Sample records for final solar peis

  1. Obama Administration Releases Roadmap for Solar Energy Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy, will publish the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for solar energy development in six southwestern states-Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada,...

  2. Solar PEIS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, NewSingapore Jump to: navigation,

  3. Hawaii Solar Integration Study Final Technical Report for Oahu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawaii Solar Integration Study Final Technical Report for Oahu Prepared for: The National Renewable ..................................................................................................................19 4.5. Statistical analysis of wind, solar and load data ................................................................................................................................... 21 5.1. Solar Site Selection Process

  4. Eighth national passive solar conference. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, A.; Zee, R.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eighth National Passive Solar Conference was held near Santa Fe, New Mexico at the Glorieta Conference Center on September 5 to 11, 1983. Nearly 900 people from all across the nation and the world attended the conference. Close to 200 technical papers were presented, 50 solar product exhibits were available; 34 poster sessions were presented; 16 solar workshops were conducted; 10 renowned solar individuals participated in rendezvous sessions; 7 major addresses were delivered; 5 solar home tours were conducted; 2 emerging architecture sessions were held which included 21 separate presentations; and commercial product presentations were given for the first time ever at a national passive solar conference. Peter van Dresser of Santa Fe received the prestigious Passive Solar Pioneer Award, posthumously, from the American Solar Energy Society and Benjamin T. Buck Rogers of Embudo received the prestigious Peter van Dresser Award from the New Mexico Solar Energy Association. This report reviews conference organization, attendance, finances, conference evaluation form results, and includes press coverage samples, selected conference photos courtesy of Marshall Tyler, and a summary with recommendations for future conferences. The Appendices included conference press releases and a report by the New Mexico Solar Industry Development Corporation on exhibits management.

  5. Nanoparticle Solar Cell Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breeze, Alison, J; Sahoo, Yudhisthira; Reddy, Damoder; Sholin, Veronica; Carter, Sue

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells with photovoltaic performance extending into the near-IR region of the solar spectrum as a pathway towards improving power conversion efficiencies. The field of all-inorganic nanoparticle-based solar cells is very new, with only one literature publication in the prior to our project. Very little is understood regarding how these devices function. Inorganic solar cells with IR performance have previously been fabricated using traditional methods such as physical vapor deposition and sputtering, and solution-processed devices utilizing IR-absorbing organic polymers have been investigated. The solution-based deposition of nanoparticles offers the potential of a low-cost manufacturing process combined with the ability to tune the chemical synthesis and material properties to control the device properties. This work, in collaboration with the Sue Carter research group at the University of California, Santa Cruz, has greatly expanded the knowledge base in this field, exploring multiple material systems and several key areas of device physics including temperature, bandgap and electrode device behavior dependence, material morphological behavior, and the role of buffer layers. One publication has been accepted to Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells pending minor revision and another two papers are being written now. While device performance in the near-IR did not reach the level anticipated at the beginning of this grant, we did observe one of the highest near-IR efficiencies for a nanoparticle-based solar cell device to date. We also identified several key parameters of importance for improving both near-IR performance and nanoparticle solar cells in general, and demonstrated multiple pathways which showed promise for future commercialization with further research.

  6. Solar Cell Nanotechnology Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Biswajit [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a low cost nonlithographic nanofabrication technology for the fabrication of thin film porous templates as well as uniform arrays of semiconductor nanostructures for the implementation of high efficiency solar cells. Solar cells based on semiconductor nanostructures are expected to have very high energy conversion efficiencies due to the increased absorption coefficients of semiconductor nanostructures. In addition, the thin film porous template can be used for optimum surface texturing of solar cells leading to additional enhancement in energy conversion efficiency. An important requirement for these applications is the ability to synthesize nanostructure arrays of different dimensions with good size control. This project employed nanoporous alumina templates created by the anodization of aluminum thin films deposited on glass substrates for the fabrication of the nanostructures and optimized the process parameters to obtain uniform pore diameters. An additional requirement is uniformity or regularity of the nanostructure arrays. While constant current anodization was observed to provide controlled pore diameters, constant voltage anodization was needed for regularity of the nanostructure arrays. Thus a two-step anodization process was investigated and developed in this project for improving the pore size distribution and pore periodicity of the nanoporous alumina templates. CdTe was selected to be the active material for the nanowires, and the process for the successful synthesis of CdTe nanowires was developed in this project. Two different synthesis approaches were investigated in this project, electrochemical and electrophoretic deposition. While electrochemical synthesis was successfully employed for the synthesis of nanowires inside the pores of the alumina templates, the technique was determined to be non-optimum due to the need of elevated temperature that is detrimental to the structural integrity of the nanoporous alumina templates. In order to eliminate this problem, electrophoretic deposition was selected as the more appropriate technique, which involves the guided deposition of semiconductor nanoparticles in the presence of ultrasonic energy to form the crystalline nanowires. Extensive experimental research was carried out to optimize the process parameters for formation of crystalline nanowires. It was observed that the environmental bath temperature plays a critical role in determining the structural integrity of the nanowires and hence their lengths. Investigation was carried out for the formation of semitransparent ohmic contacts on the nanowires to facilitate photocurrent spectroscopy measurements as well as for solar cell implementation. Formation of such ohmic contacts was found to be challenging and a process involving mechanical and electrochemical polishing was developed to facilitate such contacts. The use of nanoporous alumina templates for the surface texturing of mono- and multi-crystalline solar cells was extensively investigated by electrochemical etching of the silicon through the pores of the nanoporous templates. The processes for template formation as well as etching were optimized and the alumina/silicon interface was investigated using capacitance-voltage characterization. The process developed was found to be viable for improving solar cell performance.

  7. Solar Total Energy Project final test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O.; Towner, M.L. (Georgia Power Co., Shenandoah, GA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. New approaches for high-efficiency solar cells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedair, S.M.; El-Masry, N.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities carried out in this subcontract. These activities cover, first the atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) growth of GaAs, AlGaAs and InGaP at fairly low growth temperatures. This was followed by using ALE to achieve high levels of doping both n-type and p-type required for tunnel junctions (Tj) in the cascade solar cell structures. Then the authors studied the properties of AlGaAs/InGaP and AlGaAs/GaAs tunnel junctions and their performances at different growth conditions. This is followed by the use of these tunnel junctions in stacked solar cell structures. The effect of these tunnel junctions on the performance of stacked solar cells was studied at different temperatures and different solar fluences. Finally, the authors studied the effect of different types of black surface fields (BSF), both p/n and n/p GaInP solar cell structures, and their potential for window layer applications. Parts of these activities were carried in close cooperation with Dr. Mike Timmons of the Research Triangle Institute.

  9. CRADA Final Report: Process development for hybrid solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ager, Joel W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    development for hybrid solar cells Summary of the specific20 wafers with full tandem solar cell test structure perNitride/Silicon Tandem Solar Cell,” Appl. Phys. Express 2

  10. Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended to May 31, 2013 Draft ULPEIS comment extension community notification041813 (3).pdf More Documents & Publications...

  11. Solar water heating technical support. Technical report for November 1997--April 1998 and final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huggins, J.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report covers the time period November 1, 1997 through April 30, 1998, and also summarizes the project as the final report. The topics of the report include certification of solar collectors for water heating systems, modeling and testing of solar collectors and gas water heater backup systems, ratings of collectors for specific climates, and solar pool heating systems.

  12. Solar energy grid integration systems : final report of the Florida Solar Energy Center Team.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ropp, Michael (Northern Plains Power Technologies, Brookings, SD); Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Schaffer, Alan (Lakeland Electric Utilities, Lakeland, FL); Katz, Stanley (Satcon Technology Corporation, Boston, MA); Perkinson, Jim (Satcon Technology Corporation, Boston, MA); Bower, Ward Isaac; Prestero, Mark (Satcon Technology Corporation, Boston, MA); Casey, Leo (Satcon Technology Corporation, Boston, MA); Moaveni, Houtan (Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL); Click, David (Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL); Davis, Kristopher (Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL); Reedy, Robert (Florida Solar Energy Center of the University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL); Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Sena-Henderson, Lisa; David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiated in 2008, the Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems (SEGIS) program is a partnership involving the U.S. DOE, Sandia National Laboratories, private sector companies, electric utilities, and universities. Projects supported under the program have focused on the complete-system development of solar technologies, with the dual goal of expanding utility-scale penetration and addressing new challenges of connecting large-scale solar installations in higher penetrations to the electric grid. The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), its partners, and Sandia National Laboratories have successfully collaborated to complete the work under the third and final stage of the SEGIS initiative. The SEGIS program was a three-year, three-stage project that include conceptual design and market analysis in Stage 1, prototype development and testing in Stage 2, and moving toward commercialization in Stage 3. Under this program, the FSEC SEGIS team developed a comprehensive vision that has guided technology development that sets one methodology for merging photovoltaic (PV) and smart-grid technologies. The FSEC team's objective in the SEGIS project is to remove barriers to large-scale general integration of PV and to enhance the value proposition of photovoltaic energy by enabling PV to act as much as possible as if it were at the very least equivalent to a conventional utility power plant. It was immediately apparent that the advanced power electronics of these advanced inverters will go far beyond conventional power plants, making high penetrations of PV not just acceptable, but desirable. This report summarizes a three-year effort to develop, validate and commercialize Grid-Smart Inverters for wider photovoltaic utilization, particularly in the utility sector.

  13. Passive Solar Commercial Demonstration Program: Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The passive solar retrofit of a small existing commercial/residential building is described. An add on gallery/sunspace is integrated into the existing structure both in terms of energy and architectural functioning. The sunspace solution maximizes the amount of south facing glass for solar heat gain, while still allowing a deep penetration of daylight into the existing buildings. (MHR)

  14. Urban Options Solar Greenhouse Demonstration Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cipparone, L.

    1980-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The following are included: the design process, construction, thermal performance, horticulture, educational activities, and future plans. Included in appendices are: greenhouse blueprints, insulating curtain details, workshop schedules, sample data forms, summary of performance calculations on the Urban Options Solar Greenhouse, data on vegetable production, publications, news articles on th Solar Greenhouse Project, and the financial statement. (MHR)

  15. CRADA Final Report: Process development for hybrid solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ager, Joel W

    2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    TCF funding of a CRADA between LBNL and RSLE leveraged RSLE's original $1M investment in LBNL research and led to development of a solar cell fabrication process that will bring the high efficiency, high voltage hybrid tandem solar cell closer to commercialization. RSLE has already built a pilot line at its Phoenix, Arizona site.

  16. Online National Solar Energy Directory and 2005 Solar Decathlon Product Directory. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamm, Julia; Taylor, Mike

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA), in partnership with the American Solar Energy Society, developed an online National Solar Energy Directory with clear, comprehensive information on suppliers and purchasing options. The site was originally located at FindSolar.com, but has recently been moved to Find-Solar.org. The original FindSolar.com domain name has been taken by the American Solar Energy Society (a partner in this project) and utilized for a similar but different project. This Find-Solar.org directory offers the rapidly growing base of potential solar customers a simple, straightforward destination to learn about their solar options. Members of the public are able to easily locate contractors in their geographic area and verify companiesâ?? qualifications with accurate third-party information. It allows consumers to obtain key information on the economics, incentives, desirability, and workings of a solar energy system, as well as competing quotes from different contractors and reviews from customers they have worked with previously. Find-Solar.org is a means of facilitating the growing public interest in solar power and overcoming a major barrier to widespread development of U.S. solar markets. In addition to the development of Find-Solar.org, SEPA developed a separate online product directory for the 2005 DOE Solar Decathlon to facilitate the communication of information about the energy efficiency and renewable energy products used in each university teamâ??s home.

  17. The UMTRA PEIS: A strategy for groundwater remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, C.; Ulland, L.; Weston, R.F.; Metzler, D. (DOE, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) was initiated in 1992 for the uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) program. The PEIS kicked off the groundwater restoration phase of UMTRA, a project involving remediation of 24 sites in ten states and tribal lands contaminated with tailings from uranium mining and milling operations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed, in early 1992, that a PEIS was an appropriate strategy to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for this second, groundwater phase of the project. This decision recognized that although a parallel effort was being undertaken in preparing a PEIS for DOE's Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) program, characteristics and the maturity of the UMTRA project made it more appropriate to prepare a separate PEIS. The ER/WM PEIS is intended to examine environmental restoration and waste management issues from a very broad perspective. For UMTRA, with surface remediation completed or well under way at 18 of the 24 sites, a more focused programmatic approach for groundwater restoration is more effective than including the UMTRA project within the ER/WM environmental impact statements. A separate document allows a more focused and detailed analysis necessary to efficiently tier site-specific environmental assessments for groundwater restoration at each of the 24 UMTRA former processing sites.

  18. Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

  19. High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells Final Technical Report for the Period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    High Efficiency Thin Film CdTe and a-Si Based Solar Cells Final Technical Report for the Period This is the final report covering approximately 42 months of this subcontract for research on high efficiency CdTe-based thin-film solar cells and on high efficiency a-Si-based thin-film solar cells. Phases I and II have

  20. Abrams Primary School passive solar design. Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general project documentation and the design process documentation for the project are presented. The following are appended: analysis of thermal transfer and internal heat contributions to the heating and cooling loads for a typical four-classroom teaching module using bin-chart temperature data, trace simulation for the original building design, Teanet simulation of original building design for the month of January 1959, Teanet simulation of Solar 2 for the month of January 1959, incremental solar cost assessment, and diffuse radiation incident on the monitor glass. (MHR)

  1. File:Geothermal PEIS final.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BVEnergy3(2009).pdfForm 2800-16.pdf

  2. Final Report: Sintered CZTS Nanoparticle Solar Cells on Metal Foil; July 26, 2011 - July 25, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leidholm, C.; Hotz, C.; Breeze, A.; Sunderland, C.; Ki, W.; Zehnder, D.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report covering 12 months of this subcontract for research on high-efficiency copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS)-based thin-film solar cells on flexible metal foil. Each of the first three quarters of the subcontract has been detailed in quarterly reports. In this final report highlights of the first three quarters will be provided and details will be given of the final quarter of the subcontract.

  3. Newman Unit 1 advanced solar repowering. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The five appendices give the selection process and system specification of the Newman Unit 1 solar repowering system, including the conceptual design drawings and diagrams; input data for the simulation program; and a review of the most important characteristics of the existing plant. (LEW)

  4. Marin Solar Village: feasibility study and technical analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy needs of Hamilton Air Force Base's Solar Village for electricity and heating and cooling of buildings are considered and alternative ways of meeting the Village's requirements for these forms of energy are evaluated. First, Solar Village's energy demand is calculated and compared to a base case representing calculations for typical energy usage for a development of similar size and density that is in conformance with current state and local ordinances. The potential of selected alternative technologies to meet the Solar Village projected demand for electrical power and natural gas is evaluated. Scenarios were developed to reduce demand, particularly in the building sector. Four alternative on-site energy technologies have been evaluated: wind, solar thermal electric, biomass conversion, photovoltaics. Each alternative is analyzed in detail. Of the four alternatives considered, the one with the greatest present potential is biomass conversion. Two technologies have been incorporated into the design. A 3-acre land fill is covered with a mantle of soil. A network of pipes carries off the methane gas which is a natural product of anaerobic decomposition of the materials in the land fill. The second technology involves the planting of rapidly-growing trees on denuded and unused portions of the site; 50 acres devoted to tree production could yield 12% of the back-up energy required for home heating on a sustainable basis.

  5. Evaluation of solar collectors for heat pump applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skartvedt, Gary; Pedreyra, Donald; McMordle, Dr., Robert; Kidd, James; Anderson, Jerome; Jones, Richard

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study was initiated to evaluate the potential utility of very low cost (possibly unglazed and uninsulated) solar collectors to serve as both heat collection and rejection devices for a liquid source heat pump. The approach consisted of exercising a detailed analytical simulation of the complete heat pump/solar collector/storage system against heating and cooling loads derived for typical single-family residences in eight US cities. The performance of each system was measured against that of a conventional air-to-air heat pump operating against the same loads. In addition to evaluation of solar collector options, the study included consideration of water tanks and buried pipe grids to provide thermal storage. As a supplement to the analytical tasks, the study included an experimental determination of night sky temperature and convective heat transfer coefficients for surfaces with dimensions typical of solar collectors. The experiments were conducted in situ by placing the test apparatus on the roofs of houses in the Denver, Colorado, area. (MHR)

  6. Investigation of aerowindows for solar receivers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of aerowindows to improve the efficiency and operation of central solar receivers has been analyzed to determine the conditions under which such improvements are possible. The results have shown that the aerowindow solar receiver concept is both technically and economically viable. The energy balance in the solar receiver, with and without the aerowindow, has been estimated with conservative models of the flow and heat transfer. For receiver cavity wall temperatures in the range of 1000 to 1600 K, there is a large positive energy benefit to using the aerowindow. Effective use of the aerowindow probably will require the use of recirculated gases from the cavity to reduce mixing and heat transfer at the cavity gas/aerowindow interface. Aerowindow technology is available now from industrial air curtain technology used on open warehouse entrances with dimensions similar to the apertures of large solar receivers. The cost of these devices is modest in terms of the cost of the energy saved, with the result that the payback period under broad ranges of receiver sizes and operating conditions is 1 to 5 years, even for relatively low equivalent costs for the thermal power being saved.

  7. Solar heating and hot water system installed at office building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System Installed at the First Solar Heated Office Building, One Solar Place, Dallas, Texas. The Solar System was designed to provide 87 percent of the space heating needs, 100 percent of the potable hot water needs and is sized for future absorption cooling. The collection subsystem consists of 28 Solargenics, series 76, flat plate collectors with a total area of 1596 square feet. The solar loop circulates an ethylene glycol-water solution through the collectors into a hot water system heat exchanger. The hot water storage subsystem consists of a heat exchanger, two 2300 gallon concrete hot water storage tanks with built in heat exchangers and a back-up electric boiler. The domestic hot water subsystem sends hot water to the 10,200 square feet floor area office building hot water fixtures. The building cold water system provides make-up to the solar loop, the heating loop, and the hot water concrete storage tanks. The design, construction, cost analysis, operation and maintenance of the solar system are described. The system became operational July 11, 1979.

  8. CRADA Final Report: Process development for hybrid solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ager, Joel W

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contributions to the CRADA: DOE Funding to LBNL ParticipantCRADA Final Report v2010 Aug 24 Date ____February 14, 2011completing this form. CRADA No. __UFCRA006216____ LBNL

  9. Solar space heating installed at Kansas City, Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar energy system was constructed with the new 48,800 square feet warehouse to heat the warehouse area of about 39,000 square feet while the auxiliary energy system heats the office area of about 9800 square feet. The building is divided into 20 equal units, and each has its own solar system. The modular design permits the flexibility of combining multiple units to form offices or warehouses of various size floor areas as required by a tenant. Each unit has 20 collectors which are mounted in a single row. The collectors, manufactured by Solaron Corporation, are double glazed flat plate collectors with a gross area of 7800 ft/sup 2/. Air is heated either through the collectors or by the electric resistance duct coils. No freeze protection or storage is required for this system. Extracts from the site files, specifications, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  10. Final report : testing and evaluation for solar hot water reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM) [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM) [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM) [Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM) [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Burch, Jay (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO) [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar hot water (SHW) systems are being installed by the thousands. Tax credits and utility rebate programs are spurring this burgeoning market. However, the reliability of these systems is virtually unknown. Recent work by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has shown that few data exist to quantify the mean time to failure of these systems. However, there is keen interest in developing new techniques to measure SHW reliability, particularly among utilities that use ratepayer money to pay the rebates. This document reports on an effort to develop and test new, simplified techniques to directly measure the state of health of fielded SHW systems. One approach was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and is based on the idea that the performance of the solar storage tank can reliably indicate the operational status of the SHW systems. Another approach, developed by the University of New Mexico (UNM), uses adaptive resonance theory, a type of neural network, to detect and predict failures. This method uses the same sensors that are normally used to control the SHW system. The NREL method uses two additional temperature sensors on the solar tank. The theories, development, application, and testing of both methods are described in the report. Testing was performed on the SHW Reliability Testbed at UNM, a highly instrumented SHW system developed jointly by SNL and UNM. The two methods were tested against a number of simulated failures. The results show that both methods show promise for inclusion in conventional SHW controllers, giving them advanced capability in detecting and predicting component failures.

  11. Energy Department Finalizes $737 Million Loan Guarantee to Tonopah Solar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register /ofConcentratingDepartment offor Innovative SolarEnergy

  12. Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register /ofConcentratingDepartment offor InnovativeSolar Project

  13. Optimization of storage in passive solar heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahm, R.J.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for a simple method of estimating the optimum amount of storage for passive solar space heating system designs and the results of that search are described. The project goals, and why the project is important are described. The major project results are presented in the order of their importance with respect to meeting the project goal. A narrative description of the project is given. Here the various approaches attempted are described, giving the reasons for failure in those areas that were not successful. The Appendices contain the bulk of data generated by this project. Most of the data is presented in graphical form. (MHR)

  14. Solar heating and hot water system installed at St. Louis, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is provided on the solar heating and hot water system installed at the William Tao and Associates, Inc., office building in St. Louis, Missouri. The information consists of description, photos, maintenance and construction problems, final drawing, system requirements and manufacturer's component data. The solar system was designed to provide 50% of the hot water requirements and 45% of the space heating needs for a 900 square foot office space and drafting room. The solar facility has 252 square foot of glass tube concentrator collectors and a 1000 gallon steel storage tank buried below a concrete slab floor. Freeze protection is provided by a propylene glycol/water mixture in the collector loop. The collectors are roof mounted on a variable tilt array which is adjusted seasonally and is connected to the solar thermal storage tank by a tube-in-shell heat exchanger. Incoming city water is preheated through the solar energy thermal storage tank.

  15. (Solar clothes dryer and wastewater heat exchanger). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, B.F.

    1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The first project investigated the technical possibilities of adapting a domestic electric clothes dryer to utilize solar-heated water as the heat source, replacing electric resistance heat. The second project attempted to extract wastewater heat from a commercial dishwasher to preheat fresh water to be used in the next dish washing cycle. It is felt that the clothes dryer project has met all of intended goals. Although a solar application has some real-world practical problems, the application of a dryer connected directly to the home heating system will prove to be cost-beneficial over the life of a dryer. The additional cost of a heat exchanger is not excessive, and the installation cost, if installed with the initial house plumbing is less than $100. From a practical point of view, the complexity of installing a wastewater heat extracter is considered impractical. The environment in which such equipment must operate is difficult at best, and most restaurants prefer to maintain as simple an operation as possible. If problems were to occur in this type of equipment, the kitchen would effectively be crippled. In conclusion, further research in the concept is not recommended. Recent advances in commercial dishwashers have also considerably reduced the heat losses which accompanied equipment only a few years old.

  16. Structural concepts for large solar concentrators. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedgepeth, J.M.; Miller, R.K.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sunflower large solar concentrator, developed in the early 1970's, is a salient example of a high-efficiency concentrator. The newly emphasized needs for solar dynamic power on the Space Station and for large, lightweight thermal sources are outlined. Existing concepts for high efficiency reflector surfaces are examined with attention to accuracy needs for concentration rates of 1000 to 3000. Concepts using stiff reflector panels are deemed most likely to exhibit the long-term consistent accuracy necessary for low-orbit operation, particularly for the higher concentration ratios. Quantitative results are shown of the effects of surface errors for various concentration and focal-length diameter ratios. Cost effectiveness is discussed. Principal sources of high cost include the need for various dished panels for paraboloidal reflectors and the expense of ground testing and adjustment. A new configuration is presented addressing both problems, i.e., a deployable Pactruss backup structure with identical panels installed on the structure after deployment in space. Analytical results show that with reasonable pointing errors, this new concept is capable of concentration ratios greater than 2000.

  17. CIBS Solar Cell Development Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Exstrom, Christopher L.; Soukup, Rodney J.; Ianno, Natale J.

    2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to fabricate and study a new photovoltaic material, copper indium boron diselenide (CuInxB1-xSe2 or CIBS), were undertaken. Attempts to prepare CIBS using sputtering deposition techniques resulted in segregation of boron from the rest of elements in the material. CIBS nanocrystals were prepared from the reaction of elemental Se with CuCl, InCl3, and boric acid in solution, but the product material quickly decomposed upon heating that was required in attempts to convert the nanocrystals into a thin film. The investigation of the reasons for the lack of CIBS material stability led to new structure-property studies of closely-related photovoltaic systems as well as studies of new solar cell materials and processing methods that could enhance the development of next-generation solar technologies. A detailed compositional study of CuIn1-xAlxSe2 (CIAS, a system closely related to CIBS) revealed a non-linear correlation between crystal lattice size and the Al/(In+Al) ratios with dual-phase formation being observed. A new nanocrystal-to-thin-film processing method was developed for the preparation of CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) thin films in which colloidal Se particles are sprayed in contact with CuIn1-xGaxS2 nanoparticles and heated in an argon atmosphere with no other Se source in the system. The process is non-vacuum and does not require toxic gases such as Se vapor or H2Se. Expertise gained from these studies was applied to new research in the preparation of thin-film pyrite FeS2, an attractive earth-abundant candidate material for next-generation photovoltaics. Three methods successfully produced pure pyrite FeS2 films: sulfurization of sputtered Fe films, chemical bath deposition, and sulfurization of Fe2O3 sol-gel precursors. The last method produced pinhole-free films that may be viable for device development. Nickel, platinum, and possibly carbon would appear to serve as good ohmic contact materials. While CdS has a reasonable conduction band energy match to serve as an n-type buffer material in a pyrite FeS2-based solar cell, the less toxic SnS2 is being explored for this purpose.

  18. Glazing materials for solar and architectural applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, C.M. [ed.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes five collaborative research projects on glazings performed by participants in Subtask C of IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (SHC) Task 10, Materials Research and Testing. The projects include materials characterization, optical and thermal measurements, and durability testing of several types of new glazings Three studies were completed on electrochromic and dispersed liquid crystals for smart windows, and two were completed for low-E coatings and transparent insulation materials for more conventional window and wall applications. In the area of optical switching materials for smart windows, the group developed more uniform characterization parameters that are useful to determine lifetime and performance of electrochromics. The detailed optical properties of an Asahi (Japan) prototype electrochromic window were measured in several laboratories. A one square meter array of prototype devices was tested outdoors and demonstrated significant cooling savings compared to tinted static glazing. Three dispersed liquid crystal window devices from Taliq (USA) were evaluated. In the off state, these liquid crystal windows scatter light greatly. When a voltage of about 100 V ac is applied, these windows become transparent. Undyed devices reduce total visible light transmittance by only .25 when switched, but this can be increased to .50 with the use of dyed liquid crystals. A wide range of solar-optical and emittance measurements were made on low-E coated glass and plastic. Samples of pyrolytic tin oxide from Ford glass (USA) and multilayer metal-dielectric coatings from Interpane (Germany) and Southwall (USA) were evaluated. In addition to optical characterization, the samples were exposure-tested in Switzerland. The thermal and optimal properties of two different types of transparent insulation materials were measured.

  19. Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

  20. Solar Market Analytics, Roadmapping, and Tracking NY (SMART NY) Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, Tria [City University of New York; Reilly, Laurie [City University of New York; Kling, Alison [Con Edison, formerly City University of New York

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report, including links to Working Group reports and an attached Working Group report for SunShot Initiative Rooftop Solar Challenge I, from Sustainable CUNY of the City University of New York, on behalf of New York City

  1. Final Scientific/Technical Report Solar America Initiative: Solar Outreach and Communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissman, Jane M.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Solar America Initiative: Solar Outreach and Communications grant was to promote better communications among stakeholders; address infrastructure barriers to solar energy; and coordinate with industry, the U.S. Department of Energy, national laboratories, states, cities and counties. The Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC), a non-profit organization formed in 1982, approached this grant project by establishing a wide range of communication and outreach activities including newsletters, workshops, webinars, model practices and publications; by advancing easy and fair hook-up rules to the utility grid; and by upgrading training based on industry competency standards. The Connecting to the Grid project and the Solar Codes and Standards Public Hearings project offered communication coupled with technical assistance to overcome interconnection, net metering and other regulatory and program barriers. The Workforce Development Project tackled building a strong workforce through quality training and competency assessment programs. IREC�¢����s web site, the semi-monthly state and stakeholder newsletter and the metrics report resulted in better communications among stakeholders. Workshops and phone seminars offered technical assistance and kept stakeholders up-to-date on key issues. All of these activities resulted in implementing sustainable solutions to institutional and market barriers to solar energy and getting the right information to the right people.

  2. Final Technical Report, City of Brockton Solar Brightfield: Deploying a Solar Array on a Brockton Brownfield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro, Lori

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The City of Brockton, Massachusetts sought to install New England’s largest solar array at a remediated brownfield site on Grove Street. The 425-kilowatt solar photovoltaic array – or “Brightfield” – was installed in an urban park setting along with interpretive displays to maximize the educational opportunities. The “Brightfield” project included 1,395 310-Watt solar panels connected in “strings” that span the otherwise unusable 3.7-acre site. The project demonstrated that it is both technically and economically feasible to install utility scale solar photovoltaics on a capped landfill site. The US Department of Energy conceived the Brightfields program in 2000, and Brockton’s Brightfield is the largest such installation nationwide. Brockton’s project demonstrated that while it was both technically and economically feasible to perform such a project, the implementation was extremely challenging due to the state policy barriers, difficulty obtaining grant funding, and level of sophistication required to perform the financing and secure required state approvals. This demonstration project can be used as a model for other communities that wish to implement “Brownfields to Brightfields” projects; 2) implementing utility scale solar creates economies of scale that can help to decrease costs of photovoltaics; 3) the project is an aesthetic, environmental, educational and economic asset for the City of Brockton.

  3. INSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY The PEI Framework for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    not the right decision for securing distributed systems © Ravi Sandhu 5 #12;INSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY PostINSTITUTE FOR CYBER SECURITY 1 The PEI Framework for Application-Centric Security Prof. Ravi Sandhu Executive Director and Endowed Chair Institute for Cyber Security University of Texas at San Antonio May

  4. Solar energy system demonstration project at Wilmington Swim School, New Castle, Delaware. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the Final Report of the Solar Energy System located at the Wilmington, Swim School, New Castle, Delaware. This active solar system is composed of 2,700 square feet of Revere liquid flat plate collectors piped to a 2,800 gallon concrete storage tank located below ground near the building. A micro-computer based control system selects the optimal applications of the stored energy among space, domestic water and pool alternatives. The controlled logic is planned for serving the heat loads in the following order: space heat-new addition, domestic water-entire facility, and pool heating-entire facility. A modified trombe wall passive operation the active system will bypass the areas being served passively. The system was designed for a 40 percent heating and a 30 percent hot water solar contribution.

  5. Solar/hydrogen systems for the 1985 to 2000 time frame. Volume I. Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J.D.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The findings of a study of opportunities for commercialization of systems capable of producing hydrogen from solar energy are presented in two volumes. A compendium of monographs by specialists in the fields of solar energy conversion technologies, hydrogen production technologies and related technology descriptions from the general literature comprise Volume II. This data base was used to support an evaluation and selection process that identified four candidate solar/hydrogen systems best suited to commercialization within the next two decades. Volume I first reviews the background of the work and the methods used. Then an evaluation of the hydrogen product costs that might be achieved by the four selected candidate systems (photovoltaic/water electrolysis, thermal-heat engine/water electrolysis, wind energy/water electrolysis, small hydrogen/water electrolysis) is compared with the pricing structure and practices of the commodity gas market. Subsequently, product cost and market price match is noted to exist in the small user sector of the hydrogen marketplace. Barriers to and historical time lags in, commercialization of new technologies are then reviewed. Finally, recommendations for development and demonstration programs designed to accelerate the commercialization of the candidate systems are presented.

  6. National Solar Radiation Data Base (1961-1990). Final technical report. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1961-1990 National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) for the United States was completed in September 1992. This was the final product of four years of work under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Radiation Resource Assessment Project. The NSRDB contains 30 years of hourly data for five solar radiation elements and 15 meteorological elements for 239 sites. The user`s manual (NSRDB-Volume 1, 1992) for the NSRDB provides detailed information on the structure of the data base and the products that have been produced from it. Most users of the data base will find all of the information that they need in Volume 1. Volume 2 has been written primarily for researchers who need more information about the methods employed in producing the data base. In addition to research results, we have included information on practical lessons learned from this project. Therefore, Volume 2 should be of value to anyone developing a similar data base for other regions or other countries. Most of the solar radiation data in the NSRDB and the previous SOLMET (SOLar METeorological) data base were generated by computer models. Therefore, a major part of this report is centered around the METeorological/STATistical (METSTAT) model (Section 3.0), its input data (Sections 5.0 and 6.0), its use in producing the NSRDB (Sections 4.0 and 7.0), and comparisons with the models used in producing the SOLMET data base (Section 10.0).

  7. Solar space heating for the visitors' center, Stephens College, Columbia, Missouri. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henley, Marion

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report of the solar energy system located at the Visitors' Center on the Stephens College Campus, Columbia, Missouri. The system is installed in a four-story, 15,000 square foot building designed to include the college's Admission Office, nine guest rooms for overnight lodging for official guests of the college, a two-story art gallery, and a Faculty Lounge. The solar energy system is an integral design of the building and utilizes 176 Honeywell/Lennox hydronic flat-plate collectors which use a 50% water-ethylene glycol solution and water-to-water heat exchanger. Solar heated water is stored in a 5000 gallon water storage tank located in the basement equipment room. A natural gas fired hot water boiler supplies hot water when the solar energy heat supply fails to meet the demand. The designed solar contribution is 71% of the heating load. The demonstration period for this project ends June 30, 1984.

  8. Final Solar and Wind H2 Report EPAct 812.doc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINAL Site-Wide EnvironmentalSolar

  9. Ultrahigh Efficiency Multiband Solar Cells Final Report for Director's Innovation Initiative Project DII-2005-1221

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ager III, Joel W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, Kin Man

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Multijunction Solar Cell Performance in RadiationIgari, and W. Warta, “Solar Cell Efficiency Tables (Versionof Multijunction Solar Cell Performance in Radiation

  10. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eval and Solar Collector Various Coatings, Substrateof Various Coatings, Substrate Materials and Solar Collectorl'Optimiz ctive Coatings for Solar Collectors", N77-11529,

  11. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Various Coatings, Substrate Materials and Solar Collectorl'Optimiz ctive Coatings for Solar Collectors", N77-11529,on High Efficiency Solar Collector Coatings", N77 -30286,

  12. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN J D, Balcomb, J. Co Heds torm and R, D.Solar Energy. 19. J. D. Balcomb. et al. Solar gains through

  13. Solar 2 Green Energy, Arts & Education Center. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paquette, Jamie C; Collins, Christopher J

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar 2 Green Energy, Arts and Education Center is an 8,000 sq.ft. demonstration project that will be constructed to Platinum LEED certification and will be the first carbon-neutral, net-zero energy use public building in New York City, giving it local and national appeal. Employing â��greenâ� building features and holistic engineering practices throughout its international award-winning design, Solar 2 will be powered by a 90kW photovoltaic (PV) array in conjunction with a geothermal heating and cooling system and a high efficient design that seeks to reduce the overall energy load of the building. Solar 2 will replace our current 500 sq.ft. prototype facility - known as Solar 1 - as the educational and cultural centerpiece of a five-block public greenway on the East River in Stuyvesant Cove Park, located along two acres of public riverfront on a newly reclaimed, former brownfield in lower Manhattan. Designed as a public-use complex for year-round environmental education exhibits and onsite activities for all ages and backgrounds, Solar 2 will demonstrate energy-efficiency technologies and sustainable environmental practices available now to all urban residents, eco-tourists, teachers, and students alike. Showcasing one of Solar 2â��s most striking design elements is the PV roof array with a caf�© and river vistas for miles of New York Cityâ��s skylines. Capping the building as a solar-powered landmark, and visible from the FDR Drive, the PV array is also designed to provide visitors below a view of the solar roof when standing outside, as well as directly underneath it. Recognized by an international jury of architects, civil engineers and urban designers by the Swiss-based Holcim Foundation, the Solar 2 design was awarded the prestigious Holcim North American 2008 Gold Award for Sustainable Construction for â��innovative, future-oriented and tangible sustainable construction projects,â� selected from more than 1900 entries. Funding from the Department of Energy was provided to assist with the ongoing design work of Solar 2, including architecture, engineering and the development of construction specifications. The work performed during the project period brought this process as far along as it could go pending the raising of funds to begin construction of the building. Once those funds are secured, we will finalize any additional details needed before beginning the bidding process and then moving into construction. DOEâ��s funding was extremely valuable in helping Solar One determine the feasibility of a net-zero construction on the site and allowed for the design to project to meet the high standards necessary for LEED Platinum status.

  14. Newman Unit 1 advanced solar repowering advanced conceptual design. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Newman Unit 1 solar repowering design is a water/steam central receiver concept supplying superheated steam. The work reported is to develop a refined baseline conceptual design that has potential for construction and operation by 1986, makes use of existing solar thermal technology, and provides the best economics for this application. Trade studies performed in the design effort are described, both for the conceptual design of the overall system and for the subsystem conceptual design. System-level functional requirements, design, operation, performance, cost, safety, environmental, institutional, and regulatory considerations are described. Subsystems described include the collector, receiver, fossil energy, electrical power generating, and master control subsystems, site and site facilities. The conceptual design, cost, and performance of each subsystem is discussed at length. A detailed economic analysis of the repowered unit is made to realistically assess the economics of the first repowered unit using present cost data for a limited production level for solar hardware. Finally, a development plan is given, including the design, procurement, construction, checkout, startup, performance validation, and commercial operation. (LEW)

  15. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for passive solar deSigns of buildings. ! :'feasurements/BUILDING MATERIALS INTRODUC TION The design of passive solar

  16. Amorphous thin films for solar-cell applications. Final report, September 11, 1978-September 10, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, D E; Balberg, I; Crandall, R S; Goldstein, B C; Hanak, J J; Pankove, J I; Staebler, D L; Weakliem, H A; Williams, R

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Section II, Theoretical Modeling, theories for the capture of electrons by deep centers in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and for field-dependent quantum efficiency in a-Si:H are presented. In Section III, Deposition and Doping Studies, the optimization of phosphorus-doped a-Si:H carried out in four different discharge systems is described. Some details of the dc proximity and rf magnetron discharge systems are also provided. Preliminary mass spectroscopy studies of the rf magnetron discharge in both SiH/sub 4/ and SiF/sub 4/ are presented. In Section IV, Experimental Methods for Characterizing a-Si:H, recent work involving photoluminescence of fluorine-doped a-Si:H, photoconductivity spectra, the photoelectromagnetic effect, the photo-Hall effect and tunneling into a-Si:H is presented. Also, studies of the growth mechanism of Pt adsorbed on both crystalline Si and a-Si:H are described. Measurements of the surface photovoltage have been used to estimate the distribution of surface states of phosphorus-doped and undoped a-Si:H. Section V, Formation of Solar-Cell Structures, contains information on stacked or multiple-junction a-Si:H solar cells. In Section VI, Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Solar-Cell Parameters, an upper limit of approx. = 400 A is established for the hole diffusion length in undoped a-Si:H. A detailed description of carrier generation, recombination and transport in a-Si:H solar cells is given. Finally, some characteristics of Pd-Schottky-barrier cells are described for different processing histories.

  17. Solar Technology Acceleration Center (SolarTAC): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-259

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, W.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This agreement allowed NREL to serve as an advisor on SolarTAC - a collaborative effort between Xcel Energy, NREL, and the University of Colorado at Boulder. The collaboration was formed to accelerate pre-commercial and early commercial solar energy technologies to the marketplace. Through this CRADA, NREL participated in the deployment of solar energy generation technologies and related solar equipment for research, testing, validation, and demonstration purposes.

  18. Final draft: IEA Task 1. Report on Subtask D, optimization of solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, T.L. (ed.)

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of general techniques and specific methods useful in the optimization of solar heating and cooling systems is undertaken. A discussion of the state-of-the-art and the principal problems in both the simplified thermal performance analysis and economic analysis portions of the optimization problem are presented. Sample economic analyses are performed using several widely used economic criteria. The predicted thermal results of one typical, widely used simplified method is compared to detailed simulation results. A methodology for and the results of a sensitivity study of key economic parameters in the life cycle cost method are presented. Finally, a simple graphical optimization technique based on the life cycle cost method is proposed.

  19. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Freeze ToLerant Solar Water Heater Using C ross Linkedof a Freeze Tolerant Solar Water Heater Using CrosslinkedJ Mueller, ! 'Low Cos t Solar Air Heater tl , N78 20639 D-31

  20. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Freeze ToLerant Solar Water Heater Using C ross Linkedof a Freeze Tolerant Solar Water Heater Using Crosslinkedcrosslinked poly lene for solar water heater absorbers (18),

  1. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G, S, Perkins, If Sun 'Tracking Solar Energy Collector ll ,K. Selcuk, "A Non- Tracking Solar Energy Collector SystemSolar Collector with Stationary Spherical RefL & a Tracking

  2. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of Thin Film, Solar Thermal Energy Converters",sts of Collectors of Solar Thermal Energy, A Steel Flat PlatA Comparison of Solar Thermal Coatings", Spie 85, Optics in

  3. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRANSFER (Section 4) A. PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN B. HEA T PIPESreviews). D-15 A. PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN J D, Balcomb, J. CoSection 4) D-15 - PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN D-17 - HEAT PIPES D-

  4. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and D. F. Frazine, "Mirror Panel Solar Absorptance Test", ADLong Life Terrestrial Solar Panel", 7 8N 24649, DOE/ JPLUno, "High Efficiency Solar Panel (HESP)! ', N78 10572, AD A

  5. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only for large - scale solar power plant type applica- tionsEnergy Storage for Solar Power Plant", 11th IECEC (1976), J,energy storage~ solar power plants and other preliminary

  6. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long Life Terrestrial Solar Panel", 7 8N 24649, DOE/ JPLUno, "High Efficiency Solar Panel (HESP)! ', N78 10572, AD AOptically table for Flat Solar Panels", N78 17477 (1977). J.

  7. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Thin Film, Solar Thermal Energy Converters", N7728613, PBsts of Collectors of Solar Thermal Energy, A Steel Flat Platcharacteristics a solar thermal energy utili ng water l1ed

  8. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Cooling", Sharing the Sun in the Seventie s, Ed, J, Cook (Solar Energyll, Sharing the Sun in the Seventies, Ed, J, Cook (Cook H. M, Curran and M, M, Iller, "Comparative Evaluation of Solar

  9. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems for Solar Thermionic Converters!! , AD 922869 (Performance of a Thermionic Converter Module Utilizing

  10. Submission of Final Scientific/Technical Report [Solar Avoided Cost Solution: SunShot 6 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danziger, Eric

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The core objectives of this project were two separate but integrated products, collectively providing game-changing Avoided Cost capabilities. • The first was a kit of avoided cost tools and data that any solar provider can use a-lacarte or as a whole. It’s open and easily accessible nature allows the rapid and accurate calculation of avoided cost in whatever context and software that make sense (“Typical and Avoided Cost Tools”). This kit includes a dataset of typical energy rates, costs and usage that can be used for solar prospecting, lead generation and any situation where data about an opportunity is missing or imperfect. • The second is a web application and related APIs specifically built for solar providers to radically streamline their lead-to-sale process (“Solar Provider Module”). The typical and Avoided Cost tools are built directly into this, and allow for solar providers to track their opportunities, collaborate with their installers and financiers, and close more sales faster.

  11. EIS-0403: Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The BLM and DOE have jointly prepared this PEIS to evaluate actions that the agencies are considering taking to further facilitate utility-scale solar energy development in six southwestern states. For the BLM, this includes the evaluation of a new Solar Energy Program applicable to solar development on BLM-administered lands. For DOE, it includes the evaluation of developing new guidance to further facilitate utility-scale solar energy development and maximize the mitigation of associated potential environmental impacts. This Solar PEIS evaluates the potential environmental, social, and economic effects of the agencies’ proposed actions and alternatives. For additional information, please visit the Solar PEIS website at http://solareis.anl.gov.

  12. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Study: Sun Light Energy Study: Solar RadiationS, Perkins, If Sun 'Tracking Solar Energy Collector ll , N77L. Berger, "The Sun, a New Source of Energy", AD B 026689,

  13. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. E. McOona 1d ABSTRACT: Solar heating panel performance issolar panels, co- efficient of performance of the heat pumps and the heatingThe panel is save heating costs in winter by absorbing solar

  14. Solar energy dehumidification experiment on the Citicorp Center building : final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown author

    The technical and economic feasibility of using solar energy to reduce conventional energy consumption of a large urban commercial building were studied in depth. Specifically, solar assisted dehumidification of ventillation ...

  15. all-solid-state dye-sensitized solar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low-cost, environmental (more) Dong, Pei 2013-01-01 2 ZnO Nanotube Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Renewable Energy Websites Summary: templated by anodic aluminum oxide for use...

  16. Passive-solar-cooling system concepts for small office buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiddon, W.I.; Hart, G.K.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the efforts of a small group of building design professionals and energy analysis experts to develop passive solar cooling concepts including first cost estimates for small office buildings. Two design teams were brought together at each of two workshops held in the fall of 1982. Each team included an architect, mechanical engineer, structural engineer, and energy analysis expert. This report presents the passive cooling system concepts resulting from the workshops. It summarizes the design problems, solutions and first-cost estimates relating to each technology considered, and documents the research needs identified by the participants in attempting to implement the various technologies in an actual building design. Each design problem presented at the workshops was based on the reference (base case) small office building analyzed as part of LBL's Cooling Assessment. Chapter II summarizes the thermal performance, physical specifications and estimated first-costs of the base case design developed for this work. Chapters III - VI describe the passive cooling system concepts developed for each technology: beam daylighting; mass with night ventilation; evaporative cooling; and integrated passive cooling systems. The final Chapters, VII and VIII present the preliminary implications for economics of passive cooling technologies (based on review of the design concepts) and recommendations of workshop participants for future research in passive cooling for commercial buildings. Appendices provide backup information on each chapter as indicated.

  17. Solar process water heat for the Iris Images Custom Color Photo Lab. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report of the solar facility locted at Iris Images Custom Photo Laboratory in Mill Valley, California. It was designed to provide 59 percent of the hot water requirements for developing photographic film and domestic hot water use. The design load is to provide 6 gallons of hot water per minute for 8 hours per working day at 100/sup 0/F. It has 640 square feet of flat plate collectors and 360 gallons of hot water storage. The auxiliary back up system is a conventional gas-fired water heater. Freeze protection in this mild climate was originally provided by closed-loop circulation of hot water from the storage tank. Later this was changed to a drain-down system due to a freeze when electrical power failed. This system has been relatively successful with little or no scheduled maintenance. The site and building description, subsystem description, as-built drawings, cost breakdown and analysis, performance analysis, lessons learned, and the operation and maintenance manual are included.

  18. Solar/gas systems impact analysis study. Final report, September 1982-July 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, E.F.; Preble, B.; Neill, C.P.; Loose, J.C.; Poe, T.E.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of solar/gas technologies on gas consumers and on gas utilities was measured separately and compared against the impacts of competing gas and electric systems in four climatic regions of the U.S. A methodology was developed for measuring the benefits or penalties of solar/gas systems on a combined basis for consumers and distribution companies. The authors analysis shows that the combined benefits associated with solar/gas systems are generally greatest when the systems are purchased by customers who would have otherwise chosen high-efficiency electric systems (were solar/gas systems not available in the market place). The role of gas utilities in encouraging consumer acceptance of solar/gas systems was also examined in a qualitative fashion. The authors then developed a decision framework for analyzing the type and level of utility involvement in solar/gas technologies.

  19. 3X compound parabolic concentrating (CPC) solar energy collector. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballheim, R.W.

    1980-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Chamberlain engineers designed a 3X compound parabolic concentrating (CPC) collector for the subject contract. The collector is a completely housed, 105.75 x 44.75 x 10.23-inch, 240-pound unit with six each evacuated receiver assemblies, a center manifold and a one-piece glass cover. A truncated version of a CPC trough reflector system and the General Electric Company tubular evacuated receiver have been integrated with a mass producible collector design suitable for operation at 250 to 450/sup 0/F. The key criterion for optimization of the design was minimization of the cost per Btu collected annually at an operating temperature of 400/sup 0/F. The reflector is a 4.1X design truncated to a total height of 8.0 inches with a resulting actual concentration ratio of 2.6 to 1. The manifold is an insulated area housing the fluid lines which connect the six receivers in series with inlet and outlet tubes extending from one side of the collector at the center. The reflectors are polished, anodized aluminum which are shaped by the roll form process. The housing is painted, galvanized steel, and the cover glass is 3/16-inch thick tempered, low iron glass. The collector requires four slope adjustments per year for optimum effectiveness. Chamberlain produced ten 3X CPC collectors for the subject contract. Two collectors were used to evaluate assembly procedures, six were sent to the project officer in Albuquerque, New Mexico, one was sent to Argonne National Laboratory for performance testing and one remained with the Company. A manufacturing cost study was conducted to estimate limited mass production costs, explore cost reduction ideas and define tooling requirements. The final effort discussed shows the preliminary design for application of a 3X CPC solar collector system for use in the Iowa State Capitol complex.

  20. Parabolic Trough Solar System Piping Model: Final Report, 13 May 2002 ? 31 December 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearny and Associates regarding a study of a piping model for a solar parabolic trough system.

  1. FY2005 Final Report: Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task PVC57301

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.; Stoffel, T. L.; Andreas, A. M.; Wilcox, S. M.; Reda, I. M.; Anderberg, M.; Gotseff, B.; Kay, B. A.; Bowen, A.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents technical detail for work performed in the Solar Radiometry and Metrology Task in the period from October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2005.

  2. Evaluation of Novel Semiconductor Materials Potentially Useful in Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-06-00172

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geisz, J.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of novel semiconductor materials potentially useful in solar cells. NREL will fabricate, test and analyze solar cells from EpiWorks' wafers produced in 2-3 separate growth campaigns. NREL will also characterize material from 2-3 separate EpiWorks material development campaigns. Finally, NREL will visit EpiWorks and help establish any necessary process, such as spectral CV measurements and III-V on Si metalization processes and help validate solar cell designs and performance.

  3. Review of state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes. Task 1 of solar collector studies for solar heating and cooling applications. Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, J E; Diegle, R B

    1980-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The state-of-the-art of solar collector corrosion processes is reviewed, and Task 1 of a current research program on use of aqueous heat transfer fluids for solar heating and cooling is summarized. The review of available published literature has indicated that lack of quantitative information exists relative to collector corrosion at the present time, particularly for the higher temperature applications of solar heating and cooling compared to domestic water heating. Solar collector systems are reviewed from the corrosion/service life viewpoint, with emphasis on various applications, collector design, heat transfer fluids, and freeze protection methods. Available information (mostly qualitative) on collector corrosion technology is reviewed to indicate potential corrosion problem areas and corrosion prevention practices. Sources of limited quantitative data that are reviewed are current solar applications, research programs on collector corrosion, and pertinent experience in related applications of automotive cooling and non-solar heating and cooling. A data bank was developed to catalog corrosion information. Appendix A of this report is a bibliography of the data bank, with abstracts reproduced from presently available literature accessions (about 220). This report is presented as a descriptive summary of information that is contained in the data bank.

  4. Final Report on the Operation and Maintenance Improvement Program for Concentrating Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen Gilbert E.; Kearney, David W.; Kolb, Gregory J.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a six-year, $6.3 million project to reduce operation and maintenance (O&M) costs at power plants employing concentrating solar power (CSP) technology. Sandia National Laboratories teamed with KJC Operating Company to implement the O&M Improvement Program. O&M technologies developed during the course of the program were demonstrated at the 150-MW Kramer Junction solar power park located in Boron, California. Improvements were made in the following areas: (a) efficiency of solar energy collection, (b) O&M information management, (c) reliability of solar field flow loop hardware, (d) plant operating strategy, and (e) cost reduction associated with environmental issues. A 37% reduction in annual O&M costs was achieved. Based on the lessons learned, an optimum solar- field O&M plan for future CSP plants is presented. Parabolic trough solar technology is employed at Kramer Junction. However, many of the O&M improvements described in the report are also applicable to CSP plants based on solar power tower or dish/engine concepts.

  5. Passive solar design strategies: Remodeling guidelines for conserving energy at home. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of passive solar is simple, but applying it effectively does require information and attention to the details of design and construction. Some passive solar techniques are modest and low-cost, and require only small changes in remodeler`s typical practice. At the other end of the spectrum, some passive solar systems can almost eliminate a house`s need for purchased heating (and in some cases, cooling) energy -- but probably at a relatively high first cost. In between are a broad range of energy-conserving passive solar techniques. Whether or not they are cost-effective, practical and attractive enough to offer a market advantage to any individual remodeler depends on very specific factors such as local costs, climate, and market characteristics. Passive solar design strategies: Remodeling Guidelines For Conserving Energy At Homes is written to help give remodelers the information they need to make these decisions. Passive Solar Design Strategies is a package in three basic parts: The Guidelines contain information about passive solar techniques and how they work, and provides specific examples of systems which will save various percentages of energy; The Worksheets offer a simple, fill-in-the-blank method to pre-evaluate the performance of a specific design; The Worked Example demonstrates how to complete the worksheets for a typical residence.

  6. EIS-0455: Plan Amendment/Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Genesis Solar Energy Project, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The BLM’s purpose and need for the GSEP is to respond to Genesis Solar, LLC’s application under Title V of FLPMA (43 U.S.C. 1761) for a ROW grant to construct, operate, maintain and decommission a solar thermal facility on public lands in compliance with FLPMA, BLM ROW regulations, and other applicable Federal laws. The BLM will decide whether to approve, approve with modification, or deny issuance of a ROW grant to Genesis Solar, LLC for the proposed GSEP.

  7. FINAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederal ColumbiaASCR2 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

  8. Efficiency Improvement of Crystalline Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 January 2002 - 30 September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, E. R.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UC-Berkeley study of transition metal related defects in PV-grade mc-Si to understand their pathways into solar cells; chemical state/distribution; interaction with structural defects; defect engineering.

  9. Agua Caliente Solar Feasibility and Pre-Development Study Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carolyn T. Stewart, Managing Partner; Red Mountain Energy Partners

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of facility- and commercial-scale solar energy projects on the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians Reservation in Palm Springs, CA. The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (ACBCI) conducted a feasibility and pre-development study of potential solar projects on its lands in southern California. As described below, this study as a logical and necessary next step for ACBCI. Support for solar project development in California, provided through the statewide California Solar Initiative (CSI), its Renewable Portfolio Standard and Feed-in Tariff Program, and recently announced Reverse Auction Mechanism, provide unprecedented support and incentives that can be utilized by customers of California's investor-owned utilities. Department of Energy (DOE) Tribal Energy Program funding allowed ACBCI to complete its next logical step to implement its Strategic Energy Plan, consistent with its energy and sustainability goals.

  10. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hot water heating, etc, l50 F is good High melting temperatureand hot water systems. E-9Z REVIEW LBL LI TI Solar Absorption Properties of a High Temperature

  11. The Final 40%: SunShot charges forward to tackle solar challenges...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    discussions and idea-generating activities to help solve some of the toughest problems in solar energy. SunShot Initiative director Minh Le anchored the morning session by...

  12. Solar hot water system installed at Quality Inn, Key West, Florida. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar energy hot water system installed in the Quality Inn, Key West, Florida, which consists of four buildings, is described. Three buildings are low-rise, two-story buildings containing 100 rooms. The fourth is a four-story building with 48 rooms. The solar system was designed to provide approximately 50% of the energy required for the domestic hot water system. The solar system consists of approximately 1400 ft/sup 2/ of flat plate collector, two 500 gal storage tanks, a circulating pump, and a controller. Operation of the system was begun in April 1978, and has continued to date with only three minor interruptions for pump repair. In the first year of operation, it was determined that the use of the solar facility resulted in 40% fuel savings.

  13. Solar heating panel: Parks and Recreation Building, Saugatuck Township Park and Recreation Commission. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an account of the design and installation of a solar heating system on an existing building in Saugatuck, MI, using existing technology. The purpose of this program is to demonstrate the possibilities of alternative energy, educate local craftsmen, and make the building more useful to the community. The structure of the building is described. The process of insulating the structure is described. The design of the solar panel, headers, and strong box full of rocks for heat storage is given complete with blueprints. The installation of the system is also described, including photographs of the solar panel being installed. Included is a performance report on this system by Purbolt's Inc., which describes measurements taken on the system and outlines the system's design and operation. Included also are 12 slides of the structure and the solar heating system. (LEW)

  14. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. E. Bush, "A Simple Home Heating System", N77 20598, UCRLmore modest projects such as home heating and cooling is theEconomical Solar Heating System for Homes DATE: July 1

  15. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar energy systeml. Non-intrusive n1easurernent tech-with the flow. Thus non-intrusive techniques are desirable;medical arena for non-intrusive blood flow measurements(50-

  16. Barrier Coatings for Thin Film Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, September 1, 2002 -- January 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, L. C.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program has involved investigations of the stability of CdTe and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS) solar cells under damp heat conditions and effects of barrier coatings.

  17. Solar America Initiative State Working Group: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Taylor

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the support from the Department of Energy, NARUC has educated thousands of stakeholders, including Public Utility Commissioners, commission staff, and State energy officials on solar energy technology, implementation, and policy. During the lifetime of this grant, NARUC staff engaged stakeholders in policy discussions, technical research, site visits, and educational meetings/webinars/materials that provided valuable education and coordination on solar energy technology and policy among the States. Primary research geared toward State decision-makers enabled stakeholders to be informed on current issues and created new solar energy leaders throughout the United States. Publications including a Frequently Asked Questions guide on feed-in tariffs and a legal analysis of state implementation of feed-in tariffs gave NARUC members the capacity to understand complex issues related to the economic impacts of policies supportive of solar energy, and potential paths for implementation of technology. Technical partnerships with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) instructed NARUC members on feed-in tariff policy for four States and solar PV resource assessment in seven States, as well as economic impacts of solar energy implementation in those States. Because many of the States in these technical partnerships had negligible amounts of solar energy installed, this research gave them new capacity to understand how policies and implementation could impact their constituency. This original research produced new data now available, not only to decision-makers, but also to the public at-large including educational institutions, NGOs, consumer groups, and other citizens who have an interest in solar energy adoption in the US. Under this grant, stakeholders engaged in several dialogs. These educational opportunities brought NARUC members and other stakeholders together several times each year, shared best practices with State decision-makers, fostered partnerships and relationships with solar energy experts, and aided in increasing the implementation of smart policies that will foster solar technology deployment. The support from the Department of Energyâ??s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has created solar energy leaders in the States; leaders who will serve to be a continuing valuable resource as States consider adoption of new low-carbon and domestic energy supply to meet the energy needs of the United States.

  18. Solar energy system performance evaluation - final report for Honeywell OTS 45, Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, A K

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 45) at Salt River Project in Phoenix, Arizona, based on the analysis of data collected between April 1981 and March 31, 1982. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 45 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 8208 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 2500-gallon thermal storage tank; two 25-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted water chillers; a forced-draft cooling tower; and associated piping, pumps, valves, controls and heat rejection equipment. The solar system has eight basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 8 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 1143 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 3440 MMBtu and provided 241 MMBtu for cooling and 64 MMBtu for heating. The projected net annual electrical energy savings due to the solar system was approximately 40,000 kWh(e).

  19. EA-1798: Abengoa Solar's Mojave Solar Project near Barstow, CA...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Abengoa Solar's Mojave Solar Project near Barstow, CA July 1, 2011 EA-1798: Final Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee to Mojave Solar, LLC for the Abengoa Mojave Solar...

  20. Final Report. An Integrated Partnership to Create and Lead the Solar Codes and Standards Working Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, Andrew [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE grant, “An Integrated Partnership to Create and Lead the Solar Codes and Standards Working Group,” to New Mexico State University created the Solar America Board for Codes and Standards (Solar ABCs). From 2007 – 2013 with funding from this grant, Solar ABCs identified current issues, established a dialogue among key stakeholders, and catalyzed appropriate activities to support the development of codes and standards that facilitated the installation of high quality, safe photovoltaic systems. Solar ABCs brought the following resources to the PV stakeholder community; Formal coordination in the planning or revision of interrelated codes and standards removing “stove pipes” that have only roofing experts working on roofing codes, PV experts on PV codes, fire enforcement experts working on fire codes, etc.; A conduit through which all interested stakeholders were able to see the steps being taken in the development or modification of codes and standards and participate directly in the processes; A central clearing house for new documents, standards, proposed standards, analytical studies, and recommendations of best practices available to the PV community; A forum of experts that invites and welcomes all interested parties into the process of performing studies, evaluating results, and building consensus on standards and code-related topics that affect all aspects of the market; and A biennial gap analysis to formally survey the PV community to identify needs that are unmet and inhibiting the market and necessary technical developments.

  1. Solar feasibility study for site-specific industrial-process-heat applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, O.L.

    1980-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This study addresses the technical feasibility of solar energy in industrial process heat (IPH) applications in Mid-America. The study was one of two contracted efforts covering the MASEC 12-state region comprised of: Illinois, Michigan, North Dakota, Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Kansas, Nebraska, Wisconsin. The results of our study are encouraging to the potential future role of solar energy in supplying process heat to a varied range of industries and applications. We identified and developed Case Study documentation of twenty feasible solar IPH applications covering eight major SIC groups within the Mid-American region. The geographical distribution of these applications for the existing range of solar insolation levels are shown and the characteristics of the applications are summarized. The results of the study include process identification, analysis of process heat requirements, selection of preliminary solar system characteristics, and estimation of system performance and cost. These are included in each of the 20 Case Studies. The body of the report is divided into two primary discussion sections dealing with the Study Methodology employed in the effort and the Follow-On Potential of the identified applications with regard to possible demonstration projects. The 20 applications are rated with respect to their relative overall viability and procedures are discussed for possible demonstration project embarkment. Also, a possible extension of this present feasibility study for late-comer industrial firms expressing interest appears worthy of consideration.

  2. Solar heating system at Quitman County Bank, Marks, Mississippi. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is provided on the solar heating system installed in a single story wood frame, cedar exterior, sloped roof building, the Quitman County Bank, a branch of the First National Bank of Clarksdale, Mississippi. It is the first solar system in the geographical area and has promoted much interest. The system has on-site temperature and power measurements readouts. The 468 square feet of Solaron air flat plate collectors provide for 2000 square feet of space heating, an estimated 60% of the heating load. Solar heated air is distributed to the 235 cubic foot rock storage box or to the load (space heating) by a 960 cubic feet per minute air handler unit. A 7.5 ton Carrier air-to-air heat pump with 15 kilowatts of electric booster strips serve as a back-up (auxiliary) to the solar system. Motorized dampers control the direction of airflow and back draft dampers prevent thermal siphoning of conditioned air. The system was turned on in September 1979, and acceptance testing completed in February 1980. This is a Pon Cycle 3 Project with the Government sharing $13,445.00 of the $24,921 Solar Energy System installation cost.

  3. Final LDRD report : metal oxide films, nanostructures, and heterostructures for solar hydrogen production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronawitter, Coleman X. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Mao, Samuel S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distinction between electricity and fuel use in analyses of global power consumption statistics highlights the critical importance of establishing efficient synthesis techniques for solar fuels-those chemicals whose bond energies are obtained through conversion processes driven by solar energy. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes show potential for the production of solar fuels because of their demonstrated versatility in facilitating optoelectronic and chemical conversion processes. Tandem PEC-photovoltaic modular configurations for the generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight (solar water splitting) provide an opportunity to develop a low-cost and efficient energy conversion scheme. The critical component in devices of this type is the PEC photoelectrode, which must be optically absorptive, chemically stable, and possess the required electronic band alignment with the electrochemical scale for its charge carriers to have sufficient potential to drive the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions. After many decades of investigation, the primary technological obstacle remains the development of photoelectrode structures capable of efficient conversion of light with visible frequencies, which is abundant in the solar spectrum. Metal oxides represent one of the few material classes that can be made photoactive and remain stable to perform the required functions.

  4. Phenylnaphthalene Derivatives as Heat Transfer Fluids for Concentrating Solar Power: Loop Experiments and Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Bell, Jason R [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Joseph III, Robert Anthony [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Weaver, Samuel P [ORNL

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL and subcontractor Cool Energy completed an investigation of higher-temperature, organic thermal fluids for solar thermal applications. Although static thermal tests showed promising results for 1-phenylnaphthalene, loop testing at temperatures to 450 C showed that the material isomerized at a slow rate. In a loop with a temperature high enough to drive the isomerization, the higher melting point byproducts tended to condense onto cooler surfaces. So, as experienced in loop operation, eventually the internal channels of cooler components such as the waste heat rejection exchanger may become coated or clogged and loop performance will decrease. Thus, pure 1-phenylnaphthalene does not appear to be a fluid that would have a sufficiently long lifetime (years to decades) to be used in a loop at the increased temperatures of interest. Hence a decision was made not to test the ORNL fluid in the loop at Cool Energy Inc. Instead, Cool Energy tested and modeled power conversion from a moderate-temperature solar loop using coupled Stirling engines. Cool Energy analyzed data collected on third and fourth generation SolarHeart Stirling engines operating on a rooftop solar field with a lower temperature (Marlotherm) heat transfer fluid. The operating efficiencies of the Stirling engines were determined at multiple, typical solar conditions, based on data from actual cycle operation. Results highlighted the advantages of inherent thermal energy storage in the power conversion system.

  5. Solar heating and cooling system installed at Leavenworth, Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, R. M.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar heating and cooling system installed at the headquarters of Citizens Mutual Savings Association in Leavenworth, Kansas, is described in detail. The project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's solar demonstration program and became operational in March, 1979. The designer was TEC, Inc. Consulting Engineers, Kansas City, Missouri and contractor was Norris Brothers, Inc., Lawrence, Kansas. The solar system is expected to furnish 90 percent of the overall heating load, 70 percent of the cooling load and 100 percent of the domestic hot water load. The building has two floors with a total of 12,000 square feet gross area. The system has 120 flat-plate liquid solar panels with a net area of 2200 square feet. Five, 3-ton Arkla solar assisted absorption units provide the cooling, in conjunction with a 3000 gallon chilled water storage tank. Two, 3000 gallon storage tanks are provided with one designated for summer use, whereas both tanks are utilized during winter.

  6. AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY REVIEW FOR LBL WINDOW/PASSIVE SOLAR PROGRAM FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of radioac bve waste, thermal energy storage in unpreparedAdvanced Thermal Energy Storage Concept Definition Study forTwo Component Thermal Energy Storage Material Final Report",

  7. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  8. Solar heating and hot water system installed at Shoney's Restaurant, North Little Rock, Arkansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar heating system is designed to supply a major portion of the space and water heating requirements for a newly built Shoney's Big Boy Restaurant which was installed with completion occurring in December 1979. The restaurant has a floor space of approximately 4,650 square feet and requires approximately 1500 gallons of hot water daily. The solar energy system consists of 1,428 square feet of Chamberlain flat plate liquid collector subsystem, and a 1500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 321 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/yr (specified) building heating and hot water heating. Designer - Energy Solutions, Incorporated. Contractor - Stephens Brothers, Incorporated. This report includes extracts from site files, specification references for solar modifications to existing building heating and hot water systems, drawings installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  9. High-performance porous silicon solar cell development. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruska, P. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)] [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate use of porous silicon in new solar cell structures. Porous silicon technology has been developed at Spire for producing visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The major aspects that they have demonstrated are the following: porous silicon active layers have been made to show photovoltaic action; porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings to improve the performance of single-crystal silicon solar cells; and porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings on polycrystalline silicon solar cells. One problem with the use of porous silicon is to achieve good lateral conduction of electrons and holes through the material. This shows up in terms of poor blue response and photocurrents which increase with increasing reverse bias applied to the diode.

  10. Solar forecasting review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Richard Headen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.1.2 European Solar Radiation Atlas (ESRA)for supplementing solar radiation network data,” FinalEstimating incident solar radiation at the surface from geo-

  11. New Mexico solar and wind energy tax credit impact assessment study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bos, P.B.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct and indirect impacts of extension or termination of the New Mexico and federal residential solar energy tax credits were assessed. The potential markets and future market penetration of active and passive residential solar energy systems were projected for the alternative possible federal and state tax credit scenarios. The analysis indicates that sales will decline even with extension of the tax credits, and that the termination of either or both credits will result in major decline in active system sales and a smaller decline in passive system sales.

  12. FEDSOL: program user's manual and economic optimization guide for solar federal building projects. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, J.W.; Rodgers, R.C., Jr.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A user's manual for the FEDSOL computer program is provided. The FEDSOL program determines the economically optimal size of a solar energy system for a user-specified building, location, system type, and set of economic conditions it conducts numerous breakeven and sensitivity analyses and it calculates measures of economic performance as required under the Federal Rules. The economic model in the program is linked with the SLR (solar load ratio) design method developed to predict the performance of active systems. The economics portion of the program can, however, be used apart from the SLR method, with performance data provided by the user.

  13. Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, A.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

  14. Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants - Public Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grogan, Dylan C. P.

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary This Final Report for the "Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants” describes the overall project accomplishments, results and conclusions. Phase 1 analyzed the feasibility, cost and performance of a parabolic trough solar power plant with a molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF); researched and/or developed feasible component options, detailed cost estimates and workable operating procedures; and developed hourly performance models. As a result, a molten salt plant with 6 hours of storage was shown to reduce Thermal Energy Storage (TES) cost by 43.2%, solar field cost by 14.8%, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) by 9.8% - 14.5% relative to a similar state-of-the-art baseline plant. The LCOE savings range met the project’s Go/No Go criteria of 10% LCOE reduction. Another primary focus of Phase 1 and 2 was risk mitigation. The large risk areas associated with a molten salt parabolic trough plant were addressed in both Phases, such as; HTF freeze prevention and recovery, collector components and piping connections, and complex component interactions. Phase 2 analyzed in more detail the technical and economic feasibility of a 140 MWe,gross molten-salt CSP plant with 6 hours of TES. Phase 2 accomplishments included developing technical solutions to the above mentioned risk areas, such as freeze protection/recovery, corrosion effects of applicable molten salts, collector design improvements for molten salt, and developing plant operating strategies for maximized plant performance and freeze risk mitigation. Phase 2 accomplishments also included developing and thoroughly analyzing a molten salt, Parabolic Trough power plant performance model, in order to achieve the project cost and performance targets. The plant performance model and an extensive basic Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) quote were used to calculate a real levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 11.50˘/kWhe , which achieved the Phase 2 Go/No Go target of less than 0.12˘/kWhe. Abengoa Solar has high confidence that the primary risk areas have been addressed in the project and a commercial plant utilizing molten salt is economically and technically feasible. The strong results from the Phase 1 and 2 research, testing, and analyses, summarized in this report, led Abengoa Solar to recommend that the project proceed to Phase 3. However, a commercially viable collector interconnection was not fully validated by the end of Phase 2, combined with the uncertainty in the federal budget, forced the DOE and Abengoa Solar to close the project. Thus the resources required to construct and operate a molten salt pilot plant will be solely supplied by Abengoa Solar.

  15. Nanomaterials-Enabled Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells and Jun Lou1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O-7 Nanomaterials-Enabled Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Pei Dong1 and Jun Lou1 1 sensitized solar cells (DSCs), the third generation of solar cells, have attracted more and more attention Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Rice University, Houston, Texas, U.S.A. Dye

  16. Polar Fourier transforms of radially sampled NMR data Brian E. Coggins, Pei Zhou *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    Polar Fourier transforms of radially sampled NMR data Brian E. Coggins, Pei Zhou * Department directly using Fourier transforms in polar coordinates. We present a comprehensive theoretical analysis of the discrete polar Fourier transform, and derive the consequences of its application to radially sampled data

  17. Final Technical Report CONDUCTIVE COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS USING CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul J Glatkowski; Jorma Peltola; Christopher Weeks; Mike Trottier; David Britz

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a grant for Eikos Inc. to investigate the feasibility of developing and utilizing Transparent Conducting Coatings (TCCs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) for solar cell applications. Conventional solar cells today employ metal oxide based TCCs with both Electrical Resistivity (R) and Optical Transparency (T), commonly referred to as optoelectronic (RT) performance significantly higher than with those possible with CNT based TCCs available today. Transparent metal oxide based coatings are also inherently brittle requiring high temperature in vacuum processing and are thus expensive to manufacture. One such material is indium tin oxide (ITO). Global demand for indium has recently increased rapidly while supply has diminished causing substantial spikes in raw material cost and availability. In contrast, the raw material, carbon, needed for CNT fabrication is abundantly available. Transparent Conducting Coatings based on CNTs can overcome not only cost and availability constraints while also offering the ability to be applied by existing, low cost process technologies under ambient conditions. Processes thus can readily be designed both for rigid and flexible PV technology platforms based on mature spray or dip coatings for silicon based solar cells and continuous roll to roll coating processes for polymer solar applications.

  18. Solar heating system at Security State Bank, Starkville, Mississippi. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is provided on the Solar Energy Heating System (airtype) installed at the branch bank building, northwest corner of Highway 12 and Spring Street, Starkville, Mississippi. This installation was completed in June, 1979. The 312 square feet of Solaron flat plate air collectors provide for 788 square feet of space heating, an estimated 55 percent of the heating load. Solar heated air is distributed to the 96 cubic foot steel cylinder, which contains two inch diameter rocks. An air handler unit moves the air over the collector and into the steel cylinder. Four motorized dampers and two gravity dampers are also part of the system. A Solaron controller which has sensors located at the collectors, rock storage, and at the return air, automatically controls the system. Auxiliary heating energy is provided by electric resistance duct heaters. This project is part of the US Department of Energy's Solar Demonstration Program with the government sharing $14,201 of the $17,498 solar energy system installation cost. This system was acceptance tested February, 1980, and the demonstration period ends in 1985.

  19. Solar production of intermediate temperature process heat. Phase I design. Final report. [For sugarcane processing plant in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the final effort in the Phase I design of a solar industrial process heat system for the Hilo Coast Processing Company (HCPC) in Pepeekeo, Hawaii. The facility is used to wash, grind and extract sugar from the locally grown sugarcane and it operates 24 hours a day, 305 days per year. The major steam requirements in the industrial process are for the prime movers (mill turbines) in the milling process and heat for evaporating water from the extracted juices. Bagasse (the fibrous residue of milled sugarcane) supplied 84% of the fuel requirement for steam generation in 1979, while 65,000 barrels of No. 6 industrial fuel oil made up the remaining 16%. These fuels are burned in the power plant complex which produces 825/sup 0/F, 1,250 psi superheated steam to power a turbogenerator set which, in addition to serving the factory, generates from 7 to 16 megawatts of electricity that is exported to the local utility company. Extracted steam from the turbo-generator set supplies the plant's process steam needs. The system consists of 42,420 ft./sup 2/ of parabolic trough, single axis tracking, concentrating solar collectors. The collectors will be oriented in a North-South configuration and will track East-West. A heat transfer fluid (Gulf Synfluid 4cs) will be circulated in a closed loop fashion through the solar collectors and a series of heat exchangers. The inlet and outlet fluid temperatures for the collectors are 370/sup 0/F and 450/sup 0/F respectively. It is estimated that the net useable energy delivered to the industrial process will be 7.2 x 10/sup 9/ Btu's per year. With an HCPC boiler efficiency of 78% and 6.2 x 10/sup 6/ Btu's per barrel of oil, the solar energy system will displace 1489 barrels of oil per year. (WHK)

  20. Solar space- and water-heating system at Stanford University. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of an active hydronic domestic hot water and space heating solar system for the Central Food Services Building is discussed. The closed-loop drain-back system is described as offering dependability of gravity drain-back freeze protection, low maintenance, minimal costs, and simplicity. The system features an 840 square-foot collector and storage capacity of 1550 gallons. The acceptance testing and the predicted system performance data are briefly described. Solar performance calculations were performed using a computer design program (FCHART). Bidding, costs, and economics of the system are reviewed. Problems are discussed and solutions and recommendations given. An operation and maintenance manual is given in Appendix A, and Appendix B presents As-built Drawings. (MCW)

  1. Solar production of industrial process steam at the Home Cleaning and Laundry Co. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the operation and performance evaluation period at the Home Laundry Solar Industrial Process Heat Project at Pasadena, California. The installation comprises 6496 ft/sup 2/ (603.5 m/sup 2/) of linear parabolic trough concentrating collectors supplying solar thermal energy for use in laundry and dry cleaning processes. The design phase began in September 1977, and an acceptance test was conducted during the week of April 12, 1982. The plant has been in operation since May 1982, with the 12-month Phase III (operational) period starting in October 1982. The objective of the operational evaluation experiment was to maximize energy delivery to the industrial participant while characterizing system performance. Data were acquired for monthly documentation of system performance, maintenance requirements, and operating costs.

  2. RDI's Wisdom Way Solar Village Final Report: Includes Utility Bill Analysis of Occupied Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robb Aldrich, Steven Winter Associates

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, Rural Development, Inc. (RDI) completed construction of Wisdom Way Solar Village (WWSV), a community of ten duplexes (20 homes) in Greenfield, MA. RDI was committed to very low energy use from the beginning of the design process throughout construction. Key features include: 1. Careful site plan so that all homes have solar access (for active and passive); 2. Cellulose insulation providing R-40 walls, R-50 ceiling, and R-40 floors; 3. Triple-pane windows; 4. Airtight construction (~0.1 CFM50/ft2 enclosure area); 5. Solar water heating systems with tankless, gas, auxiliary heaters; 6. PV systems (2.8 or 3.4kWSTC); 7. 2-4 bedrooms, 1,100-1,700 ft2. The design heating loads in the homes were so small that each home is heated with a single, sealed-combustion, natural gas room heater. The cost savings from the simple HVAC systems made possible the tremendous investments in the homes' envelopes. The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored temperatures and comfort in several homes during the winter of 2009-2010. In the Spring of 2011, CARB obtained utility bill information from 13 occupied homes. Because of efficient lights, appliances, and conscientious home occupants, the energy generated by the solar electric systems exceeded the electric energy used in most homes. Most homes, in fact, had a net credit from the electric utility over the course of a year. On the natural gas side, total gas costs averaged $377 per year (for heating, water heating, cooking, and clothes drying). Total energy costs were even less - $337 per year, including all utility fees. The highest annual energy bill for any home evaluated was $458; the lowest was $171.

  3. Final Report-- A Novel Storage Method for Concentrating Solar Power Plants Allowing Storage at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the proposed work was the development and testing of a storage method that has the potential to fundamentally change the solar thermal industry. The development of a mathematical model that describes the phenomena involved in the heat storage and recovery was also a main objective of this work. Therefore, the goal was to prepare a design package allowing reliable scale-up and optimization of design.

  4. Final results of Borexino Phase-I on low energy solar neutrino spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borexino Collaboration; G. Bellini; J. Benziger; D. Bick; G. Bonfini; D. Bravo; M. B. Avanzini; B. Caccianiga; L. Cadonati; F. Calaprice; P. Cavalcante; A. Chavarria; A. Chepurnov; D. D'Angelo; S. Davini; A. Derbin; A. Empl; A. Etenko; K. Fomenko; D. Franco; C. Galbiati; S. Gazzana; C. Ghiano; M. Giammarchi; M. Goeger-Neff; A. Goretti; L. Grandi; C. Hagner; E. Hungerford; Aldo Ianni; Andrea Ianni; V. Kobychev; D. Korablev; G. Korga; D. Kryn; M. Laubenstein; T. Lewke; E. Litvinovich; B. Loer; F. Lombardi; P. Lombardi; L. Ludhova; G. Lukyanchenko; I. Machulin; S. Manecki; W. Maneschg; G. Manuzio; Q. Meindl; E. Meroni; L. Miramonti; M. Misiaszek; P. Mosteiro; V. Muratova; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; F. Ortica; K. Otis; M. Pallavicini; L. Papp; C. Pena-Garay; L. Perasso; S. Perasso; A. Pocar; G. Ranucci; A. Razeto; A. Re; A. Romani; N. Rossi; R. Saldanha; C. Salvo; S. Schoenert; H. Simgen; M. Skorokhvatov; O. Smirnov; A. Sotnikov; S. Sukhotin; Y. Suvorov; R. Tartaglia; G. Testera; D. Vignaud; R. B. Vogelaar; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Winter; M. Wojcik; A. Wright; M. Wurm; J. Xu; O. Zaimidoroga; S. Zavatarelli; G. Zuzel

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Borexino has been running since May 2007 at the LNGS with the primary goal of detecting solar neutrinos. The detector, a large, unsegmented liquid scintillator calorimeter characterized by unprecedented low levels of intrinsic radioactivity, is optimized for the study of the lower energy part of the spectrum. During the Phase-I (2007-2010) Borexino first detected and then precisely measured the flux of the 7Be solar neutrinos, ruled out any significant day-night asymmetry of their interaction rate, made the first direct observation of the pep neutrinos, and set the tightest upper limit on the flux of CNO neutrinos. In this paper we discuss the signal signature and provide a comprehensive description of the backgrounds, quantify their event rates, describe the methods for their identification, selection or subtraction, and describe data analysis. Key features are an extensive in situ calibration program using radioactive sources, the detailed modeling of the detector response, the ability to define an innermost fiducial volume with extremely low background via software cuts, and the excellent pulse-shape discrimination capability of the scintillator that allows particle identification. We report a measurement of the annual modulation of the 7 Be neutrino interaction rate. The period, the amplitude, and the phase of the observed modulation are consistent with the solar origin of these events, and the absence of their annual modulation is rejected with higher than 99% C.L. The physics implications of phase-I results in the context of the neutrino oscillation physics and solar models are presented.

  5. Large resource development projects as markets for passive solar technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roze-Benson, R V

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A basic premise of this study is that large resource development projects provide a major market opportunity for passive solar manufactured buildings. The primary objectives of the work are to document selected resource development projects and identify their potential housing needs and development schedules, to contact resource industry representatives and assess some of the processes and motivations behind their involvement in housing decisions, and to provide passive solar manufactured buildings producers with results of these steps as early initial market intelligence. The intent is to identify not only the industries, location of their planned projects, and their likely worker housing needs, but also the individuals involved in making housing-related decisions. The 56 identified projects are located within 18 states and cover 11 types of resources. The report documents individual projects, provides protections of total worker-related housing needs, and presents overviews of resource development company involvement in the new construction market. In addition, the report profiles three organizations that expressed a strong interest in implementing the use of low-cost passive solar manufactured buildings in resource-development-related activities.

  6. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

  7. End-use matching for solar industrial process heat. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.C.; Hooker, D.W.; Rabl, A.; Stadjuhar, S.A.; West, R.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the large energy demand of industry (37% of US demand) and the wide spectrum of temperatures at which heat is required, the industrial sector appears to be very suitable for the matching of solar thermal technology with industrial process heat (IPH) requirements. A methodology for end-use matching has been devised, complete with required data bases and an evaluation program PROSYS/ECONMAT. Six cities in the United States were selected for an analysis of solar applications to IPH. Typical process heat requirements for 70% of the industrial plants in each city were identified and evaluated in conjunction with meteorological and economic data for each site to determine lowest-cost solar systems for each application. The flexibility and scope of PROSYS/ECONMAT is shown in a variety of sensitivity studies that expand the results of the six-city analysis. Case studies of two industrial plants were performed to evaluate the end-use matching procedure; these results are reported.

  8. Improving thermosyphon solar domestic hot water system model performance. Final report, March 1994--February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.N.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from an indoor solar simulator experimental performance test is used to develop a systematic calibration procedure for a computer model of a thermosyphoning, solar domestic hot water heating system with a tank-in-tank heat exchanger. Calibration is performed using an indoor test with a simulated solar collector to adjust heat transfer in the heat exchanger and heat transfer between adjacent layers of water in the storage tank. An outdoor test is used to calibrate the calculation of the friction drop in the closed collector loop. Additional indoor data with forced flow in the annulus of the heat exchanger leads to improved heat transfer correlations for the inside and outside regions of the tank-in-tank heat exchanger. The calibrated simulation model is compared to several additional outdoor tests both with and without auxiliary heating. Integrated draw energies are predicted with greater accuracy and draw temperature profiles match experimental results to a better degree. Auxiliary energy input predictions improve significantly. 63 figs., 29 tabs.

  9. Concentrating Solar Power - Molten Salt Pump Development, Final Technical Report (Phase 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael McDowell; Alan Schwartz

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to develop a long shafted pump to operate at high temperatures for the purpose of producing energy with renewable resources. In Phase I of this three phase project we developed molten salt pump requirements, evaluated existing hardware designs for necessary modifications, developed a preliminary design of the pump concept, and developed refined cost estimates for Phase II and Phase III of the project. The decision has been made not to continue the project into Phases II and III. There is an ever increasing world-wide demand for sources of energy. With only a limited supply of fossil fuels, and with the costs to obtain and produce those fuels increasing, sources of renewable energy must be found. Currently, capturing the sun's energy is expensive compared to heritage fossil fuel energy production. However, there are government requirements on Industry to increase the amount of energy generated from renewable resources. The objective of this project is to design, build and test a long-shafted, molten salt pump. This is the type of pump necessary for a molten salt thermal storage system in a commercial-scale solar trough plant. This project is under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Program, managed by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. To reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and to meet the requirements of 'tomorrows' demand, technical innovations are needed. The DOE is committed to reducing the LCOE to 7-10 cents/kWh by 2015, and to 5-7 cents/kWh by 2020. To accomplish these goals, the performance envelope for commercial use of long-shafted molten salt pumps must be expanded. The intent of this project is to verify acceptable operation of pump components in the type of molten salt (thermal storage medium) used in commercial power plants today. Field testing will be necessary to verify the integrity of the pump design, and thus reduce the risk to industry. While the primary goal is to design a pump for a trough solar power plant system, the intent is for the design to be extensible to a solar power tower application. This can be accomplished by adding pumping stages to increase the discharge pressure to the levels necessary for a solar power tower application. This report incorporates all available conceptual design information completed for this project in Phase I.

  10. Methanol-based heat pump for solar heating, cooling, and storage. Phase III. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offenhartz, P O'D; Rye, T V; Malsberger, R E; Schwartz, D

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of CH/sub 3/OH vapor with solid (pellet) CaCl/sub 2/ to form the solid phase compound CaCll/sub 2/ . 2CH/sub 3/OH can be used as the basis of a combined solar heat pump/thermal energy storage system. Such a system is capable of storing heat indefinitely at ambient temperature, and can be used for space and domestic hot water heating, and for air conditioning with forced air (dry) heat rejection. It combines all features required of a residential or commercial space conditioning system except for solar collection. A detailed thermal analysis shows that the coefficient of performance for heating is greater than 1.5, and for cooling, greater than 0.5. This has been confirmed by direct experimental measurement on an engineering development test unit (EDTU). The experimental rate of CH/sub 3/OH absorption is a strong function of the absorber-evaporator temperature difference. The minimum practical hourly rate, 0.10 moles CH/sub 3/OH per mole CaCl/sub 2/, was observed with the salt-bed heat transfer fluid at 40/sup 0/C and the CH/sub 3/OH evaporator at -15/sup 0/C. a detailed performance and economic analysis was carried out for a system operated in Washington, DC. With 25 square meters of evacuated tube solar collectors, the CaCl/sub 2/-CH/sub 3/OH chemical heat pump should be capable of meeting over 90% of the cooling load, 80% of the heating load, and 70% of the domestic hot water load with nonpurchased energy in a typical well-insulated single family residence, thus saving about $600 per year. In small-scale production, the installed cost of the system, including solar collectors and backup, is estimated to be about $10,000 greater than a conventional heating and cooling system, and a much lower cost should be possible in the longer term.

  11. User needs for solar decision-making tools: the homebuilding industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantrowitz, M.; Kurtz, J.; Hart, K.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the need for decision tools and design tools to be used by decision makers considering using solar energy in the single-family residential construction sector is presented. The study finds three builder groups based upon decision making patterns relative to innovation and a five-step decision process. The report also reviews eleven existing design tools against identified user needs. The principal conclusions are that decision tools are largely lacking and design tools do not easily fit user needs. Recommendations for further study are made.

  12. Energy Department Finalizes $337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register /ofConcentratingDepartment offor Innovative Solar Power

  13. The Final 40%: SunShot charges forward to tackle solar challenges! |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon2001 PowerofUse ofManagement82The

  14. 25 kWe solar thermal stirling hydraulic engine system: Final conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the conceptual design and analysis of a solar thermal free-piston Stirling hydraulic engine system designed to deliver 25 kWe when coupled to the 11-meter Test Bed Concentrator at Sandia National Laboratories. A manufacturing cost assessment for 10,000 units per year was made by Pioneer Engineering and Manufacturing. The design meets all program objectives including a 60,000-hr design life, dynamic balancing, fully automated control, >33.3% overall system efficiency, properly conditioned power, maximum utilization of annualized insolation, and projected production costs of $300/kW. The system incorporates a simple, rugged, reliable pool boiler reflux heat pipe to transfer heat from the solar receiver to the Stirling engine. The free-piston engine produces high-pressure hydraulic flow which powers a commercial hydraulic motor that, in turn, drives a commercial rotary induction generator. The Stirling hydraulic engine uses hermetic bellows seals to separate helium working gas from hydraulic fluid which provides hydrodynamic lubrication to all moving parts. Maximum utilization of highly refined, field proven commercial components for electric power generation minimizes development cost and risk. The engine design is based on a highly refined Stirling hydraulic engine developed over 20 years as a fully implantable artificial heart power source. 4 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Solar thermal hydrogen production process: Final report, January 1978-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under sponsorship by the United States Department of Energy, Westinghouse Advanced Energy-Systems Division has investigated the potential for using solar thermal energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. A hybrid thermochemical/electrochemical process, known as the Sulfur Cycle, has been the focus of these investigations. Process studies have indicated that, with adequate and ongoing research and development, the Sulfur Cycle can be effectively driven with solar heat. Also, economic analyses have indicated that the cycle has the potential to produce hydrogen in economic competitiveness with conventional methods (e.g. methane/steam reforming) by the turn of the century. A first generation developmental system has been defined along with its critical components, i.e. those components that need substantial engineering development. Designs for those high temperature components that concentrate, vaporize and decompose the process circulating fluid, sulfuric acid, have been prepared. Extensive experimental investigations have been conducted with regard to the selection of construction materials for these components. From these experiments, which included materials endurance tests for corrosion resistance for periods up to 6000 hours, promising materials and catalysts have been identified.

  16. Modeling of a second-generation solar-driven Rankine air conditioner. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denius, M.W.; Batton, W.D.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten configurations of a second-generation (2G), solar-powered, Rankine-driven air conditioner were simulated and the data presented for use in companion studies. The results of the analysis show that the boiling-in-collector (BIC) configuration generates more power per collector area than the other configurations. The models used to simulate the configuration are presented in this report. The generated data are also presented. Experimental work was done under this study to both improve a novel refrigerant and oil lubrication system for the centrifugal compressor and investigate the aerodynamic unloading characteristics of the centrifugal compressor. The information generated was used to define possible turbo-gearbox configurations for use in the second generation computer simulation.

  17. Intergrated function nonimaging concentrating collector tubes for solar thermal energy. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winston, R

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A substantial improvement in optical efficiency over contemporary external reflector evacuated tube collectors has been achieved by integrating the reflector surface into the outer glass envelope. Described are the design fabrication and test results for a prototype collector based on this concept. A comprehensive test program to measure performance and operational characteristics of a 2 m/sup 2/ panel (45 tubes) has been completed. Efficiencies above 50% relative to beam at 200/sup 0/C have been repeatedly demonstrated. Both the instantaneous and long term average performance of this totally stationary solar collector are comparable to those for tracking line focus parabolic troughs. The yield, reliability and stability of performance achieved have been excellent. Subcomponent assemblies and fabrication procedures have been used which are expected to be compatible with high volume production. The collector has a wide variety of applications in the 100/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C range including industrial process heat, air conditioning and Rankine engine operation.

  18. Strategic partnerships final LDRD report : nanocomposite materials for efficient solar hydrogen production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corral, Erica L. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Miller, James Edward; Walker, Luke S. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Evans, Lindsey R.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 'campus executive' project sought to advance solar thermochemical technology for producing the chemical fuels. The project advanced the common interest of Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Arizona in creating a sustainable and viable alternative to fossil fuels. The focus of this effort was in developing new methods for creating unique monolithic composite structures and characterizing their performance in thermochemical production of hydrogen from water. The development and processing of the materials was undertaken in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Arizona; Sandia National Laboratories performed the thermochemical characterization. Ferrite/yttria-stabilized zirconia composite monoliths were fabricated and shown to have exceptionally high utilization of the ferrite for splitting CO{sub 2} to obtain CO (a process analogous to splitting H{sub 2}O to obtain H{sub 2}).

  19. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 5. Science Applications, Incorporated system requirements definition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report sets forth the system requirements for a Solar Controlled-Environment Agriculture System (SCEAS) Project. In the report a conceptual baseline system description for an engineering test facility is given. This baseline system employs a fluid roof/roof filter in combination with a large storage tank and a ground water heat exchanger in order to provide cooling and heating as needed. Desalination is accomplished by pretreatment followed by reverse osmosis. Energy is provided by means of photovoltaics and wind machines in conjunction with storage batteries. Site and climatic data needed in the design process are given. System performance specifications and integrated system design criteria are set forth. Detailed subsystem design criteria are presented and appropriate references documented.

  20. Parameterization and Analysis of 3-D Solar Radiative Transfer in Clouds: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Y. Harrington

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on the research that we have done over the course of our two-year project. The report also covers the research done on this project during a 1 year no-cost extension of the grant. Our work has had two main, inter-related thrusts: The first thrust was to characterize the response of stratocumulus cloud structure and dynamics to systematic changes in cloud infrared radiative cooling and solar heating using one-dimensional radiative transfer models. The second was to couple a three-dimensional (3-D) solar radiative transfer model to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model that we use to simulate stratocumulus. The purpose of the studies with 3-D radiative transfer was to examine the possible influences of 3-D photon transport on the structure, evolution, and radiative properties of stratocumulus. While 3-D radiative transport has been examined in static cloud environments, few studies have attempted to examine whether the 3-D nature of radiative absorption and emission influence the structure and evolution of stratocumulus. We undertook this dual approach because only a small number of LES simulations with the 3-D radiative transfer model are possible due to the high computational costs. Consequently, LES simulations with a 1-D radiative transfer solver were used in order to examine the portions of stratocumulus parameter space that may be most sensitive to perturbations in the radiative fields. The goal was then to explore these sensitive regions with LES using full 3-D radiative transfer. Our overall goal was to discover whether 3-D radiative processes alter cloud structure and evolution, and whether this may have any indirect implications for cloud radiative properties. In addition, we collaborated with Dr. Tamas Varni, providing model output fields for his attempt at parameterizing 3-D radiative effects for cloud models.

  1. Cobalamin (Vitamin B_(12)) Deficiency in the Chinese Shar Pei – Evaluation of a Potential Hereditary Etiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grützner, Niels

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    laboratory findings include secondary hyperammonemia, increased concentrations of ketones, and MMA in the urine (Cooper & Rosenblatt, 1987; Fyfe et al., 1991). In human patients, response to parenteral administration of cobalamin is variable...) to quantify serum cobalamin and MMA concentrations in cobalamin-deficient Shar Peis at initial testing and after parenteral cobalamin supplementation, 6) to analyze the MYC_CANFA gene, which is the closest known gene to the microsatellite marker DTR13...

  2. Passive solar commercial buildings: design assistance and demonstration program. Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The final design of the Mount Airy Public Library is given. Incremental passive design costs are discussed. Performance and economic analyses are made and the results reported. The design process is thoroughly documented. Considerations discussed are: (1) building energy needs; (2) site energy potentials, (3) matching energy needs with site energy potentials, (4) design indicators for best strategies and concepts, (5) schematic design alternatives, (6) performance testing of the alternatives, (7) design selection, and (8) design development. Weather data and Duke Power electric rates are included. (LEW)

  3. Final Vitrification Melter Evaluation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 FederalofE: Bibliography of(PEIS) | Department

  4. Tracking instrument and control for solar concentrators. Final technical report, October 1979-January 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J; Kuhlman, J

    1981-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The tracker uses a single photo sensor, and a rotating aperature to obtain tracking accuracies better than 1.5 mrads (0.1 degs). Peak signal detection is used to eliminate tracking of false sources, i.e., clouds, etc. A prism is employed to obtain an extended field of view (150 degs axially - 360 degs radially). The tracker digitally measures the Suns displacement angle relative to the concentrator axis, and repositions it incrementally. This arrangement permits the use of low cost non-servo motors. The local controller contains microprocessor based electronics, incorporating digital signal processing. A single controller may be time shared by a maximum of sixteen trackers, providing a high performance, cost effective solar tracking system, suitable for both line and point focus concentrators. An installation may have the local controller programmed as a standalone unit or slaved to a central controller. When used with a central controller, dynamic data monitoring and logging is available, together with the ability to change system modes and parameters, as desired.

  5. Final Report: Tunable Narrow Band Gap Absorbers For Ultra High Efficiency Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedair, Salah M. [NCSU; Hauser, John R. [NCSU; Elmasry, Nadia [NCSU; Colter, Peter C. [NCSU; Bradshaw, G. [NCSU; Carlin, C. Z. [NCSU; Samberg, J. [NCSU; Edmonson, Kenneth [Spectrolab

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a joint research program between NCSU and Spectrolab to develop an upright multijunction solar cell structure with a potential efficiency exceeding the current record of 41.6% reported by Spectrolab. The record efficiency Ge/GaAs/InGaP triple junction cell structure is handicapped by the fact that the current generated by the Ge cell is much higher than that of both the middle and top cells. We carried out a modification of the record cell structure that will keep the lattice matched condition and allow better matching of the current generated by each cell. We used the concept of strain balanced strained layer superlattices (SLS), inserted in the i-layer, to reduce the bandgap of the middle cell without violating the desirable lattice matched condition. For the middle GaAs cell, we have demonstrated an n-GaAs/i-(InGaAs/GaAsP)/p-GaAs structure, where the InxGa1-xAs/GaAs1-yPy SLS is grown lattice matched to GaAs and with reduced bandgap from 1.43 eV to 1.2 eV, depending upon the values of x and y.

  6. Benefits analysis for the production of fuels and chemicals using solar thermal energy. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous possibilities exist for using high temperature solar thermal energy in the production of various chemicals and fuels (Sun Fuels). Research and development activities have focused on the use of feedstocks such as coal and biomass to provide synthesis gas, hydrogen, and a variety of other end-products. A Decision Analysis technique geared to the analysis of Sun Fuels options was developed. Conventional scoring methods were combined with multi-attribute utility analysis in a new approach called the Multi-Attribute Preference Scoring (MAPS) system. MAPS calls for the designation of major categories of attributes which describe critical elements of concern for the processes being examined. The six major categories include: Process Demonstration; Full-Scale Process, Feedstock; End-Product Market; National/Social Considerations; and Economics. MAPS calls for each attribute to be weighted on a simple scale for all of the candidate processes. Next, a weight is assigned to each attribute, thus creating a multiplier to be used with each individual value to derive a comparative weighting. Last, each of the categories of attributes themselves are weighted, thus creating another multiplier, for use in developing an overall score. With sufficient information and industry input, each process can be ultimately compared using a single figure of merit. After careful examination of available information, it was decided that only six of the 20 candidate processes were adequately described to allow a complete MAPS analysis which would allow direct comparisons for illustrative purposes. These six processes include three synthesis gas processes, two hydrogen and one ammonia. The remaining fourteen processes were subjected to only a partial MAPS assessment.

  7. Accurate glass forming for high-temperature solar applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development work was undertaken to thermally form glass for solar concentrators. Sagging and pressing glass to parabolic shapes was investigated with goal of achieving slope errors less than 2.0 mr RMS and costs of $1.25/ft/sup 2/. In addition, a laminating process was investigated to overcome the problem of silvering of a curved surface and to reduce corrosion of the silver. Thermal sagging is a process in which glass is shaped by heating the glass until it is sufficiently soft to deform under its own weight and conform to a mold. For cylindrical parabolic shapes, a method for producing low cost high accuracy molds was developed using castable ceramics and a grinder. Thermal conditions were established for a commercial glass bending furnace to obtain good replication of the mold. The accuracy and cost goals were met for glass size up to 30 x 30 x 0.125 inches and for low iron and regular iron float and sheet glasses. Lamination of two curved pieces of glass using automotive technology was investigated. A silver film was placed between two layers of polyvinyl and butyral (PVB) and this was used to bond two sheets of glass. Economically, and technically, the process appears feasible. However, the non-uniform thickness of PBV cause distortion in the reflected image. More work is needed to assess accuracy of curved laminated composites. Thermal pressing of glass is accomplished by heating the glass until it is soft and mechanically stamping the shape. Equipment was built and operated to determine important parameters in pressing. Control of thermal stresses in the glass is critical to preventing cracks. No glass pieces were produced without cracks.

  8. Hybrid solar thermal-photovoltaic systems demonstration, Phase I and II. Final technical progress report, July 5, 1979-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loferski, J.J. (ed.)

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project is to investigate a system based on combined photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) panels to supply the energy needs of a small single family residence. The system finally selected and constructed uses PV/T panels which utilize air as the heat transfer medium. Optimization of thermal performance was accomplished by attaching metal fins to the back surface of each cell which significantly increased the heat transfer coefficient from the solar cells to the air stream. The other major components of the selected system are an air-to-air heat pump, a rock bin thermal energy storage bin, a synchronous dc-to-ac converter, a microprocessor to control the system, a heat exchanger for the domestic hot water system and of course the building itself which is a one story, well insulated structure having a floor area of 1200 ft/sup 2/. A prototype collector was constructed and tested. Based on this experience, twenty collectors, containing 2860 four inch diameter solar cells, were constructed and installed on the building. Performance of the system was simulated using a TRNSYS-derived program, modified to accommodate PV/T panels and to include the particular components included in the selected system. Simulation of the performance showed that about 65 percent of the total annual energy needs of the building would be provided by the PV/T system. Of this total, about one half is produced at a time when it can be used in the building and one half must be sold back to the utility.

  9. Solar Technology Validation Project - Southwest Solar (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-08

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  10. Solar Technology Validation Project - Hualapai Valley Solar (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  11. Surplus Plutonium Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In December 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published the ''Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Storage and Disposition PEIS)'' (DOE 1996a). That PEIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternative strategies for the long-term storage of weapons-usable plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) and the disposition of weapons-usable plutonium that has been or may be declared surplus to national security needs. The Record of Decision (ROD) for the ''Storage and Disposition PEIS'', issued on January 14, 1997 (DOE 1997a), outlines DOE's decision to pursue an approach to plutonium disposition that would make surplus weapons-usable plutonium inaccessible and unattractive for weapons use. DOE's disposition strategy, consistent with the Preferred Alternative analyzed in the ''Storage and Disposition PEIS'', allows for both the immobilization of some (and potentially all) of the surplus plutonium and use of some of the surplus plutonium as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of both the immobilized plutonium and the MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a potential geologic repository.

  12. Optimization of processing and modeling issues for thin film solar cell devices: Final report, February 3, 1997--September 1, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkmire, R. W.; Phillips, J. E.; Shafarman, W. N.; Hegedus, S. S.; McCandless, B. E.

    2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes results achieved under a 20-month NREL subcontract to develop and understand thin-film solar cell technology associated to CuInSe{sub 2} and related alloys, a-Si and its alloys, and CdTe. Modules based on all these thin films are promising candidates to meet DOE's long-range efficiency, reliability and manufacturing cost goals. The critical issues being addressed under this program are intended to provide the science and engineering basis for the development of viable commercial processes and to improve module performance. The generic research issues addressed are: (1) quantitative analysis of processing steps to provide information for efficient commercial-scale equipment design and operation; (2) device characterization relating the device performance to materials properties and process conditions; (3) development of alloy materials with different bandgaps to allow improved device structures for stability and compatibility with module design; (4) development and improved window/heterojunction layers and contacts to improve device performance and reliability; and (5) evaluation of cell stability with respect to device structure and module encapsulation.

  13. Energy Department Finalizes $337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1 for Innovative Solar Power Plant Energy Department Finalizes 337 Million Loan Guarantee to Mesquite Solar 1 for Innovative Solar...

  14. Improved Solar Cell Efficiency Through the Use of an Additive Nanostructure-Based Optical Downshifter: Final Subcontract Report, January 28, 2010 -- February 28, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtin, J.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes all SpectraWatt's progress in achieving a boost in solar cell efficiency using an optical downshifter. Spectrawatt's downshifting technology is based on a nanostructured material system which absorbs high energy (short wavelength) light and reemits it at a lower energy (long wavelength) with high efficiency. This system has shown unprecedented performance parameters including near unity quantum yield and high thermal stability.

  15. Solar Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Synthesis Gas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00335

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Netter, J.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CRADA is established to facilitate the development of solar thermal technology to efficiently and economically convert biomass into useful products (synthesis gas and derivatives) that can replace fossil fuels. NREL's High Flux Solar Furnace will be utilized to validate system modeling, evaluate candidate reactor materials, conduct on-sun testing of the process, and assist in the development of solar process control system. This work is part of a DOE-USDA 3-year, $1M grant.

  16. Solar Technology Validation Project - Solargen (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-06

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  17. Solar Technology Validation Project - Iberdrola Renewables, Inc.: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-298-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  18. Solar Technology Validation Project - RES Americas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  19. Solar Technology Validation Project - USS Data, LLC: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-04

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  20. Solar Technology Validation Project - Amonix, Inc.: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  1. Solar Technology Validation Project - Loyola Marymount University: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-03

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  2. A reliability and maintainability study of selected solar energy system components in the Solar in Federal Buildings Program: Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logee, T.L.; Pakkala, P.A.; Pollock, E.O.; Raymond, M.G.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eight Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP) solar energy systems described in this report were instrumented for automated data monitoring for system reliability and performance. Solar system pumps and solar system controllers were monitored for 3 to 9 months to provide data on failures, duty cycle, and system control setpoints. There was one pump failure, which was not enough to provide failure statistics. Controller failure rates were very high; 50% failed during the monitoring program. Controller drift was not as easily determined. The other most failure-prone component was the automatic flow control valves, 20% of which failed during the monitoring period. Only 0.7% of the collector panels were damaged by wind and freezing. The F-CHART model was used to predict failure-free performance; actual performance was compared to F-CHART predictions. It was concluded that failures that are corrected quickly have no significant effect on long-term performance.

  3. Commercialization of High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M. H.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) technologies is to produce electricity at 15 cents/kilowatt-hour (kWh) with six hours of thermal storage in 2015 (intermediate power) and close to 10 cents/kWh with 12-17 hours of thermal storage in 2020 (baseload power). Cost reductions of up to 50% to the solar concentrator are targeted through technology advances. The overall solar-to-electric efficiency of parabolic-trough solar power plants can be improved and the cost of solar electricity can be reduced by improving the properties of the selective coating on the receiver and increasing the solar-field operating temperature to >450 degrees C. New, more-efficient selective coatings will be needed that have both high solar absorptance and low thermal emittance at elevated temperatures. Conduction and convection losses from the hot absorber surface are usually negligible for parabolic trough receivers. The objective is to develop new, more-efficient selective coatings with both high solar absorptance (..alpha.. > 0.95) and low thermal emittance (..epsilon.. < 0.08 @ 450 degrees C) that are thermally stable above 450 degrees C, ideally in air, with improved durability and manufacturability, and reduced cost.

  4. Concentrating Solar Power Hybrid System Study: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-506

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, C.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this PTS is to collaboratively leverage the collective resources at General Electric Global Research (GEGRC) and National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL) in the areas of concentrating solar power hybrid systems to advance state-of-the-art concentrating solar and conventional power generation system integration.

  5. Survey of EPA facilities for solar thermal energy applications. Final report 1 Nov 77-30 Jun 78

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.V.; Overly, P.T.; Bell, D.M.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was done to assess the feasibility of applying solar thermal energy systems to EPA facilities. A survey was conducted to determine those EPA facilities where solar energy could best be used. These systems were optimized for each specific application and the system/facility combinations were ranked on the basis of greatest cost effectiveness.

  6. Application of Vacancy Injection Gettering to Improve Efficiency of Solar Cells Produced by Millinet Solar: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-417

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL will apply vacancy injection gettering (VIG) to Millinet solar cells and evaluate the performance improvement produced by this process step. The VIG will be done in conjunction with the formation of a back, Al-alloyed, contact. Millinet Solar will provide NREL with cells having AR coating on the front side and screen-printed Al on the backside, which will be processed in the NREL's optical furnace to perform simultaneous VIG and back contact alloying with deep BSF. These cells will be sent back to Millinet solar for a screen-printed front/side contact mask, followed by a second firing at NREL. Detailed analyses will be performed to determine improvements due to BSF and VIG.

  7. Solar thermal enhanced oil recovery (STEOR). Sections 2-8. Final report, October 1, 1979-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elzinga, E.; Arnold, C.; Allen, D.; Garman, R.; Joy, P.; Mitchell, P. Shaw, H.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The program objectives were: (1) determine the technical, economic, operational, and environmental feasibility of solar thermal enhanced oil recovery using line focusing distributed collectors at Exxon's Edison Field, and (2) estimate the quantity of solar heat which might be applied to domestic enhanced oil recovery. This volume of the report summarizes all of the work done under the contract Statement of Work. Topics include the selection of the solar system, trade-off studies, preliminary design for steam raising, cost estimate for STEOR at Edison Field, the development plan, and a market and economics analysis. (WHK)

  8. Film Si Solar Cells with Nano Si: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00356

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Q.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nevada Nanotechnology Center and Si group at NREL will work together to develop a-Si based solar cells with nano-Si technique. We will explore the existing a-Si based film solar cell technology at NREL and nano scale Si technology at Nevada Nanotechnology Center. By exchanging information, we will come; up with some new cell structures using nano-Si. We expect the new a-Si based cells will have optical enhancement or better electronic or optical properties of absorber layer to improve solar cell performance.

  9. Solar production of industrial process steam. Phase III. Operation and evaluation of the Johnson and Johnson solar facility. Final report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brink, D.F.; Kendall, J.M.; Youngblood, S.B.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar facility that generates 177/sup 0/C (350/sup 0/F) process steam has been designed and constructed by Acurex Corporation and has operated for 1 yr supplying steam to the Johnson and Johnson manufacturing plant in Sherman, Texas. The facility consists of 1068 m/sup 2/ (11,520 ft/sup 2/) of parabolic trough concentrating collectors, a 18,900 1 (5000 gal) flash boiler, and an 18.6 kW (25 hp) circulating pump. In the first year of operation the system was available 97 percent of the days, and with sufficient solar radiation available it operated 70 percent of the days during this period. The measured data showed that the collector field operated at an efficiency of 25.4 percent for the year, and that at least 75 percent of the energy reaching the flash boiler was delivered to the plant as steam. A total of 309,510 kg (682,400 lb) of steam was produced by the solar facility for the first year. An analysis of the data showed that the delivered energy was within 90 to 100 percent of the predicted value. The successful completion of the first year of operation has demonstrated the technical feasibility of generating industrial process steam with solar energy.

  10. Evaluation of Ion Damage in Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00234

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment will be used by Greenville College to enhance a previously established collaboration in the area of radiation hardness of solar cells, using Greenville's unique Ion Accelerator. Equipment will be located at the E. College Avenue site.

  11. Final_Testimony(2).pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 FederalofE: Bibliography of(PEIS) |Department

  12. Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous-silicon solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 May 1991--30 April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, R.G.; Hu, J.; Lacks, D.; Musher, J.; Thornton, J.; Liang, H. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorine-doped zinc oxide was shown to have the lowest absorption loss of any of the known transparent conductors. An apparatus was constructed to deposit textured, transparent, conductive, fluorine-doped zinc oxide layers with uniform thickness over a 10 cm by 10 cm area, using inexpensive, high-productivity atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. Amorphous silicon solar cells grown on these textured films show very high peak quantum efficiencies (over 90%). However, a significant contact resistance develops at the interface between the amorphous silicon and the zinc oxide. Transparent, conductive gallium-doped zinc oxide films were grown by APCVD at a low enough temperature (260{degree}C) to be deposited on amorphous silicon as a final conductive back contact to solar cells. A quantum-mechanical theory of bonding was developed and applied to some metal oxides; it forms a basis for understanding TCO structures and the stability of their interfaces with silicon.

  13. Alfven waves in the solar wind in association with solar energetic particles: sunspot umbral origin. Final report 1 Oct 80-31 Mar 83

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullan, D.J.; Owens, A.J.

    1983-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for Alfven waves in the solar wind during solar particle events. During the period June 6-8, 1979, we find clear signatures of outgoing Alfven waves which could have been released from the sun simultaneously with the initial release of energetic particles. The waves are soliton-like, with durations of 200-900 seconds. An isolated square Alfven solution is also seen when the first particles (with E approximately 57 MeV) are detected: the width of this solution is approximately 950 seconds. A series of five small amplitude spikes in the magnetic field are also seen, preceding the arrival of the first particles by a few hours. The spikes are separated by intervals of 854 + or - 20 seconds. We suggest that these periodicities are determined by conditions at the sun. The features which we have detected are consistent with Alfven waves released from the umbra of a sunspot during a flare.

  14. Back-Surface Passivation for High-Efficiency Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Technical Progress Report, September 2010 -- May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz-Wittmann, O.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final technical progress report for TetraSun, a Photovoltaic Technology Incubator awardee within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) SunShot Program.

  15. Acciona Solar Technology Performance Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-384

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehos, M. S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this agreement, NREL will work with Acciona to conduct joint testing, evaluation, and data collection related to Acciona's solar technologies and systems. This work includes, but is not limited to, testing and evaluation of solar component and system technologies, data collection and monitoring, performance evaluation, reliability testing, and analysis. This work will be conducted at Acciona's Nevada Solar One (NSO) power plant and NREL test facilities. Specific projects will be developed on a task order basis. Each task order will identify the name of the project and deliverables to be produced under the task order. Each task order will delineate an estimated completion date based on a project's schedule. Any reports developed under this CRADA must be reviewed by both NREL and Acciona and approved by each organization prior to publication of results or documents.

  16. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  17. Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the low cost silicon solar array project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, R.C.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were conducted on several fundamental aspects of electroless nickel/solder metallization for silicon solar cells. A process proposed by Motorola, which precedes the electroless nickel plating with several steps of palladium plating and heat treatment, was compared directly with single step electroless nickel plating. Work has directed toward answering specific questions concerning the effect of silicon surface oxide on nickel plating, effects of thermal stresses on the metallization, sintering of nickel plated on silicon, and effects of exposure to the plating solution on solar cell characteristics. The Motorola process was compared with simple electroless nickel plating in a series of parallel experiments. Results are presented. (WHK)

  18. SANDIA REPORT SAND2013-5238 Unlimited Release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    body of technical work that addresses this water challenge is the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development (Bureau of Land...

  19. Metallic Inks for Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Hest, M.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the statement of work for National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as a subcontractor for Applied Nanotech, Inc. (ANI) for the Phase II SBIR contract with the Department of Energy to build silicon solar cells using non-contact printed, nanoparticle-based metallic inks. The conductive inks are based upon ANI's proprietary method for nanoparticle dispersion. The primary inks under development are aluminum for silicon solar cell back plane contacts and copper for top interdigitated contacts. The current direction of silicon solar cell technology is to use thinner silicon wafers. The reduction in wafer thickness reduces overall material usage and can increase efficiency. These thin silicon wafers are often very brittle and normal methods used for conductive feed line application, such as screen-printing, are detrimental. The Phase II program will be focused on materials development for metallic inks that can be applied to a silicon solar cell using non-contact methods. Uniform BSF (Back Surface Field) formation will be obtained by optimizing ink formulation and curing conditions to improve cell efficiency.

  20. Solar Resources Measurements in Houston, TX -- Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-204

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loaning Texas Southern University equipment in order to perform site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance is important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: (1) establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; (2) provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; (3) support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; (4) provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center - MIDC (http://www.nrel.gov/midc) Or the Renewable Resource Data Center - RReDC (http://rredc.nrel.gov). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests).

  1. High Performance Photovoltaic Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-05-169

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, M.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL will provide certified measurements of the conversion efficiency at high concentration for several multijunction solar cells that were fabricated by Cyrium Technologies. In an earlier phase of the CRADA, Cyrium provided epitaxially-grown material and NREL processed the samples into devices and measured the performance.

  2. Solar Energy Grid Integration Systems. Final Report of the Princeton Power Systems Development of the 100kW Demand Response Inverter.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bower, Ward Isaac; Heavener, Paul (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Sena-Henderson, Lisa; Hammell, Darren (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); Holveck, Mark (Princeton Power Systems, Inc., Princeton, NJ); David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali; Gonzalez, Sigifredo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiated in 2008, the Solar Energy Grid Integration (SEGIS) program is a partnership involving the U.S. Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories, electric utilities, academic institutions and the private sector. Recognizing the need to diversify the nation's energy portfolio, the SEGIS effort focuses on specific technologies needed to facilitate the integration of large-scale solar power generation into the nation's power grid Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) awarded a contract to Princeton Power Systems, Inc., (PPS) to develop a 100kW Advanced AC-link SEGIS inverter prototype under the Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for near-term commercial applications. This SEGIS initiative emphasizes the development of advanced inverters, controllers, communications and other balance-of-system components for photovoltaic (PV) distributed power applications. The SEGIS Stage 3 Contract was awarded to PPS on July 28, 2010. PPS developed and implemented a Demand Response Inverter (DRI) during this three-stage program. PPS prepared a 'Site Demonstration Conference' that was held on September 28, 2011, to showcase the cumulative advancements. This demo of the commercial product will be followed by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., certification by the fourth quarter of 2011, and simultaneously the customer launch and commercial production sometime in late 2011 or early 2012. This final report provides an overview of all three stages and a full-length reporting of activities and accomplishments in Stage 3.

  3. EIS-0454: Tonopah Solar Energy Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in Nye County, NV Documents Available for Download February 11, 2011 EIS-0454: Final Environmental Impact Statement Tonopah Solar Energy Crescent Dunes Solar Energy Project...

  4. EA-1683: Abengoa Solar's Solana Concentrating Solar Power Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solana Concentrating Solar Power Facility, Gila Bend, AZ May 3, 2010 EA-1683: Final Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee to Abengoa Solar Inc. for the Solana Thermal...

  5. Fundamental Research and Development for Improved Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, March 2002 - July 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, A.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress made by Georgia Tech in the 2002-2006 period toward high-efficiency, low-cost crystalline silicon solar cells. This program emphasize fundamental and applied research on commercial substrates and manufacturable technologies. A combination of material characterization, device modeling, technology development, and complete cell fabrication were used to accomplish the goals of this program. This report is divided into five sections that summarize our work on i) PECVD SiN-induced defect passivation (Sections 1 and 2); ii) the effect of material inhomogeneity on the performance of mc-Si solar cells (Section 3); iii) a comparison of light-induced degradation in commercially grown Ga- and B-doped Czochralski Si ingots (Section 4); and iv) the understanding of the formation of high-quality thick-film Ag contacts on high sheet-resistance emitters (Section 5).

  6. Coaxial extrusion conversion concept for polymeric flat plate solar collectors. Final technical report, September 30, 1978-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, R.O.; Chapman, N.J.; Chao, K.C.; Sorenson, K.F.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated materials and processes for fundamental improvements in flat-plate solar collector cost and performance. The goal was to develop a process for direct conversion of inexpensive raw materials into a completed solar collector unit, without labor intensive assembly operations. It was thought that materials carefully matched to the process and end-use environment would substantially reduce collector costs, as compared to conventional industry practice. The project studied the feasibility of a cost-effective, glazed solar collector, with low labor input, utilizing a coaxial extrusion of compatible polymeric materials. This study evaluated all considered materials for the desired application. In addition, there was a trial extrusion of the leading candidate glazing and absorber materials, which resulted in successfully performing a coaxial extrusion of one cell. At the time the study was conducted, there were no materials available that met the necessary requirements for the specified utilization. It was recommended that, if potentially compatible materials become available, further investigation into the suitability of those materials be researched. Then, if a suitable material was found, proceeding into Phase II would be recommended.

  7. Energy Department Finalizes $737 Million Loan Guarantee to Tonopah...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Finalizes 737 Million Loan Guarantee to Tonopah Solar Energy for Nevada Project Energy Department Finalizes 737 Million Loan Guarantee to Tonopah Solar Energy for Nevada Project...

  8. Concentrating Solar Power �¢���� Central Receiver Panel Component Fabrication and Testing FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Michael W [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne; Miner, Kris [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

    2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to complete a design of an advanced concentrated solar panel and demonstrate the manufacturability of key components. Then confirm the operation of the key components under prototypic solar flux conditions. This work is an important step in reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from a central receiver solar power plant. The key technical risk to building larger power towers is building the larger receiver systems. Therefore, this proposed technology project includes the design of an advanced molten salt prototypic sub-scale receiver panel that can be utilized into a large receiver system. Then complete the fabrication and testing of key components of the receive design that will be used to validate the design. This project shall have a significant impact on solar thermal power plant design. Receiver panels of suitable size for utility scale plants are a key element to a solar power tower plant. Many subtle and complex manufacturing processes are involved in producing a reliable, robust receiver panel. Given the substantial size difference between receiver panels manufactured in the past and those needed for large plant designs, the manufacture and demonstration on prototype receiver panel components with representative features of a full-sized panel will be important to improving the build process for commercial success. Given the thermal flux limitations of the test facility, the panel components cannot be rendered full size. Significance changes occurred in the projects technical strategies from project initiation to the accomplishments described herein. The initial strategy was to define cost improvements for the receiver, design and build a scale prototype receiver and test, on sun, with a molten salt heat transport system. DOE had committed to constructing a molten salt heat transport loop to support receiver testing at the top of the NSTTF tower. Because of funding constraints this did not happen. A subsequent plan to test scale prototype receiver, off sun but at temperature, at a molten salt loop at ground level adjacent to the tower also had to be abandoned. Thus, no test facility existed for a molten salt receiver test. As a result, PWR completed the prototype receiver design and then fabricated key components for testing instead of fabricating the complete prototype receiver. A number of innovative design ideas have been developed. Key features of the receiver panel have been identified. This evaluation includes input from Solar 2, personal experience of people working on these programs and meetings with Sandia. Key components of the receiver design and key processes used to fabricate a receiver have been selected for further evaluation. The Test Plan, Concentrated Solar Power Receiver In Cooperation with the Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratory was written to define the scope of the testing to be completed as well as to provide details related to the hardware, instrumentation, and data acquisition. The document contains a list of test objectives, a test matrix, and an associated test box showing the operating points to be tested. Test Objectives: 1. Demonstrate low-cost manufacturability 2. Demonstrate robustness of two different tube base materials 3. Collect temperature data during on sun operation 4. Demonstrate long term repeated daily operation of heat shields 5. Complete pinhole tube weld repairs 6. Anchor thermal models This report discusses the tests performed, the results, and implications for design improvements and LCOE reduction.

  9. Solar Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water Using a Dual Bed Photosystem - Phase I Final Report and Phase II Proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clovis A. Linkous; Darlene K. Slattery

    2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we are attempting to perform the highly efficient storage of solar energy in the form of H{sub 2} via photocatalytic decomposition of water. While it has been demonstrated that H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} can be evolved from a single vessel containing a single suspended photocatalyst (Sayama 1994; 1997), we are attempting to perform net water-splitting by using two photocatalysts immobilized in separate containers, or beds. A schematic showing how the device would work is shown.

  10. Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee for Transformational...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transformational Rooftop Solar Project Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee for Transformational Rooftop Solar Project September 30, 2011 - 3:37pm Addthis Washington D.C. -...

  11. Organic Based Nanocomposite Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-145

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This CRADA will focus on the development of organic-based solar cells. Key interfacial issues in these cells will be investigated. In this rapidly emerging technology, it is increasingly clear that cell architecture will need to be at the nanoscale and the interfacial issues between organic elements (small molecule and polymer), transparent conducting oxides, and contact metallizations are critical. Thus this work will focus on the development of high surface area and nanostructured nanocarpets of inorganic oxides, the development of appropriate surface binding/acceptor molecules for the inorganic/organic interface, and the development of next-generation organic materials. Work will be performed in all three areas jointly at NREL and Konarka (with their partner in the third area of the University of Delaware). Results should be more rapid progress toward cheap large-area photovoltaic cells.

  12. FINAL REPORT OF RESEARCH ON CuxS/ (Cd,Zn)S PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ENERGY CONVERTERS 3/77 - 9/79

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, B.L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S/(Cd,Zn)S PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ENERGY CONVERTERS 3/77 - 9/79Research on Photovoltaic Solar Energy Converters CuxSI(Cd~

  13. Development of low cost contacts to silicon solar cells. Final report, 15 October 1978-30 April 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, D.P.; Iles, P.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A summary of work done on the development of a copper based contact system for silicon solar cells is presented. The work has proceeded in three phases: (1) Development of a copper based contact system using plated Pd-Cr-Cu. Good cells were made but cells degraded under low temperature (300/sup 0/C) heat treatments. (2) The degradation in Phase I was identified as copper migration into the cells junction region. A paper study was conducted to find a proper barrier to the copper migration problem. Nickel was identified as the best candidate barrier and this was verified in a heat treatment study using evaporated metal layers. (3) An electroless nickel solution was substituted for the electroless chrominum solution in the original process. Efforts were made to replace the palladium bath with an appropriate nickel layer, but these were unsuccessful. 150 cells using the Pd-Ni-Cu contact system were delivered to JPL. Also a cost study was made on the plating process to assess the chance of reaching 5 cents/watt.

  14. Photovoltaic mechanisms in polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. Final report, 28 September 1978-28 September 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanio, K.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were undertaken to examine grain boundaries in polycrystalline material and apply these results to the development of thin-film solar cells using InP as the absorber layers. A model was developed which related material parameters to leakage currents in a thin-film polycrystalline p-n junction. In this model, the grain boundary was treated as a semiconductor with bandgap lower than that of the surrounding bulk. Since a leakage current at the grain boundary might decrease for a wider bandgap material, InGaP was considered and deposited by planar reactive deposition (PRD) on a single-crystal InP and lattice-matched GaAs. X-ray analysis and Hall measurements indicated that the quality of the epitaxy on GaAs was superior to that on InP, presumably due to a closer lattice match. Parallel etching studies to preferentially remove the grain boundaries showed that a 5HCl: 3HNO/sub 3/ : 4HF etch was highly selective in attacking the grain boundaries in bulk polycrystalline InP. Canyons with depths greater than 10 ..mu..m and widths on the order of 1 ..mu..m are the most common form of attack.

  15. Final Workshop of Department's Inaugural Technology Assessment |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 FederalofE: Bibliography of(PEIS) |

  16. The Long Island Solar Farm | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy The Long Island Solar Farm More Documents & Publications The Long Island Solar Farm EA-1663: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1928: Final Environmental Assessment...

  17. The Long Island Solar Farm | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the East. The Long Island Solar Farm More Documents & Publications The Long Island Solar Farm EA-1663: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1928: Final Environmental Assessment...

  18. EIS-0455: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0455: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA Final...

  19. Thin Film Solar Cells Derived from Sintered Semiconductor Quantum Dots: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-07-00226

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginley, D. S.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NREL/Evident team will develop techniques to fabricate thin film solar cells where the absorption layers comprising the solar cells are derived from sintered semiconductor quantum dots.

  20. Productization and Manufacturing Scaling of High-Efficiency Solar Cell and Module Products Based on a Disruptive Low-Cost, Mono-Crystalline Technology: Final Technical Progress Report, April 1, 2009 - December 30, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatemi, H.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report for PV incubator subcontract with Solexel, Inc. The purpose of this project was to develop Solexel's Unique IP, productize it, and transfer it to manufacturing. Silicon constitutes a significant fraction of the total solar cell cost, resulting in an industry-wide drive to lower silicon usage. Solexel's disruptive Solar cell structure got around these challenges and promised superior light trapping, efficiency and mechanical strength, despite being significantly thinner than commercially available cells. Solexel's successful participation in this incubator project became evident as the company is now moving into commercial production and position itself to be competitive for the next Technology Pathway Partnerships (TPP) funding opportunity.

  1. Equipment Only - Solar Resources Measurements at the University of Texas at Austin, TX: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-222

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Faculty and staff at the University of Texas at Austin collected solar resource measurements at their campus using equipment on loan from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The equipment was used to train students on the operation and maintenance of solar radiometers and was returned to NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory upon completion of the CRADA. The resulting data augment the solar resource climatology information required for solar resource characterizations in the U.S. The cooperative agreement was also consistent with NREL's goal of developing an educated workforce to advance renewable energy technologies.

  2. Development of Commercial Technology for Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells on Glass: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-209

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has conducted basic research relating to high efficiency, low cost, thin film silicon solar cell design and the method of making solar cells. Two patents have been issued to NREL in the above field. In addition, specific process and metrology tools have been developed by NREL. Applied Optical Sciences Corp. (AOS) has expertise in the manufacture of solar cells and has developed its own unique concentrator technology. AOS wants to complement its solar cell expertise and its concentrator technology by manufacturing flat panel thin film silicon solar cell panels. AOS wants to take NREL's research to the next level, using it to develop commercially viable flat pane, thin film silicon solar cell panels. Such a development in equipment, process, and metrology will likely produce the lowest cost solar cell technology for both commercial and residential use. NREL's fundamental research capability and AOS's technology and industrial background are complementary to achieve this product development.

  3. CVD Growth of Mono-and Bi-Layer Graphene from Ethanol Xiao Chen, Pei Zhao, Bo Hou, Erik Einarsson, Shohei Chiashi and Shigeo Maruyama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    CVD Growth of Mono- and Bi-Layer Graphene from Ethanol Xiao Chen, Pei Zhao, Bo Hou, Erik Einarsson precursors have been employed to synthesize graphene, such as methane [6], ethane [7] and ethanol [8]. Here we report a systematic study on CVD growth of graphene on Cu and Ni substrates from ethanol. Ethanol

  4. Solar Technology Validation Project - Tri-State G&T: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  5. Solar Technology Validation Project - Utah State Energy Program (Met Station): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-367-09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this Agreement, NREL will work with Participant to improve concentrating solar power system performance characterizations. This work includes, but is not limited to, research and development of methods for acquiring renewable resource characterization information using site-specific measurements of solar radiation and meteorological conditions; collecting system performance data; and developing tools for improving the design, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar energy conversion systems. This work will be conducted at NREL and Participant facilities.

  6. Material and Device Analysis for Efficiency Improvement in Epitaxial Crystalline Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-11-433

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystal Solar has a novel approach for producing low-cost, monocrystalline silicon wafers that are capable of yielding high-efficiency solar cells. The approach involves epitaxial growth of the substrate and a proprietary lift-off technology. Crystal Solar will send selected wafers and cells to NREL for characterization and analyses. NREL will apply a variety of techniques to help identify mechanism(s) that limit the cell efficiency and suggest suitable approaches for mitigation.

  7. Inks for Ink Jet Printed Contacts for High Performance Silicon Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA No. CRD-06-199

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginley, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work under the proposed CRADA will be a joint effort by BP Solar and NREL to develop new types of high performance inks for high quality contacts to silicon solar cells. NREL will develop inks that have electronic properties that will allow the formation of high quality ohmic contacts to n- and p-type crystalline silicon, and BP Solar will evaluate these contacts in test contact structures.

  8. Market assessment for active solar heating and cooling products. Category B: a survey of decision-makers in the HVAC marketplace. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive evaluation of the market for solar heating and cooling products for new and retrofit markets is reported. The emphasis is on the analysis of solar knowledge among HVAC decision makers and a comprehensive evaluation of their solar attitudes and behavior. The data from each of the following sectors are described and analyzed: residential consumers, organizational and manufacturing buildings, HVAC engineers and architects, builders/developers, and commercial/institutional segments. (MHR)

  9. Solar Resource Measurements in El Paso, Texas (Equipment CRADA Only): Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-273

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreas, A.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations.

  10. New Metallization Technique Suitable for 6-MW Pilot Production of Efficient Multicrystalline Solar Cells Using Upgraded Metallurgical Silicon: Final Technical Progress Report, December 17, 2007-- June 16, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report describes CaliSolar's work as a Photovoltaic Technology Incubator awardee within the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program. The term of this subcontract with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was two years. During this time, CaliSolar evolved from a handful of employees to over 100 scientists, engineers, technicians, and operators. On the technical side, the company transitioned from a proof-of-concept through pilot-scale to large-scale industrial production. A fully automated 60-megawatt manufacturing line was commissioned in Sunnyvale, California. The facility converts upgraded metallurgical-grade silicon feedstock to ingots, wafers, and high-efficiency multicrystalline solar cells.

  11. Performance of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. Final report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operation of CSU Solar House I during the heating season of 1978-1979 and during the 1979 cooling season was based on the use of systems comprising an experimental evacuated tubular solar collector, a non-freezing aqueous collection medium, heat exchange to an insulated conventional vertical cylindrical storage tank and to a built-up rectangular insulated storage tank, heating of circulating air by solar heated water and by electric auxiliary in an off-peak heat storage unit, space cooling by lithium bromide absorption chiller, and service water heating by solar exchange and electric auxiliary. Automatic system control and automatic data acquisition and computation are provided. This system is compared with others evaluated in CSU Solar Houses I, II and III, and with computer predictions based on mathematical models. Of the 69,513 MJ total energy requirement for space heating and hot water during a record cold winter, solar provided 33,281 MJ equivalent to 48 percent. Thirty percent of the incident solar energy was collected and 29 percent was delivered and used for heating and hot water. Of 33,320 MJ required for cooling and hot water during the summer, 79 percent or 26,202 MJ were supplied by solar. Thirty-five percent of the incident solar energy was collected and 26 percent was used for hot water and cooling in the summer. Although not as efficient as the Corning evacuated tube collector previously used, the Philips experimental collector provides solar heating and cooling with minimum operational problems. Improved performance, particularly for cooling, resulted from the use of a very well-insulated heat storage tank. Day time (on-peak) electric auxiliary heating was completely avoided by use of off-peak electric heat storage. A well-designed and operated solar heating and cooling system provided 56 percent of the total energy requirements for heating, cooling, and hot water.

  12. Energy Department Finalizes $150 Million Loan Guarantee to 1366...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for a Loan Guarantee to Support Breakthrough Solar Manufacturing Process The Reality of Solar Panels at 50% Cost Department of Energy Finalizes 197 Million Loan Guarantee to...

  13. Commercialization of Novel Organic Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kassegne, Samuel Kinde

    Commercialization of Novel Organic Solar Cells Master of Engineering Final Report Shanel C. Miller................................................................................................................... 12 2.1 How do Solar Cells Work?.................................................................................................. 12 2.2 Types of Solar Cells that Exist Today

  14. Solar heating, cooling, and domestic hot water system installed at Kaw Valley State Bank and Trust Company, Topeka, Kansas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The building has approximately 5600 square feet of conditioned space. Solar energy is used for space heating, space cooling, and preheating domestic hot water (DHW). The solar energy system has an array of evacuated tube-type collectors with an area of 1068 square feet. A 50/50 solution of ethylene glycol and water is the transfer medium that delivers solar energy to a tube-in-shell heat exchanger that in turn delivers solar-heated water to a 1100 gallon pressurized hot water storage tank. When solar energy is insufficient to satisfy the space heating and/or cooling demand, a natural gas-fired boiler provides auxiliary energy to the fan coil loops and/or the absorption chillers. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, and installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  15. EA-1784: Fotowatio Nevada Solar, LLC's Apex Solar Power Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    County, NV July 1, 2010 DOI-BLM-NV-S010-2010-0149-EA: Bureau of Land Management's Final Environmental Assessment Fotowatio Nevada Solar, LLC's APEX Solar Power Project in Clark...

  16. THE POTENTIAL OF SOLAR ELECTRIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    and Environmental Policy University of Delaware April 2005 #12;THE POTENTIAL FOR SOLAR ELECTRIC APPLICATIONSTHE POTENTIAL OF SOLAR ELECTRIC APPLICATIONS FOR DELAWARE'S POULTRY FARMS FINAL REPORT Delaware Energy Office University of Delaware Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University

  17. Solar Resource Measurements in Humboldt State University, Arcata, California: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-262

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center - MIDC (www.nrel.gov/midc) or the Renewable Resource Data Center - RReDC (http://rredc.nrel.gov). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests).

  18. Solar Resource Measurements in Canyon, Texas - Equipment Only Loan: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-233

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreas, A.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high-quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; and provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center (MIDC) or the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests).

  19. Solar Resources Measurements in Elizabeth City, North Carolina - Equipment Only: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-217

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center - MIDC (www.nrel.gov/midc). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests).

  20. EIS-0449: Solar Millennium Blythe Solar Power Project in Riverside...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Riverside County, CA December 10, 2010 EIS-0449: Notice of Adoption of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Blythe Solar Power Project December 10, 2010 EIS-0449:...

  1. Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 2. Conceptual design, Sections 5 and 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains the detailed conceptual design and cost/performance estimates and an assessment of the commercial scale solar central receiver hybrid power system. (WHK)

  2. Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 FederalofE: Bibliography of(PEIS) | Department of

  3. Final_Testimony_3-3_HST__CHU_.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 FederalofE: Bibliography of(PEIS)

  4. EIS-0439: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0439: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Rice Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA Notice of...

  5. EIS-0416: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0416: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (07-AFC-5)...

  6. EA-1663: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1663: Final Environmental Assessment BP Solar Array Project Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York This Environmental Assessment (EA)...

  7. Solar Resource Measurements in 1400 JR Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-254

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site-specific, long-term, continuous, and high-resolution measurements of solar irradiance are important for developing renewable resource data. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: Equipment will be used by Jackson State University for solar radiation data monitoring. This is a continuing effort of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities Solar Measurement Network; Provide high quality ground-truth data for satellite remote sensing validation; Support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; Provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. Data acquired under this agreement will be available to the public through NREL's Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center (MIDC) (www.nrel.gov/midc) or the Renewable Resource Data Center (RReDC ) (http://rredc.nrel.gov). The MIDC offers a variety of standard data display, access, and analysis tools designed to address the needs of a wide user audience (e.g., industry, academia, and government interests.

  8. Low Cost High Efficiency InP-Based Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-344

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL will develop a method of growing and fabricating single junction InP solar cells on 2-inch InP substrates on which a release layer has been deposited by MicroLink Devices. NREL will transfer to MicroLink the details of the InP solar cell layer structure and test results in order that the 2-inch results can be replicated on 4-inch InP substrates. NREL will develop a method of growing and fabricating single junction InP solar cells, including a metamorphic layer, on 2-inch GaAs substrates on which a release layer has been deposited by MicroLink Devices. NREL will transfer to MicroLink the details of the InP solar cell layer structure and test results in order that the 2-inch results can be replicated on 6-inch GaAs substrates. NREL will perform characterization measurements of the solar cells, including I-V and quantum efficiency measurements at AM1.5 1-sun.

  9. Solar Energy System Economic Evaluation. Final report for Elam-Tempe, Tempe, Arizona and Elcam-San Diego, San Diego, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economic analysis of the solar energy systems that were installed at Tempe, Arizona and San Diego, California, is developed for these and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system cost over a projected twenty year life: life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  10. Fermi Guest Investigator Program Cycle 2 Project Final Report Albedo Polarimetry of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Solar Flares with GBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kippen, Richard Marc [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Several key properties of GRBs remain poorly understood and are difficult or even impossible to infer with the information currently being collected. Polarization measurements will probe the precise nature of the central engine. For solar flares, high-energy polarization measurements are expected to be useful in determining the beaming (or directivity) of solar flare electrons - a quantity that may provide important clues about electron acceleration and transport. We propose to investigate the viability of using the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to measure the polarization of GRBs and solar flares using the albedo photon flux. This approach was previously developed for use with BATSE data. We will conduct a careful study of this technique using a modified version of the GRESS simulation tools developed by the GBM team.

  11. Contract to coordinate on-going documentation requirements associated with Title X legislation for DOE active-solar activities. Final project technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this work were to ensure that Title X Active Solar Program reports complied with all guidance regarding length, format, coverage, tone, tables and schedules; provide necessary Conservation and Renewable Energy Office background and back-up material; follow this activity through to its completion in January 1982; assess information requirements associated with on-going documentation of Federal Buildings Program and its predecessors; establish a method for collecting, maintaining and utilizing appropriate program data specifically related to the preparation of report due in June 1982. Work on this project has generally remained on schedule and within budget. DOE-SAN has been instrumental in keeping us on track, by providing timely guidance as needed. Attached are recommendations and methods for documenting solar heat technologies research and the Title X sunset policy, planning, and evaluation long report for Active Solar Heating and Cooling Program.

  12. Final Closeout report for grant FG36-08GO18018, titled: Functional Multi-Layer Solution Processable Polymer Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam J. Moule

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The original objectives were: (1) Develop a method to deposit multiple conjugated polymer film layers and avoid the problem of dissolution from mutually solubility; (2) Use this deposition method to develop multi-layer polymer based solar cells with layers that are function specific; (3) characterize these layers and devices; (4) develop electrical and optical models that describe and predict the properties of the multi-layers; and (5) Ultimate efficiency goals are {approx}6.75% with J{sub sc} = 12 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF = 0.75, and V{sub oc} = 0.75. The question of whether photovoltaic (PV) cells will ever be able to replace fossil fuels as the main provider of electrical power is not just a question of device efficiency; it is a question of how much power can be provided for what price. It has been well documented that PV devices at 10% power efficiency can provide for all of the world's power needs without covering too much of the earth's surface. Assuming desert like cloud coverage, an area equivalent to the land area of Texas would have to be covered. However, it has also been shown that using the current state-of-the-art silicon devices, the price-per-Watt will never be low enough to be economically feasible for large-scale development. Solution-processable PV devices based on polymers are a very attractive alternative to traditional Silicon PV because this technology is much lower in materials cost and in environmentally toxic waste production. Solution-based polymers can be rapidly deposited using printing technologies and are compatible with light-weight flexible substrates that can increase the range of available PV applications. In the past ten years, the efficiency of polymer based PV devices has increased from {approx}1% to over 10%. The highest efficiency organic solar cells are based upon a single layer than consists of a mixture of donor and acceptor moieties. This one layer has multiple optical and electrical functions, so the design of a single heterojunction layer is based upon the idea of balancing good and bad properties within a single film. This proposal addresses the idea that the use of multiple layers that have differing electrical and optical functions could lead to greater efficiency because fewer materials compromises must be made. This idea is not new, multiple functional layer have been successfully used in cross-linked OLED's and organic small molecule evaporated PV devices. The main reason that multiple layers of polymers are not commonly deposited is that most conjugated polymers are mutually soluble in the same solvents. The work outlined in the proposal was intended to develop a new deposition strategy that would allow multiple organic layers to be deposited from solution using spin coating. The deposition method that we proposed was successful, sometimes, but ultimately not reliable. Instead we focused on more reliable methods to implement doping along the interface between layers. This work has been very successful. We found that using PEDOT:PSS, the PSS would form a surface layer of {approx}2-3 nm thickness that would mix with and electrochemically react with P3HT upon heating. This mechanism is also a crosslinking reaction in that H{sub 2} is released and permanent new bonds are formed. Using the Plextronics Inc. replacement to PEDOT:PSS, for which there are no mobile dopants, we were able to show that a second and different mechanism can be used to p-type dope organic materials. We are currently working with Plextronics to develop a new product. Finally we produced n-type doping of a thin fullerene layer near the cathode also using a self-assembly method. Low work function metals will diffuse into the BHJ layer and dope the fullerene upon heating. This doping also affects the vertical segregation of BHJ materials in a predictable way. We accomplished all of the scientific goals that we set out in the proposal written in May 2007. Some of the methods we proposed were not fully successful, but we did come up with better methods to achieve the same goal. We did not achieve the efficiency g

  13. Characterization of vegetation properties: Canopy modeling of pinyon-juniper and ponderosa pine woodlands; Final report. Modeling topographic influences on solar radiation: A manual for the SOLARFLUX model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich, P.M.; Hetrick, W.A.; Saving, S.C.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is comprised of two studies. The first study focuses on plant canopies in pinyon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine woodland, and waste sites at Los Alamos National Laboratory which involved five basic areas of research: (1) application of hemispherical photography and other gap fraction techniques to study solar radiation regimes and canopy architecture, coupled with application of time-domain reflectometry to study soil moisture; (2) detailed characterization of canopy architecture using stand mapping and allometry; (3) development of an integrated geographical information system (GIS) database for relating canopy architecture with ecological, hydrological, and system modeling approaches; (4) development of geometric models that simulate complex sky obstruction, incoming solar radiation for complex topographic surfaces, and the coupling of incoming solar radiation with energy and water balance, with simulations of incoming solar radiation for selected native vegetation and experimental waste cover design sites; and (5) evaluation of the strengths and limitations of the various field sampling techniques. The second study describes an approach to develop software that takes advantage of new generation computers to model insolation on complex topographic surfaces. SOLARFLUX is a GIS-based (ARC/INFO, GRID) computer program that models incoming solar radiation based on surface orientation (slope and aspect), solar angle (azimuth and zenith) as it shifts over time, shadows caused by topographic features, and atmospheric conditions. This manual serves as the comprehensive guide to SOLARFLUX. Included are discussions on modelling insolation on complex surfaces, the theoretical approach, program setup and operation, and a set of applications illustrating characteristics of topographic insolation modelling.

  14. Gallium arsenide-based ternary compounds and multi-band-gap solar cell research. Final subcontract report, 1 April 1988--31 March 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vernon, S. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to achieve a high-efficiency, low-cost solar cell. The basic approach to the problem is centered upon the heteroepitaxial growth of a III-V compound material onto a single-crystal silicon wafer. The growth technique employed throughout this work is metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The silicon wafer may serve as a mechanical substrate and ohmic contact for a single-junction device, or it may contain a p-n junction of its own and form the bottom cell of a two-junction tandem solar cell structure. The III-V material for the single-junction case is GaAs, and for the two-junction case it is either GaAlAs or GaAsP, either material having the proper composition to yield a band gap of approximately 1.7 eV. Results achieved in this contract include (1) a 17.6%-efficient GaAs-on-Si solar cell; (2) an 18.5%-efficient GaAs-on-Si concentrator solar cell at 400 suns; (3) a 24.8%-efficient GaAs-on-GaAs solar cell; (4) a 28.7%-efficient GaAs-on-GaAs concentrator solar cell at 200 suns; (5) the measurement of the effects of dislocation density and emitter doping on GaAs cells; and (6) improvements in the growth process to achieve reproducible thin AlGaAs window layers with low recombination velocities and environmental stability.

  15. Evaluation of Solar Grade Silicon Produced by the Institute of Physics and Technology: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-211

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, M.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL and Solar Power Industries will cooperate to evaluate technology for producing solar grade silicon from industrial waste of the phosphorus industry, as developed by the Institute of Physics and Technology (IPT), Kazakhstan. Evaluation will have a technical component to assess the material quality and a business component to assess the economics of the IPT process. The total amount of silicon produced by IPT is expected to be quite limited (50 kg), so evaluations will need to be done on relatively small quantities (? 5 kg/sample).

  16. 1980 survey and evaluation of utility conservation, load management, and solar end-use projects. Volume 3: utility load management projects. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the 1980 survey of electric utility-sponsored energy conservation, load management, and end-use solar energy conversion projects are described. The work is an expansion of a previous survey and evaluation and has been jointly sponsored by EPRI and DOE through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. There are three volumes and a summary document. Each volume presents the results of an extensive survey to determine electric utility involvement in customer-side projects related to the particular technology (i.e., conservation, solar, or load management), selected descriptions of utility projects and results, and first-level technical and economic evaluations.

  17. EA-1839: Cogentrix Solar Project near Alamosa, CO | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9: Cogentrix Solar Project near Alamosa, CO EA-1839: Cogentrix Solar Project near Alamosa, CO April 28, 2011 EA-1839: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant...

  18. EA-1796: Sempra Mesquite Solar Energy Facility near Gillespie...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Sempra Mesquite Solar Energy Facility near Gillespie, AZ EA-1796: Sempra Mesquite Solar Energy Facility near Gillespie, AZ February 1, 2011 EA-1796: Final Environmental...

  19. Solar Resource Measurements in Cocoa, Florida (FSEC) - Equipment Loaned to NREL: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-318

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoffel, T.; Afshin, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site-specific measurements of global and diffuse solar irradiance components, passively separated by alternate shading and unshading of a pyranometer mounted under a shading band with alternating opaque and open panels (for a site other than NREL) are needed to verify the underlying theory and mathematical techniques for developing direct, global and diffuse renewable resource data from such a system. These data are used for several research and development activities consistent with the NREL mission: Establish a national 30-year climatological database of measured solar irradiances; Support development of radiative transfer models for estimating solar irradiance from available meteorological observations; Provide solar resource information needed for technology deployment and operations. NREL will provide the supporting equipment (Shadow Bank Stand) for the specially designed shading band. FSEC will provide the calibrated pyranometer and perform data acquisition of the radiometer signal. Data acquired under this agreement will be shared with the NREL Principle Investigator for the purposes of validating techniques for estimating direct radiation from global and diffuse components measured with the ZEBRA system.

  20. High-Efficiency Amorphous Silicon and Nanocrystalline Silicon-Based Solar Cells and Modules: Final Technical Progress Report, 30 January 2006 - 29 January 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    United Solar Ovonic successfully used its spectrum-splitting a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H triple-junction structure in their manufacturing plants, achieving a manufacturing capacity of 118 MW in 2007, and set up a very aggressive expansion plan to achieve grid parity.

  1. Spectrally selective beam splitters designed to decouple quantum and thermal solar energy conversion in hybrid concentrating systems: Final report, Phase 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, D.E.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical feasibility and flexibility of developing elements that separate concentrated solar irradiation into specific spectral regions matched to specific photoquantum processes have been shown. These elements, spectrally selective beam splitters or filters, are designed to decouple quantum and thermal solar energy conversion in hybrid concentrating systems. Both interference filters and liquid absorption filters were investigated for use as spectrally selective beam splitters. Spectral selectivity is investigated for a variety of quantum systems with various spectral windows utilizing interference and absorption filters designed. Detailed analysis of one typical quantum system is provided consisting of a model of the silicon cell photovoltaic/photothermal hybrid system using spectral selectivity. The performance benefits of this approach are shown. Interference filters show the greatest flexibility and ability to match specific spectral windows. Liquid absorption filters appear to be a lower cost option, when an appropriate spectrally selective solution that can be used as a heat transfer fluid is available. 18 refs., 88 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

  3. Development of Thin Film Silicon Solar Cell Using Inkjet Printed Silicon and Other Inkjet Processes: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-260

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost of silicon photovoltaics (Si-PV) can be greatly lowered by developing thin-film crystalline Si solar cells on glass or an equally lower cost substrate. Typically, Si film is deposited by thermal evaporation, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and sputtering. NREL and Silexos have worked under a CRADA to develop technology to make very low cost solar cells using liquid organic precursors. Typically, cyclopentasilane (CPS) is deposited on a glass substrate and then converted into an a-Si film by UV polymerization followed by low-temperature optical process that crystallizes the amorphous layer. This technique promises to be a very low cost approach for making a Si film.

  4. High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 1 September 2001--6 March 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives for the University of Toledo are to: (1) establish a transferable knowledge and technology base for fabricating high-efficiency triple-junction a-Si-based solar cells, and (2) develop high-rate deposition techniques for the growing a-Si-based and related alloys, including poly-Si, c-Si, a-SiGe, and a-Si films and photovoltaic devices with these materials.

  5. High-Efficiency Amorphous Silicon Alloy Based Solar Cells and Modules; Final Technical Progress Report, 30 May 2002--31 May 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guha, S.; Yang, J.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of this R&D program is to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for development of high-efficiency hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon-germanium alloy (a-SiGe:H) related thin-film multijunction solar cells and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. Our strategy has been to use the spectrum-splitting triple-junction structure, a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H, to improve solar cell and module efficiency, stability, and throughput of production. The methodology used to achieve the objectives included: (1) explore the highest stable efficiency using the triple-junction structure deposited using RF glow discharge at a low rate, (2) fabricate the devices at a high deposition rate for high throughput and low cost, and (3) develop an optimized recipe using the R&D batch large-area reactor to help the design and optimization of the roll-to-roll production machines. For short-term goals, we have worked on the improvement of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H alloy solar cells. a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H are the foundation of current a-Si:H based thin-film photovoltaic technology. Any improvement in cell efficiency, throughput, and cost reduction will immediately improve operation efficiency of our manufacturing plant, allowing us to further expand our production capacity.

  6. Development of Advanced Deposition Technology for Microcrystalline Si Based Solar Cells and Modules: Final Technical Report, 1 May 2002-31 July 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. M.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The key objective of this subcontract was to take the first steps to extend the radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) manufacturing technology of Energy Photovoltaics, Inc. (EPV), to the promising field of a-Si/nc-Si solar cell fabrication by demonstrating ''proof-of-concept'' devices of good efficiencies that previously were believed to be unobtainable in single-chamber reactors owing to contamination problems. A complementary goal was to find a new high-rate deposition method that can conceivably be deployed in large PECVD-type reactors. We emphasize that our goal was not to produce 'champion' devices of near-record efficiencies, but rather, to achieve modestly high efficiencies using a far simpler (cheaper) system, via practical processing methods and materials. To directly attack issues in solar-cell fabrication at EPV, the nc-Si thin films were studied almost exclusively in the p-i-n device configuration (as absorbers or i-layers), not as stand-alone films. Highly efficient, p-i-n type, nc-Si-based solar cells are generally grown on expensive, laboratory superstrates, such as custom ZnO/glass of high texture (granular surface) and low absorption. Also standard was the use of a highly effective back-reflector ZnO/Ag, where the ZnO can be surface-textured for efficient diffuse reflection. The high-efficiency ''champion'' devices made by the PECVD methods were invariably prepared in sophisticated (i.e., expensive), multi-chamber, or at least load-locked deposition systems. The electrode utilization efficiency, defined as the surface-area ratio of the powered electrode to that of the substrates, was typically low at about one (1:1). To evaluate the true potential of nc-Si absorbers for cost-competitive, commercially viable manufacturing of large-area PV modules, we took a more down-to-earth approach, based on our proven production of a-Si PV modules by a massively parallel batch process in single-chamber RF-PECVD systems, to the study of nc-Si solar cells, with the aim of producing high-efficiency a-Si/nc-Si solar cells and sub-modules.

  7. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Chris [Altamont Environmental, Inc.] [Altamont Environmental, Inc.

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The project, ?Capital Investment to Fund Equipment Purchases and Facility Modifications to Create a Sustainable Future for EnergyXchange? served to replace landfill gas energy with alternative energy resources, primarily solar and wood waste. This is the final project closeout report.

  8. Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Leasing Program, under which DOE administers tracts of land in western Colorado for exploration, development, and the extraction of uranium and vanadium ores. ULP PEIS...

  9. Development of Advanced CdTe Solar Cells Based on High Temperature Corning Glass Substrates: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, T.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has developed advanced processes for CdTe solar cells, but because of the temperature limitations of conventional soda lime glass, many of these processes have not been transferred to manufacturing. Corning is developing high temperature substrate glasses that are believed to be manufacturable and will lead to lower $/watt modules costs. The purpose of this CRADA is to evaluate these glasses in the advanced NREL processes. In addition, the CRADA seeks to develop manufacturable processes for transparent conductive oxide layers based on cadmium stannate.

  10. Solar Resource Measurements in 1400 JR Lynch Street, Jackson, Mississippi: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-254

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouof Energy Projects to Solar Resource

  11. Abengoa Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) Abengoa Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) Abengoa Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) Abengoa Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) Abengoa Solar, Inc. (Mojave Solar) Abengoa...

  12. Solar Trailer Group EGDSN 297 D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Solar Trailer Group EGDSN 297 D Project Recap The objective of the Solar Trailer team was to design and implement a solar PV system for the ToolMaster Trailer HAZ-16 that is used by the Center for Sustainability was constructed. Finally in an all night effort to complete the project the racking and solar panels were

  13. Large-Scale PV Module Manufacturing Using Ultra-Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 April 2002--28 February 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.; Narayanan, M.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objectives of this program were to continue advances of BP Solar polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology. The Program included work in the following areas. (1) Efforts in the casting area to increase ingot size, improve ingot material quality, and improve handling of silicon feedstock as it is loaded into the casting stations. (2) Developing wire saws to slice 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers on 290-..mu..m-centers. (3) Developing equipment for demounting and subsequent handling of very thin silicon wafers. (4) Developing cell processes using 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers that produce encapsulated cells with efficiencies of at least 15.4% at an overall yield exceeding 95%. (5) Expanding existing in-line manufacturing data reporting systems to provide active process control. (6) Establishing a 50-MW (annual nominal capacity) green-field Mega-plant factory model template based on this new thin polycrystalline silicon technology. (7) Facilitating an increase in the silicon feedstock industry's production capacity for lower-cost solar-grade silicon feedstock..

  14. Growth and development of GaInAsP for use in high-efficiency solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1991--30 December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharps, P.R. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes accomplishments during Phase 3 of this subcontract. The overall goals of the subcontract were (1) to develop the necessary technology to grow high-efficiency GaInAsP layers that are lattice-matched to GaAs and Ge; (2) to demonstrate highefficiency GaInAsP single-junction solar cells; and (3) to demonstrate GaInAsP/Ge cascade solar cells suitable for operation under concentrated (500X) sunlight. The major accomplishments during Phase 3 include (1) demonstrating a GaInAsP tunnel diode for use as an interconnect in the GaInAsP/Ge cascade cell, and (2) demonstrating a GaInAsP/Ge cascade cell. The development of the GaInAsP tunnel diode is a major accomplishment because it allows for the GaInAsP and Ge cells to be connected without optical losses for the bottom Ge cell, such as a Ge tunnel diode would cause. The GaInAsP/Ge cascade cell development is significant because of the demonstration of a cascade cell with a new materials system.

  15. Solar Rights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In June 2010, Louisiana enacted solar rights legislation (HB 751) that prohibits certain entities from unreasonably restricting a property owner from installing a solar collector. Solar collectors...

  16. WindEnergyPEIS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statement (DOEEIS-0408) Western Area Power Administration (Western) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) have jointly prepared this draft programmatic...

  17. Estimating solar irradiance using a geostationary satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquhart, Bryan Glenn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WR7. Solar Radiation Data (SoDa) Service. http://www.soda-1995). In National Solar Radiation Data Base—Final TechnicalMeteosat derived gridded radiation data for Europe. This

  18. Development of ZnTe:Cu Contacts for CdTe Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-320

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhere, R.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main focus of the work at NREL was on the development of Cu-doped ZnTe contacts to CdTe solar cells in the substrate configuration. The work performed under the CRADA utilized the substrate device structure used at NREL previously. All fabrication was performed at NREL. We worked on the development of Cu-doped ZnTe as well as variety of other contacts such as Sb-doped ZnTe, CuxTe, and MoSe2. We were able to optimize the contacts to improve device parameters. The improvement was obtained primarily through increasing the open-circuit voltage, to values as high as 760 mV, leading to device efficiencies of 7%.

  19. Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

  20. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program TPP Final Report - A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. PV Industry Growth, GE Global Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Tolliver; Danielle Merfeld; Charles Korman; James Rand; Tom McNulty; Neil Johnson; Dennis Coyle

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    General Electric’s (GE) DOE Solar Energy Technologies TPP program encompassesd development in critical areas of the photovoltaic value chain that affected the LCOE for systems in the U.S. This was a complete view across the value chain, from materials to rooftops, to identify opportunities for cost reductions in order to realize the Department of Energy’s cost targets for 2010 and 2015. GE identified a number of strategic partners with proven leadership in their respective technology areas to accelerate along the path to commercialization. GE targeted both residential and commercial rooftop scale systems. To achieve these goals, General Electric and its partners investigated three photovoltaic pathways that included bifacial high-efficiency silicon cells and modules, low-cost multicrystalline silicon cells and modules and flexible thin film modules. In addition to these technologies, the balance of system for residential and commercial installations were also investigated. Innovative system installation strategies were pursed as an additional avenue for cost reduction.

  1. DUAL-MODE PROPULSION SYSTEM ENABLING CUBESAT EXPLORATION OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Jerred; Troy Howe; Adarsh Rajguru; Dr. Steven Howe

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is apparent the cost of planetary exploration is rising as mission budgets declining. Currently small scientific beds geared to performing limited tasks are being developed and launched into low earth orbit (LEO) in the form of small-scale satellite units, i.e., CubeSats. These micro- and nano-satellites are gaining popularity among the university and science communities due to their relatively low cost and design flexibility. To date these small units have been limited to performing tasks in LEO utilizing solar-based power. If a reasonable propulsion system could be developed, these CubeSat platforms could perform exploration of various extra-terrestrial bodies within the solar system engaging a broader range of researchers. Additionally, being mindful of mass, smaller cheaper launch vehicles (~1,000 kgs to LEO) can be targeted. This, in effect, allows for beneficial explora-tion to be conducted within limited budgets. Researchers at the Center for Space Nuclear Re-search (CSNR) are proposing a low mass, radioisotope-based, dual-mode propulsion system capable of extending the exploration realm of these CubeSats out of LEO. The proposed radioisotope-based system would leverage the high specific energies [J/kg] associated with radioisotope materials and enhance their inherent low specific powers [W/g]. This is accomplished by accumulating thermal energy from nuclear decay within a central core over time. This allows for significant amounts of power to be transferred to a flowing gas over short periods of time. In the proposed configuration the stored energy can be utilized in two ways: (1) with direct propellant injection to the core, the energy can be converted into thrust through the use of a converging-diverging nozzle and (2) by flowing a working fluid through the core and subsequent Brayton engine, energy within the core can be converted to electrical energy. The first scenario achieves moderate ranges of thrust, but at a higher Isp than traditional chemical-based systems. The second scenario allows for the production of electrical power, which is then available for electric-based propulsion. Additionally, once at location the production of electrical power can be dedicated to the payload’s communication system for data transfer. Ultimately, the proposed dual-mode propulsion platform capitalizes on the benefits of two types of propulsion methods – the thrust of thermal propulsion ideal for quick orbital maneuvers and the specific impulse of electric propulsion ideal for efficient inter-planetary travel. Previous versions of this RTR-based concept have been studied for various applications [NETS 1-3]. The current version of this concept is being matured through a NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) Phase I grant, awarded for FY 2014. In this study the RTR concept is being developed to deliver a 6U CubeSat payload to the orbit of the Saturnian moon - Enceladus. Additionally, this study will develop an entire mission architecture for Enceladus targeting a total allowable launch mass of 1,000 kg.

  2. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT SAIC SOLAR DISHUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · EnergyRelated Environmental Research · EnergyUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Solar Dish Concentrator

  3. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT HYBRID SOLAR LIGHTINGUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants · EnergyRelated Environmental Research · EnergyUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Hybrid Solar Lighting

  4. Final load of debris shipped from K-25 Building demolition project |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 FederalofE: Bibliography of(PEIS) |Department of

  5. Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement: Volume 1, DOE/EIS-0472, March 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINAL Site-WideTestimony of(PEIS)

  6. Georgia Power- Advanced Solar Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: According to Georgia Power's website, the Advanced Solar Initiative's final program guidelines are due to be published on June 25th and the bidding period for is expected to open on July 10,...

  7. NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) NRG Solar (California Valley Solar Ranch) Location: San...

  8. Solar Easements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia's solar easement law is similar to those in effect in other states. The Virginia Solar Easements Act of 1978 allows property owners to create binding solar easements for the purpose of...

  9. Department of Energy Finalizes Partial Guarantee for $852 Million...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Partial Guarantee for 852 Million Loan to Support California Concentrating Solar Power Plant Department of Energy Finalizes Partial Guarantee for 852 Million Loan to Support...

  10. CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating Unmeasured Solar Radiation Quantities . . . . . .Appendix C - Appendix 0 - Solar Radiation Glossary. ConversSolar Data a. Solar Radiation. , , . , . . , , , , . , . . .

  11. Community Shared Solar with Solarize

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An overview of the concept behind The Solarize Guidebook, which offers neighborhoods a plan for getting volume discounts when making group purchases of rooftop solar energy systems.

  12. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Solar in Action (Brochure),...

  13. Fissile Material Disposition Program: Deep Borehole Disposal Facility PEIS data input report for direct disposal. Direct disposal of plutonium metal/plutonium dioxide in compound metal canisters. Version 3.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wijesinghe, A.M.; Shaffer, R.J.

    1996-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for disposing of excess weapons-usable nuclear materials [principally plutonium (Pu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] in a form or condition that is substantially and inherently more difficult to recover and reuse in weapons production. This report is the data input report for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS examines the environmental, safety, and health impacts of implementing each disposition alternative on land use, facility operations, and site infrastructure; air quality and noise; water, geology, and soils; biotic, cultural, and paleontological resources; socioeconomics; human health; normal operations and facility accidents; waste management; and transportation. This data report is prepared to assist in estimating the environmental effects associated with the construction and operation of a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility, an alternative currently included in the PEIS. The facility projects under consideration are, not site specific. This report therefore concentrates on environmental, safety, and health impacts at a generic site appropriate for siting a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility.

  14. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  15. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biros, George

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This the final report for the project "Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems," for the work in the group of the co-PI George Biros.

  16. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hameed A. Naseem, Husam H. Abu-Safe

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to investigate metal-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon at low temperatures using excitation sources such as laser and rapid thermal annealing, as well as, electric field. Deposition of high quality crystalline silicon at low temperatures allows the use of low cost soda-lime glass and polymeric films for economically viable photovoltaic solar cells and low cost large area flat panel displays. In light of current and expected demands on Si supply due to expanding use of consumer electronic products throughout the world and the incessant demand for electric power the need for developing high grade Si thin films on low cost substrate becomes even more important. We used hydrogenated and un-hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering techniques (both of which are extensively used in electronic and solar cell industries) to fabricate nano-crystalline, poly-crystalline (small as well as large grain), and single-crystalline (epitaxial) films at low temperatures. We demonstrated Si nanowires on flat surfaces that can be used for fabricating nanometer scale transistors. We also demonstrated lateral crystallization using Al with and without an applied electric field. These results are critical for high mobility thin film transistors (TFT) for large area display applications. Large grain silicon (~30-50 µm grain size for < 0.5 µm thick films) was demonstrated on glass substrates at low temperatures. We also demonstrated epitaxial growth of silicon on (100) Si substrates at temperatures as low as 450?C. Thin film Si solar cells are being projected as the material of choice for low cost high efficiency solar cells when properly coupled with excellent light-trapping schemes. Ar ion laser (CW) was shown to produce dendritic nanowire structures at low power whereas at higher powers yielded continuous polycrystalline films. The power density required for films in contact with Al was demonstrated to be at least two orders of magnitude lower that that reported in the literature before. Polysilicon was successfully achieved on polyimide (Kapton©) films. Thin film Si solar cells on lightweight stoable polymer offer great advantage for terrestrial and space power applications. In summary we have demonstrated through this research the viability of producing low cost nano-, poly-, and epitaxial Si material on substrates of choice for applications in economically viable environmentally friendly sustainable solar power systems. This truly enabling technology has widespread applications in multibillion dollar electronic industry and consumer products.

  17. Solar Rights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cities and counties in North Carolina generally may not adopt ordinances prohibiting the installation of "a solar collector that gathers solar radiation as a substitute for traditional energy for...

  18. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Meng Tao

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this DOE SAI project is to demonstrate the feasibility of electrodeposited and solution-doped transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) such as zinc oxide with resistivity in the mid-10{sup -4} {Omega}-cm range. The target application is an 'on-top' TCO which can be deposited on semiconductors in thin-film and future solar cells including amorphous silicon, copper indium gallium selenide and emerging solar cells. There is no solution-prepared on-top TCO currently used in commercial solar cells. This project, if successful, will fill this gap. Our technical objectives include electrodeposited TCOs with (1) resistivity in the mid-10{sup -4} {Omega}-cm range, (2) post-deposition annealing below 300 C and (3) no-vacuum processing or low-vacuum processing. All the three research objectives listed above have been accomplished in the 14-month period from July 1, 2009 through September 30, 2010. The most noticeable accomplishments of this project are (1) identification of a terawatt-scale dopant for zinc oxide, i.e. yttrium, whose known reserve is enough for 60 peak terawatts of thin-film solar cells; (2) demonstration of a record-low resistivity, 6.3 x 10{sup -5} {Omega}-cm, in solution-deposited zinc oxide with an abundant dopant; and (3) the record-low resistivity was accomplished with a maximum process temperature of 300 C and without vacuum annealing. Industrial applications of the new yttrium-doped zinc oxide are being pursued, including (1) green deposition of yttrium-doped zinc oxide to reduce water consumption during deposition and (2) search for an industrial partner to develop an electrochemical tool for large-area uniform deposition of yttrium-doped zinc oxide.

  19. EIS-0448: First Solar Desert Sunlight Project in Riverside County...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Final Environmental Impact Statement Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project, California June 24, 2011 EIS-0448: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact...

  20. EIS-0416: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in San Bernardino...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Available for Download October 22, 2010 EIS-0416: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (07-AFC-5)...

  1. EIS-0455: Genesis Solar Energy Project in Riverside County, CA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7, 2010 EIS-0455: Notice of Adoption of an Environmental Impact Statement Genesis Solar Energy Project, Riverside County, CA August 27, 2010 EIS-0455: Final Environmental Impact...

  2. Final Reminder:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb.Information 91, 20159,Final Reminder: Final

  3. Solar forecasting review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Richard Headen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and forecasting of solar radiation data: a review,”forecasting of solar- radiation data,” Solar Energy, vol.sequences of global solar radiation data for isolated sites:

  4. CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating Unmeasured Solar Radiation Quantities . . . . . .Weather Data . . . . . , . , . . . . . . . . . .Solar DataB. l'he Solar Constant. . . . . . C. Solar Time and Standard

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Facility NSTTF Nuclear Energy photovoltaic Photovoltaics PV Renewable Energy solar Solar Energy solar power Solar Research Solid-State Lighting SSLS Connect Contact Us RSS...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSTTF Nuclear Energy photovoltaic Photovoltaics PV Renewable Energy solar Solar Energy solar power Solar Research Solid-State Lighting SSLS Connect Contact Us RSS Google+...

  7. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  8. High efficiency, radiation-hard solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ager III, J.W.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. F. Geisz, “Superior radiation resistance of In 1-x Ga x Nand H. Itoh, “Proton radiation analysis of multi-junction56326 High efficiency, radiation-hard solar cells Final

  9. Property Tax Exemption for Residential Solar Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    [http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0233.pdf HB 233 of 2010] exempted residential solar energy systems from property tax assessments. According to state law, for the purposes of...

  10. Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SREC-I)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: In April 2014, the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) issued final changes to its RPS Class I and RPS Solar Carve-Out programs. These changes resulted in the establishment of...

  11. Solar Decathlon 2005: The Event in Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, S.; Nahan, R.; Warner, C.; Wassmer, M.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Decathlon 2005: The Event in Review is a technical report describing the 2005 Solar Decathlon, an event sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy wherein 18 collegiate teams competed in 10 contests to design, build, and operate an attractive, efficient, entirely solar-powered home. The report gives an overview of the competition, including final results, team strategies, and detailed descriptions the 18 homes.

  12. Solar Car

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Des Moines Central Academy Middle School students compete in the Solar Car Challenge at the National Science Bowl, May 2 in Washington D.C.

  13. Solar Rights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maine law requires that any municipal ordinance, bylaw, or regulation adopted after September 30, 2009 regulating solar energy devices on residential property follow certain requirements. The rules...

  14. Final_signed_-_Thank_you_letters_by_EM-1_to_the_EMSSAB_Advisory_Board_-_dated_May_27,_2014.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 FederalofE: Bibliography of(PEIS)

  15. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouvetakis, John

    2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The project addressed the need for improved multijunction solar cells as identified within the Solar America Initiative program. The basic Ge/InGaAs/InGaP triple-junction structure that has led to record commercial efficiencies remains unoptimized due to excess current in the germanium component. Furthermore, its deployment cannot be scaled up to terawatt-level applications due to bottlenecks related to germanium�s cost and abundance. The purpose of the program was to explore new strategies developed at Arizona State University to deposit germanium films on much cheaper silicon substrates, largely eliminating the germanium bottleneck, and at the same time to develop new materials that should lead to an improvement in multijunction efficiencies. This included the ternary alloy SiGeSn, which can be inserted as a fourth junction in a Ge/SiGeSn/InGaAs/InGaP structure to compensate for the excess current in the bottom cell. Moreover, the possibility of depositing materials containing Sn on Si substrates created an opportunity for replacing the bottom Ge cell with a GeSn alloy, which, combined with new III-V alloys for the top cells, should enable 4-junction structures with perfectly optimized band gaps. The successes of the program, to be described below, has led to the developments of new strategies for the growth of high-quality germanium films on Si substrates and to a widespread recognition that SiGeSn is likely to play a significant role in future generations of high-efficiency devices, as demonstrated by new research and intellectual property efforts by major US industrial players.

  16. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  17. FINAL REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-lFederal ColumbiaASCR2 FINALRIVEROffice of FINAL

  18. Final Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 CleanFORTechnicalFINAL

  19. Final Proposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb.Information 91, 20159, 2012Page 1Final-Proposal

  20. Final Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb.Information 91, 20159,Final Reminder:

  1. EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF TWO SOLAR PANEL SIMULATIONS Krisztina Leban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Ewen

    EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF TWO SOLAR PANEL SIMULATIONS Krisztina Leban Institute of Energy Technology solar panel for varying temperature and irradiance. Final validation was done by comparing experimental are a renewable, non-polluting source of energy that are increasingly used for hybrid (solar panels and grid

  2. Solar neutrino measurements in Super-Kamiokande-I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The details of Super--Kamiokande--I's solar neutrino analysis are given. Solar neutrino measurement in Super--Kamiokande is a high statistics collection of $^8$B solar neutrinos via neutrino-electron scattering. The analysis method and results of the 1496 day data sample are presented. The final oscillation results for the data are also presented.

  3. POLICIES TO SUPPORT COMMUNITY SOLAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    POLICIES TO SUPPORT COMMUNITY SOLAR INITIATIVES: BEST PRACTICES TO ENHANCE NET METERING FINAL and Environmental Policy University of Delaware February 2012 #12;Mailing Address: John Byrne Director Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716-7381 Email: jbbyrne

  4. EIS-0403: DOE and BLM Notice of Availability of the Final Programmatic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (AZ, CA, CO, NV, NM, and UT) The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the...

  5. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leclerc, Monique Y.

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report presents the main activities and results of the project “A Carbon Flux Super Site: New Insights and Innovative Atmosphere-Terrestrial Carbon Exchange Measurements and Modeling” from 10/1/2006 to 9/30/2014. It describes the new AmeriFlux tower site (Aiken) at Savanna River Site (SC) and instrumentation, long term eddy-covariance, sodar, microbarograph, soil and other measurements at the site, and intensive field campaigns of tracer experiment at the Carbon Flux Super Site, SC, in 2009 and at ARM-CF site, Lamont, OK, and experiments in Plains, GA. The main results on tracer experiment and modeling, on low-level jet characteristics and their impact on fluxes, on gravity waves and their influence on eddy fluxes, and other results are briefly described in the report.

  6. Development of Novel RTP-like Processing for Solar Cell Fabrication using UV-Rich Light Sources: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA No. CRD-11-442

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL and Mattson Technology are interested in developing new processing techniques for fabrication of solar cells using UV-rich optical processing. UV light has a very high absorption coefficient in most semiconductors, allowing the semiconductor surface to be heated locally and, in some cases, without a significant increase in the substrate temperature. NREL has several projects related to cell processing that currently use an optical furnace (having a spectrum rich in visible and infrared light). Mattson Technology has developed a UV rich light source that can be used in either pulse or continuous modes. The objective of this CRADA is to explore applications in solar cell processing where absorption characteristics of UV light can lead to lower cell cost and/or higher efficiencies.

  7. EA-1935: To’Hajiilee Solar Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has determined that providing federal funding to conduct development activities including final engineering and design for a proposed 30 megawatt solar electricity generation facility, would not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the environment, and therefore, DOE has adopted the EA, titled “Final Environmental Assessment for the To’Hajiilee Solar Project” (DOI SWCA project No. 16715) that was completed by the Department of the Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) which analyzed the environmental impacts related to the construction, operation and maintenance of a 30-megawatt solar power plant. A Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) was issued on May 31, 2011 by the BIA for the solar project. The solar project would be located on tribal lands 2.5 miles northwest of the intersection of Interstate 40 and Rio Puerco Road – about 20 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  8. EIS-0403: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Programmatic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (AZ, CA, CO, NV, NM, and UT) The U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S....

  9. Solar Rights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    According to state law, effective July 1, 2008, community associations in Virginia generally may not prohibit a homeowner from installing or using a solar energy collection device on their property...

  10. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Robert C. [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Kamon, Teruki [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Toback, David [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Safonov, Alexei [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Dutta, Bhaskar [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Dimitri, Nanopoulos [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Pope, Christopher [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; White, James [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  11. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT RWE SCHOTT SOLAR Energy Commission Prepared by: RWE Schott Solar, Inc #12; PREPARED BY: Primary Author(s): Miles C on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants

  12. Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    directly from the sun because harvesting solar energy using photovoltaic technologiesEnergy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT REPORT ON ROUTE TO SCALEUP OF POLYMER Energy Commission Prepared by: California Solar Energy Collaborative(CSEC) University of California Davis

  13. CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Reno, Nevada . . . . . (Q) Solar Data for China Lake/using Nominal Solar Profiles China Lake/Inyokern ANGLE OFStations - China Lake, Edwards Monthly Latitude: Jan SOLAR

  14. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermalenergy storage in solar thermal applications," Appliedon photovoltaic/thermal hybrid solar technology," Applied

  15. Solar forecasting review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Richard Headen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 6.3: Birds-eye view of solar array deployment siteBirds-eye 7. Birds-eye view of of solar solar array array

  16. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008, uses concentrated solar power to split water. Figurethe main reason the potential for solar power is boundless.a clean energy source, solar power is inexhaustible, fairly

  17. CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Daily Solar Radiation Data. Proceedings of the 1977from total horizontal radiation data, they both suffer froma. SOLAR RADIATION Solar radiation data provide a measure of

  18. Solar forecasting review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Richard Headen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.1.2 European Solar Radiation Atlas (ESRA)2.4 Evaluation of Solar Forecasting . . . . . . . . .2.4.1 Solar Variability . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  19. Residential Solar Valuation Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

  20. CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energy Laboratory 1303 Engineering Research Building UniversitySolar Energy Laboratory 1303 Engineering Research laboratory UniversitySolar Energy Group, Energy and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University

  1. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensionalinorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction In recentoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish them

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solar Molten Salt Test Loop Commissioning On October 10, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, EC, Energy, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Solar The Molten Salt Test Loop...

  3. CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data for San Vicente Reservoir (l) Solar Data for BarrettDiego Monthly Solar Data, Barrett Reservoir Latitude: Janmonth. (L) SOLAR DATA FOR BARRETT RESERVOIR Nearby Climate

  4. SOLAR POWERING OF HIGH EFFICIENCY ABSORPTION CHILLER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy C. Gee

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Final Report for two solar cooling projects under this Cooperative Agreement. The first solar cooling project is a roof-integrated solar cooling and heating system, called the Power Roof{trademark}, which began operation in Raleigh, North Carolina in late July 2002. This system provides 176 kW (50 ton) of solar-driven space cooling using a unique nonimaging concentrating solar collector. The measured performance of the system during its first months of operation is reported here, along with a description of the design and operation of this system. The second solar cooling system, with a 20-ton capacity, is being retrofit to a commercial office building in Charleston, South Carolina but has not yet been completed.

  5. EA-1840: California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo County, CA August 3, 2011 EA-1840: Final Environmental Assessment California Valley Solar Ranch Project in San Luis Obispo and Kern...

  6. California Solar Initiative- Solar Thermal Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Originally restricted to just solar water heaters, the prorgam was expanded by CPUC Decision 13-02-018 in February 2013 to include other solar thermal technologies, including solar process heatin...

  7. Quasivacuum solar neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

    2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss in detail solar neutrino oscillations with \\delta m^2/E in the range [10^-10,10^-7] eV^2/MeV. In this range, which interpolates smoothly between the so-called ``just-so'' and ``Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein'' oscillation regimes, neutrino flavor transitions are increasingly affected by matter effects as \\delta m^2/E increases. As a consequence, the usual vacuum approximation has to be improved through the matter-induced corrections, leading to a ``quasi-vacuum'' oscillation regime. We perform accurate numerical calculations of such corrections, using both the true solar density profile and its exponential approximation. Matter effects are shown to be somewhat overestimated in the latter case. We also discuss the role of Earth crossing and of energy smearing. Prescriptions are given to implement the leading corrections in the quasi-vacuum oscillation range. Finally, the results are applied to a global analysis of solar nu data in a three-flavor framework.

  8. Solar Decathlon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary ofSmallConfidential,2 Solar Background Document 2Solar

  9. Concentrating Solar Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

  10. Solar Easements & Local Option Solar Rights Laws

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Utah's solar easement provisions are similar to easement provisions in many other states. Parties may voluntarily enter into written solar easement contracts that are enforceable by law. An...

  11. CUTTING SOLAR RED TAPECUTTING SOLAR RED TAPE Evergreen State Solar PartnershipEvergreen State Solar Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CUTTING SOLAR RED TAPECUTTING SOLAR RED TAPE Evergreen State Solar PartnershipEvergreen State Solar Partnership Rooftop Solar Challenge 1 Sunshot #12;WASHINGTON PV CONTEXTWASHINGTON PV CONTEXT 285 cities, 39 Installations happen where process is easier #12;EVERGREEN STATE SOLAR PARTNERSHIP Commerce NWSEEDEdmonds

  12. UMORE PARK -INTEGRATING SOLAR Overview, Solar Optimization & Technologies, & Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    : Introduction 3 UMore Park Overview 4 Solar Optimization 7 Passive Solar 8 Solar Technologies 10 District Solar research and development of renewable resource technologies. Integrating passive design techniques as wellUMORE PARK - INTEGRATING SOLAR Overview, Solar Optimization & Technologies, & Recommendations

  13. EA-1797: Agua Caliente Solar Project in Yuma County, AZ | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    November 1, 2010 EA-1797: Final Environmental Assessment Loan Guarantee for the Agua Caliente Solar Project in Yuma County, Arizona November 24, 2010 EA-1797: Finding of No...

  14. EA-1826: AV Solar Ranch One Project in Los Angeles and Kern Counties...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 1, 2011 EA-1826: Final Environmental Assessment AV Solar Ranch One Project, Los Angeles and Kern Counties, California August 2, 2011 EA-1826: Finding of No Significant...

  15. Development of an In-line Minority-Carrier Lifetime Monitoring Tool for Process Control during Fabrication of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 2 August 2002-15 November 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinton, R. A.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this subcontract over its two-phase, two-year duration was to design and develop improvements to the existing Sinton Consulting R&D minority-carrier lifetime testers. The improvements enable the possibilities for performing various in-line diagnostics on crystalline silicon wafers and cells for solar cell manufacturing lines. This facilitates manufacturing optimization and improved process control. The scope of work for Phase I was to prototype industrial applications for the improved instruments. A small-sample-head version of the instrument was designed and developed in this effort. This new instrument was complemented by detailed application notes detailing the productive use of minority-carrier lifetime measurements for process optimization and routine process control. In Phase II, the results from the first year were applied to design new instruments for industrial applications. These instruments were then characterized and documented. We report here on four new instruments, each optimized for a specific application as demanded by industrial customers. The documentation for these instruments was very technical and involved considerable R&D. Applications were developed that applied the latest in R&D on industrial silicon materials. By investigating the compromises that would be necessary to measure industrial material directly without the sample preparation that is commonly done for good research, we were able to develop several very innovative applications that can now be done directly in the production line for process control.

  16. A Homeowner's Guide to Solar Financing: Leases, Loans, and PPAs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guide is designed to help homeowners navigate the complex landscape of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) system financing and select the best option for their needs. It describes three popular residential solar financing choices—leases, PPAs, and loans— and explains the advantages and disadvantages of each, as well as how they compare to a direct cash purchase. It attempts to clarify key solar financing terms and provides a list of questions homeowners might consider before deciding if and how to proceed with installing a solar system. Finally, it provides a list of other resources to help homeowners learn more about financing a solar PV system.

  17. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  18. Solar Impulse's Solar-Powered Plane

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Moniz, Ernest; Piccard, Bertrand; Reicher, Dan

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Impulse lands in Washington, DC at Washington Dulles International Airport as part of its journey across the United States. Secretary Ernest Moniz speaks about how advancements like those at the Department of Energy are leading the way for innovations like the solar-powered plane. Footage of the solar-powered plane courtesy of Solar Impulse.

  19. Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Portland, Oregon: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities,...

  20. SOLAR ENERGY FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Solar Suitability Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brownstone, Rob

    SOLAR ENERGY FOR ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS Solar Suitability Assessment of Dalhousie University..................................................................................................................... 1 2 Solar Resource Assessment ........................................................................................... 2 2.1 Solar Radiation

  1. China Glass Solar aka CG Solar formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    China Glass Solar aka CG Solar formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra Photovoltaic Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Glass Solar (aka CG Solar, formerly Weihai Bluestar Terra...

  2. Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Ann Arbor, Michigan: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  3. Berkeley, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Berkeley, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Berkeley, California: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  4. Austin, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Austin, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Austin, Texas: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy...

  5. Knoxville, Tennessee: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Knoxville, Tennessee: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Knoxville, Tennessee: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  6. Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  7. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report: January 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the U.S. solar electricity market, including photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. The report provides an overview of global and U.S. installation trends. It also presents production and shipment data, material and supply chain issues, and solar industry employment trends. It also presents cost, price, and performance trends; and discusses policy and market drivers such as recently passed federal legislation, state and local policies, and developments in project financing. The final chapter provides data on private investment trends and near-term market forecasts.

  8. Solar Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. H. Robertson

    2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental work with solar neutrinos has illuminated the properties of neutrinos and tested models of how the sun produces its energy. Three experiments continue to take data, and at least seven are in various stages of planning or construction. In this review, the current experimental status is summarized, and future directions explored with a focus on the effects of a non-zero theta-13 and the interesting possibility of directly testing the luminosity constraint. Such a confrontation at the few-percent level would provide a prediction of the solar irradiance tens of thousands of years in the future for comparison with the present-day irradiance. A model-independent analysis of existing low-energy data shows good agreement between the neutrino and electromagnetic luminosities at the +/- 20 % level.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Facility NSTTF Nuclear Energy photovoltaic Photovoltaics PV Renewable Energy solar Solar Energy solar power Solar Research Solid-State Lighting SSLS Connect Contact Us RSS...

  10. Solar collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dostrovsky, I.

    1981-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar collector unit comprises a body of rigid thermally insulating material having a surface in the shape of about half a cylindrical parabola, the parabolic surface being provided with a reflective surface, a conduit being positioned with its long axis in the median plane of the parabola, said conduit serving as conduit for the heat-exchange medium, the surface of said conduit facing the parabolic surface being a selective surface, a transparent cover being provided on top of the device.

  11. Final Exam Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OwenDavis

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 22400 FINAL EXAM INFORMATION. The Final Exam is scheduled for Tuesday, December 16, at 7:00 PM in. Lambert Fieldhouse(Indoor Track Area).

  12. Final Exam Memo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    math

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15910 Final Exam Memo. Final Exam. Tuesday, December 16. 8:00 AM in Lambert Field House. (plan on arriving about 15 minutes early to find your ...

  13. (Final Draft) Superconducting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANDAND (Final Draft) Achieving Advanced Electrical Wires From Superconducting Coatings Prepared and Development Roadmap to Achieve Electrical Wire Advancements from Superconducting Coatings (Final Draft) Edited

  14. Developing a comprehensive software environment for passive solar design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotz, Steven E

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a journal which describes the thoughts and decisions leading up to the final design of a comprehensive software environment for passive solar design. The main purpose of this writing is to convey why a ...

  15. Solar Innovator | Alta Devices

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mattos, Laila; Le, Minh

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected to participate in the Energy Department's SunShot Initiative, Alta Devices produces solar cells that convert sunlight into electricity at world record-breaking levels of efficiency. Through its innovative solar technology Alta is helping bring down the cost of solar. Learn more about the Energy Department's efforts to advance solar technology at energy.gov/solar .

  16. Solar neutrinos and the solar composition problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Pena-Garay; Aldo Serenelli

    2008-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard solar models (SSM) are facing nowadays a new puzzle: the solar composition problem. New determinations of solar metal abundances lead SSM calculations to conflict with helioseismological measurements, showing discrepancies that extend from the convection zone to the solar core and can not be easily assigned to deficiencies in the modelling of the solar convection zone. We present updated solar neutrino fluxes and uncertainties for two SSM with high (old) and low (new) solar metallicity determinations. The uncertainties in iron and carbon abundances are the largest contribution to the uncertainties of the solar neutrino fluxes. The uncertainty on the ^14N+p -> ^15O+g rate is the largest of the non-composition uncertainties to the CNO neutrino fluxes. We propose an independent method to help identify which SSM is the correct one. Present neutrino data can not distinguish the solar neutrino predictions of both models but ongoing measurements can help to solve the puzzle.

  17. Final report - Sundyne Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.B.

    1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar cookers offer a viable alternative to conventional cooking methods in many areas, and can be an effective tool in the fight against the deforestation and desertification that plague many developing countries. However, there have been numerous obstacles to the successful dissemination of solar cookers in the past. The purpose of this paper is to identify opportunities, review constraints and develop a marketing strategy to disseminate the Sundyne Solar Cooker (SSC) in developing countries.

  18. Solar Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovationPriorityImpulseSolarThermal

  19. Solar Blog

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,AwardGradsSites Pending Transfer toSocial MediaSoilSolar Access

  20. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of organic based solar cells and distinguish them from theirof nanocrystal-based solar cells. No one approach orNov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensional

  1. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov, 2005). Chapter 4 Hybrid solar cells with 3-dimensional5 All-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells 5.1 Introduction Inoperation of organic based solar cells and distinguish them

  2. Solar Energy Entrepreneurs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Solar Energy Entrepreneurs Meeting MD, DC, DE, VA Region May 31, 2012 #12;Solar Energy Entrepreneurs Meeting MD, DC, DE, VA Region Meeting Objectives growth · Make our region an increasingly stronger hub for solar power You

  3. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are many solar photovoltaic power plants internationally andUSA, Blythe, CA Solar electric power plant, Blythe USA, SanTX Blue Wing solar electric power plant USA, Jacksonville,

  4. Solar | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Using Passive Solar Design to Save Money and Energy You can harness solar energy to heat and cool your home through passive solar design. October 10, 2014...

  5. CALIFORNIA SOLAR DATA MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and William A. Beckman, Solar Energy Thermal Processes (JohnWiley, Inc" New York. Solar Energy Thermal Processes. John1977): SOLCOST, Solar Energy Design Program for Non-Thermal

  6. JEA- Solar Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The JEA Solar Incentive Program provides rebates to JEA's residential customers who install new and retrofit solar hot water heaters on their homes. The rebate is worth $800 for new solar thermal...

  7. SOLAR-BLIND PYROMETRIC TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT UNDER CONCENTRATED SOLAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLAR-BLIND PYROMETRIC TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT UNDER CONCENTRATED SOLAR IRRADIATION Markus Pfänder1 temperature, pyrometric temperature measurement, solar-blind ------------------------------------ 1 #12-called solar-blind spectral measurement ranges, where the contribution of reflected solar radiation

  8. Connectable solar air collectors Solar Energy Centre Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connectable solar air collectors Solar Energy Centre Denmark Danish Technological Institute SEC-R-22 #12;Connectable solar air collectors Sřren Řstergaard Jensen Miroslav Bosanac Solar Energy Centre within the project "Connectable solar air collector/PVT collector" (Sammenkoblelig luftsolfanger

  9. Solar Industry At Work: Streamlining Home Solar Installation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Industry At Work: Streamlining Home Solar Installation Solar Industry At Work: Streamlining Home Solar Installation June 12, 2012 - 11:59am Addthis Sunrun is a home solar...

  10. Solar skylight

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adamson, James C. (Osprey La., Rumson, NJ 07760)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflective shutter rotates within a skylight housing in such a fashion as to control solar energy thereby providing a combination of heating, lighting, and ventilation. The skylight housing has three faces: a glazed southern face, a glazed northern face, and an open downwardly oriented face to the interior of the structure. Counter-weighted pivot arms support the shutter at either end causing the center of rotation to pass through the center of gravity. The shutter has three basic positions: In the first position, during the winter day, the shutter closes off the northern face, allowing solar energy to enter directly into the supporting structure providing heat gain and daylighting. In the second position, during the winter night, the shutter closes off the open face to the interior, providing insulation between the structure and the skylight housing. In the third position, during the non-heating season, the shutter closes off the southern face blocking unwanted heat gain but allowing diffuse northern light to penetrate for daylighting. In this last position, a means is provided for ventilating by natural convection. The apparatus can be operated either manually or by motor.

  11. Solar collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, William G. (Cutchogue, NY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of this invention is solar collectors, and more particularly, the invention pertains to a flat plate collector that employs high performance thin films. The solar collector of this invention overcomes several problems in this field, such as excessive hardware, cost and reliability, and other prior art drawbacks outlined in the specification. In the preferred form, the apparatus features a substantially rigid planar frame (14). A thin film window (42) is bonded to one planar side of the frame. An absorber (24) of laminate construction is comprised of two thin film layers (24a, 24b) that are sealed perimetrically. The layers (24a, 24b) define a fluid-tight planar envelope (24c) of large surface area to volume through which a heat transfer fluid flows. Absorber (24) is bonded to the other planar side of the frame. The thin film construction of the absorber assures substantially full envelope wetting and thus good efficiency. The window and absorber films stress the frame adding to the overall strength of the collector.

  12. Your Solar Home

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar Schoolhouse Education supplement for the Sacramento Bee to introduce solar to elementary school children and introduce the design and AD contest for local students.

  13. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    direct solar radiation onto the PEC cell and tracking isTracking Concentration…………………….39 Figure 1.20: PV-RO System……………………………………………………………..42 Figure 1.21: Solar

  14. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    eere.energy.gov * energy.govsunshot DOEGO-102012-3669 * September 2012 MOTIVATION All thermal concentrating solar power (CSP) systems use solar tracking, which involves moving...

  15. Solar forecasting review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Richard Headen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling of solar steam- generators, solar water heating systems, Heating Ventilating and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems, wind speed predictions, control in power generation systems,

  16. Solar Thermoelectric Energy Conversion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Efficiencies of different types of solar thermoelectric generators were predicted using theoretical modeling and validated with measurements using constructed prototypes under different solar intensities

  17. Solar Energy Technologies Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2011, the Energy Department's Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) became the SunShot Initiative, a collaborative national effort that aggressively drives innovation to make solar energy...

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, Systems Analysis Geoff Klise (in Sandia's Earth Systems...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, Systems Engineering Matthew Reno, a Sandian and an...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beam Profiling On November 2, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, News, Renewable Energy, Solar On Thursday, June 7, we began beam profiling the NSTTF field heliostat beam....

  1. Solar | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 14, 2014 The Ivanpah Solar Energy Generating System was dedicated on Thursday, February 13, 2014. | Photo courtesy of MingassonGetty Images for Bechtel. Making Solar...

  2. Department of Energy - Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    307 en Using Passive Solar Design to Save Money and Energy http:energy.govenergysaverarticlesusing-passive-solar-design-save-money-and-energy

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing Center (PV RTC), Photovoltaic Systems Evaluation Laboratory (PSEL), Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter, SunShot, Systems Analysis A research team that included...

  4. Solar radiation resource assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

  5. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PROGRAM REVIEW 2013 Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power Principal Investigator: Prof. Gang Chen Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA...

  6. PV Solar Ready

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boudra: This report presents guidelines for designing and building new houses that are Solar Ready. Following Solar Ready guidelines will streamline the process of equipping these...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Sectors in the United States View all EC Publications Related Topics Concentrating Solar Power CRF CSP EFRC Energy Energy Efficiency Energy Security National Solar Thermal...

  8. Residential Solar Rights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2007, New Jersey enacted legislation preventing homeowners associations from prohibiting the installation of solar collectors on certain types of residential properties. The term "solar...

  9. Solar in Cold, Cloudy Climates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation delivered by Chuck Marken during the 2009 Northeastern Solar Cities Conference Solar Survey session.

  10. Solar Easements & Local Option Solar Rights Laws

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New York General City, Town, and Village codes also allow local zoning districts to make regulations regarding solar access that provide for "the accommodation of solar energy systems and...

  11. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    October 2011 Solar in Action Philadelphia was designated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on March 28, 2008, as Solar America City. At that time, the city presented a...

  12. Utility Solar Generation Valuation Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Thomas N.; Dion, Phillip J.

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tucson Electric Power (TEP) developed, tested and verified the results of a new and appropriate method for accurately evaluating the capacity credit of time variant solar generating sources and reviewed new methods to appropriately and fairly evaluate the value of solar generation to electric utilities. The project also reviewed general integrated approaches for adequately compensating owners of solar generation for their benefits to utilities. However, given the limited funding support and time duration of this project combined with the significant differences between utilities regarding rate structures, solar resource availability and coincidence of solar generation with peak load periods, it is well beyond the scope of this project to develop specific rate, rebate, and interconnection approaches to capture utility benefits for all possible utilities. The project developed computer software based evaluation method models to compare solar generation production data measured in very short term time increments called Sample Intervals over a typical utility Dispatch Cycle during an Evaluation Period against utility system load data. Ten second resolution generation production data from the SGSSS and actual one minute resolution TEP system load data for 2006 and 2007, along with data from the Pennington Street Garage 60 kW DC capacity solar unit installed in downtown Tucson will be applied to the model for testing and verification of the evaluation method. Data was provided by other utilities, but critical time periods of data were missing making results derived from that data inaccurate. The algorithms are based on previous analysis and review of specific 2005 and 2006 SGSSS production data. The model was built, tested and verified by in house TEP personnel. For this phase of the project, TEP communicated with, shared solar production data with and collaborated on the development of solar generation valuation tools with other utilities, including Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project, Xcel and Nevada Power Company as well as the Arizona electric cooperatives. In the second phase of the project, three years of 10 second power output data of the SGSSS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of frequency domain analysis, normal statistical distribution analysis and finally maximum/minimum differential output analysis to test the applicability of these mathematic methods in accurately modeling the output variations produced by clouds passing over the SGSSS array.

  13. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 93(10): 1728-1723,Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 92(8) 39. Sima, C.Y. , Warta, W. , Dunlop, E.D. Solar Cell efficiency tables (

  14. Long-Term Modeling of Solar Energy: Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) and PV Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

    2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of research conducted on solar energy technologies and their implementation in the ObjECTS framework. The topics covered include financing assumptions and selected issues related to the integration of concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics PV technologies into the electric grid. A review of methodologies for calculating the levelized energy cost of capital-intensive technologies is presented, along with sensitivity tests illustrating how the cost of a solar plant would vary depending on financing assumptions. An analysis of the integration of a hybrid concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) system into the electric system is conducted. Finally a failure statistics analysis for PV plants illustrates the central role of solar irradiance uncertainty in determining PV grid integration characteristics.

  15. Solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peumans, Peter; Uchida, Soichi; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices are disclosed. The devises are thin-film crystalline organic optoelectronic devices capable of generating a voltage when exposed to light, and prepared by a method including the steps of: depositing a first organic layer over a first electrode; depositing a second organic layer over the first organic layer; depositing a confining layer over the second organic layer to form a stack; annealing the stack; and finally depositing a second electrode over the second organic layer.

  16. Test results, Industrial Solar Technology parabolic trough solar collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, V.E. [EG and G MSI, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R.; Matthews, C.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories and Industrial Solar Technology are cost-sharing development of advanced parabolic trough technology. As part of this effort, several configurations of an IST solar collector were tested to determine the collector efficiency and thermal losses with black chrome and black nickel receiver selective coatings, combined with aluminized film and silver film reflectors, using standard Pyrex{reg_sign} and anti-reflective coated Pyrex{reg_sign} glass receiver envelopes. The development effort has been successful, producing an advanced collector with 77% optical efficiency, using silver-film reflectors, a black nickel receiver coating, and a solgel anti-reflective glass receiver envelope. For each receiver configuration, performance equations were empirically derived relating collector efficiency and thermal losses to the operating temperature. Finally, equations were derived showing collector performance as a function of input insolation value, incident angle, and operating temperature.

  17. alters cell sensitivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Cells Pei Dong1 and Jun Lou1 1 sensitized solar cells (DSCs), the third generation of solar cells, have attracted more and more attention VACNTsgraphene over...

  18. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    improving efficiencies of solar photovoltaic technologies.quantum efficiency (EQE) of the associated photovoltaic

  19. Solar forecasting review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Richard Headen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar photovoltaics (PV) in electric power systems utilizingphotovoltaics (PV) in traditional electric power systems,”

  20. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    USA, Jacksonville, FL Jacksonville Solar Energy Generation Facility Constructed Systems that produce electricity

  1. SOLAR ENERGY Andrew Blakers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOLAR ENERGY Andrew Blakers Director, Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems Australian National Solar energy is special. It is vast, ubiquitous and indefinitely sustainable. The solar resource utilised by photovoltaics and solar heat is hundreds of times larger than all other energy resources

  2. ENERGIA SOLAR Introduccio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    ENERGIA SOLAR · Introducci´o · Usos t`ermics. Baixa temperatura · Sistemes de conversi´o t) Cuines Solars http://www.solarcooking.org #12;DESSALADORS SOLARS #12;APLICACIONS T`ERMIQUES BAIXA TEMPERATURA Col.lectors solars plans per a ACS #12;CONVERSI´O DIRECTA EN ELECTRICITAT C`el.lules i panells

  3. INTRODUCTIONTOTHE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? #12;WHAT ISTHE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE? #12;#12;1-D MODEL ATMOSPHERE · Averaged over space and time · GoodINTRODUCTIONTOTHE SOLAR ATMOSPHERE D. Shaun Bloomfield Trinity College Dublin #12;OUTLINE · What is the solar atmosphere? · How is the solar atmosphere observed? · What structures exist and how do they evolve

  4. Solar Policy Environment: Houston

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Houston is committed to achieving a sustainable solar infrastructure through strategic partnerships that address market barriers for solar energy through the Houston Solar Initiative. The initiative is dedicated to this long-term goal while focusing on near- and mid-term results that go beyond demonstration solar projects.

  5. Solar Policy Environment: Sacramento

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Sacramento and the greater Sacramento region is the home of a long standing history of commitment to solar. Sacramento Solar Access seeks to further widespread adoption of solar energy by addressing current market barriers and preparing, through design guidelines and education, the infrastructure that will optimize solar production in the future.

  6. Solar Policy Environment: Pittsburgh

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this project, Pittsburgh plans to build on its reputation as a national leader in green practices. Its Solar America Cities project will develop a distributed approach to adoption of solar energy technologies. Pittsburgh’s partnership includes universities, non-profit organizations, and business, labor and foundation communities. The city plans to transform the solar energy market and stimulate early adoption of solar technology, to show that solar technology works in a northern city.

  7. Plasmonic light trapping in thin-film Si solar cells This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    of energy. Reducing the overall cost per watt is thus one of the major challenges in solar cell research. The price of an installed solar cell includes both material and processing costs as well as system costs solar cells, material costs account for 40% of the final module price. Recently, thin- film solar cell

  8. Another practice final

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Charlotte M

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    11) A solar heating panel requires 150 gallons of a fluid that is 55% antifreeze. The fluid comes in either a 75% or a 30% solution. How many gallons of the 75%

  9. Boston Massachusetts: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boston, Massachusetts Includes case studies on: * Incorporating Solar into Emergency Preparedness Planning * Developing the Boston Solar Map October 2011 Solar in Action Boston was...

  10. Salt Lake City, Utah: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a lack of understanding about solar contributed to preventing the widespread adoption of solar energy in all markets. Salt Lake City's prior solar successes with support from...

  11. SciTech Connect: Solar Energy Education. Solar solutions: Reader...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar solutions: Reader, Part III Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Solar solutions: Reader, Part III You are accessing a document from the...

  12. FAST Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toister, Elad

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The FAST project was initiated by BrightSource in an attempt to provide potential solar field EPC contractors with an effective set of tools to perform specific construction tasks. These tasks are mostly associated with heliostat assembly and installation, and require customized non-standard tools. The FAST concept focuses on low equipment cost, reduced setup time and increased assembly throughput as compared to the Ivanpah solar field construction tools.

  13. EA-1827: Final Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Suniva Solar Project Site Community Development Block Grant in Thomas Township, Saginaw County, Michigan

  14. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    collaborating on a Solar Programmatic Environmental ImpactEconomic, and Environmental Benefits of the Solar AmericaEnergy and Environmental Benefits of Concentrating Solar

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter A team from Sandia National Laboratories' (SNL) National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) recently won a first place Excellence Award in the...

  16. Bright Ideas in Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melville, Jo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten Nitrate Salt for Solar Energy Storage. Retrieved frommore-efficiently Solar Energy Industries Association (2012-year-review Solar Energy Industries Association (

  17. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    96 4.3.2 Customer Solar Leaseagreement financing, customer solar lease financing,eligible Minimum solar or customer-sited requirement Extra

  18. Utah Solar Outlook March 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of Utah's solar market, policy initiatives, and progress to date on the Solar America Cities Project: Solar Salt Lake.

  19. Solar Impulsive Energetic Electron Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Linghua

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coronal mass ejections and solar energetic proton events, J.Voyager observations of solar wind proton temperature:1- 10Howard (2004), Variability of solar eruptions during cycle

  20. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10MW Thin Film Solar Power Plant for Sempra Generation. ”2009). “Concentrating solar power plants of the southwest1.11. Concentrating solar power plants of the southwest

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Concentrating Solar Power, Customers & Partners, Energy, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Solar Areva Solar is collaborating with Sandia National Laboratories on a new...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Download On March 13, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Solar, Solar Newsletter Sandia developed the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heat can also be efficiently and cheaply stored to produce electricity when the sun ... Solar Energy On February 3, 2011, in Solar Programs Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Force Research Laboratory Testing On August 17, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, Renewable Energy, Solar...

  5. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the shipments of two companies, BP Solar and Mitsubishiaddition, funding to solar companies increased dramaticallyand expansions of solar companies. Greater debt financing is

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Research Pratt Whitney Rocketdyne Testing On December 19, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, EC, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News &...

  7. First Solar Corporate Template 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Copyright 2013, First Solar, Inc. Why Are We Backtracking? 3 Copyright 2013, First Solar, Inc. Shading Response * First Solar modules are laid-out in landscape...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Mirrors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Mirrors Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) On April 13, 2011, in CSP R&D at Sandia Testing Facilities Software & Tools Resources Contacts News Concentrating Solar Power...

  9. Solar Easements and Rights Laws

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Solar access provisions in the General Laws of Massachusetts allow for the creation of voluntary solar easements to protect solar exposure and authorizes zoning rules that prohibit unreasonable...

  10. Solar Design Workbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franta, G.; Baylin, F.; Crowther, R.; Dubin, F.; Grace, A., Griffith, J.W.; Holtz, M.; Kutscher, C.; Nordham, D.; Selkowitz, S.; Villecco, M.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Solar Design Workbook presents solar building design applications for commercial buildir^s. The book is divided into four sections. The first section describes the variety of solar applications in buildings including conservation aspects, solar fundamentals, passive systems, active systems, daylighting, and other solar options. Solar system design evaluation techniques including considerations for building energy requirements, passive systems, active systems, and economics are presented in Section II. The third section attempts to assist the designer in the building design process for energy conservation and solar applications including options and considerations for pre-design, design, and post-design phases. The information required for the solar design proee^ has not been fully developed at this time. Therefore, Section III is incomplete, but an overview of the considerations with some of the design proces elements is presented. Section IV illustrates ease studies that utilize solar applications in the building design.

  11. Solar Influence on the North Atlantic Oscillation - Initial Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dacie, Sally

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some initial investigations into various atmospheric phenomena and the influence of the solar cycle on weather have been made. Strongly negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) indices, which cause cold and dry winter weather in North West Europe, rarely occur during periods of high solar activity. Coupling between the troposphere and stratosphere is discussed, particularly in the context of Polar-night jet oscillation events (defined by Hitchcock et al., 2013) and the Quasi-Biennial Oscillation. The energy of North Atlantic hurricanes (as indicated by the Accumulated Cyclone Energy Index, ACE) is also linked to solar activity, via UV heating at the tropopause (Elsner et al., 2010), and is suggested as a possible mechanism through which solar activity could influence the NAO. Finally the lack of solar influence on the NAO before $\\sim$ 1950 is addressed, with a possible cause being the smaller solar cycle amplitudes. This short report contains several ideas, which may be worth pursuing further.

  12. CONJUGATED POLYMERS AND POLYELECTROLYTES IN SOLAR PHOTOCONVERSION, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schanze, Kirk S [University of Florida

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE-supported program investigated the fundamental properties of conjugated polyelectrolytes, with emphasis placed on studies of excited state energy transport, self-assembly into conjugated polyelectroyte (CPE) based films and colloids, and exciton transport and charge injection in CPE films constructed atop wide bandgap semiconductors. In the most recent grant period we have also extended efforts to examine the properties of low-bandgap donor-acceptor conjugated polyelectrolytes that feature strong visible light absorption and the ability to adsorb to metal-oxide interfaces.

  13. Final proceedings of the Solar Power Satellite Program review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 171 papers and extended abstracts included in the proceeding were entered into the data base separately; short abstracts of papers and brief introductory papers were not entered separately. (WHK)

  14. Microsoft Word - Solar Farm EA July final.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNL 2001a, hasCORRECTIVENATIONAL4,

  15. Energy Department Finalizes Loan Guarantee to Support California Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 inJohnSystems|inBuilding toDepartment

  16. Homebuyer Solar Option and Solar Offset Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Senate Bill 1 of 2006, which established the statewide California Solar Initiative, also required the California Energy Commission (CEC) to implement regulations that require sellers of production...

  17. Solar buildings. Overview: The Solar Buildings Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings account for more than one third of the energy used in the United States each year, consuming vast amounts of electricity, natural gas, and fuel oil. Given this level of consumption, the buildings sector is rife with opportunity for alternative energy technologies. The US Department of Energy`s Solar Buildings Program was established to take advantage of this opportunity. The Solar Buildings Program is engaged in research, development, and deployment on solar thermal technologies, which use solar energy to produce heat. The Program focuses on technologies that have the potential to produce economically competitive energy for the buildings sector.

  18. Blackout Final Implementation Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Task Force: Final Report on Implementation of Recommendations G R23. Strengthen reactive power and voltage control practices in all NERC regions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 R24....

  19. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

  20. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

  1. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

  2. DOE Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D.; Long, James; Newby, Greg B.

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report contains a summary of work accomplished in the establishment of a Climate Data Center at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

  3. National Science Bowl Finals

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

  4. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

  5. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

  6. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census...

  7. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

  8. Final_Report.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy, Offi ce of Fossil Energy. Ormat: Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Generation Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final Report for the...

  9. Final Exam Memo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    math

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15200 FINAL EXAM Memo. Tuesday, December 13th, 2011, 10:20 AM (2 hour exam). Location: Lambert Fieldhouse. ** Bring your Purdue ID, appropriate

  10. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census...

  11. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Computers and Other Electronics in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    11 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

  17. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Water Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

  18. National Science Bowl Finals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

  19. Capacity Building on Access to Energy in Africa: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capacity Building on Access to Energy in Africa: Final Report Danish Support to EUEI Facilitation from African partner organisations and individuals Title: Capacity Building on Access to Energy (Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs) Cover: Solar home system installed at house near Chipata, Eastern

  20. Plasmonic conversion of solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clavero, Cesar

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization, BasicS. Pillai and M. A. Green, Solar Energy Materials and SolarPlasmonic conversion of solar energy César Clavero Plasma

  1. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News, vol. 65,Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells, vol. 86, pp. 451-Nanostructured Silicon- Based Solar Cells, 2013. X. C. Tong,

  2. Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data UO SOLAR MONITORING LAB Physics Department -- Solar Energy Center 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274 April 1, 1999 #12;Hourly solar radiation data

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: solar power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solar power Recent Solar Highlights On October 31, 2012, in View all Solar Energy News Molten Salt Test Loop Commissioning On October 10, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, EC,...

  4. BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

  5. Rooftop Solar Potential Distributed Solar Power in NW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Rooftop Solar Potential Distributed Solar Power in NW Massoud Jourabchi June 2013 1 Renewables;3 Regional Growth In Solar Energy Consumption Solar consumption both Thermal and PV h b t d i i lhas been on steady increase since early 1990s. From 2000-2010 Solar PV grow at annual rate of 13% and solar thermal

  6. Solar Cycle Signals in the Pacific and the Issue of Timings INDRANI ROY AND JOANNA D. HAIGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mumby, Peter J.

    Solar Cycle Signals in the Pacific and the Issue of Timings INDRANI ROY AND JOANNA D. HAIGH, in final form 21 December 2011) ABSTRACT The solar cycle signal in sea level pressure during 1856­2007 is analyzed. Using composites of data from January­February in solar cycle peak years the strong positive

  7. Residential Solar Investment Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2012, the CT Green Bank* unveiled its solar photovoltaic residential investment program with the ultimate goal to support 30 megawatts of residential solar photovoltaics (PV). HB 6838...

  8. Junior Solar Sprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Junior Solar Sprint Overview The Junior Solar Sprint (JSS) Car Competition is a classroom-based, hands-on educational program for 6th, 7th, and 8th grade students. Student teams...

  9. Solar Thermoelectric Energy Conversion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SOLID-STATE SOLAR-THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CENTER NanoEngineering Group Solar Thermoelectric Energy Conversion Gang Chen, 1 Daniel Kraemer, 1 Bed Poudel, 2 Hsien-Ping Feng, 1 J....

  10. Solar Construction Permitting Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Owners of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar water heating systems in Colorado are required to obtain a building permit before their systems may be installed. Permits are handled at the l...

  11. Solar Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renne, D.; George, R.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Heimiller, D.

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the solar resource assessment aspects of the Renewable Systems Interconnection study. The status of solar resource assessment in the United States is described, and summaries of the availability of modeled data sets are provided.

  12. Solar America Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Capacity (MW) 0.1494 20 Baseline (2006) 0.3181 1 0.069 150 2009-2010 2014-2015 BP Solar International Inc. Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology...

  13. CT Solar Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering a pilot loan program, CT Solar Loan, to provide homeowners with 15-year loans for solar PV equipment. The loans are administered...

  14. Solar Sales Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For both residential and non-residential systems, the exemption applies to solar-energy systems that utilize solar radiation to produce energy designed to provide heating, cooling, hot water and/or...

  15. Solar Property Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Missouri, solar energy systems not held for resale are exempt from state, local, and county property taxes. As enacted in July 2013, the law does not define solar energy systems.

  16. Solar Construction Permitting Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Owners of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems and solar water heating systems in Arizona are required to obtain a building permit before their systems may be installed. Permits are handled at the...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: solar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Initiative to decrease total cost of solar energy systems by 75% by 2020 and make solar energy cost-competitive with ... Page 3 of 1612345...10...Last Last...

  18. Solar powered desalination system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Tiffany Alisa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the electrical power output to the solar power input), aSolar Energy Calculator using Google Maps 23 Table 1.24: PV System Power Production Average Daily Irradiance (kWh/m2) Instillation Efficiency Labeled Efficiency Output

  19. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.T. Misture

    2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was centered on developing new ceramic materials to improve efficiency of solar energy capture for photovoltaic cells and for catalysts to split water to make hydrogen. The work has led to one possible breakthrough material, a nanoscale photocatalyst that can be used to assemble nanocomposite catalysts. Another important result of the work is the development of synthesis methods to create nanostructured and mesoporous oxides for use in solar energy harvesting. Specifically, we have developed two new methods potentially useful for preparing high performance electrodes for PV cells.

  20. EIS-0073: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of98-F, Western22,EERE Solar5: Supplement0: FinalFinal2: Final3:

  1. Method to Calculate Uncertainty Estimate of Measuring Shortwave Solar Irradiance using Thermopile and Semiconductor Solar Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty of measuring solar irradiance is fundamentally important for solar energy and atmospheric science applications. Without an uncertainty statement, the quality of a result, model, or testing method cannot be quantified, the chain of traceability is broken, and confidence cannot be maintained in the measurement. Measurement results are incomplete and meaningless without a statement of the estimated uncertainty with traceability to the International System of Units (SI) or to another internationally recognized standard. This report explains how to use International Guidelines of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM) to calculate such uncertainty. The report also shows that without appropriate corrections to solar measuring instruments (solar radiometers), the uncertainty of measuring shortwave solar irradiance can exceed 4% using present state-of-the-art pyranometers and 2.7% using present state-of-the-art pyrheliometers. Finally, the report demonstrates that by applying the appropriate corrections, uncertainties may be reduced by at least 50%. The uncertainties, with or without the appropriate corrections might not be compatible with the needs of solar energy and atmospheric science applications; yet, this report may shed some light on the sources of uncertainties and the means to reduce overall uncertainty in measuring solar irradiance.

  2. SOLAR ENERGY POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loreta N. Gashi; Sabedin A. Meha; Besnik A. Duriqi; Fatos S. Haxhimusa

    In recent years solar energy has experienced phenomenal growth due to the technological improvements resulting in cost reductions and also governments policies supportive of renewable energy development and utilization. In this paper we will present possibilities for development and deployment of solar energy. We will use Kosovo to compare the existing power production potential and future possible potential by using solar energy.

  3. 7Name ________________________________ Solar Electricity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be attached directly to the outer surface of a satellite, or can be found on `solar panels' that the satellite. If the satellite is not big enough, additional solar panels may be needed to supply the electricity) The solar cells produce 0.03 watts per square cm, so the power available is 39819 x 0.03 = 1194 watts

  4. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  5. Your Community With Solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powering Your Community With Solar: Overcoming Market and Implementation Barriers Lessons from successful Solarize campaigns help communities seize volume discounts through collective purchasing The first Solarize program began in Portland, Oregon, as a grassroots campaign for collective SunShot will work

  6. Matter & Energy Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    See Also: Matter & Energy Solar Energy· Electronics· Materials Science· Earth & Climate Energy at the University of Illinois, the future of solar energy just got brighter. Although silicon is the industry Electronics Over 1.2 Million Electronics Parts, Components and Equipment. www.AlliedElec.com solar energy

  7. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  8. Solar forecasting review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inman, Richard Headen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying PV power output variability,” Solar Energy, vol.each solar sen at node i, P(t) the total power output of theSolar Forecasting Historically, traditional power generation technologies such as fossil and nu- clear power which were designed to run in stable output

  9. Solar Policy Environment: Milwaukee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Milwaukee’s SAC Initiative, Milwaukee Shines, works to reduce informational, economic and procedural barriers to the widespread adoption of solar energy systems. While the City of Milwaukee and its partners have demonstrated commitment and experience in implementing solar technologies, Milwaukee Shines aims to enhance these efforts and make solar a viable alternative throughout the region.

  10. Solar Policy Environment: Tucson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tucson Solar Initiative seeks to institutionalize the value of nine years of solar energy development experience, secure the promise of renewable energy investment funds, facilitate the installation of a significant volume of installations in the community and establish a mechanism for sustainable solar integration for the future.

  11. Conservation and solar guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines are given for selecting R-values and infiltration levels, and determining the size of the solar collection area for passive solar buildings. The guidelines are based on balancing the incremental cost/benefit of conservation and passive solar strategies. Tables are given for 90 cities in the US and the results are also displayed on maps. An example is included.

  12. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    il",7.7,6.3,2.6,0.8,1.8,3.7,2.3,1.1,0.3 "Kerosene",1.7,0.5,0.2,"Q",0.2,0.4,0.2,0.2,"N" "Solar",1.2,0.2,0.1,"Q",0.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may...

  13. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Fuel Oil",7.7,4.6,2.9,"Q","Q","Q" "Kerosene",1.7,0.8,0.7,0.1,"Q","Q" "Solar",1.2,0.5,0.1,0.3,0.3,0.1 "Electricity End Uses3" "(more than one may apply)" "Space...

  14. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Fuel Oil",7.7,2.2,2.4,1.1,1.1,0.9 "Kerosene",1.7,0.4,0.5,0.3,0.2,0.3 "Solar",1.2,0.2,0.6,0.2,0.1,0.1 "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)" "Space...

  15. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Fuel Oil",7.7,5.1,0.4,0.7,1.3,0.1 "Kerosene",1.7,1.1,"Q","Q","Q",0.5 "Solar",1.2,1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)" "Space...

  16. " Million Housing Units, Final...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wood",13.1,2.5,2.9,4,3.7 "Fuel Oil",7.7,6.3,0.5,0.7,0.2 "Kerosene",1.7,0.5,0.4,0.6,0.2 "Solar",1.2,0.2,0.2,0.3,0.5 "Electricity End Uses2" "(more than one may apply)" "Space...

  17. Petrovay: Solar physics Solar wind and heliosphere THE SOLAR WIND AND THE HELIOSPHERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrovay, KristĂłf

    with high first ionization potential are underrepresented in solar wind. Probable cause: ambipolar diffusion: Solar physics Solar wind and heliosphere Potential explanation: belt due to higher pressurePetrovay: Solar physics Solar wind and heliosphere THE SOLAR WIND AND THE HELIOSPHERE 1951: First

  18. Artificial photosynthesis- solar fuels: current status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cogdell, Richard J; Brotosudarmo, Tatas H.P.; Gardiner, Alastair T; Sanchez, Pedro M; Cronin, Leroy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review considers the case for using artificial photosynthesis to make solar fuels. The conceptual framework on which this idea is based is described. Photosynthesis is broken down into four partial reactions. Each one is described and progress in mimicking each of these is discussed. Finally, the current major barriers to achieving working systems based on artificial photosynthesis capable of making solar fuels are highlighted

  19. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  20. A solar regenerative thermoelectrochemical converter (RTEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, C.W.; McHardy, J. (Hughes Aircraft Co., El Segundo, CA (United States))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an executive summary of a final subcontract report that describes the successful completion of a closed-loop demonstration of a regenerative thermoelectromechanical device using solar heat input for the production of electricity. The full report, which contains a detailed description of the two-year effort, is currently subject to a government secrecy order which precludes public release of the information. Copies of the full report will be made available for general release whenever the secrecy order is lifted.