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1

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;#12;#12;Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy;#12;Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six-scale solar energy development in six southwestern states.1 For the BLM, this includes the evaluation of a new

Argonne National Laboratory

2

Documents: Final PEIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final PEIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Final Programmatic EIS DOEEIS-0269 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for...

3

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southwestern States Volume 3 Colorado Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapter 10 July 2012 Bureau of Land; California Public Utilities Commission; Nevada Department of Wildlife; N-4 Grazing Board, Nevada; Utah Public southwestern states.1 For the BLM, this includes the evaluation of a new Solar Energy Program applicable

Argonne National Laboratory

4

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southwestern States Volume 5 New Mexico and Utah Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapters 12 and 13 July 2012; California Public Utilities Commission; Nevada Department of Wildlife; N-4 Grazing Board, Nevada; Utah Public southwestern states.1 For the BLM, this includes the evaluation of a new Solar Energy Program applicable

Argonne National Laboratory

5

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southwestern States Volume 4 Nevada Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapter 11 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management; California Public Utilities Commission; Nevada Department of Wildlife; N-4 Grazing Board, Nevada; Utah Public southwestern states.1 For the BLM, this includes the evaluation of a new Solar Energy Program applicable

Argonne National Laboratory

6

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southwestern States Volume 2 Arizona and California Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapters 8 and 9 July 2012; California Public Utilities Commission; Nevada Department of Wildlife; N-4 Grazing Board, Nevada; Utah Public southwestern states.1 For the BLM, this includes the evaluation of a new Solar Energy Program applicable

Argonne National Laboratory

7

Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (DES 10-59; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; U.S. National Park Service; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, South Pacific Division; Arizona Game and Fish Department; California Energy Commission; California Public Utilities Commission; Nevada Department of Wildlife; N-4 Grazing Board, Nevada; Utah Public Lands Policy Coordination Office; Clark County, Nevada,

8

BLM Announces Second Extension of Public Comment Period for Draft Solar PEIS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BLM Announces Second Extension of Public Comment Period for Draft Solar PEIS BLM Announces Second Extension of Public Comment Period for Draft Solar PEIS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORBUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT NEWS RELEASE Release Date: 04/15/11 Contacts: David Quick, (202) 912-7413 BLM Announces Second Extension of Public Comment Period for Draft Solar PEIS The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today announced a two-week extension of the public comment period for the Draft Solar Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Draft Solar PEIS), a joint effort with the Department of Energy. The agencies had previously provided for a 120-day public comment period on the Draft Solar PEIS. Because of numerous requests, the agencies are extending the comment period by an additional two weeks beyond April 16, 2011. The comment period will now run until May 2, 2011. No additional public meetings will be held during the

9

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix J; Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-i APPENDIX J: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF TRANSPORTATION OF UF 6 CYLINDERS, URANIUM OXIDE, URANIUM METAL, AND ASSOCIATED MATERIALS Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-ii Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-iii CONTENTS (APPENDIX J) NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-vi J.1 SUMMARY OF TRANSPORTATION OPTION IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-3 J.2 TRANSPORTATION MODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-8 J.2.1 Truck Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-8 J.2.2 Rail Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-9 J.2.3 Transportation Options Considered But Not Analyzed in Detail . . . . . . . . . . J-9 J.3 IMPACTS OF OPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-10 J.3.1

10

File:Geothermal PEIS final.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PEIS final.pdf PEIS final.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Geothermal PEIS final.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. 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1,016 1,017 1,018 1,019 1,020 1,021 1,022 1,023 1,024 1,025 1,026 1,027 1,028 1,029 1,030 1,031 1,032 1,033 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,037 1,038 1,039 1,040 1,041 1,042 1,043 1,044 1,045 1,046 1,047 1,048 1,049 1,050 1,051 1,052 1,053 1,054 1,055 1,056 1,057 1,058 1,059 1,060 1,061 1,062 1,063 1,064 1,065 1,066 1,067 1,068 1,069 1,070 1,071 1,072 1,073 1,074 1,075 1,076 1,077 1,078 1,079 1,080 1,081 1,082 1,083 1,084 1,085 1,086 1,087 1,088 1,089 1,090 1,091 1,092 1,093 1,094 1,095 1,096 1,097 1,098 1,099 1,100 1,101 1,102 1,103 1,104 1,105 1,106 1,107 1,108 1,109 1,110 1,111 1,112 1,113 1,114 1,115 1,116 1,117 1,118 1,119 1,120 1,121 1,122 1,123 1,124 1,125 1,126 1,127 1,128 1,129 1,130 1,131 1,132 1,133 1,134 1,135 1,136 1,137 1,138 1,139 1,140 1,141 1,142 1,143 1,144 1,145 1,146 1,147 1,148 1,149 1,150 1,151 1,152 1,153 1,154 1,155 1,156 1,157 1,158 1,159 1,160 1,161 1,162 1,163 1,164 1,165 1,166 1,167 1,168 1,169 1,170 1,171 1,172 1,173 1,174 1,175 1,176 1,177 1,178 1,179 1,180 1,181 1,182 1,183 1,184 1,185 1,186 1,187 1,188 1,189 1,190 1,191 1,192 1,193 1,194 1,195 1,196 1,197 1,198 1,199 1,200 1,201 1,202 1,203 1,204 1,205 1,206 1,207 1,208 1,209 1,210 1,211 1,212 1,213 1,214 1,215 1,216 1,217 1,218 1,219 1,220 1,221 1,222 1,223 1,224 1,225 1,226 1,227 1,228 1,229 1,230 1,231 1,232 1,233 1,234 1,235 1,236 1,237 1,238 1,239 1,240 1,241 1,242 1,243 1,244 1,245 1,246 1,247 1,248 1,249 1,250 1,251 1,252 1,253 1,254 1,255 1,256 1,257 1,258 1,259 1,260 1,261 1,262 1,263 1,264 1,265 1,266 1,267 1,268 1,269 1,270 1,271 1,272 1,273 1,274 1,275 1,276 1,277 1,278 1,279 1,280 1,281 1,282 1,283 1,284 1,285 1,286 1,287 1,288 1,289 1,290 1,291 1,292 1,293 1,294 1,295 1,296 1,297 1,298 1,299 1,300 1,301 1,302 1,303 1,304 1,305 1,306 1,307 1,308 1,309 1,310 1,311 1,312 1,313 1,314 1,315 1,316 1,317 1,318 1,319 1,320 1,321 1,322 1,323 1,324 1,325 1,326 1,327 1,328 1,329 1,330 1,331 1,332 1,333 1,334 1,335 1,336 1,337 1,338 1,339 1,340 1,341 1,342 1,343 1,344 1,345 1,346 1,347 1,348 1,349 1,350 1,351 1,352 1,353 1,354 1,355 1,356 1,357 1,358 1,359 1,360 1,361 1,362 1,363 1,364 1,365 1,366 1,367 1,368 1,369 1,370 1,371 1,372 1,373 1,374 1,375 1,376 1,377 1,378 1,379 1,380 1,381 1,382 1,383 1,384 1,385 1,386 1,387 1,388 1,389 1,390 1,391 1,392 1,393 1,394 1,395 1,396 1,397 1,398 1,399 1,400 1,401 1,402 1,403 1,404 1,405 1,406 1,407 1,408 1,409 1,410 1,411 1,412 1,413 1,414 1,415 1,416 1,417 1,418 1,419 1,420 1,421 1,422 1,423 1,424 1,425 1,426 1,427 1,428 1,429 1,430 1,431 1,432 1,433 1,434 1,435 1,436 1,437 1,438 1,439 1,440 1,441 1,442 1,443 1,444 1,445 1,446 1,447 1,448 1,449 1,450 1,451 1,452 1,453 1,454 1,455 1,456 1,457 1,458 1,459 1,460 1,461 1,462 1,463 1,464 1,465 1,466 1,467 1,468 1,469 1,470 1,471 1,472 1,473 1,474 1,475 1,476 1,477 1,478 1,479 1,480 1,481 1,482 1,483 1,484 1,485 1,486 1,487 1,488 1,489 1,490 1,491 1,492 1,493 1,494 1,495 1,496 1,497 1,498 1,499 1,500 1,501 1,502 1,503 1,504 1,505 1,506 1,507 1,508 1,509 1,510 1,511 1,512 1,513 1,514 1,515 1,516 1,517 1,518 1,519 1,520 1,521 1,522 1,523 1,524 1,525 1,526 1,527 1,528 1,529 1,530 1,531 1,532 1,533 1,534 1,535 1,536 1,537 1,538 1,539 1,540 1,541 1,542 1,543 1,544 1,545 1,546 1,547 1,548 1,549 1,550 1,551 1,552 1,553 1,554 1,555 1,556 1,557 1,558 1,559 1,560 1,561 1,562 1,563 1,564 1,565 1,566 1,567 1,568 1,569 1,570 1,571 1,572 1,573 1,574 1,575 1,576 1,577 1,578 1,579 1,580 1,581 1,582 1,583 1,584 1,585 1,586 1,587 1,588 1,589 1,590 1,591 1,592 1,593 1,594 1,595 1,596 1,597 1,598 1,599 1,600 1,601 1,602 1,603 1,604 1,605 1,606 1,607 1,608 1,609 1,610 1,611 1,612 1,613 1,614 1,615 1,616 1,617 1,618 1,619 1,620 1,621 1,622 1,623 1,624 1,625 1,626 1,627 1,628 1,629 1,630 1,631 1,632 1,633 1,634 1,635 1,636 1,637 1,638 1,639 1,640 1,641 1,642 1,643 1,644 1,645 1,646 1,647 1,648 1,649 1,650 1,651 1,652 1,653 1,654 1,655 1,656 1,657 1,658 1,659 1,660 1,661 1,662 1,663 1,664 1,665 1,666 1,667 1,668 1,669 1,670 1,671 1,672 1,673 1,674 1,675 1,676 1,677 1,678 1,679 1,680 1,681 1,682 1,683 1,684 1,685 1,686 1,687 1,688 1,689 1,690 1,691 1,692 1,693 1,694 1,695 1,696 1,697 1,698 1,699 1,700 1,701 1,702 1,703 1,704 1,705 1,706 1,707 1,708 1,709 1,710 1,711 1,712 1,713 1,714 1,715 1,716 1,717 1,718 1,719 1,720 1,721 1,722 1,723 1,724 1,725 1,726 1,727 1,728 1,729 1,730 1,731 1,732 1,733 1,734 1,735 1,736 1,737 1,738 1,739 1,740 1,741 1,742 1,743 1,744 1,745 1,746 1,747 1,748 1,749 1,750 1,751 1,752 1,753 1,754 1,755 1,756 1,757 1,758 1,759 1,760 1,761 1,762 1,763 1,764 1,765 1,766 1,767 1,768 1,769 1,770 1,771 1,772 1,773 1,774 1,775 1,776 1,777 1,778 1,779 1,780 1,781 1,782 1,783 1,784 1,785 1,786 1,787 1,788 1,789 1,790 1,791 1,792 Go!

11

Pei Zhai  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pei Zhai Pei Zhai Sustainable Energy Systems Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2002 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2024G (510) 495-2147...

12

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 1: Chapter 4; Assessment Approach and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of people historically exposed to large doses of radiation, such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The factors used for the analysis in this PEIS were 0.0004 LCFperson-rem of...

13

Volume 1, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Volume 1 Executive Summary Chapters 1-7, 14-16 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

14

Volume 2, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Arizona and California Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapters 8 and 9 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation;

15

Volume 7, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Comments and Responses July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation;

16

Volume 5, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 New Mexico and Utah Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapters 12 and 13 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

17

WindEnergyPEIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all or parts of the States of Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The draft PEIS assesses environmental impacts associated with wind energy...

18

Solar still. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Passive solar heating was used in a still in which a packed column packed with popped popcorn separates the alcohol and water vapors. The still's performance was not satisfactory, and it is concluded that passive solar heating could have been better used to preheat makeup water for the fermentation process and to maintain proper fermentation temperatures during the winter. (LEW)

Adams, W.D.

1983-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

19

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southwestern States Volume 7 Comments and Responses July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department Pacific Division; Arizona Game and Fish Department; California Energy Commission; California Public Utilities Commission; Nevada Department of Wildlife; N-4 Grazing Board, Nevada; Utah Public Lands Policy

Argonne National Laboratory

20

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southwestern States Volume 6, Part 1 Appendices A­I July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department Pacific Division; Arizona Game and Fish Department; California Energy Commission; California Public Utilities Commission; Nevada Department of Wildlife; N-4 Grazing Board, Nevada; Utah Public Lands Policy

Argonne National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was heated on a hot plate with a magnetic stirrer and held at 80 C throughout the preparation process. Typically, a 0.03 g sample was loaded within the bottom of a U-type quartz tube cell (4 mm I.D.) containing the reference side of a thermal conductivity detector (TCD), and then introduced into the reactor cell. The gas

Argonne National Laboratory

22

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of oil shales, 76th Annual International Meeting, SEG, Expanded Abstracts, 1973­1977. Caputo, M., 1967

Argonne National Laboratory

23

Volume 3, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Colorado Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapter 10 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies

24

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2005 Final Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dwelling contests winner Solar Decathlon 2005 Final Results The overall winners of the Solar Decathlon and the winners of the ten contests are listed here. For more information...

25

Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) is a nationwide study examining the environmental impacts of managing more than 2 million cubic meters of radioactive wastes from past, present, and future DOE activities. The WM PEIS will assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in improving the efficiency and reliability of management of its current and anticipated volumes of radioactive and hazardous wastes and will help DOE continue to comply with applicable laws and regulations and protect workers, public health and safety, and the environment. The WM PEIS

26

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2007 Final Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer-generated image of the Technische Universität Darmstadt 2007 Solar Decathlon house. Computer-generated image of the Technische Universität Darmstadt 2007 Solar Decathlon house. First Place: Technische Universität Darmstadt Computer-generated image of the University of Maryland 2007 Solar Decathlon house. Second Place: University of Maryland Computer-generated image of the Santa Clara University 2007 Solar Decathlon house. Third Place: Santa Clara University Solar Decathlon 2007 Final Results The Solar Decathlon challenged 20 college and university teams to compete in 10 contests and design, build, and operate the most attractive and energy-efficient solar-powered home. After two years of preparation and a week of competition, the final scores and standings are in. Overall First Place: Technische Universität Darmstadt This team from Germany came to the Solar Decathlon hoping to have an impact

27

Volume 6, Part 1, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, Part 1 6, Part 1 Appendices A-I July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies

28

Solar thermal repowering systems integration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a solar repowering integration analysis which defines the balance-of-plant characteristics and costs associated with the solar thermal repowering of existing gas/oil-fired electric generating plants. Solar repowering interface requirements for water/steam and salt or sodium-cooled central receivers are defined for unit sizes ranging from 50 MWe non-reheat to 350 MWe reheat. Finally balance-of-plant cost estimates are presented for each of six combinations of plant type, receiver type and percent solar repowering.

Dubberly, L. J.; Gormely, J. E.; McKenzie, A. W.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Solar heating demonstration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The demonstration involved a 4-panel solar collector mounted on the industrial arts building. A 120 gallon storage tank supplements a 66 gallon electric hot water heater which supplies hot water for 5 shop wash basins, girl's and boy's lavatories, and a pressure washer in the auto shop. The installation and educational uses of the system are described. (MHR)

Bonicatto, L.; Kozak, C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Si concentrator solar cell development. [Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a program to develop a commercial, high-efficiency, low-cost concentrator solar cell compatible with Spectrolab`s existing manufacturing infrastructure for space solar cells. The period covered is between 1991 and 1993. The program was funded through Sandia National Laboratories through the DOE concentrator initiative and, was also cost shared by Spectrolab. As a result of this program, Spectrolab implemented solar cells achieving an efficiency of over 19% at 200 to 300X concentration. The cells are compatible with DOE guidelines for a cell price necessary to achieve a cost of electricity of 12 cents a kilowatthour.

Krut, D.D. [Spectrolab, Inc., Sylmar, CA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Pure Energy Inc PEI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City, Nevada Zip 89703 Product Manufactures a small volume of alkaline rechargeable batteries. References Pure Energy Inc (PEI)1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

32

Approved Authorizations and FirstinLine Pending Applications within Proposed Solar Energy Zones (SEZs) as of May 31, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved Authorizations and FirstinLine Pending Applications within Proposed Solar Energy Zones 49884, Solar Reserve - Tower 4,000 Riverside East 147,910 9 approved 48880, Genesis - Trough 1 as reported in the Final Solar PEIS, July 2012. To convert acres to km2 , multiply by 0.004047. #12;

Argonne National Laboratory

33

EIS-0403: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0403: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (AZ, CA, CO, NV, NM, and UT) The BLM and DOE have jointly prepared this PEIS to evaluate actions that the agencies are considering taking to further facilitate utility-scale solar energy development in six southwestern states. For the BLM, this includes the evaluation of a new Solar Energy Program applicable to solar development on BLM-administered lands. For DOE, it includes the evaluation of developing new guidance to further facilitate utility-scale solar energy development and maximize the mitigation of associated potential environmental impacts. This Solar PEIS evaluates the potential environmental, social, and economic effects of the agencies'

34

Microsoft Word - Rockford Solar- FINAL EA _DOE EA 1823_  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR ROCKFORD SOLAR ENERGY PROJECT CHICAGO ROCKFORD INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, WINNEBAGO COUNTY, ILLINOIS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy...

35

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2009 Final Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Team Germany Solar Decathlon 2009 house. First Place: Team Germany (Technische Universitt Darmstadt) Photo the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Solar Decathlon 2009...

36

Central Internet Database (CID) PEIS Settlement Information  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

About the CID > PEIS About the CID > PEIS Settlement Agreement Information Requirements Central Internet Database CID Photo Banner PEIS Settlement Agreement Information Requirements Information Categories: Contaminated environmental media, contaminated facilities, and waste managed by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program Contaminated facilities and waste generated or managed by the DOE Offices of Defense Programs (DP) Exit CID Website , Science (SC) Exit CID Website , and Nuclear Energy (NE) Exit CID Website . DOE-managed domestic/foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel (spent fuel from commercial reactors is excluded ). Sites governed by Section 151(b) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA)* Adobe PDF Document Exit CID Website , as amended, upon the transfer of those sites to DOE ownership.

37

Obama Administration Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development on  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development on Public Lands Obama Administration Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development on Public Lands July 24, 2012 - 4:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - As part of President Obama's all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Department of the Interior, in partnership with the Department of Energy, will publish the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for solar energy development in six southwestern states-Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. The final Solar PEIS represents a major step forward in the permitting of utility-scale solar energy on public lands throughout the west. Today's announcement builds on the historic progress made in fostering renewable energy development on public lands. When President Obama took

38

Energy Department Finalizes $737 Million Loan Guarantee to Tonopah Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$737 Million Loan Guarantee to Tonopah $737 Million Loan Guarantee to Tonopah Solar Energy for Nevada Project Energy Department Finalizes $737 Million Loan Guarantee to Tonopah Solar Energy for Nevada Project September 28, 2011 - 12:32pm Addthis Washington D.C. --- U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced the Department finalized a $737 million loan guarantee to Tonopah Solar Energy, LLC to develop the Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project. The solar project, sponsored by SolarReserve, LLC, is a 110 megawatt concentrating solar power tower generating facility with molten salt as the primary heat transfer and storage medium. It will be the first of its kind in the United States and the tallest molten salt tower in the world. Located 14 miles northwest of Tonopah, Nevada on land leased from the Bureau of Land

39

Eighth national passive solar conference. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Eighth National Passive Solar Conference was held near Santa Fe, New Mexico at the Glorieta Conference Center on September 5 to 11, 1983. Nearly 900 people from all across the nation and the world attended the conference. Close to 200 technical papers were presented, 50 solar product exhibits were available; 34 poster sessions were presented; 16 solar workshops were conducted; 10 renowned solar individuals participated in rendezvous sessions; 7 major addresses were delivered; 5 solar home tours were conducted; 2 emerging architecture sessions were held which included 21 separate presentations; and commercial product presentations were given for the first time ever at a national passive solar conference. Peter van Dresser of Santa Fe received the prestigious Passive Solar Pioneer Award, posthumously, from the American Solar Energy Society and Benjamin T. Buck Rogers of Embudo received the prestigious Peter van Dresser Award from the New Mexico Solar Energy Association. This report reviews conference organization, attendance, finances, conference evaluation form results, and includes press coverage samples, selected conference photos courtesy of Marshall Tyler, and a summary with recommendations for future conferences. The Appendices included conference press releases and a report by the New Mexico Solar Industry Development Corporation on exhibits management.

Owen, A.; Zee, R.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Tucson Public Building Solar Arrays Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The City of Tucson installed photovoltaic panels on parking structures at a library/police substation and developed a county-wide solar education program based in the public library system, including numerous new solar resources for the libraries and training for library staff.

Bruce Plenk

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solar greenhouse training project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this project were: (1) To train twenty teams, each from a different region, to organize and run workshops to build inexpensive, practical solar greenhouses. (2) To help create working solar greenhouse experts in the field available to respond to their community's needs. (3) To establish a national model program for solar greenhouse construction workshops. (4) To determine whether the barn-raising style used in the greenhouse construction workshops could be taught in the format of a 3 1/2 day seminar with a follow-up workshop. (5) To determine whether the audio-visual exhibit and printed materials used in the seminar were effective. (MOW)

Davis, L.; Kensil, D.; Lazar, B.; Yanda, B.; Yanda, S.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Nanoparticle Solar Cell Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells with photovoltaic performance extending into the near-IR region of the solar spectrum as a pathway towards improving power conversion efficiencies. The field of all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells is very new, with only one literature publication in the prior to our project. Very little is understood regarding how these devices function. Inorganic solar cells with IR performance have previously been fabricated using traditional methods such as physical vapor deposition and sputtering, and solution-processed devices utilizing IR-absorbing organic polymers have been investigated. The solution-based deposition of nanoparticles offers the potential of a low-cost manufacturing process combined with the ability to tune the chemical synthesis and material properties to control the device properties. This work, in collaboration with the Sue Carter research group at the University of California, Santa Cruz, has greatly expanded the knowledge base in this field, exploring multiple material systems and several key areas of device physics including temperature, bandgap and electrode device behavior dependence, material morphological behavior, and the role of buffer layers. One publication has been accepted to Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells pending minor revision and another two papers are being written now. While device performance in the near-IR did not reach the level anticipated at the beginning of this grant, we did observe one of the highest near-IR efficiencies for a nanoparticle-based solar cell device to date. We also identified several key parameters of importance for improving both near-IR performance and nanoparticle solar cells in general, and demonstrated multiple pathways which showed promise for future commercialization with further research.

Breeze, Alison, J; Sahoo, Yudhisthira; Reddy, Damoder; Sholin, Veronica; Carter, Sue

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

43

Solar greenhouse training project. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The goals of this project were: (1) To train twenty teams, each from a different region, to organize and run workshops to build inexpensive, practical solar greenhouses. (2) To help create working solar greenhouse experts in the field available to respond to their community's needs. (3) To establish a national model program for solar greenhouse construction workshops. (4) To determine whether the barn-raising style used in the greenhouse construction workshops could be taught in the format of a 3 1/2 day seminar with a follow-up workshop. (5) To determine whether the audio-visual exhibit and printed materials used in the seminar were effective. (MOW)

Davis, L.; Kensil, D.; Lazar, B.; Yanda, B.; Yanda, S.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Solar heating system final design package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Contemporary Systems has taken its Series V Solar Heating System and developed it to a degree acceptable by local codes and regulatory agencies. The system is composed of the Series V warm air collector, the LCU-110 logic control unit and the USU-A universal switching and transport unit. The collector was originally conceived and designed as an integrated roof/wall system and provides a dual function in the structure. The collector serves both as a solar energy conversion system and as a structural weather resistant skin. The collector can be fabricated in any length from 12 to 24 feet. This provides maximum flexibility in design and installation. The LCU-110 control unit provides totally automatic control over the operation of the system. It receives input data from sensor probes in collectors, storage and living space. The logic is designed so as to make maximum use of solar energy and minimize use of conventional energy. The USU-A transport and switching unit is a high-efficiency air-handling system equipped with gear motor valves that respond to outputs from the control system. The fan unit is designed for maximum durability and efficiency in operation, and has permanently lubricated ball bearings and excellent air-handling efficiency.

Not Available

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Poverty-Environment Initiative (PEI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Poverty-Environment Initiative (PEI) Poverty-Environment Initiative (PEI) Jump to: navigation, search Name Poverty-Environment Initiative (PEI) Agency/Company /Organization UNDP, UNEP Partner Poverty and Environment Partnership (PEP), WRI, WWF, OECD, IISD, IIED Topics Low emission development planning Website http://www.unpei.org/ Program Start 2005 References Poverty-Environment Initiative (PEI)[1] Overview The Poverty-Environment Initiative (PEI) of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is a global UN-led programme that supports country-led efforts to mainstream poverty-environment linkages into national development planning. The PEI provides financial and technical assistance to government partners to set up institutional and capacity strengthening programmes and carry out

46

Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended to May 31, 2013 Uranium...

47

Newman Unit 1 solar repowering. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This specification defines the system and subsystem characteristics, design requirements, and system environmental requirements for solar repowering of Newman Unit 1 which is operating on the El Paso Electric Company (EPE) system. This unit has a reheat steam turbine rated to produce 82 MWe with a 10.1 Pa/538/sup 0/C (1450 psig/1000/sup 0/F) main steam conditions and a 2.93 MPa/538/sup 0/C (410 psig/1000/sup 0/F) reheat steam conditions. The solar subsystem will be designed to supply steam in sufficient quantity and quality to generate 50 percent of the rated electrical power at the design point of noon summer solstice. It will operate in parallel with the present gas/oil fired boiler. In general, the level of detail presented in this specification is consistent with the conceptual design phase of a large power plant project. Engineering information is developed to the extent necessary to support the development of a conceptual plant cost estimate and the determination of technical and economic feasibility of the project.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Solar Total Energy Project final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O.; Towner, M.L. (Georgia Power Co., Shenandoah, GA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

EIS-0403: Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03: Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States EIS-0403: Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Summary The BLM and DOE have jointly prepared this PEIS to...

50

New passive solar cooking system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The development of a solar cooking system which uses a phase change process to passively transfer heat from a collector to a cooker is presented. In the design of this cooking system steam is produced in the collector and then is used as the heat transfer fluid in the cooker. The most efficient use of the system is to heat food directly by condensing the steam onto the food, whereas a heat exchanger is necessary to heat an oven or a frying pan. A pressure cooker was successfully built and tested using the steam from the collector. Brief discussions on the collector design and performance, and heat storage phase change materials are provided. (BCS)

Schlussler, L.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Support California to Support California Solar Generation Project Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar Generation Project September 30, 2011 - 3:15pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Department finalized partial loan guarantees of $1.46 billion in loans to Desert Sunlight 250, LLC and Desert Sunlight 300, LLC to support the Desert Sunlight Project. The 550 MW project is expected to be one of the world's largest solar photovoltaic plants and is expected to fund over 550 construction jobs. The project will be located on land managed by the Bureau of Land Management in eastern Riverside County, California. "To win the clean energy race we must invest in projects like this that fund jobs and increase the generation of clean, renewable power in the

52

Technical and economic assessment of solar hybrid repowering. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) has performed a Technical and Economic Assessment of Solar Hybrid Repowering under funding by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Western Energy Supply and Transmission (WEST) Associates, and a number of southwestern utilities. Solar hybrid repowering involves placement of solar hardware adjacent to and connected to existing gas- and oil-fueled electric generation units to displace some of or all the fossil fuel normally used during daylight hours. The subject study assesses the technical economic viability of the solar hybrid repowering concept within the southwestern United States and the PNM system. This document is a final report on the study and its results. The study was divided into the six primary tasks to allow a systematic investigation of the concept: (1) market survey and cost/benefit analysis, (2) study unit selection, (3) conceptual design and cost estimates, (4) unit economic analysis, (5) program planning, future phases, and (6) program management. Reeves Station No. 2 at Albuquerque, New Mexico, was selected for repowering with a design goal of 50 percent (25 MWe). The solar system design is based on the 10 MW solar central receiver pilot plant preliminary design for Barstow, California. SAN--1608-4-2 contains the technical drawings. (WHK)

None

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

CDCA Final EIS for Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA DESERT CONSERVATION AREA PLAN CALIFORNIA DESERT CONSERVATION AREA PLAN AMENDMENT / FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT FOR IVANPAH SOLAR ELECTRIC GENERATING SYSTEM FEIS-10-31 JULY 2010 BLM/CA/ES-2010-010+1793 In Reply Refer To: In reply refer to: 1610-5.G.1.4 2800lCACA-48668 Dear Reader: Enclosed is the proposed California Desert Conservation Area Plan Amendment and Final Environmental Impact Statement (CDCA Plan Amendment/FEIS) for the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (ISEGS) project. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) prepared the CDCA Plan Amendment/FEIS for the ISEGS project in consultation with cooperating agencies and California State agencies, taking into account public comments received during the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. The proposed plan amendment adds the Ivanpah

54

Final system instrumentation design package for decade 80 solar house  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This system instrumentation design package reflects the final configuration of the Decade 80 solar house to monitor and collect system performance data. The system instrumentation acceptance review was held on June 14, 1977. This review demonstrated by actual operation that the system and the data acquisition subsystem operated satisfactorily and installation of instrumentation was in accordance with the design. This design package is made up of: site and system description, operating and control modes, and instrumentation program (including sensor schematic).

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

New approaches for high-efficiency solar cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities carried out in this subcontract. These activities cover, first the atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) growth of GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP at fairly low growth temperatures. This was followed by using ALE to achieve high levels of doping both n-type and p-type required for tunnel junctions (Tj) in the cascade solar cell structures. Then the authors studied the properties of AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions and their performances at different growth conditions. This is followed by the use of these tunnel junctions in stacked solar cell structures. The effect of these tunnel junctions on the performance of stacked solar cells was studied at different temperatures and different solar fluences. Finally, the authors studied the effect of different types of black surface fields (BSF), both p/n and n/p GaInP solar cell structures, and their potential for window layer applications. Parts of these activities were carried in close cooperation with Dr. Mike Timmons of the Research Triangle Institute.

Bedair, S.M.; El-Masry, N.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Energy Department Finalizes $337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Finalizes $337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Energy Department Finalizes $337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1 for Innovative Solar Power Plant Energy Department Finalizes $337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1 for Innovative Solar Power Plant September 28, 2011 - 12:37pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Energy Department finalized a $337 million loan guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1, LLC to support the development of an innovative photovoltaic solar generating project. The optimized 150 megawatt (MW) alternating current photovoltaic (PV) solar generation project will be located in Maricopa County, Arizona, approximately 45 miles west of Phoenix. Sempra Energy, the project sponsor, estimates the project will fund up to 300 construction

57

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix F; Conversion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

would be packaged and sent either for disposal or storage. The HF would be neutralized to calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) and separately packaged for disposal or sale. It was assumed...

58

CRADA Final Report: Process development for hybrid solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development for hybrid solar cells Summary of the specific20 wafers with full tandem solar cell test structure perIIINitride/Silicon Tandem Solar Cell, Appl. Phys. Express

Ager, Joel W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Solar water heating technical support. Technical report for November 1997--April 1998 and final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report covers the time period November 1, 1997 through April 30, 1998, and also summarizes the project as the final report. The topics of the report include certification of solar collectors for water heating systems, modeling and testing of solar collectors and gas water heater backup systems, ratings of collectors for specific climates, and solar pool heating systems.

Huggins, J.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Microsoft Word - West TN Solar Farm_Final EA.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 10-088(E)/010511 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT WEST TENNESSEE SOLAR FARM PROJECT HAYWOOD COUNTY, TENNESSEE U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh, PA February 2011 DOE/EA-1706 10-088(E)/010511 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT West Tennessee Solar Farm Project Haywood County, Tennessee February 2011 Environmental Assessment for the West Tennessee Solar Farm Project Table of Contents i Table of Contents 1 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................. 1 1.1 VOLUNTEER STATE SOLAR INITIATIVE ....................................................................... 1 1.1.1 Tennessee Solar Institute ........................................................................................ 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Assessment of solar-powered cooling of buildings. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three solar-powered cooling concepts are analyzed and evaluated. These are: (1) the solar Rankine concept in which a Rankine cycle driven by solar energy is used to drive a vapor compression refrigeration machine, (2) the solar-assisted Rankine concept in which a Rankine cycle driven by both solar energy and fuel combustion is used to drive a vapor compression refrigeration machine, and (3) the solar absorption concept in which solar energy is used to drive an absorption refrigeration machine. These concepts are compared on the bases of coefficient of performance, requirements for primary fuel input, and economic considerations. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. (WHK)

Curran, H.M.

1975-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Solar energy legal bibliography. Final report. [160 references  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Legal Bibliography is a compilation of approximately 160 solar publications abstracted for their legal and policy content (through October 1978). Emphasis is on legal barriers and incentives to solar energy development. Abstracts are arranged under the following categories: Antitrust, Biomass, Building Codes, Consumer Protection, Environmental Aspects, Federal Legislation and Programs, Financing/Insurance, International Law, Labor, Land Use (Covenants, Easements, Nuisance, Zoning), Local Legislation and Programs, Ocean Energy, Patents and Licenses, Photovoltaics, Solar Access Rights, Solar Heating and Cooling, Solar Thermal Power Systems, Standards, State Legislation and Programs, Tax Law, Tort Liability, Utilities, Warranties, Wind Resources, and General Solar Law.

Seeley, D.; Euser, B.; Joyce, C.; Morgan, G. H.; Laitos, J. G.; Adams, A.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Energy Department Finalizes $337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite 337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1 for Innovative Solar Power Plant Energy Department Finalizes $337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1 for Innovative Solar Power Plant September 28, 2011 - 12:37pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that the Energy Department finalized a $337 million loan guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1, LLC to support the development of an innovative photovoltaic solar generating project. The optimized 150 megawatt (MW) alternating current photovoltaic (PV) solar generation project will be located in Maricopa County, Arizona, approximately 45 miles west of Phoenix. Sempra Energy, the project sponsor, estimates the project will fund up to 300 construction jobs. "Domestic solar power generation strengthens and diversifies our

64

Solar energy grid integration systems : final report of the Florida Solar Energy Center Team.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initiated in 2008, the Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) program is a partnership involving the U.S. DOE, Sandia National Laboratories, private sector companies, electric utilities, and universities. Projects supported under the program have focused on the complete-system development of solar technologies, with the dual goal of expanding utility-scale penetration and addressing new challenges of connecting large-scale solar installations in higher penetrations to the electric grid. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), its partners, and Sandia National Laboratories have successfully collaborated to complete the work under the third and final stage of the SEGIS initiative. The SEGIS program was a three-year, three-stage project that include conceptual design and market analysis in Stage 1, prototype development and testing in Stage 2, and moving toward commercialization in Stage 3. Under this program, the FSEC SEGIS team developed a comprehensive vision that has guided technology development that sets one methodology for merging photovoltaic (PV) and smart-grid technologies. The FSEC team's objective in the SEGIS project is to remove barriers to large-scale general integration of PV and to enhance the value proposition of photovoltaic energy by enabling PV to act as much as possible as if it were at the very least equivalent to a conventional utility power plant. It was immediately apparent that the advanced power electronics of these advanced inverters will go far beyond conventional power plants, making high penetrations of PV not just acceptable, but desirable. This report summarizes a three-year effort to develop, validate and commercialize Grid-Smart Inverters for wider photovoltaic utilization, particularly in the utility sector.

Ropp, Michael (Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD); Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Schaffer, Alan (Lakeland Electric Utilities, Lakeland, FL); Katz, Stanley (Satcon Technology Corporation, Boston, MA); Perkinson, Jim (Satcon Technology Corporation, Boston, MA); Bower, Ward Isaac; Prestero, Mark (Satcon Technology Corporation, Boston, MA); Casey, Leo (Satcon Technology Corporation, Boston, MA); Moaveni, Houtan (Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL); Click, David (Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL); Davis, Kristopher (Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL); Reedy, Robert (Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL); Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Sena-Henderson, Lisa; David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Calibration of solar radiation measuring instruments. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of solar radiation measurement of instruments and some types of errors is given; and procedures for calibrating solar radiation measuring instruments are detailed. An appendix contains a description of various agencies who perform calibration of solar instruments and a description of the methods they used at the time this report was prepared. (WHK)

Bahm, R J; Nakos, J C

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Semiconductor grade, solar silicon purification project. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motorola's low cost poly silicon program is described. In the process, SiF/sub 4/, a low cost by-product is reacted with mg silicon to form SiF/sub 2/ gas which is polymerized. The (SiF/sub 2/)/sub x/ polymer is heated forming volatile Si/sub x/F/sub y/ homologues which disproportionate (C.V.D.) on a silicon particle bed forming silicon and SiF/sub 4/. During the initial phases of the investigation the silicon analysis procedure relied heavily on S.S.M.S. and E.S. analysis. This analysis demonstrated that major purification had occurred and some samples were indistinguishable from semiconductor grade silicon (except possibly for phosphorus). However, more recent electrical analysis via crystal growth reveals that the product contains compensated phosphorus and boron. Work on the control or removal of the electrically active donors and acceptors could yield a product suitable for solar application. The low projected product cost and short energy payback time suggest that the economics of this process will result in a cost less than the J.P.L./D.O.E. goal of $10/Kg (1975 dollars). Finally, assuming a successful demonstration of a pilot facility, the process appears to be readily scalable to a major silicon purification facility as was proposed by Motorola and R. Katzen.

Ingle, W.M.; Rosler, R.S.; Thompson, S.W.; Chaney, R.E.

1979-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

Integrated passive-solar demonstration project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the study reported were to collect data on a combination of several passive solar heating and cooling systems. A passive solar test structure was constructed and monitored and the demonstration of passive systems designed into the structure was evaluated. Passive solar cooling principles include: shading all mass walls and windows from direct solar gain, maintaining cool attic and ceiling temperatures using solar induced ventilation, maintaining cool mean radiant wall temperatures, recirculating internal air, and using natural cross-ventilation through the conditioned space in spring and fall. Passive solar heating principles include: orientation of windows and sunspaces towards the south, providing double pane south windows, providing a double pane solar sunspace, using night insulation over glazing, extended thermal storage mass, and using a fan-forced rock/earth/air storage system. (LEW)

Garrison, M.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Notice of Intent (NOI) to Prepare DUF6 PEIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1, No. 17 / Thursday, January 25, 1996 / Notice 1, No. 17 / Thursday, January 25, 1996 / Notice [Pages 2239-2242] From the Federal Register Online via GPO Access [wais.access.gpo.gov] Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use o f Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride AGENCY: Department of Energy ACTION: Notice of Intent (NOI). SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC 4321 et seq.). The PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts of alternative strategies for the long-term management and use of 560,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) currently stored in cylinders at DOE's three gaseous diffusion plant sites located near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak

69

Solar production of industrial process steam. Final detail design report  

SciTech Connect

The application of solar energy to produce 110 psig industrial steam for processing laundry and drycleaning for a facility in Pasadena, California, is described. The system uses tracking parabolic trough collectors. The collectors, the detailed process analyses, solar calculations and insolation data, energy reduction analyses, economic analyses, design of the solar system, construction, and costs are presented in detail. Included in appendices are the following: mechanical specifications and calculations, electrical specifications and calculations, and structural specifications and calculations. (MHR)

Eldridge, B.G.

1978-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

CRADA Final Report: Process development for hybrid solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III-Nitride Alloys for Solar Power Conversion. List ofsolar cells have the potential to reduce the cost of concentrator photovoltaic power

Ager, Joel W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Potential market for solar equipment among California homeowners. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the research reported herein is to determine what is the nature of the potential market for residential solar equipment among California homeowners. The present study of 812 California homeowners builds upon a pilot study of 111 solar equipment owners and 104 of their nearby neighbors (Rogers and others, 1979). At present, seven out of eight California homeowners are at least aware of residential users in solar energy, but the majority have little current intention to purchase. About one-fourth knows someone who owns a solar residential system. The number of solar owners with whom homeowners are acquainted is a crucial influence on their intention to purchase solar equipment themselves. Other important predictors of intent to buy are: the number of years respondents believe it will take for solar equipment to pay for itself, attitudes about the viability of residential solar equipment, the extent to which respondents tend towards a lifestyle of voluntary simplicity, and the homeowners' socio-economic status. These five variables predict 46% of the total variance in interest and intention to puchase residential solar equipment.

Leonard-Barton, D.; Rogers, E.M.; Avi-Itzhak, T.; Patel, I.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: University of Riyadh. Solar air conditioning. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on solar air conditioning at the University of Riyadh in Riyhadh, Saudi Arabia is presented. Topics relevant to the university's proposed solar cooling laboratory are discussed: absorption systems and various contingencies, photovoltaic solar collectors and thermoelectric elements, measuring instruments, solar radiation measurement and analysis, laboratory specifications, and decision theories. Dual cycle computations and equipment specifications are included among the appendices.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Development and testing of the Solar Control Corporation modular Controller and Solarstat Subsystem. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes the final results of contract NAS8-32258 Solar Control Corporation, for the additional development work on their existing Controller and Solarstat Subsystem for use with solar heating and cooling systems. It discusses the intended use of the final report, describes the deliverable end items, lists program objectives, and relates how they were accomplished. The report shows that the products developed are marketable and suitable for public use.

Hankins, J.D.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

CRADA Final Report: Process development for hybrid solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TCF funding of a CRADA between LBNL and RSLE leveraged RSLE's original $1M investment in LBNL research and led to development of a solar cell fabrication process that will bring the high efficiency, high voltage hybrid tandem solar cell closer to commercialization. RSLE has already built a pilot line at its Phoenix, Arizona site.

Ager, Joel W

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

Solar applications of thermal energy storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology assessment is presented on solar energy systems which use thermal energy storage. The study includes characterization of the current state-of-the-art of thermal energy storage, an assessment of the energy storage needs of solar energy systems, and the synthesis of this information into preliminary design criteria which would form the basis for detailed designs of thermal energy storage. (MHR)

Lee, C.; Taylor, L.; DeVries, J.; Heibein, S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Residential Solar Data Center Mirads User's Guide. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential Solar Data Center Project staff in the Center for Building Technology, National Bureau of Standards, maintains a computerized data base containing non-instrumented residential data from the DOE/HUD Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program. Data contained in the solar data base are accessible online to users of the NBS Center Computer via remote terminals with a data base retrieval software package called MIRADS (Marshall Information Retrieval And Display System). This document is a self-teaching user's guide to the solar data base. It is complete with the basic MIRADS language rules, examples of use, and a step-by-step walk-through of a typical interactive session. Appendices contain all the data element names and coded values needed to use the solar data with MIRADS, as well as many examples of actual computer sessions.

Christopher, P.M.; Vogt, M.; Hall, D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Passive solar potential of a conventional home. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A conventional home not designed for passive solar heating was found to use an average of 61% less natural gas for space heating when compared to four similarly used control homes of identical design during the 1979-1980 heating season in Fort Collins, Colorado. The significant savings are attributed to: (1) passive solar gain through conventional windows; (2) optimum orientation of the home placing windows and doors away from prevailing winds; (3) the use of low-cost insulating window shutters; (4) conventional winterization; and (5) energy-conscious life-styles of the occupants. The payback period for the minor investment made by the owners of the demonstration home was estimated to be approximately two years. The results demonstrate that passive solar has a much greater potential in a conventional home than is currently believed and suggest that all future homes be oriented and constructed for maximum solar exposure.

Waterman, E.L.

1981-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Windjammer solar-water-heating system. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the Windjammer Solar-Water-Heating System tests showed that it was not as an efficient system as a comparable conventional system for converting solar energy into heat energy. However, it was determined that the innovative mode used less electric back-up energy for water heating. Reduced fossil fuel energy consumption being the ultimate objective of a solar water heating, the principle employed has been shown to be a workable energy saving concept. The differential mode of temperature control emerged as the more efficient mode of operation for the innovative system and under comparable conditions is projected to be nearly equivalent to the conventional solar system. Although the concept has proven workable, the costs feasible, and the potential for considereable improvements exists, additional research and development is needed to advance the design into its most practical application.

Windham, J.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Solar energy management systems development program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the requirements of a general-purpose solar controller, the novel control system, and sample application of that system. The investigation showed that solar systems vary in terms of temperature setpoints and differentials. Also, system design details, such as the particular placement of temperatur sensors, lengths or types of ducts, etc., affect setpoint and differential values, even for systems with similar mechanical schematics. (MOW)

None

80

Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Epitaxial silicon growth for solar cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this contract were: (1) to determine the feasibility of silicon epitaxial growth on low-cost silicon substrates for the development of silicon sheet capable of producing low-cost, high efficiency solar cells; (2) to achieve a goal of 12% (AM-0) efficient solar cells fabricated on thin epitaxial layers (<25 ..mu..m) grown on low-cost substrates; and (3) to evaluate the add-on cost for the epitaxial process and to develop low-cost epitaxial growth procedures for application in conjunction with low-cost silicon substrates. The basic epitaxial procedures and solar-cell fabrication and evaluation techniques are described, followed by a discussion of the development of baseline epitaxial solar-cell structures, grown on high-quality conventional silicon substrates. This work resulted in the definition of three basic structures which reproducibly yielded efficiencies in the range of 12 to 13.7%. These epitaxial growth procedures and baseline structures were then used to grow diagnostic layers and solar cells on four potentially low-cost silicon substrates. A description of the crystallographic properties of such layers and the performance of epitaxially grown solar cells fabricated on these materials is given. The major results were the achievement of cell efficiencies of 10.6 to 11.2% on multigrained substrates and approx. 13% on a low-cost single-crystal substrate. An advanced epitaxial reactor, the Rotary Disc, is described. The results of growing solar-cell structures of the baseline type and on low-cost substrates are given. The add-on cost for the epitaxial process is assessed. These cost estimates show a value of approx. 0.46/W using existing or near-term technologies and project an add-on cost of $0.10/W for future reactors.

D'Aiello, R.V.; Robinson, P.H.; Richman, D.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Public Comment Period Re-Opened for the Uranium Leasing Program PEIS |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Comment Period Re-Opened for the Uranium Leasing Program Public Comment Period Re-Opened for the Uranium Leasing Program PEIS Public Comment Period Re-Opened for the Uranium Leasing Program PEIS May 28, 2013 - 5:37pm Addthis Public Comment Period Re-Opened for the Uranium Leasing Program PEIS The U.S. Department of Energy is re-opening the public comment period for the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Draft ULP PEIS, DOE/EIS-0472D). DOE made the Draft ULP PEIS available for public comment on March 15, 2013 (78 FR 16500). The public comment period for the Draft ULP PEIS originally was to end on May 16, 2013, and an extension to May 31, 2013 was announced on April 23, 2013 (78 FR 23926). In response to a public request for additional review time, DOE re-opens the public comment period, which will now close on July 1,

84

Solar heating system installed at Stamford, CT. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on the solar heating system installed at the Lutz-Sotire Partnership Executive East Office Building, Stamford, Connecticut. The information consists of description of system and components, operation and maintenance manual, as-built drawings and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50 percent of the heating requirements. The solar facility has 2,561 sq. ft. of liquid flat plate collectors and a 6000 gallon, stone lined, well-insulated storage tank. Freeze protection is provided by a 50 percent glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. From the storage tank, solar heated water is fed into the building's distributed heat pump loop via a modulating three-way valve. If the storage tank temperature drops below 80/sup 0/F, the building loop may be supplied from the existing electrical hot water boilers. The Executive East Office Building is of moderate size, 25,000 sq. ft. of heated space in 2 1/2 stories. The solar system makes available for other users up to 150 KVA of existing electrical generating capacity.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Consumer demand analysis: solar heating and cooling of buildings. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study concerns the acceptability of solar heating and cooling to homebuyers for residential applications. The study assesses the extent of homeowner awareness of solar technologies, estimates the acceptability of elevated first costs including willingness to trade higher initial costs for life cycle savings, and investigates the impact of solar aesthetics. Also explored are other areas of potential concern to homeowners in evaluating a solar alternative as well as positive motivations that would encourage purchase. Finally, the socioeconomic and attitudinal characteristics of individuals more likely to purchase a solar home rather than a conventional home were studied. The results are based on group depth interviews and personal interviews with active homeseekers, top executives of large residential development firms, and architects. The sample was split evenly between Denver, Colorado and the Philadelphia, Pa./Wilmington, Del. areas. Implications of the results for the commercialization of solar energy and possible public policy decisions are also discussed.

Scott, J.E.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Final Report: Sintered CZTS Nanoparticle Solar Cells on Metal Foil; July 26, 2011 - July 25, 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report covering 12 months of this subcontract for research on high-efficiency copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS)-based thin-film solar cells on flexible metal foil. Each of the first three quarters of the subcontract has been detailed in quarterly reports. In this final report highlights of the first three quarters will be provided and details will be given of the final quarter of the subcontract.

Leidholm, C.; Hotz, C.; Breeze, A.; Sunderland, C.; Ki, W.; Zehnder, D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Solar window collection and distribution module system. Final performance report  

SciTech Connect

The construction and monitoring of a solar window collection and distribution system are presented. One complete window module was purchased and assembled, including: the glass, the window frames, sealants, grills, vents and a mechanical damper device. Monitoring of the system operation was limited to measuring inside air temperature, outside air temperature, and circulation temperatures through the window module systems, as well as the actual tinted glass surface temperature. The system has produced a reduction in glare, fading of furniture, and control of solar gains to a building structure.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Solar-powered steam generator heliostat. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small-size central-receiver-type solar energy collecting system delivering commercial grade steam is analyzed and a wind avoidance type heliostat designed, built, and successfully tested. The heliostat design effort is described, including reflecting surface materials and measurements, optic considerations and mirror field arrangements, mechanical analysis and fabrication techniques, and economics and cost effectiveness. Measurements of normal incident solar energy at Upton, N.Y., are reported and a method is proposed for estimating this input parameter for other locations proposed.

Cottingham, J G

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Solar heating and cooling commercialization research program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Heating and Cooling Commercialization Research Program has addressed a recognized need to accelerate the commercialization of solar products. The development of communication techniques and materials for a target group of heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) wholesalers and distributors has been the primary effort. A summary of the program, the approach to the development of the techniques and materials, the conclusions derived from seminar feedback, the development of additional research activities and reports and the recommendations for follow-on activities are presented. The appendices offer detailed information on specific elements of the research effort.

Christensen, D.L.; Tragert, W.; Weir, S.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Extra focal convective suppressing solar collector. Final technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report describes work done on the Extra Focal Convective Suppressing Solar Collector. The topics of the report include sensor refinement for the tracking electronics, tracking controller refinement, system optics evaluation, absorber system material evaluation and performance, tracking hardware evaluation and refinement, and full scale prototype construction and testing.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Solar powered desiccant air conditioning system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar-powered desiccant air conditioning system using silica gel has been developed, and modifications to the existing unit and additional testing are proposed to demonstrate the feasibility of the unit. Conversion from a rotating bed to a fixed bed of silica gel is proposed. Some general plans for commercialization are briefly discussed. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

92

Wind energy/geothermic/solar heating system. Final report  

SciTech Connect

I've observed three distinct ''camps'' of renewable energy resources; WIND, Geothermic, and Solar. None of the three are completely adequate for the NE by themselves. I observe little effort to combine them to date. My objective has been to demonstrate that the three can be combined in a practical system. To mitagate the high cost and poor payback for individual residences, I believe neighborhoods of 4 to 5 homes, apartment complexes or condominiums could form an Energy Association alloting a piece of ground (could be a greenbelt) which would contain the well or wells, solar boosted underground water storage and the Solar banks. These are the high cost items which could be prorated and ammortized by the Association. Easements would permit each residence underground insulated water lines for individual heat pump conversions to existing forced air furnaces. Where regulations permit, an individual home could erect his own windmill to belt drive his freon compressor. With or without the optional windmill the water to freon heat pump with its solar boosts on the well water, will enjoy COP's (coefficient of Performances or times better than electric resistance heat) beyond anything on the market today. In a neighborhood energy association, all trenching could be done together all plumbing could be one contract and they could qualify for quantity discounts on heat pump units, chillers and components and installation.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Solar-assisted heat pump field performance evaluation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An analysis carried out to determine some guidelines to use in laying out six ground coil installations is summarized. The installation of the solar-assisted ground coupled heat pumps is described. The instrumentation employed at each of the installations in order to obtain performance data is discussed. (MHR)

1980-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Marin Solar Village: feasibility study and technical analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The energy needs of Hamilton Air Force Base's Solar Village for electricity and heating and cooling of buildings are considered and alternative ways of meeting the Village's requirements for these forms of energy are evaluated. First, Solar Village's energy demand is calculated and compared to a base case representing calculations for typical energy usage for a development of similar size and density that is in conformance with current state and local ordinances. The potential of selected alternative technologies to meet the Solar Village projected demand for electrical power and natural gas is evaluated. Scenarios were developed to reduce demand, particularly in the building sector. Four alternative on-site energy technologies have been evaluated: wind, solar thermal electric, biomass conversion, photovoltaics. Each alternative is analyzed in detail. Of the four alternatives considered, the one with the greatest present potential is biomass conversion. Two technologies have been incorporated into the design. A 3-acre land fill is covered with a mantle of soil. A network of pipes carries off the methane gas which is a natural product of anaerobic decomposition of the materials in the land fill. The second technology involves the planting of rapidly-growing trees on denuded and unused portions of the site; 50 acres devoted to tree production could yield 12% of the back-up energy required for home heating on a sustainable basis.

Not Available

1980-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Solar Central Receiver Prototype Heliostat. Volume I. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to support the Solar Central Receiver Power Plant research, development and demonstration effort by: (1) Establishment of a heliostat design, with associated manufacturing, assembly, installation and maintenance approaches, that, in quantity production will yield significant reductions in capital and operating costs over an assumed 30 year plant lifetime as compared with existing designs; and (2) Identification of needs for near term and future research and development in heliostat concept, materials, manufacture, installation, maintenance, and other areas, where successful accomplishment and application would offer significant payoffs in the further reduction of the cost of electrical energy from solar central receiver power plants. The prototype heliostat design is presented in detail; and manufacturing, installation, and maintenance procedures described. (WHK)

None

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Prototype Energy Retrieval and Solar (PERS) System : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PERS System, which provides both heating and cooling for the substation Control House, has several different modes of operation. During the winter, heat from the transformer is recovered by a heat pump and is transferred to water circulating through a fan coil unit in the Control House forced air system. In addition, banks of tubular collectors mounted on the roof of the Control House can provide direct solar heating. During the summer, the solar collector array is used to drive a 15-ton absorption air conditioner which cools water in a 4300-gallon storage tank. Mechanical difficulaties were encountered, performance of components was not always satisfactory, and a need for modifications in the system emerged. During the winter testing period in December 1978, the heat recovery system performed with an average Coefficient of Performance (COP) of 2.75, as compared to the design goal of 4.6. The absorption chiller, however, performed quite well during the summer testing period in August, 1978. The coefficient of performance ranged from 0.598 to 0.622 on a daily basis, comparing favorably with the anticipated goal of a COP of 0.74. The overall solar-assisted absorption chiller system performed with a COP ranging from 2.80 to 3.57, with the absorption chiller functioning at even relatively low collector temperatures.

Guddat, Robert O.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

New vision solar system mission study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vision for the future of the planetary exploration program includes the capability to deliver {open_quotes}constellations{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}fleets{close_quotes} of microspacecraft to a planetary destination. These fleets will act in a coordinated manner to gather science data from a variety of locations on or around the target body, thus providing detailed, global coverage without requiring development of a single large, complex and costly spacecraft. Such constellations of spacecraft, coupled with advanced information processing and visualization techniques and high-rate communications, could provide the basis for development of a {open_quotes}virtual{close_quotes} {open_quotes}presence{close_quotes} in the solar system. A goal could be the near real-time delivery of planetary images and video to a wide variety of users in the general public and the science community. This will be a major step in making the solar system accessible to the public and will help make solar system exploration a part of the human experience on Earth.

Mondt, J.F.; Zubrin, R.M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between 11 U. S. industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprised 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system, a steam generation system, and steam-turbine power block. Molten nitrate salt was used as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powered a 10-MWe (megawatt electric), conventional Rankine cycle turbine. Solar Two operated from June 1996 to April 1999. The major objective of the test and evaluation phase of the project was to validate the technical characteristics of a molten salt power tower. This report describes the significant results from the test and evaluation activities, the operating experience of each major system, and overall plant performance. Tests were conducted to measure the power output (MW) of the each major system, the efficiencies of the heliostat, receiver, thermal storage, and electric power generation systems and the daily energy collected, daily thermal-to-electric conversion, and daily parasitic energy consumption. Also included are detailed test and evaluation reports.

BRADSHAW, ROBERT W.; DAWSON, DANIEL B.; DE LA ROSA, WILFREDO; GILBERT, ROCKWELL; GOODS, STEVEN H.; HALE, MARY JANE; JACOBS, PETER; JONES, SCOTT A.; KOLB, GREGORY J.; PACHECO, JAMES E.; PRAIRIE, MICHAEL R.; REILLY, HUGH E.; SHOWALTER, STEVEN K.; VANT-HULL, LORIN L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Solar heating and hot water system installed at St. Louis, Missouri. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on the solar heating and hot water system installed at the William Tao and Associates, Inc., office building in St. Louis, Missouri. The information consists of description, photos, maintenance and construction problems, final drawing, system requirements and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide 50% of the hot water requirements and 45% of the space heating needs for a 900 square foot office space and drafting room. The solar facility has 252 square foot of glass tube concentrator collectors and a 1000 gallon steel storage tank buried below a concrete slab floor. Freeze protection is provided by a propylene glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. The collectors are roof mounted on a variable tilt array which is adjusted seasonally and is connected to the solar thermal storage tank by a tube-in-shell heat exchanger. Incoming city water is preheated through the solar energy thermal storage tank.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Solar energy retrofit for Clarksville Middle School, Clarksville, Indiana. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes in detail the solar energy retrofit heating system installed to provide heating for two gymnasiums at the Clarksville Middle School located in Clarksville, Indiana. The solar components were partly funded by the Department of Energy, and the technical management was done by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The system type is hot water using existing chilled water piping and chilled water coils in an air handler system. Flat-plate, single-glazed selectively coated solar collectors were installed on the roof of each gymnasium. Total collector area covers 6,520 square feet. The liquid is stored in a 10,000 gallon steel tank installed below grade.

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Residential solar data center: data resources and reports. Final report Sep 79-Sep 81  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential Solar Data Center (SDC) was responsible for the establishment and operation of a computerized data base containing non-instrumented residential data collected from the DoE/HUD Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program. This document includes a summary of the history and background of the SDC and its role in the demonstration program, a list of the final computer reports which are available, sample pages of representative reports, and a description of the data files which comprised the solar data base.

Christopher, P.M.; Houser, A.O.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Final report : testing and evaluation for solar hot water reliability.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar hot water (SHW) systems are being installed by the thousands. Tax credits and utility rebate programs are spurring this burgeoning market. However, the reliability of these systems is virtually unknown. Recent work by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has shown that few data exist to quantify the mean time to failure of these systems. However, there is keen interest in developing new techniques to measure SHW reliability, particularly among utilities that use ratepayer money to pay the rebates. This document reports on an effort to develop and test new, simplified techniques to directly measure the state of health of fielded SHW systems. One approach was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and is based on the idea that the performance of the solar storage tank can reliably indicate the operational status of the SHW systems. Another approach, developed by the University of New Mexico (UNM), uses adaptive resonance theory, a type of neural network, to detect and predict failures. This method uses the same sensors that are normally used to control the SHW system. The NREL method uses two additional temperature sensors on the solar tank. The theories, development, application, and testing of both methods are described in the report. Testing was performed on the SHW Reliability Testbed at UNM, a highly instrumented SHW system developed jointly by SNL and UNM. The two methods were tested against a number of simulated failures. The results show that both methods show promise for inclusion in conventional SHW controllers, giving them advanced capability in detecting and predicting component failures.

Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Burch, Jay (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nonimaging concentrators for solar thermal energy. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A small experimental solar collector test facility has been established on the campus of the University of Chicago. This capability has been used to explore applications of nonimaging optics for solar thermal concentration in three substantially different configurations: (1) a single stage system with moderate concentration on an evacuated absorber (a 5.25X evacuated tube Compound Parabolic Concentrator or CPC), (2) a two stage system with high concentration and a non-evacuated absorber (a 16X Fresnel lens/CPC type mirror) and (3) moderate concentration single stage systems with non-evacuated absorbers for lower temperature (a 3X and a 6.5X CPC). Prototypes of each of these systems have been designed, built and tested. The performance characteristics are presented. In addition a 73 m/sup 2/ experimental array of 3X non-evacuated CPC's has been installed in a school heating system on the Navajo Indian Reservation in New Mexico. The full array has a peak noon time efficiency of approx. 50% at ..delta..T = 50/sup 0/C above ambient and has supplied about half the school's heat load for the past two heating seasons. Several theoretical features of nonimaging concentration have been investigated including their long term energy collecting behavior. The measured performance of the different systems shows clearly that non-tracking concentrators can provide solar thermal energy from moderately high low temperature regimes (> 50/sup 0/C above ambient) up into the mid-temperature region (well above 200/sup 0/C above ambient). The measured efficiency at 220/sup 0/C for the 5.25X CPC was as high or higher than that for any of the commercial tracking systems tested.

Winston, R.

1980-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Winter experience of a passive solar retrofit. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An older home in St. Louis had 2 inch foam insulation added to the outside of masonry walls with stucco exterior finish applied. The south wall was modified so that there is a gross solar collection area of 26.2 m/sup 2/, with 13.2 m/sup 2/ of greenhouse, 8.6 m/sup 2/ of direct gain and 4.4 m/sup 2/ of Trombe components. The performance of the building and its data acquisition system are described. (MHR)

Michels, T.I.; Andes, F.S.

1980-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

105

An investigation of wind loads on solar collectors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A wind-tunnel study of a series of model solar-collector installations (flat-plate collectors) immersed in a thick turbulent shear layer was undertaken in order to determine design wind loads on such installations. Wind tunnel measurements were made of the mean and fluctuating pressures on a model of a single flat-plate collector which was a component of different multi-panel installations. The pressures were spatially integrated over the top and bottom surface of the single collector separately.

Tieleman, H.W.; Akins, R.E.; Sparks, P.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Solar system installation at Louisville, Kentucky (final report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A contract was awarded in June 1976 for the installation of a solar space heating and domestic hot water system at 2400 Watteroon Trail, Louisville, Kentucky. The overall philosophy used was to install both a liquid and a hot air system retrofitted to the existing office and combined warehouse building. The 1080 sq ft office space is heated first and excess heat is dumped into the warehouse. The two systems offered a unique opportunity to measure the performance and compare results of both air and liquid at one site. The two systems are described in detail and information on the data acquisition system is included.

Not Available

1978-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

Silicon-film{trademark} on ceramic solar cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Silicon-Film{trademark} design achieves high performance through the use of a thin silicon layer. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (<50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The enhancement in performance requires the incorporation of back-surface passivation and light trapping. The high-performance Silicon-Film{trademark} design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. The properties of the metallurgical barrier must be engineered to implement specific device requirements, such as high back-surface reflectivity. Recent advances in process development are described here.

Hall, R.B.; Bacon, C.; DiReda, V.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Lampo, S.M.; Rand, J.A.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M. [AstroPower, Inc., Newark, DE (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Low-cost solar collector test and evaluation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project was to test and evaluate a highly efficient low cost solar collector and to make this technology available to the average homeowner. The basic collector design was for use in mass production, so approximately forty collector panels were made for testing and to make it simple to be hand built. The collectors performed better than expected and written and visual material was prepared to make construction easier for a first time builder. Publicity was generated to make public aware of benefits with stories by Associated Press and in publications like Popular Science.

Benjamin, C.M.

109

Solar Energy Research and Education Foundation. Final reports by task  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains final reports for the following tasks: kiosk for the children`s museum renewable energy exhibit and display, internet promotional and educational material, Aurora renewable energy science and engineering, CD-ROM training materials, presentations and traveling display, radio show `Energy Matters`, and newspaper articles and weekly news column.

von Reis, K.; Waegel, A.S.; Totten, M.

1997-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

Center punched solar cell module development effort. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of an advanced module development program with the objective of providing a low cost solar cell mechanical interconnect design are presented. The design approach, which avoids soldering or welding operations, lends itself to automated assembly techniques thus supporting the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project goals. During the course of the program, a total of twelve modules were delivered to JPL for qualification testing. The first group of six modules contained aluminum contact cells and the second group of six modules contained silver-titanium-palladium contact cells. Extensive component and environmental testing by Xerox Electro-Optical Systems at the module level has shown that reliable cell mechanical interconnection can be achieved when utilizing the proper electrical contact materials and pressures. Environmental testing of XEOS modules at JPL, in accordance with the same JPL specification used by XEOS, will be performed and the results will be separately published. The module design, manufacturing procedure, test program, significant problem areas and solutions, and conclusions and recommendations as formulated and conducted by XEOS are discussed.

Ross, R.E.; Mortensen, W.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

CIBS Solar Cell Development Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Efforts to fabricate and study a new photovoltaic material, copper indium boron diselenide (CuInxB1-xSe2 or CIBS), were undertaken. Attempts to prepare CIBS using sputtering deposition techniques resulted in segregation of boron from the rest of elements in the material. CIBS nanocrystals were prepared from the reaction of elemental Se with CuCl, InCl3, and boric acid in solution, but the product material quickly decomposed upon heating that was required in attempts to convert the nanocrystals into a thin film. The investigation of the reasons for the lack of CIBS material stability led to new structure-property studies of closely-related photovoltaic systems as well as studies of new solar cell materials and processing methods that could enhance the development of next-generation solar technologies. A detailed compositional study of CuIn1-xAlxSe2 (CIAS, a system closely related to CIBS) revealed a non-linear correlation between crystal lattice size and the Al/(In+Al) ratios with dual-phase formation being observed. A new nanocrystal-to-thin-film processing method was developed for the preparation of CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) thin films in which colloidal Se particles are sprayed in contact with CuIn1-xGaxS2 nanoparticles and heated in an argon atmosphere with no other Se source in the system. The process is non-vacuum and does not require toxic gases such as Se vapor or H2Se. Expertise gained from these studies was applied to new research in the preparation of thin-film pyrite FeS2, an attractive earth-abundant candidate material for next-generation photovoltaics. Three methods successfully produced pure pyrite FeS2 films: sulfurization of sputtered Fe films, chemical bath deposition, and sulfurization of Fe2O3 sol-gel precursors. The last method produced pinhole-free films that may be viable for device development. Nickel, platinum, and possibly carbon would appear to serve as good ohmic contact materials. While CdS has a reasonable conduction band energy match to serve as an n-type buffer material in a pyrite FeS2-based solar cell, the less toxic SnS2 is being explored for this purpose.

Exstrom, Christopher L.; Soukup, Rodney J.; Ianno, Natale J.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

112

Solar liquid-desiccant air-conditioning system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design for a closed, diurnal, intermittent absorption chiller for passive solar air-conditioning using liquid sorbents has been constructed and tested. LiBr-H/sub 2/O will not work with this design because of its low vapor pressure at the temperature available. The approach has possibilities using the 2 LiBr-ZrBr-CH/sub 3/OH or H/sub 2/O-NH/sub 3/ sorbent refrigerant pairs. The use of H/sub 2/O-NH/sub 3/ appears to be the better candidate because of the lower solution viscosity and less cycle weight, through tank volumes and collector requirements are similar. Further study of other refrigerant pairs such as S-Thiocyanate-ammonia is indicated, however, the difficulties encountered in construction and low potential coefficient of performance, and thus large collection area needed, makes commercialization of such a system doubtful in the foreseeable future.

Not Available

113

Free-formed insulated concentrating solar collector. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A free-formed, insulated solar concentrating-collector was designed, built, and tested. The design utilizes new concepts to achieve simplicity, low cost, high efficiency, and long service life. Three concepts were utilized to meet these goals: First, the concentrating reflector is free-formed by hand from a thin steel sheet. Second, a transparent cover is placed over the concentrator and insulation is placed on the back and ends reduce heat losses and protect the reflecting surface from attack by rain and dust. Third, a highly-reflective aluminum film, protected by bonding between two thin sheets of uv stabilized polyester, is fastened to the steel substrate by peelable adhesive. The material cost of the unit without sun seeking electronics and drive motor is about $6.75 per square foot of sun capturing area. Sun following equipment adds to the cost, however, in units of about 100 square feet sun following equipment contributes about $2.00 per square foot. Labor costs are estimated to be approximately $3.00 per square foot for a $5.00 per hour labor rate for a trained crew. On a do-it-yourself basis a 100 square foot unit would cost about $875. Tests of the prototype collector performed by a certified solar test laboratory were made and the results compared with similar tests of a commercial unit. These tests indicate that the efficiency of the prototype is higher than the commercial unit at outlet temperatures below 160/sup 0/F and comparable with the commercial unit at the boiling point of water.

Goodwin, G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Glazing materials for solar and architectural applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes five collaborative research projects on glazings performed by participants in Subtask C of IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (SHC) Task 10, Materials Research and Testing. The projects include materials characterization, optical and thermal measurements, and durability testing of several types of new glazings Three studies were completed on electrochromic and dispersed liquid crystals for smart windows, and two were completed for low-E coatings and transparent insulation materials for more conventional window and wall applications. In the area of optical switching materials for smart windows, the group developed more uniform characterization parameters that are useful to determine lifetime and performance of electrochromics. The detailed optical properties of an Asahi (Japan) prototype electrochromic window were measured in several laboratories. A one square meter array of prototype devices was tested outdoors and demonstrated significant cooling savings compared to tinted static glazing. Three dispersed liquid crystal window devices from Taliq (USA) were evaluated. In the off state, these liquid crystal windows scatter light greatly. When a voltage of about 100 V ac is applied, these windows become transparent. Undyed devices reduce total visible light transmittance by only .25 when switched, but this can be increased to .50 with the use of dyed liquid crystals. A wide range of solar-optical and emittance measurements were made on low-E coated glass and plastic. Samples of pyrolytic tin oxide from Ford glass (USA) and multilayer metal-dielectric coatings from Interpane (Germany) and Southwall (USA) were evaluated. In addition to optical characterization, the samples were exposure-tested in Switzerland. The thermal and optimal properties of two different types of transparent insulation materials were measured.

Lampert, C.M. [ed.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Final Technical Report, City of Brockton Solar Brightfield: Deploying a Solar Array on a Brockton Brownfield  

SciTech Connect

The City of Brockton, Massachusetts sought to install New Englands largest solar array at a remediated brownfield site on Grove Street. The 425-kilowatt solar photovoltaic array or Brightfield was installed in an urban park setting along with interpretive displays to maximize the educational opportunities. The Brightfield project included 1,395 310-Watt solar panels connected in strings that span the otherwise unusable 3.7-acre site. The project demonstrated that it is both technically and economically feasible to install utility scale solar photovoltaics on a capped landfill site. The US Department of Energy conceived the Brightfields program in 2000, and Brocktons Brightfield is the largest such installation nationwide. Brocktons project demonstrated that while it was both technically and economically feasible to perform such a project, the implementation was extremely challenging due to the state policy barriers, difficulty obtaining grant funding, and level of sophistication required to perform the financing and secure required state approvals. This demonstration project can be used as a model for other communities that wish to implement Brownfields to Brightfields projects; 2) implementing utility scale solar creates economies of scale that can help to decrease costs of photovoltaics; 3) the project is an aesthetic, environmental, educational and economic asset for the City of Brockton.

Ribeiro, Lori

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

116

Final Scientific/Technical Report Solar America Initiative: Solar Outreach and Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Solar America Initiative: Solar Outreach and Communications grant was to promote better communications among stakeholders; address infrastructure barriers to solar energy; and coordinate with industry, the U.S. Department of Energy, national laboratories, states, cities and counties. The Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC), a non-profit organization formed in 1982, approached this grant project by establishing a wide range of communication and outreach activities including newsletters, workshops, webinars, model practices and publications; by advancing easy and fair hook-up rules to the utility grid; and by upgrading training based on industry competency standards. The Connecting to the Grid project and the Solar Codes and Standards Public Hearings project offered communication coupled with technical assistance to overcome interconnection, net metering and other regulatory and program barriers. The Workforce Development Project tackled building a strong workforce through quality training and competency assessment programs. IREC?¢????s web site, the semi-monthly state and stakeholder newsletter and the metrics report resulted in better communications among stakeholders. Workshops and phone seminars offered technical assistance and kept stakeholders up-to-date on key issues. All of these activities resulted in implementing sustainable solutions to institutional and market barriers to solar energy and getting the right information to the right people.

Weissman, Jane M.

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Degradation of ITO/silicon solar cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research under this contract investigated the degradation mechanisms and projected lifetime of indium tin oxide (ITO/P-silicon) solar cells. Both single and polycrystalline silicon cells were investigated. Thermal degradation of the cells was shown to proceed by the growth of an interfacial SiO/sub 2/ which resulted from oxygen diffusion through the ITO. The growth of the interfacial SiO/sub 2/ causes reduction in fill factor but not V/sub oc/ or I/sub sc/ until the degradation is severe. While thermal degradation occurs, it proceeds very slowly at 50/sup 0/C and the cell efficiency is projected to remain above 50% of its original value for 10/sup 5/ years at this temperature. Cells subjected to illuminated load testing at room temperature for 840 hours showed no reduction in output. However, some changes were noted in the dark characteristics. The mechanism causing the change is not known. Preliminary noise spectral density reliability tests were conducted but the results were inconclusive.

Wilmsen, C.W. (ed.)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Solar thermal repowering utility value analysis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The retrofit of solar central receiver energy supply systems to existing steam-electric generating stations (repowering) is being considered as a major programmatic thrust by DOE. The determination of a government response appropriate to the opportunities of repowering is an important policy question, and is the major reason for the analysis. The study objective is to define a government role in repowering that constitutes an efficient program investment in pursuit of viable private markets for heliostat-based energy systems. In support of that objective, the study is designed to identify the scope and nature of the repowering opportunity within the larger context of its contributions to central receiver technology development and commercialization. The Supply and Integration Tasks are documented elsewhere. This report documents the Demand Task, determining and quantifying the sources of the value of repowering and of central receiver technology in general to electric utilities. The modeling tools and assumptions used in the Demand Task are described and the results are presented and interpreted. (MCW)

Taylor, R.; Day, J.; Reed, B.; Malone, M.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Reliability and maintainability study of select solar-energy-system components in the National Solar Data Network. Final subcontract report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reports on the reliability and maintainability of select solar energy system components evaluated in 16 solar heating and cooling systems over a one-year period. The systems evaluated were instrumented sites from the National Solar Data Network (NSDN). A complete description and system schematic for each site is provided. The study period was generally between October 1981 to October 1982. The report provides quantitative R and M data (e.g., Failure Rate and Mean Time Between Failures) on pumps, motors and fans from the selected NSDN sites, along with conclusions and recommendations based on comparative data for other components. In summary, pumps, valves, and heat exchangers in solar heating and cooling (SHAC) systems appear to be very reliable and show failure rates comparable to other mechanical system applications. Control systems typically used in SHAC systems appear to be the least reliable but still fall within the range of failures exhibited by other mechanical systems. Evidence suggests that piping leaks in SHAC systems occur at three times the rate of other mechanical systems. Recommendations are provided on other areas of research necessary to determine the useful life of SHAC system components. Finally, an appendix to this report describes actual failures encountered in the 16 systems evaluated.

Kendall, P.W.; Logee, T.L.; Raymond, M.G.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Martin Marietta Corporation. Pilot plant final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the technical effort of Martin Marietta Corporation, in association with Black and Veatch International as a subcontractor for the trade studies performed to design a Solar Desalination Pilot Plant is documented. The final system configuration utilizes existing technology to convert seawater to potable water. This technology includes the collection of solar energy, storage of this energy in a fluid heat transfer medium, generation of steam and electricity from this stored energy, utilization of low pressure turbine exhaust steam as a source of energy to distill salt water, and also generation of potable water through the use of a reverse osmosis unit.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Supplement Analysis for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, (DOE/EIS-0310-SA-01) (08/05/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-SA-01 0-SA-01 Supplement Analysis for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility Introduction and Background The Department of Energy (DOE), pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), issued the Final PEIS for Accomplishing Expanded Civilian Nuclear Energy Research and Development and Isotope Production Missions in the United States, Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility (Nuclear Infrastructure (NI) PEIS, DOE/EIS-0310) in December 2000. Under the Authority of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, the DOE's missions include: (1) producing isotopes for research and applications

123

Application of solar energy to industrial drying or dehydration processes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of a solar energy system to the Lawrence, Kansas alfalfa dehydration plant, owned by the Western Alfalfa Corporation, is an attractive opportunity to demonstrate the feasibility of using solar energy to supply industrial process heat. The work undertaken for this project is reviewed. The design parameters of the dehydrator, including the energy consumed by the plant, the airflow requirements of the dehydrator, and the interface between the dehydrator and the solar array are discussed. The design of the collector array, the selection of solar collectors, the calculation of collector areas for the array, and the simulations of the system performance are addressed. Discussions of the detailed engineering drawings and specifications of the array construction, duct work, air handling equipment, system controls, and data monitoring, and acquisition systems are presented. The results of the contractors' bids based on these drawings and specifications are given. An economic analysis of the solar system using the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory format is presented. Finally, the impact of the solar system on the process energy requirements and on the operation of the plant are discussed. (WHK)

Not Available

1977-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

124

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project. Rural solar applications. Final report, executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contracts awarded to five US-based firms for their intended design of a solar water desalination plant are outlined and briefly discussed. The companies awarded include: Catalytic, Inc. of Philadelphia, PA; Exxon Research and Engineering Co. of Florham Park, NJ; Boeing Engineering and Construction Co. of Seattle, WA; Chicago Bridge and Iron Co. of Oakbrook, IL; and Donovan, Hamester and Rattien, Inc. of Washington, D.C. Some cost estimates for each proposal are provided. (BCS)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Solar/hydrogen systems for the 1985 to 2000 time frame. Volume I. Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The findings of a study of opportunities for commercialization of systems capable of producing hydrogen from solar energy are presented in two volumes. A compendium of monographs by specialists in the fields of solar energy conversion technologies, hydrogen production technologies and related technology descriptions from the general literature comprise Volume II. This data base was used to support an evaluation and selection process that identified four candidate solar/hydrogen systems best suited to commercialization within the next two decades. Volume I first reviews the background of the work and the methods used. Then an evaluation of the hydrogen product costs that might be achieved by the four selected candidate systems (photovoltaic/water electrolysis, thermal-heat engine/water electrolysis, wind energy/water electrolysis, small hydrogen/water electrolysis) is compared with the pricing structure and practices of the commodity gas market. Subsequently, product cost and market price match is noted to exist in the small user sector of the hydrogen marketplace. Barriers to and historical time lags in, commercialization of new technologies are then reviewed. Finally, recommendations for development and demonstration programs designed to accelerate the commercialization of the candidate systems are presented.

Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J.D.; Hanson, J. A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

A solar regenerative thermoelectrochemical converter (RTEC). Executive summary of final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an executive summary of a final subcontract report that describes the successful completion of a closed-loop demonstration of a regenerative thermoelectromechanical device using solar heat input for the production of electricity. The full report, which contains a detailed description of the two-year effort, is currently subject to a government secrecy order which precludes public release of the information. Copies of the full report will be made available for general release whenever the secrecy order is lifted.

Townsend, C.W.; McHardy, J. [Hughes Aircraft Co., El Segundo, CA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Solar total energy systems final technical summary report. Volume I. Solar total energy systems market penetration  

SciTech Connect

The results of the market penetration analysis of Solar Total Energy Systems (STES) for the industrial sector are described. Performance data derived for STES commercial applications are included. The energy use and price forecasts used in the analysis are summarized. The STES Applications Model (SAM), has been used to develop data on STES development potential by state and industry as a function of time from 1985 through 2015. A second computer code, the Market Penetration Model (MPM), has been completed and used to develop forecasts of STES market penetration and national energy displacement by fuel type. This model was also used to generate sensitivity factors for incentives, and variations in assumptions of cost of STES competing fuel. Results for the STES performance analysis for commercial applications are presented. (MHR)

Bush, L.R.; Munjal, P.K.

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development, testing, and certification of the Northrup, Inc. , ML Series concentrating solar collector model NSC-01-0732. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the final results of Northrup, Inc., of Hutchins, Texas, for the additional development work on their existing ML Series concentrating solar collector Model NSC-01-0732 for use with solar heating and cooling systems. The intended use of the final report, the development hardware, deliverable end items, problems encountered during fabrication and testing, and certification statements of performance are included. It is shown that the products developed are marketable and suitable for public use.

Parker, J.C.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Heat pipes applied to flat-plate solar collectors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program was to analytically and experimentally investigate the use of heat pipes in flat-plate solar collectors. Heat pipes are passive heat transport devices which utilize a closed evaporation-condensation cycle. Because of their high equivalent conductance, they appear to be well suited to transport heat from the solar absorber to an air or liquid distribution system. The program consisted of the following tasks: (I) Configuration Studies, (II) Parametric Performance Studies, (III) Economic Analysis, (IV) System Integration Studies, (V) Submodule Fabrication and Testing (in the laboratory), and (VI) Full-Scale Module Fabrication and Testing (using solar input). An additional Task VII, Feasibility Study of a Stationary Concentrator, was identified during the program and was also completed. In performing Tasks I through IV, various aspects of integrating heat pipes into flat-palte solar collectors were investigated. The results of these tasks were reported in the Annual Progress Report (Ref. 2) dated January 31, 1975. A summary of that program effort is included in the present report. The results of the experimental work conducted under Tasks V and VI are presented in this report. Under Task V, breadboard heat pipes were fabricated from sections of Roll-Bond panels and their heat transfer performance was evaluated in the laboratory. Three complete solar panels, two of which were heat pipe absorbers and one was a Roll-Bond control panel, were fabricated and solar tested during Task VI. Finally, under the new Task VII, a feasibility study of a stationary concentrator using heat pipes as thermal diodes was conducted. Results are presented and discussed.

Bienert, W.B.; Wolf, D.A.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Final report. Volume 2. Technical  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program was to assess the feasibility of using solar energy to provide a significant fraction of the energy needs of commercial buildings that have energy demands greater than 200 kWe. This volume of the final report discusses the approach employed to develop: (1) STES concept configurations and component data, (2) commercial buildings application data, and (3) computer simulation programs for evaluating various STES concept-commercial buildings applications. Various solar thermal and photovoltaic solar total energy systems (STES) configurations were considered. Concurrently, data on commercial buildings (e.g., categories, energy demand, demographic population, etc.) were developed and used to define six model building configurations which could be used as representative commercial buildings within six various regions (12 specific sites) of the United States. The six configurations included four building types (a low rise office building, a large retail store, a medium-size shopping center and a large shopping center) typifying current building designs. The remaining two configurations used the large shopping center model except that the energy demand was changed to reflect future building designs. The STESEP Computer Code was developed for a quick evaluation method for tradeoffs related to (1) cascading of thermal power conversion systems, (2) determination of optimum collector sizes and operating conditions (make or buy decisions for auxiliary energy), and (3) comparison of solar total energy concepts in various parts of the country and in various types of commercial buildings to assess their future economic potential for various economic scenarios. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development of surfaces optically suitable for flat solar panels. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report contains three principal items. The first describes a simple and novel reflectometer which can separately evaluate the spectral and diffuse reflectivities of surfaces. A phase locked detection system for the reflectometer is also described. The second item is a selective coating on aluminium potentially useful for flat-plate solar collector applications. The coating is composed of strongly bound copper oxide (divalent) and is formed by an etching process performed on an aluminium alloy with high copper content. Because of this one step fabrication process, fabrication costs are expected to be small. Process parameters, however, need further definition. The third item contains conclusions gleaned from the literature as to the required optical properties of flat plate solar collectors.

Not Available

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

DOE/EA-1622: Final Environmental Assessment for University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation Solar Technology Center (January 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University of Nevada, Las Vegas University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation SOLAR TECHNOLOGY CENTER January 2009 Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact DOE/EA-1622 U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 This Environmental Assessment was prepared on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation with contractual assistance from Ninyo & Moore, Inc. and MBP Consulting, LLC. Finding of No Significant Impact Solar Technology Center January 2009 Finding of No Significant Impact Solar Technology Center January 2009 Finding of No Significant Impact Solar Technology Center

133

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F. Uno, "High Efficiency Solar Panel (HESP)! ', N78 10572,High Efficiency, Long Life Terrestrial Solar Panel", 7 8Ncapabilities, the efficiency of the solar panels, co-

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System, Phase 1. CDRL Item 10. Final technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of analysis and design efforts by McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC), Rocketdyne, Stearns-Roger, Inc., Sheldahl, Inc., and the University of Houston between 1 July 1975 and 30 June 1977 are summarized. This is the Final Technical Progress Report published on the Phase 1 Central Receiver Solar Thermal Power System contract. Historical summaries and final selection of 10-MWe pilot plant and 100-MWe commercial systems are presented, with emphasis on the collector field characteristics, overall system performance, selection of steam/feedwater operating conditions, and rationale for system and subsystem selection. The commercial and pilot plant designs, as well as the subsystem research experiment activities for the collector, receiver, and thermal storage subsystems are presented, including a historical summary, design summary, and a description of the overall SRE test program and major test results for each of the subsystems.

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Cost effective solar hot water system for Econo-Travel Motor Hotel, Chesapeake, Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The final report of a cost effective solar hot water heating system installed on the Econo-Travel Motor Hotel at 4725 W. Military Highway, Chesapeake, Virginia, is presented. The description of the system along with the final breakdown performance data and payback time are given. The payback time for the installed system will be approximately four (4) years instead of the 6.65 years estimated for the proposal. The additional savings is due to the reduction in the peak demand charge since the electric hot water heaters are not required to operate at the same time each morning as the dryers used for the laundry. As called for in the proposal to DOE, the success of the system will be determined by the reduction in the utility cost and reduced use of our fossil fuels. The results shown in the hotel's monthly electricity bills indicate that this goal has been accomplished.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cost effective solar hot water system for Econo-Travel Motor Hotel, Chesapeake, Virginia. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report of a cost effective solar hot water heating system installed on the Econo-Travel Motor Hotel at 4725 W. Military Highway, Chesapeake, Virginia, is presented. The description of the system along with the final breakdown performance data and payback time are given. The payback time for the installed system will be approximately four (4) years instead of the 6.65 years estimated for the proposal. The additional savings is due to the reduction in the peak demand charge since the electric hot water heaters are not required to operate at the same time each morning as the dryers used for the laundry. As called for in the proposal to DOE, the success of the system will be determined by the reduction in the utility cost and reduced use of our fossil fuels. The results shown in the hotel's monthly electricity bills indicate that this goal has been accomplished.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project. Final report. Volume 1. Project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SOLERAS Project Summary - Final Report contains a synopsis of each completed project based on contractors final report. Additionally, a brief description of the limited testing completed by the SOLERAS staff on the collectors is included. SOLERAS comments or opinions expressed in the report are solely based on experiences with the SOLERAS Installations. It must be recognized that many product improvements and design modifications have been made since installation completion, many of which are the result of SOLERAS experience. The last chapter of this report is a synopsis of suggested new research areas for the solar cooling program. These suggestions were made by the participants of the cooling workshop held in Phoenix, Arizona in August 1984.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

PEIS data report: Upgrading the Y-12 Plant for long-term HEU storage  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is planning the future of weapons-capable fissile materials owned by the United States (U.S.). Under its Disposition Program, DOE is evaluating its options for: (a) storage of fissile materials needed for specific national programs, and (b) disposal of surplus fissile materials. In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE is preparing the {open_quotes}Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Long-Term Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials{close_quotes} (Disposition PEIS). This paper discusses storage options for highly enriched uranium at the Y-12 plant.

Everitt, D.A.; Johnson, J.P.; Phillips, J.K.; Snider, J.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Optimization of solar-selective paint coatings. Final report, September 15, 1980-June 15, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program was the development of low-cost, high-performance, solar-selective paint coatings for solar flat-plate collector (FPC) use and passive thermal wall application. Thickness-sensitive selective paint (TSSP) coating development was intended to demonstrate large-scale producibility. Thickness-insensitive selective paint (TISP) coating development was intended to develop and optimize the coating for passive solar systems and FPC applications. Low-cost, high-performance TSSP coatings and processes were developed to demonstrate large-scale producibility and meet all program goals. Dip, spray, roll, laminating and gravure processes were investigated and used to produce final samples. High-speed gravure coating was selected as the most promising process for solar foil fabrication. Development and optimization of TISP coatings was not completely successful. A variation in reflective metal pigment was suspected of being the primary problem, although other variables may have contributed. Consistent repeating of optical properties of these coatings achieved on the previous program was not achieved. However, a new method of achieving better control of coating components was conceived and preliminary development initiated. The new concept was described as an engineered pigment approach. The engineered pigment approach uses TSSP-coated metal foil particles instead of uncoated aluminum flakes in a liquid TSSP coating. The approach offers many advantages over the use of uncoated aluminum flakes: control of particle flatness, size, and thickness; control of the optical selectivity of each particle; and control of the liquid TSSP coating surrounding the coated particles.

McChesney, M.A.; Zimmer, P.B.; Lin, R.J.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Amorphous thin films for solar-cell applications. Final report, September 11, 1978-September 10, 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Section II, Theoretical Modeling, theories for the capture of electrons by deep centers in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and for field-dependent quantum efficiency in a-Si:H are presented. In Section III, Deposition and Doping Studies, the optimization of phosphorus-doped a-Si:H carried out in four different discharge systems is described. Some details of the dc proximity and rf magnetron discharge systems are also provided. Preliminary mass spectroscopy studies of the rf magnetron discharge in both SiH/sub 4/ and SiF/sub 4/ are presented. In Section IV, Experimental Methods for Characterizing a-Si:H, recent work involving photoluminescence of fluorine-doped a-Si:H, photoconductivity spectra, the photoelectromagnetic effect, the photo-Hall effect and tunneling into a-Si:H is presented. Also, studies of the growth mechanism of Pt adsorbed on both crystalline Si and a-Si:H are described. Measurements of the surface photovoltage have been used to estimate the distribution of surface states of phosphorus-doped and undoped a-Si:H. Section V, Formation of Solar-Cell Structures, contains information on stacked or multiple-junction a-Si:H solar cells. In Section VI, Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Solar-Cell Parameters, an upper limit of approx. = 400 A is established for the hole diffusion length in undoped a-Si:H. A detailed description of carrier generation, recombination and transport in a-Si:H solar cells is given. Finally, some characteristics of Pd-Schottky-barrier cells are described for different processing histories.

Carlson, D E; Balberg, I; Crandall, R S; Goldstein, B C; Hanak, J J; Pankove, J I; Staebler, D L; Weakliem, H A; Williams, R

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-259  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This agreement allowed NREL to serve as an advisor on SolarTAC - a collaborative effort between Xcel Energy, NREL, and the University of Colorado at Boulder. The collaboration was formed to accelerate pre-commercial and early commercial solar energy technologies to the marketplace. Through this CRADA, NREL participated in the deployment of solar energy generation technologies and related solar equipment for research, testing, validation, and demonstration purposes.

Kramer, W.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kreider and F. Kreith, "Solar Heating and Cooling". McGraw-and R. L. Field, "Solar Heating of Buildings and DomesticHeat Storage for Solar Heating Systems", N75-17005 (

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. L. Field, "Solar Heating of Buildings and Domestic HotPullium, "Solar Heating and Cooling In Buildings: Air Force7Z LI I Tl Solar Heating and Cooling in Buildings: DATE: May

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Freeze ToLerant Solar Water Heater Using C ross Linkedof a Freeze Tolerant Solar Water Heater Using Crosslinkedof a Freeze- Tolerant Solar Water Heater Using Crosslinked

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications'! , Sharing the Sun, Solar Technology in theAbsorber " , Sharing the Sun, Solar Technology in the 70's,Design ll , Sharing the Sun, Solar Technology in the 70's K,

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ks W" Boer, t1Th.e Solar Spectrum at Typical Clear WeatherDifferent Regions of the Solar Spectrum in Degrading an ABS1) transmit the solar spectrum and reflect the infrared,

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of NOAA Solar/Weather S", N78 24766 (1977). F, C,Boer, t1Th.e Solar Spectrum at Typical Clear Weather Days",FORM The Solar Spectrum at Typical Clear Weather Days N77-

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Residential solar photovoltaic systems: Final report for the Northeast Residential Experiment Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers research and development work conducted by the MIT Energy Lab. from July 1982 through June 1986. This Energy Lab. work in the field of solar photovoltaic systems followed six years of similar work at the MIT Lincoln Lab. under the same contract with the US DOE. The final report from the Lincoln Lab. period was published by Lincoln Lab. in 1983. During the period of Energy Lab. involvement, the project focused on the refinement of residential scale, roof-mounted photovoltaic systems for application in the northeastern US. Concurrent with the conclusion of MIT`s involvement, the New England Electric Co. is building a major field test of residential photovoltaics in Gardner, Massachusetts to determine experimentally the effects of photovoltaics on electric power company operations. Using systems designs and technology developed at MIT, the long-term performance of these thirty residential systems in Gardner will provide a measure of our success.

Kern, E.C. Jr.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Final draft: IEA Task 1. Report on Subtask D, optimization of solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of general techniques and specific methods useful in the optimization of solar heating and cooling systems is undertaken. A discussion of the state-of-the-art and the principal problems in both the simplified thermal performance analysis and economic analysis portions of the optimization problem are presented. Sample economic analyses are performed using several widely used economic criteria. The predicted thermal results of one typical, widely used simplified method is compared to detailed simulation results. A methodology for and the results of a sensitivity study of key economic parameters in the life cycle cost method are presented. Finally, a simple graphical optimization technique based on the life cycle cost method is proposed.

Freeman, T.L. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

News Release: DOE to Host Public Scoping Meetings on Uranium Leasing PEIS |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE to Host Public Scoping Meetings on Uranium DOE to Host Public Scoping Meetings on Uranium Leasing PEIS News Release: DOE to Host Public Scoping Meetings on Uranium Leasing PEIS July 29, 2011 - 2:53pm Addthis News Contact: DOE, Laura Kilpatrick Esq., Realty Officer (720) 880-4338 Contractor, Bob Darr, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (720) 377-9672 GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - The U.S. Department of Energy is hosting public scoping meetings to invite comments on the scope of the Draft Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. The meetings will be held at the locations and dates listed below and will begin at 6:30 p.m. with an opportunity to sign-in to provide oral comments. A formal presentation by DOE officials will start at 7:00 p.m. followed by public comments starting at 7:15 p.m.

151

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix I; Disposal of Oxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I-80 TABLES I.1 Summary of Depleted Uranium Chemical Forms and Disposal Options Considered . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

152

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix H; Manufacture and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uses exist for depleted uranium. Depleted uranium could be mixed with highly enriched uranium from retired nuclear weapons to produce nuclear reactor fuel. This process is...

153

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix D: Continued Cylinder Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data of 55 to 196 mremyr (Hodges 1996) because of the more vigorous inspection and maintenance activities planned to be implemented. The radiation dose to noninvolved workers...

154

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2, Appendix G; Long-Term Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLMW low-level mixed waste LLW low-level radioactive waste MEI maximally exposed individual NEPA National Environmental Policy Act...

155

Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leads a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative solar photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies that will make solar...

156

Solar energy dehumidification experiment on the Citicorp Center building : final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of using solar energy to reduce conventional energy consumption of a large urban commercial building were studied in depth. Specifically, solar assisted dehumidification of ventillation ...

Unknown author

157

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General) ro space Medicine Aircraft Propulsion and PowerSpace Sciences (General) Spacecraft Instru:mentation Solar Physics Spacecraft Propulsion

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Solar laboratory development. Final report, September 1, 1977--August 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress made on the establishment of a solar laboratory at the University of Illinois is reported. The laboratory will be located in a moving trailer and will demonstrate the operation of a solar water heater and a solar-assisted heat pump using flat plate collector. (WHK)

Simon, H.A.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Technical evaluation of a solar heating system having conventional hydronic solar collectors and a radiant panel slab. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple innovative solar heating design (Solar Option One) using conventional hydronic solar collectors and a radiant panel slab was constructed. An objective of hybrid solar design is to combine the relative advantages of active and passive design approaches while minimizing their respective disadvantages. A test house using the Solar Option One heating system was experimentally monitored to determine its energy based performance during the 1982-83 heating season. The test residence is located in Lyndonville, Vermont, an area which has a characteristically cold and cloudy climate. The two story residence has a floor area of about 1400 square feet and is constructed on a 720 square foot 5.5 inch thick floor slab. A 24 inch packed gravel bed is located beneath the slab and the slab-gravel bed is insulated by two inches of polystyrene insulation. The test building is of frame construction and uses insulation levels which have become commonplace throughout the country. The structure would not fall into the superinsulated category but was tightly constructed so as to have a low infiltration level. The building is sun-tempered in that windows were concentrated somewhat on the South side and all but avoided on the North. A solar greenhouse on the South side of the building was closed off from the structure permanently throughout the testing so as to better observe the solar heating invention without confounding variables. The monitoring equipment generated an internal gain of about 17,000 BTUs per day, roughly the equivalent of occupancy by two persons. A full description of the experimental testing program is given. System efficiency and performance are reported.

Starr, R.J.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Plasma analysis and diagnostics for high efficiency amorphous solar cell production. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a project that sought to improve the amorphous silicon-germanium (SiGe) thin film deposition process in the production of solar cells. To accomplish this, the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma discharge, employed for the thin film deposition, was modified. Changes in the parameters of the plasma were monitored with diagnostic techniques, similar to those used in fusion plasma studies. That was the primary contribution from ORNL. Only one phase was contained in the statement of work, with the following tasks: (1) Develop a detailed program for plasma characterization. (2) Carry-out plasma modeling and analysis to support deposition systems design. (3) Operate experimental deposition systems for the purpose of plasma characterization. (4) Analyze data. (5) Modify deposition as directed by measurements. (6) This final report, which was deemed to be the only deliverable of this small project. And while the modified ECR discharge did not show measurable improvement of the conditions relevant to the deposition process, much was learned about the plasma parameters in the process. Some ideas on alternative designs are being discuss and funding options for testing such designed are being sought.

Klepper, C.C.

1994-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Solar process water heat for the Iris Images Custom Color Photo Lab. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final technical report of the solar facility locted at Iris Images Custom Photo Laboratory in Mill Valley, California. It was designed to provide 59 percent of the hot water requirements for developing photographic film and domestic hot water use. The design load is to provide 6 gallons of hot water per minute for 8 hours per working day at 100/sup 0/F. It has 640 square feet of flat plate collectors and 360 gallons of hot water storage. The auxiliary back up system is a conventional gas-fired water heater. Freeze protection in this mild climate was originally provided by closed-loop circulation of hot water from the storage tank. Later this was changed to a drain-down system due to a freeze when electrical power failed. This system has been relatively successful with little or no scheduled maintenance. The site and building description, subsystem description, as-built drawings, cost breakdown and analysis, performance analysis, lessons learned, and the operation and maintenance manual are included.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Solar cooling system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, Virgin Islands. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The operational and thermal performance of a variety of solar systems are described. The Solar Cooling System was installed in a hotel at St. Thomas, U. S. Virgin Islands. The system consists of the evacuated glass tube collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, computerized controller, a large solar optimized industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat.

Harber, H.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 4. Saudi Engineering Solar Energy Applications System Design Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Literature summarizing a study on the Saudi Arabian solar controlled environment agriculture system is presented. Specifications and performance requirements for the system components are revealed. Detailed performance and cost analyses are used to determine the optimum design. A preliminary design of an engineering field test is included. Some weather data are provided for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: University of Petroleum and Minerals. Solar cooling system. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides details of the proposed solar cooling laboratory, including descriptions of the building and design conditions; the collector/storage subsystem; the Rankine cycle engine subsystem; instrumentation and data acquisition; and an implementation plan. Appendices of relevant data including computer programs for building load and engine system calculations and descriptions of equipment are included.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Solar heating and cooling system installed at RKL Controls Company, Lumberton, New Jersey. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar heating and cooling of a 40,000 square foot manufacturing building, sales offices and the solar computer control center/display room are described. Information on system description, test data, major problems and resolutions, performance, operation and maintenance manual, manufacturer's literature and as-built drawings are provided also. The solar system is composed of 6000 square feet of Sunworks double glazed flat plate collectors, external above ground storage subsystem, controls, ARKLA absorption chiller, heat recovery and a cooling tower.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Simplified solar fraction estimation for space and water heating at DOD installations. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A set of nomographs is provided which can be used to estimate the average annual solar fraction for solar space and water heating at a large number of DOD facilities. The solar fraction estimated from the nomograph is in close agreement with F-Chart 3.0 and allows for variation of the following parameters: annual load, collector area, collector transmittance-absorption coefficient, and collector overall loss coefficient.

Pacheco, N.S.; Kniola, D.G.; Sheedy, J.F.; Scari, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project. Final report, project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposals for research on solar cooling are presented for four Saudi Arabian universities. The universities are the University of Petroleum and Minerals in Dhahran, King Saud University in Riyadh, King Abdulaziz University in Jeddah, and King Faisal University in Dammam. Topics researched include the Rankine cycle, passive solar cooling systems, a solar-powered lithium bromide-water absorption machine and a photovoltaic-powered thermoelectric cooling machine. (BCS)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

EIS-0403: Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03: Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States 03: Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States EIS-0403: Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Summary The BLM and DOE have jointly prepared this PEIS to evaluate actions that the agencies are considering taking to further facilitate utility-scale solar energy development in six southwestern states. For the BLM, this includes the evaluation of a new Solar Energy Program applicable to solar development on BLM-administered lands. For DOE, it includes the evaluation of developing new guidance to further facilitate utility-scale solar energy development and maximize the mitigation of associated potential environmental impacts. This Solar PEIS evaluates the potential environmental, social, and economic effects of the agencies' proposed actions and alternatives. For additional information, please

169

Application of compound parabolic concentrators to solar photovoltaic conversion. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final results of an analytical and experimental study of the application of nonimaging concentrators to solar photovoltaic conversion are presented. Two versions of the Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) were considered, the Dielectric Compound Parabolic Concentrator (DCPC) in which the concentrator is filled with a dielectric material that satisfies requirements for Total Internal Reflection (TIR), and a conventional CPC in which metallic reflection is used for the mirror surfaces. Two working prototype panels were constructed and tested during the course of the program. The first was a 1.22 m by 1.22 m DCPC panel that requires only ten adjustments/year, has a panel utilization factor (packing factor) of 96%, and delivered the equivalent of 138 W (peak) under 1 kW/m/sup 2/ direct insolation. The net energy conversion efficiency was 10.3% over the entire panel area. The second panel was a conventional CPC panel measuring 1.22 m by 1.22 m. This panel requires thirty-six adjustments per year, and delivers the equivalent of 97 W when under 1 kW/m/sup 2/ direct insolation. The results of a cost-effectiveness analysis of the concept of using nonimaging concentrators for photovoltaic conversion are also presented. The concentrator panels showed a decided savings in comparison to the cost of flat plate photovoltaic panels, both at present-day silicon costs ($2000/m/sup 2/) and projected lower silicon costs ($200/m/sup 2/). At a silicon cost of $200/m/sup 2/, a two-dimensional (cone) version of the collector has the potential for achieving from $0.60-2.00 per average watt (about $0.15-0.50 per peak watt) while requiring only crude (+-4.5/sup 0/) tracking.

Cole, R.L.; Gorski, A.J.; Graven, R.M.; McIntire, W.R.; Schertz, W.W.; Winston, R.; Zwerdling, S.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projects such as home heating and cooling is the overall production cost of converting solarcosts do not project a bright future for this method in solar

Viswanathan, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Mid-South solar total energy: institutional analysis. Final report, May 1, 1978-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive survey was undertaken to determine the current usage of energy by the Mississippi State University, considering electricity and fuel separately. A variety of individual components likely to be employed in total energy systems are then considered in detail, including: solar assisted space heating system, space cooling system design, solar electric system, flat plate solar collector system, central solar receiver, and geothermal heat pump system. Also, algorithms have been developed for the approximate prediction of building heating and cooling loads based on gross parameters such as floor area, type of wall construction, etc. System considerations and evaluation are then presented. (LEW)

Powe, R.E.; Carley, C.T.; Forbes, R.E.; Johnson, L.R.; Stiffler, A.K.; Hodge, B.K.; Bouchillon, C.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Parabolic Trough Solar System Piping Model: Final Report, 13 May 2002 ? 31 December 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearny and Associates regarding a study of a piping model for a solar parabolic trough system.

Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

FY2005 Final Report: Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task PVC57301  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents technical detail for work performed in the Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task in the period from October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2005.

Myers, D. R.; Stoffel, T. L.; Andreas, A. M.; Wilcox, S. M.; Reda, I. M.; Anderberg, M.; Gotseff, B.; Kay, B. A.; Bowen, A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Solar forecasting review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.1.2 European Solar Radiation Atlas (ESRA)for supplementing solar radiation network data, FinalEstimating incident solar radiation at the surface from geo-

Inman, Richard Headen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Evaluation of Novel Semiconductor Materials Potentially Useful in Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-06-00172  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of novel semiconductor materials potentially useful in solar cells. NREL will fabricate, test and analyze solar cells from EpiWorks' wafers produced in 2-3 separate growth campaigns. NREL will also characterize material from 2-3 separate EpiWorks material development campaigns. Finally, NREL will visit EpiWorks and help establish any necessary process, such as spectral CV measurements and III-V on Si metalization processes and help validate solar cell designs and performance.

Geisz, J.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 4. Appendices. Final report. [Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. This volume contains the appendices. Topics include deterministic insolation model computer code; building energy usage data; computer simulation programs for building energy demand analysis; model buildings for STES evaluation; Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) computer code; transient simulation of STES concept; solar data tape analysis; program listings and sample output for use with TRNSYS; transient simulation, and financial parameters sensitivities. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Combined cycle solar central receiver hybrid power system study. Volume III. Appendices. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design study for a 100 MW gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle solar/fossil-fuel hybrid power plant is presented. This volume contains the appendices: (a) preconceptual design data; (b) market potential analysis methodology; (c) parametric analysis methodology; (d) EPGS systems description; (e) commercial-scale solar hybrid power system assessment; and (f) conceptual design data lists. (WHK)

None

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume III. Engineering drawings. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engineering drawings are presented for the Solar Total Energy System at Fort Hood, Texas. Drawings are given for the solar collector subsystem, power conversion subsystem, instrumentation and control subsystem, thermal storage subsystem, site preparation, thermal storage area piping and equipment layout, heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystem, STES building and facility, and electrical distribution. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The PEIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

evaluating the alternative strategies for long-term management and use of the depleted uranium hexafluoride in storage for several years. These studies included the preparation of...

180

Review of state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes. Task 1 of solar collector studies for solar heating and cooling applications. Final technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes is reviewed, and Task 1 of a current research program on use of aqueous heat transfer fluids for solar heating and cooling is summarized. The review of available published literature has indicated that lack of quantitative information exists relative to collector corrosion at the present time, particularly for the higher temperature applications of solar heating and cooling compared to domestic water heating. Solar collector systems are reviewed from the corrosion/service life viewpoint, with emphasis on various applications, collector design, heat transfer fluids, and freeze protection methods. Available information (mostly qualitative) on collector corrosion technology is reviewed to indicate potential corrosion problem areas and corrosion prevention practices. Sources of limited quantitative data that are reviewed are current solar applications, research programs on collector corrosion, and pertinent experience in related applications of automotive cooling and non-solar heating and cooling. A data bank was developed to catalog corrosion information. Appendix A of this report is a bibliography of the data bank, with abstracts reproduced from presently available literature accessions (about 220). This report is presented as a descriptive summary of information that is contained in the data bank.

Clifford, J E; Diegle, R B

1980-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Solar-cooling-system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Cooling System installed in the Frenchman's Reef Resort Hotel Test Site, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, used 956 Sunmaster Corporation evacuated glass tube collector modules which provide an effective solar collector aperture of 13,384 square feet. The system consists of the collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, an Andover Controls Corporation computerized controller, a large solar optimized Carrier Corporation industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat. The system, its operation sequence, and performance are described.

Harber, H.

1981-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

Addition of inexpensive solar air-heaters to a pre-engineered metal building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Mississippi State University a research project was begun in 1976 to investigate the use of site-built solar collectors for heating air in poultry houses. The purpose of this work was to design and test a functional air heater solar collector which would be inexpensive to construct and acceptable to poultry producers. The results reported are an extension of the original concept. The basic concept is to use a pre-engineered metal building for the structure and incorporate the solar air heaters as an integral part of the south facing wall of the building. The outer skin of the building is used as the absorber plate for the collctors. Construction and testing of the solar collectors and heat storage systems are discussed, and the performance characteristics of the site-built solar collectors are described. (WHK)

Forbes, R E; McClendon, R W

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Application of solar energy to industrial drying of soybeans: Phase III, performance evaluation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 15-month performance evaluation was conducted on a solar system designed and constructed to augment the industrial drying of soybeans at the Gold Kist, Inc., extraction plant in Decatur, Alabama. The plant employs three oil-fired, continuous-flow dryers of 3,000 bu/hr each. The solar system consists of 672 Solaron air collectors that temper the airflow into the existing dryers. Since the requirement for energy exceeds the peak solar system capacity, no storage is provided. The interface with the existing facility is simply accomplished by three ducts that release the solar heated air directly adjacent to the dryer air intakes, and no mechanical coupling is needed. The solar system was operated for 1,752 hr on 290 days during the 15-month period without a single failure sufficient to cause shutdown. No interference with normal plant operations was experienced. Maintenance of the solar system, consisting of service to the air handling unit, cleaning of collector glazing, and minor duct repair, totaled $1,564. System utilization was only 46.3%. This was primarily due to daytime routine maintenance performed on the conventional drying and processing equipment. The solar fraction was not large enough to justify maintenance shift changes. An average collector efficiency of 26.2% was experienced. Contamination caused by the local plant environment reduced the average collector efficiency by 9.3 percentage points. A prototype of an automatic cleaning system was constructed and tested.

Hall, B.R.

1979-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Passive solar design strategies: Remodeling guidelines for conserving energy at home. [Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The idea of passive solar is simple, but applying it effectively does require information and attention to the details of design and construction. Some passive solar techniques are modest and low-cost, and require only small changes in remodeler`s typical practice. At the other end of the spectrum, some passive solar systems can almost eliminate a house`s need for purchased heating (and in some cases, cooling) energy -- but probably at a relatively high first cost. In between are a broad range of energy-conserving passive solar techniques. Whether or not they are cost-effective, practical and attractive enough to offer a market advantage to any individual remodeler depends on very specific factors such as local costs, climate, and market characteristics. Passive solar design strategies: Remodeling Guidelines For Conserving Energy At Homes is written to help give remodelers the information they need to make these decisions. Passive Solar Design Strategies is a package in three basic parts: The Guidelines contain information about passive solar techniques and how they work, and provides specific examples of systems which will save various percentages of energy; The Worksheets offer a simple, fill-in-the-blank method to pre-evaluate the performance of a specific design; The Worked Example demonstrates how to complete the worksheets for a typical residence.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

The sun as a variable star: solar and stellar irradiance variations. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this Colloquium was to review the most recent results on the observations, theoretical interpretations, empirical and physical models of the variations observed in solar and stellar irradiances, as well as on Sun-climate connections. The Colloquium was divided into six sessions as defined by the key topics. Included for each session were the 36 invited talks and 110 contributed poster papers. A special session of the Solar Electromagnetic Radiation Study for Solar Cycle 22 (SOLERS22) was held on June 25, 1993, where the five working groups discussed their progress and future plans on measuring the absolute value of solar total and spectral irradiances and studying their temporal variations. Papers on both theoretical models and solar irradiance observations have shown that the solar energy output changes on different time scales: the short-term (from minutes to months) variations are related to surface modulations mainly caused by the evolution of active regions, the solar cycle related long-term variations are directly linked with the evolution of magnetic fields over the activity cycle, while the secular variations over centuries are associated with long-term modulations.

Pap, J.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Page Jackson solar school, Charles Town, West Virginia. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Page Jackson Elementary School in Charles Town, West Virginia, uses a solar energy system to provide space heating and cooling for a 52,600 sq. ft. school building. A total of 11,215 sq. ft. of PPG Industries, Inc., double-glazed, flat plate collectors (facing south at a 45/sup 0/ tilt from the horizontal) are used in conjunction with glass mirrored reflectors facing north at a 38/sup 0/ tilt from the horizontal) to collect the available solar energy. The solar energy system at Page Jackson is of the drainback type. Space heating for the school is provided by circulating warm water from the storage tanks through five air handling units (AHU's). Space cooling to the building is provided by a 100 ton Trane packaged absorption water chiller when sufficiently hot solar water is available. The solar energy system began operation late in the summer of 1977. In general, the solar energy systemand controls appears to be in good working order. The performance of the system is particularly good; in fact, much better than most. Because the refurbished collector array is now operating at near design conditions, it is anticipated that the system will begin to contribute substantially (as originally intended) to the building load. In order to ensure that the system is operating as designed while in the space cooling mode, it is recommended that the solar cooling subsystem be tested for proper operation and performance during the warmer summer months.

Frazier, R.H.; Pickett, J.W.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

SolarTile: A rooftop integrated photovoltaic system. Phase 1, final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

AstroPower, Royal Group Technologies, and Solar Design Associates are jointly developing an integrated photovoltaic roofing system for residential and light commercial building applications. This family of products will rely heavily on the technological development of a roofing tile made from recycled plastic and innovative module fabrication and encapsulation processes in conjunction with an advanced Silicon-Film{trademark} solar cell product. This solar power generating roofing product is presently being referred to as the SolarTile. A conceptual drawing of the solar roofing tile is shown. The SolarTile will be integrated with non-solar tiles in a single roof installation permitting ease of assembly and the ability to use conventional roofing techniques at ridges, valleys, and eaves. The Phase 1 effort included tasks aimed at the development of the proposed product concept; product manufacturing or fabrication, and installation cost estimates; business planning; and a market assessment of the proposed product, including target selling prices, target market sectors, size estimates for each market sector, and planned distribution mechanisms for market penetration. Technical goals as stated in the Phase 1 proposal and relevant progress are reported.

NONE

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

188

Final Report on the Operation and Maintenance Improvement Program for Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a six-year, $6.3 million project to reduce operation and maintenance (O&M) costs at power plants employing concentrating solar power (CSP) technology. Sandia National Laboratories teamed with KJC Operating Company to implement the O&M Improvement Program. O&M technologies developed during the course of the program were demonstrated at the 150-MW Kramer Junction solar power park located in Boron, California. Improvements were made in the following areas: (a) efficiency of solar energy collection, (b) O&M information management, (c) reliability of solar field flow loop hardware, (d) plant operating strategy, and (e) cost reduction associated with environmental issues. A 37% reduction in annual O&M costs was achieved. Based on the lessons learned, an optimum solar- field O&M plan for future CSP plants is presented. Parabolic trough solar technology is employed at Kramer Junction. However, many of the O&M improvements described in the report are also applicable to CSP plants based on solar power tower or dish/engine concepts.

Cohen Gilbert E.; Kearney, David W.; Kolb, Gregory J.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Microsoft Word - FONSI_CalValleySolarRanch_Final For Silver Sig_8-2-11  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE TO HIGH PLAINS RANCH II, LLC FOR THE CALIFORNIA VALLEY SOLAR RANCH PROJECT IN SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Loan Programs Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts associated with the California Valley Solar Ranch (CVSR) project, a 250-megawatt (MW) gross output commercial solar photovoltaic (PV) power plant project proposed by High Plains Ranch II, LLC (HPR II) in southeastern San Luis Obispo County, California. The CVSR Project would include the construction, operation, maintenance, and

190

Solar heating and cooling of mobile homes, Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The specific objectives of the Phase II program were: (1) through system testing, confirm the feasibility of a solar heated and cooled mobile home; (2) update system performance analysis and provide solar heating and cooling computer model verification; (3) evaluate the performance of both an absorption and a Rankine air conditioning system; (4) perform a consumer demand analysis through field survey to ascertain the acceptance of solar energy into the mobile home market; and (5) while at field locations to conduct the consumer demand analysis, gather test data from various U.S. climatic zones. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Jacobsen, A.A.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Alcohol production with solar distillation. Final report, March 31, 1982-June 30, 1982  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to determine it an absorber in a solar distillation unit that would provide a more efficient and effective way to produce fuel grade ethanol. Four tests of distilling ethanol were made. Numerous other tests were conducted distiling water, drying an assortment at materials, cooking food, and heating various liquids. The absorber in the solar distillation unit creates much heat on the glazing. The mixture in the solar distillation unit, does not have to reach temperatures that boil water to produce distillate.

Wuestenberg, D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Solar heating panel: Parks and Recreation Building, Saugatuck Township Park and Recreation Commission. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an account of the design and installation of a solar heating system on an existing building in Saugatuck, MI, using existing technology. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate the possibilities of alternative energy, educate local craftsmen, and make the building more useful to the community. The structure of the building is described. The process of insulating the structure is described. The design of the solar panel, headers, and strong box full of rocks for heat storage is given complete with blueprints. The installation of the system is also described, including photographs of the solar panel being installed. Included is a performance report on this system by Purbolt's Inc., which describes measurements taken on the system and outlines the system's design and operation. Included also are 12 slides of the structure and the solar heating system. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Solar water-heating system refurbishments: Ingham County Geriatric Medical Care Facility. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The step-by-step procedure for the refurbishment project for the medical care facility is detailed. The Wyle Laboratories' solar collector test report is included in the apendix.

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Options for thermal energy storage in solar-cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current effort concentrates on design requirements of thermal storage subsystems for active solar cooling systems. The use of thermal storage with respect to absorption, Rankine, and desiccant cooling technologies is examined.

Curran, H.M.; DeVries, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the history, design, performance, supporting activities, and management plans for the Solar Total Energy System for the troop housing complex at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. (WHK)

None

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Monitoring of the performance of a solar heated and cooled apartment building. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An all-electric apartment building in Texas was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The system consists of an array of 1280 square feet of Northrup concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vessel, a 25-ton Arkla Industries absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. The system was fully instrumented for monitoring. Detailed descriptions are given of the solar system, the performance monitoring system, and the data reduction processes. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Demonstrate use of solar energy for laundromat washing and drying. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A solar system was designed and installed to supply energy to a university laundry. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate the use of solar energy in both the washing and drying processes of laundry operations and to determine the expected gas energy savings. The limited performance data available indicate a 30% saving in gas consumption while laundry operations were running at about 35% capacity. Tt is expected that 40% or more will be saved at near capacity operation. The solar system, retrofitted to an existing building, is composed of 120 parabolic trough collectors, a 2500 gallon storage tank, and supporting pumps and heat exchangers. The system is operated with a minimum of controls and performed satisfactorily with no interruptions of laundry operations. The use of solar energy to displace gas energy in laundries appears to be practical. The amount of gas to be saved is limited by the desired temperatures of the preheated air to the dryers.

Whitacre, J.A.

1982-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Efficiency Improvement of Crystalline Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 January 2002 - 30 September 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

UC-Berkeley study of transition metal related defects in PV-grade mc-Si to understand their pathways into solar cells; chemical state/distribution; interaction with structural defects; defect engineering.

Weber, E. R.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Barrier Coatings for Thin Film Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, September 1, 2002 -- January 30, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has involved investigations of the stability of CdTe and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) solar cells under damp heat conditions and effects of barrier coatings.

Olsen, L. C.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Agua Caliente Solar Feasibility and Pre-Development Study Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of facility- and commercial-scale solar energy projects on the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Reservation in Palm Springs, CA. The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) conducted a feasibility and pre-development study of potential solar projects on its lands in southern California. As described below, this study as a logical and necessary next step for ACBCI. Support for solar project development in California, provided through the statewide California Solar Initiative (CSI), its Renewable Portfolio Standard and Feed-in Tariff Program, and recently announced Reverse Auction Mechanism, provide unprecedented support and incentives that can be utilized by customers of California's investor-owned utilities. Department of Energy (DOE) Tribal Energy Program funding allowed ACBCI to complete its next logical step to implement its Strategic Energy Plan, consistent with its energy and sustainability goals.

Carolyn T. Stewart, Managing Partner; Red Mountain Energy Partners

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Solar Cell Design for Manufacturing: Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GE Energy made progress in improving its solar cell process, developing its metal wrap-through process, and completing highly accelerated lifetime testing on elements of its roof-integrated module.

Rand, J. A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Final Report for Annex II--Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources In Saudi Arabia, 1998-2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Final Report for Annex II - Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1998-2000 summarizes the accomplishment of work performed, results achieved, and products produced under Annex II, a project established under the Agreement for Cooperation in the Field of Renewable Energy Research and Development between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United States. The report covers work and accomplishments from January 1998 to December 2000. A previous progress report, Progress Report for Annex II - Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1993-1997, NREL/TP-560-29374, summarizes earlier work and technical transfer of information under the project. The work was performed in at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and at selected weather stations of the Saudi Meteorological and Environmental Protection Administration (MEPA).

Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S. M.; Marion, W. F.; Al-Abbadi, N. M.; Mahfoodh, M.; Al-Otaibi, Z.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Catalytic. System design final report. Volume 1. System requirement definition and system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic Inc. was awarded a contract to conduct a preliminary system design and cost analysis for a brackish water desalination project to be located in Brownsville, Texas. System analyses and economic analyses were performed to define the baseline solar energy desalination system. The baseline system provides an average daily product water capacity of 6000 mT. The baseline system is optimal relative to technological risk, performance, and product water cost. Subsystems and their interfaces have been defined and product water cost projections made for commercial plants in a range of capacities. Science Applications, Inc. (SAI), subcontractor to Catalytic, had responsibility for the solar power system. This, the final report, summarizes the work performed under the Phase I effort.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Solar America Initiative State Working Group: Final Scientific/Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the support from the Department of Energy, NARUC has educated thousands of stakeholders, including Public Utility Commissioners, commission staff, and State energy officials on solar energy technology, implementation, and policy. During the lifetime of this grant, NARUC staff engaged stakeholders in policy discussions, technical research, site visits, and educational meetings/webinars/materials that provided valuable education and coordination on solar energy technology and policy among the States. Primary research geared toward State decision-makers enabled stakeholders to be informed on current issues and created new solar energy leaders throughout the United States. Publications including a Frequently Asked Questions guide on feed-in tariffs and a legal analysis of state implementation of feed-in tariffs gave NARUC members the capacity to understand complex issues related to the economic impacts of policies supportive of solar energy, and potential paths for implementation of technology. Technical partnerships with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) instructed NARUC members on feed-in tariff policy for four States and solar PV resource assessment in seven States, as well as economic impacts of solar energy implementation in those States. Because many of the States in these technical partnerships had negligible amounts of solar energy installed, this research gave them new capacity to understand how policies and implementation could impact their constituency. This original research produced new data now available, not only to decision-makers, but also to the public at-large including educational institutions, NGOs, consumer groups, and other citizens who have an interest in solar energy adoption in the US. Under this grant, stakeholders engaged in several dialogs. These educational opportunities brought NARUC members and other stakeholders together several times each year, shared best practices with State decision-makers, fostered partnerships and relationships with solar energy experts, and aided in increasing the implementation of smart policies that will foster solar technology deployment. The support from the Department of Energy??s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has created solar energy leaders in the States; leaders who will serve to be a continuing valuable resource as States consider adoption of new low-carbon and domestic energy supply to meet the energy needs of the United States.

Julie Taylor

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Ingham County Geriatric Medical Care Facility solar water-heating system refurbishments. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tasks of the refurbishment of a damaged solar water heating system are outlined. The system is a closed loop, 50% glycol antifreeze system consisting of 14 rows of 6 series manifolds each containing 6 solar collectors connected in parallel for a total of 504 modules. The Wyle Laboratories' test report for the Revere Model 132 flat plate collector is appended. A collector test plan and photographs are also appended. Reference CAPE-2834. (LS)

Not Available

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Monitoring of the performance of a solar-heated-and-cooled apartment building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 12-unit student apartment building was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The retrofit of the all-electric building resulted in a system consisting of an array of 1280 square feet of concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vesel, a 25-ton absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. The system was fully instrumented for temperature, flow rate, electrical power, and meteorological measurements. The data indicate that 11.2% of the cooling load was met by solar and 8.2% of the total load (cooling plus hot water) was met by solar. The performance of the collector array was determined to be approximately 60% of that suggested by the manufacturer. Steady-state chiller operation exhibited a C.O.P. very close to the manufacturer's specified performance values, but the time-averaged chiller C.O.P. is degraded due to cycling. The composite solar fraction (8.2%) is less than solar cooling only (11.2%) because there was no solar domestic hot water delivery during this monitoring period. The evaluation of system performance for the cooling season indicates a lower performance than expected. However, system performance in the cooling mode can be improved by better adjustment of the thermostats and controls. Continued data collection and analysis should be performed, to improve system operations, assess performance limits, and compare results with design projections.

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Passive solar renovations to the Common Ground Community Restaurant. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The passive solar and energy conserving renovations to the Common Ground Community Restaurant were funded primarily as a demonstration project under this program. The majority of work accomplished was (1) design and construction of a passive solar greenhouse on the existing second floor porch of the restaurant, and (2) the design and construction of energy conserving improvements to the interior of the building, consisting largely of renovating the walls and ceiling to provide an insulated space with a substantially reduced heat load.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Airport Solar Photovoltaic Concentrator Project. Phase 1 - final report, June 1, 1978-February 28, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The system design, analysis, and specification, site preparation, and operation and evaluation plan for a 500 kWe photovoltaic power supply to be located at the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, Arizona, are presented. The solar cell arrays are concentrator silicon solar cells with tracking 70X Cassegrain-type concentrators. The power conditioning system, tracking system, and control systems are described in detal. Environmental impact studies are described. Component specifications and drawings are included. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Solar heating, cooling, and hot water systems installed at Richland, Washington. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Sunburst is a demonstration system for solar space heating and cooling and solar hot water heating for a 14,400 square foot office building in Richland, Washington. The project is part of the US Department of Energy's solar demonstration program, and became operational in April 1978. The solar system uses 6,000 square feet of flat-plate liquid collectors in a closed loop to deliver solar energy through a liquid--liquid heat exchanger to the building heat-pump duct work or 9,000-gallon thermal energy storage tank. A 25-ton Arkla solar-driven absorption chiller provides the cooling, in conjunction with a 2,000 gallon chilled water storage tank and reflective ponds on three sides of the building to reject surplus heat. A near-by building is essentially identical except for having conventional heat-pump heating and cooling, and can serve as an experimental control. An on-going public relations program has been provided from the beginning of the program and has resulted in numerous visitors and tour groups.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Solar energy system performance evaluation - final report for Honeywell OTS 45, Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 45) at Salt River Project in Phoenix, Arizona, based on the analysis of data collected between April 1981 and March 31, 1982. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 45 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 8208 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 2500-gallon thermal storage tank; two 25-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted water chillers; a forced-draft cooling tower; and associated piping, pumps, valves, controls and heat rejection equipment. The solar system has eight basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 8 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 1143 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 3440 MMBtu and provided 241 MMBtu for cooling and 64 MMBtu for heating. The projected net annual electrical energy savings due to the solar system was approximately 40,000 kWh(e).

Mathur, A K

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

Provenzano, J.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, TN, and Columbus, GA

213

Performance evaluation of the Shenandoah Community Solar Recreational Center for the year 1980. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Shenandoah Solar Recreational Center, when completed in early 1977, was the largest building to have most of its heating, air conditioning, and hot water needs met by solar energy. Principal components of the building solar energy system are a 1121 sq-m array of modularized flat plate collectors with 2300 sq-m of aluminum foreground reflectors integrated into a sawtooth wood truss roof, a 15.1 cu-m collector loop buffer tank, a 56.8 cu-m hot water storage tank, two 113.6 cu-m chilled water storage tanks, and a nominal 100 ton single stage absorption chiller. The system is interconnected by means of primary-secondary loops and was designed for simultaneous operation of all subsystems in either the heating or cooling modes. Control is by means of conventional HVAC pneumatic and electric control equipment. Transient thermal simulation studies were used to design the solar energy system. The collector array size was fixed so as to provide a significant fraction of the building annual thermal load, and the hot and chilled water storage volumes and other system functions were sized to maximize economic benefit. On this basis the predicted solar fractions were 95% space heating, 64% space cooling and 50% hot water. The building operation was monitored for a period on one year (February 1980 through February 1981) using a calculator-based data acquisition system with 80 sensors located throughout the building. This report presents an analysis of this data and an evaluation of the building performance over the year. The annual collector efficiency was found to be 19% and the overall annual solar fraction (combined thermal loads met from solar) was determined to be 39%. It is felt that this level of performance for a demonstration system is quite acceptable.

Craig, J.I.; Jeter, S.M.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

DOE/EIS-0146 FINAL PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACr STATEMENT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

146 146 FINAL PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACr STATEMENT CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM NOVEMBER 1989 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D.C. 20585 CovERsm LEAD AGENCY U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) COOPERATING AGENCIES None November 1989 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), Clean Coal Demonstration Program Technology Additional copies or information concerning this final PEIS can be obtained from Allyn Hemenway FE-222, Office of Clean Coal Technology, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. 20585. Telephone: (202) 586-7162. ABsmAcr The proposed action evaluated in this PEIS is to continue the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) involving the selection, for cost-shared federal funding, of one

215

DOE/EIS-0146 FINAL PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACr STATEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

146 146 FINAL PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACr STATEMENT CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM NOVEMBER 1989 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Washington, D.C. 20585 CovERsm LEAD AGENCY U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) COOPERATING AGENCIES None November 1989 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), Clean Coal Demonstration Program Technology Additional copies or information concerning this final PEIS can be obtained from Allyn Hemenway FE-222, Office of Clean Coal Technology, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. 20585. Telephone: (202) 586-7162. ABsmAcr The proposed action evaluated in this PEIS is to continue the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) involving the selection, for cost-shared federal funding, of one

216

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume III. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall, long term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumpton, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains appendices to the conceptual design and systems analysis studies gien in Volume II, Books 1 and 2. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Final LDRD report : metal oxide films, nanostructures, and heterostructures for solar hydrogen production.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The distinction between electricity and fuel use in analyses of global power consumption statistics highlights the critical importance of establishing efficient synthesis techniques for solar fuels-those chemicals whose bond energies are obtained through conversion processes driven by solar energy. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes show potential for the production of solar fuels because of their demonstrated versatility in facilitating optoelectronic and chemical conversion processes. Tandem PEC-photovoltaic modular configurations for the generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight (solar water splitting) provide an opportunity to develop a low-cost and efficient energy conversion scheme. The critical component in devices of this type is the PEC photoelectrode, which must be optically absorptive, chemically stable, and possess the required electronic band alignment with the electrochemical scale for its charge carriers to have sufficient potential to drive the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions. After many decades of investigation, the primary technological obstacle remains the development of photoelectrode structures capable of efficient conversion of light with visible frequencies, which is abundant in the solar spectrum. Metal oxides represent one of the few material classes that can be made photoactive and remain stable to perform the required functions.

Kronawitter, Coleman X. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Mao, Samuel S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

An assessment of the DOE Active Solar Planning Process: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a review of the planning process used by the Active Solar Heating and Cooling Program, Office of Solar Heat Technologies, US Department of Energy as it pertains to a project title, ''An Industry Assessment of Solar Building R and D Needs.'' This report will restrict its discussion to the active solar planning aspects of this particular project, and will not address Congressional plans for funding the DOE solar programs, DOE national laboratory planning procedures, internal DOE programmatic directives and procedures, or planning activities provided by DOE support services contractors. The purpose of the DOE planning process is to establish a systemmatic procedure for developing a future program of activities. The DOE procedure is designed to include an assessment of current goals and objectives, review direction of the overall program, and appraise present program activities to assure they are in tune with the public interest and private sector needs. This project was designed to provide broad private sector input to the process.

Not Available

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Phenylnaphthalene Derivatives as Heat Transfer Fluids for Concentrating Solar Power: Loop Experiments and Final Report  

SciTech Connect

ORNL and subcontractor Cool Energy completed an investigation of higher-temperature, organic thermal fluids for solar thermal applications. Although static thermal tests showed promising results for 1-phenylnaphthalene, loop testing at temperatures to 450 C showed that the material isomerized at a slow rate. In a loop with a temperature high enough to drive the isomerization, the higher melting point byproducts tended to condense onto cooler surfaces. So, as experienced in loop operation, eventually the internal channels of cooler components such as the waste heat rejection exchanger may become coated or clogged and loop performance will decrease. Thus, pure 1-phenylnaphthalene does not appear to be a fluid that would have a sufficiently long lifetime (years to decades) to be used in a loop at the increased temperatures of interest. Hence a decision was made not to test the ORNL fluid in the loop at Cool Energy Inc. Instead, Cool Energy tested and modeled power conversion from a moderate-temperature solar loop using coupled Stirling engines. Cool Energy analyzed data collected on third and fourth generation SolarHeart Stirling engines operating on a rooftop solar field with a lower temperature (Marlotherm) heat transfer fluid. The operating efficiencies of the Stirling engines were determined at multiple, typical solar conditions, based on data from actual cycle operation. Results highlighted the advantages of inherent thermal energy storage in the power conversion system.

McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Bell, Jason R [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Joseph III, Robert Anthony [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Weaver, Samuel P [ORNL

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Solar feasibility study for site-specific industrial-process-heat applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study addresses the technical feasibility of solar energy in industrial process heat (IPH) applications in Mid-America. The study was one of two contracted efforts covering the MASEC 12-state region comprised of: Illinois, Michigan, North Dakota, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Wisconsin. The results of our study are encouraging to the potential future role of solar energy in supplying process heat to a varied range of industries and applications. We identified and developed Case Study documentation of twenty feasible solar IPH applications covering eight major SIC groups within the Mid-American region. The geographical distribution of these applications for the existing range of solar insolation levels are shown and the characteristics of the applications are summarized. The results of the study include process identification, analysis of process heat requirements, selection of preliminary solar system characteristics, and estimation of system performance and cost. These are included in each of the 20 Case Studies. The body of the report is divided into two primary discussion sections dealing with the Study Methodology employed in the effort and the Follow-On Potential of the identified applications with regard to possible demonstration projects. The 20 applications are rated with respect to their relative overall viability and procedures are discussed for possible demonstration project embarkment. Also, a possible extension of this present feasibility study for late-comer industrial firms expressing interest appears worthy of consideration.

Murray, O.L.

1980-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cost effective solar hot water system for Econo-Travel Motor Hotel located at Bluefield, West Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The final report of a cost effective solar hot water heating system installed on the Econo-Travel Motor Hotel at 3400 Cumberland Road, Bluefield, West Virginia. The description of the system along with the final breakdown performance data and payback time are given. The payback time for the installed system will be approximately five (5) years instead of the 7.73 years estimated for the proposal. The additional savings is due to the reduction in the peak demand charge since the electric hot water heaters are not required to operate at the same time each morning as the dryers used for the laundry. The success of the system will be determined by the reduction in the utility cost and reduced use of our fossil fuels. The results shown in the hotel's monthly electricity bills indicate that this goal has been accomplished.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cost effective solar hot water system for Econo-Travel Motor Hotel located at Richmond, Virginia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The final report is presented of a cost effective solar hot water heating system installed on the Econo-Travel Motor Hotel at 5408 Williamsburg Road, Richmond, Virginia. The description of the system is given along with the final cost breakdown, expected performance data and expected payback time for the installed system is estimated to be approximately five (5) years instead of the 6.65 years estimated for the proposal. The additional savings is due to the reduction in the peak demand charge since the electric hot water heaters are not required to operate at the same time each morning as the dryers used for the laundry. The success of the system will be determined by the reduction in the utility cost and reduced use of our fossil fuels. The results shown in the hotel's monthly electricity bills indicate that this goal has been accomplished.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Cost effective solar hot water system for Econo-Travel Motor Hotel located at Woodbrdge, VA. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The final report of a cost effective solar hot water heating system installed on the Econo-Travel Motor Hotel at 13317 Gordon Boulevard, Woodbridge, Virginia is given. The description of the system along with the final breakdown, performance data and payback time are given. The payback time for the installed system will be approximately four (4) years instead of the 7.2 years estimated for the proposal. The additional savings is due to the reduction in the peak demand charge since the electric hot water heaters are not required to operate at the same time each morning as the dryers used for the laundry. As called for in the proposal to DOE, the success of the system will be determined by the reduction in the utility cost and reduced use of our fossil fuels. The results shown in the hotel's monthly electricity bills indicate that this goal has been accomplished.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Cost effective solar hot water system for Econo-Travel Motor Hotel located at Bluefield, West Virginia. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report of a cost effective solar hot water heating system installed on the Econo-Travel Motor Hotel at 3400 Cumberland Road, Bluefield, West Virginia. The description of the system along with the final breakdown performance data and payback time are given. The payback time for the installed system will be approximately five (5) years instead of the 7.73 years estimated for the proposal. The additional savings is due to the reduction in the peak demand charge since the electric hot water heaters are not required to operate at the same time each morning as the dryers used for the laundry. The success of the system will be determined by the reduction in the utility cost and reduced use of our fossil fuels. The results shown in the hotel's monthly electricity bills indicate that this goal has been accomplished.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cost effective solar hot water system for Econo-Travel Motor Hotel located at Richmond, Virginia. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final report is presented of a cost effective solar hot water heating system installed on the Econo-Travel Motor Hotel at 5408 Williamsburg Road, Richmond, Virginia. The description of the system is given along with the final cost breakdown, expected performance data and expected payback time for the installed system is estimated to be approximately five (5) years instead of the 6.65 years estimated for the proposal. The additional savings is due to the reduction in the peak demand charge since the electric hot water heaters are not required to operate at the same time each morning as the dryers used for the laundry. The success of the system will be determined by the reduction in the utility cost and reduced use of our fossil fuels. The results shown in the hotel's monthly electricity bills indicate that this goal has been accomplished.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants - Public Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary This Final Report for the "Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants describes the overall project accomplishments, results and conclusions. Phase 1 analyzed the feasibility, cost and performance of a parabolic trough solar power plant with a molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF); researched and/or developed feasible component options, detailed cost estimates and workable operating procedures; and developed hourly performance models. As a result, a molten salt plant with 6 hours of storage was shown to reduce Thermal Energy Storage (TES) cost by 43.2%, solar field cost by 14.8%, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) by 9.8% - 14.5% relative to a similar state-of-the-art baseline plant. The LCOE savings range met the projects Go/No Go criteria of 10% LCOE reduction. Another primary focus of Phase 1 and 2 was risk mitigation. The large risk areas associated with a molten salt parabolic trough plant were addressed in both Phases, such as; HTF freeze prevention and recovery, collector components and piping connections, and complex component interactions. Phase 2 analyzed in more detail the technical and economic feasibility of a 140 MWe,gross molten-salt CSP plant with 6 hours of TES. Phase 2 accomplishments included developing technical solutions to the above mentioned risk areas, such as freeze protection/recovery, corrosion effects of applicable molten salts, collector design improvements for molten salt, and developing plant operating strategies for maximized plant performance and freeze risk mitigation. Phase 2 accomplishments also included developing and thoroughly analyzing a molten salt, Parabolic Trough power plant performance model, in order to achieve the project cost and performance targets. The plant performance model and an extensive basic Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) quote were used to calculate a real levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 11.50/kWhe , which achieved the Phase 2 Go/No Go target of less than 0.12/kWhe. Abengoa Solar has high confidence that the primary risk areas have been addressed in the project and a commercial plant utilizing molten salt is economically and technically feasible. The strong results from the Phase 1 and 2 research, testing, and analyses, summarized in this report, led Abengoa Solar to recommend that the project proceed to Phase 3. However, a commercially viable collector interconnection was not fully validated by the end of Phase 2, combined with the uncertainty in the federal budget, forced the DOE and Abengoa Solar to close the project. Thus the resources required to construct and operate a molten salt pilot plant will be solely supplied by Abengoa Solar.

Grogan, Dylan C. P.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Monitoring of the performance of a solar heated and cooled apartment building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An all-electric apartment building was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The resulting system consists of an array of 1280 square feet of Northrup concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vessel, a 25-ton Arkla Industries absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. With support from the State of Texas Energy Development Fund and the Department of Energy the system was fully instrumented for monitoring.

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Northview Junior High solar energy demonstration project. Final report, 16 May 1974--16 May 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers a one-year test and evaluation of the Northview Junior High School Solar Energy Demonstration Project. The system provided about 5 percent of the school's energy requirements for the year. This energy was used for space heating, domestic water heating, and pool water heating for a total of 629,000,000 solar supplied Btu's. Average collector efficiency for the year was 44 percent. Operating costs were less than 5 percent of the value of the collected energy. Solar insolation data and system performance data are presented for the various operating modes. Results and conclusions indicate that the supplemental heating of large-scale buildings is feasible and economical. An optimum performance requires a careful matching of load, collectors, and distribution system.

Merrill, G.; Dib, A.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Solar heating and hot water system installed at Shoney's Restaurant, North Little Rock, Arkansas. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar heating system is designed to supply a major portion of the space and water heating requirements for a newly built Shoney's Big Boy Restaurant which was installed with completion occurring in December 1979. The restaurant has a floor space of approximately 4,650 square feet and requires approximately 1500 gallons of hot water daily. The solar energy system consists of 1,428 square feet of Chamberlain flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 1500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 321 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/yr (specified) building heating and hot water heating. Designer - Energy Solutions, Incorporated. Contractor - Stephens Brothers, Incorporated. This report includes extracts from site files, specification references for solar modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems, drawings installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

High-performance porous silicon solar cell development. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the program was to demonstrate use of porous silicon in new solar cell structures. Porous silicon technology has been developed at Spire for producing visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The major aspects that they have demonstrated are the following: porous silicon active layers have been made to show photovoltaic action; porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings to improve the performance of single-crystal silicon solar cells; and porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings on polycrystalline silicon solar cells. One problem with the use of porous silicon is to achieve good lateral conduction of electrons and holes through the material. This shows up in terms of poor blue response and photocurrents which increase with increasing reverse bias applied to the diode.

Maruska, P. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Northview Junior High solar energy demonstration project. Final report, 16 May 1974--16 May 1975  

SciTech Connect

This report covers a one-year test and evaluation of the Northview Junior High School Solar Energy Demonstration Project. The system provided about 5 percent of the school's energy requirements for the year. This energy was used for space heating, domestic water heating, and pool water heating for a total of 629,000,000 solar supplied Btu's. Average collector efficiency for the year was 44 percent. Operating costs were less than 5 percent of the value of the collected energy. Solar insolation data and system performance data are presented for the various operating modes. Results and conclusions indicate that the supplemental heating of large-scale buildings is feasible and economical. An optimum performance requires a careful matching of load, collectors, and distribution system.

Merrill, G.; Dib, A.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hybrid Nanorod-Polymer Solar Cell: Final Report; 19 July 1999--19 September 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the support of this grant, we successfully demonstrated that semiconductor nanorods can be used to fabricate readily processed and efficient hybrid solar cells together with polymers. By controlling nanorod length, we changed the distance over which electrons are transported directly through the thin-film device. Tuning the bandgap by altering the nanorod radius enabled us to optimize the overlap between the absorption spectrum of the cell and the solar emission spectrum. A photovoltaic device consisting of 7-nm by 60-nm CdSe nanorods and the conjugated polymer poly-3(hexylthiophene) was assembled from solution with an external quantum efficiency of over 54% and a monochromatic power conversion efficiency of 6.9% under 0.1 mW/cm2 illumination at 515 nm. Under AM 1.5 Global solar conditions, we obtained a power conversion efficiency of 1.7%.

Alivisatos, A. P.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Boeing Engineering and Construction. System design final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The system design for a future commercial solar energy brackish water desalination plant is described. Key features of the plant are discussed along with its configuration selection rationale, design objectives, operation, and performance. The water treatment technology used in the plant is ion exchange pretreatment and single stage reverse osmosis desalination utilizing high-flux membranes. Electrical power needed for plant operation is produced by a solar energy system, which is based on the Brayton cycle having air as the working fluid. Primary solar system components are: heliostat field, central cavity-tube receiver, receiver support tower, thermal energy storage, and a commercial gas turbine generator set. The thermal energy storage subsystem is of the sensible heat brick type and provides a capability for continuous day/night power generation during most weather conditions. This system design was selected in a study of various system alternatives and their life cycle product water costs for a representative site in western Texas.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

National plan for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy. Final report  

SciTech Connect

After a brief profile of the Mid-American region and characterization of the residential and commercial markets and the industry of the region, a short description is given of a regional planning meeting held for the purpose of preparing input for the Mid-American section of the National Program for the Accelerated Commercialization of Solar Energy (NPAC) Implementation plans. For each of thirty-eight programs, the objective, rationale, task statement/description, evaluation measures, and implementor are given. The programs are in these areas: public education/awareness; education/training; legislative/regulatory; performance/analysis; design/planning;demonstrations; state interface; technology; information dissemination; legal and regulatory; analysis and assessment; and regional coordination. Two policy statements are included - one on cratering a solar society and the other recommending the expansion of the commercialization to encompass and include the concepts of utilization and popularization in the plan for the advancement of solar energy. (LEW)

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

Schneider, A.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Solar-MEC Development Program. Project 61019 final report, September 1, 1977-March 9, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar-MEC is an open-cycle, solid-desiccant solar-powered, heating/cooling system. Its development has been under way since 1974 under sponsorship of the National Science Foundation, the American Gas Association, and several private companies within the gas industry. The results, conclusions, and recommendations of the program are presented. All laboratory testing and evaluations carried out in support of the conceptual and engineering design and fabrication of an ''improved'' Solar-MEC (System III) unit are described. The performance of the ''improved'' Solar-MEC (System III) unit was evaluated in detail in the laboratory, under full-, part-, and overload conditions of weather; the results were used to develop a characteristic model and computer program for the System III unit. This model was subsequently used to carry out seasonal performance simulations for heating and cooling in six US cities to develop optimized operating control strategies for maximum efficiency with reasonable controls system complexity and, therefore, reasonable costs. The demonstrated improved performance of this new unit (System III) includes: cooling thermal COP of 0.50 under ARI conditions; unit cooling capacity of 2.6 tons under ARI conditions; average Energy Efficiency Ratio (EER) under ARI conditions of 26.5; electric parasitic power requirements (as percent of thermal power input requirements) of only 6.2; and tolerable capacity degradation. On the basis of the results of seasonal performance simulations with the new unit (System III), it was concluded that, for most climates, in order to maximize the system's efficiency for solar cooling at reasonable system complexity, the unit must be designed to operate in the ventilating mode and must be provided with sensing capability to respond to ambient high humidities. The unit must be capable of operating most of the time with combined solar-gas firing and part of the time (only in very humid climates) as a gas-only fired unit.

Kinast, J.A.; Wurm, J.; Zawacki, T.S.; Macriss, R.A.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assessment of the potential of solar thermal small power systems in small utilities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study involved an assessment of the potential economic benefit of small solar thermal electric power systems to small municipal and rural electric utilities. Five different solar thermal small power system configurations were considered in the study representing three different solar thermal technologies. The configurations included: (1) 1-MW, 2-MW, and 10-MW parabolic dish concentrators with a 15-kW heat engine mounted at the focal point of each dish. These systems utilized advanced battery energy storage. (2) A 10-MW system with variable slat concentrators and central steam Rankine energy conversion. This system utilized sensible thermal energy storage. (3) A 50-MW central receiver system consisting of a field of heliostats concentrating energy on a tower-mounted receiver and a central steam Rankine conversion system. This system also utilized sensible thermal storage. The approach used in determining the potential for solar thermal small power systems in the small utility market involved a comparison of the economics of power supply expansion plans for seven hypothetical small utilities through the year 2000 both with and without the solar thermal small power systems. Insolation typical of the Southwestern US was assumed. A comparison of the break-even capital costs with the range of plant costs estimated in this study yields the following conclusions: (1) The parabolic dish concentrator systems could be economically competitive with conventional generation if the lowest capital costs can be achieved. (2) The variable slat concentrator and central receiver systems would have to achieve lower costs than the lowest in the cost ranges generally assumed in the study to become economically competitive. (3) All of the solar thermal plant types are potentially more competitive in utilities which are heavily dependent upon oil.

Steitz, P.; Mayo, L.G.; Perkins, S.P. Jr.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 1. Project summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project is presented. The design of the greenhouses include transparent double pane glass roof with channels for fluid between the panes, inner pane tinted and double pane extruded acrylic aluminized mylar shade and diffuser. Solar energy technologies provide power for water desalination, for pumping irrigation water, and for cooling and heating the controlled environment space so that crops can grow in arid lands. The project is a joint effort between the United States and Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Solar heating and cooling system installed at Columbus, Ohio. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy System installed at Columbus Technical Institute, Columbus, Ohio was installed as a part of a new construction of a college building. The building will house classrooms and laboratories, administrative offices and three lecture halls. The Solar Energy System consists of 4096 square feet (128 panels) Owens/Illinois Evacuated Glass Tube Collector Subsystem, and a 5000 gallon steel tank below ground storage system, hot water is circulated between the collectors and storage tank, passing through a water/lithium bromide absorption chiller to cool the building. Extracts from the site files specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

Coy, R.G.; Braden, R.P.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research. Final subcontract report, 6 January 1993--31 October 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Final Technical Report for a program entitled ''Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research,'' funded by the US Department of Energy. This program was part of Phase 3A of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, which addressed the generic needs of the photovoltaic (PV) industry for improved quality, accelerated production scale-up, and substantially reduced manufacturing cost. Crystalline silicon solar cells (Czochralski monocrystalline, cast polycrystalline, and ribbon polycrystalline) are used in the great majority of PV modules produced in the US, accounting for 95% of all shipments in 1994. Spire's goal in this program was to reduce the cost of these modules by developing high throughput (5 MW per year) automated processes for interconnecting solar cells made from standard and thin silicon wafers. Spire achieved this goal by developing a completely new automated processing system, designated the SPI-ASSEMBLER{trademark} 5000, which is now offered as a commercial product to the PV industry. A discussion of the project and of the Assembler is provided.

Nowlan, M. J.; Hogan, S. J.; Breen, W. F.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Patterson, J. S.; Darkazalli, G. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (US)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Evaluation of the solar building, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Final report, April 1974-September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During portions of the 1974-1975 and 1975-1976 winter heating seasons, a field evaluation was made of a solar-assisted heat pump heating system in a small commercial office building in Albuquerque, N.M. The system was comprised of one main water-to-water heat pump and five small water-to-air heat pumps. The liquid-type solar collector array had an area equivalent to about 10% of the building floor area. Other than the ethylene glycol/water solution circulated through the solar collector array, water was used in all parts of the system, including three thermal energy storage tanks. Considerable information concerning this project has been disseminated through conferences, workshops, technical papers at professional society meetings, reports to the federal government and Master of Science theses, all of which are referenced in this report. The work done on this project over the period of the contract is summarized and pertinent information concerning the building, the solar-assisted heat pump system, data acquisition aspects, results, and conclusions are included.

Gilman, S.F.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

SOLERAS - Photovoltaic Power Systems Project. Rural solar applications. Final report: project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Saudi Solar Village Project photovoltaic system is described, consisting of 160 arrays, a computerized control system, 1100 kW of electrical storage in lead-acid batteries, and an automatic weather data gathering system. Satisfactory overall system performance is reported. Performance degradation due to dust on the array lenses was determined. Field operational problems are discussed. (LEW)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Investigation of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and water systems for saturated solar ponds. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this study was to gather relevant data primarily from the published literature to investigate the technical feasibility of using a Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-NaHCO/sub 3/ mixture for a saturated solar pond. This objective was accomplished by a literature search and review of existing chemical information and by performing simple chemistry experiments in the laboratory. Information on density, solubility, phase diagram, equilibrium compositions, reaction rate constant, equilibrium constant, diffusion coefficient, vapor pressure and potentially useful additives is compiled. It is concluded that even though both the saturation density and solubility increase with temperature for trona, it is not chemically stable either at room temperature or higher temperatures (80/sup 0/C). Therefore, as is, trona is not suitable for use in a saturated solar pond. From the literature it has been found that sugar and gum can retard the decomposition of bicarbonate to carbonate in the mixture. Nevertheless, trona is a very attractive solute for an unsaturated solar pond. A laboratory unsaturated pond with a stable density gradient has worked without any problems for about two months at InterTechnology/Solar Corporation.

None

1980-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

244

Utility-impacts assessment of residential passive-solar systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a project undertaken to provide the electric-utility industry with a tool to use in analyzing the advantages and disadvantages for themselves and their customers of passive-solar residential construction within their service areas. A methodology to accomplish this was created and then tested in cooperation with seven participating utilities. Results indicate that passive solar homes and well-insulated homes are more economic to both utilities and homeowners than conventional homes insulated to ASHRAE 90-75 standards, still the norm for building construction in many parts of the country. Further indications are that passive-solar homes may have lower life-cycle costs for heating and cooling than well-insulated homes in areas of the country where the annual heating load predominates over the annual cooling load, and where there is an adequate amount of sunshine during the heating season. The methodology developed also has the capability of simulating and comparing the performance of a wide variety of non-solar electrical heating and cooling systems. As a result, it can be adapted by utilities for a broad range of residential energy analyses.

Wood, R.A.; Siegel, M.D.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Cost reduction of the Sun Challenger batch solar water heater: Final report  

SciTech Connect

A variety of materials and methods were investigated as a means to reduce the cost of the Sun Challenger Solar Collector. Three prototypes were constructed and tested using lower-cost methods. Test results are summarized, including heat gain, heat loss, and collection efficiency. Costs and benefits are also presented and summarized.

Stickney, B.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Research on the application of solar energy to industrial drying or dehydration processes. Final Phase report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dehydration operation is described. The system design and its economic analysis are discussed. The system analysis covers the solar collectors, fan and ducting selection, rock storage design, heat recovery, control system, system simulation, and the monitoring system. The construction costs are discussed thoroughly. The construction design is presented including engineering drawings. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Final Technical Report CONDUCTIVE COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS USING CARBON NANOTUBES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a grant for Eikos Inc. to investigate the feasibility of developing and utilizing Transparent Conducting Coatings (TCCs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) for solar cell applications. Conventional solar cells today employ metal oxide based TCCs with both Electrical Resistivity (R) and Optical Transparency (T), commonly referred to as optoelectronic (RT) performance significantly higher than with those possible with CNT based TCCs available today. Transparent metal oxide based coatings are also inherently brittle requiring high temperature in vacuum processing and are thus expensive to manufacture. One such material is indium tin oxide (ITO). Global demand for indium has recently increased rapidly while supply has diminished causing substantial spikes in raw material cost and availability. In contrast, the raw material, carbon, needed for CNT fabrication is abundantly available. Transparent Conducting Coatings based on CNTs can overcome not only cost and availability constraints while also offering the ability to be applied by existing, low cost process technologies under ambient conditions. Processes thus can readily be designed both for rigid and flexible PV technology platforms based on mature spray or dip coatings for silicon based solar cells and continuous roll to roll coating processes for polymer solar applications.

Paul J Glatkowski; Jorma Peltola; Christopher Weeks; Mike Trottier; David Britz

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

CIGSS Thin Film Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 10 October 2001-30 June 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the I-III-VI2 compounds that are developing into a promising material to meet the energy requirement of the world. CuInSe2 (CIS) and its alloy with Ga and S have shown long-term stability and highest conversion efficiency of 19.5%. Among the various ways of preparing CuIn1-xGaxSe2-ySy (CIGSS)/CdS thin-film solar cells, co-evaporation and sputtering techniques are the most promising. Sputtering is an established process for very high-throughput manufacturing. ARCO Solar, now Shell Solar, pioneered the work in CIS using the sputtering technique. The two-stage process developed by ARCO Solar involved sputtering of a copper and indium layer on molybdenum-coated glass as the first step. In the second step, the copper-indium layers were exposed to a selenium-bearing gas such as hydrogen selenide (H2Se) mixed with argon. The hydrogen selenide breaks down and leaves selenium, which reacts and mixes with the copper and indium in such a way to produce very high-quality CIS absorber layer. Sputtering technology has the added advantage of being easily scaled up and promotes roll-to-roll production on flexible substrates. Preliminary experiments were carried out. ZnO/ZnO:Al deposition by RF magnetron sputtering and CdS deposition by chemical-bath deposition are being carried out on a routine basis.

Dhere, N. G.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Final Report of Native Village of Venetie Tribal Government Solar Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The villages of Venetie and Arctic, located above the Arctic Circle in northeast Alaska along the Chandalar River and just southeast of the Brooks Range, will study the feasibility of powering the villages using renewable solar energy during the season of the midnight sun. The solar electric (photovoltaic) system will replace diesel generator power for most of the summertime, yielding great economic, environmental, and social benefits. The Native Village of Venetie Tribal Government conducted a feasibility study for powering of an entire village during the season of the midnight sun, using renewable solar energy. The goal was for the renewable system to allow the diesel generators to be turned completely off for most of the summertime, yielding great economic, environmental, and social benefits. The system would operate year round. While there would be no solar energy input during the long night of December and January, during the months that the sun does not shine, the system's energy storage component would continue to provide benefits by saving fuel, due to more steady generator operation and by providing back-up power during generator outages.

Lance Whitwell

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Solar heating system at the office of Burns/Peters Architects. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 6000 ft/sup 2/ office building is described which uses 820 ft/sup 2/ of concentrating, tracking solar collectors for domestic water heating and part of the space heating. The piping schematic, major maintenance and construction problems, system performance data, acceptance test, and operation and maintenance manual are included. (MHR)

Not Available

1979-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

SOLERAS program. Engineering field test of a solar cooling system. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar-powered air conditioning system was designed, constructed, and installed at a Phoenix, Arizona site whose climatic conditions approximate those of Saudi Arabia. The nominal 18 ton capacity Rankine cycle chiller system with hot and cold storage and conventional fan/coil delivery units was operated for two cooling seasons and met its design objectives.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Application of phase-change materials in passive solar systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Institute of Energy Conversion of the University of Delaware has designed and constructed a modular, hybrid passive solar energy collection and storage unit called the Thermal Wall Panel. The Thermal Wall Panel uses the concept of energy storage in phase change materials combined with direct solar gain. In the winter of 1977-78, the Thermal Wall Panel was tested at Solar One, the Institute's solar house and laboratory. The key results and conclusions from this testing and analysis program include the following: (1) Based on measurements, a Thermal Wall Panel with movable nighttime insulation (R = 6.80) between the storage components and the outside can retain and deliver as heat an average of 45 percent of the sun's energy which falls on it during the day. (2) Based on calculations, a 120 square foot wall can provide about 25 percent of the heating needs of a 1100 square foot house. Analysis indicates that when the Thermal Wall Panel (R = 6.00 nighttime insulation) is combined with other direct gain passive solar energy systems as large, south-facing windows, 56 percent of a home's heating needs can be provided. (3) A Thermal Wall Panel can be installed into a typical home in the Mid-Atlantic Region for an incremental cost of from $6 to $8 per square foot beyond the cost of the normal wall and pay for itself in 5 to 9 years at 1978 energy costs. Also, the Thermal Wall Panel does not require any additional foundation support. (4) A computer model has been developed for the Thermal Wall Panel which shows good agreement with predicted and measured performance. Based on these results, it is recommended that full-scale testing of the system be initiated at multiple sites in the Mid-Atlantic Region.

Sliwkowski, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Incidence angle modifiers in cylindrical solar collector design. Final report, June 1996--May 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thesis presents an analysis of the thermal performance of cylindrical solar collectors. A major contributor to performance is optics, the principle focus of this work. A tool used to compute the incidence angle modifiers (IAM`s) for cylindrical solar collectors is presented. The Monte Carlo Method is employed in a Fortran 90 computer code to compute the hemispheric IAM`s of cylindrical solar collectors. Using concentric cylinders, the tubes are modeled with and without back plane reflectors of varying size. The computed IAM`s are verified both analytically and experimentally. Outdoor experiments on an array of cylindrical tubes with various back planes and two different tube spacings are described. Agreement with TRNSYS runs in daily energy gain is excellent. Over the 38 data sets, taken on different days, a maximum error of 11.2% is observed, with an average error of 3%. Heat loss tests, used to calculate an overall heat loss coefficient for the collector, are also described. A parametric variation study is used to illustrate the effect of varying many of the collector parameters. This study provides insight into the significant design parameters for cylindrical solar collectors. This insight is used to analyze the effect of these design parameters on the annual energy delivered by the collector. In addition, a simple cost analysis illustrates the benefits of varying the design parameters. The use of this new program and a detailed Life Cycle Cost analysis are the tools needed for optimizing the design of a cylindrical solar collector. 27 figs., 9 tabs.

Ryan, J.P.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fluid bed adsorption of carbon dioxide on immobilized polyethyenimine (PEI): kinetic analysis and breakthrough behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) by immobilized polyethylenimine (PEI) on mesoporous silica was investigated in a fluid bed. The tests were performed to determine breakthrough behavior with varying bed temperature, flow rates and feed concentrations. Experimental breakthrough curves were analyzed using a theoretical 1D model developed by Bohart and Adams. The results showed that Bohart-Adams model was suitable for the normal description of breakthrough curve for the temperature ranges of 40-90{degree}C. The maximum capacity increased with temperature up to 70{degree}C and then decreased. The adsorption rate constant exhibited a negative temperature dependence decreasing as the temperature increased. Parameters characteristic of a fluid bed adsorber were inferred from these breakthrough curves including the breakthrough time, saturation time, critical reactor length, and length of mass transfer zone LMTZ. These parameters can be used to design fluid bed adsorption system without resolving the mechanistic contributions of dispersion, mixing, and intraparticle diffusion.

Monazam, Esmail R.; Spenik,, James; Shadle, Lawrence J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, , Final for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards . Environmental Assessment Prepared for Southwestern Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy - _ . . . " Prepared by Black & Veatch October 13,1995 ' Table of Contents 1 . 0 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Description of the Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 Alternative 1 . No Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Alternative 2 . Mechanical and Manual Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Alternative 3 . Proposed Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 Foliar Spray Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2 Soil-Spot Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

256

Development of economical improved thick film solar cell contact. Final report, September 1978-April 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for economy and efficiency has been demonstrated for the thick film metallization process using screen printing for solar cell electrodes. However, process reliability and materials economy remain deficient. It is believed that these deficiencies can be removed by the use of ink formulations designed specifically for silicon solar cells, departing from ceramic technology tradition and utilizing all metal systems. The objectives of this investigation are as follows: 1) eliminate the glass frit which has been the conventional liquid phase sintering medium and adhesive for metallization inks; 2) provide an appropriate metal which can serve as the liquid phase sintering medium; 3) find a chemical constituent which effectively removes the native oxide from the silicon during the firing step, which can be made part of the ink, and which either becomes fugitive or remains an inert part of the matured metallization; and 4) maintain cognizance of the cost objectives of the LSA Project in selecting materials and processes. Progress is reported. (WHK)

Ross, B.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

City of Scottsdale Courts Building solar space-conditioning project. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Maricopa County Courts Building is an existing 6800 square foot, single story structure housing offices and courtroom space. The solar system is sized to provide 65% of the annual cooling load and 100% of the heating load. An adjacent city swimming pool is connected to the system as a heat sink to provide thermal overload protection. A 25-ton absorption chiller is piped in series with the existing 25-ton air-cooled packaged chiller. Heating will be by standard hot water duct coils mounted upstream of the existing electric heaters. Freeze control is by recirculation under normal conditions, and by flush through in the event of power failure. The control sequence is given and the acceptance tests are described. Problems and solutions in constructing the system and lessons learned are discussed. Appended are the solar system schematic and as-built drawings, as well as photographs of the completed project. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Page Jackson solar school, Charles Town, West Virginia. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Page Jackson Elementary School uses a solar energy system to provide space heating and cooling for a 52,600 sq. ft. school building. A total of 11,215 sq. ft. of PPG Industries, Inc., double-glazed, flat plate collectors are used in conjunction with glass mirrored reflectors. The system is of the drainback type. Space heating is provided by circulating warm water from the storage tanks through five air handling units. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Trane packaged absorption water chiller when sufficient hot solar water is available. Following the introduction and description, the remaining sections include: problems and solutions; acceptance test report; building plans; as-built plans; control drawings; and operating and maintenance instructions and diagrams.

Frazier, R.H.; Pickett, J.W.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Passive solar heating of building with attached greenhouse. Final report, August 31, 1979-August 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research has been conducted on the attached-greenhouse type of passive solar heating system in the north-central region. The thermal performance of attached-greenhouse buildings was analyzed in order to determine the component sizes and configurations which optimize performance. The analytical method is dynamic computer simulation using a thermal network model and actual hourly meteorological and solar radiation data from the north-central region. The project has consisted of a large number of computer simulation runs and resulting performance estimates for certain designs. Conclusions on design guidelines emerge from the results. The overall result of the project is the development of specific design guidelines useful to architects and builders.

Jones, R W

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Mission analysis of photovoltaic solar energy systems. Final report. Volume I. Summary  

SciTech Connect

A summary report of a study program whose principal objective was to develop methods for the technical and economic evaluation of potential missions (applications) for photovoltaic solar energy conversion in the southwestern United States in the 1980 to 2000 period is presented. A secondary objective was to apply the methodology, when developed, to the evaluation of a number of illustrative examples of candidate missions in order to obtain at least a preliminary indication of the competitive position of the photovoltaic technology in the future energy economy of the Southwest. Because of their large potential significance, most of the effort in the study was devoted to two main classes of missions: on-site applications (in which the photovoltaic system serves an electric load point that is colocated with the system) and central station power plant applications. A smaller amount of attention was given to the electrolytic production of hydrogen with electric power generated by the photovoltaic conversion of solar energy. (WHK)

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solar production of industrial process steam at the Home Cleaning and Laundry Co. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the operation and performance evaluation period at the Home Laundry Solar Industrial Process Heat Project at Pasadena, California. The installation comprises 6496 ft/sup 2/ (603.5 m/sup 2/) of linear parabolic trough concentrating collectors supplying solar thermal energy for use in laundry and dry cleaning processes. The design phase began in September 1977, and an acceptance test was conducted during the week of April 12, 1982. The plant has been in operation since May 1982, with the 12-month Phase III (operational) period starting in October 1982. The objective of the operational evaluation experiment was to maximize energy delivery to the industrial participant while characterizing system performance. Data were acquired for monthly documentation of system performance, maintenance requirements, and operating costs.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Solar thermal electric power systems with line-focus collectors. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric power generation by conventional Rankine cycle heat engines with heat supplied by line-focus solar collectors was investigated. The objectives of the study were: (1) determine which of four types of line-focus solar collectors coupled with turbine-generators of conventional design has the potential to produce low-cost electric power with thermal energy in 100 to 300/sup 0/C range; (2) develop performance and cost relationships for organic Rankine cycle engines for power generation capacities from 3 MW/sub e/ to 300 MW/sub e/; (3) develop conceptual storage units for organic fluid systems. Evaluation procedures and study results and conclusion are presented and discussed in detail. (WHK)

Duff, W.S.; Karaki, S.; Shaner, W.W.; Wilbur, P.J.; Somers, E.V.; Grimble, R.E.; Wilson, H.S.; Watt, A.D.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Educational initiative for EE/RE engineering skills: Solar Two student interns. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy sponsored five student interns from the University of California, Riverside, College of Engineering to work during the summer of 1996 at the Solar Two Energy facility in the Mojave Desert. Through the DOE intern program, engineering students supported the Solar Two Project under the supervision of engineers from Southern California Edison. The prime purpose was to provide outreach and educational support for expanding interactions with university students to increase awareness of careers in renewable energy and energy efficiency fields. The College of Engineering-Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) coordinated this project. CE-CERT is primarily a research facility focusing on air pollution and energy efficiency. CE-CERT serves undergraduate and graduate students by employing them on research projects, supporting them in the research and experimentation required for Senior Design Projects, and sponsoring them in student engineering competitions.

Norbeck, J.M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Luminescent solar concentrator development: Final subcontract report, 1 June 1982-31 December 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) was begun by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Owens-Illinois, Inc., in 1978. Experimental and theoretical results of that investigation are summarized in this report. An assessment of the LSC technology was compiled to provide a concise description to guide future research in this field. Since 1978, tremendous progress was made in the development of this device as a practical nonimaging concentrator for achieving solar concentration ratios on the order of 10X. The two most important technical achievements appear to be first, the understanding that dye self-absorption of radiated energy is not as serious a problem as originally thought; and second, the demonstration that organic dyes in polymeric hosts are capable of surviving outdoors in bright sunlight for years without serious degradation. System efficiencies approaching 4% have been achieved for photovoltaic conversion and theoretical efficiencies on the order of 9% appear feasible for large-area devices.

Friedman, P.S.; Parent, C.R.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Preliminary investigation of user requirements for solar radiation data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to: (1) make a preliminary assessment of the accuracy and precision of insolation data with respect to user requirements, and (2) make a corresponding assessment of the minimum/maximum geographic network coverage. In order to make these preliminary assessments, several specific questions have been addressed. Specifically: (1) how should users of solar radiation be classified and what principal uses of the data are made by each class, (2) what temporal and spatial properties of the data network are required to adequately serve the defined uses and users of solar radiation data, (3) to what degree does the existing network and associated data fulfill the desired data system properties, and (4) what criteria should be applied in identifying and evaluating expanded network/data options. The findings and conclusions of investigation of these questions are presented.

Hamilton, C.W.; Thomas, R.E.

1976-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

266

Directly coupled solar thermal water pumping concepts for agriculture. Final report, October 1978-May 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The directly coupled solar thermal water pumping system has been analyzed for both performance and cost. Performance estimates for a real operating system exceed 8% for the typical environmental conditions expected. The cost of such a system, using currently available flat-panel collectors, is highly competitive with alternative, remote location, water pumping systems. Although the system has a fairly low relative cost, there are areas such as valve and actuator cost that have a high potential for reducing system cost, especially for smaller systems. The performance of the system can be improved by high-performance, moderate-temperature collectors such as evacuated glass tubes. The advantages of the directly coupled solar thermal system are simplicity and limited failure modes. Results of the experimental phase indicate that the analytic models provide an accurate estimate of achievable system performance.

Scharlack, R S

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 6. Science Applications, Incorporated system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the systems analysis task for the conceptual design of a commercial size, solar powered, controlled environment agriculture system. The baseline greenhouse system consists of a 5-hectare growing facility utilizing an innovative fluid roof filter concept to provide temperature and humidity control. Fresh water for the system is produced by means of a reverse osmosis desalination unit and energy is provided by means of a solar photovoltaic array in conjunction with storage batteries and a power conditioning unit. The greenhouse environment is controlled via circulation of brackish groundwater in a closed system, which permits water recovery during dehumidification as well as CO/sub 2/ enrichment for increased crop productivity.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Solar space- and water-heating system at Stanford University. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Application of an active hydronic domestic hot water and space heating solar system for the Central Food Services Building is discussed. The closed-loop drain-back system is described as offering dependability of gravity drain-back freeze protection, low maintenance, minimal costs, and simplicity. The system features an 840 square-foot collector and storage capacity of 1550 gallons. The acceptance testing and the predicted system performance data are briefly described. Solar performance calculations were performed using a computer design program (FCHART). Bidding, costs, and economics of the system are reviewed. Problems are discussed and solutions and recommendations given. An operation and maintenance manual is given in Appendix A, and Appendix B presents As-built Drawings. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 3. Conceptual designs and market analyses. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to assess the feasibility of using solar energy to provide a significant fraction of the energy needs of commercial buildings that have energy demands greater than 200 kWe. The STES concept trade studies, sensitivity parameters, performance characteristics, and selected concepts are discussed. Market penetration rate estimates are provided, and technology advancements and utilization plans are discussed. Photovoltaic STES configurations and Rankine cycle thermal STES systems are considered. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Development of a solar-desiccant dehumidifier. Phase II. Final summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar desiccant air conditioner (SODAC), its operation, characteristics of the major components, performance at design conditions, and the control schemes for optimum operation in various climates are described for both recirculated and ventilated configurations, with greater emphasis on the recirculated configuration. The development testing and the determination of the SODAC performance in both configurations over the entire range of interfacing parameters are reported. (LEW)

Rousseau, J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Technical Progress Report, 1 July 2001--31 August 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the research under this subcontract is to explore, identify, evaluate, and develop non-conventional photovoltaic technologies capable of making a breakthrough in the production of low-cost electricity from sunlight. The specific objectives are to (1) develop microwave glow-discharge parameters for the deposition of high-quality microcrystalline silicon (mc-Si:H) thin films at high rate, (2) characterize this microcrystalline material, and (3) fabricate high-efficiency microcrystalline nip solar cells.

Guha, S.; Yang. J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

An investigation of wind loads on solar collectors. Appendix II - net pressure coefficients. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A wind-tunnel study of a series of model solar-collector installations (flat-plate collectors) immersed in a thick turbulent shear layer was undertaken in order to determine design wind loads on such installations. Wind tunnel measurements were made of the mean and fluctuating pressures on a model of a single flat-plate collector which was a component of different multi-panel installations. The pressures were spatially integrated over the top and bottom of the single collector separately.

Tieleman, H.W.; Akins, R.E.; Sparks, P.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, Rural Development, Inc. (RDI) completed construction of Wisdom Way Solar Village (WWSV), a community of ten duplexes (20 homes) in Greenfield, MA. RDI was committed to very low energy use from the beginning of the design process throughout construction. Key features include: 1. Careful site plan so that all homes have solar access (for active and passive); 2. Cellulose insulation providing R-40 walls, R-50 ceiling, and R-40 floors; 3. Triple-pane windows; 4. Airtight construction (~0.1 CFM50/ft2 enclosure area); 5. Solar water heating systems with tankless, gas, auxiliary heaters; 6. PV systems (2.8 or 3.4kWSTC); 7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Evaluation of the typical meteorological years for solar heating and cooling system studies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of an evaluation of the weather data set, generated at Sandia Laboratories, known as the Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) Data. The purpose of the evaluation is to determine how well the TMY data represent actual long-term weather data in affecting the performance of solar heating and cooling systems. The two data sets are compared through detailed SHAC simulation.

Freeman, T. L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Final results of Borexino Phase-I on low energy solar neutrino spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borexino has been running since May 2007 at the LNGS with the primary goal of detecting solar neutrinos. The detector, a large, unsegmented liquid scintillator calorimeter characterized by unprecedented low levels of intrinsic radioactivity, is optimized for the study of the lower energy part of the spectrum. During the Phase-I (2007-2010) Borexino first detected and then precisely measured the flux of the 7Be solar neutrinos, ruled out any significant day-night asymmetry of their interaction rate, made the first direct observation of the pep neutrinos, and set the tightest upper limit on the flux of CNO neutrinos. In this paper we discuss the signal signature and provide a comprehensive description of the backgrounds, quantify their event rates, describe the methods for their identification, selection or subtraction, and describe data analysis. Key features are an extensive in situ calibration program using radioactive sources, the detailed modeling of the detector response, the ability to define an innermost fiducial volume with extremely low background via software cuts, and the excellent pulse-shape discrimination capability of the scintillator that allows particle identification. We report a measurement of the annual modulation of the 7 Be neutrino interaction rate. The period, the amplitude, and the phase of the observed modulation are consistent with the solar origin of these events, and the absence of their annual modulation is rejected with higher than 99% C.L. The physics implications of phase-I results in the context of the neutrino oscillation physics and solar models are presented.

Borexino Collaboration; G. Bellini; J. Benziger; D. Bick; G. Bonfini; D. Bravo; M. B. Avanzini; B. Caccianiga; L. Cadonati; F. Calaprice; P. Cavalcante; A. Chavarria; A. Chepurnov; D. D'Angelo; S. Davini; A. Derbin; A. Empl; A. Etenko; K. Fomenko; D. Franco; C. Galbiati; S. Gazzana; C. Ghiano; M. Giammarchi; M. Goeger-Neff; A. Goretti; L. Grandi; C. Hagner; E. Hungerford; Aldo Ianni; Andrea Ianni; V. Kobychev; D. Korablev; G. Korga; D. Kryn; M. Laubenstein; T. Lewke; E. Litvinovich; B. Loer; F. Lombardi; P. Lombardi; L. Ludhova; G. Lukyanchenko; I. Machulin; S. Manecki; W. Maneschg; G. Manuzio; Q. Meindl; E. Meroni; L. Miramonti; M. Misiaszek; P. Mosteiro; V. Muratova; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; F. Ortica; K. Otis; M. Pallavicini; L. Papp; C. Pena-Garay; L. Perasso; S. Perasso; A. Pocar; G. Ranucci; A. Razeto; A. Re; A. Romani; N. Rossi; R. Saldanha; C. Salvo; S. Schoenert; H. Simgen; M. Skorokhvatov; O. Smirnov; A. Sotnikov; S. Sukhotin; Y. Suvorov; R. Tartaglia; G. Testera; D. Vignaud; R. B. Vogelaar; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Winter; M. Wojcik; A. Wright; M. Wurm; J. Xu; O. Zaimidoroga; S. Zavatarelli; G. Zuzel

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fundamentals and techniques of nonimaging optics for solar energy concentration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Nonimaging optics is a new discipline with techniques, formalism and objectives quite distinct from the traditional methods of focusing optics. These new systems achieve or closely approach the maximum concentration permitted by the Second Law of Thermodynamics for a given angular acceptance and are often called ideal. Application of these new principles to solar energy over the past seven years has led to the invention of a new class of solar concentrators, the most well known version of which is the Compound Parabolic Concentrator or CPC. A new formalism for analyzing nonimaging systems in terms of a quantity called the geometrical vector flux has been developed. This has led not only to a better understanding of the properties of ideal concentrators but to the discovery of several new concentrator designs. One of these new designs referred to as the trumpet concentrator has several advantageous features when used as a secondary concentrator for a point focusing dish concentrator. A new concentrator solution for absorbers which must be separated from the reflector by a gap has been invented. The properties of a variety of new and previously known nonimaging optical configurations have been investigated: for example, Compound Elliptical Concentrators (CEC's) as secondary concentrators and asymmetric ideal concentrators. A thermodynamic model which explains quantitatively the enhancement of effective absorptance of gray body receivers through cavity effects has been developed. The classic method of Liu and Jordan, which allows one to predict the diffuse sunlight levels through correlation with the total and direct fraction was revised and updated and applied to predict the performance of nonimaging solar collectors. The conceptual design for an optimized solar collector which integrates the techniques of nonimaging concentration with evacuated tube collector technology was carried out.

Winston, R.

1980-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

Improving thermosyphon solar domestic hot water system model performance. Final report, March 1994--February 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data from an indoor solar simulator experimental performance test is used to develop a systematic calibration procedure for a computer model of a thermosyphoning, solar domestic hot water heating system with a tank-in-tank heat exchanger. Calibration is performed using an indoor test with a simulated solar collector to adjust heat transfer in the heat exchanger and heat transfer between adjacent layers of water in the storage tank. An outdoor test is used to calibrate the calculation of the friction drop in the closed collector loop. Additional indoor data with forced flow in the annulus of the heat exchanger leads to improved heat transfer correlations for the inside and outside regions of the tank-in-tank heat exchanger. The calibrated simulation model is compared to several additional outdoor tests both with and without auxiliary heating. Integrated draw energies are predicted with greater accuracy and draw temperature profiles match experimental results to a better degree. Auxiliary energy input predictions improve significantly. 63 figs., 29 tabs.

Swift, T.N.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Panel results of the solar thermal program research requirement assessment review. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the assessment were to identify: research needs by topic and activity, relative priority of research needs, options for performing needed research, potential performers, costs and duration of R and D activities, gaps and duplications within the R and D program, and activities underway that appear to be of low priority. To achieve these objectives, research programs of the Division of Solar Thermal Technologies within the Office of Renewable Energy and Conservation and the Materials and Advanced Energy Programs of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences were reviewed. Several recent assessments of solar thermal research needs made within the past two years by various groups were also reviewed, and the key research issues and needs were extracted. The primary results from the assessment are a set of prioritized activities to meet the most important research needs for solar thermal technologies. These activities belong to four disciplines: materials science, thermal science, thermochemistry, and engineering. Further, priorities associated with the needs for research result from the various activities allow the recommended activities to be grouped into two categories; a core group which should be at the heart of any future program developed by the department, and a set of important needs that should, at least, find their way into a program at some time during its existence. The recommended research program is outlined, and the complete set of ranked research needs is listed.

None

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Technical and economic feasibility of solar augmented process steam generation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the technical and economic feasibility of solar augmented process steam generation was performed. This approach is analogous to a heat pump that extracts heat from a low temperature reservoir (provided by solar energy) and raises its temperature to a useful level via mechanical work. The shaft power required in the compressor is only one third to one quarter of total steam enthalpy for low pressure process steam (100 psig). This approach permits the use of low cost flat plate collectors. It was concluded that these systems have the potential of yielding payback periods of 5 to 8 years and 10 to 15 years for collector costs of $2/ft/sup 2/ and $5/ft/sup 2/, respectively, depending upon the location. A design study of various components indicated that these components are generally available or need only minor modifications for steam service. The component selection was largely a function of steam generation rate. In general, collector cost was the controlling factor. It was also concluded that additional incentives are probably required for increased utilization of solar energy for industrial process steam.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Solar energy facility at North Hampton Recreation Center, Dallas, Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar energy system is installed in a single story (two heights), 16,000 sq ft building enclosing a gymnasium, locker area, and health care clinic surrounded by a recreational area and athletic field. The solar energy system is designed to provide 80 percent of the annual space heating, 48 percent of the annual space cooling, and 90 percent of the domestic hot water requirements. The solar energy system includes a 238 single glazed flat plate, 3650 sq ft area collector subsystem, a 6000 gallon hot water storage subsystem, a domestic hot water preheat subsystem, an absorption chiller subsystem with a 2000 gallon tank chilled water storage subsystem. The auxiliary back up system is a gas-fired boiler and a conventional 100 gallon natural gas water heater provides any additional energy to satisfy hot water load requirements. A summary of project information, project chronology, project costs, the five modes of system operation, description of the Site Data Acquisition System, system performance summary, experience recommendations, system operational verification, drawings and major component manufacturers information are provided.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Large resource development projects as markets for passive solar technologies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A basic premise of this study is that large resource development projects provide a major market opportunity for passive solar manufactured buildings. The primary objectives of the work are to document selected resource development projects and identify their potential housing needs and development schedules, to contact resource industry representatives and assess some of the processes and motivations behind their involvement in housing decisions, and to provide passive solar manufactured buildings producers with results of these steps as early initial market intelligence. The intent is to identify not only the industries, location of their planned projects, and their likely worker housing needs, but also the individuals involved in making housing-related decisions. The 56 identified projects are located within 18 states and cover 11 types of resources. The report documents individual projects, provides protections of total worker-related housing needs, and presents overviews of resource development company involvement in the new construction market. In addition, the report profiles three organizations that expressed a strong interest in implementing the use of low-cost passive solar manufactured buildings in resource-development-related activities.

Roze-Benson, R V

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Concentrating Solar Power - Molten Salt Pump Development, Final Technical Report (Phase 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop a long shafted pump to operate at high temperatures for the purpose of producing energy with renewable resources. In Phase I of this three phase project we developed molten salt pump requirements, evaluated existing hardware designs for necessary modifications, developed a preliminary design of the pump concept, and developed refined cost estimates for Phase II and Phase III of the project. The decision has been made not to continue the project into Phases II and III. There is an ever increasing world-wide demand for sources of energy. With only a limited supply of fossil fuels, and with the costs to obtain and produce those fuels increasing, sources of renewable energy must be found. Currently, capturing the sun's energy is expensive compared to heritage fossil fuel energy production. However, there are government requirements on Industry to increase the amount of energy generated from renewable resources. The objective of this project is to design, build and test a long-shafted, molten salt pump. This is the type of pump necessary for a molten salt thermal storage system in a commercial-scale solar trough plant. This project is under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program, managed by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. To reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and to meet the requirements of 'tomorrows' demand, technical innovations are needed. The DOE is committed to reducing the LCOE to 7-10 cents/kWh by 2015, and to 5-7 cents/kWh by 2020. To accomplish these goals, the performance envelope for commercial use of long-shafted molten salt pumps must be expanded. The intent of this project is to verify acceptable operation of pump components in the type of molten salt (thermal storage medium) used in commercial power plants today. Field testing will be necessary to verify the integrity of the pump design, and thus reduce the risk to industry. While the primary goal is to design a pump for a trough solar power plant system, the intent is for the design to be extensible to a solar power tower application. This can be accomplished by adding pumping stages to increase the discharge pressure to the levels necessary for a solar power tower application. This report incorporates all available conceptual design information completed for this project in Phase I.

Michael McDowell; Alan Schwartz

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Solar production of industrial process steam for the Lone Star Brewery. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report outlines the detailed design and system analysis of a solar industrial process steam system for the Lone Star Brewery. The industrial plant has an average natural gas usage of 12.7 MMcf per month. The majority of this energy goes to producing process steam of 125 psi and 353/sup 0/F at about 50,000 lb/h, with this load dropping to about 6000 lb/h on the weekends. The maximum steam production of the solar energy system is about 1700 lb/h. The climatic conditions at the industrial site give 50% of the possible amount of sunshine during the winter months and more than 70% during the summer months. The long-term yearly average daily total radiation on a horizontal surface is 1574 Btu/day-ft/sup 2/, the long-term yearly average daytime ambient temperature is 72/sup 0/F, and the percentage of clear day insolation received on the average day of the year is 62%. The solar steam system will consist of 9450 ft/sup 2/ of Solar Kinetics T-700 collectors arranged in fifteen 90-ft long rows through which 67.5 gpm of Therminol T-55 is pumped. This hot Therminol then transfers the heat collected to a Patterson-Kelley Series 380 unfired steam boiler. The solar-produced steam is then metered to the industrial process via a standard check valve. The thermal performance of this system is projected to produce about 3 million lbs of steam during an average weather year, which is approximately 3 billion Btu's. As with any prototype system, this steam system cannot be justified for purely economic reasons. It is estimated, however, that if the cost of the collectors can be reduced to a mass production level of $3 per lb then this type of system would be cost effective in about six years with the current government incentives and a fuel escalation rate of 10%. This period can be shortened by a combination of an increased investment tax credit and an accelerated depreciation.

Deffenbaugh, D.M.; Watkins, P.V.; Hugg, S.B.; Kulesz, J.J.; Decker, H.E.; Powell, R.C.

1979-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

285

Solar decomposition of cadmium oxide for hydrogen production. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reactor developed for this study performed satisfactorily in establishing the feasibility of cadmium oxide decomposition under the realistic conditions of the solar-furnace environment. The solar-furnace environment is very appropriate for the evaluation of design concepts. However, the solar furnace probably cannot give precise rate data. The flux is too nonuniform, so temperatures of reactant and corresponding reaction rates are also nonuniform. One of the most important results of this project was the recovery of samples from the quench heat exchanger that contained a surprisingly large amount of metallic cadmium. The fact that the sample taken from the quench heat exchanger was metallic in appearance and contained between 67% and 84% metallic cadmium would tend to indicate recombination of cadmium vapor and oxygen can be effectively prevented by the quenching operation. It would also tend to confirm recent studies that show cadmium oxide does not sublime appreciably. Determination of the decomposition rate of cadmium oxide was severely limited by fluctuating and nonuniform reactant temperatures and baseline drift in the oxygen sensor. However, the estimated rate based on a single run seemed to follow a typical solid decomposition rate pattern with an initial acceleratory period, followed by a longer deceleratory period. From a preliminary flowsheet analysis of the cadmium-cadmium oxide cycle, it was determined that at a cadmium oxide decomposition temperature of 1400/sup 0/C and a requirement of 0.2 V in the electrolyzer the efficiency was 41%, assuming total quenching of the cadmium oxide decomposition products. This efficiency could increase to a maximum of 59% if total recovery of the latent heats of vaporization and fusion of the decomposition products is possible.

Schreiber, J. D.; Yudow, B. D.; Carty, R. H.; Whaley, T. P.; Pangborn, J. B.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Conceptual design of a solar cogeneration facility at Pioneer Mill Co. , Ltd. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study is made of the retrofit of a solar central receiver system to an existing cogeneration facility at a raw sugar factory in Hawaii. The existing facility is described and the studies for selecting the preferred system are presented. The conceptual design is described including requirements and load profile. Characteristics of the collector, receiver, thermal transport, master control, and nonsolar energy systems are described. An economic analysis was performed. Appendices include the system specification, site insolation, utility power purchase agreement, performance simulation results, interface data, and receiver flux maps. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Experiments with structural concrete blocks which double as solar air heaters. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because concrete is a low cost, low energy content material, and because many buildings have unobstructed south-facing walls, the concept of an air heating structural block was evolved. Four configurations are described, two routinely available from concrete block manufacturers, and two specially designed. Test walls were evaluated heating ambient air in a single pass, so the temperature difference was low. With that reservation, there was little difference between any of the configurations (one of the special designs was best) or between the blocks and conventional solar air heaters.

Payne, P.R.; Brown, J.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Solar central receiver prototype heliostat CDRL item B. d. Final technical report, Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is volume II of a two volume report which presents the results of a study to define a low-cost approach to the production, installation, and operation of heliostats for central receiver solar thermal power plants. Performance and cost analyses are presented, and critical R and D areas are identified. Also, computer printed work sheets are included for heliostat investment, maintenance equipment investment, initial spares investment, and first years operations and maintenance for 2,500, 25,000, 250,000, and 1,000,000 units per year production. (WHK)

Easton, C. R.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Solar collector/still for salt-water desalination. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined in-line solar collector/still for the desalination of salt water was designed, built, and tested on site in the Florida Keys. During the course of the project the basic configuration was modified, as project funds permitted, to enhance performance. This collector/still utilizes sunlight for the direct heating of water and for the heating of air. The heating air is bubbled through the heated water producing desalinated water vapor which is subsequently collected. The result is non-salted water produced using sunlight.

Fonash, R.L.

290

Institutional applications of solar total-energy systems. Draft final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conceptual designs are presented for thermal and photovoltaic solar total energy (STE) systems optimized to have the lowest possible life-cycle costs. An analysis is made of the market for STE systems, synthesizing the results of interviews with institutional-sector decision-makers and representatives of utilities, component manufacturers, architect/engineers, contractors, and labor unions. The operation and outputs of the market model developed to estimate potential STE system sales and resultant energy savings are presented. Outlined are the preliminary guidelines for selecting sites and conducting the planned federal demonstration program. (LEW)

None

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Quartzsite Solar Energy Project and Proposed Yuma Field Office Resource Management Plan Amendment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Quartzsite Solar Energy Project and Proposed Yuma Field Office Resource Management Plan Amendment DOE/EIS - 0440 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, Yuma Field Office U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Army Garrison Yuma Proving Ground Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Arizona Game and Fish Department December 2012 COVER SHEET Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management U.S. Army Corps of Engineers U.S. Army Garrison-Yuma Proving Ground Arizona Department of Environmental Quality

292

Mixed strategies for energy conservation and alternative energy utilization (solar) in buildings. Final report. Volume III. Appendixes. [10 appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix summarizes building characteristics used to determine heating and cooling loads for each of the five building types in each of the four regions. For the selected five buildings, the following data are attached: new and existing construction characteristics; new and existing construction thermal resistance; floor plan and elevation; people load schedule; lighting load schedule; appliance load schedule; ventilation schedule; and hot water use schedule. For the five building types (single family, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, office buildings, and schools), data are compiled in 10 appendices. These are Building Characteristics; Alternate Energy Sources and Energy Conservation Techniques Description, Costs, Fuel Price Scenarios; Life Cycle Cost Model; Simulation Models; Solar Heating/Cooling System; Condensed Weather; Single and Multi-Family Dwelling Characteristics and Energy Conservation Techniques; Mixed Strategies for Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Utilization in Buildings. An extensive bibliography is given in the final appendix. (MCW)

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Terrestrial solar cell module automated array assembly, Task 4. Final report  

SciTech Connect

It was proposed to establish a cost effective design and manufacturing process that would produce solar cell modules capable of meeting the JPL qualification test criteria. The basic design consisted of a glass/polyvinyl butyral/Mylar laminate mounted in either aluminum or stainless steel frames. To achieve a satisfactory power output margin, the production 36 three-inch solar cell design was expanded to 41 cells interconnected with standard dual redundant contacts. Aluminum paste as a back contact has both performance and cost advantages which warranted its production evaluation. The major effort involved firing the aluminum in a large belt furnace. Prior to this time, cells were successfully fired by hand in diffusion tube type furnaces. When printed aluminum was belt fired in small lots, i.e., less than 200 wafers, acceptable cells were produced. However, when implemented into production, i.e., 1,000 wafer lots, resistance increased a factor of two. Based on this result, production of the aluminum back contact in the existing muffle type furnace was stopped, awaiting installation of a new infrared furnace. Results of qualification testing are reported.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Solar thermal hydrogen production process: Final report, January 1978-December 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under sponsorship by the United States Department of Energy, Westinghouse Advanced Energy-Systems Division has investigated the potential for using solar thermal energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. A hybrid thermochemical/electrochemical process, known as the Sulfur Cycle, has been the focus of these investigations. Process studies have indicated that, with adequate and ongoing research and development, the Sulfur Cycle can be effectively driven with solar heat. Also, economic analyses have indicated that the cycle has the potential to produce hydrogen in economic competitiveness with conventional methods (e.g. methane/steam reforming) by the turn of the century. A first generation developmental system has been defined along with its critical components, i.e. those components that need substantial engineering development. Designs for those high temperature components that concentrate, vaporize and decompose the process circulating fluid, sulfuric acid, have been prepared. Extensive experimental investigations have been conducted with regard to the selection of construction materials for these components. From these experiments, which included materials endurance tests for corrosion resistance for periods up to 6000 hours, promising materials and catalysts have been identified.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Abrams Primary School passive solar system, Bessemer Board of Education, Bessemer, Alabama. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The general economic feasibility of the project was poor. Without federal assistance the solar enhancements would never have been considered economically feasible. The most optimistic payback time ranged up to 30 years or more. The construction was not any more difficult than a conventional building. Operation of the building is not affected by the solar enhancements insofar as any human participation is concerned: it is completely passive in response to the owner's original program criteria. Natural daylighting would be the feature the architect would recommend most to other designers. The advantages are obvious to anyone who sees the building, whereas the effect of passive heat storage and rejection systems is too esoteric and not directly discernible to the layman observer. The architect would design another passive commercial building without federal assistance provided the owner was willing to pay for the extra design effort and greater cost of construction. Federal participation created a paradox: funding was crucial to the realization of the project, but the cost of design was increased substantially by the level of detail required in reporting. The architect realizes very well the need for such detail in a publicly funded project but he doesn't think he would be inclined to participate in such a program in the future.

McWilliams, R.S.

1984-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development of economical improved thick film solar cell contact. Extension final report, April-December 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the second half of the investigation of all metal screened electrodes, the focus was on base metal pastes in addition to further work with the silver systems. Contact resistance measurements were refined. A facility allowing firing in hydrogen and other atmospheres was acquired. Several experiments were made applying screenable pastes to solar cells. Doping investigations emphasized eutectic alloys reduced to powders. Metal systems were reviewed. A previously published vapor pressure curve for silver fluoride was corrected. Base metal experiments were done with nickel and copper using lead and tin as the frit metals. Severe adhesion problems were experienced with hydrogen atmospheres in all metal systems. A two step firing schedule was devised based upon experimentation which gave evidence that the silver fluoride-silicon dioxide reaction was modified by the presence of hydrogen. It was found that nitrogen prefiring allowed the silver fluoride dissociation and oxide removal without causing catastrophic oxidation of the base metal powders. The subsequent hydrogen firing step reduced oxides tht had formed and gave the proper sintered structure. Electrodes were coherent, adherent, and solderable in both nickel lead and copper lead systems. Towards the end of the contractual period aluminum-silicon and aluminum-germanium eutectic doping additions to copper pastes were tried on 2 1/4'' diameter solar cell back contacts, both with good results (eta = 9.4% AM1 uncoated).

Ross, B.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the third phase of the subcontract, IEC researchers have continued to provide the thin film PV community with greater depth of understanding and insight into a wide variety of issues including: the deposition and characterization of CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2}, a-Si, CdTe, CdS, and TCO thin films; the relationships between film and device properties; and the processing and analysis of thin film PV devices. This has been achieved through the systematic investigation of all aspects of film and device production and through the analysis and quantification of the reaction chemistries involved in thin film deposition. This methodology has led to controlled fabrications of 15% efficient CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} solar cells over a wide range of Ga compositions, improved process control of the fabrication of 10% efficient a-Si solar cells, and reliable and generally applicable procedures for both contacting and doping films. Additional accomplishments are listed below.

Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Institute of Energy Conversion

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Line focus solar central power systems. Phase I. Final report, September 30, 1978-October 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was performed of a stand-alone Line Focus Solar Central Power System based on the fixed mirror solar concentrator (FMSC) for heat collection and draw salt (a 50% molar mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate) for heat transport and storage. Parametric analyses were performed at the subsystem level, and models were developed that were employed in a computerized simulation to minimize the cost of electricity (COE) by adjusting system design parameters. A design was prepared and costed for a first commercial plant with a rating of 100 MW(e) and a storage capacity equivalent to 420 MW(e)-hr of generation. The resulting plant achieves an annual capacity of 45.6%. Scaling studies indicate reductions in the COE for increased capacity factor and increased plant rating. Assessments of the plant concept indicate it should be acceptable to utilities on the basis of technical and operational considerations, but that reductions from the first 100-MW(e) plant cost would be required to achieve substantial market penetration.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

25 kWe solar thermal stirling hydraulic engine system: Final conceptual design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the conceptual design and analysis of a solar thermal free-piston Stirling hydraulic engine system designed to deliver 25 kWe when coupled to the 11-meter Test Bed Concentrator at Sandia National Laboratories. A manufacturing cost assessment for 10,000 units per year was made by Pioneer Engineering and Manufacturing. The design meets all program objectives including a 60,000-hr design life, dynamic balancing, fully automated control, >33.3% overall system efficiency, properly conditioned power, maximum utilization of annualized insolation, and projected production costs of $300/kW. The system incorporates a simple, rugged, reliable pool boiler reflux heat pipe to transfer heat from the solar receiver to the Stirling engine. The free-piston engine produces high-pressure hydraulic flow which powers a commercial hydraulic motor that, in turn, drives a commercial rotary induction generator. The Stirling hydraulic engine uses hermetic bellows seals to separate helium working gas from hydraulic fluid which provides hydrodynamic lubrication to all moving parts. Maximum utilization of highly refined, field proven commercial components for electric power generation minimizes development cost and risk. The engine design is based on a highly refined Stirling hydraulic engine developed over 20 years as a fully implantable artificial heart power source. 4 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Development and testing of shingle-type solar cell modules. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, development, fabrication and testing of a shingle-type terrestrial solar cell module which produces 98 watts/m/sup 2/ of exposed module area at 1 kW/m/sup 2/ insolation and 61/sup 0/C are reported. These modules make it possible to easily incorporate photovoltaic power generation into the sloping roofs of residential or commercial buildings by simply nailing the modules to the plywood roof sheathing. This design consists of nineteen series-connected 53 mm diameter solar cells arranged in a closely packaged hexagon configuration. These cells are individually bonded to the embossed surface of a 3 mm thick thermally tempered hexagon-shaped piece of ASG SUNADEX glass. Monsanto SAFLEX polyvinyl butyral is used as the laminating adhesive. RTVII functions as the encapsulant between the underside of the glass superstrate and a rear protective sheet of 0.8 mm thick TEXTOLITE. The semi-flexible portion of each shingle module is a composite laminate construction consisting of outer layers of B.F. Goodrich FLEXSEAL and an epichlorohydrin closed cell foam core. The module design has satisfactorily survived the JPL-defined qualification testing program which includes 50 thermal cycles between -40 and +90/sup 0/C, a seven-day temperature-humidity exposure test and a mechanical integrity test consisting of a bidirectional cyclic loading at 2390 Pa (50 lb/ft/sup 2/) which is intended to simulate loads due to a 45 m/s (100 mph) wind.

Shepard, N.F.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Assessment of fuels and chemicals production using solar thermal energy. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigated the technical and economic viability of a wide range of potentially market-dominating solar thermal fuels and chemicals (S/T-F/C) system concepts. The current market-dominating fuels and chemical processes were reviewed to identify those appearing to have the greatest potential for successful integration with a solar thermal heat source. In addition, advanced concepts (e.g., coal gasification, oil shale, etc.) were examined. Based upon that initial screening, systems felt to be a representative cross-section of possible S/T-F/C systems were selected for further study. For each of those systems (e.g., steam reforming of natural gas, oil shale retorting, etc.), a case-study type examination was made to estimate plant costs, operational performance, technical difficulties, and financial characteristics (e.g., return on investment). More advanced systems (such as thermochemical hydrogen production) which are not sufficiently well defined at present to permit a case-study examination were also evaluated, but in a qualitative fashion.

Not Available

1982-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

302

Use of solar energy in the production of channel catfish. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

No catfish are grown commercially in eastern Kentucky due primarily to a growing season approximately three weeks too short to provide the minimum 180 day feeding season. This research project was designed to test the feasibility of using solar energy to heat pond water enough to lengthen the feeding season the required number of days. The procedure involved the heating of a small starter pond by covering it with a solar swimming pool cover. Fingerling catfish were stocked in the small pond in early April and transferred to a larger rearing pond in May when water temperatures in the larger pond reached 65/sup 0/ F. Oxygen levels were maintained at acceptable levels in the covered pond by frequent aeration. Water quality resulting from a prolonged spring drought and run-off from a pasture fertilized by chicken manure seriously affected the project. Other significant problems encountered included algae build-up and the accumulation ammonia and carbon dioxide in the water. Losses to fungus infection was the most serious problem encountered. Approximately 30 percent of the fingerlings died from this cause while in the small covered pond. After the fish were transferred to the large rearing pond, no further unanticipated problems were encountered. From the time the fish were transferred to the large pond they were handled in a typical open pond operation. At the end of the growing season in October, the fish had an average weight of 1.4 pounds.

Cox, G C

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Passive-solar-heating project for a single-family residence. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was a passive home heating system utilizing solar collectors that are part of the roof structure of a 15' x 30' greenhouse. The design utilized solar air collectors constructed on site that are actually part of the roof of the greenhouse. The flow of air is from the storage to the collectors then back to the storage. The storage bin consists of a 5' x 19' concrete insulated bin built into the floor of the greenhouse. The storage mass was gallon plastic jugs. The plastic jugs did not work properly, so they are being replaced by salt rods. This replacement will be an after the fact project by the owner. The concrete storage bin was insulated with 2'' plastic foam insulation, applied to the 8'' concrete wall. The ducts entering and leaving the storage bin have low voltage (12 volt) electric dampers. A cross flow system was used. The heated air circulates from the collectors to storage via ducts in the walls of the lean-to design. The removal of heat from the storage bin was from end to end via the ducts to the central air system for the house. In addition, the greenhouse is connected to the house with a doorway that can be opened to circulate air into the house, a shuttled exhaust fan 1/3H.P. motor has aided in the circulation of air from the storage bin to the collectors and back.

Starkey, V.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 5. Science Applications, Incorporated system requirements definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report sets forth the system requirements for a Solar Controlled-Environment Agriculture System (SCEAS) Project. In the report a conceptual baseline system description for an engineering test facility is given. This baseline system employs a fluid roof/roof filter in combination with a large storage tank and a ground water heat exchanger in order to provide cooling and heating as needed. Desalination is accomplished by pretreatment followed by reverse osmosis. Energy is provided by means of photovoltaics and wind machines in conjunction with storage batteries. Site and climatic data needed in the design process are given. System performance specifications and integrated system design criteria are set forth. Detailed subsystem design criteria are presented and appropriate references documented.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Heat pipe dynamics. Final report, April 30, 1981. [Uses of heat pipe, especially in solar collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A heat-pipe flat plate solar collector is constructed like a typical flat plate collector with the exception that individual heat pipes are attached to the collector surface to transfer collected heat via a phase change from collector surface into an attached jacket containing a phase change material. The efficiency of such a collector was measured roughly. Also briefly described are: a heat-pipe heat exchanger, heat-pipe heat exchanger freeze proofing, heat-pipe attic ventilation, transfer of light bulb heat via a heat pipe to heat water, heat recovery via heat pipe, cooling of oil in engines and transmissions via heat pipe, a tracking reflector, automatic sun tracker, single-stroke vacuum pump for heat-pipe manufacture, and heat pipe heat transfer from rock bed. (LEW)

Norman, R.M. Sr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Solar-receiver heat-flux capability and structural integrity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental program was conducted to determine the operating characteristics of full length (65 feet) single and multi-tube once-through steam generator test sections subjected to radiant heat flux levels commensurate with commercial solar tower receiver application. Absorbed heat flux levels ranging from 0.15 to 0.71 Btu/in./sup 2/-sec (0.25 to 1.16 MW/m/sup 2/) were achieved in a horizontal facility utilizing graphite radiant heater arrays. Steam exit temperatures ranged from 625 F (two-phase) to 1380 F at pressures of 1000 to 2300 psia. Wall temperature profiles and fluid pressure losses were obtained and compared with an existing computer model.

Tobin, R.D.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Solar-collector-materials exposure to the IPH site environment. Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In-situ environmental exposure tests were conducted at nine proposed intermediate-temperature Industrial Process Heat (IPH) sites. Three types of reflector materials were evaluated for survivability at the nine sites: second-surface silvered glass, aluminized acrylic FEK-244 film on aluminumsubstrate and Alzak (electropolished aluminum) on aluminium substrate. Black chrome absorber material and low-iron float glass were evaluated for thermal, photochemical, and environmental degradation. The reflector specimens were monitored for decreases in specular and hemispherical reflectance due to soil buildup. The absorber material was evaluated for changes in solar absorptivity and emissivity, and the float glass was monitored for changes in transmissivity. Surface and subsurface defects on all materials were examined microscopically and, where deemed of note, were documented photographically.

Morris, V.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Institutional applications of solar total-energy systems. Draft final report. Volume 2. Appendixes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The appendices present the analytical basis for the analysis of solar total energy (STE) systems. A regional-climate model and a building-load requirements model are developed, along with fuel-price scenarios. Life-cycle costs are compared for conventional-utility, total energy, and STE systems. Thermal STE system design trade-offs are performed and thermal STE system performance is determined. The sensitivity of STE competitiveness to fuel prices is examined. The selection of the photovoltaic array is briefly discussed. The institutional-sector decision processes are analyzed. Hypothetical regional back-up rates and electrical-energy costs are calculated. The algorithms and equations used in operating the market model are given, and a general methodology is developed for projecting the size of the market for STE systems and applied to each of 8 institutional subsectors. (LEW)

None

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Improvement of solar air collectors: Study and Experimental Research Project. Final report, May 1976-June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Literature and patents relevant to solar air-heating collectors were reviewed. The design constraints are listed. The analysis considered the heat transfer and pressure loss characteristics of the various designs. Three absorbers along with the baseline design were mounted in identical collector bodies and subjected to thermal efficiency tests on Solaron's collector test stand. The testing was done simultaneously on the four panels in a side-by-side collector test. Various manufacturing techniques for producing an absorber with extended heat transfer surface were investigated. It was found that fins could be attached to the absorber in a cost-effective manner by an electrical resistance weld. Four finned absorbers were fabricated by resistance welding and installed in a 2 x 2 collector array to verify that these production model prototypes would, in fact, increase performance by a factor of 1.11. (MHR)

Cole-Appel, B.E.; Loef, G.O.G.; Shaw, L.E.; Fischer, B.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Solar-collector materials exposure to the IPH site environment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In-situ environmental exposure tests were conducted at nine proposed intermediate-temperature Industrial Process Heat (IPH) sites. Three types of reflector materials were evaluated for survivability at the nine sites: second-surface silvered glass, aluminized acrylic FEK-244 film on aluminum substrate, and Alzak (electropolished aluminum) on aluminum substrate. Black chrome absorber material and low-iron float glass were evaluated for thermal, photochemical, and environmental degradation. The reflector specimens were monitored for decreases in specular and hemispherical reflectance due to soil buildup. The absorber material was evaluated for changes in solar absorptivity and emissivity, and the float glass was monitored for changes in transmissivity. Surface and subsurface defects on all materials were examined microscopically and, where deemed of note, were documented photographically.

Morris, V.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Strategic partnerships final LDRD report : nanocomposite materials for efficient solar hydrogen production.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 'campus executive' project sought to advance solar thermochemical technology for producing the chemical fuels. The project advanced the common interest of Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Arizona in creating a sustainable and viable alternative to fossil fuels. The focus of this effort was in developing new methods for creating unique monolithic composite structures and characterizing their performance in thermochemical production of hydrogen from water. The development and processing of the materials was undertaken in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Arizona; Sandia National Laboratories performed the thermochemical characterization. Ferrite/yttria-stabilized zirconia composite monoliths were fabricated and shown to have exceptionally high utilization of the ferrite for splitting CO{sub 2} to obtain CO (a process analogous to splitting H{sub 2}O to obtain H{sub 2}).

Corral, Erica L. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Miller, James Edward; Walker, Luke S. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Evans, Lindsey R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Modeling of a second-generation solar-driven Rankine air conditioner. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ten configurations of a second-generation (2G), solar-powered, Rankine-driven air conditioner were simulated and the data presented for use in companion studies. The results of the analysis show that the boiling-in-collector (BIC) configuration generates more power per collector area than the other configurations. The models used to simulate the configuration are presented in this report. The generated data are also presented. Experimental work was done under this study to both improve a novel refrigerant and oil lubrication system for the centrifugal compressor and investigate the aerodynamic unloading characteristics of the centrifugal compressor. The information generated was used to define possible turbo-gearbox configurations for use in the second generation computer simulation.

Denius, M.W.; Batton, W.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Intergrated function nonimaging concentrating collector tubes for solar thermal energy. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A substantial improvement in optical efficiency over contemporary external reflector evacuated tube collectors has been achieved by integrating the reflector surface into the outer glass envelope. Described are the design fabrication and test results for a prototype collector based on this concept. A comprehensive test program to measure performance and operational characteristics of a 2 m/sup 2/ panel (45 tubes) has been completed. Efficiencies above 50% relative to beam at 200/sup 0/C have been repeatedly demonstrated. Both the instantaneous and long term average performance of this totally stationary solar collector are comparable to those for tracking line focus parabolic troughs. The yield, reliability and stability of performance achieved have been excellent. Subcomponent assemblies and fabrication procedures have been used which are expected to be compatible with high volume production. The collector has a wide variety of applications in the 100/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C range including industrial process heat, air conditioning and Rankine engine operation.

Winston, R

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Line focus solar thermal central receiver research study. Final report, April 30, 1977-March 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study to examine the line focus central receiver alternative for solar thermal generation of electric power on a commercial scale are presented. The baseline concept consists of the following elements: (1) a solar collector (heliostat) whose geometry is the equivalent of a focused parabolic cylinder. The heliostat reflecting surface is composed of an array of flexible rectangular mirror panels supported along their long edges by a framework which rotates about an axis parallel to the ground plane. The mirror panels in one section (18.3 meters by 3.05 meters (60 feet by 10 feet)) are defocused in unison by a simple mechanism under computer control to achieve the required curvature. Two sections (110 meters/sup 2/(591 feet/sup 2/)) are controlled and driven in elevation by one control/drive unit. (2) A linear cavity receiver, composed of 61-meter (200-foot) sections supported by towers at an elevation of 61 meters (200 feet). Each section receives feedwater and produces turbine-rated steam. The cavity is an open cylinder 1.83 meters (6 feet) in inside diameter, with a 1.22 meter (4 foot) aperture oriented at 45 degrees to the collector field. (3) Heliostat control, consisting of a local controller at each heliostat module which communicates with a master control computer to perform elevation tracking and focal length adjustment. The control logic is open-loop, with sun position computer by the master computer with an algorithm. Image sensors, mounted above and below the receiver aperture, are used to monitor the collector field and provide feedback to the master computer for detection of misaligned heliostats. (WHK)

Di Canio, D.G.; Treytl, W.J.; Jur, F.A.; Watson, C.D.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Parameterization and Analysis of 3-D Solar Radiative Transfer in Clouds: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports on the research that we have done over the course of our two-year project. The report also covers the research done on this project during a 1 year no-cost extension of the grant. Our work has had two main, inter-related thrusts: The first thrust was to characterize the response of stratocumulus cloud structure and dynamics to systematic changes in cloud infrared radiative cooling and solar heating using one-dimensional radiative transfer models. The second was to couple a three-dimensional (3-D) solar radiative transfer model to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model that we use to simulate stratocumulus. The purpose of the studies with 3-D radiative transfer was to examine the possible influences of 3-D photon transport on the structure, evolution, and radiative properties of stratocumulus. While 3-D radiative transport has been examined in static cloud environments, few studies have attempted to examine whether the 3-D nature of radiative absorption and emission influence the structure and evolution of stratocumulus. We undertook this dual approach because only a small number of LES simulations with the 3-D radiative transfer model are possible due to the high computational costs. Consequently, LES simulations with a 1-D radiative transfer solver were used in order to examine the portions of stratocumulus parameter space that may be most sensitive to perturbations in the radiative fields. The goal was then to explore these sensitive regions with LES using full 3-D radiative transfer. Our overall goal was to discover whether 3-D radiative processes alter cloud structure and evolution, and whether this may have any indirect implications for cloud radiative properties. In addition, we collaborated with Dr. Tamas Varni, providing model output fields for his attempt at parameterizing 3-D radiative effects for cloud models.

Jerry Y. Harrington

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

316

Nanostructure Arrays for Multijunction Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 12 May 1999--11 July 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project developed the process technologies for the fabrication of high-efficiency multijunction photovoltaic cells using semiconductor nanostructure arrays. These devices are expected to provide increased energy conversion efficiency, as well as increased carrier collection efficiency. In addition, this approach provides the ability to tune the absorption spectrum to match selected windows of the solar spectrum. At the same time, these devices can be fabricated using existing industrial electrochemical processing techniques that can substantially reduce the cost of each device. The fabrication technique is based on electrochemical synthesis of II-VI semiconductor quantum wires using a preformed alumina template. This project focused on and solved the technical challenges that need to be addressed for the implementation of such devices. Specific issues addressed include (a) improved pore ordering on thin-film templates, (b) synthesis of II-VI semiconductor nanostructures by both AC and DC deposition, (c) an in-situ barrier-layer engineering process that allow the fabrication of superior-quality materials and improved template/substrate interface, (d) characterization techniques for templates, (e) process technology for creating stacked layers of nanostructures, (f) process throughput and improved apparatus, (g) modeling tools, (h) use of glass substrates, and (i) a nonlithographic surface texturing technique for silicon PV cells. An important outcome of this project is the demonstration of the fabrication technique on glass substrates. This breakthrough provides the possibility of covering buildings with''transparent'' solar cells fabricated on architectural glass. The accomplishments of this project position it well for the next phase of research, namely, creation and optimization of the nanostructure-based PV cells.

Das, B.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Performance characteristics of open-flow liquid desiccant solar collector/regenerator for solar cooling applications. Part 2. System simulation and performance measurements. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research focussed on the performance and system simulation of an open-flow liquid desiccant solar collector/regenerator.

Wood, B.D.; Siebe, D.A.; Applebaum, M.A.; Novak, K.S.; Ballew, L.M.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

DOE/EIS-0236-S1; National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS, October 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office Oakland, California October 1999 [This page intentionally left blank.] iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS CONTACT: For additional information on For general information on the NEPA this statement write or call: process at DOE, write or call: Mr. Richard Scott, Document Manager Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director U.S. Department of Energy, L-293 Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance, EH-42 7000 East Avenue, P.O. Box 808 U.S. Department of Energy Livermore, CA 94550 1000 Independence Avenue, SW

319

Final project report - CRADA with United Solar Technologies and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL-021): Thin film materials for low-cost high performance solar concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were as follows: To develop and evaluate promising low-cost dielectric and polymer-protected thin-film reflective metal coatings to be applied to preformed continuously-curved solar reflector panels to enhance their solar reflectance, and to demonstrate protected solar reflective coatings on preformed solar concentrator panels. The opportunity for this project arose from a search by United Solar Technologies (UST) for organizations and facilities capable of applying reflective coatings to large preformed panels. PNL was identified as being uniquely qualified to participate in this collaborative project.

Martin, P.M.; Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.; Bennett, W.D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

EXCESS OXYGEN DEFECTS IN LAYERED CUPRATES P. Lightfoot, S.-Y. Pei, J. D. Jorgensen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EXCESS OXYGEN DEFECTS IN LAYERED CUPRATES EXCESS OXYGEN DEFECTS IN LAYERED CUPRATES P. Lightfoot, S.-Y. Pei, J. D. Jorgensen Materials Science Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne,IL 60439 and A. Manthiram and J. B. Goodenough Center for Materials Science and Engineering University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX 78712 CONF-900813-1 DE90 017669 C g 3 3 * o f E , < * > 3' 5' S B O ? c 8 5 o q ft 8 a 2, o o The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. W - 3 M 0 9 - E N G - 3 8 . Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-lrea license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. ° 8 c (tm) 8.= M 8 S g-« I. 2,-, 9 ^ n - i f s £ : 6. " c < B o September 1990 3 5- 8 " ^ B _

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Mixed strategies for energy conservation and alternative energy utilization (solar) in buildings. Final report. Volume II. Detailed results. [New York, Atlanta, Omaha, and Albuquerque  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mixed-strategy analysis was a tradeoff analysis between energy-conservation methods and an alternative energy source (solar) considering technical and economic benefits. The objective of the analysis was to develop guidelines for: reducing energy requirements; reducing conventional fuel use; and identifying economic alternatives for building owners. The analysis was done with a solar system in place. This makes the study unique in that it is determining the interaction of energy conservation with a solar system. The study, therefore, established guidelines as to how to minimize capital investment while reducing the conventional fuel consumption through either a larger solar system or an energy-conserving technique. To focus the scope of energy-conservation techniques and alternative energy sources considered, five building types (house, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, schools, and office buildings) were selected. Finally, the lists of energy-conservation techniques and alternative energy sources were reduced to lists of manageable size by using technical attributes to select the best candidates for further study. The resultant energy-conservation techniques were described in detail and installed costs determined. The alternative energy source reduced to solar. Building construction characteristics were defined for each building for each of four geographic regions of the country. A mixed strategy consisting of an energy-conservation technique and solar heating/hot water/cooling system was analyzed, using computer simulation to determine the interaction between energy conservation and the solar system. Finally, using FEA fuel-price scenarios and installed costs for the solar system and energy conservation techniques, an economic analysis was performed to determine the cost effectiveness of the combination. (MCW)

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

How Solar Panels Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

their understanding of this concept. Finally, students will investigate careers in solar energy and report on the growing solar industry. LESSON OVERVIEW Grade Level &...

323

Development of high efficiency (14%) solar cell array module. Final report, November 1979-June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

More effort was concentrated on development of procedures to provide large area (3 in. dia) high efficiency (16.5% AM1, 28/sup 0/C) P+NN+ solar cells. Intensive tests with 3 in. slices gave consistently lower efficiency (13.5%). The problems were identified as incomplete formation of an optimum back surface field (BSF), and interaction of the BSF process and the shallow P+ junction. The problem was shown not to be caused by reduced quality of silicon near the edges of the larger slices. A promising process sequence was identified. A reasonably large number of fairly efficient (13.5% average) 3 in. P+NN+ cells were made and combined with no problems with the module design developed for this project. In the module, one hundred and twenty (120) cells were connected, eight (8) in parallel and fifteen (15) in series. Six (6) modules were delivered with an average power output (per total module area of 6890 cm/sup 2/) of 75.3 watts and a module overall average efficiency of 10.9%.

Iles, P.A.; Khemthong, S.; Olah, S.; Sampson, W.J.; Ling, K.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Large scale production task: low cost silicon solar array project. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several design concepts were evaluated and compared with respect to potential for low cost and automation, protection against weathering, potential for array efficiency as a function of weight and area, potential for design flexibility and exposure to electrical breakdown or leakage to ground. This evaluation program narrowed attention to design concepts involving glass as the primary structural and weather resistant component of the module. The leading specific design structure consisted of the solar cell circuit embedded in polyvinyl butyrate by lamination between a glass front surface and a polyester film rear surface. Preliminary evaluation of this structure in high humidity and thermal cycle was promising, and extensive field experience with similar structures in architectural and automotive applications was favorable. The specific design proposed was comprised of 120 two-inch diameter cells in a series-parallel configuration. The laminate was mounted in an aluminum frame with a neoprene gasket providing the requisite mechanical strength with flexibility. The resulting module size of 15 by 46 inches permits three modules to be neatly fitted into the 46 inch square subarray specified by JPL. The design as modified to accommodate subsequent experience is shown. Performance and environmental test results are presented and discussed.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 1. Summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. The photovoltaic STES appears favorable for applications under 800 kWe; whereas the organic Rankine STES would be more cost effective for larger energy demand applications. Initial penetration of these systems are expected to occur in the northeast for large shopping centers in the 1990 to 2000 time period. Such systems could provide about 0.8 to 1.8 quads (8 x 10/sup 14/ to 1.8 x 10/sup 15/ Btu) of energy per year for commercial applictions by the year 2010.

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of this program was to determine the feasibility of using continuous high-temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce silicon in large quantities and of suitable purity for use in the production of photovoltaic solar cells. Equilibrium calculations showed that a range of conditions were available where silicon was produced as a condensed phase but the byproduct alkali metal salt was a vapor. A process was proposed using the vapor phase reaction of Na with SiCl/sub 4/. Low pressure experiments were performed demonstrating that free silicon was produced and providing experience with the construction of reactant vapor generators. Further experiments at higher reagent flow rates were performed in a low temperature flow tube configuration with co-axial injection of reagents. Relatively pure silicon was produced in these experiments. A high temperature graphite flow tube was built and continuous separation of Si from NaCl was demonstrated. A larger-scaled well-stirred reactor was built. Experiments were performed to investigate the compatibility of graphite-based reactor materials of construction with sodium. At 1100 to 1200 K none of these materials were found to be suitable. At 1700 K the graphites performed well with little damage except to coatings of pyrolytic graphite and silicon carbide which were damaged.

Olson, D.B.; Miller, W.J.; Gould, R.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Tracking instrument and control for solar concentrators. Final technical report, October 1979-January 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tracker uses a single photo sensor, and a rotating aperature to obtain tracking accuracies better than 1.5 mrads (0.1 degs). Peak signal detection is used to eliminate tracking of false sources, i.e., clouds, etc. A prism is employed to obtain an extended field of view (150 degs axially - 360 degs radially). The tracker digitally measures the Suns displacement angle relative to the concentrator axis, and repositions it incrementally. This arrangement permits the use of low cost non-servo motors. The local controller contains microprocessor based electronics, incorporating digital signal processing. A single controller may be time shared by a maximum of sixteen trackers, providing a high performance, cost effective solar tracking system, suitable for both line and point focus concentrators. An installation may have the local controller programmed as a standalone unit or slaved to a central controller. When used with a central controller, dynamic data monitoring and logging is available, together with the ability to change system modes and parameters, as desired.

Gray, J; Kuhlman, J

1981-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Solar Pilot Plant: Phase I. Final report, July 1, 1975--July 1, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell was given a 2-year contract by the Energy Research and Development Administration on 1 July 1975 to develop a preliminary design for a 10-MW(e) solar pilot plant of the central receiver type. The program culminated in mid-1977 with delivery of a pilot plant preliminary design, estimates for its cost, and performance, and cost estimates for a 100-MW(e) plant, which will be detailed during the operation of and built as a follow-on to the pilot plant. The pilot plant preliminary design evolved through three iterations, which were verified and refined by analysis and experimentation. Subsystem research experiments (SREs) were conducted on the collector subsystem and the steam generator portion of the receiver subsystem. A lesser amount of testing was done on a latent-heat storage subsystem before a sensible-heat storage subsystem was incorporated at the direction of ERDA. All test results and analyses pointed to the feasibility of the pilot plant, and by extension to commercial-scale plants. On that basis and in light of the worsening energy situation, Honeywell recommended that Phase II of the program be undertaken as quickly as practical.

None

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Overcoming Degradation Mechanisms in CdTe Solar Cells: Final Report, July 1998--September 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the stability of CdTe solar cells, with special focus on possible effects of diffusion from the contact to the absorber towards other cell components. Both whole cells and test systems containing only the ohmic contact and the absorber or only the window were used. We found that NiTe2 is a promising back-contact material. We also found that Cu as such is not the dominant factor in the most common and quickest type of degradation of these cells. An additional factor appears to be the formation of an oxide film on CdTe grains, which can be associated with the formation of the additional back-contact barrier that has been deduced from electrical characterization. Further observations were: Cell degradation appears to be promoted by H2O, O2, and illumination, in that order; less efficient cells are less stable than more efficient ones; some cells have been stabilized by heating in ultra-dry and O2-free inert atmosphere (N2 was used by us) before use, against subsequent degradation; and cells can recover by heating in dry N2 or by sitting on the shelf in ambient atmosphere.

Cahen, D.; Hodes, G.; Gartsman, K.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Agencies Publish Final Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Corridor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Final Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Corridor Designation in the West Agencies Publish Final Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Corridor Designation in the West November 26, 2008 - 2:07pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Four Federal agencies today released a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Final PEIS) proposing to designate more than 6,000 miles of energy transport corridors on Federal lands in 11 Western States. The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Departments of Energy, Agriculture, and Defense (the Agencies) prepared the Final PEIS as part of their work to implement Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The proposed energy corridors would facilitate future siting of oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines, as well as electricity

332

Agencies Publish Final Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Corridor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Final Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Corridor Designation in the West Agencies Publish Final Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Corridor Designation in the West November 26, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Four Federal agencies today released a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Final PEIS) proposing to designate more than 6,000 miles of energy transport corridors on Federal lands in 11 Western States. The Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Departments of Energy, Agriculture, and Defense (the Agencies) prepared the Final PEIS as part of their work to implement Section 368 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The proposed energy corridors would facilitate future siting of oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines, as well as electricity

333

Energy Department Finalizes $337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1 for Innovative Solar Power Plant Energy Department Finalizes 337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1 for Innovative Solar...

334

Hybrid solar thermal-photovoltaic systems demonstration, Phase I and II. Final technical progress report, July 5, 1979-December 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to investigate a system based on combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) panels to supply the energy needs of a small single family residence. The system finally selected and constructed uses PV/T panels which utilize air as the heat transfer medium. Optimization of thermal performance was accomplished by attaching metal fins to the back surface of each cell which significantly increased the heat transfer coefficient from the solar cells to the air stream. The other major components of the selected system are an air-to-air heat pump, a rock bin thermal energy storage bin, a synchronous dc-to-ac converter, a microprocessor to control the system, a heat exchanger for the domestic hot water system and of course the building itself which is a one story, well insulated structure having a floor area of 1200 ft/sup 2/. A prototype collector was constructed and tested. Based on this experience, twenty collectors, containing 2860 four inch diameter solar cells, were constructed and installed on the building. Performance of the system was simulated using a TRNSYS-derived program, modified to accommodate PV/T panels and to include the particular components included in the selected system. Simulation of the performance showed that about 65 percent of the total annual energy needs of the building would be provided by the PV/T system. Of this total, about one half is produced at a time when it can be used in the building and one half must be sold back to the utility.

Loferski, J.J. (ed.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transparent conducting fluorine doped zinc oxide was deposited as thin films on soda lime glass substrates by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at substrate temperatures of 460 to 500 degrees C. The precursors diethylzinc, tetramethylethylenediamine and benzoyl fluoride were dissolved in xylene. This solution was nebulized ultrasonically and then flash vaporized by a carrier gas of nitrogen preheated to 150 degrees C. Ethanol was vaporized separately, and these vapors were then mixed to form a homogeneous vapor mixture. Good reproducibility was achieved using this new CVD method. Uniform thicknesses were obtained by moving the heated glass substrates through the deposition zone. The best electrically and optical properties were obtained when the precursor solution was aged for more than a week before use. The films were polycrystalline and highly oriented with the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. More than 90% of the incorporated fluorine atoms were electrically active as n-type dopants. The electrical resistivity of the films was as low as 5 x 10/sup -4/ Omega cm. The mobility was about 45 cm /Vs. The electron concentration was up to 3 x 10 %sup20;/cm. The optical absorption of the films was about 3-4% at a sheet resistance of 7 ohms/square. The diffuse transmittance was about 10% at a wavelength of 650 nm. Amorphous ilicon solar cells were deposited using the textured fluorine doped zinc oxide films as a front electrode. The short circuit current was increased over similar cells made with fluorine doped tin oxide, but the open circuit voltages and fill factors were reduced. The voltage was restored by overcoating the fluorine-doped zinc oxide with a thin layer of fluorine-doped tin oxide.

Gordon, R.G.; Kramer, K.; Liang, H.; Liu, X.; Pang, D.; Teff, D.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Benefits analysis for the production of fuels and chemicals using solar thermal energy. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous possibilities exist for using high temperature solar thermal energy in the production of various chemicals and fuels (Sun Fuels). Research and development activities have focused on the use of feedstocks such as coal and biomass to provide synthesis gas, hydrogen, and a variety of other end-products. A Decision Analysis technique geared to the analysis of Sun Fuels options was developed. Conventional scoring methods were combined with multi-attribute utility analysis in a new approach called the Multi-Attribute Preference Scoring (MAPS) system. MAPS calls for the designation of major categories of attributes which describe critical elements of concern for the processes being examined. The six major categories include: Process Demonstration; Full-Scale Process, Feedstock; End-Product Market; National/Social Considerations; and Economics. MAPS calls for each attribute to be weighted on a simple scale for all of the candidate processes. Next, a weight is assigned to each attribute, thus creating a multiplier to be used with each individual value to derive a comparative weighting. Last, each of the categories of attributes themselves are weighted, thus creating another multiplier, for use in developing an overall score. With sufficient information and industry input, each process can be ultimately compared using a single figure of merit. After careful examination of available information, it was decided that only six of the 20 candidate processes were adequately described to allow a complete MAPS analysis which would allow direct comparisons for illustrative purposes. These six processes include three synthesis gas processes, two hydrogen and one ammonia. The remaining fourteen processes were subjected to only a partial MAPS assessment.

None

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Liquid metal cooled solar central receiver feasibility study and heliostat field analysis. Final report, Part II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four studies are presented, the first two of which are based on a specific design for a water/steam commercial 100 MW/sub e/ Solar Tower System. The first of these uses the RCELL computer program, which provides a cellwise method for the economic optimization of central receiver systems, to compare performance for several latitudes, field slopes, tower heights, heliostat costs, land costs, and input figures of merit. Using the systems design studies for the 100 MW/sub e/ unit, the second study performs a detailed net energy analysis on capital energy required to build the thermal collection component, including 6 hours of storage. Also determined is the Energy Amplification Factor, which measures the number of times the energy incorporated in the plant can be replicated during its lifetime. The third study provides a means for calculating the sun's position as a function of time. The fundamental reference frames for observing celestial objects are defined, and basic notions of orbits and time reckoning are explained. Series solutions for the equation of time and for the equation of the center are given. Phenomena affecting the sun's position and the errors which result when their effects are disregarded are summarized. A computer program to accurately locate the sun was written. The effects that two different sun tracker programs have on insolation prediction are compared. The fourth study describes and models the sodium heat engine, a continuous isothermal expansion engine for sodium vapor. The heart of the machine is beta''-alumina, a refractory material remarkable for its high conductivity of sodium ions. (LEW)

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Solar energy conversion: an analysis of impacts on desert ecosystems. Final report, June 1, 1977-December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A research program is proposed to determine the response of desert ecosystems to the operation of various solar conversion systems. Existing solar powered irrigation pumping systems are described, as well as the 5 MW solar thermal test system at Albuquerque, the proposed 10 MW central receiver system at Barstow, and photovoltaic solar dispersed power systems. The theoretical ecological impacts of solar conversion system are described. Three major impact categories are discussed in detail: shading, wind deflection, and physical disturbance. Research needs necessary to evaluate biotic and abiotic changes in the desert ecosystem are delineated, and specific monitoring and manipulation programs for existing and proposed solar conversion sites are proposed.

Patten, D.C.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Solar Technology Validation Project - Hualapai Valley Solar (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-02  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

Wilcox, S.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Solar Technology Validation Project - Southwest Solar (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-08  

SciTech Connect

Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

Wilcox, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Catalytic. System design final report. Volume 2. Preliminary pilot plant design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The preliminary design of a solar water desalination pilot plant is presented. Pilot plant drawings and process descriptions are provided. Use of solar and wind energy are discussed. Testing, performance and cost of the pilot plant are studied. (BCS)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Optimization of processing and modeling issues for thin film solar cell devices: Final report, February 3, 1997--September 1, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes results achieved under a 20-month NREL subcontract to develop and understand thin-film solar cell technology associated to CuInSe{sub 2} and related alloys, a-Si and its alloys, and CdTe. Modules based on all these thin films are promising candidates to meet DOE's long-range efficiency, reliability and manufacturing cost goals. The critical issues being addressed under this program are intended to provide the science and engineering basis for the development of viable commercial processes and to improve module performance. The generic research issues addressed are: (1) quantitative analysis of processing steps to provide information for efficient commercial-scale equipment design and operation; (2) device characterization relating the device performance to materials properties and process conditions; (3) development of alloy materials with different bandgaps to allow improved device structures for stability and compatibility with module design; (4) development and improved window/heterojunction layers and contacts to improve device performance and reliability; and (5) evaluation of cell stability with respect to device structure and module encapsulation.

Birkmire, R. W.; Phillips, J. E.; Shafarman, W. N.; Hegedus, S. S.; McCandless, B. E.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

343

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1. Quarterly progress report (final) for period ending March 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this period (January 1976 through March 1976), the primary program effort was expended toward the completion of the detail design of the three major research experiments. Also, the Preliminary Pilot Plant Economic Cost Study was completed. In the Collector Subsystem, the designs for both the twenty-five mirror and the nine-mirror heliostats were completed and released. In the Receiver Subsystem, Foster Wheeler continued with the detail design of the 5 MW research experiment receiver. A preliminary draft of the detailed test plan for the receiver subsystem research experiment was prepared and is now undergoing a final review. The detailed design of the Thermal Storage Subsystem continued at Georgia Institute of Technology. Several incremental detail design reviews were held as the design progressed. During this period, Bechtel completed the preliminary environmental analysis for the Pilot Plant. The optimization studies of the electrical power generation subsystem were initiated. A major effort was the preparation of the preliminary cost analysis for the 10 MWe Central Receiver Solar Thermal Pilot Plant. This task required the development of a cost accounting structure and a definition of all of the costs associated with the design, construction, checkout, and two-year test of the Pilot Plant. (WDM)

None

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Analysis of the economic potential of solar thermal energy to provide industrial process heat. Final report, Volume I. [In-depth analysis of 78 industries  

SciTech Connect

The process heat data base assembled as the result of this survey includes specific process applications from 78 four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) groups. These applications account for the consumption of 9.81 quadrillion Btu in 1974, about 59 percent of the 16.6 quadrillion Btu estimated to have been used for all process heat in 1974. About 7/sup 1///sub 2/ percent of industrial process heat is used below 212/sup 0/F (100/sup 0/C), and 28 percent below 550/sup 0/F (288/sup 0/C). In this study, the quantitative assessment of the potential of solar thermal energy systems to provide industrial process heat indicates that solar energy has a maximum potential to provide 0.6 quadrillion Btu per year in 1985, and 7.3 quadrillion Btu per year in 2000, in economic competition with the projected costs of conventional fossil fuels for applications having a maximum required temperature of 550/sup 0/ (288/sup 0/C). A wide variety of collector types were compared for performance and cost characteristics. Performance calculations were carried out for a baseline solar system providing hot water in representative cities in six geographical regions within the U.S. Specific industries that should have significant potential for solar process heat for a variety of reasons include food, textiles, chemicals, and primary metals. Lumber and wood products, and paper and allied products also appear to have significant potential. However, good potential applications for solar process heat can be found across the board throughout industry. Finally, an assessment of nontechnical issues that may influence the use of solar process heat in industry showed that the most important issues are the establishment of solar rights, standardization and certification for solar components and systems, and resolution of certain labor-related issues. (Volume 1 of 3 volumes.)

1977-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 4 March 1998--15 October 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report covering about 42 months of this subcontract for research on high-efficiency CdTe-based thin-film solar cells and on high-efficiency a-Si-based thin-film solar cells. Phases I and II have been extensively covered in two Annual Reports. For this Final Report, highlights of the first two Phases will be provided and then detail will be given on the last year and a half of Phase III. The effort on CdTe-based materials is led by Prof. Compaan and emphasizes the use of sputter deposition of the semiconductor layers in the fabrication of CdS/CdTe cells. The effort on high-efficiency a-Si materials is led by Prof. Deng and emphasizes plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition for cell fabrication with major efforts on triple-junction devices.

Compaan, A. D.; Deng, X.; Bohn, R. G.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Improved Solar Cell Efficiency Through the Use of an Additive Nanostructure-Based Optical Downshifter: Final Subcontract Report, January 28, 2010 -- February 28, 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes all SpectraWatt's progress in achieving a boost in solar cell efficiency using an optical downshifter. Spectrawatt's downshifting technology is based on a nanostructured material system which absorbs high energy (short wavelength) light and reemits it at a lower energy (long wavelength) with high efficiency. This system has shown unprecedented performance parameters including near unity quantum yield and high thermal stability.

Kurtin, J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Solar production of industrial process hot water: operation and evaluation of the Campbell Soup hot water solar facility. Final report, September 1, 1979-December 10, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The operation and evaluation of a solar hot water facility designed by Acurex Corporation and installed (November 1977) at the Campbell Soup Company Sacramento, California canning plant is summarized. The period of evaluation was for 12 months from October 1979 through September 1980. The objective of the work was to obtain additional, long term data on the operation and performance of the facility. Minor modifications to the facility were completed. The system was operated for 15 months, and 12 months of detailed data were evaluated. The facility was available for operation 99% of the time during the last 8 months of evaluation. A detailed description of the solar facility and of the operating experience is given, and a summary of system performance for the 12 month operation/evaluation period is presented. Recommendations for large-scale solar facilities based on this project's experience are given, and an environmental impact assessment for the Campbell Soup solar facility is provided. (WHK)

Kull, J. I.; Niemeyer, W. N.; Youngblood, S. B.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Solar Technology Validation Project - Iberdrola Renewables, Inc.: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-298-3  

SciTech Connect

Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

Wilcox, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Solar Technology Validation Project - Loyola Marymount University: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-03  

SciTech Connect

Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

Wilcox, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Solar Technology Validation Project - Solargen (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-06  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

Wilcox, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Solar Technology Validation Project - Amonix, Inc.: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

Wilcox, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Solar Technology Validation Project - RES Americas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

Wilcox, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Solar Technology Validation Project - USS Data, LLC: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-04  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

Wilcox, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Solar Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Synthesis Gas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00335  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CRADA is established to facilitate the development of solar thermal technology to efficiently and economically convert biomass into useful products (synthesis gas and derivatives) that can replace fossil fuels. NREL's High Flux Solar Furnace will be utilized to validate system modeling, evaluate candidate reactor materials, conduct on-sun testing of the process, and assist in the development of solar process control system. This work is part of a DOE-USDA 3-year, $1M grant.

Netter, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Solar fuels and chemicals system design study (ammonia/nitric acid production process). Volume 2. Conceptual design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Solar Central Receiver Fuels and Chemicals Program, Foster Wheeler Solar Development Corporation (FWSDC), under contract to Sandia National Laboratories-Livermore (SNLL), developed a conceptual design of a facility to produce ammonia and nitric acid using solar energy as the principal external source of process heat. In the selected process, ammonia is produced in an endothermic reaction within a steam methane (natural gas) reformer. The heat of reaction is provided by molten carbonate salt heated by both a solar central receiver and an exothermic ammonia-fired heater. After absorption by water, the product of the latter reaction is nitric acid.

Not Available

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

An Overview of Potential Environmental, Cultural, and Socioeconomic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

based on the findings of the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States, prepared by the U.S. Department of...

357

Agencies Publish Final Environmental Impact Statement On Energy Corridor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement On Energy Final Environmental Impact Statement On Energy Corridor Designation in the West Agencies Publish Final Environmental Impact Statement On Energy Corridor Designation in the West Four Federal agencies today released a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Final PEIS) proposing to designate more than 6,000 miles of energy transport corridors on Federal lands in 11 Western States. Agencies Publish Final Environmental Impact Statement On Energy Corridor Designation in the West More Documents & Publications Agencies Publish Draft Environmental Impact Statement on Energy Transport Corridor Designations in 11 Western States, November 8, 2007 Proposed Energy Transport Corridors: West-wide energy corridor programmatic EIS, Draft Corridors - September 2007.

358

40 kW of solar cell modules for the Large Scale Production Task, a Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Forty kilowatts of solar cell modules was produced in this program. This is equivalent to 4123 modules. The average power output per module was 9.7 watts at 16.5 volts, 60/sup 0/C and 100 mW/cm/sup 2/. The peak production rate was 200 modules per week which is equal to 1.9 kW per week. This rate was sustained for over four and one-half months and is equivalent to 100 kW per year. The solar cell module design, electrical and power performance, module preproduction environmental test results, production and shipping schedule, program summary, and delivery are described. A cost analysis section is written. Particular emphasis on the percentage of labor and material utilized in constructing a solar cell module is presented. Also included are cost reduction recommendations. It was concluded from this program that volume production on the order of hundreds of kilowatts per year per company as a minimum is required to significantly reduce the price per watt for solar cell modules. Sensor Technology more than doubled its solar cell module manufacturing facilities since the completion of the JPL Block II procurement. Plans are being made for large scale expansion of our facilities to meet growing JPL/DOE procurements.

Jones, G.T.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Study of capital requirements for solar energy. Final report, Volume 1. Analysis of the macroeconomic effects of increased solar energy market penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report defines the analytical framework for, and presents the results of, a study to determine the macroeconomic effects of increased market penetration of solar energy technologies over the 1977-2000 time period. For the purposes of this document, solar technologies are defined as wind, photovoltaics, ocean thermal electric (OTEC), small-scale (non-utility) hydroelectric and all solar active and passive thermal technologies. This research has been undertaken in support of the National Plan to Accelerate Commercialization (NPAC) of Solar Energy. The capital and operating requirements for three market penetration levels are first determined; the effects of these requirements on economic performance are then estimated using the Hudson-Jorgenson Energy/Economic Model. The analytical design, computational methods, data sources, assumptions and scenario configurations for this analysis are defined in detail. The results of the analysis of the economic impact of solar energy are presented in detail, and the implications of these results are discussed. Appendix A explains the methodology for transforming investment to capital stocks. Appendix B, which is provided in a separate volume, describes the Hudson-Jorgenson Model in greater detail. (WHK)

Pleatsikas, C.J.; Hudson, E.A.; O'Connor, D.C.; Funkhouser, D.H.

1979-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

Solar-cooling-system performance, Frenchman's Reef Hotel, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Solar Cooling System installed in the Frenchman's Reef Resort Hotel Test Site, St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands, used 956 Sunmaster Corporation evacuated glass tube collector modules which provide an effective solar collector aperture of 13,384 square feet. The system consists of the collectors, two 2500 gallon tanks, pumps, an Andover Controls Corporation computerized controller, a large solar optimized Carrier Corporation industrial sized lithium bromide absorption chiller, and associated plumbing. Solar heated water is pumped through the system to the designed public areas such as lobby, lounges, restaurant and hallways. Auxiliary heat is provided by steam and a heat exchanger to supplement the solar heat. The system, its operation sequence, and performance are described.

Harber, H.

1981-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Application of Vacancy Injection Gettering to Improve Efficiency of Solar Cells Produced by Millinet Solar: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-417  

SciTech Connect

NREL will apply vacancy injection gettering (VIG) to Millinet solar cells and evaluate the performance improvement produced by this process step. The VIG will be done in conjunction with the formation of a back, Al-alloyed, contact. Millinet Solar will provide NREL with cells having AR coating on the front side and screen-printed Al on the backside, which will be processed in the NREL's optical furnace to perform simultaneous VIG and back contact alloying with deep BSF. These cells will be sent back to Millinet solar for a screen-printed front/side contact mask, followed by a second firing at NREL. Detailed analyses will be performed to determine improvements due to BSF and VIG.

Sopori, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Textile drying using solarized can dryers to demonstrate the application of solar energy to industrial drying or dehydration processes, Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has resulted in the installation of a solar energy collection system for providing process heat to a textile drying process. The solar collection subsystem uses 700 square meters (7500 square feet) of parabolic trough, single-axis tracking, concentrating collectors to heat water in a high temperature water (HTW) loop. The solar collectors nominally generate 193/sup 0/C (380/sup 0/F) water with the HTW loop at 1.9 x 10/sup 6/ Pa (275 psi). A steam generator is fueled with the HTW and produces 450 kg/hour (1000 pounds per hour) of process steam at the nominal design point conditions. The solar-generated process steam is at 0.5 x 10/sup 6/ Pa (75 psi) and 160/sup 0/C (321/sup 0/F). It is predicted that the solar energy system will provide 1.2 x 10/sup 6/ MJ/year (1.1 x 10/sup 9/ Btu/year) to the process. This is 46 percent of the direct isolation available to the collector field during the operational hours (300 days/year of the Fairfax mill. The process being solarized is textile drying using can dryers. The can dryers are part of a slashing operation in a WestPoint Pepperell mill in Fairfax, Alabama. Over 50 percent of all woven goods are processed through slashers and dried on can dryers. The collectors were fabricated by Honeywell at a pilot production facility in Minneapolis, Minnesota, under a 3000-square-meter (32,000-square-foot) production run. The collectors and other system components were installed at the site by the Bahnson Service Company and their subcontractors, acting as the project general contractor. System checkout and start-up was conducted. Preliminary system performance was determined from data collected during start-up. System design, fabrication and installation, data analysis, operation and maintenance procedures, and specifications and drawings are presented.

Mitchell, P.D.; Beesing, M.E.; Bessler, G.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Silicon materials task of the low-cost solar-array project. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants, and contaminant-process interactions on the properties of silicon and on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study has encompassed topics such as thermochemical (gettering) treatments, base-doping concentration, base-doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary-impurity interaction in polycrystalline devices, and long-term effects of impurities and impurity impacts on high-efficiency cells, as well as a preliminary evaluation of some potential low-cost silicon materials. The effects have been studied of various metallic impurities, introduced singly or in combination into Czochralski, float zone, and polycrystalline silicon ingots and into silicon ribbons grown by the dendritic web process. The solar cell data indicate that impurity-induced performance loss is caused primarily by a reduction in base diffusion length. An analytical model based on this observation has been developed and verified experimentally for both n- and p-base material. Studies of polycrystalline ingots containing impurities indicate that solar cell behavior is species sensitive and that a fraction of the impurities are segregated to the grain boundaries. HCl and POCl gettering improve the performance of single-crystal solar cells containing Fe, Cr, and Ti. In contrast Mo-doped material is barely affected. The efficiencies of solar cells fabricated on impurity-doped wafers is lower when the front junction is formed by ion implantation than when conventional diffusion techniques are used. For most impurity-doped solar cells stability is expected for projected times beyond 20 years. Feedstock impurity concentrations below one part per million for elements like V, or 100 parts per million for more benign impurities like Cu or Ni, will be required.

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Hanes, M.H.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Performance evaluation of a solar air-heating and nocturnal cooling system in CSU Solar House II. Final report, June 1, 1977-September 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar heating system in Solar House II consists of 67.1 m/sup 2/ of double-glazed air-heating collectors with flat-black absorbers, 10.3 m/sup 3/ of pebble bed storage, air-to-water heat exchanger for preheating domestic water and one blower to circulate the air through the system. The nocturnal cooling system consists of an evaporative cooler and utilizes the pebble bed for cool storage. A schematic diagram of the system is shown.

Karaki, S.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Packaged residential active-solar space-conditioning system. Appendix E. System performance monitoring. Final subcontract report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the testing of four solar space heating systems that had cost and performance characteristics equalling or exceeding competing conventional heating systems. Design concepts for these systems were solicited from the solar industry and field tested by Vitro Corporation. The designers of the four prototype systems were: Calmac Manufacturing Corporation, Contemporary Systems, Inc., Honeywell Inc., and Trident Energy Systems. Vitro Corporation reports the results of field test performance for the four packaged space heating systems. Their review presents the primary performance factors for all systems, comparing them to the best National Solar Data Network (NSDN) space heating systems. Performance factors evaluated and reported on were: collection subsystem efficiency, collector array operational efficiency, percentage of incident solar delivered to loads, collector coefficients of performance, system coefficients of performance, percent collected solar to load, and solar energy to loads/ft/sup 2/ collector/day. The data indicate that these packaged space heating systems compare well with the most recent National Solar Data Network systems.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Development of high-efficiency, thin-film CdTe solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 February 1992--30 November 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) to bring the polycrystalline CdTe cell efficiency a step closer to the practically achievable efficiency of 18% through fundamental understanding of detects and loss mechanisms, the role of chemical and heat treatments, and investigation of now process techniques. The objective was addressed by a combination of in-depth characterization, modeling, materials growth, device fabrication, and `transport analyses of Au/Cu/CdTe/CdS/SnO {sub 2} glass front-wall heterojunction solar cells. GiT attempted to understand the loss mechanism(s) in each layer and interface by a step-by-step investigation of this multilayer cell structure. The first step was to understand, quantify, and reduce the reflectance and photocurrent loss in polycrystalline CdTe solar calls. The second step involved the investigation of detects and loss mechanisms associated with the CdTe layer and the CdTe/CdS interface. The third stop was to investigate the effect of chemical and heat treatments on CdTe films and cells. The fourth step was to achieve a better and reliable contact to CdTe solar cells by improving the fundamental understanding. Of the effects of Cu on cell efficiency. Finally, the research involved the investigation of the effect of crystallinity and grain boundaries on Cu incorporation in the CdTe films, including the fabrication of CdTe solar calls with larger CdTe grain size.

Rohatgi, A.; Chou, H.C.; Kamra, S.; Bhat, A. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Film Si Solar Cells with Nano Si: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00356  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nevada Nanotechnology Center and Si group at NREL will work together to develop a-Si based solar cells with nano-Si technique. We will explore the existing a-Si based film solar cell technology at NREL and nano scale Si technology at Nevada Nanotechnology Center. By exchanging information, we will come; up with some new cell structures using nano-Si. We expect the new a-Si based cells will have optical enhancement or better electronic or optical properties of absorber layer to improve solar cell performance.

Wang, Q.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Development of a gas backup heater for solar domestic hot-water systems. Final report, April 1978-April 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive program was undertaken to develop a unique gas fired backup for solar domestic hot water systems. Detailed computer design tools were written. A series of heat transfer experiments were performed to characterize the performance of individual components. A full scale engineering prototype, including the solar preheat tank and solar heat exchanger, was designed, fabricated and subjected to limited testing. Firing efficiency for the backup system was found to be 81.4% at a firing rate of 50,000 Btu/h. Long term standby losses should be negligible.

Morrison, D.J.; Grunes, H.E.; de Winter, F.; Armstrong, P.R.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Solar thermal enhanced oil recovery (STEOR). Sections 2-8. Final report, October 1, 1979-June 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objectives were: (1) determine the technical, economic, operational, and environmental feasibility of solar thermal enhanced oil recovery using line focusing distributed collectors at Exxon's Edison Field, and (2) estimate the quantity of solar heat which might be applied to domestic enhanced oil recovery. This volume of the report summarizes all of the work done under the contract Statement of Work. Topics include the selection of the solar system, trade-off studies, preliminary design for steam raising, cost estimate for STEOR at Edison Field, the development plan, and a market and economics analysis. (WHK)

Elzinga, E.; Arnold, C.; Allen, D.; Garman, R.; Joy, P.; Mitchell, P. Shaw, H.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Solar thermal enhanced oil recovery (STEOR). Sections 2-8. Final report, October 1, 1979-June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

The program objectives were: (1) determine the technical, economic, operational, and environmental feasibility of solar thermal enhanced oil recovery using line focusing distributed collectors at Exxon's Edison Field, and (2) estimate the quantity of solar heat which might be applied to domestic enhanced oil recovery. This volume of the report summarizes all of the work done under the contract Statement of Work. Topics include the selection of the solar system, trade-off studies, preliminary design for steam raising, cost estimate for STEOR at Edison Field, the development plan, and a market and economics analysis. (WHK)

Elzinga, E.; Arnold, C.; Allen, D.; Garman, R.; Joy, P.; Mitchell, P. Shaw, H.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Solar production of industrial process steam. Phase III. Operation and evaluation of the Johnson and Johnson solar facility. Final report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solar facility that generates 177/sup 0/C (350/sup 0/F) process steam has been designed and constructed by Acurex Corporation and has operated for 1 yr supplying steam to the Johnson and Johnson manufacturing plant in Sherman, Texas. The facility consists of 1068 m/sup 2/ (11,520 ft/sup 2/) of parabolic trough concentrating collectors, a 18,900 1 (5000 gal) flash boiler, and an 18.6 kW (25 hp) circulating pump. In the first year of operation the system was available 97 percent of the days, and with sufficient solar radiation available it operated 70 percent of the days during this period. The measured data showed that the collector field operated at an efficiency of 25.4 percent for the year, and that at least 75 percent of the energy reaching the flash boiler was delivered to the plant as steam. A total of 309,510 kg (682,400 lb) of steam was produced by the solar facility for the first year. An analysis of the data showed that the delivered energy was within 90 to 100 percent of the predicted value. The successful completion of the first year of operation has demonstrated the technical feasibility of generating industrial process steam with solar energy.

Brink, D.F.; Kendall, J.M.; Youngblood, S.B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 2. System performance and supporting studies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. System performance analysis and evaluation are described. Feedback of completed performance analyses on current system design and operating philosophy is discussed. The basic computer simulation techniques and assumptions are described and the resulting energy displacement analysis is presented. Supporting technical studies are presented. These include health and safety and reliability assessments; solar collector component evaluation; weather analysis; and a review of selected trade studies which address significant design alternatives. Additional supporting studies which are generally specific to the installation site are reported. These include solar availability analysis; energy load measurements; environmental impact assessment; life cycle cost and economic analysis; heat transfer fluid testing; meteorological/solar station planning; and information dissemination. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Evaluation of Ion Damage in Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00234  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equipment will be used by Greenville College to enhance a previously established collaboration in the area of radiation hardness of solar cells, using Greenville's unique Ion Accelerator. Equipment will be located at the E. College Avenue site.

Young, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Development and testing of thermal-energy-storage modules for use in active solar heating and cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional development work on thermal-energy-storage modules for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is summarized. Performance testing, problems, and recommendations are discussed. Installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included. (MHR)

Parker, J.C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous-silicon solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 May 1991--30 April 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluorine-doped zinc oxide was shown to have the lowest absorption loss of any of the known transparent conductors. An apparatus was constructed to deposit textured, transparent, conductive, fluorine-doped zinc oxide layers with uniform thickness over a 10 cm by 10 cm area, using inexpensive, high-productivity atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. Amorphous silicon solar cells grown on these textured films show very high peak quantum efficiencies (over 90%). However, a significant contact resistance develops at the interface between the amorphous silicon and the zinc oxide. Transparent, conductive gallium-doped zinc oxide films were grown by APCVD at a low enough temperature (260{degree}C) to be deposited on amorphous silicon as a final conductive back contact to solar cells. A quantum-mechanical theory of bonding was developed and applied to some metal oxides; it forms a basis for understanding TCO structures and the stability of their interfaces with silicon.

Gordon, R.G.; Hu, J.; Lacks, D.; Musher, J.; Thornton, J.; Liang, H. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Optimization of Phase-Engineered a-Si:H-Based Multi-Junction Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, October 2001-July 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scope of the work under this subcontract has involved investigating engineered improvements in the performance and stability of solar cells in a systematic way, which included the following four tasks: (1) Materials research and device development; (2) Process improvement directed by real time diagnostics; (3) Device loss mechanisms; and (4) Characterization strategies for advanced materials Our work has resulted in new and important insights into the deposition of a-Si:H-based materials, as well as into the nature of the Staebler-Wronski Effect (SWE). Presumably, many of these insights will be used by industrial partners to develop more systematic approaches in optimizing solar cells for higher performance and stability. This effort also cleared up several serious misconceptions about the nature of the p-layer in cells and the SWE in materials and cells. Finally, the subcontract identified future directions that should be pursued for greater understanding and improvement.

Wronski, C. R.; Collins, R. W.; Podraza, N. J.; Vlahos, V.; Pearce, J. M.; Deng, J.; Albert, M.; Ferreira, G. M.; Chen, C.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Efficiency-improvement study for GaAs solar cells. Final report, March 31, 1980-September 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-yield fabrication of good quality AlGaAs/GaAs concentration solar cells has been a limiting factor in widespread utilization of these high conversion efficiency (22 to 24%) photovoltaic cells. Reported is a series of investigations to correlate solar cell yield with substrate quality, growth techniques, layer composition, and metallization processes. In addition, several diagnostic techniques are described to aid in device characterization.

Cape, J.A.; Oliver, J.R.; Zehr, S.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Application of solar energy to the supply of hot water for textile dyeing. Final report, CDRL/PA 10  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design plan for a solar process hot water system for a textile dye beck at Riegel Textile Corporation's LaFrance, South Carolina, facilities is presented. The solar system consists of 396 GE model TC 100 evacuated tube collector modules arranged in a ground mounted array with a total collector area of 6680 square feet. The system includes an 8000-gallon hot water storage tank. Systems analyses, specification sheets, performance data, and an economic evaluation of the proposed system are presented. (WHK)

None

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Test Project: Honeywell Technology Strategy Center. Final report, Volume 2. Engineering field test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SOLERAS solar cooling system at Arizona Public Service Company in Phoenix, Arizona, was subjected to engineering field testing for a period of 18 months. Although some problems arose, which is typical with a new engineering model, the system generally ran well. This document describes the work completed in all three phases of this program, which included the preliminary analysis and detailed design of the solar cooling system, installation, testing, and data analysis.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Instrumentation and performance analysis of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture solar heated and cooled building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instrumentation system was designed and installed on the New Mexico Department of Agriculture (NMDA) building to evaluate the performance of the solar system. The NMDA building is the first specifically designed solar heated and cooled building constructed in the United States. The solar system utilizes the flat plate collectors with liquid as the thermal transfer fluid, hot and cold storage tanks, and an absorption chiller. Over two years of operating experience now exists in regard to the NMDA building. Operation of the NMDA building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system involves three modes. The full heating mode utilizes the collected solar thermal energy for space heating. The full cooling mode utilizes the energy input from the solar collectors in driving the absorption chiller to provide space cooling. The intermediate mode requires heating during the morning hours and cooling during the afternoon. Cooling for the intermediate mode utilizes the cooling tower due to the low ambient relative humidity. The requirement of auxiliary energy is met with a gas fired boiler within the building. The instrumentation system installed on the NMDA building monitored solar insolation, 45 temperatures, 15 flow rates, the rate of electrical energy consumption, local meterology and the relative humidity. The data was recorded on a 15 minute time interval during daylight and every hour during the night.

San Martin, R.L.; Fenton, D.L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Development of a Wide Bandgap Cell for Thin Film Tandem Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 6 November 2003 - 5 January 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research program was to develop approaches for a transparent wide-bandgap cell to be used in a thin-film tandem polycrystalline solar cell that can ultimately attain 25% efficiency. Specific goals included the research and development of Cu(InGa)(SeS)2 and Cd1-xZnxTe alloys with a bandgap from 1.5 to 1.8 eV, demonstrating the potential of a 15% cell efficiency with a transparent contact, and supporting the High Performance PV Program. This Final Report presents results that emphasize the 3rd phase of the program.

Shafarman, W.; McCandless, B.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The development of solar-assisted gas-fired appliances: phase ii. Final report dec 80-nov 81  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of applying solar assistance to commercial laundry drying and supermarket dehumidification was accomplished. The laundry drying project included experimental evaluation of the transient and steady-state characteristics of the hot air produced by an air-heating solar collector; experimental evaluation of the performance characteristics of a gas-fired laundry dryer as affected by varying the inlet air temperature and humidity; and an assessment of the characteristics of commercial laundries in relation to the potential commercialization of the solar-assisted dryer concept. The supermarket dehumidification project included an assessment of the relative latent and sensible cooling requirements as a function of geographic location; typical design studies of the performance and cost effectiveness of desiccant dehumidification systems in this application; and the incremental effectiveness of solar assistance to desiccant regeneration. In both projects, the solar-assist feature is, at best, marginally cost effective, including incentives, in the near term; however, the gas-fired only desiccant dehumidification concept is shown to be a potentially attractive alternative to vapor compression dehumidification with a potential for widespread application.

Hagen, K.G.; Levine, A.; Colarusso, J.M.; Zakak, A.I.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

High efficiency epitaxial optical reflector solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 January 1990--31 October 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work to test the feasibility of a new solar cell concept -- the epitaxial optical reflector (EOR) solar cell. This cell concept alters current designs for high efficiency cells by changing the optical absorption efficiency of single cells. The change is introduced by the use an epitaxial multilayer reflector as an integral part of the cell to increase the optical path length of certain wavelengths of light in the cell. These changes are expected to increase the open circuit voltage at which power is extracted from the cell. The program is designed to test the feasibility of the use of a broad band epitaxial multilayer reflector grown as an integral part of the device structure to reflect the near-band-edge light back through the device for a second absorption pass. This second pass allows the design of a solar cell with a thinner base, and the use of the epitaxial reflector as a heterojunction carrier-reflecting barrier at the rear of the device. The thinner cell design and altered carrier profile that results from the light- and carrier-reflecting barrier will decrease the carrier concentration gradient and increase the open circuit voltage. The program is structured to have three tasks: (1) Solar Cell and Reflector Modeling, (2) Materials Growth and Optimization, and (3) Solar Cell Fabrication and Characterization.

Dapkus, P.D.; Hummel, S.G. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Back-Surface Passivation for High-Efficiency Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Technical Progress Report, September 2010 -- May 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final technical progress report for TetraSun, a Photovoltaic Technology Incubator awardee within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SunShot Program.

Schultz-Wittmann, O.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Methods for reducing heat losses from flat plate solar collectors: Phase II. Final report, February 1, 1976--August 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improvements to flat plate solar collectors for heating and cooling of buildings were investigated through two parallel studies. The first study, which deals with the free convective heat loss from V-corrugated absorber plate to a plane glass cover, has shown that, for the same average spacing, the free convective heat loss is greater for a V-corrugated absorber plate than for a plane absorber plate. However, provided the average spacing is large enough, the amount of increase is slight. The second study, which deals with the free convective heat loss in a honeycomb solar collector in which the honeycomb consists of a set of horizontal partitions, or slits, has shown that provided the solar collector is tilted to near vertical, such a honeycomb gives equivalent or superior free convective loss suppression than does a square-celled honeycomb having the same amount of material. Correlation equations for the free convective heat loss are given for both studies.

Hollands, K.G.T.; Raithby, G.D.; Unny, T.E.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the low cost silicon solar array project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies were conducted on several fundamental aspects of electroless nickel/solder metallization for silicon solar cells. A process proposed by Motorola, which precedes the electroless nickel plating with several steps of palladium plating and heat treatment, was compared directly with single step electroless nickel plating. Work has directed toward answering specific questions concerning the effect of silicon surface oxide on nickel plating, effects of thermal stresses on the metallization, sintering of nickel plated on silicon, and effects of exposure to the plating solution on solar cell characteristics. The Motorola process was compared with simple electroless nickel plating in a series of parallel experiments. Results are presented. (WHK)

Petersen, R.C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: Arizona State University. Prototype carrier 10 ton air-cooled solar absorption chiller. Final evaluation report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prototype air-cooled 10 ton solar absorption chiller was disassembled and inspected after having been field-tested for three consecutive cooling seasons. Included in the inspection were some flow visualization experiments which revealed some problems in the absorber header design. The objectives of this evaluation project were to determine possible causes for the frequent crystallization and generally below-design performance of the chiller during the testing period. The major conclusions reached were that a combination of leaks and of poor (50%) flow distribution in the absorber could account for most of the chiller's poor performance.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems. Final Report of the Princeton Power Systems Development of the 100kW Demand Response Inverter.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initiated in 2008, the Solar Energy Grid Integration (SEGIS) program is a partnership involving the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, electric utilities, academic institutions and the private sector. Recognizing the need to diversify the nation's energy portfolio, the SEGIS effort focuses on specific technologies needed to facilitate the integration of large-scale solar power generation into the nation's power grid Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) awarded a contract to Princeton Power Systems, Inc., (PPS) to develop a 100kW Advanced AC-link SEGIS inverter prototype under the Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for near-term commercial applications. This SEGIS initiative emphasizes the development of advanced inverters, controllers, communications and other balance-of-system components for photovoltaic (PV) distributed power applications. The SEGIS Stage 3 Contract was awarded to PPS on July 28, 2010. PPS developed and implemented a Demand Response Inverter (DRI) during this three-stage program. PPS prepared a 'Site Demonstration Conference' that was held on September 28, 2011, to showcase the cumulative advancements. This demo of the commercial product will be followed by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., certification by the fourth quarter of 2011, and simultaneously the customer launch and commercial production sometime in late 2011 or early 2012. This final report provides an overview of all three stages and a full-length reporting of activities and accomplishments in Stage 3.

Bower, Ward Isaac; Heavener, Paul (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Sena-Henderson, Lisa; Hammell, Darren (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Holveck, Mark (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems. Final Report of the Princeton Power Systems Development of the 100kW Demand Response Inverter.  

SciTech Connect

Initiated in 2008, the Solar Energy Grid Integration (SEGIS) program is a partnership involving the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, electric utilities, academic institutions and the private sector. Recognizing the need to diversify the nation's energy portfolio, the SEGIS effort focuses on specific technologies needed to facilitate the integration of large-scale solar power generation into the nation's power grid Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) awarded a contract to Princeton Power Systems, Inc., (PPS) to develop a 100kW Advanced AC-link SEGIS inverter prototype under the Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for near-term commercial applications. This SEGIS initiative emphasizes the development of advanced inverters, controllers, communications and other balance-of-system components for photovoltaic (PV) distributed power applications. The SEGIS Stage 3 Contract was awarded to PPS on July 28, 2010. PPS developed and implemented a Demand Response Inverter (DRI) during this three-stage program. PPS prepared a 'Site Demonstration Conference' that was held on September 28, 2011, to showcase the cumulative advancements. This demo of the commercial product will be followed by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., certification by the fourth quarter of 2011, and simultaneously the customer launch and commercial production sometime in late 2011 or early 2012. This final report provides an overview of all three stages and a full-length reporting of activities and accomplishments in Stage 3.

Bower, Ward Isaac; Heavener, Paul (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Sena-Henderson, Lisa; Hammell, Darren (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Holveck, Mark (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Commercial building unitary heat pump system with solar heating. Final report, May 1, 1976--October 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A generalized dynamic computer program (SYRSOL) has been developed for the mathematical simulation of the thermal behavior of multi-zone solar heated buildings. The system modeled employs a series of water-to-air heat pumps connected in a closed loop, flat-plate liquid cooled solar collector, a water storage tank, and a cooling tower. Weather data are represented by sinusoids, which provide a convenient and economical alternative to weather tapes. Results indicate that the use of sinusoidal functions for temperature and monthly average values for cloud cover is quite realistic and accurate. Temperature functions for thirteen cities are presented. A preliminary analysis has been done of the feasibility of using solar-energized desiccant dehumidification systems to reduce summer cooling loads. Service hot water production using a water-to-water heat pump from the storage tank is shown to be highly effective and idle solar collectors can be used directly to make service hot water in the summer. A new mathematical heat pump heating model, in which the COP increases linearly with the source water temperature, has been developed and incorporated into SYRSOL. The computer simulation capability has been extended from a heating season to an entire year. The results of some experiments, that have improved the COP of a heat pump, are also reported.

Drucker, E.E.; Ucar, M.; LaGraff, J.E.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Solar Resources Measurements in Houston, TX -- Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-204  

SciTech Connect

Loaning Texas Southern University equipment in order to perform site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance is important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: (1) establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; (2) provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; (3) support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; (4) provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center - MIDC (http://www.nrel.gov/midc) Or the Renewable Resource Data Center - RReDC (http://rredc.nrel.gov). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests).

Stoffel, T.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 2. Battelle Columbus Laboratories system requirements definition and system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System specifications, design criteria, and representative weather data necessary for the system evolution and preliminary design are generated. A detailed analysis and evaluation of the commercial-sized controlled environment agriculture system coupled with a solar energy system was conducted. A simulation model to test the performance of the greenhouse is presented. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

van Hest, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

High Performance Photovoltaic Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-169  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL will provide certified measurements of the conversion efficiency at high concentration for several multijunction solar cells that were fabricated by Cyrium Technologies. In an earlier phase of the CRADA, Cyrium provided epitaxially-grown material and NREL processed the samples into devices and measured the performance.

Steiner, M.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Solar central receiver prototype heliostat: phase 1. Appendices to final technical report, September 30, 1977-June 24, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The appendices include (A) design compliance with DOE 001 specification, (B) General Electric heliostat parts list and drawings, (C) specular solar transmittance and reflectance measurements, (D) preliminary draft-design specification for conceptual design of automatic foundation machine, (E) Ingersoll-Rand critique of GE automatic foundation machine concept, and (F) appendix to section 4.0 - controls and drives. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Development of a carbonaceous selective absorber for solar thermal energy collection and process for its formation: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of the US Department of Energy supported part of this project is to develop information about controlling the complicated chemical processes involved in the formation of a carbonaceous selective absorber and learn what equipment will allow production of this absorber commercially. The work necessary to accomplish this goal is not yet complete. Formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber in the conveyor oven tried so far has been unsatisfactory, because the proper conditions for applying the carbonaceous coating in each conveyor oven fabricated, either have been difficult to obtain, or have been difficult to maintain over an extended period of time. A new conveyor oven is nearing completion which is expected to allow formation of the carbonaceous selective absorber on absorber tubes in a continuous operation over many days without the necessity of cleaning the conveyor oven or changing the thickness of the electroplated nickel catalyst to compensate for changes in the coating environment in the oven. Work under this project concerned with forming and sealing glass panels to test ideas on evacuated glass solar collector designs and production have been generally quite satisfactory. Delays in completion of the selective absorber work, has caused postponement of the fabrication of a small prototype evacuated glass solar collector panel. Preliminary cost estimates of the selective absorber and solar collector panel indicate that this collector system should be lower in cost than evacuated solar collectors now on the market. 4 figs.

Garrison, J.D.

1989-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

398

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: United Technologies Research Center. Final report, Volume 3. Engineering field test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar-powered air conditioning system was designed, constructed, and installed at a Phoenix, Arizona site whose climatic conditions approximate those of Saudi Arabia. The nominal 18 ton capacity Rankine cycle chiller system with hot and cold storage and conventional fan/coil delivery units was operated for two cooling seasons and met its design objectives.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Photovoltaic mechanisms in polycrystalline thin film silicon solar cells. Final report, 30 June 1979-29 June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were: (1) to develop appropriate measurement techniques to facilitate a quantitative study of the electrical activity of structural defects and at a grain boundary (G.B.) in terms of generation-recombination, barrier height, and G.B. conductivity; (2) to characterize G.B.s in terms of physical properties such as angle of misfit and local stress, and to correlate them with the electrical activity; (3) to determine the influence of solar cell processing on the electrical behavior of structural defects and G.B.s; and (4) to evaluate polycrystalline solar cell performance based on the above study, and to compare it with the experimentally measured performance. Progress is reported in detail. (WHK)

Sopori, B.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept-definition study for solar Brayton power plants. Final technical report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The detailed results are presented of a technical and economic assessment of phase change and thermochemical energy storage systems in a solar power plant employing a high temperature Brayton cycle thermal engine with helium as the heat transport fluid. The assessment included an examination of the storage system operation, efficiency, power plant interaction, design, materials, safety, maintenance, environmental impact, system life, and economics. These considerations are implemented in the conceptual design of three baseline storage systems and their components for use in a solar power plant module of 50 megawatt electrical power output. Rationale is provided to support the configuration, operation and material choices. A preliminary assessment of the technology development and experimental test program requirements are also included. The report is contained in four separate volumes. This volume is the technical report.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Research and development of low cost processes for integrated solar arrays. Final report, April 15, 1974--January 14, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a program to study process routes leading to a low cost large area integrated silicon solar array manufacture for terrestrial applications are reported. Potential processes for the production of solar-grade silicon are evaluated from thermodynamic, economic, and technical feasibility points of view. Upgrading of the present arc-furnace process is found most favorable. Experimental studies of the Si/SiF/sub 4/ transport and purification process show considerable impurity removal and reasonable transport rates. Silicon deformation experiments indicate production of silicon sheet by rolling at 1350/sup 0/C is feasible. Significant recrystallization by strain-anneal technique has been observed. Experimental recrystallization studies using an electron beam line source are discussed. A maximum recrystallization velocity of approximately 9 m/hr is calculated for silicon sheet. A comparative process rating technique based on detailed cost analysis is presented.

Graham, C.D.; Kulkarni, S.; Louis, E.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Performance of a glazed open flow liquid desiccant solar collector for both summer cooling and winter heating: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the work performed under DOE Contract ACO3-82SF11658, entitled, ''A Research Study to Determine the Heat and Mass Transfer Characteristics of an Open Flow Solar Collector for Both Summer Cooling and Winter Heating.'' Data and computer simulation results are shown for a glazed, open flow collector used for reconcentrating a lithium chloride solution and for thermal energy collection. A comparison of the glazed collector with an unglazed collector from a previous study is also presented.

McCormick, P.O.; Brown, S.R.; Tucker, S.P.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Need for and evaluation of hail protection devices for solar flat plate collectors. Final report, June 1978-March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A brief summary of the hail risk work previously done under this contract is given, and a summary evaluation of hail impact resistance standards currently being developed is presented. Simulated hail impact test data, field data, and the impact resistance of commercially available glazings are discussed. The use of screens for protection against hail and the threat of vandalism to solar flat plate collectors are discussed. (WHK)

Armstrong, P R; Cox, M; de Winter, F

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Effects of plumbing attachments on heat losses from solar domestic hot water storage tanks. Final report, Part 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) has established a standardized methodology for determining the performance rating of the Solar Domestic Hot Water (SDHW) systems it certifies under OG-300. Measured performance data for the solar collector component(s) of the system are used along with numerical models for the balance of the system to calculate the system`s thermal performance under a standard set of rating conditions. SRCC uses TRNSYS to model each of the components that comprise the system. The majority of the SRCC certified systems include a thermal storage tank with an auxiliary electrical heater. The most common being a conventional fifty gallon electric tank water heater. Presently, the thermal losses from these tanks are calculated using Q = U {center_dot} A {center_dot} {Delta}T. Unfortunately, this generalized formula does not adequately address temperature stratification both within the tank as well as in the ambient air surrounding the tank, non-uniform insulation jacket, thermal siphoning in the fluid lines attached to the tank, and plumbing fittings attached to the tank. This study is intended to address only that part of the problem that deals with the plumbing fittings attached to the tank. Heat losses from a storage tank and its plumbing fittings involve three different operating modes: charging, discharging and standby. In the charging mode, the tank receives energy from the solar collector. In the discharge mode, water flows from the storage tank through the distribution pipes to the faucets and cold city water enters the tank. In the standby mode, there is no forced water flow into or out of the tank. In this experimental study, only the standby mode was considered.

Song, J.; Wood, B.D. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Ji, L.J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

West Angeles Community Development Corporation final technical report on export market feasibility planning and research for the solar medical autoclave  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes core findings from an investigation performed by the staff of West Angeles Community Development Corporation (CDC) regarding the feasibility of marketing the Solar Medical Autoclave (``autoclave``) in South Africa. The investigation was completed during 1997, the period prescribed by the Grant Award made by the U.S. Department of Energy on January 1, 1997, and was monitored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Power, G.D.

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

406

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Chicago Bridge and Iron Company. Final report: system design extension. Volume 1. Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of a solar energy powered, sea water desalination pilot plant for installation at Yanbu, Saudi Arabia, on the shore of the Red Sea is presented. Earlier work is introduced and a description of the system is presented. Important design analyses and cost reduction considerations are reviewed. The pilot plant design is described in detail. Construction plans for and projected operation of the plant are discussed.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Corrosion resistance of metallic solar absorber materials in a range of heat transfer fluids. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report is intended to provide manufacturers, designers, and installers with reliable corrosion compatibility data, meaningful maintenance schedule, and confidence in durability and performance of solar collector units. The corrosion behavior of Cu alloy 122, Al alloy 1100, mild steel 1010, and a ferritic stainless steel (alloy 444) was determined in a variety of potential solar heat transfer fluids. The fluids included potable waters, water glycol solutions, and four non-aqueous fluids. The test apparatus cycled the temperatures of the fluids through those typical of an operating solar energy collector unit. The 444 stainless steel was the most corrosion resistant material and in uninhibited solutions demonstrated only extremely shallow pits during the 180 day test. The use of inhibited solutions generally prevented pits from forming. Cu alloy 122 showed quite low corrosion rates in uninhibited solutions although the presence of excess solder flux promoted some crevice corrosion. In such solutions, uniform, corrosive attack produced general surface roughening along with a protective surface oxide. The overall corrosion rate of the alloy was generally lower in inhibited glycol solutions although pitting within the crevice region occurred in limited cases. Exposure in the non-aqueous fluids resulted in extremely low corrosion rates with little evidence of localized attack.

Brock, A.J.; Smith, E.F. III

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

In-situ parameter estimation for solar domestic hot water heating systems components. Final report, June 1995--May 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three different solar domestic hot water systems are being tested at the Colorado State University Solar Energy Applications Laboratory; an unpressurized drain-back system with a load side heat exchanger, an integral collector storage system, and an ultra low flow natural convection heat exchanger system. The systems are fully instrumented to yield data appropriate for in-depth analyses of performance. The level of detail allows the observation of the performance of the total system and the performance of the individual components. This report evaluates the systems based on in-situ experimental data and compares the performances with simulated performances. The verification of the simulations aids in the rating procedure. The whole system performance measurements are also used to analyze the performance of individual components of a solar hot water system and to develop improved component models. The data are analyzed extensively and the parameters needed to characterize the systems fully are developed. Also resulting from this indepth analysis are suggested design improvements wither to the systems or the system components.

Smith, T.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Coaxial extrusion conversion concept for polymeric flat plate solar collectors. Final technical report, September 30, 1978-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigated materials and processes for fundamental improvements in flat-plate solar collector cost and performance. The goal was to develop a process for direct conversion of inexpensive raw materials into a completed solar collector unit, without labor intensive assembly operations. It was thought that materials carefully matched to the process and end-use environment would substantially reduce collector costs, as compared to conventional industry practice. The project studied the feasibility of a cost-effective, glazed solar collector, with low labor input, utilizing a coaxial extrusion of compatible polymeric materials. This study evaluated all considered materials for the desired application. In addition, there was a trial extrusion of the leading candidate glazing and absorber materials, which resulted in successfully performing a coaxial extrusion of one cell. At the time the study was conducted, there were no materials available that met the necessary requirements for the specified utilization. It was recommended that, if potentially compatible materials become available, further investigation into the suitability of those materials be researched. Then, if a suitable material was found, proceeding into Phase II would be recommended.

Rhodes, R.O.; Chapman, N.J.; Chao, K.C.; Sorenson, K.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Low energy solar neutrino experiments: The Soviet American Gallium Experiment (SAGE). Final report, August 12, 1988--October 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Two {sup 71}Ga experiments are currently in operation. The first is the 60 ton Soviet American Gallium Experiment (SAGE) at Baksan, which has recently reported a signal level of 73+18/{minus}16(stat)+5/{minus}7(syst) SNU; the second is the 30 ton GALLEX experiment at Gran Sasso, which sees 87{+-}14{+-}7 SNU. Both results are consistent, and both suggest a neutrino flux level low compared to the total expected from standard solar model calculations. It is not possible, however, to make a case for flux levels lower than the p-p prediction. Assuming the experiments are correct (Neutrino source calibrations are planned for both SAGE and GALLEX in the near future.), it is not at all clear yet whether the answer lies with the neutrino physics, solar physics, or a combination of both. Nevertheless, though solar model effects cannot be ruled out, if the Homestake and Kamiokande results are taken at face value, then these two experiments alone imply that neutrino oscillations or some similar particle physics result must be present to some degree. This report reviews the SAGE experiment and recent results. Non-radiochemical experiments are also discussed, with an emphasis on the Kamiokande water Cerenkov results.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

High-efficiency one-sun photovoltaic module demonstration using solar-grade CZ silicon. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was performed jointly by Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) and Siemens Solar Industries (Camarillo, CA) under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA 1248). The work covers the period May 1994 to March 1996. The purpose of the work was to explore the performance potential of commercial, photovoltaic-grade Czochralski (Cz) silicon, and to demonstrate this potential through fabrication of high-efficiency cells and a module. Fabrication of the module was omitted in order to pursue further development of advanced device structures. The work included investigation of response of the material to various fabrication processes, development of advanced cell structures using the commercial material, and investigation of the stability of Cz silicon solar cells. Some important achievements of this work include the following: post-diffusion oxidations were found to be a possible source of material contamination; bulk lifetimes around 75 pts were achieved; efficiencies of 17.6% and 15.7% were achieved for large-area cells using advanced cell structures (back-surface fields and emitter wrap-through); and preliminary investigations into photodegradation in Cz silicon solar cells found that oxygen thermal donors might be involved. Efficiencies around 20% should be possible with commercial, photovoltaic-grade silicon using properly optimized processes and device structures.

Gee, J.M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Final report on the power production phase of the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluations of the power production testing of Solar One, the 10 MW/sub e/ Solar Thermal Central Receiver Pilot Plant near Barstow, California. The Pilot Plant, a cooperative project of the US Department of Energy and utility firms led by the Southern California Edison Company, began a three year period of power production operation in August 1984. During this period, plant performance indicators, such as capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability, were studied to assess the operational capability of the Pilot Plant to reliably supply electrical power. Also studied was the long-term performance of such key plant components as the heliostats and the receiver. During the three years of power production, the Pilot Plant showed an improvement in performance. Considerable increases in capacity factor, system efficiency, and availability were achieved. Heliostat operation was reliable, and only small amounts of mirror corrosion were observed. Receiver tube leaks did occur, however, and were the main cause of the plant's unscheduled outages. The Pilot Plant provided valuable lessons which will aid in the design of future solar central receiver plants. 53 refs., 46 figs., 4 tabs.

Radosevich, L.G.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Application of phase change materials in passive solar systems. Final report, October 1, 1977-November 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A modular, hybrid passive solar energy collection and storage unit called the Thermal Wall Panel was designed and constructed. The Thermal Wall Panel uses the concept of energy storage in phase change materials combined with direct solar gain. Based on measurements, a Thermal Wall Panel with movable night-time insulation (R = 6.80) between the storage components and the outside can retain and deliver as heat an average of 45 percent of the sun's energy which falls on it during the day. Based on calculations, a 120 square foot wall can provide about 25 percent of the heating needs of a 1100 square foot house. Analysis indicates that when the Thermal Wall Panel (R = 6.00 nighttime insulation) is combined with other direct gain passive solar energy systems as large, south-facing windows, 56 percent of a home's heating needs can be provided. A Thermal Wall Panel can be installed into a typical home in the Mid-Atlantic Region for an incremental cost of from $6 to $8 per square foot beyond the cost of the normal wall and pay for itself in 5 to 9 years at 1978 energy costs. Also, the Thermal Wall Panel does not require any additional foundation support. A computer model has been developed for the Thermal Wall Panel which shows good agreement with predicted and measured performance.

Sliwkowski, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Final Plan for the Conversion of DUF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (Draft PEIS) 1 . The Draft PEIS and...

415

Concentrating Solar Power ?¢???? Central Receiver Panel Component Fabrication and Testing FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to complete a design of an advanced concentrated solar panel and demonstrate the manufacturability of key components. Then confirm the operation of the key components under prototypic solar flux conditions. This work is an important step in reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from a central receiver solar power plant. The key technical risk to building larger power towers is building the larger receiver systems. Therefore, this proposed technology project includes the design of an advanced molten salt prototypic sub-scale receiver panel that can be utilized into a large receiver system. Then complete the fabrication and testing of key components of the receive design that will be used to validate the design. This project shall have a significant impact on solar thermal power plant design. Receiver panels of suitable size for utility scale plants are a key element to a solar power tower plant. Many subtle and complex manufacturing processes are involved in producing a reliable, robust receiver panel. Given the substantial size difference between receiver panels manufactured in the past and those needed for large plant designs, the manufacture and demonstration on prototype receiver panel components with representative features of a full-sized panel will be important to improving the build process for commercial success. Given the thermal flux limitations of the test facility, the panel components cannot be rendered full size. Significance changes occurred in the projects technical strategies from project initiation to the accomplishments described herein. The initial strategy was to define cost improvements for the receiver, design and build a scale prototype receiver and test, on sun, with a molten salt heat transport system. DOE had committed to constructing a molten salt heat transport loop to support receiver testing at the top of the NSTTF tower. Because of funding constraints this did not happen. A subsequent plan to test scale prototype receiver, off sun but at temperature, at a molten salt loop at ground level adjacent to the tower also had to be abandoned. Thus, no test facility existed for a molten salt receiver test. As a result, PWR completed the prototype receiver design and then fabricated key components for testing instead of fabricating the complete prototype receiver. A number of innovative design ideas have been developed. Key features of the receiver panel have been identified. This evaluation includes input from Solar 2, personal experience of people working on these programs and meetings with Sandia. Key components of the receiver design and key processes used to fabricate a receiver have been selected for further evaluation. The Test Plan, Concentrated Solar Power Receiver In Cooperation with the Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratory was written to define the scope of the testing to be completed as well as to provide details related to the hardware, instrumentation, and data acquisition. The document contains a list of test objectives, a test matrix, and an associated test box showing the operating points to be tested. Test Objectives: 1. Demonstrate low-cost manufacturability 2. Demonstrate robustness of two different tube base materials 3. Collect temperature data during on sun operation 4. Demonstrate long term repeated daily operation of heat shields 5. Complete pinhole tube weld repairs 6. Anchor thermal models This report discusses the tests performed, the results, and implications for design improvements and LCOE reduction.

McDowell, Michael W [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne; Miner, Kris [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Design and testing a solar cooling system employing liquid desiccants: Dehumidifier experiments in Colorado State University Solar House II: Final report, 1986--1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A nominal 3-ton (10.5-kW) lithium bromide, open-cycle desiccant cooling system has been designed, installed, and operated. This experimental system dehumidifies ambient air in a packed bed utilizing an aqueous solution of lithium bromide. The absorbent solution is distributed by spray nozzles and flows countercurrent to the air. The dilute solution exiting the dehumidifier is concentrated in a packed bed regenerator by solar heated air. The strong solution is cooled by two heat exchangers before reentering the dehumidifier. Provisions to simulate conditions of high ambient humidity and temperature have been made. Experiments on the dehumidifier operating in a decoupled mode (without countercurrent regenerator operation) have been carried out. Cooling capacities in the range of 1.0--4.0 refrigeration tons have been achieved, depending upon the operating conditions. The effect of different independent variables on the capacity of the dehumidifier has been studied. An empirical equation correlating the variables have been obtained by statistical analysis of the data. The equation obtained indicates that the capacity of the dehumidifier depends strongly on the solution concentration, solution flow rate, air inlet temperature and the air humidity. Two other variables studied, the solution inlet temperature and the air flow rate, did not affect the cooling capacity greatly. The dependence of condensation rate on each of the variables is analyzed. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Lenz, T.G.; Loef, G.O.G.; Patnaik, S.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Determination of interaction between different waters and chemical antifreeze additives. Task 3 of solar collector studies for solar heating and cooling applications. Final technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical degradation of aqueous glycol solutions was monitored during stagnant exposure at temperatures of 100 C and 180 C. Changes in corrosivity of the solutions toward alloys of construction in solar collectors were also determined. The solutions consisted of equivolume mixtures of reagent grade ethylene glycol and water, and propylene glycol and water. The water was either distilled/deionized, or a mildy corrosive solution containing 100 ppM each of chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate ions. The solutions were exposed with and without contact with metals, these metals being unalloyed copper (CA 122), 1018 steel, and aluminum alloys 1100, 3003, and 6061. Either air or nitrogen was purged through the solutions at 100 C, whereas for solutions at 180 C the autoclave head space was filled with air or nitrogen prior to sealing the autoclave. Degradation was measured by noting changes in solution pH and accumulation of organic acids during prolonged elevated temperature exposures. Changes in corrosivity were measured in terms of weight loss, polarization resistance, and pit depth on metal coupons suspended in the solutions during exposure.

Beavers, J A; Salmons, L A; Diegle, R B

1980-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

418

Emerging materials for solar cell applications: electrodeposited CdTe. Final report, February 14, 1979-February 14, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin film gold/polycrystalline cadmium telluride Schottky solar cells made by electrodepositing the semiconductor on an ITO-coated glass substrate serving also as an ohmic contact demonstrated an internal efficiency of 4% over 2 mm/sup 2/ areas. During the year being reported upon, Monosolar devoted mator attention to refining the electroplating process and determining the parameters governing CdTe film stoichiometry, grain size, substrate adhesion, and quality. UCLA acting as a Monosolar sub-contractor characterized both the CdTe films themselves and solar cells made from them. Techniques were developed for making measurements on films often less than 1 micron in thickness. The highest values achieved for efficiency parameters, not necessarily all in the same cell, were V/sub oc/ = 0.5 V, J/sub sc/ = 11 mA/cm/sup 2/, and fill factor = 0.55 before corrections in the absence of anti-reflection coatings. Typical resistivities for n-CdTe films were 10/sup 5/ ..cap omega..-cm. Lifetimes of about 10/sup -10/ sec were measured. Absorption coefficient of these films is in the order of 10/sup 4/ for lambda < 0.7 ..mu..m. Measured energy gap for these CdTe films is 1.55 eV, sightly higher than the 1.45 eV value for single crystal CdTe. The activation energy of the dominating trap level is 0.55 eV. Trap density is in the order of 10/sup 16//cm/sup 3/. Schottky diodes were of excellent quality and pinhole-free. The measured barrier height varied between 0.75 and 0.85 eV. Rectification ratios of 10/sup 4/ were obtained reproducibly. Films measure about 1 inch square. Indications are that larger and more efficient low cost solar devices can readily be obtained soon using the techniques developed in this program.

Rod, R.L.; Bunshah, R.; Stafsudd, O.; Basol, B.M.; Nath, P.

1980-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Interferometric study of the natural convection characteristics of flat plate, slat and vee-corrugated solar collectors. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The natural convection heat transfer relations for the heat transfer between absorber and cover plates of solar collectors have been studied. Interferometric techniques were employed to evaluate the local coefficients. Average values were obtained by integration of the local values. The results are presented in terms of correlations between Nusselt number and Grashof number. The investigations were carried out over tilt angles of 45 to 90 degrees. The Grashof number range tested was representative of that existing in flat plate collectors. The various geometrics included large flat enclosures, small aspect ratio enclosures representative of honeycomb or slat collectors, vee-corrugated (vee-grooved) collectors, and compound parabolic concentrators.

El Wakil, M.M.; Mitchell, J.W.

1979-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Solar Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water Using a Dual Bed Photosystem - Phase I Final Report and Phase II Proposal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work we are attempting to perform the highly efficient storage of solar energy in the form of H{sub 2} via photocatalytic decomposition of water. While it has been demonstrated that H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} can be evolved from a single vessel containing a single suspended photocatalyst (Sayama 1994; 1997), we are attempting to perform net water-splitting by using two photocatalysts immobilized in separate containers, or beds. A schematic showing how the device would work is shown.

Clovis A. Linkous; Darlene K. Slattery

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final solar peis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume II, energy requirements. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project analyzed the application of solar total energy systems to appropriate segments of the residential sector and determined their market penetration potential. This volume covers the work done on energy requirements definition and includes the following: (1) identification of the single-family and multi-family market segments; (2) regionalization of the United States; (3) electrical and thermal load requirements, including time-dependent profiles; (4) effect of conservation measures on energy requirements; and (5) verification of simulated load data with real data.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

An investigation of wind loads on solar collectors. Appendix I - data listing for top and bottom of collector. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A wind-tunnel study of a series of model solar-collector installations (flat-plate collectors) immersed in a thick turbulent shear layout was undertaken in order to determine design wind loads on such installations. Wind tunnel measurements were made of the mean and fluctuating pressures on a model of a single flat-plate collector which was a component of different multi-panel installations. The pressures were spatially integrated over the top and bottom surface of the single collector separately.

Tieleman, H.W.; Akins, R.E.; Sparks, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

150 kWe solar-powered deep-well irrigation facility. Phase I. Preliminary design study. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a preliminary design study for a solar-powered irrigation facility to be located on a farm between Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona, are presented. The ERDA-specified generic design criteria are detailed. A detailed systems analysis is presented, and preliminary designs of the thermal storage system, organic Rankine cycle power system, cooling water system, power distribution system, and collector foundation are given. Site layout and improvements are described, and a cost analysis of prototype and production units is included. Engineering drawings are included. (WHK)

Not Available

1977-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

Theory of intense radio waves in an underdense ionosphere: application to solar power satellite transmissions. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The instabilities in the F-region plasma are investigated that can be created by the passage of a solar power satellite beam (2.45 Ghz frequency, at a power flux of 23 mW/cm/sup 2/) at frequencies much higher than the cut-off plasma frequency of the ionosphere. The threshold geometry and frequency and intensity scaling laws are calculated for the thermal self-focusing instability, and its saturation level is estimated. The possibility is considered of scaled experiments at HF power to detect the thermal self-focusing instability for an underdense ionosphere. Other experimental possibilities are discussed in terms of the scaling laws. (LEW)

Goldman, M.V.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Deposition, fabrication and analysis of polycrystalline silicon MIS solar cells. Final Report, January 1-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion of MIS cell fabrication techniques, protovoltaic response data, I-V-T analysis to reveal conduction mechanisms, a detailed computer model, optimum MIS solar cell design, surface state effects, Auger studies, reliability studies and e-beam deposition of thin silicon films are included. The most important features of the work during 1979 include the one pump-down fabrication process, establishing a consistent fabrication sequence, achieving 13% efficiency of 2 cm/sup 2/ area, an evaluation of conduction mechanisms, establishing a detailed computer model and setting up an improved e-beam system to deposit thin silicon films. Details are reported. (WHK)

Anderson, W.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

High temperature process steam application at the Southern Union Refining Company, Hobbs, New Mexico. Solar energy in the oil patch. Final report, Phase III: operation, maintenance, and performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the technical reports for Phase III of this project. The third phase included the operation, maintenance, upgrade and performance reporting of a 10,080 square foot Solar Industrial Process Heat System installed at the Famariss Energy Refinery of Southern Union Refining Company near Hobbs, New Mexico. This report contains a description of the upgraded system, and a summary of the overall operation, maintenance and performance of the installed system. The results of the upgrade activities can be seen in the last two months of operational data. Steam production was significantly greater in peak flow and monthly total than at any previous time. Also monthly total cost savings was greatly improved even though natural gas costs remain much lower than originally anticipated.

Wilson, L.E.; McGuire, D.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Study of corrosion in multimetallic systems. Task 2 of solar collector studies for solar heating and cooling applications. Final technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion measurements were made on candidate alloys of construction for non-concentrating solar collectors under simulated conditions of collector operation. Materials evaluated were aluminum alloys 1100, 3003, and 6061, copper alloy 122, Type 444 stainless steel, and 1018 plain carbon steel. The solutions used were equivolume mixtures of ethylene glycol and water, and propylene glycol and water. They were used without corrosion inhibitors but with addition of chloride, sulfate, and bicarbonate ions. The influences of dissolved oxygen, solution flow velocity, and heat transfer were evaluated. Corrosion morphologies investigated were general attack, pitting, crevice corrosion, and galvanic corrosion. Experimental results indicated that aluminum alloys can experience severe pitting and crevice corrosion at chloride concentrations approaching 50 ppM. The corrosion rate of copper exceeded about 100 ..mu..m/yr in ethylene glycol solutions and about 80 ..mu..m/yr in propylene glycol solutions. Crevice corrosion was not observed for copper, but severe galvanic corrosion occurred when it was coupled to T444 stainless steel. T444 steel corroded at rates of less than 1 ..mu..m/yr under all exposure conditions. During circulation at 100 C in the presence of air, ethylene glycol solutions acidified because of degradation of the glycol. The initial pH of propylene glycol solutions was already low, about 4.5. The inherent corrosivity of propylene glycol was somewhat less than that of ethylene glycol, although this difference was usually less than a factor of two in measured corrosion rates. It was concluded that he corrosion rates of aluminum alloys and copper were prohibitively high in uninhibited glycol solutions, and that corrosion inhibitors are definitely necessary in operating systems.

Diegle, R B

1980-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

428

Fixed tilt solar collector employing reversible vee-trough reflectors and evacuated tube receivers for solar heating and cooling systems. Final report, Phase II data acquisition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Vee-Trough/Evacuated Tube Collector (VTETC) Project, undertaken for the DOE Solar Heating and Cooling Branch, was to show how vee-trough concentrators could improve the heat collection capability and reduce the cost of collectors consisting of evacuated tube receivers. The work was carried out in two phases. During the first phase, the VTETC was analyzed rigorously and various mathematical models were developed to calculate the optical performance of the vee-trough concentrators and the thermal performance of the evacuated tube receivers. A test bed was constructed to verify the mathematical analyses and compare reflectors made of back-silvered glass mirror, Alzak, Aluminized Teflon, and Kinglux (an electro polished aluminum reflector). Testing was conducted and data was obtained for the months of April to August 1977. The results of the mathematical analyses, as well as the results from 1977, were reported in DOE/JPL/1024-1, published in January 1978. In the second phase, additional tests were run at temperatures ranging from 80 to 190/sup 0/C (176 to 374/sup 0/F) during the months of April, May, June, and July 1978. The results obtained compared well with theoretical predictions. For the glass mirror reflectors, peak efficiencies, based on aperture area and operating temperatures of 125/sup 0/C (257/sup 0/F), were over 40%. Efficiencies of about 40% were observed at temperatures of 150/sup 0/C (302/sup 0/F) and 30% at 175/sup 0/C (347/sup 0/F). Test data covering a complete day are presented for selected dates throughout the test season. Predicted daily useful heats collected and efficiency values are presented for a full year. These theoretical values are then compared with actual data points for the same temperature range.

Selcuk, M.K.

1978-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Silicon sheet with molecular beam epitaxy for high efficiency solar cells. Final technical report, March 22, 1982-April 30, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-year program has been carried out for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in which the UCLA silicon MBE facility has been used to attempt to grow silicon solar cells of high efficiency. MBE ofers the potential of growing complex and arbitrary doping profiles with 10 A depth resolution. It is the only technique taht can readily grow built-in front and back surface fields of any desired depth and value in silicon solar cells, or the more complicated profiles needed for a double junction cascade cell, all in silicon, connected in series by a tunnel junction. Although the dopant control required for such structures has been demonstrated in silicon by UCLA, crystal quality at the p-n junctions is still too poor to allow the other advantages to be exploited. Results from other laboratories indicate that this problem will soon be overcome. A computer analysis of the double cascade all in silicon shows that efficiencies can be raised over that of any single silicon cell by 1 or 2%, and that open circuit voltage of almost twice that of a single cell should be possible.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Solar thermal enhanced oil recovery. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report, October 1, 1979-June 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal enhanced oil recovery is widely used in California to aid in the production of heavy oils. Steam injection either to stimulate individual wells or to drive oil to the producing wells, is by far the major thermal process today and has been in use for over 20 years. Since steam generation at the necessary pressures (generally below 4000 kPa (580 psia)) is within the capabilities of present day solar technology, it is logical to consider the possibilities of solar thermal enhanced oil recovery (STEOR). The present project consisted of an evaluation of STEOR by a team from various Exxon affiliates, Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and Honeywell Inc. The results of the study are presented in three volumes. This volume contains the executive summary. Volume II contains Sections 2 through 8 together with Appendices A through K and in essence is the response to the original contract statement of work. Volume III summarizes the additional work performed to evaluate STEOR as a privately financed commercial venture at Exxon's Edison Field near Bakersfield, California. (WHK)

Elzinga, E.; Arnold, C.; Allen, D.; Garman, R.; Joy, P.; Mitchell, P.; Shaw, H.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Saguaro Power Plant Solar Repowering Project. Volume I. Conceptual design. Final technical report, September 1979-July 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a solar thermal central receiver repowered gas/oil fired steam-Rankine electrical power generation plant based on a central receiver using a molten salt (60% NaNO/sub 3/, 40% KNO/sub 3/, by wt) for repowering the No. One Unit of APS's Saguaro power plant is described in detail. The plant is located 66 km (41 mi) north of Tucson, Arizona. The selection of both the site and the molten salt central receiver promotes a near-term feasibility demonstration and cost-effective power production from an advanced solar thermal technology. The recommended system concept is to repower the existing electric power generating system at the maximum possible level (120 MW/sub e/ gross) using a field of 10,500 second-generation (49 m/sup 2/) heliostats and a storage capacity of 3.8 hours to be used for optimum dispatch of power to the utility system. The total project construction cost is estimated to be 167 million in 1980 dollars. The plant will be capable of displacing fossil energy equivalent to 4.9 million barrels of No. 6 oil in its first 10 years of operation. Detailed subsystem characteristics, an economic analysis, and a development plan are presented in detail. (WHK)

Weber, E.R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 1. System criteria and design description. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume documents the preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas. Current system, subsystem, and component designs are described and additional studies which support selection among significant design alternatives are presented. Overall system requirements which form the system design basis are presented. These include program objectives; performance and output load requirements; industrial, statutory, and regulatory standards; and site interface requirements. Material in this section will continue to be issued separately in the Systems Requirements Document and maintained current through revision throughout future phases of the project. Overall system design and detailed subsystem design descriptions are provided. Consideration of operation and maintenance is reflected in discussion of each subsystem design as well as in an integrated overall discussion. Included are the solar collector subsystem; the thermal storage subsystem, the power conversion sybsystem (including electrical generation and distribution); the heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystems; overall instrumentation and control; and the STES building and physical plant. The design of several subsystems has progressed beyond the preliminary stage; descriptions for such subsystems are therefore provided in more detail than others to provide complete documentation of the work performed. In some cases, preliminary design parameters require specific verificaton in the definitive design phase and are identified in the text. Subsystem descriptions will continue to be issued and revised separately to maintain accuracy during future phases of the project. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Timonium Elementary School solar energy heating and cooling augmentation experiment. Final engineering report: executive summary (ER-8877)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers a two-year and seven-month solar space heating and cooling experiment conducted at the Timonium Elementary School, Timonium, Maryland. The system was designed to provide a minimum of 50% of the energy required during the heating season and to determine the feasibility of using solar energy to power absorption-type chillers for cooling. The area to be heated or cooled totaled approximately 8500 square feet of the center wing of the school. To accomplish this a system containing 5000 square feet of collectors, 5300 square feet of reflectors, a 15,000 gallon insulated hot water storage tank, 40,000 gallons of chilled water storage, an absorption chiller, miscellaneous plumbing, and instrumentation and controls, were installed. The system utilized untreated water (except for one time deionization of initial water supply) as a working fluid. The collection system efficiency (without reflectors) reached a maximum of 56% on a clear day in April 1975. This was with an average water temperature of 161/sup 0/F. The collection system efficiency (with collector and reflector area totaling 9550 square feet) on a clear day in August amounted to 40.5%. This was with an average water temperature of 170/sup 0/F. Data on the work accomplished and on the system performance are presented.

Not Available

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Chicago Bridge and Iron Company. System design final report. Volume 1. Design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chicago Bridge and Iron Company (CBI), based on a demonstrated breakthrough in freeze desalination is proposing an indirect bulk freeze desalination process for seawater that is uniquely integrated with a stand alone solar cogeneration power plant. Working under SOLERAS auspices, CBI and Foster Miller Associates (FMA) have designed an integrated power system consisting of modular parabolic dish point focus solar energy collection, molten salt thermal energy storage, and a conventional steam turbine. The shaft power provides electrical energy needs via a generator and vapor compression energy needs via compressors. The vapor compression and turbine exhaust heat provide the refrigeration required for the unique freeze desalination process. Efficient energy utilization is achieved by using high grade heat to produce compression refrigeration. The flexibility of this system in making use of available energy and certain inherent advantages of the freeze desalination process make it very attractive. The desalination process includes seawater precooling and freezing, ice separation, washing, and melting to produce fresh water. Brine concentrate is rejected back to the sea after heat exchange with feed seawater.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finalized 535 Million Loan Guarantee for Solyndra Recovery Act funding will accelerate job creation and help expand marketplace for innovative solar electric panels July 15, 2009...

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