbulence may well follow the rule of chaotic motion.

  11. Optical Turbulence Characterization at LAMOST Site: Observations and Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, L -Y; Yao, Y -Q; Vernin, J; Chadid, M; Wang, H -S; Yin, J; Wang, Y -P

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric optical turbulence seriously limits the performance of high angular resolution instruments. An 8-night campaign of measurements was carried out at the LAMOST site in 2011, to characterize the optical turbulence. Two instruments were set up during the campaign: a Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) used to measure the total atmospheric seeing, and a Single Star Scidar (SSS) to measure the vertical profiles of the turbulence C_n^2(h) and the horizontal wind velocity V(h). The optical turbulence parameters are also calculated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the Trinquet-Vernin model, which describes optical effects of atmospheric turbulence by using the local meteorological parameters. This paper presents assessment of the optical parameters involved in high angular resolution astronomy. Its includes seeing, isoplanatic angle, coherence time, coherence etendue, vertical profiles of optical turbulence intensity _n^2(h)$ and horizontal wind speed V(h). The median...

  12. Non-premixed flame-turbulence interaction in compressible turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livescu, D. (Daniel); Madnia, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    Nonpremixed turbulent reacting flows are intrinsically difficult to model due to the strong coupling between turbulent motions and reaction. The large amount of heat released by a typical hydrocarbon flame leads to significant modifications of the thermodynamic variables and the molecular transport coefficients and thus alters the fluid dynamics. Additionally, in nonpremixed combustion, the flame has a complex spatial structure. Localized expansions and contractions occur, enhancing the dilatational motions. Therefore, the compressibility of the flow and the heat release are intimately related. However, fundamental studies of the role of compressibility on the scalar mixing and reaction are scarce. In this paper they present results concerning the fundamental aspects of the interaction between non-premixed flame and compressible turbulence.

  13. Vortices within vortices: hierarchical nature of vortex tubes in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Kai; Westermann, Rüdiger; Werner, Suzanne; Lalescu, Cristian C; Szalay, Alexander; Meneveau, Charles; Eyink, Gregory L

    2012-01-01

    The JHU turbulence database [1] can be used with a state of the art visualisation tool [2] to generate high quality fluid dynamics videos. In this work we investigate the classical idea that smaller structures in turbulent flows, while engaged in their own internal dynamics, are advected by the larger structures. They are not advected undistorted, however. We see instead that the small scale structures are sheared and twisted by the larger scales. This illuminates the basic mechanisms of the turbulent cascade.

  14. Space-time correlations in turbulent flow: A review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, James M

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the principal uses, over almost seven decades, of correlations, in both Eulerian and Lagrangian frames of reference, of properties of turbulent flows at variable spatial locations and variable time instants. Commonly called space--time correlations, they have been fundamental to theories and models of turbulence as well as for the analyses of experimental and direct numerical simulation turbulence data.

  15. ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY (Suggested 2 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    FIRST YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS ENG 0101 English Composition I 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 PET 0101 Per Term 3 Total Credits Per Academic Year 34 SECOND YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS SECOND YEAR, 2ND TERMASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY (Suggested 2 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS

  16. ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN LIBERAL STUDIES (Suggested 2 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS ENG 0101 English Composition I 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 GE TERM CREDITS SECOND YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS GE: Arts & Letters 3 GE: Arts & Letters 3 GE: Science & LabASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN LIBERAL STUDIES (Suggested 2 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST

  17. 522012-13SuggestedCoursePlan CIVIL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    522012-13SuggestedCoursePlan CIVIL ENGINEERING FIRST YEAR FALL: 16-17 units SPRING: 17 units SECOND 408: Risk Analysis in Civil Engr. CE 451: Water Resources Engineering CE 453: Water Quality Control CE and Magnetism SCIENCE (8 UNITS) CHEM 105AL: General Chemistry GEOL 305L: Intro. to Engineering Geology or BISC

  18. Web Service Composition using Service Suggestions , Chaitanya Guttula1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissinger, Jessica

    Web Service Composition using Service Suggestions Rui Wang1 , Chaitanya Guttula1 , Maryam@cs., jkissing@, eileen@cs.}uga.edu Abstract-- This paper presents a semi-automatic Web service composition approach. This approach ranks all available candidate Web service operations based on semantic annotations

  19. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    16 Credit hours per term 15 Credit hours per academic year 31 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTHBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS FS 0102 Freshman Seminar 3 HPRED 0108 Nutrition 3 HPRED 0101

  20. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Elective 3 Credits Per Term 15 Credits Per Term 15 Credits Per Academic Year 30 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS Area I Upper Level Elective 3 IA 1451 Capstone 3 Area II Upper LevelBACHELOR OF ARTS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY ARTS (Suggested 4 Year Plan) Please note

  1. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Total Credits Per Term 19 Total Credits Per Term 18 Total Credits Per Academic Year 37 FOURTH YEAR, FIRST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, SECOND TERM CREDITS EDUC 1307 Secondary Methods* 4 EDUC 1481 StudentBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, FIRST TERM CREDITS

  2. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Courses 3 Credits Per Term 16 Credits Per Term 16 Credits Per Academic Term Year 32 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS PSY 1452 Capstone: Psychology , PSY Electives 3-6 PSY 1452 CapstoneBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR

  3. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Credits per term 16 Credits per term 18 Credits per academic year 34 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM FOURTH YEAR, 3rd TERM (Summer) Radiographic Procedures III Radiation Biology General ReviewBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (Suggested 4 Year Plan) Please note

  4. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Credit hours per academic year 32-33 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS UpperBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND hours per academic year 30 SECOND YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS SECOND YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS BIOL 0203

  5. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BROADCAST COMMUNICATIONS (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    academic year 31 Fourth Year, 1st Term Credits Fourth Year, 2nd Term Credits Minor Course 3 COMM 1451BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BROADCAST COMMUNICATIONS (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS FS 0102 Freshman Seminar 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 ENG 0101

  6. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGLISH EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    -19 Credits per term 18 Credits per academic year 36-37 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERMBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGLISH EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan) NOTE: Students who started at Pitt- Bradford fall 2013 and after must complete TWO GE courses designed as GLOBAL. FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS

  7. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MATH EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Credits Per Academic Year 32 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS EDUC 1307BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MATH EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR 19 Total Credits Per Academic Year 36 SECOND YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS SECOND YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS

  8. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOSPITALITY MANAGMENET (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Hospitality & Tourism Marketing 3 Credits per term 16 Credits per term 16 Credits per academic year 32 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS HMGT Level Elective 3 HMGT 1451 Senior SeminarBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HOSPITALITY MANAGMENET (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS

  9. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES (Suggested 4 Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Academic Year 30 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS Major Elective 3 ANTH, ECONBACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES (Suggested 4 Year Plan FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR Term 15 Credits Per Term 15 Credits Per Academic Year 30 SECOND YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS SECOND YEAR, 2ND

  10. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Per Term 15 Total Credits Per Academic Year 30 FORTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERMBACHELOR OF ARTS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS FS 0102 Freshman Seminar 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 ENG 0101 English

  11. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    : PEDC 1 Credits Per Term 16 Credits Per Term 16 Credits Per Academic Year 32 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS ENVSTD Upper Level Elective (Internship Recommended) 3 ENVSTD 1451BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS

  12. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SPORTS MEDICINE (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    31 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS HPRED 1405 Research Methods 3 HPREDBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN SPORTS MEDICINE (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS FS 0102 Freshman Seminar 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 ENG 0101 English

  13. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN WRITING (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Term 16 Credits Per Term 15 Credits Per Academic Year 31 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2NDBACHELOR OF ARTS IN WRITING (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND II 3 Credits Per Term 15 Credits Per Term 15 Credits Per Academic Year 30 SECOND YEAR, 1ST TERM

  14. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Credits per academic year 32-33 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS EDUC 1307BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY EDUCATION (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS ENG 0101 English Composition I 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 BIO 0101

  15. BACHELOR OF SCIENCES IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Credits per term 15 Credits per academic year 31 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERMBACHELOR OF SCIENCES IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS ENG 0101 English Composition I 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 MGMT

  16. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Huiqiang

    or Political Science 3 Elective 1 Credits per term 16 Credits per term 15 Credits per academic year 31 FOURTH YEAR, FIRST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, SECOND TERM CREDITS MATH 1452 1 MATH 1452 Capstone: Mathematics 2BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING (Suggested 4 Year Plan) YEAR 1, 1ST TERM CREDITS YEAR 1, 2ND TERM

  17. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Per Academic Year 31 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS Sectoral EconomicsBACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS (Suggested 4 Year Plan) Please note that this is a potential plan for completing your degree within four years. The order of classes does not necessarily need to be followed

  18. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    , Philosophical Inquiry (NW) 3 Credits per term 15 Credits per term 15 Credits per academic year 30 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS Upper Level Major Elective (ENG 1499 InternshipBACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND

  19. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    Credits Per Academic Year 31 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS SOC 1401 SocialBACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND YEAR CREDITS FS 0102 Freshman Seminar 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 ENG 0101 English Composition

  20. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    and Letters 3 Total Credits Per Term 15 Total Credits Per Term 16 Total Credits Per Academic Year 31 FOURTH YEAR, FIRST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, SECOND TERM CREDITS CHEM 1451 Capstone 2 CHEM 1451 Capstone 2 GEBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, FIRST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR

  1. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PUBLIC RELATIONS (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    31 FOURTH YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS PR 1499 Internship in Public RelationsBACHELOR OF ARTS IN PUBLIC RELATIONS (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, 1ST TERM CREDITS FIRST YEAR, 2ND TERM CREDITS FS 0102 Freshman Seminar 3 ENG 0102 English Composition II 3 ENG 0101 English

  2. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS (Suggested 4 Year Plan)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    or Political Science 3 Elective 1 Credits per term 16 Credits per term 15 Credits per academic year 31 FOURTH YEAR, FIRST TERM CREDITS FOURTH YEAR, SECOND TERM CREDITS MATH 1452 1 MATH 1452 Capstone: Mathematics 2BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS (Suggested 4 Year Plan) FIRST YEAR, FIRST TERM CREDITS

  3. 682012-13SuggestedCoursePlan ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SPECIALIZATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    EE 364: Intro to Probability & Statistics ISE 460: Engineering Economy or BUAD 301: Technical682012-13SuggestedCoursePlan ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SPECIALIZATIONS CORE CURRICULUM All courses are required for an electrical engineering degree. EE 105 EE 330EE 202EE 101 EE 150 EE 355 EE 301 EE 364

  4. 722012-13SuggestedCoursePlan INDUSTRIAL & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    : Discrete Systems Simulation ISE 440: Work, Technology and Organization ISE 460: Engineering Economy ISE 495722012-13SuggestedCoursePlan INDUSTRIAL & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING FIRST YEAR FALL: 16 units SPRING: 15 ENGINEERING (58-59 UNITS) AME 341AL: Mechoptronics Laboratory I or EE 326LX: Essentials of Electrical Engr

  5. Computer Simulation Suggests Mechanisms That Drive Jovian Jet Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Simulation Suggests Mechanisms That Drive Jovian Jet Streams 06 September 2005 Lori Stiles activity may explain the multiple east-west jet streams on Jupiter and Saturn and even produce strong winds are driven. Scientists have been trying to understand the mechanisms that form the jet streams and control

  6. Incorporating Seasonality into Search Suggestions Derived from Intranet Query Logs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruschwitz, Udo

    Incorporating Seasonality into Search Suggestions Derived from Intranet Query Logs Stephen Dignum performed on query logs collected for major Web search engines, query log analysis to enhance search search engine can be enhanced by adapting the search system to real users' search behaviour through

  7. MPP (Planning & Economic Development Concentration) Requirements & Suggested Course Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frantz, Kyle J.

    of Planning Spring Fall PMAP 8321 Economic Development Policy PMAP 8521 Evaluation Research: DesignMPP (Planning & Economic Development Concentration) Requirements & Suggested Course Sequence 2013 and Analysis R PMAP 8321 Economic Development Policy R PMAP 8331 Urban Development and Growth Management E

  8. Bioengineering Curriculum Map-128 hrs Suggested Sequence by Semester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    Bioengineering Curriculum Map- 128 hrs Suggested Sequence by Semester C MATH 221 (4) Calculus I ENG 100 (0) Engineering Lecture BIOE 120 (1) Introduction to Bioengineering SS/Hum (3) 1 (16 hrs) MATH, Elec & Mag BIOE 206 (3) Cellular Bioengineering Track Elec (3) BIOE 415 (2) Biomedical Instrumentation

  9. Noise-induced Turbulence in Nonlocally Coupled Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoji Kawamura; Hiroya Nakao; Yoshiki Kuramoto

    2007-02-22

    We demonstrate that nonlocally coupled limit-cycle oscillators subject to spatiotemporally white Gaussian noise can exhibit a noise-induced transition to turbulent states. After illustrating noise-induced turbulent states with numerical simulations using two representative models of limit-cycle oscillators, we develop a theory that clarifies the effective dynamical instabilities leading to the turbulent behavior using a hierarchy of dynamical reduction methods. We determine the parameter region where the system can exhibit noise-induced turbulent states, which is successfully confirmed by extensive numerical simulations at each level of the reduction.

  10. Hot Particle and Turbulent Transport Effects on Resistive Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, Dylan P.

    2012-10-16

    This research project included two main thrusts; energetic particle effects on resistive MHD modes in tokamaks, and turbulence interactions with tearing modes in simplified geometry.

  11. DNS/LES of Complex Turbulent Flows | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hot oxygen. The green isocontours illustrate the turbulent structures in the fuel, the blue isocontours show the HO2 radical (an important precursor to autoignition), and the...

  12. Massively Parallel Simulations of Solar Flares and Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grauer, Rainer

    in space- and astrophysical plasmasystems include solar flares and hydro- or magnetohydrodynamic turbulence a pure MPI parallelization, which, however requires a careful optimization of the multi

  13. A Model for Turbulent Combustion Simulation of Large Scale Hydrogen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Model for Turbulent Combustion Simulation of Large Scale Hydrogen Explosions Event Sponsor: Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Seminar Start Date: Oct 6 2015 - 10:00am...

  14. Sandia Energy - Turbulent Mixed-Mode Combustion Studied in a...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbulent Mixed-Mode Combustion Studied in a New Piloted Burner Home Transportation Energy CRF Office of Science Capabilities News News & Events Research & Capabilities Fuel...

  15. Magnetostrophic balance as the optimal state for turbulent magnetoconvection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, EM; Aurnou, JM

    2015-01-01

    that the magnetostrophic balance is no longer attained (Magnetostrophic balance as the optimal state for turbulentLorentz and Coriolis forces balance. One can estimate the

  16. Gyrokinetic simulations of turbulent transport in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, Barrett Neil

    2013-05-30

    This is the final report for a DOE award that was targeted at understanding and simulating turbulence and transport in plasma fusion devices such as tokamaks.

  17. Toward the Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2013-07-26

    The goal of the project was to develop a theory of turbulence in magnetized plasmas at large scales, that is, scales larger than the characteristic plasma microscales (ion gyroscale, ion inertial scale, etc.). Collisions of counter-propagating Alfven packets govern the turbulent cascade of energy toward small scales. It has been established that such an energy cascade is intrinsically anisotropic, in that it predominantly supplies energy to the modes with mostly field-perpendicular wave numbers. The resulting energy spectrum of MHD turbulence, and the structure of the fluctuations were studied both analytically and numerically. A new parallel numerical code was developed for simulating reduced MHD equations driven by an external force. The numerical setting was proposed, where the spectral properties of the force could be varied in order to simulate either strong or weak turbulent regimes. It has been found both analytically and numerically that weak MHD turbulence spontaneously generates a “condensate”, that is, concentration of magnetic and kinetic energy at small k{sub {parallel}}. A related topic that was addressed in the project is turbulent dynamo action, that is, generation of magnetic field in a turbulent flow. We were specifically concentrated on the generation of large-scale magnetic field compared to the scales of the turbulent velocity field. We investigate magnetic field amplification in a turbulent velocity field with nonzero helicity, in the framework of the kinematic Kazantsev-Kraichnan model.

  18. Sandia Energy - The CRF's Turbulent Combustion Lab (TCL) Captures...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CRF's Turbulent Combustion Lab (TCL) Captures the Moment of Hydrogen Ignition Home Energy Transportation Energy CRF Facilities News News & Events Research & Capabilities The CRF's...

  19. Vertical stratified turbulent transport mechanism indicated by remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson; R. Norris Keeler; Valery G. Bondur

    2007-12-02

    Satellite and shipboard data reveal the intermittent vertical information transport mechanism of turbulence and internal waves that mixes the ocean, atmosphere, planets and stars.

  20. Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Identification of new turbulence contributions to plasma transport and confinement in spherical tokamak regime Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly...

  1. MHD turbulence model for global simulations of the solar wind and SEP acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Roussev, Ilia I.

    2008-08-25

    The aim of the present work is to unify the various transport equations for turbulent waves that are used in different areas of space physics. We mostly focus on the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, in particular the Alfvenic turbulence.

  2. Toward Understanding and Modeling Compressibility Effects on Velocity Gradients in Turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suman, Sawan

    2011-02-22

    Development of improved turbulence closure models for compressible fluid flow simulations requires better understanding of the effects of compressibility on various underlying processes of turbulence. Fundamental studies of turbulent velocity...

  3. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Turbulent flame speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Direct numerical simulations of the interaction of a premixed flame with driven, subsonic, homogeneous, isotropic, Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system are used to study the mechanisms determining the turbulent flame speed, S{sub T}, in the thin reaction zone regime. High intensity turbulence is considered with the r.m.s. velocity 35 times the laminar flame speed, S{sub L}, resulting in the Damkoehler number Da=0.05. The simulations were performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive-flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model, based on the one-step Arrhenius kinetics, represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture under the assumption of the Lewis number Le=1. Global properties and the internal structure of the flame were analyzed in an earlier paper, which showed that this system represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. This paper demonstrates that: (1) The flame brush has a complex internal structure, in which the isosurfaces of higher fuel mass fractions are folded on progressively smaller scales. (2) Global properties of the turbulent flame are best represented by the structure of the region of peak reaction rate, which defines the flame surface. (3) In the thin reaction zone regime, S{sub T} is predominantly determined by the increase of the flame surface area, A{sub T}, caused by turbulence. (4) The observed increase of S{sub T} relative to S{sub L} exceeds the corresponding increase of A{sub T} relative to the surface area of the planar laminar flame, on average, by {approx}14%, varying from only a few percent to as high as {approx}30%. (5) This exaggerated response is the result of tight flame packing by turbulence, which causes frequent flame collisions and formation of regions of high flame curvature >or similar 1/{delta}{sub L}, or ''cusps,'' where {delta}{sub L} is the thermal width of the laminar flame. (6) The local flame speed in the cusps substantially exceeds its laminar value, which results in a disproportionately large contribution of cusps to S{sub T} compared with the flame surface area in them. (7) A criterion is established for transition to the regime significantly influenced by cusp formation. In particular, at Karlovitz numbers Ka >or similar 20, flame collisions provide an important mechanism controlling S{sub T}, in addition to the increase of A{sub T} by large-scale motions and the potential enhancement of diffusive transport by small-scale turbulence. (author)

  4. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  5. Suggested Talking Points for Hydrogen Road Tour | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department of Energy 1Department ofLithiumSuccessesSuggested

  6. OPEC's investments and the international financial system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattione, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    Few events of the past decade have affected the global economic and political landscape as much as the sharp increase in the price of oil in 1973-74 and again in 1979-80. The massive transfer of real resources from mostly Western oil-consuming nations to oil-producing countries, especially to members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, raised widespread fears that actions of OPEC nations could disrupt world financial markets, that oil markets and energy supplies would become unstable, and that a significant shift of political power would increase international tensions. In this study of how OPEC nations have used and learned to invest their wealth, Richard P. Mattione shows that the fears, have not in any significant way been realized. Mattione is the first to analyze in detail the size and distribution of the investments, their effects on the international financial system, and the motivations behind each OPEC member's investment strategy. Analyzing hard-to-find data from a variety of sources, he argues that investments in the United States and elsewhere have been motivated at least as much by conventional financial considerations - the need for liquidity, diversification, safety, and adequate rate of return - as by oil policy, development policy, or political considerations. He also traces the growth of these countries' abilities to absorb funds through internal development, their growing sophistication in financial planning and in moving Arab banks into international financial markets, and their mixed success in using aid to Third World countries to further their foreign policy goals. The book concludes with an analysis of the interplay of oil prices and policy, development needs, and financial strategies and their implication for the investments of each OPEC member in the 1980s. 33 tabs.

  7. Financial and Physical Oil Market Linkages

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |Final Report DocumentRatesFinancialFinancial Statement:

  8. Financial and Physical Oil Market Linkages II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) |Final Report DocumentRatesFinancialFinancial Statement:II

  9. Battling Golden Algae: Results suggest preventative lake management approaches 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info Battling Golden Algae.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 10626 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Battling Golden Algae.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 14 tx H2...O Winter 2011 Story by Danielle Supercinski Battling golden algae Results suggest preventative lake management approaches Golden algae blooms, or the explosive growth of algae, are known to be toxic, but recent ?ndings from three university...

  10. Battling golden algae: Results suggest preventative lake managment approaches 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercinski, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    stream_source_info Battling Golden Algae.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 10626 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Battling Golden Algae.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 14 tx H2...O Winter 2011 Story by Danielle Supercinski Battling golden algae Results suggest preventative lake management approaches Golden algae blooms, or the explosive growth of algae, are known to be toxic, but recent ?ndings from three university...

  11. Suggestions for Controlling Insects in Farm-Stored Grain. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamman, Philip J.

    1982-01-01

    Suggestions B-1410 for Controlling Insects ? In Farm-Stored Grain The Texas A&M University System ? Texas Agricultural Extension Service JUN 2 0 2002 Zerle L. Carpenter . Director College Station Figure 1. The map shows, by regions, the degree... to which farm-stored grain in the United States is subject to insect attack: Region 1, little if any damage occurs to grain on the farm during the first season's storage. Region 2, insects may be troublesome during the first season. Region 3, insects...

  12. Transition to turbulence in particulate pipe flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matas, J P; Guazzelli, E; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Guazzelli, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the influence of suspended particles on the transition to turbulence. The particles are monodisperse and neutrally-buoyant with the liquid. The role of the particles on the transition depends both upon the pipe to particle diameter ratios and the concentration. For large pipe-to-particle diameter ratios the transition is delayed while it is lowered for small ratios. A scaling is proposed to collapse the departure from the critical Reynolds number for pure fluid as a function of concentration into a single master curve.

  13. PLASMA EMISSION BY WEAK TURBULENCE PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.; Pavan, J. E-mail: rudi.gaelzer@ufrgs.br E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br

    2014-11-10

    The plasma emission is the radiation mechanism responsible for solar type II and type III radio bursts. The first theory of plasma emission was put forth in the 1950s, but the rigorous demonstration of the process based upon first principles had been lacking. The present Letter reports the first complete numerical solution of electromagnetic weak turbulence equations. It is shown that the fundamental emission is dominant and unless the beam speed is substantially higher than the electron thermal speed, the harmonic emission is not likely to be generated. The present findings may be useful for validating reduced models and for interpreting particle-in-cell simulations.

  14. Neutrino oscillations in a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendonça, J. T.; Haas, F.

    2013-07-15

    A new model for the joint neutrino flavor and plasma oscillations is introduced, in terms of the dynamics of the neutrino flavor polarization vector in a plasma background. Fundamental solutions are found for both time-invariant and time-dependent media, considering slow and fast variations of the electron plasma density. The model is shown to be described by a generalized Hamiltonian formalism. In the case of a broad spectrum of electron plasma waves, a statistical approach indicates the shift of both equilibrium value and frequency oscillation of flavor coherence, due to the existence of a turbulent plasma background.

  15. Lyapunov exponents of heavy particles in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremie Bec; Luca Biferale; Guido Boffetta; Massimo Cencini; Stefano Musacchio; Federico Toschi

    2006-06-08

    Lyapunov exponents of heavy particles and tracers advected by homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows are investigated by means of direct numerical simulations. For large values of the Stokes number, the main effect of inertia is to reduce the chaoticity with respect to fluid tracers. Conversely, for small inertia, a counter-intuitive increase of the first Lyapunov exponent is observed. The flow intermittency is found to induce a Reynolds number dependency for the statistics of the finite time Lyapunov exponents of tracers. Such intermittency effects are found to persist at increasing inertia.

  16. Characteristics of Plasma Turbulence in the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghim, Young-chul

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is a major factor limiting the achievement of better tokamak performance as it enhances the transport of particles, momentum and heat which hinders the foremost objective of tokamaks. Hence, understanding and possibly being able to control turbulence in tokamaks is of paramount importance, not to mention our intellectual curiosity of it.

  17. TURBULENT-LAMINAR PATTERNS IN PLANE COUETTE Dwight Barkley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkley, Dwight

    @limsi.fr Abstract Regular patterns of turbulent and laminar fluid motion arise in plane Couette flow near the lowest and is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid. See figure 1. For all val- ues of ¡£¢ , laminar Couette flow at an angle to the streamwise direction. Fluid flows exhibiting coexisting turbulent and laminar regions have

  18. Preventing transition to turbulence using streamwise traveling waves: theoretical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Mihailo

    . INTRODUCTION Fluid motion is usually classified as either laminar or turbulent; flows that are smooth force on a vehicle moving through a fluid in the laminar regime. Sensorless flow control represents and ordered (laminar) may become complex and disordered (turbulent) as the flow strength increases

  19. Skin friction and pressure: the "footprints" of turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protas, Bartosz

    been a flurry of activity in controlling both laminar and turbulent flows in certain idealized settings, and to begin to shed light on how to control fluid flow in practical engineering applications with modelSkin friction and pressure: the "footprints" of turbulence Thomas R. Bewley and Bartosz Protas Flow

  20. Advanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and developed a data post-processing method to reduce the cost of flow and turbulence measurements at MHKAdvanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization and flow characterization within full scale conventional hydropower systems, at marine and hydrokinetic

  1. Assessment of turbulence by high-order statistics. Offshore example.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research University of Oldenburg, Germany 1 Summary OffshoreAssessment of turbulence by high-order statistics. Offshore example. Allan Morales Joachim Peinke. Keywords: Offshore turbulence. Intermittency. Tur- bulence Intensity. Log-Normal distributions. 2 Data sets

  2. Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    in a supersonic turbulent crossflow By S. Kawai AND S. K. Lele 1. Motivation and objectives Important recent load, etc. Jet mixing in a supersonic crossflow (JISC) is a type of flow where compressible LES can, the enhancement of supersonic turbulent mixing of jet fuel and crossflow air is a critical issue in developing

  3. Fluctuations of energy flux in wave turbulence Eric Falcon,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcon, Eric

    Fluctuations of energy flux in wave turbulence ´Eric Falcon,1 S´ebastien Auma^itre,2 Claudio Falc gravity and capillary wave turbulence in a statistically stationary regime displays fluctuations much interactions transfer kinetic energy toward small scales where viscous dissipation takes place

  4. Time-Varying Stochastic Turbulence Model Curtis R. Vogela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Curtis

    Time-Varying Stochastic Turbulence Model Curtis R. Vogela aDepartment of Mathematical Sciences for time-varying turbulence. The model can be viewed as a linearization of the Navier-Stokes equation, with deterministic drift and diffusion terms, plus an additional stochastic driving term. Fixed-time realizations

  5. Passive Tomography of Turbulence Strength Marina Alterman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechner, Yoav Yosef

    industrial, rural and urban areas. 1 The Need to Recover Turbulence Strength Turbulence creates refractive. Hence, modeling and trying to compensate for random refractive distortions has long been studied), wind, and atmospheric stability. This is measured using special Doppler lidars [9, 31], which are very

  6. Growth of Cloud Droplets in a Turbulent Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lian-Ping

    Growth of Cloud Droplets in a Turbulent Environment Wojciech W. Grabowski1 and Lian-Ping Wang2 1 Keywords condensational growth, turbulent collision-coalescence, particle-laden flow, cloud microphysical concerning the growth of cloud droplets by water-vapor diffu- sion and by collision

  7. Large-Scale Streamwise Turbulent Structures in Hypersonic Boundary Layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Benjamin L.

    2013-04-22

    Prior research in the field of boundary layer turbulence has identified streamwise-elongated large-scale turbulence structures in both low speed compressible and high speed (M=2.0) flow. No experimental work has been done in any flow of M> or =3...

  8. Network Based Evaluation Method for Financial Analysis of Toll Roads 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajdic, Nevena

    2011-02-22

    common financial instruments were analyzed: bank loans, bonds and real options. Emphasis of the financial feasibility assessment was on the price of the revenue risk, as the most important risk in public private partnership agreements. Results have shown...

  9. Asset liability management throughout macroeconomic cycle in financial institutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Jingsi

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis, we are going to study asset liability management throughout the macroeconomic cycle in financial institutions. There are two important problems in financial institutions. The first is that asset and liability ...

  10. Development and application of a photovoltaic financial model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Brad

    2010-01-01

    Due to the relative immaturity of the solar farm industry, there are very few comprehensive financial models in use. I address this by developing a photovoltaic NPV financial model and apply the model to various base cases ...

  11. Keeping It Simple: Financial Literacy and Rules of Thumb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drexler, Alejandro

    Micro-entrepreneurs often lack the financial literacy required to make important financial decisions. We conducted a randomized evaluation with a bank in the Dominican Republic to compare the impact of two distinct programs: ...

  12. ACCOUNTING FOR CAPITAL Financial Policies and Procedures for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    ACCOUNTING FOR CAPITAL PROJECTS Financial Policies and Procedures for the Capital Project Delivery Process Office of the CFO #12;Project Accounting Kimberley Rourke Manager, Project Accounting Correen Baker Fiscal Manager Lynn Chapdelaine Accountant Tammie Corioso Accountant #12;Financial Policies

  13. Determinants of Role Structure in Family Financial Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Dennis L.; Granbois, Donald H.

    1983-01-01

    Variables determining the role of husband and wife in family financial management are explored based on in-home, personal interviews. Financial tasks reflecting implementation activities and two groupings of decision ...

  14. Policy Flash 20 Acquisition Letter 2014-05/Financial Acquisition...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    301 Contract Award letter FY2014 March 5.pdf Attachment 2A1 DOE Section 301 Financial Assistance Letter FY2014 March 5 2014.pdf Attachment 2A2 DOE Section 301 Financial Assistance...

  15. Privacy-Preserving Methods for Sharing Financial Risk Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbe, Emmanuel A.

    The financial industry relies on trade secrecy to protect its business processes and methods, which can obscure critical financial risk exposures from regulators and the public. Using results from cryptography, we develop ...

  16. The Inherent Inefficiency of Simultaneously Feasible Financial Transmission Rights Auctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transmission right, electricity auction, simultaneous feasibility, transmission pricing. I. INTRODUCTION POINTThe Inherent Inefficiency of Simultaneously Feasible Financial Transmission Rights Auctions Shi as financial transmission rights (FTRs), resulting from centralized auctions conducted by Independent System

  17. Controller's office Division of Financial Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    : 5612976101 Fax: 5612970683 www.fau.edu Request For Change In Billing Of Florida Prepaid Students in the event that you do not have enough credits remaining in the Prepaid Program. Florida Prepaid College a combination of both Florida Prepaid and financial aid that will cover the entire balance owed

  18. Section 4 -Financial Information A. General Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    Section 4 - Financial Information A. General Information 1. All University Housing and Dining fees of Alaska campuses until the debt is paid in full. B. Security deposit 1. A security deposit is required performance of the agreement, and (2) for damages beyond normal wear and tear. The security deposit does

  19. Financial Literacy Effectiveness in Central Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Lauren Pheriche

    2014-05-01

    consumers from making costly mistakes; for example, if consumers know about interest charges on 10 credit cards, they can avoid such charges by paying the balance in full. There are some compelling correlations between financial literacy... Debt Scores Disaggregated- Credit Management............................... 46 Table 5: Healthy Savings Scores..................................................................................... 47 Table 6: Healthy Savings Scores Disaggregated...

  20. FINANCIAL HEDGING OF OPERATIONAL FLEXIBILITY MICHAEL LUDKOVSKI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludkovski, Mike

    -dependency. Moreover, the operator is only able to imperfectly hedge her income on the futures market. Using options, stochastic income. 1 #12;FINANCIAL HEDGING OF OPERATIONAL FLEXIBILITY 2 1. INTRODUCTION. The manager in charge has control over the operating modes and attempts to maximize expected profit which

  1. Banner Financial Aid Account Request Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    Banner Financial Aid Account Request Form ETSU Office of Information Technology 424 Roy Nicks Hall, Box 70728 Johnson City, Tennessee 37614 (423) 439-4648 · oithelp@etsu.edu This section for use ______________________________________________________________________________________ [last] [first] [middle] ETSU Domain Name ____________________@etsu.edu School / College

  2. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS 1999 2000 3/31/96=1 S&P 500 S&P Non-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn; Pulp: MM tons) 0 20 40 60 80 1989 1999 1989 1999 1989 1999 Lumber-US Lumber-Canada Structural Panels

  3. FINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the economy ­ and demand for paper and wood -- is slowing. The recent softness in market pulp pricesFINANCIAL TRENDS IN THE FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY PRESENTATION TO INTERNATIONAL FOREST PRODUCTS-Technology S&P Paper & Forest Products #12;Source: National Assn. of Home Builders U.S. HOUSING STARTS Million

  4. Big Data Analytics in Financial Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Demographic and Weather Big Data · OfficeMax personalizes online landing pages based on customerBig Data Analytics in Financial Statement Audits Min Cao Roman Chychyla Trevor Stewart February 26th, 2015 #12;Big Data Analytics · Big Data analytics is the process of inspecting, cleaning

  5. ARTICLE XIX SALARY AND OTHER FINANCIAL BENEFITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    107 ARTICLE XIX SALARY AND OTHER FINANCIAL BENEFITS Preamble and Conditions Precedent The cost to fully fund such cost items has been enacted in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws. A. Salary, 2012, who meets the eligibility criteria for satisfactory performance shall receive a salary rate

  6. Financial Policy Manual 2107 ACCOUNTING AUTHORITY & RESPONSIBILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2107 ACCOUNTING AUTHORITY & RESPONSIBILITY Effective: December 1986: Research Services PURPOSE To assign authority and responsibility for the accounting for sponsored projects must be separately accounted for per the terms of the award An advance account may be established prior

  7. Financial Policy Manual 2111 UNALLOWABLE COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2111 UNALLOWABLE COSTS Effective: August 1998 Last Revision PURPOSE: To establish policy for the accounting of costs which are unallowable charges against federally sponsored projects. POLICY: 1. The following costs are unallowable charges to sponsored projects as either

  8. UNDERGRADUATE FINANCIAL AID 220 West College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jaswinder Pal

    UNDERGRADUATE FINANCIAL AID 220 West College REQUEST FOR SUMMER SAVINGS REPLACEMENT Do not mail _________ I was unable to meet my summer savings expectation for the reason(s) listed below and request __________________________________________ Date ____________ I worked but did not save the amount expected. Total Earnings $__________ Summer

  9. Scale invariance at the onset of turbulence in Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Liang; Hof, Bjoern

    2013-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent intermittency is intrinsic to the transitional regime of a wide range of fluid flows including pipe, channel, boundary layer and Couette flow. In the latter turbulent spots can grow and form continuous stripes, yet in the stripe-normal direction they remain interspersed by laminar fluid. We carry out direct numerical simulations in a long narrow domain and observe that individual turbulent stripes are transient. In agreement with recent observations in pipe flow we find that turbulence becomes sustained at a distinct critical point once the spatial proliferation outweighs the inherent decaying process. By resolving the asymptotic size distributions close to criticality we can for the first time demonstrate scale invariance at the onset of turbulence.

  10. Gyrokinetic turbulence: a nonlinear route to dissipation through phase space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Schekochihin; S. C. Cowley; W. Dorland; G. W. Hammett; G. G. Howes; G. G. Plunk; E. Quataert; T. Tatsuno

    2008-11-04

    This paper describes a conceptual framework for understanding kinetic plasma turbulence as a generalized form of energy cascade in phase space. It is emphasized that conversion of turbulent energy into thermodynamic heat is only achievable in the presence of some (however small) degree of collisionality. The smallness of the collision rate is compensated by the emergence of small-scale structure in the velocity space. For gyrokinetic turbulence, a nonlinear perpendicular phase mixing mechanism is identified and described as a turbulent cascade of entropy fluctuations simultaneously occurring at spatial scales smaller than the ion gyroscale and in velocity space. Scaling relations for the resulting fluctuation spectra are derived. An estimate for the collisional cutoff is provided. The importance of adequately modeling and resolving collisions in gyrokinetic simulations is biefly discussed, as well as the relevance of these results to understanding the dissipation-range turbulence in the solar wind and the electrostatic microturbulence in fusion plasmas.

  11. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munroe, James R.; Sutherland, Bruce R.

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  12. Non-Linear Stochastic Fractional Programming Model of Financial ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-04-19

    of financial derivatives- II, Proceedings of International Conference on Business ... optimum allocation of recruitment in manpower planning, International Journal

  13. One-dimensional turbulence model simulations of autoignition of hydrogen/carbon monoxide fuel mixtures in a turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Kamlesh G.; Echekki, Tarek [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The autoignition of hydrogen/carbon monoxide in a turbulent jet with preheated co-flow air is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model. The simulations are performed at atmospheric pressure based on varying the jet Reynolds number and the oxidizer preheat temperature for two compositions corresponding to varying the ratios of H{sub 2} and CO in the fuel stream. Moreover, simulations for homogeneous autoignition are implemented for similar mixture conditions for comparison with the turbulent jet results. The results identify the key effects of differential diffusion and turbulence on the onset and eventual progress of autoignition in the turbulent jets. The differential diffusion of hydrogen fuels results in a reduction of the ignition delay relative to similar conditions of homogeneous autoignition. Turbulence may play an important role in delaying ignition at high-turbulence conditions, a process countered by the differential diffusion of hydrogen relative to carbon monoxide; however, when ignition is established, turbulence enhances the overall rates of combustion of the non-premixed flame downstream of the ignition point. (author)

  14. CMC Markets Stockbroking Limited Financial Services Guide (FSG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    and responsibility of CMC Markets Stockbroking when it provides retail clients with the financial services describedCMC Markets Stockbroking Limited Financial Services Guide (FSG) 1 October 2013 AFSL No. 246381 and ABN 69 081 002 851 #12;Table of Contents CMC Markets Stockbroking Limited | Financial Services Guide 2

  15. Optimal lengthscale for a turbulent dynamo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadek, Mira; Fauve, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that there is an optimal forcing length scale for low Prandtl number dynamo flows, that can significantly reduce the required energy injection rate. The investigation is based on simulations of the induction equation in a periodic box of size $2\\pi L$. The flows considered are turbulent ABC flows forced at different forcing wavenumbers $k_f$ simulated using a subgrid turbulent model. The critical magnetic Reynolds number $Rm_c^T$ decreases as the forcing wavenumber $k_f$ increases from the smallest allowed $k_{min}=1/L$. At large $k_f$ on the other hand, $Rm_c^T$ increases with the forcing wavenumber as $Rm_c^T \\propto \\sqrt{ k_f}$ in agreement with mean-field scaling prediction. At $k_f L\\simeq 4$ an optimal wavenumber is reached where $Rm_c^T$ obtains its minimum value. At this optimal wavenumber $Rm_c^T$ is smaller by more than a factor of ten than the case forced in $k_f=1$. This leads to a reduction of the energy injection rate by three orders of magnitude when compared to the case that th...

  16. Laminated Wave Turbulence: Generic Algorithms III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Kartashova; Alexey Kartashov

    2007-01-11

    Model of laminated wave turbulence allows to study statistical and discrete layers of turbulence in the frame of the same model. Statistical layer is described by Zakharov-Kolmogorov energy spectra in the case of irrational enough dispersion function. Discrete layer is covered by some system(s) of Diophantine equations while their form is determined by wave dispersion function. This presents a very special computational challenge - to solve Diophantine equations in many variables, usually 6 to 8, in high degrees, say 16, in integers of order $10^{16}$ and more. Generic algorithms for solving this problem in the case of {\\it irrational} dispersion function have been presented in our previous papers. In this paper we present a new generic algorithm for the case of {\\it rational} dispersion functions. Special importance of this case is due to the fact that in wave systems with rational dispersion the statistical layer does not exist and the general energy transport is governed by the discrete layer alone.

  17. Spark ignition of lifted turbulent jet flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, S.F.; Mastorakos, E. [Hopkinson Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents experiments on ignition and subsequent edge flame propagation in turbulent nonpremixed methane jets in air. The spark position, energy, duration, electrode diameter and gap, and the jet velocity and air premixing of the fuel stream are examined to study their effects on the ignition probability defined as successful flame establishment. The flame is visualized by a high-speed camera and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH. It was found that after an initially spherical shape, the flame took a cylindrical shape with a propagating edge upstream. The probability of successful ignition increases with high spark energy, thin electrode diameter and wide gap, but decreases with increasing dilution of the jet with air. The flame kernel growth rate is high when the ignition probability is high for all parameters, except for jet velocity. Increasing the jet velocity decreases the ignition probability at all locations. The average flame position as a function of time from the spark was measured and the data were used to estimate a net propagation speed, which then resulted in an estimate of the average edge flame speed relative to the incoming flow. This was about 3 to 6 laminar burning velocities of a stoichiometric mixture. The measurements can assist theoretical models for the probability of ignition of nonpremixed flames and for edge flame propagation in turbulent inhomogeneous mixtures, both of which determine the success of ignition in practical combustion systems. (author)

  18. Magnetic flux concentrations from turbulent stratified convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Käpylä, P J; Kleeorin, N; Käpylä, M J; Rogachevskii, I

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) Context: The mechanisms that cause the formation of sunspots are still unclear. Aims: We study the self-organisation of initially uniform sub-equipartition magnetic fields by highly stratified turbulent convection. Methods: We perform simulations of magnetoconvection in Cartesian domains that are $8.5$-$24$ Mm deep and $34$-$96$ Mm wide. We impose either a vertical or a horizontal uniform magnetic field in a convection-driven turbulent flow. Results: We find that super-equipartition magnetic flux concentrations are formed near the surface with domain depths of $12.5$ and $24$ Mm. The size of the concentrations increases as the box size increases and the largest structures ($20$ Mm horizontally) are obtained in the 24 Mm deep models. The field strength in the concentrations is in the range of $3$-$5$ kG. The concentrations grow approximately linearly in time. The effective magnetic pressure measured in the simulations is positive near the surface and negative in the bulk of the convection zone. Its ...

  19. Transition radiation in turbulent astrophysical medium. Application to solar radio bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory D. Fleishman; Dale E. Gary; Gelu M. Nita

    2007-10-01

    Modern observations and models of various astrophysical objects suggest that many of their physical parameters fluctuate substantially at different spatial scales. The rich variety of the emission processes, including Transition Radiation but not limited to it, arising in such turbulent media constitutes the scope of Stochastic Theory of Radiation. We review general approaches applied in the stochastic theory of radiation and specific methods used to calculate the transition radiation produced by fast particles in the magnetized randomly inhomogeneous plasma. The importance of the theory of transition radiation for astrophysics is illustrated by one example of its detailed application to a solar radio burst, including specially designed algorithms of the spectral forward fitting.

  20. The future of financial markets and regulation: What Strategy for Europe? The Future of Financial Markets and Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The future of financial markets and regulation: What Strategy for Europe? 1 The Future of Financial Markets and Regulation: What Strategy for Europe? Jean-Baptiste Gossé1 Dominique Plihon2 Abstract This article provides insight into the future of financial markets and regulation in order to define what would

  1. Evidence of Shock-Driven Turbulence in the Solar Chromosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. P. Reardon; F. Lepreti; V. Carbone; A. Vecchio

    2008-09-24

    We study the acoustic properties of the solar chromosphere in the high-frequency regime using a time sequence of velocity measurements in the chromospheric Ca II 854.2 nm line taken with the Interferometric Bidimensional Spectrometer (IBIS). We concentrate on quiet-Sun behavior, apply Fourier analysis, and characterize the observations in terms of the probability density functions (PDFs) of velocity increments. We confirm the presence of significant oscillatory fluctuation power above the cutoff frequency and find that it obeys a power-law distribution with frequency up to our 25 mHz Nyquist limit. The chromospheric PDFs are non-Gaussian and asymmetric and they differ among network, fibril, and internetwork regions. This suggests that the chromospheric high-frequency power is not simply the result of short-period waves propagating upward from the photosphere but rather is the signature of turbulence generated within the chromosphere from shock oscillations near the cutoff frequency. The presence of this pervasive and broad spectrum of motions in the chromosphere is likely to have implications for the excitation of coronal loop oscillations.

  2. Laminar-Turbulent Transition: Calculation of Minimum Critical Reynolds Number in Channel Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laminar-Turbulent Transition: Calculation of Minimum Critical Reynolds Number in Channel Flow) for laminar-turbulent transition in pipe and channel flows. For pipe flow, the minimum critical Reynolds laminar to turbulent flow Rc2 Rc from turbulent to laminar flow Rc(min) minimum Rc Re Reynolds number = UH

  3. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    . INTRODUCTION The complex small-scale dynamics of turbulent thermonuclear flames are essential to understanding

  4. High-performance Computation and Visualization of Plasma Turbulence on Graphics Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varshney, Amitabh

    thermonuclear fusion devices. Turbulence in plasma can lead to energy losses and various catastrophic events

  5. TURBULENT PRESSURE IN THE ENVELOPES OF YELLOW HYPERGIANTS AND LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TURBULENT PRESSURE IN THE ENVELOPES OF YELLOW HYPERGIANTS AND LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLES Richard B turbulent pressure) affects the structure and stability of luminous post­red-supergiant stars is critically radiative, making both the turbulent pressure and the turbulent kinetic energy flux structurally unimportant

  6. Propagation of light beams in anisotropic nonlinear media: From symmetry breaking to spatial turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    turbulence A. V. Mamaev* and M. Saffman Department of Optics and Fluid Dynamics, Riso" National Laboratory

  7. Turbulent regimes in the tokamak scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosetto, Annamaria; Halpern, Federico D.; Jolliet, Sébastien; Loizu, Joaquim; Ricci, Paolo [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-09-15

    The non-linear turbulent regimes in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) are identified according to the linear instability responsible for the perpendicular transport. Four regions of the SOL operational parameters are determined where turbulence is driven by the inertial or resistive branches of the ballooning mode or of drift waves. The analysis, based on the linear electrostatic drift-reduced Braginskii equations, evaluates the pressure scale length self-consistently from the balance between plasma losses at the vessel and perpendicular turbulent transport. The latter is estimated by assuming that turbulence saturation occurs due to a local flattening of the plasma gradients and associated removal of the linear instability drive; it is also shown that transport is led by the mode that maximizes the ratio of the linear growth to the poloidal wavenumber. The methodology used to identify the turbulent regimes is confirmed by the results of non-linear simulations of SOL turbulence. The identification of the turbulent regimes, the predicted pressure scale length, and the poloidal wavenumber of the leading mode are in reasonable agreement with non-linear simulation results.

  8. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Guangyuan, E-mail: gysungrad@gmail.com; Lignell, David O., E-mail: davidlignell@byu.edu [Chemical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States); Hewson, John C., E-mail: jchewso@sandia.gov [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Gin, Craig R., E-mail: cgin@math.tamu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. Here, we present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. The particle implementation introduces a single model parameter ?{sub p}, and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. These results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  9. On the Turbulence Beneath Finite Amplitude Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babanin, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    The paper by Beya et al. (2012, hereinafter BPB) has a general title of Turbulence Beneath Finite Amplitude Water Waves, but is solely dedicated to discussing the experiment by Babanin and Haus (2009, hereinafter BH) who conducted measurements of wave-induced non-breaking turbulence by particle image velocimetry (PIV). The authors of BPB conclude that their observations contradict those of BH. Here we argue that the outcomes of BPB do not contradict BH. In addition, although the main conclusion of BPB is that there is no turbulence observed in their experiment, it actually is observed.

  10. Kolmogorov Dispersion for Turbulence in Porous Media: A Conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikas K. Chakrabarti

    2006-12-26

    We will utilise the self-avoiding walk (SAW) mapping of the vortex line conformations in turbulence to get the Kolmogorov scale dependence of energy dispersion from SAW statistics, and the knowledge of the disordered fractal geometries on the SAW statistics. These will give us the Kolmogorov energy dispersion exponent value for turbulence in porous media in terms of the size exponent for polymers in the same. We argue that the exponent value will be somewhat less than 5/3 for turbulence in porous media.

  11. Edge Turbulence Velocity Changes with Lithium Coating on NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, A.; Zweben, S. J.; Stotler, D. P.; Bell, M.; Diallo, A.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.

    2012-08-10

    Lithium coating improves energy confinement and eliminates edge localized modes in NSTX, but the mechanism of this improvement is not yet well understood. We used the gas-puff-imaging (GPI) diagnostic on NSTX to measure the changes in edge turbulence which occurred during a scan with variable lithium wall coating, in order to help understand the reason for the confinement improvement with lithium. There was a small increase in the edge turbulence poloidal velocity and a decrease in the poloidal velocity fluctuation level with increased lithium. The possible effect of varying edge neutral density on turbulence damping was evaluated for these cases in NSTX. __________________________________________________

  12. Social Welfare Issues of Financial Literacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchell, S. E.; Williams, O. J.

    of households in ad- vanced economies typically ‘outsource’ this forecasting problem to professional fund managers. Within that industry active, rather than passive, management of assets is often equated with forecasting skill and presumably active managers... of economics, encompassing issues at the level of the individual, such as consumers’ ability to manage a household budget or make informed decisions about credit, as well as at the aggregate level, such as the impact of financial literacy on stock...

  13. Federal financial assistance for hydroelectric power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The Rural Energy Initiative seeks to maximize the effectiveness of Federal programs in developing certain energy resources, including small-scale hydropower. The REI target is to arrange financing for 100 hydro sites by 1981, with about 300 MWe of additional capacity. The REI financial assistance programs for small hydropower development in the US DOE; Economic Development Administration; REA; HUD; Farmers Home Administration; DOI; DOL's CETA programs; and the Community Services Administration are described. (MCW)

  14. FY 2007 Financial Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeCommunication3-EDepartmentExerciseCarbon CaptureNational NuclearBudget7 Financial

  15. Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy Services »Information Resources » Fuel Cell TechnologiesFinancial

  16. Related Financial Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnowRedox ShuttleRegisterRelated Financial

  17. Tribal Financial Management Symposium | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancialInvestingRenewableTeach and Learn5Shopping

  18. Laminated Wave Turbulence: Generic Algorithms II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena Kartashova; Alexey Kartashov

    2006-11-17

    The model of laminated wave turbulence puts forth a novel computational problem - construction of fast algorithms for finding exact solutions of Diophantine equations in integers of order $10^{12}$ and more. The equations to be solved in integers are resonant conditions for nonlinearly interacting waves and their form is defined by the wave dispersion. It is established that for the most common dispersion as an arbitrary function of a wave-vector length two different generic algorithms are necessary: (1) one-class-case algorithm for waves interacting through scales, and (2) two-class-case algorithm for waves interacting through phases. In our previous paper we described the one-class-case generic algorithm and in our present paper we present the two-class-case generic algorithm.

  19. Turbulent strings in AdS/CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    We study nonlinear dynamics of the flux tube between an external quark-antiquark pair in $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills theory using the AdS/CFT duality. In the gravity side, the flux tube is realized by a fundamental string whose endpoints are attached to the AdS boundary. We perturb the endpoints in various ways and numerically compute the time evolution of the nonlinearly oscillating string. As a result, cusps can form on the string, accompanied by weak turbulence and power law behavior in the energy spectrum. When cusps traveling on the string reach the boundary, we observe the divergence of the force between the quark and antiquark. Minimal amplitude of the perturbation below which cusps do not form is also investigated. No cusp formation is found when the string moves in all four AdS space directions, and in this case an inverse energy cascade follows a direct cascade.

  20. Turbulent strings in AdS/CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takaaki Ishii; Keiju Murata

    2015-06-25

    We study nonlinear dynamics of the flux tube between an external quark-antiquark pair in $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills theory using the AdS/CFT duality. In the gravity side, the flux tube is realized by a fundamental string whose endpoints are attached to the AdS boundary. We perturb the endpoints in various ways and numerically compute the time evolution of the nonlinearly oscillating string. As a result, cusps can form on the string, accompanied by weak turbulence and power law behavior in the energy spectrum. When cusps traveling on the string reach the boundary, we observe the divergence of the force between the quark and antiquark. Minimal amplitude of the perturbation below which cusps do not form is also investigated. No cusp formation is found when the string moves in all four AdS space directions, and in this case an inverse energy cascade follows a direct cascade.

  1. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  2. Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical engineering applications.

  3. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, Mohy [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve [Institute of Combustion Technology, Aachen (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  4. A dynamically collapsing core and a precursor of a core in a filament supported by turbulent and magnetic pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuya, Ray S.; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Shinnaga, Hiroko E-mail: kitamura@isas.jaxa.jp

    2014-10-01

    To study physical properties of the natal filament gas around the cloud core harboring an exceptionally young low-mass protostar GF 9-2, we carried out J = 1-0 line observations of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O molecules using the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. The mapping area covers ? one-fifth of the whole filament. Our {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O maps clearly demonstrate that the core formed at the local density maxima of the filament, and the internal motions of the filament gas are totally governed by turbulence with Mach number of ?2. We estimated the scale height of the filament to be H = 0.3-0.7 pc, yielding the central density of n {sub c} = 800-4200 cm{sup –3}. Our analysis adopting an isothermal cylinder model shows that the filament is supported by the turbulent and magnetic pressures against the radial and axial collapse due to self-gravity. Since both the dissipation timescales of the turbulence and the transverse magnetic fields can be comparable to the free-fall time of the filament gas of 10{sup 6} yr, we conclude that the local decay of the supersonic turbulence and magnetic fields made the filament gas locally unstable, hence making the core collapse. Furthermore, we newly detected a gas condensation with velocity width enhancement to ?0.3 pc southwest of the GF 9-2 core. The condensation has a radius of ?0.15 pc and an LTE mass of ?5 M {sub ?}. Its internal motion is turbulent with Mach number of ?3, suggesting a gravitationally unbound state. Considering the uncertainties in our estimates, however, we propose that the condensation is a precursor of a cloud core, which would have been produced by the collision of the two gas components identified in the filament.

  5. Diapycnal advection by double diffusion and turbulence in the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Laurent, Louis C

    1999-01-01

    Observations of diapycnal mixing rates are examined and related to diapycnal advection for both double-diffusive and turbulent regimes. The role of double-diffusive mixing at the site of the North Atlantic Tracer Release ...

  6. Implementation and Validation of the BHR Turbulence Model in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    density mixing in the KH, RT, and RM cases in an Eulerian framework 7. The primary motivation of the present work is to implement the BHR-2 turbulence model in the Arbitrary...

  7. Scientists use plasma shaping to control turbulence in stellarators...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    could also apply to their more widely used symmetrical donut-shaped cousins called tokamaks. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science. Turbulence allows the hot,...

  8. Behavior of buoyant moist plumes in turbulent atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Redouane

    1981-01-01

    A widely applicable computational model of buoyant moist plumes in turbulent atmospheres has been constructed. To achieve this a one dimensional Planetary Boundary Layer (P.B.L.) model has been developed to account for ...

  9. Temporal coherence of individual turbulent patterns in atmospheric seeing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimotakis, Paul E.

    by turbulent mixing of volumes of air with different indices of refraction. Adaptive optics sys- tems designed, under the conditions described above. In this paper we de- scribe a measurement of this coherence time

  10. The dynamics of transition to turbulence in plane Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanath, D

    2007-01-01

    In plane Couette flow, the incompressible fluid between two plane parallel walls is driven by the motion of those walls. The laminar solution, in which the streamwise velocity varies linearly in the wall-normal direction, is known to be linearly stable at all Reynolds numbers ($Re$). Yet, in both experiments and computations, turbulence is observed for $Re \\gtrsim 360$. In this article, we show that when the laminar flow is perturbed on to the transition {\\it threshold}, the flow approaches either steady or traveling wave solutions. These solutions exhibit some aspects of turbulence but are not fully turbulent even at $Re=4000$. However, these solutions are linearly unstable and flows that evolve along their unstable directions become fully turbulent. The solution approached by a threshold perturbation depends upon the nature of the perturbation. Surprisingly, the positive eigenvalue that corresponds to one family of solutions decreases in magnitude with increasing $Re$, with the rate of decrease given by $Re...

  11. Experimental signatures of localization in Langmuir wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, H.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Russell, D.; Bezzerides, B.

    1988-01-01

    Features in certain laser-plasma and ionospheric experiments are identified with the basic properties of Langmuir wave turbulence. Also, a model of caviton nucleation is presented which leads to certain novel scaling predictions. 12 refs., 19 figs.

  12. Experimental Signatures of Critically Balanced Turbulence in MAST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghim, Y.-c.

    Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) measurements of ion-scale density fluctuations in the MAST tokamak are used to show that the turbulence correlation time, the drift time associated with ion temperature or density gradients, ...

  13. Turbulent Transport and the Scrape-off-layer Width

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, J. R. [Lodestar Research Corporation; Russell, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation; Ahn, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); D'Ippolito, D. A. [Lodestar Research Corporation; Maingi, Rajesh [ORNL; Maqueda, R. J. [Nova Photonics, Princeton, NJ; Lundberg, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Stotler, D. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Zweben, S. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2011-01-01

    The two-dimensional fluid turbulence code SOLT is employed to study the role of midplane turbulence on the scrape-off-layer (SOL) heat flux width of tokamak plasmas. The physics simulated includes curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from the simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL width for the low power ELM-free H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Additional simulations predict a transition to a convectively-dominated SOL at critical values of power and connection length.

  14. Turbulence may be key to "fast magnetic reconnection" mystery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A paper published in the journal Nature asserts to have found the key to a long-standing mystery in plasma physics and astrophysics, and it's all about turbulence....

  15. Lattice Boltzmann equation simulations of turbulence, mixing, and combustion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Huidan

    2006-04-12

    We explore the capability of lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method for complex fluid flows involving turbulence, mixing, and reaction. In the first study, LBE schemes for binary scalar mixing and multi-component reacting flow with reactions...

  16. Turbulence-induced persistence in laser beam wandering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zunino, Luciano; Funes, Gustavo; Pérez, Darío G

    2015-01-01

    We have experimentally confirmed the presence of long-memory correlations in the wandering of a thin Gaussian laser beam over a screen after propagating through a turbulent medium. A laboratory-controlled experiment was conducted in which coordinate fluctuations of the laser beam were recorded at a sufficiently high sampling rate for a wide range of turbulent conditions. Horizontal and vertical displacements of the laser beam centroid were subsequently analyzed by implementing detrended fluctuation analysis. This is a very well-known and widely used methodology to unveil memory effects from time series. Results obtained from this experimental analysis allow us to confirm that both coordinates behave as highly persistent signals for strong turbulent intensities. This finding is relevant for a better comprehension and modeling of the turbulence effects in free-space optical communication systems and other applications related to propagation of optical signals in the atmosphere.

  17. Magnetohydrodynamic lattice Boltzmann simulations of turbulence and rectangular jet flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riley, Benjamin Matthew

    2009-05-15

    relaxation time (SRT) parameter for the Maxwell’s stress tensor is developed for this study. In the MHD homogeneous turbulence studies, the kinetic/magnetic energy and enstrophy decays, kinetic enstrophy evolution, and vorticity alignment with the strain...

  18. NUMERICAL MODELING OF TURBULENT FLOW IN A COMBUSTION TUNNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    of turbulent combustion in a 1 ean propane~a1 of high sp r mturbulent combustion stabilized behind a step in a propane~combustion behind a step at R while Su corresponding to a propane-

  19. Spectral breaks of Alfvenic turbulence in a collisionless plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Xia, Qian; Zhdankin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations reveal that magnetic turbulence in the nearly colisionless solar wind plasma extends to scales smaller than the plasma microscales, such as ion gyroradius and ion inertial length. Measured breaks in the spectra of magnetic and density fluctuations at high frequencies are thought to be related to the transition from large-scale hydromagnetic to small-scale kinetic turbulence. The scales of such transitions and the responsible physical mechanisms are not well understood however. In the present work we emphasize the crucial role of the plasma parameters in the transition to kinetic turbulence, such as the ion and electron plasma beta, the electron to ion temperature ratio, the degree of obliquity of turbulent fluctuations. We then propose an explanation for the spectral breaks reported in recent observations.

  20. Turbulent Flow and Transport Modeling by Long Waves and Currents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dae Hong

    2010-10-12

    This dissertation presents models for turbulent flow and transport by currents and long waves in large domain. From the Navier-Stokes equations, a fully nonlinear depth-integrated equation model for weakly dispersive, ...

  1. Charecterization of inertial and pressure effects in homogeneous turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikkani, Ravi Kiran

    2005-11-01

    and anisotropy components and invariants are examined. In the second part of the thesis, the velocity gradient dynamics in turbulent flows are studied with the help of inviscid 3D Burgers equations and restricted Euler equations. The analytical asymptotic...

  2. Simulations of High Speed Turbulent Jets in Crossflows Xiaochuan Chai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    of the turbulent mixing mechanisms are important in combustor design. Supersonic jets are used for attitude or roll crossflows of two different Mach numbers and showed the presence of large-scale stuctures. Kawai and Lele7

  3. Simulations of High Speed Turbulent Jets in Crossflow Xiaochuan Chai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    understanding of the turbulent mixing mechanisms play important roles in combustor design. Supersonic jets used crossflows of two different Mach numbers and showed the presence of large-scale stuctures. Kawai and Lele7

  4. NUMERICAL MODELING OF TURBULENT FLOW IN A COMBUSTION TUNNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    1VJcDona·ld, H. (1979) Combustion r 1 iodeJ·ing in Two and1979) Practical Turbulent-Combustion Interaction Models forInternation on Combustors. Combustion The 17th Symposium

  5. Turbulent drag reduction by constant near-wall forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JIN XU, SUCHUAN DONG, MARTIN R. MAXEY and GEORGE E. KARNIADAKIS

    2007-06-07

    This transition of the shear layer is correlated with a Reynolds number ... The quest for 'taming' turbulence with the objective of reducing the skin friction on ...... in principle, extracts kinetic energy from the flow and the positive forcing further.

  6. TURBULENT CONVECTION IN STELLAR INTERIORS. III. MEAN-FIELD ANALYSIS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    implicit large eddy simulations of the turbulent convection in the envelope of a 5 Msub Sun red giant star and in the oxygen-burning shell of a 23 Msub Sun supernova...

  7. Soliton Turbulence in Shallow Water Ocean Surface Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Andrea; Resio, Donald T; Alessio, Silvia; Chrivì, Elisabetta; Saggese, Enrica; Bellomo, Katinka; Long, Chuck E

    2014-01-01

    We analyze shallow water wind waves in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and experimentally confirm, for the first time, the presence of $soliton$ $turbulence$ in ocean waves. Soliton turbulence is an exotic form of nonlinear wave motion where low frequency energy may also be viewed as a $dense$ $soliton$ $gas$, described theoretically by the soliton limit of the Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation, a $completely$ $integrable$ $soliton$ $system$: Hence the phrase "soliton turbulence" is synonymous with "integrable soliton turbulence." For periodic/quasiperiodic boundary conditions the $ergodic$ $solutions$ of KdV are exactly solvable by $finite$ $gap$ $theory$ (FGT), the basis of our data analysis. We find that large amplitude measured wave trains near the energetic peak of a storm have low frequency power spectra that behave as $\\sim\\omega^{-1}$. We use the linear Fourier transform to estimate this power law from the power spectrum and to filter $densely$ $packed$ $soliton$ $wave$ $trains$ from the data. We apply ...

  8. Low-altitude atmospheric turbulence around an airport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cass, Stanley Dale

    1972-01-01

    speed and the average wind speed computed over an entire run (approximately 1 hr). iv Profiles of wind speed were approximately logarithmic, but profiles of turbulent energy showed a large increase in the wake of large obstructions. Spectra of wind... from u 30-sec averages 56 57 28 Spectra of accelerometer and wind data for same period 59 LIST OF SYMBOLS Symbol Definition Exchange coefficient for momentum Height Time Kinetic energy Average kinetic energy of turbulence u' + v'2 + w' (' 2...

  9. Supersonic turbulent boundary layers with periodic mechanical non-equilibrium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekoto, Isaac Wesley

    2007-04-25

    is essential. Turbulence reduction has applications for reentry vehicles. On their undersurface they have a heat shield that is composed of uniformly shaped materials (e.g. tiles, ablative materiel, etc.). Shape selection that can reduce turbulent heat... of the literature reveals roughness elements with sharp leading edges have not been explored. Much could be revealed by an investigation into a these type of roughness elements. The thought is that the blunt shaped roughness elements used in the past (e.g. square...

  10. SCALING PROPERTIES OF SMALL-SCALE FLUCTUATIONS IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez, Jean Carlos; Mason, Joanne; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Cattaneo, Fausto E-mail: j.mason@exeter.ac.uk E-mail: cattaneo@flash.uchicago.edu

    2014-09-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the majority of natural systems, including the interstellar medium, the solar corona, and the solar wind, has Reynolds numbers far exceeding the Reynolds numbers achievable in numerical experiments. Much attention is therefore drawn to the universal scaling properties of small-scale fluctuations, which can be reliably measured in the simulations and then extrapolated to astrophysical scales. However, in contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, where the universal structure of the inertial and dissipation intervals is described by the Kolmogorov self-similarity, the scaling for MHD turbulence cannot be established based solely on dimensional arguments due to the presence of an intrinsic velocity scale—the Alfvén velocity. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the Kolmogorov first self-similarity hypothesis cannot be formulated for MHD turbulence in the same way it is formulated for the hydrodynamic case. Besides profound consequences for the analytical consideration, this also imposes stringent conditions on numerical studies of MHD turbulence. In contrast with the hydrodynamic case, the discretization scale in numerical simulations of MHD turbulence should decrease faster than the dissipation scale, in order for the simulations to remain resolved as the Reynolds number increases.

  11. Magnetic Discontinuities in Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Zhdankin; Stanislav Boldyrev; Joanne Mason; Jean Carlos Perez

    2012-04-19

    Recent measurements of solar wind turbulence report the presence of intermittent, exponentially distributed angular discontinuities in the magnetic field. In this Letter, we study whether such discontinuities can be produced by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We detect the discontinuities by measuring the fluctuations of the magnetic field direction, Delta theta, across fixed spatial increments Delta x in direct numerical simulations of MHD turbulence with an imposed uniform guide field B_0. A large region of the probability density function (pdf) for Delta theta is found to follow an exponential decay, proportional to exp(-Delta theta/theta_*), with characteristic angle theta_* ~ (14 deg) (b_rms/B_0)^0.65 for a broad range of guide-field strengths. We find that discontinuities observed in the solar wind can be reproduced by MHD turbulence with reasonable ratios of b_rms/B_0. We also observe an excess of small angular discontinuities when Delta x becomes small, possibly indicating an increasing statistical significance of dissipation-scale structures. The structure of the pdf in this case closely resembles the two-population pdf seen in the solar wind. We thus propose that strong discontinuities are associated with inertial-range MHD turbulence, while weak discontinuities emerge from near-dissipation-range turbulence. In addition, we find that the structure functions of the magnetic field direction exhibit anomalous scaling exponents, which indicates the existence of intermittent structures.

  12. Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

    2014-04-03

    Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

  13. GYROKINETIC PARTICLE SIMULATION OF TURBULENT TRANSPORT IN BURNING PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, Claude Wendell

    2014-06-10

    The SciDAC project at the IFS advanced the state of high performance computing for turbulent structures and turbulent transport. The team project with Prof Zhihong Lin [PI] at Univ California Irvine produced new understanding of the turbulent electron transport. The simulations were performed at the Texas Advanced Computer Center TACC and the NERSC facility by Wendell Horton, Lee Leonard and the IFS Graduate Students working in that group. The research included a Validation of the electron turbulent transport code using the data from a steady state university experiment at the University of Columbia in which detailed probe measurements of the turbulence in steady state were used for wide range of temperature gradients to compare with the simulation data. These results were published in a joint paper with Texas graduate student Dr. Xiangrong Fu using the work in his PhD dissertation. X.R. Fu, W. Horton, Y. Xiao, Z. Lin, A.K. Sen and V. Sokolov, “Validation of electron Temperature gradient turbulence in the Columbia Linear Machine, Phys. Plasmas 19, 032303 (2012).

  14. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  15. Impact of Financial Structure on the Cost of Solar Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Kreycik, C.; Bird, L.; Schwabe, P.; Cory, K.

    2012-03-01

    To stimulate investment in renewable energy generation projects, the federal government developed a series of support structures that reduce taxes for eligible investors--the investment tax credit, the production tax credit, and accelerated depreciation. The nature of these tax incentives often requires an outside investor and a complex financial arrangement to allocate risk and reward among the parties. These financial arrangements are generally categorized as 'advanced financial structures.' Among renewable energy technologies, advanced financial structures were first widely deployed by the wind industry and are now being explored by the solar industry to support significant scale-up in project development. This report describes four of the most prevalent financial structures used by the renewable sector and evaluates the impact of financial structure on energy costs for utility-scale solar projects that use photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies.

  16. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-15

    This publication presents 5 years (1990--94) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented. Composite tables present: Aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, financial indicators, electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data.

  17. Poverty, Armed Conflict and Financial Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baddeley, Michelle

    international private interests. For example, Angolan war funding was on the basis of oil reserves and diamonds, which led to 95% of Angola?s oil share being used in debt servicing of loans to finance arms and mercenaries. Similar patterns were observed... and Gunning, 1995). Rent seeking activities may exist, for example the Bank of Cambodia encouraged the development of many banks in order to gather the fees and fines associated with the licensing of a bank (Addison et al, 2001). Weak financial regulation...

  18. Distributed Energy Financial Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP)Displacement Transfer Zone Jump to:Financial

  19. NNG Financial Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver,Minnesota:EnergyNARI|Forms12StateNNG Financial

  20. User Financial Accounts | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0 - 19PortalStatusUserUser Facility CenterFinancial

  1. Financial Institution Lending Programs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report to CongressApril 6,Final9 ReportFinancial institution

  2. Vireo Energy Financial Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairexVertVillage of Shiloh,Vireo Energy Financial

  3. LPO Financial Performance Report | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety Standards ImplementationfyLPO Financial Performance Report

  4. Form:Financial Organization | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprint Ventures Jump to:45 -Financial Organization Jump

  5. User Financial Accounts | Linac Coherent Light Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPPfinalUnexpectedofWykoW03: Data TransferUserFinancial Accounts

  6. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flows: Experimental Studies on the Turbulence of Multiphase Plumes and Tidal Vortices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Duncan Burnette

    2011-08-08

    stream_source_info BRYANT-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 163756 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name BRYANT-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859..., the turbulent energy spectra in inertial particle plumes followed the same modulation as the bubble plumes. PIV experiments from the tidal starting-jet vortices detail the influence of a finite channel length using identified vortice. The results show...

  7. Public Financial Disclosure Reports Filed by the Secretary and...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Public Financial Disclosure Reports Filed by the Secretary and Deputy Secretary The Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge (STOCK) Act requires online posting of the Public...

  8. Financial Institution Request for Proposals and Selection Process

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A state or local government typically conducts a competitive procurement procedure to award loan loss reserve (LLR) funds to a financial institution partner. The request for proposals (RFP)...

  9. Good Year - Bad Year Financial Planning Workshop handout - April...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    within Rate Period Build reserves Reserve financing Buy down debt Reduce future rates Rebate to customers Targeted program spending Midpoint April 10, 2008 BPA Financial Plan...

  10. Financial Vehicles Within an Integrated Energy Efficiency Program Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Financial Vehicles Within an Integrated Energy Efficiency Program Webinar, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  11. Optimisation of physical and financial power purchase portfolios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorden Spangardt

    2002-10-18

    Oct 18, 2002 ... Optimisation of physical and financial power purchase portfolios. Gorden Spangardt (spa ***at*** umsicht.fhg.de) Michael Lucht (luc ***at*** ...

  12. Small Businesses Working with Community Development Financial Institutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) offers loan guarantees to banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, community development financial institutions, and other authorized specialty lenders.

  13. TO: Procurement Directors FROM: Director, Contract and Financial...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    revised Guide for Financial Assistance. The Guide has been updated to reflect changes to web sites, organization names, systems, and DOE policies and practices since the guide was...

  14. Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carrots for Utilities: Providing Financial Returns for Utility Investments in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carrots for Utilities:...

  15. Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Financial Impact of Energy Efficiency under a Federal Renewable Electricity Standard: Case Study of a Kansas 'Super-Utility' Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL...

  16. CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy Innovations to Support Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy Innovations to Support Energy Efficiency: Energy Performance Contracting and On-Bill Financing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH...

  17. Steve N. Economou Managing Director, Curtis Financial Group, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    buyouts and financial opinions including fairness and valuation opinions. He has completed hundreds direct investments in emerging growth technology companies and management buyouts. He was also

  18. Quarterly Business Review FY 2009 3rd Quarter Financial Results...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contains BPA-Approved Agency Financial Information Report ID: 0070FY10 Federal Columbia River Power System Statement of Revenues and Expenses Data Source: EPM Data Warehouse...

  19. Quarterly Business Review FY 2009 2nd Quarter Financial Results...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contains BPA-approved Agency Financial Information. Report ID: 0070FY09 Federal Columbia River Power System Statement of Revenues and Expenses Data Source: EPM Data Warehouse...

  20. Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    The 1993 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents five years (1989 to 1993) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, the Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities, filed on a fiscal basis.