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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (March 2012)

2

Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program -12184  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) methods and protocols allow evaluation of remediation and final site conditions to determine if remediated sites remain protective. Two case studies are presented that involve the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) and associated vicinity properties (VPs), which are being remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). These properties are a part of the former Lake Ontario Ordnance Works (LOOW). In response to stakeholders concerns about whether certain remediated NFSS VPs were putting them at risk, DOE met with stakeholders and agreed to evaluate protectiveness. Documentation in the DOE records collection adequately described assessed and final radiological conditions at the completed VPs. All FUSRAP wastes at the completed sites were cleaned up to meet DOE guidelines for unrestricted use. DOE compiled the results of the investigation in a report that was released for public comment. In conducting the review of site conditions, DOE found that stakeholders were also concerned about waste from the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) that was handled at LOOW. DOE agreed to determine if SPRU waste remained at that needed to be remediated. DOE reviewed records of waste characterization, historical handling locations and methods, and assessment and remediation data. DOE concluded that the SPRU waste was remediated on the LOOW to levels that pose no unacceptable risk and allow unrestricted use and unlimited exposure. This work confirms the following points as tenets of an effective long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) program: ? Stakeholder interaction must be open and transparent, and DOE must respond promptly to stakeholder concerns. ? DOE, as the long-term custodian, must collect and preserve site records in order to demonstrate that remediated sites pose no unacceptable risk. ? DOE must continue to maintain constructive relationships with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and state and federal regulators.

Clayton, Christopher [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; Kothari, Vijendra [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; Starr, Ken [U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, Colorado; Widdop, Michael; Gillespie, Joey [SM Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

Microsoft Word - Berger Radiological Conditions.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Dec. Dec. 2, 2009 1 Summary of Information Regarding Radiological Conditions of NFSS Vicinity Properties J. D. Berger, CHP DeNuke Contracting Services, Inc. Oak Ridge, TN The following is a summary of the information obtained from reviews of radiological survey reports, prepared by ORAU in support of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. These reports were obtained for review from the IVEA Program at ORAU/ORISE. A list of the reports, reviewed for this summary, is included at the end of this report. Hard copies of reports for ORAU survey activities of NFSS and NFSS Vicinity Properties are available at the South Campus Site of ORAU (these reports are not available in electronic form). In addition, there are 12 - 14 boxes of hard-copy supporting data and information, pertinent to the surveys. I inspected the contents of Box 54. That box contained records for NFSS Vicinity

4

Radiological Final Status Survey of the Hammond Depot, Hammond, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ORISE conducted extensive scoping, characterization, and final status surveys of land areas and structures at the DNSC’s Hammond Depot located in Hammond, Indiana in multiple phases during 2005, 2006 and 2007.

T.J. Vitkus

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear Facilities from Category 3 to Radiological  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Office of Nuclear and Facility Safety Policy Nuclear Safety Technical Position NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear Facilities from Category 3 to Radiological Issue: DOE-STD-1027-92 defines a lower threshold criterion for preliminary hazard categorization as a nuclear Hazard Category 3 (HC-3) facility or activity. But it does not provide a method other than inventory reduction or segmentation on how an HC-3 facility or activity can be demonstrated to be below HC-3 (i.e., radiological) in final hazard categorization. Background: 10 CFR 830 Subpart B requires that all DOE nuclear facilities categorized as HC-3 or above have a DOE approved safety basis compliant with the requirements of Subpart B. The rule requires the use of DOE-

6

Radiological Conditions at Bikini Atoll: Prospects for ResettlementRadiological Conditions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan: Preliminary assessment and recommendations for further study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiological Conditions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan: Preliminary assessment and recommendations for further study Radiological Assessment Reports Series 1998 (Vienna: IAEA) 43 pp 200 Austr. Sch. ISBN 92 0 104098 9 These two reports stem from requests to the IAEA, from the local Government Authorities, for help and advice in assessing the radiological situations at two former nuclear weapons testing sites. Both reports have similar general structures - a discussion of the geographical context of the sites; a summary of the weapon tests, and their continuing impacts on the local populations; the basis for the IAEA programme; radiological concepts and criteria in the context of the residual contamination arising from the tests, and specifically the bases for intervention and remediation; assessments of the present and future radiation exposures of the actual/potential residents of the areas; and conclusions and recommendations. Because the indigenous Bikinian population is at present relocated elsewhere in the Marshall Islands archipelago, the report for Bikini Atoll is essentially concerned with an assessment of the current radiological situation, the prospects for resettlement, and the justification and available strategies for remedial action to reassure the Bikinians that it would be safe to return. Since the cessation of testing at the atoll in July 1958, there have been continuing radiological surveys of the local environment - the latest being the Marshall Islands Nationwide Radiological Study under an International Scientific Advisory Panel. The Panel report was not accepted by the Marshall Islands Government, who then requested the IAEA to carry out an independent peer review. The IAEA assessment (with some corroboratory data from a monitoring mission) confirmed the estimate of 15 mSv a-1 for the total potential dose rate to individuals relying entirely on locally produced foodstuffs, mainly from 137Cs in coconuts and other fruits. An examination of existing guidelines and practice concluded that 10 mSv a-1 is an appropriate generic action level to trigger consideration of remediation strategies prior to resettlement. From five potential remedial measures, two were considered in more detail - removal and disposal of the surface 40 cm of the topsoil, and treatment of the soil with high potassium fertilizers. It was concluded that the former, although reducing the dose rate from the residual contamination to less than 0.1 mSv a-1, would entail unacceptable environmental and social consequences. Experimental investigation of the latter showed that it would reduce the uptake of 137Cs significantly, with the total dose rate rapidly declining to about 1.2 mSv a-1; it was also found that the application of fertilizer would have to be repeated every 4-5 years to sustain the reduction. The latter was, therefore, the preferred option together with some localised soil removal in the living areas of the village to reduce both the external exposure and the inhalation pathway. The sole remaining concern of the Bikinians appears to relate to the identification of a reliable authority to assume responsibility for maintaining the implementation of the countermeasure to reduce the 137Cs uptake into foodstuffs for the foreseeable future. If this concern can be resolved, it appears that the way is open for the resettlement of the Bikinian people on the atoll. The situation at Semipalatinsk is somewhat different in one respect - the site, although large, has unrestricted access and small numbers of people already live within the boundaries. After the request to the IAEA from the Kazakhstan Government for assistance, the initial objective was to determine the magnitude of the problem. This was achieved on the first mission to the site when the main areas of contamination were identified using information available from the local authorities, and radiation measurements and sample collections were made at identified places both within, and external to, the site. A second mission extended the range of measurements and sample

Dennis Woodhead

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Introduction of e-learning in dental radiology reveals significantly improved results in final examination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose Because a traditionally instructed dental radiology lecture course is very time-consuming and labour-intensive, online courseware, including an interactive-learning module, was implemented to support the lectures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceptions of students who have worked with web-based courseware as well as the effect on their results in final examinations. Materials and methods Users (n3+4 = 138) had access to the e-program from any networked computer at any time. Two groups (n3 = 71, n4 = 67) had to pass a final exam after using the e-course. Results were compared with two groups (n1 = 42, n2 = 48) who had studied the same content by attending traditional lectures. In addition a survey of the students was statistically evaluated. Results Most of the respondents reported a positive attitude towards e-learning and would have appreciated more access to computer-assisted instruction. Two years after initiating the e-course the failure rate in the final examination dropped significantly, from 40% to less than 2%. Conclusions The very positive response to the e-program and improved test scores demonstrated the effectiveness of our e-course as a learning aid. Interactive modules in step with clinical practice provided learning that is not achieved by traditional teaching methods alone. To what extent staff savings are possible is part of a further study.

Sandra Meckfessel; Constantin Stühmer; Kai-Hendrik Bormann; Thomas Kupka; Marianne Behrends; Herbert Matthies; Bernhard Vaske; Meike Stiesch; Nils-Claudius Gellrich; Martin Rücker

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Final Expert Meeting Report: Simplified Space Conditioning Strategies for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Expert Meeting Report: Simplified Space Conditioning Final Expert Meeting Report: Simplified Space Conditioning Strategies for Energy Efficient Houses Final Expert Meeting Report: Simplified Space Conditioning Strategies for Energy Efficient Houses More research is needed to evaluate the level of energy efficiency and the conditions where simplified space conditioning systems will work in new and retrofitted houses. Guidance is needed on the design and installation of these systems to support a wider adoption throughout the new construction and retrofit market. The purpose of this expert meeting was to recap the current state of knowledge in this area and to provide a peer review of IBACOSs research plan for new and existing unoccupied test houses with minimized space conditioning systems. expt_mtg_space_cond.pdf

9

Radiological Conditions on Rongelap Atoll: Perspective on Resettlement of Rongelap Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most widely accepted international guidelines for protection of the public from ionizing radiation and in circumstances related to intervention strategies to reduce exposures to preexisting conditions, such as those on Rongelap Island, come from the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the National Council on Radiation Protection and the International Atomic Energy Agency. By all internationally agreed scientific criteria, present radiological conditions on Rongelap Island are considered safe for permanent resettlement. Safe implies that no additional cancer deaths are expected among those living on Rongelap Island beyond the number that would occur in a community of the same population size, similar ages and mix of males and females, who do not experience exposure to residual fallout by living on the island. It is expected that the average dose received by Rongelap Island residents will fall well below the dose adopted by the Republic of the Marshall Islands Nuclear Claims Tribunal considered a ''safe'' or acceptable health risk. These conclusions are supported by environmental measurements and assessments performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) including the results of radiological surveillance of resettlement workers living on Rongelap Island for various lengths of time from 1999 through 2002, and independent studies conducted by Japanese scientists. Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons was responsible for the widespread dispersion of radioactive fallout around the globe. Rongelap Island received higher levels of fallout from local or close-in fallout deposition from nuclear testing on Bikini Atoll. The main pathway for exposure to radiation from the bomb testing is ''internally'' through ingestion of radioactive cesium (cesium-137) taken up from the soil into locally grown foodstuffs. Resettlement workers living on Rongelap Island who ate local foods have volunteered to have the cesium-137 content of their bodies measured. The measuring device is called a whole body counter. A person relaxes in a chair for a few minutes while counts are taken using a detector a few inches away from the body. The whole body counting program on Rongelap Island was established under a cooperative agreement between the Rongelap Atoll Local Government (RALG), the Republic of the Marshall Islands and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Local technicians from Rongelap continue to operate the facility under supervision of scientists from LLNL. Whole body counting data collected on resettlement workers during the initial phases of resettlement can tell us what exposure level a permanently resettled population could reasonably expect. The average internal dose to resettlement workers from cesium-137 is less than 1 mrem (0.01 mSv) per year. The highest individual dose observed over the last 3-years was less than 4 mrem (0.04 mSv) per year. The RALG-DOE resettlement support plan also calls for spreading potassium fertilizer across the agricultural areas to prevent the uptake of cesium-137 into plants. Fertilization will reduce the dietary intake of cesium-137 and reduce the dose to island residents. By 2004, over 70 percent of the cesium-137 deposition in soil from fallout in 1954 will have decayed to a non-radioactive substance. Over the next 10-20 years, more than one-half of the remaining cesium-137 in the soil and vegetation of the atoll islands will have disappeared by decay or washed out of the soil by rain. Removing some soil, applying crushed coral around living areas, and spreading potassium fertilizer across agricultural areas will reduce the level of radiation exposure in the resettled population to levels below those considered safe by the Nuclear Claims Tribunal and to levels well below those considered safe by the international scientific community.

Hamilton, T F

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

DOE/EA-1499; Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex, Nevada Test Site Final Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

499 499 Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex, Nevada Test Site Final Environmental Assessment August 2004 U. S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Las Vegas, Nevada Available for sale to the Public, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis..gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in paper from-- U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information

11

Radiological review of conditions created during & after a fire on the Hanford Site in the BC Crib controlled area & areas of radiological concern  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological implications of fighting a wildland fire in the BC Crib controlled area with the surrounding Soil Contamination Area (SCA) and for fighting a wildland fire in the genera1 600 Area are addressed in this document. The primary focus is on the BC Crib controlled area; however, the 600 Area radiological concerns are much lower and generally have the same constraints as the BC Crib controlled area. This analysis addresses only radiological hazards and does not address any physical hazards or industrial hygiene hazards.

EVANS, C.L.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20���ºC to 120���ºC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20���ºC to 120���ºC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA�¢����s comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20���ºC to 120���ºC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA�¢����s, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year R&D Plan. In the course of this four-year program we developed a new PEM with improved proton conductivity, chemical stability and mechanical stability. We incorporated this new membrane into MEAs and evaluated performance and durability.

Hamrock, Steven J.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Dental Radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning “cheat sheet” to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed.

Tony M. Woodward

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Preclosure radiological safety analysis for accident conditions of the potential Yucca Mountain Repository: Underground facilities; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preliminary preclosure radiological safety analysis assesses the scenarios, probabilities, and potential radiological consequences associated with postulated accidents in the underground facility of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. The analysis follows a probabilistic-risk-assessment approach. Twenty-one event trees resulting in 129 accident scenarios are developed. Most of the scenarios have estimated annual probabilities ranging from 10{sup {minus}11}/yr to 10{sup {minus}5}/yr. The study identifies 33 scenarios that could result in offsite doses over 50 mrem and that have annual probabilities greater than 10{sup {minus}9}/yr. The largest offsite dose is calculated to be 220 mrem, which is less than the 500 mrem value used to define items important to safety in 10 CFR 60. The study does not address an estimate of uncertainties, therefore conclusions or decisions made as a result of this report should be made with caution.

Ma, C.W.; Sit, R.C.; Zavoshy, S.J.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Laub, T.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

EMSL - radiological  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiological en Diffusional Motion of Redox Centers in Carbonate Electrolytes . http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsdiffusional-motion-redox-centers-carbonate-electrolytes...

16

Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Operational Guidelines/Radiological Emergency Response. Provides information and resources concerning the development of Operational Guidelines as part of planning guidance for protection and recovery following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and/or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents. Operational Guidelines Technical (OGT) Manual, 2009 RESRAD-RDD Complementing Software to OGT Manual EPA Protective Action Guidelines (2013), Interim Final Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) Federal Radiological Preparedness Coordinating Committee (FRPCC)

17

FINAL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, TN, and Columbus, GA

18

Radiological Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii DOE-STD-1098-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ DOE-STD-1098-2008 Radiological Control DOE Policy October 2008 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal

19

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiological Control Technician Training Facility Practical Training Attachment Phase IV Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction................................................................................................................................1 Facility Job Performance Measures ........................................................................................2 Final Verification Signatures ....................................................................................................3 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iv

20

Radiological Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 ------------------------------------- Change Notice 1 May 2009 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1098-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ iii DOE-STD-1098-2008 Change Notice 1: DOE-STD-1098-2008, Radiological Control Standard Section/page/paragraph Change Section 211, page 2-3, paragraph 1 Add new paragraph 1: "Approval by the appropriate Secretarial Officer or designee should be required

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Industrial Radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... chief application of industrial radiology in Norway is in the examination of pipe welds in hydroelectric plant. H. Vinter (Denmark), director of the Akademiet for de Technische Videns ... and to compare various methods of non-destructive testing. He gave results of tests on turbine disk forgings of austenitic steel which showed satisfactory agreement between radiography, ultrasonic examination and ...

1950-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

22

Final  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

, , Final for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards . Environmental Assessment Prepared for Southwestern Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy - _ . . . " Prepared by Black & Veatch October 13,1995 ' Table of Contents 1 . 0 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Description of the Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 Alternative 1 . No Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Alternative 2 . Mechanical and Manual Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Alternative 3 . Proposed Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 Foliar Spray Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2 Soil-Spot Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

23

Radiological Areas  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

24

RADIOLOGICAL SURWY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

111 111 j -,~ ' - et- -*\. _(a v - r\lfs+8 plY 45+ c iill I r\l&; p) :;!I..; .: .. :,, ,m -,< :' - ' ec-. :-*% ". _(.*- ~ . . : : : ' .. : : : .. ..:, . . . :. : : ,, :;I;:~~:; :.:.!,;;y ' 1;: .: 1. .., ; ' . :. : c :...: .;: .: RADIOLOGICAL SURWY - RADIoL~BI~L.::.~~~y:- : ::: 1 ,: . . : : :: :. :..." - OFi~:,~~~~:poRTI~~~ 0J-g ,m_ ,. :. y.;,:. ,.:I; .:. F~~~~~~as~~~ ~~~~~~~:~~~~ :co~~~:~~~~~; ;, .. ; I : : ::.. :.. :. - ,B~~Lo,.~-~~~. ..; .:I ,,,, :--:.;:I:: ;' #I Y' i ' 11". .. .. ; :;: ;I, ' . 1::. J;,;. ~;_:y,;:::::; - T.J..:+~uS~~ .' .:' : : . . .. ...: .:.. : OFTHE EXCERIORPORTIONS O F THE FORIMER BLISS ANT3 LAUGHLIN STEEL COMPANY FAC' KJTy - BUFFALO,NEw YORK - T. J.VITKUS I : . . : : ' . .:. : I : : .. :. Prepaied for.:the:' 6ffice.iibfiEnvir~nmenfal Re$o&idn z . . :

25

Women in pediatric radiology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AM et al. (2001) Pediatric radiology at the millennium.a case study of pediatric radiology. J Am Coll Radiol 6:635–WORKPLACE Women in pediatric radiology M. Ines Boechat # The

Boechat, M. Ines

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Book Review: Radiological Conditions in the Dnieper River Basin: Assessment by an International Expert Team and Recommendations for an Action Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article is a book review of a report from the International Atomic Energy Agency that was prepared by a team of scientists from Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine as an assessment of radiological contamination of the Dnieper River, which flows through these three countries. The topics covered begin with radioactive sources (actual and potential) including areas affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, nuclear power plants along the river and its tributaries, uranium mining and ore processing, radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and non-power sources, such as medicine, industry, and research. The report continues with an assessment of human exposures to radiation from these sources. An additional area of consideration is radiological “hot spots” in the region. The report finishes with conclusions and recommendations to the regional governments for a strategic action plan and individual government national plans.

Napier, Bruce A.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Estimate of radionuclide release characteristics into containment under severe accident conditions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed review of the available light water reactor source term information is presented as a technical basis for development of updated source terms into the containment under severe accident conditions. Simplified estimates of radionuclide release and transport characteristics are specified for each unique combination of the reactor coolant and containment system combinations. A quantitative uncertainty analysis in the release to the containment using NUREG-1150 methodology is also presented.

Nourbakhsh, H.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Standardized radiological dose evaluations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Final Expert Meeting Report: Simplified Space Conditioning Strategies for Energy Efficient Houses  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Expert Meeting Report: Expert Meeting Report: Simplified Space Conditioning Strategies for Energy Efficient Houses Dave Stecher IBACOS, Inc. July 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

30

Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Final Technical Report Recovery Act: Online Nonintrusive Condition Monitoring and Fault Detection for Wind Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The penetration of wind power has increased greatly over the last decade in the United States and across the world. The U.S. wind power industry installed 1,118 MW of new capacity in the first quarter of 2011 alone and entered the second quarter with another 5,600 MW under construction. By 2030, wind energy is expected to provide 20% of the U.S. electricity needs. As the number of wind turbines continues to grow, the need for effective condition monitoring and fault detection (CMFD) systems becomes increasingly important [3]. Online CMFD is an effective means of not only improving the reliability, capacity factor, and lifetime, but it also reduces the downtime, energy loss, and operation and maintenance (O&M) of wind turbines. The goal of this project is to develop novel online nonintrusive CMFD technologies for wind turbines. The proposed technologies use only the current measurements that have been used by the control and protection system of a wind turbine generator (WTG); no additional sensors or data acquisition devices are needed. Current signals are reliable and easily accessible from the ground without intruding on the wind turbine generators (WTGs) that are situated on high towers and installed in remote areas. Therefore, current-based CMFD techniques have great economic benefits and the potential to be adopted by the wind energy industry. Specifically, the following objectives and results have been achieved in this project: (1) Analyzed the effects of faults in a WTG on the generator currents of the WTG operating at variable rotating speed conditions from the perspective of amplitude and frequency modulations of the current measurements; (2) Developed effective amplitude and frequency demodulation methods for appropriate signal conditioning of the current measurements to improve the accuracy and reliability of wind turbine CMFD; (3) Developed a 1P-invariant power spectrum density (PSD) method for effective signature extraction of wind turbine faults with characteristic frequencies in the current or current demodulated signals, where 1P stands for the shaft rotating frequency of a WTG; (4) Developed a wavelet filter for effective signature extraction of wind turbine faults without characteristic frequencies in the current or current demodulated signals; (5) Developed an effective adaptive noise cancellation method as an alternative to the wavelet filter method for signature extraction of wind turbine faults without characteristic frequencies in the current or current demodulated signals; (6) Developed a statistical analysis-based impulse detection method for effective fault signature extraction and evaluation of WTGs based on the 1P-invariant PSD of the current or current demodulated signals; (7) Validated the proposed current-based wind turbine CMFD technologies through extensive computer simulations and experiments for small direct-drive WTGs without gearboxes; and (8) Showed, through extensive experiments for small direct-drive WTGs, that the performance of the proposed current-based wind turbine CMFD technologies is comparable to traditional vibration-based methods. The proposed technologies have been successfully applied for detection of major failures in blades, shafts, bearings, and generators of small direct-drive WTGs. The proposed technologies can be easily integrated into existing wind turbine control, protection, and monitoring systems and can be implemented remotely from the wind turbines being monitored. The proposed technologies provide an alternative to vibration-sensor-based CMFD. This will reduce the cost and hardware complexity of wind turbine CMFD systems. The proposed technologies can also be combined with vibration-sensor-based methods to improve the accuracy and reliability of wind turbine CMFD systems. When there are problems with sensors, the proposed technologies will ensure proper CMFD for the wind turbines, including their sensing systems. In conclusion, the proposed technologies offer an effective means to achieve condition-based smart maintenance for wind turbines and have a gre

Wei Qiao

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

33

Case Based Dental Radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice.

Brook A. Niemiec

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor Safety 3 C #12;Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1

Sheridan, Scott

36

Radiological Worker Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MEASUREMENT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix B December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . ii Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

37

Radiological Worker Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

38

Radiological Worker Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix A Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

39

Radiological Worker Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

40

Radiological Worker Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Appendix C December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Panoramic Radiology: Endodontic Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Endodontics is concerned with the morphology, physiology, and pathology of the human dental pulp and periradicular tissues. Radiology is especially important for diagnosis in the...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Radiological Assistance Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and responsibilities for its Radiological Assistance Program. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1992-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

DOE-HDBK-1143-2001; Radiological Control Training for Supervisors - Course Introduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

143-2001 143-2001 Instructor's Guide DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Administrative Policies and Procedures Objectives: Upon completion of this training, the student will be able to: 1. Identify the radiological controlled areas a person should be allowed to enter after successfully completing General Employee Radiological Training, Radiological Worker I training, and Radiological Worker II training. 2. List five actions used to increase the awareness level of workers relating to proper radiological work practices. 3. Identify three conditions when a "Stop Radiological Work" should be initiated. 4. Identify the actions that should be performed, prior to recommencement of work, after a "Stop Radiological Work" order has been initiated.

44

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiological Work Coverage Radiological Work Coverage Instructor's Guide 2.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Work Coverage Module Number: 2.11 Objectives: 2.11.01 List four purposes of job coverage. 2.11.02 Explain the differences between continuous and intermittent job coverage. 2.11.03 Given example conditions, identify those that should require job coverage. 2.11.04 Identify items that should be considered in planning job coverage. 2.11.05 Identify examples of information that should be discussed with workers during pre-job briefings. 2.11.06 Describe exposure control techniques that can be used to control worker and technician radiation exposures. L 2.11.07 Describe the in-progress radiological surveys that should be performed, at your site, under various radiological conditions.

45

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technican Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiological Work Coverage Radiological Work Coverage Study Guide 2.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Work Coverage Module Number: 2.11 Objectives: 2.11.01 List four purposes of job coverage. 2.11.02 Explain the differences between continuous and intermittent job coverage. 2.11.03 Given example conditions, identify those that should require job coverage. 2.11.04 Identify items that should be considered in planning job coverage. 2.11.05 Identify examples of information that should be discussed with workers during pre-job briefings. 2.11.06 Describe exposure control techniques that can be used to control worker and technician radiation exposures. i 2.11.07 Describe the in-progress radiological surveys that should be performed, at your site, under various radiological conditions.

46

Radiological Survey of Contaminated Installations of Research Reactor before Dismantling in High Dose Conditions with Complex for Remote Measurements of Radioactivity - 12069  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decontamination and decommissioning of the research reactors MR (Testing Reactor) and RFT (Reactor of Physics and Technology) has recently been initiated in the National Research Center (NRC) 'Kurchatov institute', Moscow. These research reactors have a long history and many installations - nine loop facilities for experiments with different kinds of fuel. When decommissioning nuclear facilities it is necessary to measure the distribution of radioactive contamination in the rooms and at the equipment at high levels of background radiation. At 'Kurchatov Institute' some special remote control measuring systems were developed and they are applied during dismantling of the reactors MR and RFT. For a survey of high-level objects a radiometric system mounted on the robotic Brokk vehicle is used. This system has two (4? and collimated) dose meters and a high resolution video camera. Maximum measured dose rate for this system is ?8.5 Sv/h. To determine the composition of contaminants, a portable spectrometric system is used. It is a remotely controlled, collimated detector for scanning the distribution of radioactive contamination. To obtain a detailed distribution of contamination a remote-controlled gamma camera is applied. For work at highly contaminated premises with non-uniform background radiation, another camera is equipped with rotating coded mask (coded aperture imaging). As a result, a new system of instruments for remote radioactivity measurements with wide range of sensitivity and angular resolution was developed. The experience and results of measurements in different areas of the reactor and at its loop installations, with emphasis on the radioactive survey of highly-contaminated samples, are presented. These activities are conducted under the Federal Program for Nuclear and Radiation Safety of Russia. Adaptation of complex remote measurements of radioactivity and survey of contaminated installations of research reactor before dismantling in high dose conditions has proven successful. The radioactivity measuring devices for operation at high, non-uniform dose background were tested in the field and a new data of measurement of contamination distribution in the premises and installations were obtained. (authors)

Danilovich, Alexey; Ivanov, Oleg; Lemus, Alexey; Smirnov, Sergey; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Volkovich, Anatoly [National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7of 9 7of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii Table of Contents Page Introduction.............................................................................. ......1 Development of Job Performance Measures (JPMs)............................ .....1 Conduct Job Performance Evaluation...................................................3 Qualification Area: Radiological Instrumentation.......................................5 Task 2-1.................. ..................................................................... 5 Objective.............................................................................. 5

48

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Control Training for Supervisors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A A December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Radiological Worker Training - Appendix A Radiological Control Training for Supervisors DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

49

Radiological Assessor Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1-2008 1-2008 August 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techs\ Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.1-1B, Radiation Protection Programs, March 2007, and as outlined in DOE- STD- 1098-99, CN1, March 2005, DOE Radiological Control (the Radiological Control Standard - RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of

50

Radiological worker training  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

52

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 25-Oct-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

53

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

54

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Radiation Therapy (with AAS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

55

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Nuclear Medicine (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study

Sheridan, Scott

56

Radiology of thoracic diseases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the essential clinical and radiologic findings of a wide variety of thoracic diseases. The authors include conventional, CT and MR images of each disease discussed. In addition, they present practical differential diagnostic considerations for most of the radiographic findings or patterns portrayed.

Swensen, S.J.; Pugatch, R.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Coal combustion: Effect of process conditions on char reactivity. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--May 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal utilization involves two major stages: coal pyrolysis and char combustion. Figure 1.1 summarizes the steps of these processes. During the pyrolysis stage, heated particles from plastic coals soften, swell and release their volatiles before resolidifying again. During the combustion or gasification stage, char particles may ignite and fragment as the carbon is consumed leaving behind a solid ash residue. Process conditions such as pyrolysis heating rate, heat treatment temperature, pyrolysis atmosphere, and particle size are shown to chemically and physically affect the coal during pyrolysis and the resulting char. Consequently, these pyrolysis conditions as well as the combustion conditions such as the oxygen concentration and combustion temperature affect the char reactivity and ignition phenomena during the combustion stage. Better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of coal pyrolysis and char combustion is needed to achieve greater and more efficient utilization of coal. Furthermore, this knowledge also contributes to the development of more accurate models that describe the transient processes involved in coal combustion. The project objectives were to investigate the effect of pyrolysis conditions on the macropore structure and subsequent reactivity of chars.

Zygourakis, K.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Modeling of hydrologic conditions and solute movement in processed oil shale waste embankments under simulated climatic conditions. Final report, November 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study is described on the hydrological and geotechnical behavior of an oil shale solid waste. The objective was to obtain information which can be used to assess the environmental impacts of oil shale solid waste disposal in the Green River Basin. The spent shale used in this study was combusted by the Lurgi-Ruhrgas process by Rio Blanco Oil Shale Company, Inc. Laboratory bench-scale testing included index properties, such as grain size distribution and Atterberg limits, and tests for engineering properties including hydraulic conductivity and shear strength. Large-scale tests were conducted on model spent shale waste embankments to evaluate hydrological response, including infiltration, runoff, and seepage. Large-scale tests were conducted at a field site in western Colorado and in the Environmental Simulation Laboratory (ESL)at the University of Wyoming. The ESL tests allowed the investigators to control rainfall and temperature, providing information on the hydrological response of spent shale under simulated severe climatic conditions. All experimental methods, materials, facilities, and instrumentation are described in detail, and results are given and discussed. 34 refs.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

EA-1499: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment EA-1499: Final Environmental Assessment RadiologicalNuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex, Nevada Test Site The DOE, National Nuclear Security...

60

Field development of a desiccant-based space-conditioning system for supermarket applications. Final report, February 1982-June 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The benefits associated with the use of gas-regenerated desiccant dehumidifiers in conjunction with electric-vapor-compression sensible cooling to provide space conditioning in supermarkets were evaluated. Data collected at two field installations were used for the assessment, in addition to the results of a computer program developed by Thermo Electron to simulate the loads and equipment performance in a supermarket. Both conventional humidity-level operation (47% relative humidity at 75F) and reduced store humidity level operation were evaluated for the desiccant-based system. Reductions in food refrigeration-system electric consumption with reduced store humidities were experimentally verified at both field sites. The use of desiccant dehumidifier hybrid space-conditioning systems produced operating cost savings over all electric vapor-compression systems in climates of moderate and high humidities.

Cohen, B.M.; Manley, D.L.; Arora, R.; Levine, A.H.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Report for the Waste Loading Area, Former Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the verification survey was to obtain evidence by means of measurements and sampling to confirm that the final radiological conditions were less than the established release criteria. This objective was achieved via multiple verification components including document reviews to determine the accuracy and adequacy of FSS documentation.

P.C. Weaver

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

Radiological safety at Argonne national laboratory's heavy ion research facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the radiological safety system to be employed at the Argonne tandem—linac accelerator system (ATLAS). The design parameters of ATLAS that affect safety have remained unchanged since ATLAS construction began in 1982. The specialized radiological safety considerations of ATLAS were discussed in 1982 [1]. This paper will present the details of the hardware, the administrative controls, and the radiation monitoring that will be in effect when beam is produced in April 1985. The experimental hall utilizing the maximum energy beam ( ? 27 MeV per nucleon) from the completed ATLAS has been partitioned with shielding blocks into its final configuration. Because scientists want access to some of the partitioned-off areas while beam is present in other areas, an interlock and logic system allowing such occupancy has been designed. The rationale and hardware of the system will be discussed. Since one of the potential radiation hazards is high-energy forward-directed neutrons from any location where the beam impinges (such as collimators, bending and focussing systems, experimental targets, and beam stops), radiation surveys and hazard assessments are necessary for the administrative controls that allow occupancy of various areas. Because of the various uses of ATLAS, neutrons (the dominant beam hazard) will be non-existent in some experiments and will be of energies ? 10 MeV for a few experiments. These conditions may exist at specific locations during beam preparation but may change rapidly when beam is finally delivered to an experimental area. Monitoring and assessing such time varying and geographically changing hazards will be a challenge since little data will be available on source terms until various beams are produced of sufficient intensity and energy to make measurements. How the operating division for ATLAS and the Argonne safety division are addressing this aspect through administrative controls will also be discussed.

R.H. Cooke; R.A. Wynveen

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

General Employee Radiological Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in chapter 14, Radiation Safety Training, of Implementation Guide G44.1B, Radiation Protection Programs Guide, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard [RCS - DOE-STD-1098-99, Ch. 1]. The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals

64

Radiological Assessor Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

141-2001 141-2001 April 2001 Change Notice No. 1 and Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 iii

65

Development of a high efficiency compressor/expander for an air cycle air conditioning system. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the methods and procedures used and the results obtained in the design, fabrication, and testing of a rotary vane type compressor operated on air cycle thermodynamics. The history and results of the testing of a similar expander are summarized and the full report of that work is referenced. The machine design used was based on one patented by Ecton Corporation. The goal of the reported effort was to demonstrate the attainable efficiencies of these machines. Appropriate test rigs were assembled and the machines were tested at various operating conditions. The compressor testing did not achieve the full design speed because of time constraints but important data was obtained at 87% speed (3000 rpm). The maximum measured total efficiencies were 78% for the expander and 71% for the compressor. Various design improvements which may yield improved performance were identified and reported.

Summers, R.L.; Smolinski, R.E.

1982-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Radiological Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Part 2 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for the Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 iii Table of Contents Page Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Purpose of Qualification Standard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Phase I: RCT Academics Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 1 Phase II: RCT Core Practical (JPMs) Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 1

67

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

B B December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL WORKER TRAINING RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ . Radiological Worker Training Appendix B Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for core training as outlined in

68

Dissimilar-welded failure analysis and development: Volume 6, Weld condition and remaining life assessment manual: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Step-by-step guidelines contained in a new engineering manual explain how to evaluate dissimilar metal weld loadings, assess the current state of damage, and predict remaining weld life. Suggested plant and operational modifications will help utility personnel identify root causes and avoid additional failures in a given boiler. Failure of dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) between the austenitic and ferritic steel tubing used in superheaters and reheaters constitutes a major cause of forced outages in fossil boilers. EPRI has undertaken a study of DMWs, reported in volumes 1-6 of this nine-volume series, to provide utilities with a systematic approach for identifying root causes, remedying identified problems, and estimating remaining DMW useful life. This manual follows the three-phase approach outlined in the EPRI guidelines for life extension (report CS-4778). The investigators subjected the samples to detailed metallurgical examination and established correlations among operating conditions, system stresses, and the extent of observed DMW cracking. These correlations were quantified in the PODIS computer code (prediction of damage in service code; EPRI report CS-4252, volume 7). The investigators documented this information in a manual explaining how to carry out life assessment of DMWs. These guidelines describe an analytic procedure that computes the current level of DMW damage based on operating temperature, the number and nature of cycles, and system stresses. They explain a procedure for supplementary destructive examinations to verify the analytic predictions. 10 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Nuclear & Radiological Activity Center (NRAC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear & Radiological Activity Center (NRAC) Where nuclear research and deployment capabilities come together to solve nuclear nonproliferation challenges. Skip Navigation Links...

70

Panoramic Radiology: Oncologic Dentistry Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Panoramic radiology can serve as an important input supporting ... they are also important (1) for planning dental treatment in preparation of the oral cavity...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Change Notice No. 1 2009 Change Notice No. 2 2011 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". NCRP Report No. 160 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population

72

Radiological Worker Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

98 98 October 1998 Change Notice No. 1 June 2001 Change Notice No. 2 December 2003 Reaffirmation with Errata May 2004 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-98 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration,

73

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical ExaminerCoroner...

74

Radiological Worker Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement document.

75

General Employee Radiological Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Not Measurement Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 December 2007_______ Change Notice 1 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

76

General Employee Radiological Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1131-2007 Original Change Part 2 page 5 The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 360 millirem/year. The average annual radiation dose to a member of the general population is about 620 millirem/year. Part 2 page 5 Natural background radiation is by far the

77

Radiological Worker Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 December 2008 Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Part 2 Module 2 page 17 Medical radiation sources (total average dose ~ 54 mrem/yr) 1) X rays (total average dose ~ 40mrem/yr) a) X rays are similar to gamma rays; however, they originate outside the nucleus.

78

Radiological Worker Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 December 2008 Change Notice 2 Reaffirmed 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Original Change Throughout Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement document.

79

For S Radiological  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

? . ? . -. .- * -* (\/If.r.-5- .* , d- For S Radiological ' mer Bridgepo pecial Metals Adrian, Survey of the Irt Brass Company Extrusion Plant, Michigan / /f?t' . ( F. F. Haywood H. W. Dickson W. D. Cottrell W. H. Shinpaugh _ : I., _-. .I ( ._ rc/ DOE/EV-0005128 ORNL-57 13 / J. E. Burden 0. R. Stone R. W. Doane W. A. Goldsmith 4 , Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service U.S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: A06 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the UnitedStatesGovernment. Neither theUnitedStatesGovernment noranyagency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or

80

Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

_______ _______ Change Notice 1 June 2009 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change 1 DOE-HDBK-1122-2009 Original Change Part 3 1.05-1 NCRP Report No. 93 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". NCRP Report No. 160 "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States". Part 3 1.05-9 4) U.S. national average from diagnostic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Radiology LPCH Fast Pediatric MRI Shreyas Vasanawala, MD/PhD Stanford University Lucile Radiology LPCH Thank you Par Lab Briefer, lighter, safer anesthesia for pediatric MRI #12; practice #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH #12;Stanford Radiology LPCH Current Solution INVASIVE LIMITS ACCESS

California at Berkeley, University of

82

I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

im im I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prprd* OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' | Prepared for Office of Operational FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE Safety U.S. Department LEWISTON, NEW YORK I of Energy i J.D. BERGER i Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division I l*~~~~~~ ~~~~DRAFT REPORT January 1983 I I I ------- COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -- Remedial Action Program J. D. Berger Project Staff L.W. Cole W.O. Helton R.D. Condra T.J. Sowell P.R. Cotten C.F. Weaver G.R. Foltz T.S. Yoo R.C. Gosslee Prepared by Radiological Site Assessment Program

83

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Home HSS Logo Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive sealed sources identified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), Appendix E, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sealed sources identified in Attachment 5, Appendix A of O 321.1B, will submit information to the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) System.

84

Radiological Emergency Response Plan (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes a radiological emergency response plan fund, into which any entity operating a nuclear reactor or storing nuclear fuel and radioactive waste in this state (referred to...

85

Radiological cleanup of Enewetak Atoll  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For 8 years, from 1972 until 1980, the United States planned and carried out the radiological cleanup, rehabilitation, and resettlement of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. This documentary records, from the perspective of DOD, the background, decisions, actions, and results of this major national and international effort. The documentary is designed: First, to provide a historical document which records with accuracy this major event in the history of Enewetak Atoll, the Marshall Islands, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands, Micronesia, the Pacific Basin, and the United States. Second, to provide a definitive record of the radiological contamination of the Atoll. Third, to provide a detailed record of the radiological exposure of the cleanup forces themselves. Fourth, to provide a useful guide for subsequent radiological cleanup efforts elsewhere.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Access Control and Work Area Setup Access Control and Work Area Setup Instructor's Guide 2.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Access Control and Work Area Setup Module Number: 2.10 Objectives: L 2.10.01 State the purpose of and information found on a Radiological Work Permit (RWP) including the different classifications at your site. L 2.10.02 State responsibilities in using or initiating a RWP. L 2.10.03 State the document that governs the ALARA program at your site. L 2.10.04 Describe how exposure/performance goals are established at your site. L 2.10.05 State the conditions under which a pre-job ALARA review is required at your site. L 2.10.06 State the conditions under which a post-job ALARA review is required at your site. 2.10.07 State purpose of radiological postings, signs, labels, and barricades; and

87

Radiological training for tritium facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program management guide describes a recommended implementation standard for core training as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM). The standard is to assist those individuals, both within DOE and Managing and Operating contractors, identified as having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RCM. This training may also be given to radiological workers using tritium to assist in meeting their job specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Radiological Protection for DOE Activities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes radiological protection program requirements that, combined with 10 CFR 835 and its associated implementation guidance, form the basis for a comprehensive program for protection of individuals from the hazards of ionizing radiation in controlled areas. Extended by DOE N 441.3. Cancels DOE 5480.11, DOE 5480.15, DOE N 5400.13, DOE N 5480.11; please note: the DOE radiological control manual (DOE/EH-0256T)

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

89

DOE standard: Radiological control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835 (10 CFR 835), ``Occupational Radiation Protection``. Failure to comply with these requirements may lead to appropriate enforcement actions as authorized under the Price Anderson Act Amendments (PAAA). While this Standard does not establish requirements, it does restate, paraphrase, or cite many (but not all) of the requirements of 10 CFR 835 and related documents (e.g., occupational safety and health, hazardous materials transportation, and environmental protection standards). Because of the wide range of activities undertaken by DOE and the varying requirements affecting these activities, DOE does not believe that it would be practical or useful to identify and reproduce the entire range of health and safety requirements in this Standard and therefore has not done so. In all cases, DOE cautions the user to review any underlying regulatory and contractual requirements and the primary guidance documents in their original context to ensure that the site program is adequate to ensure continuing compliance with the applicable requirements. To assist its operating entities in achieving and maintaining compliance with the requirements of 10 CFR 835, DOE has established its primary regulatory guidance in the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides. This Standard supplements the DOE G 441.1 series of Guides and serves as a secondary source of guidance for achieving compliance with 10 CFR 835.

Not Available

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

LANL responds to radiological incident  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident LANL responds to radiological incident Multiple tests indicate no health risks to public or employees. August 27, 2012 Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center(LANSCE). Aerial view of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The contamination poses no danger to the public. The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center August 27, 2012-The Laboratory is investigating the inadvertent spread of Technetium 99 by employees and contractors at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), a multidisciplinary accelerator facility used for both civilian and national security research. The Laboratory has determined that about a dozen people

91

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Change Notice No. 2 Change Notice No. 2 May 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 2. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Part 1, page 14 Change: U.S. Department of Energy, Radiological Control

92

An overview of dental radiology: a primer on dental radiology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To provide medical and scientific background on certain selected technologies generally considered to be of particular significance, the National Center for Health Care Technology (NCHCT) has commissioned a series of overview papers. This is one of several projects entered into jointly by the Bureau of Radiological Health (BRH) and NCHCT relating to the use of radiation for health care. Dental radiation protection has been a long-time interest of BRH. Both past and on-going efforts to minimize population radiation exposure from electronic products have included specific action programs directed at minimizing unnecessary radiation exposure to the population from dental radiology. Current efforts in quality assurance and referral criteria are two aspects of NCHCT's own assessment of this technology which are described within the larger picture presented in this overview. The issues considered in this document go beyond the radiation exposure aspects of dental x-ray procedures. To be responsive to the informational needs of NCHCT, the assessment includes various other factors that influence the practice of dental radiology. It is hoped this analysis will serve as the basis for planning and conducting future programs to improve the practice of dental radiology.

Manny, E.F.; Carlson, K.C.; McClean, P.M.; Ra1hlin, J.A.; Segal, P.

1980-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy...

94

Departmental Radiological Emergency Response Assets  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the DOE/NNSA national radiological emergency response assets and capabilities and Nuclear Emergency Support Team assets. Cancels DOE O 5530.1A, DOE O 5530.2, DOE O 5530.3, DOE O 5530.4, and DOE O 5530.5.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

95

Best practice techniques for environmental radiological monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Best practice techniques for environmental radiological monitoring Science Report ­ SC030308/SR SCHO0407BMNL-E-P #12;ii Science Report Best Practice Techniques for Environmental Radiological #12;iv Science Report Best Practice Techniques for Environmental Radiological Monitoring Executive

96

Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

/ Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security / Radiological Advisory Team | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Operations > Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team Nuclear / Radiological Advisory Team

97

Radiological Assistance Program (RAP)- Nuclear Engineering Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Major Programs > Radiological Major Programs > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Radiological Assistance Program Bookmark and Share Survey equipment is used to detect and measure radiation Survey equipment is used to detect and measure radiation. Click on image to view larger image. The Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team at Argonne can provide assistance in the event of a radiological accident or incident. Support ranges from giving technical information or advice over the telephone, to sending highly trained team members and state-of-the-art equipment to the accident site to help identify and minimize any radiological hazards. The

98

Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8-2002 8-2002 May 2002 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities

99

Radiological Training for Tritium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE HANDBOOK DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING FOR TRITIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Change Notice 1. Radiological Safety Training for Tritium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1105-2002 Page/Section Change Cover sheets parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 Change: Office of Environment, Safety & Health

100

Radiological Control Training for Supervisors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3-2001 3-2001 August 2001 Change Notice No 1. with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Control Training for Supervisors U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Control Training for Supervisors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Understanding Mechanisms of Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last 50 years, the study of radiological contamination and decontamination has expanded significantly. This paper addresses the mechanisms of radiological contamination that have been reported and then discusses which methods have recently been used during performance testing of several different decontamination technologies. About twenty years ago the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC) at the INL began a search for decontamination processes which could minimize secondary waste. In order to test the effectiveness of these decontamination technologies, a new simulated contamination, termed SIMCON, was developed. SIMCON was designed to replicate the types of contamination found on stainless steel, spent fuel processing equipment. Ten years later, the INL began research into methods for simulating urban contamination resulting from a radiological dispersal device (RDD). This work was sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and included the initial development an aqueous application of contaminant to substrate. Since 2007, research sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has advanced that effort and led to the development of a contamination method that simulates particulate fallout from an Improvised Nuclear Device (IND). The IND method diverges from previous efforts to create tenacious contamination by simulating a reproducible “loose” contamination. Examining these different types of contamination (and subsequent decontamination processes), which have included several different radionuclides and substrates, sheds light on contamination processes that occur throughout the nuclear industry and in the urban environment.

Rick Demmer; John Drake; Ryan James, PhD

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Depleted uranium residual radiological risk assessment for Kosovo sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the recent conflict in Yugoslavia, depleted uranium rounds were employed and were left in the battlefield. Health concern is related to the risk arising from contamination of areas in Kosovo with depleted uranium penetrators and dust. Although chemical toxicity is the most significant health risk related to uranium, radiation exposure has been allegedly related to cancers among veterans of the Balkan conflict. Uranium munitions are considered to be a source of radiological contamination of the environment. Based on measurements and estimates from the recent Balkan Task Force UNEP mission in Kosovo, we have estimated effective doses to resident populations using a well-established food-web mathematical model (RESRAD code). The UNEP mission did not find any evidence of widespread contamination in Kosovo. Rather than the actual measurements, we elected to use a desk assessment scenario (Reference Case) proposed by the UNEP group as the source term for computer simulations. Specific applications to two Kosovo sites (Planeja village and Vranovac hill) are described. Results of the simulations suggest that radiation doses from water-independent pathways are negligible (annual doses below 30 ?Sv). A small radiological risk is expected from contamination of the groundwater in conditions of effective leaching and low distribution coefficient of uranium metal. Under the assumptions of the Reference Case, significant radiological doses (>1 mSv/year) might be achieved after many years from the conflict through water-dependent pathways. Even in this worst-case scenario, DU radiological risk would be far overshadowed by its chemical toxicity.

Marco Durante; Mariagabriella Pugliese

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Imperium/Lanzatech Syngas Fermentation Project - Biomass Gasification and Syngas Conditioning for Fermentation Evaluation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-474  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LanzaTech and NREL will investigate the integration between biomass gasification and LanzaTech's proprietary gas fermentation process to produce ethanol and 2,3-butanediol. Using three feed materials (woody biomass, agricultural residue and herbaceous grass) NREL will produce syngas via steam indirect gasification and syngas conditioning over a range of process relevant operating conditions. The gasification temperature, steam-to-biomass ratio of the biomass feed into the gasifier, and several levels of syngas conditioning (based on temperature) will be varied to produce multiple syngas streams that will be fed directly to 10 liter seed fermenters operating with the Lanzatech organism. The NREL gasification system will then be integrated with LanzaTech's laboratory pilot unit to produce large-scale samples of ethanol and 2,3-butanediol for conversion to fuels and chemicals.

Wilcox, E.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

5 - Medical Considerations for Radiological Terrorism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the medical considerations for radiological terrorism. Radiological warfare (RW) attack is the deliberate use of radiological materials to cause injury and death. The explosion of a radiological weapon causes damage by the heat and blast liberated at the time of detonation. The proliferation of nuclear material and technology has made the acquisition and terrorist use of ionizing radiation more probable than ever. Currently, there are three threat scenarios for radiological terrorism. The most probable scenario for the near future would be a radiological dispersion device. Such a weapon can be developed and used by any terrorist with conventional weapons and access to radionuclides. This is an expedient weapon in that the radioactive waste material is easy to obtain from any location that uses radioactive sources. These sites can include a nuclear-waste processor, a nuclear power plant, a university research facility, a medical radiotherapy clinic, or an industrial complex.

James Winkley; Paul D. Mongan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's

106

TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program » TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) TEPP Training - Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) Once the jurisdiction has completed an evaluation of their plans and procedures, they will need to address any gaps in training. To assist, TEPP has developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT) program. MERRTT provides fundamental knowledge for responding to transportation incidents involving radiological material and builds on training in existing hazardous materials curricula. MERRTT satisfies the training requirements outlined in the Waste Isolation Pilot

107

US, UK, Kazakhstan Secure Radiological Transportation Vehicles...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

place them in secure storage, and improve radiological transportation security and site security. The United Kingdom-funded projects provide an immediate security and safety...

108

Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Data results provided back to the field within 30-60 minutes. All NNSA teams that conduct search, detection and identification operations, to include the Radiological...

109

Implementation of a Radiological Safety Coach program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safe Sites of Colorado Radiological Safety program has implemented a Safety Coach position, responsible for mentoring workers and line management by providing effective on-the-job radiological skills training and explanation of the rational for radiological safety requirements. This position is significantly different from a traditional classroom instructor or a facility health physicist, and provides workers with a level of radiological safety guidance not routinely provided by typical training programs. Implementation of this position presents a challenge in providing effective instruction, requiring rapport with the radiological worker not typically developed in the routine radiological training environment. The value of this unique training is discussed in perspective with cost-savings through better radiological control. Measures of success were developed to quantify program performance and providing a realistic picture of the benefits of providing one-on-one or small group training. This paper provides a description of the unique features of the program, measures of success for the program, a formula for implementing this program at other facilities, and a strong argument for the success (or failure) of the program in a time of increased radiological safety emphasis and reduced radiological safety budgets.

Konzen, K.K. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Langsted, J.M. [M.H. Chew and Associates, Golden, CO (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administra...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

(trained personnel and equipment) to evaluate, assess, advise, isotopically identify, search for, and assist in the mitigation of actual or perceived nuclear or radiological...

111

Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public...

112

Radiological Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Assistance Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Assistance Program Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > First Responders > Radiological Assistance Program Radiological Assistance Program RAP Logo NNSA's Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) is the nation's

113

Performance and evaluation of gas-engine-driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station. Final report (revised October 21, 1996)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance was evaluated of a new US cooling technology that has been installed for the first time at a federal facility. The technology is a 15-ton natural gas-engine-driven rooftop air conditioning unit made by Thermo King. Two units were installed to serve the Navy Exchange at Willow Grove. The savings potential at Willow Grove is described and that in the federal sector estimated. Conditions for implementation are discussed. In summary, the new technology is generally cost-effective at sites where marginal electricity cost (per MBtu at the meter) is more than 4 times the marginal gas cost (per MBtu at the meter) and annual full-load-equivalent cooling hours exceed 2,000.

Armstrong, P.R.; Katipamula, S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRHA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended

Sheridan, Scott

115

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 11-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

116

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

117

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRHA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 11-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended

Sheridan, Scott

118

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMHO] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May 13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

119

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Magnetic Resonance Imaging (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-MRRT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

120

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Nuclear Medicine (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) ­ Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-NMHO] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 11-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTHA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

122

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences-Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences- Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-HATS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended

Sheridan, Scott

123

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with AAS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTAS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Apr-2013/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended

Sheridan, Scott

124

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences Radiation Therapy (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences ­ Radiation Therapy ­ (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-RTHB] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-May-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

125

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences-Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences- Diagnostic Medical Sonography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-HATS] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 21-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended

Sheridan, Scott

126

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences -Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Imaging Sciences - Computed Tomography (with certification and ATS Radiologic Technology) - Bachelor of Radiologic and Imaging Sciences Technology [RE-BRIT-RIS-CTHA] Regional College Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 25-Oct-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester

Sheridan, Scott

127

Radiological characterization of spent control rod assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document represents the final report of an ongoing study to provide radiological characterizations, classifications, and assessments in support of the decommissioning of nuclear power stations. This report describes the results of non-destructive and laboratory radionuclide measurements, as well as waste classification assessments, of BWR and PWR spent control rod assemblies. The radionuclide inventories of these spent control rods were determined by three separate methodologies, including (1) direct assay techniques, (2) calculational techniques, and (3) by sampling and laboratory radiochemical analyses. For the BWR control rod blade (CRB) and PWR burnable poison rod assembly (BPRA), {sup 60}Co and {sup 63}Ni, present in the stainless steel cladding, were the most abundant neutron activation products. The most abundant radionuclide in the PWR rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) was {sup 108m}Ag (130 yr halflife) produced in the Ag-In-Cd alloy used as the neutron poison. This radionuclide will be the dominant contributor to the gamma dose rate for many hundreds of years. The results of the direct assay methods agree very well ({+-}10%) with the sampling/radiochemical measurements. The results of the calculational methods agreed fairly well with the empirical measurements for the BPRA, but often varied by a factor of 5 to 10 for the CRB and the RCCA assemblies. If concentration averaging and encapsulation, as allowed by 10CFR61.55, is performed, then each of the entire control assemblies would be classified as Class C low-level radioactive waste.

Lepel, E.A.; Robertson, D.E.; Thomas, C.W.; Pratt, S.L.; Haggard, D.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological Incidents  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological Incidents Carlos Corredor*, Department of Energy ; Charley Yu, Argonne National Labs Abstract: Since September 11, 2001, there has been a large effort by the government to develop new methods to reduce the consequence of potential radiological incidents. This is evident in the enhancement of technologies and methods to detect, prepare, or manage radiological incidents or accidents . With any radiological accident, radiological dispersal device (RDD), or improvised nuclear device (IND) , the major focus is always on the immediate phase of an incident or accident and less centered on the intermediate phase and the late recovery phase of that incident. In support of the 2008 protective action guides(PAGs) for RDDs , established by the Department of Homeland Security and by agreement with the EPA, the White House requested establishment of a series of operational guidelines that would focus on efforts during all phases of the incident and not just the immediate phase. “Operational Guidelines” were developed for this purpose. The operational guidelines are dose based pre-derived levels of radioactivity or radionuclide concentrations in various media that can be measured in the field and compared to the PAGs to quickly determine if protective actions are warranted. I.e can certain roads, bridges or metro systems be used, can the public return to their homes or businesses, can the public consume certain foods, etc. An operational guidelines manual, developed by a federal interagency working group led by the Department of Energy (DOE), was published in 2009 as the Preliminary Report on Operational Guidelines Developed for Use in Emergency Response to a Radiological Dispersal Device Incident, with its companion software RESidual RADiation (RESRAD)-RDD. With the development of the new PAG Manual (Interim Final 2013) by the EPA, an interagency working group was created under the auspices of the ISCORS to develop a revised operational guidelines manual that would reflect the changes by EPA’s new PAG Manual, new best available technology based on new dosimetric models (ICRP 60+), include operational guidelines for IND’s and increase the amount of radionuclides in the OGT Manual from 11 radioisotopes to 55. The new manual is scheduled for publication in 2015.

129

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technical Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 Access Control and Work Area Setup 10 Access Control and Work Area Setup Study Guide 2.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Access Control and Work Area Setup Module Number: 2.10 Objectives: i 2.10.01 State the purpose of and information found on a Radiological Work Permit (RWP) including the different classifications at your site. i 2.10.02 State responsibilities in using or initiating a RWP. i 2.10.03 State the document that governs the ALARA program at your site. i 2.10.04 Describe how exposure/performance goals are established at your site. i 2.10.05 State the conditions under which a pre-job ALARA review is required at your site. i 2.10.06 State the conditions under which a post-job ALARA review is required at your site. 2.10.07 State purpose of radiological postings, signs, labels, and barricades; and the

130

2012-2013 Diagnostic Radiology Fellows Cardiovascular Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dbweinreb@ Pediatric Radiology Body Imaging 1st yr. Neuroradiology NCI Body Mammography Sonya Edwards 149042012-2013 Diagnostic Radiology Fellows Cardiovascular Imaging Nuclear Medicine David Weinreb 14895 14909 laxpati@ Michael Kim 14961 mjjkim@ Vascular and Interventional Radiology Charles Kosydar 14908

Sonnenburg, Justin L.

131

Radiological-dose assessments of atolls in the northern Marshall Islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Marshall Islands in the Equatorial Pacific, specifically Enewetak and Bikini Atolls, were the site of US nuclear testing from 1946 through 1958. In 1978, the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey was conducted to evaluate the radiological conditions of two islands and ten atolls downwind of the proving grounds. The survey included aerial external gamma measurements and collection of soil, terrestrial, and marine samples for radionuclide analysis to determine the radiological dose from all exposure pathways. The methods and models used to estimate doses to a population in an environment where natural processes have acted on the source-term radionuclides for nearly 30 y, data bases developed for the models, and results of the radiological dose analyses are described.

Robison, W.L.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, “Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 0 issued in October 2009. Brief Description of Revision: A minor revision to correct oversights made during revision to incorporate the 10 CFR 835 Update; and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

Radiological Control Managers' Council Nevada Test Site

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

133

Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document supersedes DOE/NV/11718--079, “NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual,” Revision 5 issued in November 2004. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect the recent changes in compliance requirements with 10 CFR 835, and for use as a reference document for Tenant Organization Radiological Protection Programs.

Radiological Control Managers' Council - Nevada Test Site

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish Department of Energy (DOE) policy, procedures, authorities, and requirements for the establishment of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), as set forth in the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP). This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

135

INL@Work Radiological Search & Response Training  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dealing with radiological hazards is just part of the job for many INL scientists and engineers. Dodging bullets isn't. But some Department of Defense personnel may have to do both. INL employee Jennifer Turnage helps train soldiers in the art of detecting radiological and nuclear material. For more information about INL's research projects, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Turnage, Jennifer

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

Memorandum, Reporting of Radiological Sealed Sources Transactions  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The requirements for reporting transactions involving radiological sealed sources are identified in Department of Energy (DOE) Notice (N) 234.1, Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources. The data reported in accordance with DOE N 234.1 are maintained in the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) database by the Office of Information Management, within the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security.

137

Radiological health aspects of uranium milling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized.

Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

EA-1776: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6: Final Environmental Assessment 6: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1776: Final Environmental Assessment Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range The objective of this environmental assessment (EA) is to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of creating and operating a radiological response training range by evaluating two alternative approaches to achieve the proposed action and a 'No Action' alternative. The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed several possible on-site and off-site alternatives and determined that the reasonable alternative included two on-site locations; no off-site locations met the site-selection criteria. Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range Final Environmental Assessment, DOE/EA-1776 (October 2010) More Documents & Publications

139

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project November 2003 A...

140

Unified Resolve 2014: A Proof of Concept for Radiological Support...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Unified Resolve 2014: A Proof of Concept for Radiological Support to Incident Commanders Unified Resolve 2014: A Proof of Concept for Radiological Support to Incident Commanders...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident This Transportation...

142

Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportati...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents This part should...

143

MACCS2 Final Gap Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MACCS2-Gap Analysis MACCS2-Gap Analysis Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2002-1 Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan Commitment 4.2.1.3: Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan: MACCS2 Gap Analysis Final Report U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and Health 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, DC 20585-2040 May 2004 MACCS2 Gap Analysis May 2004 Final Report INTENTIONALLY BLANK ii MACCS2 Gap Analysis May 2004 Final Report FOREWORD This report documents the outcome of an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance (SQA) attributes of the radiological dispersion computer code, MACCS2, relative to established software requirements. This evaluation, a "gap analysis", is performed to meet commitment 4.2.1.3 of the

144

Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

Radiological Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Triage | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Radiological Triage Home > About Us > Our Programs > Emergency Response > Responding to Emergencies > Render Safe > Radiological Triage Radiological Triage Triage Logo NNSA's Triage is a non-deployable, secure, on-line capability

146

Radiological Worker Training - Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

C C December 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training Radiological Safety Training for Radiation Producing (X-Ray) Devices U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Radiological Worker Training - Appendix C Radiological Safety Training for Radiation-Producing (X-Ray) Devices DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Program Management

147

Integrating pathology and radiology disciplines: an emerging opportunity?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pediatric vascular malformations: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and the role of interventional radiology.

Sorace, James; Aberle, Denise R; Elimam, Dena; Lawvere, Silvana; Tawfik, Ossama; Wallace, W Dean

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Apparatus for safeguarding a radiological source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tamper detector is provided for safeguarding a radiological source that is moved into and out of a storage location through an access porthole for storage and use. The radiological source is presumed to have an associated shipping container approved by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for transporting the radiological source. The tamper detector typically includes a network of sealed tubing that spans at least a portion of the access porthole. There is an opening in the network of sealed tubing that is large enough for passage therethrough of the radiological source and small enough to prevent passage therethrough of the associated shipping cask. Generally a gas source connector is provided for establishing a gas pressure in the network of sealed tubing, and a pressure drop sensor is provided for detecting a drop in the gas pressure below a preset value.

Bzorgi, Fariborz M

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

2.04 - Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter addresses the technologies and the applications of radiology used in the field of oral (or dental) and maxillofacial imaging. While the basic science and x-ray technology are the same as in general radiology, there are here important specialized differentiations that lead to very distinct equipment and procedures compared to general medical imaging. Four major subcategories are discussed: Dedicated x-ray sources for dental intraoral radiology, that is, radiography where the detector is located inside the oral cavity, and the radiographic object consisting of a few teeth Intraoral detectors: (classic) radiographic film, photostimulated-phosphor imaging plates, and solid-state digital detectors (that produce an image immediately) Equipment for panoramic and for cephalometric extraoral radiology Cone beam volumetric imaging (3D x-ray) of the head (aka CBCT)

R. Molteni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Educational strategies in oral and maxillofacial radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we interpret a trend in higher education in terms of its relation to oral and maxillofacial radiology education. Specifically, we describe an “evidence-based dental education” – borrowing from the ...

Madeleine Rohlin; Koji Shinoda; Yumi Takano

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Radiological safety training for uranium facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This handbook contains recommended training materials consistent with DOE standardized core radiological training material. These materials consist of a program management guide, instructor`s guide, student guide, and overhead transparencies.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

DOE Issues WIPP Radiological Release Investigation Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today, the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management (EM) released the initial accident investigation report related to the Feb. 14 radiological release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico.

153

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated

154

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 of 3) 3 of 3) RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page TERMINAL OBJECTIVE............................................................................1 ENABLING OBJECTIVES...........................................................................1 I. RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION................................................. 2 A. Comparison of Radiation and Radioactive Contamination ..................... 2 B. Types of Contamination.............................................................. 2

155

Environmental/Radiological Assistance Directory (ERAD)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Environmental Radiological Assistance Directory or ERAD, developed by HS-22, serves as an assistance tool to the DOE complex for protection of the public and environment from radiation. The ERAD is a combination webinar/conference call, designed to provide DOE and its contractors a forum to share information, lessons-learned, best practices, emerging trends, compliance issues, etc. in support of radiological protection programs developed in accordance with DOE O 458.1. ERAD Presentations, Questions and Answers ERAD

156

A radiological evaluation of phosphogypsum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum is the by-product resulting from phosphoric acid or phosphate fertilizer production. The phosphate used in these chemical processes contains the naturally occurring radioactive material U and all its subsequent decay products. During processing, the U generally remains in the phosphoric acid product, while the daughter, {sup 226}Ra, tends to be concentrated in the phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum has physical properties that make it useful as a sub-base for roadways, parking lots, and similar construction. A radiological evaluation, to determine exposures to workers mixing this material with a stabilizing agent (portland cement), was performed at a South Louisiana phosphoric acid chemical plant. Measurements of the {sup 226}Ra content of the phosphogypsum showed an average of 1.1 +/- 0.3 Bq g-1 (0.7-1.7 Bq g-1). The average measured gross gamma exposure rate on the phosphogypsum pile corresponded to a dose equivalent rate of 0.368 +/- 0.006 mu Sv h-1 (0.32-0.42 mu Sv h-1). Radon daughter concentrations measured on top of the phosphogypsum pile ranged from 0.0006 to 0.001 working levels. An analysis of the airborne {sup 226}Ra concentrations showed only background levels.

Laiche, T.P.; Scott, L.M. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Final Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

revised revised AGENDA Transportation at a Crossroads The First Meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 25-27, 2010 The Westin Michigan Avenue Chicago, Illinois MONDAY, MAY 24 10 am - 6 pm Tour of Argonne National Laboratory Board bus on Delaware Tour participants will learn about the history of Argonne National Laboratory and observe the decontamination and decommissioning that is generating shipments of radioactive waste to sites like DOE's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The group will also see a demonstration of DOE's new system for using radio-frequency identification technology to track shipments in real time. A visit to the DOE Region 5 Radiological Assistance Program facility will give participants a first-hand look at the resources that are available to help

160

Application of a geographic information system for radiologic emergency response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A geographic information system (GIS) is a multifunctional analytical tool that can be used to compile available data and derive information. A GIS is a computerized database management system for the capture, storage, retrieval, analysis, and display of spatial data. Maps are the most common type of spatial data, but any type of data that can be referenced by an x-y location or geographic coordinate can be used in a GIS. In a radiological emergency, it is critical that data of all types be rapidly compiled into a common format in order to make accurate observations and informed decisions. Developing a baseline GIS for nuclear facilities would offer a significant incentive for all organizations to contribute to and utilize this powerful data management tool. The system being developed could integrate all elements of emergency planning, from the initial protective actions based on models through the emergency monitoring phase, and finally ending with the complex reentry and recovery phase. Within the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), there is a continuing effort to improve the data management and communication process. To demonstrate the potential of GIS for emergency response, the system has been utilized in interagency FRMAC exercises. An interactive GIS system has been deployed and used to analyze the available spatial data to help determine the impact of a hypothetical radiological release and to develop mitigation plans. For this application, both hardcopy and real-time spatial displays were generated with the GIS. Composite maps with different sizes, scales, and themes were produced to support the exercises.

Best, R.G.; Doyle, J.F.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology Radiology Department Management Technology Associate of Technical Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology ­ Radiology Department Management Technology ­ Associate-Nov-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However technology, housed at the Salem Campus. Course Subject and Title Credit Hours Min. Grade Major GPA Important

Sheridan, Scott

162

In-Situ Radiation Detection Demonstration Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Defense (DoD) has hundreds of facilities where radioactive materials have been used or are being used, including firing ranges, low-level radioactive waste disposal areas, and areas where past activities have resulted in environmental contamination. Affected sites range in size from a few acres to square miles. Impact to the DoD comes through military base closure and release to the public. It is important that radioactive contaminants are remediated to levels that result in acceptable risk to the public. Remediation requires characterization studies, e.g., sampling and surveys, to define the affected areas, removal actions, and final confirmatory sampling and surveys. Characterization of surface contamination concentrations has historically been performed using extensive soil sampling programs in conjunction with surface radiation surveys conducted with hand-held radiation monitoring equipment. Sampling is required within the suspect affected area and a large buffer area. Surface soil contaminant characterization using soil sampling and hand held monitoring are costly, time consuming, and result in long delays between submission of samples for analysis and obtaining of final results. This project took an existing, proven radiation survey technology that has had limited exposure and improved its capabilities by documenting correlation factors for various detector/radionuclide geometries that commonly occur in field surveys. With this tool, one can perform characterization and final release surveys much more quickly than is currently possible, and have detection limits that are as good as or better than current technology. This paper will discuss the capabilities of a large area plastic scintillation detector used in conjunction with a global positioning system (GPS) to improve site characterization, remediation, and final clearance surveys of the radioactively contaminated site. Survey results can rapidly identify areas that require remediation as well as guide surgical removal of contaminated soil that is above remediation guidelines. Post-remediation surveys can document that final radiological site conditions are within the remedial action limits.

MOHAGHEGHI,AMIR H.; REESE,ROBERT; MILLER,DAVID R.; MILLER,MARK LAVERNE; DUCE,STEPHEN

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Final Reminder:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Please save your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 imporant files by 4/30/12 April 27, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) Franklin batch system is drained, and all batch queues are stopped as of 4/26 23:59pm. This is the final reminder that please make sure to save important files on your Franklin $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2. ALL FILES THERE WILL BE DELETED, and there will be no mechanisms to recover any of the files after May 1. Mon Apr 30: Last day to retrieve files from Franklin scratch file systems Mon Apr 30, 23:59: User logins are disabled If you need help or have any concerns, please contact "consult at nersc dot gov". Post your comment You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here. Comments No one has commented on this page yet.

164

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This the final report for the project "Large-Scale Optimization for Bayesian Inference in Complex Systems," for the work in the group of the co-PI George Biros.

Biros, George

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

165

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

DeTar, Carleton [P.I.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance to EMS care providers for properly handling and packaging potentially radiologically contaminated patients. This procedure applies to Emergency Medical Service care providers who respond to a radioactive material transportation incident that involves potentially contaminated injuries. Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient.docx More Documents & Publications Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Radioactive Materials Transportation and Incident Response

167

Addressing the risks of diagnostic radiology : what should be done about the increasing use of computed tomography in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computed tomography (CT) is a prominent procedure in the US with larger radiation doses than traditional radiology. CT is a powerful tool in the diagnosis of a wide variety of conditions and its use has grown quickly because ...

Eastwick, Gary (Gary A.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Final Report to Improved Reservoir Access Through Refracture Treatments in Tight Gas Sands and Gas Shales 07122-41.FINAL June 2013 PI Mukul M. Sharma The University of Texas at Austin 200 E. Dean Keeton St. Stop C0300 Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471---3257 msharma@mail.utexas.edu LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by The University of Texas at Austin as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT, OR THAT THE

169

EM-Led Radiological Incident Response Program Receives Honors...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM-Led Radiological Incident Response Program Receives Honors EM-Led Radiological Incident Response Program Receives Honors May 29, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Jessie Welch performs...

170

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and Medical Physics Programs The George W. Woodruff School #12 Year Enrollment - Fall Semester Undergraduate Graduate #12; Nuclear Power Industry Radiological Engineering Industry Graduate School DOE National Labs Nuclear Navy #12; 104 Operating Nuclear Power plants

Weber, Rodney

171

E-Print Network 3.0 - arms aerial radiological Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

General Diagnostic Radiology * Clinical Rotation Breast Imaging... * Clinical Rotation Pediatric Radiology * Clinical Rotation Nuclear Medicine Semester ... Source: VandeVord,...

172

Environmental Health & Safety Office of Radiological Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Health & Safety Office of Radiological Safety Page 1 of 2 FORM LU-1 Revision 01 1 safety training and submit this registration to the LSO prior to use of Class 3B or 4 lasers. A copy will be returned to the Laser Supervisor to be filed in the Laboratory Laser Safety Notebook. Both the Laser

Houston, Paul L.

173

Feminist theoretical perspectives on ethics in radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......about the substantive public health issues? In the Western world...female cancer, and yet public health systems come under serious...accorded the best education, health care, nutrition or technology...unwanted food or inferior or even dangerous radiological or other technical......

Mary Condren

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Measurement of radiation dose in dental radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......product to effective dose and energy imparted to the patient. Phys...C. A. and Persliden, J. Energy imparted to the patient in diagnostic...factors for determining the energy imparted from measurements of...dental radiology. | Patient dose audit is an important tool for quality......

Ebba Helmrot; Gudrun Alm Carlsson

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Nuclear Engineering Catalog 2014 Radiological Concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering Catalog 2014 Radiological Concentration Fall Math 141 or 147 (4) FA, SP, SU-approved by the department. Courses in Nuclear Engineering other than 500, 502 or 598 may also be used as technical electives. No more than four (4) credit hours of nuclear engineering courses in which a C- or lower is the highest

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

176

Development of radiological concentrations and unit liter doses for TWRS FSAR radiological consequence calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The analysis described in this report develops the Unit Liter Doses for use in the TWRS FSAR. The Unit Liter Doses provide a practical way to calculate conservative radiological consequences for a variety of potential accidents for the tank farms.

Cowley, W.L.

1996-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

THE RABIT: A RAPID AUTOMATED BIODOSIMETRY TOOL FOR RADIOLOGICAL TRIAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-priority need in an environment of heightened concern over possible radiological or nuclear terrorist attacks (Pellmar and Rockwell 2005). The detonation of even a small dirty bomb (radiological dispersal device of radiological injuries. A small improvised nuclear device (IND) would produce a major health emergency

178

FINAL REPORT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FINAL REPORT AEC-ERDA Research Contract AT (11-1) 2174 Columbia University's Nevis Laboratories "Research in Neutron Velocity Spectroscopy" James RainwatGr DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

179

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiological Protection Standards Radiological Protection Standards Instructor's Guide 1.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Protection Standards Module Number: 1.09 Objectives: 1.09.01 Identify the role of advisory agencies in the development of recommendations for radiological control. 1.09.02 Identify the role of regulatory agencies in the development of standards and regulations for radiological control. 1.09.03 Identify the scope of the 10 CFR Part 835. References: 1. ANL-88-26 (1988) "Operational Health Physics Training"; Moe, Harold; Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998) "Occupational Radiation Protection" Instructional Aids:

180

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiological Considerations for First Aid Radiological Considerations for First Aid Study Guide 2.15-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after medical personnel have arrived at the scene. i 2.15.04 List the requirements for treatment and transport of contaminated injured personnel at your facility. INTRODUCTION "Standard first aid is applied prior to contamination control whenever it is considered to have life-saving value, or is important to the patient for relief of pain or prevention of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid 5 Radiological Considerations for First Aid Instructor's Guide 2.15-1 Course Number: Radiological Control Technicians Module Title: Radiological Considerations for First Aid Module Number: 2.15 Objectives: 2.15.01 List the proper steps for the treatment of minor injuries occurring in various radiological areas. 2.15.02 List the requirements for responding to major injuries or illnesses in radiological areas. 2.15.03 State the RCT's responsibility at the scene of a major injury in a radiological area after medical personnel have arrived at the scene. L 2.15.04 List the requirements for treatment and transport of contaminated injured personnel at your facility. References: 1. Basic Radiation Protection Technology (2nd edition) - Daniel A. Gollnick 2. Operational Health Physics Training - H. J. Moe

182

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

06-97 06-97 February 1997 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 March 2002 Reaffirmation with Errata August 2002 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Reaffirmation with Errata DOE-HDBK-1106-97 Radiological Contamination Control for Laboratory Research

183

Radiological Safety Training for Accelerator Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TS TS NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1108-2002 May 2002 Reaffirmation with Change Notice 2 July 2013 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR ACCELERATOR FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ Change Notice No.2 Radiological Training for Accelerator Facilities Page/Section Change Throughout the document: Program Management Guide Instructor's Guide Student's Guide "Shall" and "Must" statements Revised to: Program Management Instructor's Material Student's Material Reworded to non-mandatory language unless associated with a requirement

184

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2 7% 2 7% d &y / 7 ORNL/TM- 10076 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL ~-T-m -~=- -~ w-~- -"" * ,<.~- ~w&$UREMENTs: TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NF002) J. K. Williams B. A. Berven ~.~~;:;-~~~ ~. -,' - ~~ 7, OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIDTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC, FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY --... ORNL/TM-10076 HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; ONLWCOI) RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL MEASUREMENTS TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NFOO2) J. K. Williams* and B. A. Berven *Biology Division Date Published November 1986 Investigation Team B. A. Berven - RASA Program Manager W. D. Cottrell - FUSRAP Project Director W. H. Shinpaugh - Field Survey Supervisor

185

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

145-2008 145-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1145-2008 Program Management Guide

186

Radiological Safety Training for Uranium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE HDBK-1113-2008 DOE HDBK-1113-2008 April 2008 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY TRAINING FOR URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1113-2008 iii Foreword This Handbook describes a recommended implementation process for additional training as outlined in DOE-STD-1098-99, Radiological Control (RCS). Its purpose is to assist those individuals, Department of Energy (DOE) employees, Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors, and Managing and Integrating

187

Radiological Dispersion Devices and Basic Radiation Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introductory physics courses present the basic concepts of radioactivity and an overview of nuclear physics that emphasizes the basic decay relationship and the various types of emitted radiation. Although this presentation provides insight into radiological science it often fails to interest students to explore these concepts in a more rigorous manner. One reason for limited student interest is the failure to link the discussion to topics of current interest. The author has found that presenting this material with a link to radiological dispersion devices (RDDs) or dirty bombs and their associated health effects provides added motivation for students. The events of Sept. 11 2001 and periodic media focus on RDDs heighten student interest from both a scientific curiosity as well as a personal protection perspective. This article presents a framework for a more interesting discussion of the basics of radiation science and their associated health effects. The presentation can be integrated with existing radioactivitylectures or added as a supplementary or enrichment activity.

Joseph John Bevelacqua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 March 2013 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities U.S. Department of Energy TRNG-0061 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. ii Radiological Safety Training for Plutonium Facilities DOE-HDBK-1145-2013 Program Management Foreword

189

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 of 3) 2 of 3) Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research Instructor's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy February 1997 DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Table of Contents Page DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - Course/Lesson Plan.............................. 1 Standardized Core Course Materials................................................... 1 Course Goal.........................................................................1 Target Audience.................................................................. 1 Course Description............................................................... 1 Prerequisites...................................................................... 1

190

Nevada National Security Site Radiological Control Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document supersedes DOE/NV/25946--801, 'Nevada Test Site Radiological Control Manual,' Revision 1 issued in February 2010. Brief Description of Revision: A complete revision to reflect a recent change in name for the NTS; changes in name for some tenant organizations; and to update references to current DOE policies, orders, and guidance documents. Article 237.2 was deleted. Appendix 3B was updated. Article 411.2 was modified. Article 422 was re-written to reflect the wording of DOE O 458.1. Article 431.6.d was modified. The glossary was updated. This manual contains the radiological control requirements to be used for all radiological activities conducted by programs under the purview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Compliance with these requirements will ensure compliance with Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection.' Programs covered by this manual are located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); Nellis Air Force Base and North Las Vegas, Nevada; Santa Barbara and Livermore, California; and Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland. In addition, fieldwork by NNSA/NSO at other locations is covered by this manual. Current activities at NNSS include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for United States defense-generated waste, assembly and execution of subcritical experiments, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, the storage and use of special nuclear materials, performing criticality experiments, emergency responder training, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, environmental activity by the University system, and nonnuclear test operations, such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center. Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level radioactive waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures.

Radiological Control Managers’ Council

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT 5823/5849 NORTH RAVENSWOOD AVEXJE CHICAGO, ILLINOIS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT 5823/5849 NORTH RAVENSWOOD AVEXJE CHICAGO, ILLINOIS Prepared by M.R. LANDIS Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Project Staff J.D. Berger R.C. Gosslee E.A. Powell G.R. Foltz M.J. Laudeman A. Wallo* C.F. Weaver Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites - Remedial Action Program FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760RC0033 with the U.S. Department of Energy. *with the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning -- LIST OF FIGURES Page FIGURE 1: Map of Chicago, Illinois Indicating the Location of the Facility at

192

Radiological standards and calibration laboratory capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national radiological standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE sites, and research programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site`s 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, and thermoluminescent and radiochromic dosimetry. The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, and a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentations, photon transfer standards and alpha, beta and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory. Photographs that accompany the text appear in the Appendix and are designated Figure A.1 through A.29.

Goles, R.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Radiological and chemical source terms for Solid Waste Operations Complex. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological and chemical source terms for the major projects of the Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC), including Project W-112, Project W-133 and Project W-100 (WRAP 2A). For purposes of this document, the term ``source term`` means the design basis inventory. All of the SWOC source terms involve the estimation of the radiological and chemical contents of various waste packages from different waste streams, and the inventories of these packages within facilities or within a scope of operations. The composition of some of the waste is not known precisely; consequently, conservative assumptions were made to ensure that the source term represents a bounding case (i.e., it is expected that the source term would not be exceeded). As better information is obtained on the radiological and chemical contents of waste packages and more accurate facility specific models are developed, this document should be revised as appropriate. Radiological source terms are needed to perform shielding and external dose calculations, to estimate routine airborne releases, to perform release calculations and dose estimates for safety documentation, to calculate the maximum possible fire loss and specific source terms for individual fire areas, etc. Chemical source terms (i.e., inventories of combustible, flammable, explosive or hazardous chemicals) are used to determine combustible loading, fire protection requirements, personnel exposures to hazardous chemicals from routine and accident conditions, and a wide variety of other safety and environmental requirements.

Boothe, G.F.

1994-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

194

Attributes and practices of oral and maxillofacial radiology departments in US and Canadian dental schools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Objective: To assess the actual state of oral and maxillofacial radiology departments in US and Canadian dental schools against the ideal characteristics defined by the American Academy of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (AAOMR) 1997 position paper. Study Design: Cross-sectional survey of all 65 US and Canadian dental schools. Results: Sixty-four surveys were returned (98%). At most schools, oral and maxillofacial radiology (OMR) was an identifiable division of a department, established policies, and had operational authority for radiographic practices in the primary radiology clinic. The majority of full-time faculty (72%) had formal training in OMR; the majority of part-time faculty (86%) did not. Full-time faculty spent approximately 60% of their time teaching, with the remainder of their time divided among research and scholarship, faculty practice, and service. Routine x-ray equipment was universally available; advanced imaging technologies were not. OMR faculty involvement in the interpretation of radiographs varied across diseases and conditions. Most published scholarship (85%+) was produced by full-time faculty. Average output was 1 paper per person per year, but a relatively small cadre of OMR faculty generated most papers. Conclusions: In some attributes, the status of OMR closely approximated the ideal characteristics established in the AAOMR report. Among the remaining attributes, bridging the difference between the actual and the ideal will be the challenge for the next 5 years. (Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2001;91:101-8)

Mel L. Kantor; Dona Schneider; M.Kevin O Carroll

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

EA-1900: Final Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Radiological Work and Storage Building at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York

196

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Worker Injuries and Illnesses (joint w TWC) ... 2 Radiation Primer: Understanding Radiological Terms (joint w TWC, PIC, and RAP)...

197

Surveillance Guides - RPS 11.2 Radiological Work Practices  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RADIOLOGICAL WORK PRACTICES RADIOLOGICAL WORK PRACTICES 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the practices of workers performing tasks in radiological controlled areas to ensure that these practices protect the safety and health of the workers and comply with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection 2.2 DOE/EH-0256T, rev. 1, Radiological Control Manual 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirement RP-0024 from the RL S/RID. This requirement comes from the Radiological Control Manual. 4.0 Surveillance Activities The Facility Representative performs the following activities to evaluate the effectiveness of work practices by contractor personnel in minimizing exposure to radiological hazards.

198

Air Conditioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Air Conditioning ... CHEMISTS and engineers use air conditioning as a valuable tool in more than two hundred industries. ... Air conditioning is a tool with many facets. ...

MARGARET INGELS

1938-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

200

NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management System | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency ... Press Release NNSA Helps Vietnam Establish Nuclear, Radiological Emergency Management

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material Fact Sheet GTRI: Removing Vulnerable Civilian Nuclear and Radiological Material

202

Recent Developments in Field Response for Mitigation of Radiological...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of Radiological Incidents Carlos Corredor*, Department of Energy; Charley Yu, Argonne National Labs Abstract: Since September 11, 2001, there has been a large effort by...

203

Analysis of nuclear test TRINITY radiological and meteorological data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the TRINITY nuclear test. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. Comparisons of the WSNSO fallout analyses with analyses performed in the 1940s are presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO 1987 fallout patterns are tabulated in appendices.

Quinn, V.E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ornl< ORNLRASA-8664 (MJ18V) orni OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL EZ-BBBB - *VERIFICATION SURVEY AT THE BALLOD ASSOCIATES PROPERTY,...

205

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C...

206

DOE, Westinghouse to Partner with NMJC To Train Radiological...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Partner with NMJC To Train Radiological and Waste Handling Technicians Hobbs, NM, December 5, 2001 -- Representatives of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) yesterday...

207

Trending and root cause analysis of TWRS radiological problem reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a uniform method for trending and performing root cause analysis for radiological problem reports at Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS).

Brown, R.L.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Hospital Triage in First Hours After Nuclear or Radiological...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hospital Triage in the First 24 Hours after a Nuclear or Radiological Disaster Medical professionals with the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the...

209

DOE Subpart H Report. Annual NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NESHAPS Meeting on Radiological Emissions Gustavo Vazquez*, DOE; Sandra Snyder, PNNL Abstract: The National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants, Subpart H,...

210

Radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological hazards of alpha-contaminated wastes are discussed in this overview in terms of two components of hazard: radiobiological hazard, and radioecological hazard. Radiobiological hazard refers to human uptake of alpha-emitters by inhalation and ingestion, and the resultant dose to critical organs of the body. Radioecological hazard refers to the processes of release from buried wastes, transport in the environment, and translocation to man through the food chain. Besides detailing the sources and magnitude of hazards, this brief review identifies the uncertainties in their estimation, and implications for the regulatory process.

Rodgers, J.C.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal carbides have recently attracted a great deal of interest due to their potential to replace noble metal catalysts in a variety of reactions. To date, attempts to develop commercial applications with bulk metal carbides have been unsuccessful, however, the catalytic behavior of nanometer-sized carbide particles are reported to be sufficiently different from the bulk materials that new research in this area is warranted. In this report, Mo/W carbides were synthesized using carbon nanotubes both as carbon source and as a catalyst support. These carbon nanotubes (FIBRIL[TM] Nanotubes) are composed of parallel layers of trigonal carbon, but in the form of a series of concentric tubes disposed about the longitudinal axis of the fibrils with diameter of 8{approx}10 nm. The special dimensions of nanotubes stabilize fine dispersion of catalytic entities as only particles with limited sizes, ca <8nm, could be supported on this nanoscale substrate. Two types of catalysts have been prepared in this manner. First, highly dispersed Mo carbide particles were generated on the carbon nanotube surface with average particle size of 3{approx}10 nm. Furthermore, stoichiometric Mo carbide was also obtained in the form of highly porous assemblages of nanorods by careful control of the reaction conditions. The prepared Mo and W carbide catalysts were tested in several industrial reactions with significant energy savings. Results from these studies demonstrated the ''poor man's platinum'' hypothesis as well as many great potentials associated with these novel catalysts in chemical and refinery industries.

Ma, Jun; Hoch, Robert

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

COT"IPREITENS IVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY P NIAGARA FALIS STORAGE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

COT"IPREITENS IVE RADIOLOGICAL COT"IPREITENS IVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY P NIAGARA FALIS STORAGE SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK Prepared for U.S. DePartment of EnergY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites - Remedial ActLon Program J . D . B e r g e r P r o j e c t S t a f f J. Burden* w.L. Smlth* R.D. Condra T.J. Sowell J.S . Epler* G.M. S tePhens P.Iil. Frame L.B. Taus* W . 0 . H e l t o n C . F . W e a v e r R . C . G o s s l e e B . S . Z a c h a r e k d I I Prepared bY Radiological Slte Assessoent Progran Manpower Educailon Research, and Training Dlvision Oak Ridge Assoclated Universlties Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3783f-0117 I FINAL REPORT March 1984 Thts report ls based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 wiLh the DePartment of EnergY. *Evaluatlon Research Corporatlon, Oak Ridge, Tennessee TABLE OF CONTENTS L i s t o f F i g u

213

The Present Role of Radiological Methods in Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Present Role of Radiological Methods in Engineering R. Halmshaw A brief outline of the history of industrial radiology is given. Major...of metals and metal thicknesses used in engineering, X-ray energies from 20 keV to 30 MeV...

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Pre-Hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient The purpose of this User's Guide is to provide instructors with an overview of the key points covered in the video. The Student Handout portion of this Guide is designed to assist the instructor in reviewing those points with students. The Student Handout should be distributed to students after the video is shown and the instructor should use the Guide to facilitate a discussion on key activities and duties at the scene. PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT More Documents & Publications Emergency Response to a Transportation Accident Involving Radioactive Material Handling and Packaging a Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Patient

215

Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established November 03, 2003 Washington, DC Nuclear Radiological Threat Task Force Established

216

How ORISE is Making a Difference: Radiological Assessment and Monitoring  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Develops Paperless Tool to Assist with Data Input Into Radiological Develops Paperless Tool to Assist with Data Input Into Radiological Assessment and Monitoring System During the Empire 09 exercise, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) tested (for the first time) a paperless system of data management to support the operations of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). The paperless FRMAC (pFRMAC) provides tools that enables the FRMAC to collect and process field measurements and samples following a radiological or nuclear event. The process allows field data to be entered into specialized electronic tablets that are then sent to the Radiological Assessment and Monitoring System (RAMS). RAMS is the hub of pFRMAC that provides data analysis to the consequence management home team and

217

NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Blog > NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia NNSA Conducts Radiological Training in Slovenia Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog NNSA today concluded International Radiological Assistance Program Training for Emergency Response (I-RAPTER) in Slovenia. The training, co-sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was provided to 36 nuclear/radiological emergency responders, which included 15 participants from Slovenia and 21 students from 20 other countries. The training was conducted with involvement of personnel from Sandia National Laboratories, the Remote Sensing Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory. To read more about the training see: http://www.nnsa.energy.gov/mediaroom/pressreleases/slovenia Posted on March 22, 2012 at 4:13 pm ET

218

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiation Protection Standards Radiation Protection Standards Study Guide 1.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Protection Standards Module Number: 1.09 Objectives: 1.09.01 Identify the role of advisory agencies in the development of recommendations for radiological control. 1.09.02 Identify the role of regulatory agencies in the development of standards and regulations for radiological control. 1.09.03 Identify the scope of 10 CFR Part 835. References: 1. ANL-88-26 (1988) "Operational Health Physics Training"; Moe, Harold; Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998) "Occupational Radiation Protection" DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Module 1.09 Radiation Protection Standards

219

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas Summary This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.) PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 28, 2012 EA-1919: Notice of Public Comment Period Extension Recycling of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas December 12, 2012 EA-1919: Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental

220

PRE-HOSPITAL PRACTICES FOR HANDLING A RADIOLOGICALLY CONTAMINATED PATIENT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Pre-hospital Practices for Handling a Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient Radiologically Contaminated Patient DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Viewing this video and completing the enclosed printed study material do not by themselves provide sufficient skills to safely engage in or perform duties related to emergency response to a transportation accident involving radioactive material. Meeting that goal is beyond the scope of this video and requires either additional specific areas of competency or more hours of training

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Radiological aspects of in situ uranium recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium in situ leaching in situ recovery (ISL / ISR), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and may make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since 1975. Solution mining involves the pumping of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing and complexing agents into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant. Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which Radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. An overview of the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of Uranium ISR technologies and facilities. (authors)

BROWN, STEVEN H. [SHB INC., 7505 S. Xanthia Place, Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Enhancing Diagnostic Accuracy in Oral Radiology: A Case for the Basic Sciences.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Background: Cognitive processing in diagnostic oral radiology requires a solid foundation in the basic sciences as well as knowledge of the radiologic changes associated with… (more)

Baghdady, Mariam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - aids radiological findings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pulmonary edema... administrative codes that will aid in billing and quality assurance. The radiology report should record... of Radiology. ACR prac- tice guideline for...

224

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

84-2004 84-2004 SEPTEMBER 2004 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 Date June 2006 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Table of Changes Page Change 67 (near bottom) In row 1, column 2 of the table titled "dosimetric properties" 6 mrem was changed to 6 x 10 -2 mrem Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1184-2004 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have undertaken a wide variety

225

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 11, 2006 REPLY TO EH-52:JRabovsky:3-2 135 ATTN OF: APPROVAL OF CHANGE NOTICE 1 TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) SUBJECT. HANDBOOK 1184-2004, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS TO: Dennis Kubicki, EH-24 Technical Standards Manager This memorandum forwards the subject Change Notice 1 to DOE Handbook, DOE- HDBK- 1184-2004, which has approved for publication and distribution. The change to this handbook consists of a correction to the rule of thumb, listed in Appendix A, for converting the uptake of tritium oxide into radiation dose. A factor of 1/100 was inadvertently omitted from this rule of thumb when this DOE Handbook was originally published. This change does not affect the references, is not of a technical nature, and

226

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Change Notice 2 Change Notice 2 with Reaffirmation January 2007 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

227

Radiological Contamination Control Training for Laboratory Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Reaffirmation Reaffirmation August 2002 Change Notice 1 December 2004 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTAMINATION CONTROL TRAINING FOR LABORATORY RESEARCH U.S. Department of Energy FSC 6910 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1106-97 ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1106-97 iii Page/Section Change

228

Radiological assessment of BWR recirculatory pipe replacement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Replacement of primary recirculating coolant pipe in BWRs is a major effort that has been carried out at a number of nuclear generating stations. This report reviews the planned or actual pipe replacement projects at six sites: Nine Mile Point-1, Monticello, Cooper, Peach Bottom-2, Vermont Yankee, and Browns Ferry-1. It covers the radiological issues of the pipe replacement, measures taken to reduce doses to ALARA, estimated and actual occupational doses, and lessons learned during the various replacements. The basis for the decisions to replace the pipes, the methods used for preparation and decontamination, the removal of old pipe, and the installation of the new pipe are briefly described. Methods for reducing occupational radiation dose during pipe repairs/replacements are recommended. 32 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

Parkhurst, M.A.; Hadlock, D.E.; Harty, R.; Pappin, J.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Survey of radiologic practices among dental practitioners  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence and contribute to patient exposure in radiologic procedures performed in the offices of 132 staff members within the dental department of a teaching hospital. A questionnaire was prepared in which data were requested on brands of film used, type of x-ray unit used, processing, and use of leaded apron, cervical shield, and film holder. Offices were also visited to evaluate performance of existing dental x-ray equipment. Both the Dental Radiographic Normalizing and Monitoring Device and the Dental Quality Control Test Tool were evaluated. The average exposure was equivalent to the class D film (220 mR), but only 13% of those surveyed used the faster class E film, which would reduce patient exposure in half. The survey indicates that dentists are not using the newer low-exposure class E film in their practices.

Goren, A.D.; Sciubba, J.J.; Friedman, R.; Malamud, H. (Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (USA))

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Radiological Control Change Notice 1 Memorandum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DATE: May DATE: May 20, 2004 REPLY TO EH-52:Judith D. Foulke:301 :903-5865 ATTN OF: CHANGE NOTICE TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) HANDBOOK, DOE-STD- SUBJECT. 1098-99, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TO: George Detsis, EH-3 1 This memorandum forwards Change Notice Number 1 to subject DOE Technical Standard, DOE-STD-1098-99. The changes are being made as part of the 5-year review of the standard. The table inserted into the document details the changes. After the changes are made, a notice of intent to reaffirm memorandum will be issued. A compact disk (CD) of the revised document in MS Word and in PDF format is attached. If there are any questions, please contact Dr. Judith Foulke of my staff on 3-5865 or electronic mail (Judy.Foulke@eh.doe.gov). ill R. McArthur, PhD, C1}T Office Director Office of Worker Protection Policy

231

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range draft environmental assessment available for public review and comment August 4, 2010 Media contact: Brad Bugger, 208-526-0833 The public is invited to read and comment on a draft environmental assessment that the U.S. Department of Energy has published for a proposed radiological response training range at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). At the range, INL experts would train personnel, conduct exercises, and perform technology evaluation and demonstrations in support of national technical nuclear forensic and radiological emergency response programs. �The Radiological Response Training Range will allow emergency responders to prepare for a major radiological incident by training in an environment that safely simulates scenarios they might encounter,� said Vic Pearson, DOE�s document manager for the environmental assessment. �Activities at the range would directly support the nation�s readiness to respond to a radiological incident, but more importantly, would enable responders to develop proficiency in characterizing the scene in support of determining the origins of the incident.�

232

GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Protection | National Nuclear Protection | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative > GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection GTRI's Nuclear and Radiological Material Protection

233

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Instructor's Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Instructor's Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers

234

DOE Issues Finding of No Significant Impact and Final Environmental...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

technology evaluation and demonstrations in support of national technical nuclear forensic and radiological emergency response programs. The Radiological Response Training...

235

NETL Final Report Outline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensor Evaluation for a Robotic In Line Inspection Vehicle for Sensor Evaluation for a Robotic In Line Inspection Vehicle for Detection of Natural Gas Pipeline Defects and Leaks Final Report February 2003 Submitted by Michael Hassard and Gerald Stoker Advanced Diagnostics and Production Testing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0555 And Mark Vaughn and Bob Bickerstaff Mobile Robotics Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS1125 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, Natural Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy ABSTRACT When examining the condition of a pipeline, In-Line Inspection (ILI) utilizing various Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods is an essential tool and a significant factor in establishing a quality management

236

Initial Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Before we can run a transient analysis, we must find the appropriate set of initial conditions for the variables. The most important requirement of initial conditions is that they do not contradict any of the ...

Michael Tiller Ph.D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Instructor's Guide 2.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Module Number: 2.13 Objectives: 2.13.01 Describe the general response and responsibilities of an RCT during any incident. L 2.13.02 Identify any emergency equipment and facilities that are available, including the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. L 2.13.03 Describe the RCT response to a Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) alarm. L 2.13.04 Describe the RCT response to a personnel contamination monitor alarm. L 2.13.05 Describe the RCT response to off scale or lost dosimetry. L 2.13.06 Describe the RCT response to rapidly increasing, unanticipated radiation levels or an area radiation monitor alarm. L

238

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Overheads  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

13.1 13.1 Overhead 13.1 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators Objectives: * Identify the general characteristics of accelerators. * Identify the types of particles accelerated. * Identify the two basic types of accelerators. * Identify uses for accelerators. * Define prompt radiation. * Identify prompt radiation sources. OT 13.2 Overhead 13.2 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators (cont.) Objectives: * Define radioactivation. * Explain how contaminated material differs from activated material with regard to radiological concerns. * Identify activation sources. OT 13.3 Overhead 13.3 DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Radiological Aspects of Accelerators (cont.) Objectives: * Identify engineered and administrative controls at accelerator facilities. * Identify the special

239

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources Posted By Office of Public Affairs Container NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) was recently commended

240

Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

30-2008 30-2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overheads December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 OT 1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in the above documents. * Describe the role of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) at DOE sites and facilities. OT 1.3 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.3 DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy * Conduct oversight to ensure compliance and that appropriate radiological work

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources GTRI commended for work to secure radiological sources Posted By Office of Public Affairs Container NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) was recently commended

242

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation Radiological Incident Medical Consultation The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with a comprehensive capability to respond effectively to medical emergencies involving radiological or nuclear materials. Through the management of the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation accidents. REAC/TS strengthens hospital preparedness for radiation emergencies by preparing and educating first responders, medical personnel and occupational health professionals who will provide care to patients with a radiation injury or illness. REAC/TS staff provide medical advice,

243

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Study Guide 2.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiological Incidents and Emergencies Module Number: 2.13 Objectives: 2.13.01 Describe the general response and responsibilities of an RCT during any incident. i 2.13.02 Identify any emergency equipment and facilities that are available, including the location and contents of emergency equipment kits. i 2.13.03 Describe the RCT response to a Continuous Air Monitor (CAM) alarm. i 2.13.04 Describe the RCT response to a personnel contamination monitor alarm. i 2.13.05 Describe the RCT response to off scale or lost dosimetry. i 2.13.06 Describe the RCT response to rapidly increasing, unanticipated radiation levels or an area radiation monitor alarm. i 2.13.07

244

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Radiation Protection Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste

245

A comparative study of quality control in diagnostic radiology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......effective National Regulatory Authority in Syria...radiological and Nuclear Regulatory Office, for his...2 Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. Atlas of Reference Plans for Medical Diagnostic...Burkhart R. L. A review of the experience......

M. H. Kharita; M. S. Khedr; K. M. Wannus

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Bayesian Network Analysis of Radiological Dispersal Device Acquisitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It remains unlikely that a terrorist organization could produce or procure an actual nuclear weapon. However, the construction of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) from commercially produced radioactive sources and conventional explosives could...

Hundley, Grant Richard

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

247

An external dose reconstruction involving a radiological dispersal device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emergency situation. In response, the Department of Homeland Security has published Protective Action Guides (DHS 2006) to help minimize these exposures and associated risks. This research attempts to provide some additional radiological exposure knowledge...

Hearnsberger, David Wayne

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

30-2008 30-2008 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Worker Training DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overheads December 2008 Reaffirmed 2013 OT 1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in the above documents. * Describe the role of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) at DOE sites and facilities. OT 1.3 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.3 DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy * Conduct oversight to ensure compliance and that appropriate radiological work

249

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Fact Sheets > Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: ... Fact Sheet Insider Threat to Nuclear and Radiological Materials: Fact Sheet

250

Radiological Characterization around the Afsin-Elbistan Coal-Fired Power Plant in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiological Characterization around the Afsin-Elbistan Coal-Fired Power Plant in Turkey ... The environmental effect of natural radionuclides caused by coal-fired power plants was considered to be negligible because the Raeq values of the measured samples are generally lower than the limit value of 370 Bq·kg?1, equivalent to a gamma dose of 1.5 mSv·y?1. ... Although significant variations were not observed with distance and direction, these results may be affected by several factors, such as soil formation, weather conditions (wind, rain, etc.) and human activity. ...

Ugur Cevik; Nevzat Damla; Bahad?r Koz; Selim Kaya

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An apparatus for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm.

Dudar, Aed M. (Augusta, GA); Wagner, David G. (Augusta, GA); Teese, Gregory D. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mobile robotic system that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console.

Dudar, Aed M. (Dearborn, MI); Ward, Clyde R. (Aiken, SC); Jones, Joel D. (Aiken, SC); Mallet, William R. (Cowichan Bay, CA); Harpring, Larry J. (North Augusta, SC); Collins, Montenius X. (Blackville, SC); Anderson, Erin K. (Pleasanton, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot (SIMON) to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A base, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It uses an ultrasonic ranging system for collision avoidance. In addition, two safety bumpers located in the front and the back of the robot will stop the robots motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robots motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/0 interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A.

Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A mobile autonomous robot for radiological surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Robotics Development Group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot (SIMON) to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A base, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It uses an ultrasonic ranging system for collision avoidance. In addition, two safety bumpers located in the front and the back of the robot will stop the robots motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robots motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/0 interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A.

Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mobile robotic system is described that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console. 4 figs.

Dudar, A.M.; Ward, C.R.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.; Harpring, L.J.; Collins, M.X.; Anderson, E.K.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

Project RU LlSON COPY ON-SITE RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS DURING REENTRY DISILLING THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RU LlSON RU LlSON COPY ON-SITE RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS DURING REENTRY DISILLING THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING FINAL REPOAT EBERLlNE INSTRUMENT CORPORATION Santa Fe, New Mexico Date Published - December 1973 PREPARED FOR THE U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION N E V A D A OPERATIONS OFFICE UNDER CONTRACT NO. AT(26-11-294 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Project RULISON ON-S1l'E RADIOLOGICAL PROGRAMS D U R I N G R E E N T R Y D R I L L I N G THROUGH PRODUCTION TESTING \ F I N A L REPORT EBERLINE INSTRUMENT CORPORATION . Santa Fe, New Mexico 1 Date Published - December 1973 NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE . UNDER CONTRACT NO. AT(26-11-294 NOTICE ~~~~ This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United

257

Final Report to DOE’s Office of Science (BER) submitted by Ram Oren (PI) of DE-FG02-00ER63015 (ended on 09/14/2009) entitled “Controls of Net Ecosystem Exchange at an Old Field, a Pine Plantation, & a Hardwood Forest under Identical Climatic & Edaphic Conditions”  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project yielded papers on fluxes (energy, water and carbon dioxide)between each ecosystem and the atmosphere, and explained the temporal dynamics of fluxes based on intrinsic (physiology, canopy leaf area and structure) and extrinsic (atmospheric and edaphic conditions). Comparisons between any two of the ecosystems, and among all three followed, attributing differences in behavior to different patterns of phenology and differential sensitivities to soil and atmospheric humidity. Finally, data from one-to-three of the ecosystems (incorporated into FluxNet data archive) were used in syntheses across AmeriFlux sites and even more broadly across FluxNet sites.

Oren, Ram; Oishi, AC; Palmroth, Sari; Butnor, JR; Johnsen, KH

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

258

NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear Facilities from Category 3 to Radiological (11/13/02). NSTP 2002-2 Methodology for Final Hazard Categorization for Nuclear Facilities from Category 3 to Radiological (11/13/02). 0 CFR 830 Subpart B requires that all DOE nuclear facilities categorized as HC-3 or above have a DOE approved safety basis compliant with the requirements of Subpart B. The rule requires the use of DOESTD- 1027-92 (STD- 1027) as the methodology for categorizing DOE nuclear facilities. STD- 1027 requires a preliminary categorization be established on the basis of the inventory of radionuclides in a facility or involved in an activity. It also permits a safety analyses (see STD-1027 section 3.1.2) to establish a final

259

A Checklist to Improve Patient Safety in Interventional Radiology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop a specific RADiological Patient Safety System (RADPASS) checklist for interventional radiology and to assess the effect of this checklist on health care processes of radiological interventions. On the basis of available literature and expert opinion, a prototype checklist was developed. The checklist was adapted on the basis of observation of daily practice in a tertiary referral centre and evaluation by users. To assess the effect of RADPASS, in a series of radiological interventions, all deviations from optimal care were registered before and after implementation of the checklist. In addition, the checklist and its use were evaluated by interviewing all users. The RADPASS checklist has two parts: A (Planning and Preparation) and B (Procedure). The latter part comprises checks just before starting a procedure (B1) and checks concerning the postprocedural care immediately after completion of the procedure (B2). Two cohorts of, respectively, 94 and 101 radiological interventions were observed; the mean percentage of deviations of the optimal process per intervention decreased from 24 % before implementation to 5 % after implementation (p < 0.001). Postponements and cancellations of interventions decreased from 10 % before implementation to 0 % after implementation. Most users agreed that the checklist was user-friendly and increased patient safety awareness and efficiency. The first validated patient safety checklist for interventional radiology was developed. The use of the RADPASS checklist reduced deviations from the optimal process by three quarters and was associated with less procedure postponements.

Koetser, Inge C. J. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Vries, Eefje N. de [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands); Delden, Otto M. van [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands); Smorenburg, Susanne M. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Quality and Process Innovation (Netherlands); Boermeester, Marja A. [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Surgery (Netherlands); Lienden, Krijn P. van, E-mail: k.p.vanlienden@amc.uva.nl [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)] [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Interventional Radiology (Netherlands)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Radiological considerations of phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological concerns associated with phosphogypsum utilization in agriculture have been placed in perspective by considering the consequences of a hypothetical case involving heavy long term applications of phosphogypsum. In California, such a schedule might consist of an initial gypsum application of 10 tons/acre followed by alternate year applications of 5 tons/acre. If the radium content of the gypsum were 15 pCi/g and the till depth 6 inches, this schedule could be maintained for more than 100 years before the radium buildup in the soil would reach a proposed federal concentration limit of 5 pCi/g. An agricultural worker spending 40 h a week in a field containing 5 pCi/g of radium would be exposed to terrestrial radiation of about 7 ..mu..R/h above background. This exposure would result in an annual radiation dose of about 15 mrem, which is 3% of the recommended limit for an individual working in an uncontrolled area. Five pCi/g of radium in the soil could generate airborne radon daughter concentrations exceeding the concentration limit proposed for residential exposure. However, as residential exposure limits are predicated on 75% of continuous occupancy, these limits should not be applied to agricultural workers because of the seasonal nature of their work. Radium uptake by food crops grown in the hypothetical soil would result in a 50 year integrated dose to the bone surface of 1.4 rem. This dose is conservatively based on the assumption that an adult's total vegetable diet comes from this source and that consumption was continuous during the 50 year period.

Lindeken, C.L.

1980-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 1 - effects of solvents, catalysts and temperature conditions on conversion and structural changes of low-rank coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objectives of this project were to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank, and influence of solvent were examined. Specific objectives were to identify the basic changes in coal structure induced by catalytic and thermal pretreatments, and to determine the reactivity of the catalytically and thermally treated coals for liquefaction. In the original project management plan it was indicated that six coals would be used for the study. These were to include two each of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite rank. For convenience in executing the experimental work, two parallel efforts were conducted. The first involved the two lignites and one subbituminous coal; and the second, the two bituminous coals and the remaining subbituminous coal. This Volume presents the results of the first portion of the work, studies on two lignites and one subbituminous coal. The remaining work accomplished under this project will be described and discussed in Volume 2 of this report. The objective of this portion of the project was to determine and compare the effects of solvents, catalysts and reaction conditions on coal liquefaction. Specifically, the improvements of reaction conversion, product distribution, as well as the structural changes in the coals and coal-derived products were examined. This study targeted at promoting hydrogenation of the coal-derived radicals, generated during thermal cleavage of chemical bonds, by using a good hydrogen donor-solvent and an effective catalyst. Attempts were also made in efforts to match the formation and hydrogenation of the free radicals and thus to prevent retrogressive reaction.

Lili Huang; Schobert, H.H.; Chunshan Song

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Documents & Publications Microsoft PowerPoint - Final translated version of Tsinghua Speech Idaho Operations AMWTP Fact Sheet Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Efficiency...

263

NIF Final Optics Assemblies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NIF Final Optics Assemblies The Final Optics Assemblies (FOAs) are the last element of the main laser system and the first of the target area systems. Each FOA contains four...

264

Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R. (eds.)

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

ASPECT Emergency Response Chemical and Radiological Mapping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique airborne emergency response tool, ASPECT is a Los Alamos/U.S. Environmental Protection Agency project that can put chemical and radiological mapping tools in the air over an accident scene. The name ASPECT is an acronym for Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology. Update, Sept. 19, 2008: Flying over storm-damaged refineries and chemical factories, a twin-engine plane carrying the ASPECT (Airborne Spectral Photometric Environmental Collection Technology) system has been on duty throughout the recent hurricanes that have swept the Florida and Gulf Coast areas. ASPECT is a project of the U.S. U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Decontamination Team. Los Alamos National Laboratory leads a science and technology program supporting the EPA and the ASPECT aircraft. Casting about with a combination of airborne photography and infrared spectroscopy, the highly instrumented plane provides emergency responders on the ground with a clear concept of where danger lies, and the nature of the sometimes-invisible plumes that could otherwise kill them. ASPECT is the nations only 24/7 emergency response aircraft with chemical plume mapping capability. Bob Kroutil of Bioscience Division is the project leader, and while he said the team has put in long hours, both on the ground and in the air, its a worthwhile effort. The plane flew over 320 targeted sites in four days, he noted. Prior to the deployment to the Gulf Coast, the plane had been monitoring the Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado. Los Alamos National Laboratory Divisions that are supporting ASPECT include, in addition to B-Division, CTN-5: Networking Engineering and IRM-CAS: Communication, Arts, and Services. Leslie Mansell, CTN-5, and Marilyn Pruitt, IRM-CAS, were recognized the the U.S. EPA for their outstanding support to the hurricane response of Gustav in Louisiana and Ike in Texas. The information from the data collected in the most recent event, Hurricane Ike, was sent to the EPA Region 6 Rapid Needs Assessment and the State of Texas Joint Field Office in Austin, Texas. It appears that though there is considerable damage in Galveston and Texas City, there are fewer chemical leaks than during either hurricanes Katrina or Rita. Specific information gathered from the data was reported out to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Headquarters, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Department of Homeland Security, and the State of Texas Emergency Management Agency.

LANL

2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Student's Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Student's Guide Notes Module 4-1 I. Introduction II. Radiological Control Program A. Overall program The Radiological Control Program consists of the commitments, policies, and procedures that are administered by a site or facility to meet the EH Health and Safety Policy. The Radiation Protection Program required by 10 CFR Part 835 is an element of the overall Radiological Control Program. The Radiological Control Program should address the following: * Requirements * Responsibilities * Programs/procedures * Assessments B. Size of the program Radiological Control Programs vary in size. There are several factors that may affect the magnitude of a Radiological Control Program. The specific mission, types and quantities of

267

Final Report to DOE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the accomplished goals and provide a list of the publications and presentations made during the project. The goals of the project were accomplished through the various publications submitted to Journals and presentations done at the DOE and international meetings and conferences. The 8 journal articles related to the goals of this project were accepted or submitted. The 23 presentations related to goals of the project were presented at the meetings. There were some minor changes regarding to project goals because of issues encountered during the analysis of the data. For example, a total water probe sensor mounted on the Convair-580 that can be used for defining mixed phase conditions and parameterization, had some problems to estimate magnitude of total water mass, and this resulted in issues providing an accurate parameterization for cloud fraction. Variability related aerosol number concentrations and their composition for direct and indirect effects were studied and published. Results were given to explain aerosol and ice microphysical effects on climate change studies. It is suggested that developed parameterizations should consider the variability in aerosol and ice parameters over the Arctic regions.

Ismail Gultepe

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Potential Radiological Doses Associated with the Disposal of Petroleum Industry Norm Via Landspreading  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Eng-38-5 Eng-38-5 (DE98000550) POTENTIAL RADIOLOGICAL DOSES ASSOCIATED WITH THE DISPOSAL OF PETROLEUM INDUSTRY NORM VIA LANDSPREADING Final Report, September 1998 By Karen P. Smith Deborah L. Blunt John J. Arnish December 1998 Performed Under Argonne National Laboratory Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Assessment Division Lakewood, Colorado National Petroleum Technology Office U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Tulsa, Oklahoma DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

269

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE GUN FORGING MACHINE BUILDING ITHACA GUN COMPANY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SURVEY SURVEY OF THE GUN FORGING MACHINE BUILDING ITHACA GUN COMPANY ITHACA, NEW YORK T. J. VITKUS AND J. L. PAYNE Prepared for the Office of Erivironmental Restoration U.S.' Department of Energy ORISE 95/K-1 3 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE GUN FORGING MACHINE BUILDING ITHACA GUN COMPANY ITHACA, NEW YORK Prepared by T. J. Vi&us and J. L. Payne Environme& Survey and Site Assessment Program Envirotiental and Health Sciences Group Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Offke of Environmental Restoration FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1995 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the U.S. Department of Energy. .I I I I I I I I 1 I I I ' I

270

Radiological Worker Training Power Point Slides for App. A  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1.1 1.1 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.1 Regulatory Documents Objectives: * Identify the hierarchy of regulatory documents. * Define the purposes of 10 CFR Parts 820, 830 and 835. * Define the purpose of the DOE Radiological Control Standard. OT 1.2 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.2 Regulatory Documents (cont.) Objectives: * Define the terms "shall" and "should" as used in the above documents. * Describe the role of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) at DOE sites and facilities. OT 1.3 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 Overhead 1.3 DOE Radiological Health and Safety Policy * Conduct oversight to ensure compliance and that appropriate radiological work practices are implemented. * Ensure accurate and appropriately made measurements. * Incorporate measures to minimize

271

Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Indoor and Radiological Health Branch Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Health Indoor and Radiological Health Branch From Open Energy Information Address 591 Ala Moana Blvd. Place Honolulu, Hawaii Zip 96813 Website http://hawaii.gov/health/envir Coordinates 21.300314°, -157.864542° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.300314,"lon":-157.864542,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

272

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ALARA Instructor's Guide ALARA Instructor's Guide 1.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: ALARA Module Number: 1.10 Objectives: 1.10.01 Describe the assumptions on which the current ALARA philosophy is based. 1.10.02 Identify the ALARA philosophy for collective personnel exposure and individual exposure. 1.10.03 Identify the scope of an effective radiological ALARA program. 1.10.04 Identify the purposes for conducting pre-job and/or post-job ALARA reviews. 1.10.05 Identify RCT responsibilities for ALARA implementation. References: 1. NCRP Report No. 91 (1987) "Recommendations on Limits for Exposure to Ionizing Radiation" 2. U.S. Department of Energy, DOE-STD-1098-99, "Radiological Control Standard" 3. 10 CFR Part 835 (1998), "Occupational Radiation Protection"

273

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Fundamental Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

274

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 of 9 6 of 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Site Academic Training Study Guide Phase I Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technician Study Guide iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

275

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Study Guide 2.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Environmental Monitoring Module Number: 2.09 Objectives: 2.09.01 State the goals of an environmental monitoring program. 2.09.02 State the exposure limits to the general public as they apply to environmental monitoring. 2.09.03 Define the term "critical nuclide." 2.09.04 Define the term "critical pathway." i 2.09.05 State locations frequently surveyed for radiological contamination at outdoor waste sites associated with your site and the reasons for each. 2.09.06 Define the term "suspect waste site," and how they can be identified. i 2.09.07 Describe the methods used for environmental monitoring at your site. INTRODUCTION Environmental monitoring plays a large role in the field of radiological control.

276

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" 7 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,25.9,42.1,24.8 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,16.5,22.4,40.5,14.6 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.4,1.2,0.9,1.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,2.8,2.3,0.7,8.9 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment " "Used (more than one may apply)" "Use Central Air Conditioning Equipment",69.7,7.2,17.1,34.6,10.8

277

Operation Crossroads-1946. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crossroads was the first peacetime nuclear weapons test series. It was conducted at Bikini Atoll in 1946. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

Berkhouse, L.; Hallowell, J.H.; McMullan, F.W.; Davis, S.E.; Jones, C.B.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Radiological planning and implementation for nuclear-facility decommissioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need and scope of radiological planning required to support nuclear facility decommissioning are issues addressed in this paper. The role of radiation protection engineering and monitoring professionals during project implementation and closeout is also addressed. Most of the discussion focuses on worker protection considerations; however, project support, environmental protection and site release certification considerations are also covered. One objective is to identify radiological safety issues that must be addressed. The importance of the issues will vary depending on the type of facility being decommissioned; however, by giving appropriate attention to these issues difficult decommissioning projects can be accomplished in a safer manner with workers and the public receiving minimal radiation exposures.

Valentine, A.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

EA-1310: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

310: Final Environmental Assessment 310: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1310: Final Environmental Assessment Decontamination and Dismantlement of the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility and Coupled Fast Reactivity Measurements Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory This Environmental Assessment evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's proposal to decontaminate and dismantle radiologically contaminated and hazardous components and equipment in TRA-660, to allow future use by other programs. EA-1310-FEA-2000.pdf More Documents & Publications EA-1310: Finding of No Significant Impact Above on the left is K-25, at Oak Ridge before and after the 844,000 sq-ft demolition.

280

Hospital response for children as a vulnerable population in radiological/nuclear incidents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......hospital's response to a nuclear or radiological emergency...Stronger links between nuclear medicine programs and...operations and preparedness policies need to include paediatric...Infectious Disease. Policy statement: chemical-biological...population in radiological/nuclear incidents. | Emergency......

Brenda Conway; Jordan Pike

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Dealing with at-risk populations in radiological/nuclear emergencies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Biological, Radiological-Nuclear, and Explosives (CBRNE...Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) Incidents...Security Council Interagency Policy Coordination Subcommittee for...Response to Radiological and Nuclear Threats. Planning guidance......

Diana Wilkinson

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

E-Print Network 3.0 - aspects radiological aspects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources 14 Radiological Control Manual ESH Division Summary: Radiological Control Manual ESH Division SLAC-I-720-0A05Z-001-R005 1...

283

Paint for detection of corrosion and warning of chemical and radiological attack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

284

An assessment of the radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East district, Jharkhand, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East...The Health Hazards of Depleted Uranium Munitions (2001) The...in soil and lifetime cancer risk due to gamma radioactivity...radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East......

R. M. Tripathi; S. K. Sahoo; S. Mohapatra; A. C. Patra; P. Lenka; J. S. Dubey; V. N. Jha; V. D. Puranik

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Yearly Chnages of Radiation Exposure Doses Received by Workers in Radiological Occupations at Kyushu University Hospital  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......by Workers in Radiological Occupations at Kyushu University Hospital Hideo Irie * Chikara Takei * Shigeki Momii * Takehiko Higuchi...by workers in radiological occupations at Kyushu University Hospital from September 1962 to March 1966 were reported. The exposure......

Hideo Irie; Chikara Takei; Shigeki Momii; Takehiko Higuchi; Sigeaki Okamura; Kouji Masuda

1967-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Quality Control in the Radiological Departments of the Florence General Hospital  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Quality Control in the Radiological Departments of the Florence General Hospital C. Gori G. Belli S. Calvagno L. Capaccioli A. Guasti G. Spano G. Zatelli At the Hospital of Careggi in Florence six radiological departments are currently active......

C. Gori; G. Belli; S. Calvagno; L. Capaccioli; A. Guasti; G. Spanò; G. Zatelli

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Method for warning of radiological and chemical substances using detection paints on a vehicle surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A system for warning of corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances. The system comprises painting a surface with a paint or coating that includes an indicator material and monitoring the surface for indications of the corrosion, chemical, or radiological substances.

Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

288

E-Print Network 3.0 - action program radiological Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

program RWT Radiological Worker Training SLAC Stanford Linear Accelerator Center 12;DOE G 441.1-12 1 03... radiological hazards (10 CFR 835.901(c)). Radiation safety training...

289

An assessment of the radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East district, Jharkhand, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......radiological scenario around uranium mines in Singhbhum East district...radiological scenario around uranium-mining sites in the Singhbhum...3 The Royal Society. The Health Hazards of Depleted Uranium Munitions (2001) The Royal......

R. M. Tripathi; S. K. Sahoo; S. Mohapatra; A. C. Patra; P. Lenka; J. S. Dubey; V. N. Jha; V. D. Puranik

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Radiological conditions at Bikini Atoll: Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation, soil, animals, cistern water, and ground water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended as a resource document for the eventual cleanup of Bikini Atoll and contains a summary of the data for the concentrations of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239 +240/Pu, and /sup 241/Am in vegetation through 1987 and in soil through 1985 for 14 islands at Bikini Atoll. The data for the main residence island, Bikini, and the most important island, Eneu, are extensive; these islands have been the subject of a continuing research and monitoring program since 1974. Data for radionuclide concentrations in ground water, cistern water, fish and other marine species, and pigs from Bikini and Eneu Islands are presented. Also included are general summaries of our resuspension and rainfall data from Bikini and Eneu Islands. The data for the other 12 islands are much more limited because samples were collected as part of a screening survey and the islands have not been part of a continuing research and monitoring program. Cesium-137 is the radionuclide that produces most of the estimated dose for returning residents, mostly through uptake by terrestrial foods and secondly by direct external gamma exposure. Remedial measures for reducing the /sup 137/Cs uptake in vegetation are discussed. 40 refs., 32 figs., 131 tabs.

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Stuart, M.L.

1988-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

NIF final optics system: frequency conversion and beam conditioning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

inside the IOM are operated at a pressure of 10 torr with a 1-SLPM purge of clean dry air, separated from the argon environment of the beam transport system by a 1 pressure...

292

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Housing Unit Type, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,," Detached"," Attached"," 2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,71.8,6.7,9,19.1,6.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,61.1,5.6,6.3,15.2,5.8 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,2.6,0.2,0.7,0.9,0.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,8.1,0.9,2.1,3,0.7 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment "

293

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" 4 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More Members" "Air Conditioning",,"1 Member","2 Members","3 Members","4 Members" "Total Homes",113.6,31.3,35.8,18.1,15.7,12.7 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,24.6,30.2,15.1,13.5,10.6 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.7,1.5,0.7,0.6,0.5 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,5,4.1,2.3,1.7,1.7 "Type of Air Conditioning Equipment "

294

National Science Bowl Finals  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

296

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Household Demographics of Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

297

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census...

298

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Household Demographics of Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census Division",,,"Pacific...

299

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC.1.11 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in West Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"West Census Region" ,,,"Mountain Census...

300

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census...

302

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Household Demographics of Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

303

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" " ",,,"East North Central Census...

304

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Fuels Used and End Uses in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census...

305

DOE Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report contains a summary of work accomplished in the establishment of a Climate Data Center at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Hinzman, Larry D.; Long, James; Newby, Greg B.

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Final Meeting Summary ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health, Safety, and Environmental Protection Committee November 8, 2012 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD HEALTH SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION COMMITTEE November...

307

Final_Report.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Energy, Offi ce of Fossil Energy. Ormat: Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Generation Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final Report for the...

308

Final Meeting Summary ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Issue Manager Report-Out on Tank Closure and Waste Management Final Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM FEIS) Groundwater and Vadose Zone Modeling (JOINT...

309

Radiology utilizing a gas multiwire detector with resolution enhancement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process and apparatus for obtaining filmless, radiological, digital images utilizing a gas multiwire detector. Resolution is enhanced through projection geometry. This invention further relates to imaging systems for X-ray examination of patients or objects, and is particularly suited for mammography.

Majewski, Stanislaw (Grafton, VA); Majewski, Lucasz A. (Grafton, VA)

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Radiological safety training for accelerator facilities: DOE handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program management guide describes the proper implementation standard for core training as outline in the DOE Radiological Control (RadCon) Manual. Its purpose is to assist DOE employees and Managing and Operating (M&O) contractors having responsibility for implementing the core training recommended by the RadCon Manual.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.)

312

Radiological Habits Survey: Chapelcross Liquid Effluent Pipeline, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiological Habits Survey: Chapelcross Liquid Effluent Pipeline, 2002 Science commissioned Pipeline, 2002 The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science Lowestoft Laboratory Pakefield OF SURVEY 5 2.1 Pipeline description 5 2.2 Occupancy 6 2.3 Gamma dose rate measurements 7 3 SURVEY FINDINGS

313

Radiological Survey Data for 38 Grove Avenue, Rochelle Park,...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

K e l l e r , D i r e c t o r T e c h n i c a l S e r v i c e s D i v i s i o n 0ak Ridge Operations 0ffice The radiological survey data for the subject vicinity property has been...

314

External dosimetry in the aftermath of a radiological terrorist event  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Similarly, site assessment and cleanup...routinely at risk from many...case of a nuclear power plant accident...radiological assessments and may be...responsible for terrorism preparedness...Monitoring and Assessment Center...after the nuclear power plant accident......

Gladys A. Klemic; Paul D. Bailey; Kevin M. Miller; Matthew A. Monetti

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

External dosimetry in the aftermath of a radiological terrorist event  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......routinely at risk from many...case of a nuclear power plant accident...radiological attack, but its...responsible for terrorism preparedness...support of nuclear power plants. 3. Managing...Attachment G-Terrorism, is a supplement...actions for nuclear incidents......

Gladys A. Klemic; Paul D. Bailey; Kevin M. Miller; Matthew A. Monetti

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

External dosimetry in the aftermath of a radiological terrorist event  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......associated health risks. A framework...routinely at risk from many...case of a nuclear power plant accident...Homeland Security (DHS...radiological attack, but its...responsible for terrorism preparedness...of nuclear power plants. 3. Managing...Attachment G-Terrorism, is a supplement...actions for nuclear incidents...Homeland Security Working Group......

Gladys A. Klemic; Paul D. Bailey; Kevin M. Miller; Matthew A. Monetti

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

COMMENTARY/COMMENTAIRE The radiological consequences of the Chernobyl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMENTARY/COMMENTAIRE The radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident The First­22 March 1996 Eric Voice Abstract: The human health consequences of the Chernobyl accident in 1986 have are discussed with particular focus on thyroid cancers and exposures to iodine-131. Key words: Chernobyl

Shlyakhter, Ilya

318

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (Suggested 4 Year Plan)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedures II Clinical Experience Medical Terminology Radiation Protection II Elementary Radiation ProtectionBACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (Suggested 4 Year Plan) Please note that this is a potential plan for completing your degree within four years. The order of classes does not necessarily need

Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

319

24.01.01.M5 Radiological Safety Page 1 of 3 UNIVERSITY RULE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiological Safety Page 3 of 3 1.5 Employees, visitors and students shall only work with radiation sources24.01.01.M5 Radiological Safety Page 1 of 3 UNIVERSITY RULE 24.01.01.M5 Radiological Safety 25, 2011 Next scheduled review: March 25, 2014 Rule Statement Environmental Health and Safety (EHS

320

Microsoft Word - Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for all two-phase conditions. The Chen correlation was developed for relatively low pressure, high quality conditions associated with Forced Convection Vaporization and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Final Draft ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the anticipated completion of the Constellation Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement in June 2008Final Draft ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE CONSTRUCTION, MODIFICATION, AND OPERATION OF THREE CENTER, FL 32899 February 2007 #12;THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK #12;FINAL DRAFT DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL

Waliser, Duane E.

322

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" 2 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Owner/Renter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings With" ,,,,"Detached",,"Attached",,"2 to 4 Units",,"5 or More Units",,"Mobile Homes" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" "Air Conditioning",,"Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent","Own","Rent" "Total Homes",113.6,76.5,37.1,63.2,8.6,3.9,2.8,1.5,7.6,2.3,16.8,5.5,1.4 "Air Conditioning Equipment"

323

Comparison of the scientific quality of spanish radiologists that publish in international radiology journals and in Spanish radiology journals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective To determine that the quality, measured by the Hirsch index, of Spanish authors who publish in international radiology journals with an impact factor (AJR, European Radiology, Investigative Radiology, Radiographics, and Radiology) is higher of those who publish only in Spanish journals or in both types of journals. Material and methods We analyzed a total of 6 radiology journals, including 5 international journals and one national (Radiología). We selected Spanish authors of original articles published in 2008 and 2009 who were working at Spanish centers when their articles were written. We classified the authors into three categories: a) those who published only in international journals; b) those who published only in Radiología, and c) those who published in Radiología and in an international journal. We calculated the Hirsch index score for each author and analyzed the groups using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov goodness-of-fit test, the Kruskal-Wallis nonparametric test, and the median test to evaluate the differences. Results Of the 440 identified Spanish authors as having published in the two-year period, 248 (56 %) published only in Radiología, 172 (39 %) only in international journals, and 20 (5 %) in both. The mean Hirsch index score for the group of authors who published only in Radiología (1.15 ± 2.35) was lower than for those who published only in international journals (2.59 ± 3.39). Authors who published in both international journals and Radiología had the highest score on the Hirsch index (4.1 ± 3.89) (P < .001). Conclusions The Spanish authors with the highest prestige and quality publish both in international journals and in Radiología.

L. Martí-Bonmatí; A.I. Catalá-Gregori; A. Miguel-Dasit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Instructor's Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4-1 4-1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Elements of a Radiological Control Program Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, the participant will be able to: 1. Identify factors that influence the scope and magnitude of a Radiological Control Program at any nuclear facility. 2. Identify typical elements of a Radiological Control Program. Training Aids: Overhead Transparencies (OTs): OT 4.1 - OT 4.5 (may be supplemented or substituted with updated or site-specific information) Handouts - "List of Radiological Control Program Elements" "Elements of a Radiological Control Program" Equipment Needs: Overhead projector Screen Flip chart Markers Masking tape Student Materials: Student's Guide

325

ADVANTAGES OF INVESTIGATING CHEMICAL AND RADIOLOGICAL CONSTITUENTS SIMULTANEOUSLY IN SOIL AND GROUNDWATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At some sites both chemical and radiological investigation of soil and groundwater is required for overall site characterization. While the planning and execution of investigation activities is usually completed to fulfill regulatory (i.e., United States Environmental Protection Agency or United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission) requirements, coordination of chemical and radiological investigation programs may provide an opportunity for reducing the duration of investigation activities and reducing overall project costs. There are several similarities in the chemical and radiological investigation processes that one can take advantage of in program design and execution to efficiently plan and execute chemical and radiological investigations simultaneously. At sites where both chemical and radiological constituents are being investigated in soil and groundwater, various steps can be taken during the investigation processes to combine chemical and radiological investigation and characterization activities. With proper planning, investigating chemical and radiological constituents simultaneously in soil and groundwater can reduce the project schedule and provide cost savings for overall characterization of the site.

Downey, H.; Shephard, E.; Walter, N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

326

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 2013 January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office JANUARY 2013 DOE/EA-1923 iv January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office January 2013 DOE/EA-1923 v January 2013 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Final Environmental Assessment for the Green Energy School Wind Project (DOE/EA-1923) CONTACT: For additional copies or more information on this final Environmental Assessment (EA),

327

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

328

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

329

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to...

330

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Household Demographics of U.S. Homes, by OwnerRenter Status, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,,,"Housing Unit Type" ,,,,"Single-Family Units",,,,"Apartments in Buildings...

331

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Fuels Used and End Uses in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2"...

332

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Census Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Census Region" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Northeast","Midwest","South","West" "Space...

333

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

334

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Number of Household Members, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Number of Household Members" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,,,,,"5 or More...

335

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

336

Aurora final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Technical report detailing the work done by Nuvera and its partners to fulfill the goals of the program "Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks" (a.k.a. AURORA)

Robert, Dross; Amedeo, Conti

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Final Beamline Design Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Beamline Design Report Final Beamline Design Report Guidelines and Review Criteria (SCD 1.20.95) 6.0 Final Beamline Design Report (FDR) Overview The Final Beamline Design Report is part of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline review process and should be planned for when approximately 90% of the total beamline design has been completed. Fifteen copies of the FDR are to be submitted to the APS Users Office. Approval of the Collaborative Access Team's (CAT) designs described in the report is required prior to installation of beamline components in the APS Experiment Hall. Components that have a long lead time for design or procurement can be reviewed separately from the remainder of the beamline, but enough information must be provided so that the reviewer can understand the

338

RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF DECONTAMINATION DEBRIS LOCATED AT THE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

h h ' . * ' 1. MI). q-8 RADIOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF DECONTAMINATION DEBRIS LOCATED AT THE FUTURA CHEMICAL COMPANY FACILITY 9200 LATTY AVENUE HAZELWOOD, MISSOURI L.W. Cole J.D. Berger W.O. Helton B.M. Putnam T.J. Sowell C.F. Weaver R.D. Condra September 9, 1981 Work performed by Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division Oak Ridge Associated Universities Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 Under Interagency Agreement DOE No. 40-770-80 NRC Fin. No. A-9093-0 Between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy I_--___- ". TABLE OF CONTENTS Page List of Figures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.

339

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Environmental Monitoring Environmental Monitoring Instructor's Guide 2.09-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Environmental Monitoring Module Number: 2.09 Objectives: 2.09.01 State the goals of an environmental monitoring program. 2.09.02 State the exposure limits to the general public as they apply to environmental monitoring. 2.09.03 Define the term "critical nuclide." 2.09.04 Define the term "critical pathway." L 2.09.05 State locations frequently surveyed for radiological contamination at outdoor waste sites associated with your site and the reasons for each. 2.09.06 Define the term "suspect waste site," and how they can be identified. L 2.09.07 Describe the methods used for environmental monitoring at your site. References: 1. Gollnick, Daniel, Basic Radiation Protection Technology, 2nd Edition, Pacific

340

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contamination Control Contamination Control Instructor's Guide 2.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Control Module Number: 2.05 Objectives: 2.05.01 Define the terms "removable and fixed surface contamination," state the difference between them and list common methods used to measure each. 2.05.02 State the components of a radiological monitoring program for contamination control and common methods used to accomplish them. 2.05.03 State the basic goal of a contamination control program and list actions that contribute to its success. 2.05.04 State the basic principles of contamination control and list examples of implementation methods. 2.05.05 List and describe the possible engineering control methods used for contamination control. 2.05.06

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRU TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project November 2003 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a November 2003 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project More Documents & Publications CRAD, Quality Assurance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT

342

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41-2001 41-2001 April 2001 DOE HANDBOOK Radiological Assessor Training U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for training as recommended in

343

I RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-I a.d *4dk *-f--l- -I a.d *4dk *-f--l- --- I. ,e-- - .- --_ -- -. ;,. -* " . I . RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES (Unit XII and W a rehouse) DAYTON, OHIO Report Date: 4 September 1997 Survey Dak 27 Aitgust 1991 Prepared by: Mark L. Mays, Chief Radiation Safety Branch Sponsored by: M iamisburg Environmental Matigement Reject Office Ohio FTekl Ofice U.S.. Department of Energy Conducted by: %diation Safety Branch Of&e of Environmental Management ggtb Air Base W ing U.S. Departmtnt of the Air Force In Cooperation W ith: Southwest District Office Ohio Environmental Protection Agency - O h io Cnvironmwhl Protection Agenty Bureau of Radiological Health Ohio Department of Health. I Lb ^U .L*-u i-.-r- --- , .., II ,.--(_ ~_ -_- --- -_ _.. ;

344

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Unit Analysis & Conversion Unit Analysis & Conversion Instructor's Guide 1.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Unit Analysis & Conversion Module Number: 1.02 Objectives: 1.02.01 Identify the commonly used unit systems of measurement and the base units for mass, length, and time in each system. 1.02.02 Identify the values and abbreviations for SI prefixes. 1.02.03 Given a measurement and the appropriate conversion factor(s) or conversion factor table, convert the measurement to the specified units. 1.02.04 Using the formula provided, convert a given temperature measurement to specified units. References: 1. "Health Physics and Radiological Health Handbook"; Scinta, Inc; 1989. 2. DOE-HDBK-1010-92 (June 1992) "Classical Physics" DOE Fundamental Handbook; US

345

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contamination Control Contamination Control Study Guide 2.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Control Module Number: 2.05 Objectives: 2.05.01 Define the terms "removable and fixed surface contamination," state the difference between them and list common methods used to measure each. 2.05.02 State the components of a radiological monitoring program for contamination control and common methods used to accomplish them. 2.05.03 State the basic goal of a contamination control program and list actions that contribute to its success. 2.05.04 State the basic principles of contamination control and list examples of implementation methods. 2.05.05 List and describe the possible engineering control methods used for contamination control. 2.05.06

346

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

347

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ALARA ALARA Study Guide 1.10-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: ALARA Module Number: 1.10 Objectives: 1.10.01 Describe the assumptions on which the current ALARA philosophy is based. 1.10.02 Identify the ALARA philosophy for collective personnel exposure and individual exposure. 1.10.03 Identify the scope of an effective radiological ALARA program. 1.10.04 Identify the purposes for conducting pre-job and/or post-job ALARA reviews. 1.10.05 Identify RCT responsibilities for ALARA implementation. INTRODUCTION All personnel at a facility must be committed to the ALARA philosophy. The RCT can play a major role in establishing and maintaining that commitment by understanding its concepts. This lesson will familiarize the student with the ALARA concepts and the

348

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Study Guide Study Guide 2.14-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Personnel Decontamination Module Number: 2.14 Objectives: 2.14.01 List the three factors which determine the actions taken in decontamination of personnel. i 2.14.02 List the preliminary actions and notifications required by the RCT for an individual suspected to be contaminated. i 2.14.03 List the actions to be taken by the RCT when contamination of clothing is confirmed. i 2.14.04 List the actions to be taken by the RCT when skin contamination is confirmed. i 2.14.05 List the steps for using decontamination reagents to decontaminate personnel. INTRODUCTION In our work environment, one of the major concerns of radiological control is the prevention of personnel contamination. When personnel contamination has been

349

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Unit Analysis & Conversion Unit Analysis & Conversion Study Guide 1.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Unit Analysis & Conversion Module Number: 1.02 Objectives: 1.02.01 Identify the commonly used unit systems of measurement and the base units for mass, length, and time in each system. 1.02.02 Identify the values and abbreviations for SI prefixes. 1.02.03 Given a measurement and the appropriate conversion factor(s) or conversion factor table, convert the measurement to the specified units. 1.02.04 Using the formula provided, convert a given temperature measurement to specified units. INTRODUCTION A working knowledge of the unit analysis and conversion process is necessary for the Radiological Control Technician. It is useful for air and water sample activity

350

Release criteria and pathway analysis for radiological remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Site-specific activity concentrations were derived for soils contaminated with mixed fission products (MFP), or uranium-processing residues, using the Department of Energy (DOE) pathway analysis computer code RESRAD at four different sites. The concentrations and other radiological parameters, such as limits on background-subtracted gamma exposure rate were used as the basis to arrive at release criteria for two of the sites. Valid statistical parameters, calculated for the distribution of radiological data obtained from site surveys, were then compared with the criteria to determine releasability or need for further decontamination. For the other two sites, RESRAD has been used as a preremediation planning tool to derive residual material guidelines for uranium. 11 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Subbaraman, G.; Tuttle, R.J.; Oliver, B.M. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Devgun, J.S. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

US Department of Energy radiological control manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual establishes practices for the conduct of Department of Energy radiological control activities. The Manual states DOE`s positions and views on the best courses of action currently available in the area of radiological controls. Accordingly, the provisions in the Manual should be viewed by contractors as an acceptable technique, method or solution for fulfilling their duties and responsibilities. This Manual shall be used by DOE in evaluating the performance of its contractors. This Manual is not a substitute for Regulations; it is intended to be consistent with all relevant statutory and regulatory requirements and shall be revised whenever necessary to ensure such consistency. Some of the Manual provisions, however, challenge the user to go well beyond minimum requirements. Following the course of action delineated in the Manual will result in achieving and surpassing related statutory or regulatory requirements.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report documents the performance of certain radiological protection sitewide services during calendar year (CY) 1988 by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and contractor activities on the Hanford Site. The routine program for each service is discussed along with any significant program changes and tasks, investigations, and studies performed in support of each program. Other related activities such as publications, presentations, and memberships on standard or industry committees are also listed. The programs covered provide services in the areas of (1) internal dosimetry, (2) in vivo measurements, (3) external dosimetry, (4) instrument calibration and evaluation, (5) calibration of radiation sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (formerly the National Bureau of Standards), and (6) radiological records. 23 refs., 15 figs., 15 tabs.

Lyon, M.; Fix, J.J.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Leonowich, J.A.; Palmer, H.E.; Sula, M.J.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Analysis of meteorological and radiological data for selected fallout episodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Weather Service Nuclear Support Office has analyzed the meteorological and radiological data collected for the following atmospheric nuclear tests: TRINITY; EASY of the Tumbler-Snapper series; ANNIE, NANCY, BADGER, SIMON, and HARRY of the Upshot-Knothole series; BEE and ZUCCHINI of the Teapot series; BOLTZMANN and SMOKY of the Plumbbob series; and SMALL BOY of the Dominic II series. These tests were chosen as having the greatest impact on nearby downwind populated locations, contributing approximately 80% of the collective estimated exposure. This report describes the methods of analysis used in deriving fallout-pattern contours and estimated fallout arrival times. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of estimating fallout arrival times from the meteorological data are described. Comparisons of fallout patterns resulting from these analyses with earlier analyses show insignificant differences in the areas covered or people exposed.

Quinn, V.E. (Weather Service Nuclear Support Office, Las Vegas, NV (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Neutron Energy Measurements in Radiological Emergency Response Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present significant results in recent advances in the determination of neutron energy. Neutron energy measurements are a small but very significant part of radiological emergency response applications. Mission critical information can be obtained by analyzing the neutron energy given off from radioactive materials. In the case of searching for special nuclear materials, neutron energy information from an unknown source can be of paramount importance.

Sanjoy Mukhopadhyay, Paul Guss, Michael Hornish, Scott Wilde, Tom Stampahar, Michael Reed

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Surface Contamination Guidelines/Radiological Clearance of Property  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Table IV-1, DOE O 5400.5, DOE Draft 441.XX, Authorized Limits govern the control and clearance of personal and real property. They are radionuclide concentrations or activity levels approved by DOEto permit the clearance of property under DOE radiological control for either restricted or unrestricted use, consistent with DOE’s radiation protection framework and standards for workers, the general public, and the environment.

356

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 8 Air Conditioning in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle Atlantic Census Division" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total New England",,,"Total Middle Atlantic" ,,"Total Northeast",,,"CT, ME, NH, RI, VT" "Air Conditioning",,,,"MA",,,"NY","PA","NJ" "Total Homes",113.6,20.8,5.5,2.5,3,15.3,7.2,4.9,3.2 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,16.5,3.9,1.9,2,12.6,5.3,4.4,2.9 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But"

357

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" 5 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,,,,,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than $20,000","$20,000 to $39,999","$40,000 to $59,999","$60,000 to $79,999","$80,000 to $99,999","$100,000 to $119,999","$120,000 or More" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,23.7,27.5,21.2,14.2,9.3,5.7,12,16.9 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,18.3,22.3,17.9,11.9,8.1,5.1,10.4,12.8 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,1.5,1.3,0.9,0.5,0.2,0.1,0.3,1

358

DRAFT - Design of Radiological Survey and Sampling to Support Title Transfer or Lease of Property on the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns, operates, and manages the buildings and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. As land and buildings are declared excess or underutilized, it is the intent of DOE to either transfer the title of or lease suitable property to the Community Reuse Organization of East Tennessee (CROET) or other entities for public use. It is DOE's responsibility, in coordination with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 4, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), to ensure that the land, facilities, and personal property that are to have the title transferred or are to be leased are suitable for public use. Release of personal property must also meet site requirements and be approved by the DOE contractor responsible for site radiological control. The terms title transfer and lease in this document have unique meanings. Title transfer will result in release of ownership without any restriction or further control by DOE. Under lease conditions, the government retains ownership of the property along with the responsibility to oversee property utilization. This includes involvement in the lessee's health, safety, and radiological control plans and conduct of site inspections. It may also entail lease restrictions, such as limiting access to certain areas or prohibiting digging, drilling, or disturbing material under surface coatings. Survey and sampling requirements are generally more rigorous for title transfer than for lease. Because of the accelerated clean up process, there is an increasing emphasis on title transfers of facilities and land. The purpose of this document is to describe the radiological survey and sampling protocols that are being used for assessing the radiological conditions and characteristics of building and land areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation that contain space potentially available for title transfer or lease. After necessary surveys and sampling and laboratory analyses are completed, the data are analyzed and included in an Environmental Baseline Summary (EBS) report for title transfer or in a Baseline Environmental Analysis Report (BEAR) for lease. The data from the BEAR is then used in a Screening-Level Human Health Risk Assessment (SHHRA) or a risk calculation (RC) to assess the potential risks to future owners/occupants. If title is to be transferred, release criteria in the form of specific activity concentrations called Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGLs) will be developed for the each property. The DCGLs are based on the risk model and are used with the data in the EBS to determine, with statistical confidence, that the release criteria for the property have been met. The goal of the survey and sampling efforts is to (1) document the baseline conditions of the property (real or personal) prior to title transfer or lease, (2) obtain enough information that an evaluation of radiological risks can be made, and (3) collect sufftcient data so that areas that contain minimal residual levels of radioactivity can be identified and, following radiological control procedures, be released from radiological control. (It should be noted that release from radiological control does not necessarily mean free release because DOE may maintain institutional control of the site after it is released from radiological control). To meet the goals of this document, a Data Quality Objective (DQO) process will be used to enhance data collection efficiency and assist with decision-making. The steps of the DQO process involve stating the problem, identifying the decision, identifying inputs to the decision, developing study boundaries, developing the decision rule, and optimizing the design. This document describes the DQOs chosen for surveys and sampling efforts performed for the purposes listed above. The previous version to this document focused on the requirements for radiological survey and sampling protocols that are be used for leasing. Because the primary focus at this time is on title transfer, th

Cusick L.T.

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

359

EA-1673: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Final Environmental Assessment 3: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1673: Final Environmental Assessment 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment This chapter describes potential environmental effects that may result from amended energy conservation standards for certain equipment covered by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1. Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating

360

final_report.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Final Scientific/Technical Report Final Scientific/Technical Report October 1, 2008 - December 31, 2011 Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle Submitted by: The University of Chicago 5801 S. Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 Principal Author: David Archer Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 10, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle Final Scientific/Technical Report submitted by David Archer 1 and Bruce Buffett 2 Submitted 4-10-2012 1 Department of the Geophysical Sciences University of Chicago Chicago IL 60637 2 University of California, Berkeley Earth & Planetary Science 383 McCone Hall Berkeley, CA 94720-5800 Agency Award Number: DE-NT0006558 Award Dates 1/1/08 to 12/31/11

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Order Module--DOE STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL Order Module--DOE STD-1098-2008, DOE STANDARD: RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL "The radiological control program discussed in DOE-STD-1098-2008 goes beyond the scope of, and includes more details than, the documented radiation protection program (RPP) required by 10 CFR 835, -Occupational Radiation Protection.‖ To ensure implementation of a comprehensive and coherent radiological control program that exceeds basic requirements and provides a substantial safety margin, DOE encourages its contractors to implement the provisions of DOE-STD-1098- 2008 to the extent appropriate to facility hazards and operations, consistent with DOE's integrated safety management program. Should any conflicts arise between the site-specific radiological control manual and the documented RPP, the

362

Supplementary radiological and beryllium characterization of the facility at 425 Peek Street, Schenectady, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the Office of Naval Reactors through the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, a radiological survey of the Peek Street industrial facility, the adjacent state-owned bike path, and two nearby residential properties was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in November 1989. The results indicated small isolated areas that exceeded DOE guidelines. These areas totaled approximately 0.2 m{sup 2} of floor area and approximately 3 m{sup 2} of wall area inside the building, and two small areas totaling approximately 5 m{sup 2} outside the building. A small section of one of these areas extended beyond the fence on the east side of the industrial property onto the state-owned property. No residual radioactive material or elevated radiation levels were detected on any portion of the paved section of the bike path or the residential properties adjacent to the site. Because the elevated radiation levels were localized and limited in extent, any credible use scenario, including current use conditions, indicated that no significant radiation exposures would accrue to individuals frequenting the area. Samples were also analyzed for elemental beryllium since that material had formerly been used at the site. In conjunction with the planned remediation at the facility, a supplementary characterization survey was performed to further define the areas containing beryllium in excess of the identified guidelines. Additional radiological characterization of Ra-226, Th-232, and U-238 was also performed in areas that were largely inaccessible prior to the remediation efforts.

Foley, R.D.; Allred, J.F.; Carrier, R.F.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

Mizell, Steve A [DRI; Nikolich, George [DRI; Shadel, Craig [DRI; McCurdy, Greg [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI; Miller, Julianne J [DRI

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Preliminary results of the radiological survey at the former Dow Chemical Company site, Madison, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the late 1950s and early 1960s, the former Dow Chemical Company plant, now owned and operated by Spectrulite Consortium Inc., supplied materials and provided services for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) under purchase orders issued by the Mallinckrodt Chemical Company, a primary AEC contractor. Information indicates that research and development work involving gamma-phase extrusion of uranium metal was conducted at the Dow Chemical plant. Because documentation establishing the current radiological condition of the property was unavailable, a radiological survey was conducted by members of the Measurement Applications and Development Group of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1989. The survey included: measurement of indoor gamma exposure rates; collection and radionuclide analysis of dust and debris samples; and measurements to determine alpha and beta-gamma surface contamination. The results of the survey demonstrate that Building 6, the area uranium extrusion and rod-straightening work occurred, is generally free of radioactive residuals originating from former DOE-sponsored activities. However, {sup 238}U- and {sup 232}Th-contaminated dust was found on overhead beams at the south end of Building 6. These findings suggest that past DOE-supported operations were responsible for uranium-contaminated beam dust in excess of guidelines in Building 6. However, the contamination is localized and limited in extent, rendering it highly unlikely that under present use an individual working in or frequenting these remote areas would receive a significant radiation exposure. We recommend that additional scoping survey measurements and sampling be performed to further define the extent of indoor uranium contamination southward to include Building 4 and northward throughout Building 6. 5 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Cottrell, W.D.; Williams, J.K.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Assessment for Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community Tourism Assessment for Lindstrom, Minnesota Final Report May 2008 Prepared for of the University of Minnesota Extension and College of Food, Agricultural & Natural Resource Sciences #12; INTRODUCTION 1 DATA USED IN THE TOURISM ASSESSMENT 2 TOURISM-RELATED DATA FOR LINDSTROM 2 REFERENCES TO TOURISM

Amin, S. Massoud

366

Final Report Sustainability at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Final Report Sustainability at Oregon State University Prepared by The Institute for Natural Resources Oregon State University June 2009 #12;2 Sustainability at Oregon State University June 2009 The Institute for Natural Resources Created by the Oregon Legislature through the 2001 Oregon Sustainability Act

Escher, Christine

367

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project, ?Capital Investment to Fund Equipment Purchases and Facility Modifications to Create a Sustainable Future for EnergyXchange? served to replace landfill gas energy with alternative energy resources, primarily solar and wood waste. This is the final project closeout report.

Gilbert, Chris [Altamont Environmental, Inc.] [Altamont Environmental, Inc.

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

SWERA_Final_Report  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopian Rural Energy Development Ethiopian Rural Energy Development and Promotion Center Final Report Country background information Solar and Wind Energy Utilization and Project Development Scenarios October 2007 Ethio Resource Group with Partners i Table of Contents Executive Summary..................................................................................... ii 1 Introduction.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1 Overview.....................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Objective of the study .................................................................................1-1

369

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 Air Conditioning in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 9 Air Conditioning in Homes in Midwest Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Midwest Census Region" ,,,"East North Central Census Division",,,,,"West North Central Census Division" ,,,"Total East North Central",,,,,"Total West North Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Total Midwest",,,,," IN, OH",,,"IA, MN, ND, SD" "Air Conditioning",,,,"IL","MI","WI",,,"MO",,"KS, NE" "Total Homes",113.6,25.9,17.9,4.8,3.8,2.3,7,8.1,2.3,3.9,1.8 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,22.4,15,4.3,3.1,1.8,5.9,7.4,2.3,3.4,1.7

370

Idaho's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory , OAS-L-12-02  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho's Radiological and Idaho's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory OAS-L-12-02 February 2012 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 21, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE FROM: Daniel M. Weeber, Director Eastern Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Idaho's Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy owns and operates the Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory (RESL) through the Idaho Operations Office (Idaho). RESL is a reference measurements laboratory specializing in analytical chemistry, radiation measurements and calibrations, and quality assurance. RESL had been located at the Idaho National Laboratory

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual radiological environmental Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Procedures 24.01.01.A1.05 RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY Approved: December 6, 1999 Revised: October 5, ... Source: Texas A&M University, Spatial Sciences Laboratory Collection:...

372

Development of an ambient lighting monitoring system for radiological image viewing application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ambient lighting plays a very important role in radiological image viewing environment. Excessive room ambient lighting (or illuminance) degrades image contrast, introducing veiling glare, diffuse reflectivity...

Ahmad Azlan Che; K. H. Ng; N. F. Mohd. Nasir…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Extension of DOE N 441.1, Radiological Protection for DOE Activities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Notice extends DOE N 441.1, Radiological Protection for DOE Activities, dated 9-30-95 until 6-30-00.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

NNSA Continues to Assist Vietnam in Enhancing its Nuclear/Radiological...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

to Assist Vietnam in Enhancing its NuclearRadiological Emergency Program | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

375

RESRAD Family of Codes - A Suite of Tools for Environmental Radiologic...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Laboratory, Argonne, IL Presented at Environmental Radiological Assistance Directory Web Conference June 27, 2012 Presentation Outline RESRAD Family of Codes Overview ...

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess radiological risk Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine 7 TRAINING & QUALIFICATIONS PROGRAM OFFICE Summary: and the policies and procedures in place to minimize their risk. Radiological Worker 1 Training is...

377

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted radiology proceedings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

staffing is maintained in CT, MR, Vascular... and outpatient populations are served from pediatric to adult. Within their role, the Radiology nurses Source: Duke University,...

378

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial radiological monitoring Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

staffing is maintained in CT, MR, Vascular... and outpatient populations are served from pediatric to adult. Within their role, the Radiology nurses Source: Duke University,...

379

Analysis of Operation TEAPOT nuclear test BEE radiological and meteorological data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the BEE nuclear test of Operation TEAPOT. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. A comparison of the WSNSO fallout analysis with an analysis performed in the 1950's is presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO fallout pattern are tabulated in an appendix.

Quinn, V.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Analysis of operation TEAPOT nuclear test ZUCCHINI radiological and meterological data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) analyses of the radiological and meteorological data collected for the ZUCCHINI nuclear test of Operation TEAPOT. Inconsistencies in the radiological data and their resolution are discussed. The methods of normalizing the radiological data to a standard time and estimating fallout-arrival times are presented. The meteorological situations on event day and the following day are described. A comparison of the WSNSO fallout analysis with an analysis performed in the 1950's is presented. The radiological data used to derive the WSNSO 1986 fallout pattern are tabulated in an appendix.

Quinn, V.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Radiological and Depleted Uranium Weapons: Environmental and Health Consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of nuclear weapons are due to the release of blast and thermal energy and the immediate and residual ionizing radiation energy. Most of the short-term damages to the environment and the human health are caused by the blast and thermal energies. Ionizing radiation energy received in large doses at high dose rates (victims of nuclear explosions) can produce acute radiation sickness and can even be lethal. Individuals having received lower radiation doses, or even high doses at low dose rates, may suffer from stochastic effects, primarily, the induction of cancer. Studies of exposed populations suggest the probability of developing a lethal cancer following low dose rate exposure is increased by approximately 5% for each Sv the whole-body receives. This risk is added, of course, to the risk of dying from cancer without exposure to radiation, which is more than 20% worldwide. For radiological weapons (radiological dispersion devices or dirty bombs), the health effects due to radiation are expected to be minor in most cases. Casualties will mainly occur due to the conventional explosive. Fear, panic, and decontamination costs will be the major effects. Significant radiation damage to individuals would likely be limited to very few persons. Depleted uranium (DU) weapons leave in the battlefield fragmented or intact DU penetrators as well as DU dust. The latter, if inhaled, could represent a radiological risk, especially to individuals spending some time in vehicles hit by DU munitions. All studies conducted so far have shown the outdoors doses to be so low not to represent a significant risk. For those spending 10 h per year in vehicles hit by DU munitions, the risk of developing a lethal cancer is slightly higher (?0.2%).

P.R. Danesi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Aldana, J. [NES, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Lawrence Livermore Site Office Safety Basis Self-Assessment Final...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

impact of the review team on the quality of the final documents. The reports also document the tracking and closure of a number of conditions of approval or directions...

384

DOE-STD-1098-99; Radiological Control  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1098-99 July 1999 Reaffirmation December 2004 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National

385

Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact cyclone filter train for the removal of hazardous and radiologi particles from a gaseous fluid medium which permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired.

Bench, Thomas R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Compact cyclone filter train for radiological and hazardous environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact cyclone filter train is disclosed for the removal of hazardous and radiological particles from a gaseous fluid medium. This filter train permits a small cyclone separator to be used in a very small space envelope due to the arrangement of the filter housing adjacent to the separator with the cyclone separator and the filters mounted on a plate. The entire unit will have a hoist connection at the center of gravity so that the entire unit including the separator, the filters, and the base can be lifted and repositioned as desired. 3 figs.

Bench, T.R.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Health and Safety Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual is a tool to provide information to all responders and emergency planners and is suggested as a starting point for all organizations that provide personnel/assets for radiological emergency response. It defines the safety requirements for the protection of all emergency responders. The intent is to comply with appropriate regulations or provide an equal level of protection when the situation makes it necessary to deviate. In the event a situation arises which is not addressed in the manual, an appropriate management-level expert will define alternate requirements based on the specifics of the emergency situation. This manual is not intended to pertain to the general public.

FRMAC Health and Safety Working Group

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors. The interaction of the contaminant/substrate with the particular decontamination technology is also very important. Results of decontamination testing from hundreds of contaminated coupons have lead to certain conclusions about the contamination and the type of decontamination methods being deployed. A recent addition to the DARPA initiated methodology simulates the deposition of nuclear fallout. This contamination differs from previous tests in that it has been developed and validated purely to simulate a 'loose' type of contamination. This may represent the first time that a radiologically contaminated 'fallout' stimulant has been developed to reproducibly test decontamination methods. While no contaminant/methodology may serve as a complete example of all aspects that could be seen in the field, the study of this family of simulation methods provides insight into the nature of radiological contamination.

Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various Hanford site-wide radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1990. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological records keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program, program changes and enhancements, associated tasks, investigations and studies, and related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are discussed as applicable. 22 refs., 10 figs., 19 tabs.

Lyon, M; Bihl, D E; Fix, J J; Piper, R K; Freolich, T J; Leonowich, J A; Lynch, T P

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services annual report for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1993. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological record keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Froelich, T.J.; Piper, R.K.; Olsen, P.C.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Hanford Radiological Protection Support Services annual report for 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Field Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report of calendar year 1992. These activities include internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological record keeping. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M; Bihl, D E; Fix, J J; Piper, R K; Froelich, T J; Lynch, T P

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1997. These activities include external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, radiological exposure record keeping, radiation source calibration, and instrument calibration and evaluation. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Johnson, M.L.; Lynch, T.P.; Piper, R.K.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hanford radiological protection support services. Annual report for 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1995. These activities include external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, radiological record keeping, radiation source calibration, and instrument calibration and evaluation. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Carbaugh, E.H. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for calendar year 1996. These activities include external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, radiological exposure record keeping, radiation source calibration, and instrument calibration and evaluation. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program-related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Froelich, T.J.; Piper, R.K.; Schulze, S.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various Hanford Site radiation protection services provided by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office and Hanford contractors are described in this annual report for the calendar year 1994. These activities include external dosimetry measurements and evaluations, internal dosimetry measurements and evaluations, in vivo measurements, radiological record keeping, radiation source calibration, and instrument calibration and evaluation. For each of these activities, the routine program and any program changes or enhancements are described, as well as associated tasks, investigations, and studies. Program- related publications, presentations, and other staff professional activities are also described.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Piper, R.K.; Froelich, T.J.; Olsen, P.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hanford radiological protection support services annual report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Certain sitewide radiation protection services operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations office and Hanford contractor are documented in this annual report on these services provided during calendar year 1989. These activities include internal dosimetry, in vivo measurements, external dosimetry, instrument calibration and evaluation, radiation source calibration, and radiological records keeping. In each case the routine program, program changes, associated tasks, investigations, and studies, as well as related publications, presentations, and other professional activities are discussed as applicable. 26 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs.

Lyon, M.; Bihl, D.E.; Fix, J.J.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Leonowich, J.A.; Palmer, H.E.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report for the formation of faculty and education establishing Colorado State's Smart Grid Integration Center

Troxell, W; Batchelor, A

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Final Meeting Summary Page 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 4 Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC & WM EIS) (joint with PIC) ......

399

RPSEA Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RPSEA RPSEA Final Report 08122-36.Final Produced Water Pretreatment for Water Recovery and Salt Production 08122-36 January 26, 2012 Principal Investigator: James M. Silva Senior Chemical Engineer General Electric Global Research Center 1 Research Circle Niskayuna, NY 12309 ii Legal Notice This report was prepared by General Electric Global Research as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA, members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION

400

Final Notice of Violation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8,2011 8,2011 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Mr. Jolm J. Grossenbacher Director, Idaho National Laboratory and President, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC P. O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-3695 SEA-2011-01 Dear Mr. Grossenbacher: Pursuant to section 234B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, (the Act), and the Department of Energy's (DOE) regulations at 10 C.F.R . §§ 824.4(a)(3) and 824.7(b), DOE is issuing this Final Notice of Violation (FNOV) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) for multiple violations of classified information security requirements. The FNOV is based upon the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement May 11, 2010, Investigation Report and an evaluation of the evidence presented to DOE by BEA, including BEA's final

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Final Design RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Design Review Module Final Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 [This Rev Design Re O 0 view Module w eview of the OR OFFICE OF C CD-1 was used to dev R U 233 Dispo F ENVIRO Standard R Fin Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M velop the Revie osition Project ONMENTAL Review Plan al Design view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 ew Plan for 90% in 2009. Lesso Module.] L MANAGE n (SRP) n e pplicability D-3 % Design Revi ons learned hav EMENT CD-4 iew of SWPF i ve been incorpo Post Ope in 2008 and for orated in the R eration r 60% Review Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively.

402

Sage Final EA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FINAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Environmental Assessment for DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR SAGE ELECTROCHROMICS SAGEGLASS® HIGH VOLUME MANUFACTURING (HVM) FACILITY IN FARIBAULT, MN U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 July 2009 DOE/EA-1645 Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Sage Electrochromics SageGlass® High Volume Manufacturing Facility in Faribault, MN DOE/EA-1645 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS iii Executive Summary 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 2 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2 2.1 Description of Proposed Action 2 2.2 Alternatives Considered but Eliminated 7 2.3 No Action Alternative 8 3.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS 9

403

Final - Gasbuggy S  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasbuggy S Gasbuggy S i t e Environmental Management End State Vision - January 2005 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Gasbuggy Site ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT END STATE VISION Final Final - Gasbuggy Site Environmental Management End State Vhion - fanuaty 2005 Executive Summary The Environmental Management End State Vision is to be used as the primary tool for communicating the individual site end state to the involved parties (e.g., U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], regulators, public stakeholders, Tribal Nations). The end state document is not a decisional document. If the DOE decides to seek changes to the current compliance agreements, decisions, or statutoqdregulatory requirements, those changes will be made in accordance with applicable requirements (DOEIEM, 2003).

404

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Sustainable energy Examen Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable energy Examen Final 24 mai 2013 Consignes ­ Vous disposez de 2 heures 30. ­ N'oubliez pas de r´epondre `a chaque question sur des feuilles s´epar´ees et d'indiquer votre nom sur chaque feuille. ­ La r´eponse `a la question huit doit se faire en anglais et sur la derni`ere feuille de l

Ernst, Damien

406

Sustainable energy Examen Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainable energy Examen Final 30 mai 2014 Consignes -- Vous disposez de 2 heures 30. -- N'oubliez pas de r´epondre `a chaque question sur des feuilles s´epar´ees et d'indiquer votre nom, pr´enom et institution (ULg, Gramme) sur chaque feuille. -- Les r´eponses aux diff´erentes sous-questions doivent ^etre

Ernst, Damien

407

ORISE: DeepwaterHorizon and Nuclear & Radiological Incidents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wi l l i a m H a l e y Wi l l i a m H a l e y B r a d P o t t e r C o mm o n C h a l l e n g e s a n d S o l u t i o n s J u n e 2 0 1 1 D e e p w a t e r H o r i z o n a n dN u c l e a r & R a d i o l o g i c a l I n c i d e n t s The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill shares many of the same challenges associated with a radiological incident like the one considered in the Empire 09 1 exercise or even a much larger nuclear incident. By analyzing experiences during Deepwater Horizon, these challenges can be identified by the interagency in advance of a radiological or nuclear emergency and solutions made available. Establishing and staffing a UnifiEd Command strUCtUrE The demands of Deepwater Horizon challenged the traditional response construct envisioned by national planning systems.

408

The use of panoramic radiology in dental practice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objectives: Approximately 1.5 million panoramic radiographs are taken annually in the general dental service in England and Wales. The aim of this review was to assess the clinical role of panoramic radiology in the diagnosis of diseases associated with the teeth and to consider its value in routine screening of patients. Method: This was carried out by critical review of the literature. Results: In addition to common problems with radiographic technique and processing, there are limitations in image quality inherent to panoramic radiology. These factors contribute to a reduced diagnostic accuracy for caries diagnosis, demonstration of periodontal bone support and periapical pathology when compared with intraoral radiography. Routine screening is unproductive for large proportions of dentate and edentulous populations, while in those cases where pathology is detected the diagnostic accuracy can be questioned. Furthermore, the ‘detection’ of asymptomatic anomalies may have no effect on patient management. Attempts to develop and test panoramic radiographic selection criteria are reviewed. Conclusion: New, high-yield selection criteria for panoramic radiography are proposed as a means of reducing unnecessary examinations, limiting radiation doses and reducing financial costs to patients and health service providers. However, research is indicated to develop further and to test such selection criteria.

V.E. Rushton; K. Horner

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Doses to patients from dental radiology in France  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In France, a national study was undertaken to estimate both dental radiology practices (equipment and activity) and the associated population collective dose. This study was done in two steps: A nationwide survey was conducted on the practitioner categories involved in dental radiology, and dosimetric measurements were performed on patients and on an anthropomorphic phantom by using conventional dental x-ray machines and pantomographic units. A total of 27.5 x 10(6) films were estimated to have been performed in 1984; 6% of them were pantomographic and 94% were conventional. Most of the organ doses measured for one intra-oral film were lower than 1 mGy (100 mrad); pantomogram dose values were generally higher than intra-oral ones. The collective effective dose equivalent figure was 2,000 person-Sv (2 x 10(5) person rem) leading to a per head dose equivalent of 0.037 mSv (3.7 mrem). The study allowed authors to identify ways to reduce the patient dose in France (e.g., implementing the use of long cone devices and controlling darkroom practices).

Benedittini, M.; Maccia, C.; Lefaure, C.; Fagnani, F. (Centre d'etude sur l'Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire, Fontenay aux Roses (France))

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

NV/YMP radiological control manual, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the adjacent Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) are located in Nye County, Nevada. The NTS has been the primary location for testing nuclear explosives in the continental US since 1951. Current activities include operating low-level radioactive and mixed waste disposal facilities for US defense-generated waste, assembly/disassembly of special experiments, surface cleanup and site characterization of contaminated land areas, and non-nuclear test operations such as controlled spills of hazardous materials at the hazardous Materials (HAZMAT) Spill Center (HSC). Currently, the major potential for occupational radiation exposure is associated with the burial of low-level nuclear waste and the handling of radioactive sources. Planned future remediation of contaminated land areas may also result in radiological exposures. The NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual, Revision 2, represents DOE-accepted guidelines and best practices for implementing Nevada Test Site and Yucca Mountain Project Radiation Protection Programs in accordance with the requirements of Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. These programs provide protection for approximately 3,000 employees and visitors annually and include coverage for the on-site activities for both personnel and the environment. The personnel protection effort includes a DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program accredited dosimetry and personnel bioassay programs including in-vivo counting, routine workplace air sampling, personnel monitoring, and programmatic and job-specific As Low as Reasonably Achievable considerations.

Gile, A.L. [comp.] [comp.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: sampling and analysis summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiological survey was conducted in the Northern Marshall Islands to document reamining external gamma exposures from nuclear tests conducted at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. An additional program was later included to obtain terrestrial and marine samples for radiological dose assessment for current or potential atoll inhabitants. This report is the first of a series summarizing the results from the terrestrial and marine surveys. The sample collection and processing procedures and the general survey methodology are discussed; a summary of the collected samples and radionuclide analyses is presented. Over 5400 samples were collected from the 12 atolls and 2 islands and prepared for analysis including 3093 soil, 961 vegetation, 153 animal, 965 fish composite samples (average of 30 fish per sample), 101 clam, 50 lagoon water, 15 cistern water, 17 groundwater, and 85 lagoon sediment samples. A complete breakdown by sample type, atoll, and island is given here. The total number of analyses by radionuclide are 8840 for /sup 241/Am, 6569 for /sup 137/Cs, 4535 for /sup 239 +240/Pu, 4431 for /sup 90/Sr, 1146 for /sup 238/Pu, 269 for /sup 241/Pu, and 114 each for /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. A complete breakdown by sample category, atoll or island, and radionuclide is also included.

Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Stuart, M.L.

1981-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

412

Radiological survey results at 4400 Piehl Road, Ottawa Lake, Michigan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey at 4400 Piehl Road in Ottawa Lake, Michigan. The survey was performed in September, 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if materials containing uranium from work performed under government contract at the former Baker Brothers facility in Toledo, Ohio had been transported off-site to this neighboring area. The radiological survey included surface gamma scans indoors and outdoors, alpha and beta scans inside the house and attached garage, beta-gamma scans of the hard surfaces outside, and the collection of soil, water, and dust samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated that the majority of the measurements on the property were within DOE guidelines. However, the presence of isolated spots of uranium contamination were found in two areas where materials were allegedly transported to the property from the former Baker Brothers site. Uranium uptake by persons on the property by ingestion is fairly unlikely, but inhalation is a possibility. Based on these findings, it is recommended that the residential property at 4400 Piehl Road in Ottawa Lake, Michigan be considered for inclusion under FUSRAP.

Foley, R.D.; Johnson, C.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Radiological Instrumentation Assessment for King County Wastewater Treatment Division  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into its combined sanitary and storm sewer system. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material. Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. Volume 2 of PNNL-15163 assesses the radiological instrumentation needs for detection of radiological or nuclear terrorism, in support of decisions to treat contaminated wastewater or to bypass the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP), and in support of radiation protection of the workforce, the public, and the infrastructure of the WPTP. Fixed radiation detection instrumentation should be deployed in a defense-in-depth system that provides 1) early warning of significant radioactive material on the way to the WPTP, including identification of the radionuclide(s) and estimates of the soluble concentrations, with a floating detector located in the wet well at the Interbay Pump Station and telemetered via the internet to all authorized locations; 2) monitoring at strategic locations within the plant, including 2a) the pipe beyond the hydraulic ram in the bar screen room; 2b) above the collection funnels in the fine grit facility; 2c) in the sampling tank in the raw sewage pump room; and 2d) downstream of the concentration facilities that produce 6% blended and concentrated biosolids. Engineering challenges exist for these applications. It is necessary to deploy both ultra-sensitive detectors to provide early warning and identification and detectors capable of functioning in high-dose rate environments that are likely under some scenarios, capable of functioning from 10 microrems per hour (background) up to 1000 rems per hour. Software supporting fixed spectroscopic detectors is needed to provide prompt, reliable, and simple interpretations of spectroscopic outputs that are of use to operators and decision-makers. Software to provide scientists and homeland security personnel with sufficient technical detail for identification, quantification, waste management decisions, and for the inevitable forensic and attribution needs must be developed. Computational modeling using MCNP software has demonstrated that useful detection capabilities can be deployed. In particular, any of the isotopes examined can be detected at levels between 0.01 and 0.1 ?Ci per gallon. General purpose instruments that can be used to determine the nature and extent of radioactive contamination and measure radiation levels for purposes of protecting personnel and members of the public should be available. One or more portable radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs) should be available to WTD personnel. Small, portable battery-powered personal radiation monitors should be widely available WTD personnel. The personal monitors can be used for personal and group radiation protection decisions, and to alert management to the need to get expert backup. All considerations of radiological instrumentation require considerations of training and periodic retraining of personnel, as well as periodic calibration and maintenance of instruments. Routine “innocent” alarms will occur due to medical radionuclides that are legally discharged into sanitary sewers on a daily basis.

Strom, Daniel J.; McConn, Ronald J.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

414

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Student's Guide, Part 4 of 5  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessor Training Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide ii This page intentionally left blank. Radiological Assessor Training DOE-HDBK-1141-2001 Student's Guide iii Table of Contents Regulatory Documents.....................................................................................

415

Radiological risk evaluation for risk-based design criteria of the multiple canister overpack packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multiple Canister Overpack (MCO) cask will be used in the transportation of irradiated nuclear fuel from the K Basins to a Canister Storage Building. This report presents the radiological risk evaluation, which is used in the development of the design criteria for the MCO cask. The radiological risk evaluation ensures compliance with the onsite transportation safety program.

Green, J.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

416

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology -Associate of Applied Science [RE-AAS-RADT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology - Associate of Applied Science [RE-AAS-RADT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 30-Oct-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester Introduction to Radiologic Technology 2 C RADT 14005 Clinical Education I 1 C RADT 14006 Radiographic

Sheridan, Scott

417

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology Associate of Technical Study [RE-ATS-RADT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Radiologic Technology ­ Associate of Technical Study [RE-ATS-RADT] Regional College Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 1 | Last Updated: 25-Nov-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester, but students must be advised by the director of radiologic technology, housed at the Salem Campus. Course

Sheridan, Scott

418

Ris-R-819(EN) The Radiological Exposure ofMan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risø-R-819(EN) The Radiological Exposure ofMan from Ingestion ofCs-137 and Sr-90 in Seafood from describes a limited radiological assessment of the collective doses to man from the intake of seafood from-137« 5.2 Results for Sr-90 9 6 Collective Doses 10 6.1 Assumptions Concerning Seafood Consumption 10 6

419

2013 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Final Regulatory Impact Review/ Final Environmental Assessment/Initial Regulatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final Regulatory Impact Review/ Final Environmental Assessment/Initial Regulatory Flexibility................................................................................................. 1 2 REGULATORY IMPACT REVIEW................................................................. 2 2 Analysis Amendment 97 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

WIPP radiological assistance team dispatched to Los Alamos as precautionary measure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiological Assistance Team Dispatched Radiological Assistance Team Dispatched To Los Alamos as Precautionary Measure CARLSBAD, N.M., May 11, 2000 - A team of radiological experts has been dispatched from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in response to a week-long forest fire that is threatening Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), one of the nation's premiere research laboratories. "We are responding completely as a precautionary measure," said Jere Galle, team leader for the WIPP Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) team. "It is our understanding that nuclear materials at LANL are not in harm's way. Our primary concern, however, is always to protect human health and the environment." The RAP team's mission is to provide radiological assistance to federal agencies, state,

422

U.S. Department of Energy Region 6 Radiological Assistance Program response plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Upon request, the DOE, through the Radiological Assistance Program (RAP), makes available and will provide radiological advice, monitoring, and assessment activities during radiological incidents where the release of radioactive materials is suspected or has occurred. Assistance will end when the need for such assistance is over, or if there are other resources available to adequately address the incident. The implementation of the RAP is usually accomplished through the recommendation of the DOE Regional Coordinating Office`s (RCO) on duty Regional Response Coordinator (RRC) with the approval of the Regional Coordinating Office Director (RCOD). The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) is the designated RCO for DOE Region 6 RAP. The purpose of this document is: to describe the mechanism for responding to any organization or private citizen requesting assistance to radiological incidents; to coordinate radiological assistance among participating federal agencies, states, and tribes in DOE Region 6; and to describe the RAP Scaled Response concept of operations.

Jakubowski, F.M.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Final Environmental Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

95 95 :&,, ' - , i . -- Final Environmental Assessment for Device Assembly - Facility Operations f 3: >fi - , - , ' , 7 - . ' ' , , . I 8 ' , :-<:- L , a . ' ' ' -L. -1 , , ~ e m - . - I ! - , - # 8 , r I I , , , - , . .-- - ' - I S - . ! - , - , Y 2 L - . . 8 : L.-- , r Nevada ' f e s t ~ h e , Nye county, Nevada U. S. Department Of Energy - , 8 - - . 8 - I,, ' - 8 - - , , 8 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for DEVICE ASSEMBLY FACIUTY OPERATIONS MAY 1995 TABLE OF CONTENTS LISTOFFIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv USTOFTABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv A. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8. PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B.1 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

424

Accumulations Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Final Report Date: July 15, 2013 Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2013 NETL Manager: Skip Pratt Principal Investigators: Matthew Reagan (LBNL), Philip W. Jones (LLNL) 1. Goal of this report This report will summarize previously reported or published results concerning the behavior of hydrates subjected to warming, highlighting contributing and mitigating factors relating to the possibility of rapid climate feedbacks. We will thus assess various scenarios and possibilities for the relationship between climate and hydrates: i.e., the likelihood of a "clathrate

425

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 8: List of Preparers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 8 LIST OF PREPARERS Name Education/Expertise Contribution U.S. Department of Energy Gary S. Hartman B.A., Geology; 23 years of experience in NEPA compliance and environmental compliance and regulation DOE Document Manager Argonne National Laboratory 1 Timothy Allison M.S., Mineral and Energy Resource Economics; M.A., Geography; 16 years of experience in regional analysis and economic impact analysis Socioeconomic analysis Halil I. Avci Ph.D., Nuclear Engineering; 19 years of experience in environmental assessment, waste management, accident analysis, and project management Project Leader Bruce M. Biwer Ph.D., Chemistry; 13 years of experience in radiological pathway analysis, dose calculations, and radiological transportation risk analysis

426

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 8: List of Preparers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 8 LIST OF PREPARERS Name Education/Expertise Contribution U.S. Department of Energy Gary S. Hartman B.A., Geology; 23 years of experience in NEPA compliance and environmental compliance and regulation DOE Document Manager Argonne National Laboratory 1 Timothy Allison M.S., Mineral and Energy Resource Economics; M.A., Geography; 16 years of experience in regional analysis and economic impact analysis Socioeconomic analysis Halil I. Avci Ph.D., Nuclear Engineering; 19 years of experience in environmental assessment, waste management, accident analysis, and project management Project Leader Bruce M. Biwer Ph.D., Chemistry; 13 years of experience in radiological pathway analysis, dose calculations, and radiological transportation risk analysis

427

Microsoft Word - S04932 History final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FUSRAP History of the Chupadera Mesa, NM, Site FUSRAP History of the Chupadera Mesa, NM, Site December 2008 Doc. No. S0493200 (FUSRAP NM.04-5) Page 1 of 9 FUSRAP History of the Chupadera Mesa, NM, Site The following historical summary is provided to document the inclusion of the Chupadera Mesa, NM, Site into the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Although no remedial action was required, the site met eligibility criterion and was included under FUSRAP, under which the final radiological surveys were performed. Chupadera Mesa is located north and east of the White Sands Missile Range and downwind of the Trinity test site (Figure1). The Trinity test was the first detonation of a nuclear device. The test occurred on July 16, 1945, at the Trinity Site located within White Sands Missile Range in

428

Simulations of neutralized final focus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result of too little plasma density near focus where n b > nof a plasma- neutralized solenoidal final focus. A Ne+ beamto NDC, beam-plasma instability growth and final focus in a

Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Study Guide Study Guide 2.19-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Room Equipment Module Number: 2.19 Objectives: 2.19.01 Describe the features and specifications for commonly used laboratory counters or scalers: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding c. Detector window d. Types of radiation detected and measured e. Operator-adjustable controls f. Source check g. Procedure for sample counting 2.19.02 Describe the features and specifications for low-background automatic counting systems: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding c. Detector window d. Types of radiation detected and measured e. Operator-adjustable controls f. Source check g. Procedure for sample counting 2.19.03 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used gamma spectroscopy systems.

430

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Sampling Program/Methods Air Sampling Program/Methods Instructor's Guide 2.06-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Air Sampling Program/Methods Module Number: 2.06 Objectives: 2.06.01 State the primary objectives of an air monitoring program. 2.06.02 Describe the three physical states of airborne radioactive contaminants. 2.06.03 List and describe the primary considerations to ensure a representative air sample is obtained. 2.06.04 Define the term "isokinetic sampling" as associated with airborne radioactivity sampling. 2.06.05 Identify the six general methods for obtaining samples or measurements of airborne radioactivity concentrations and describe the principle of operation for each method. a. Filtration b. Volumetric c. Impaction/impingement d. Adsorption e. Condensation/dehumidification

431

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Instructor's Guide Instructor's Guide 2.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Shipment/Receipt of Radioactive Material Module Number: 2.12 Objectives: 2.12.01 List the applicable agencies which have regulations that govern the transport of radioactive material. 2.12.02 Define terms used in DOT regulations. 2.12.03 Describe methods that may be used to determine the radionuclide contents of a package. 2.12.04 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on packages and state the applicable limits. 2.12.05 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on exclusive use vehicles and state the applicable limits. 2.12.06 Identify the proper placement of placards on a transport vehicle. L 2.12.07 Identify inspection criteria that should be checked prior to releasing a

432

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Communication Systems Communication Systems Instructor's Guide 2.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Communication Systems Module Number: 2.02 Objectives: 2.02.01 Explain the importance of good communication. 2.02.02 Identify two methods of communication and be able to determine different types of each. 2.02.03 Describe different types of communication systems. 2.02.04 Describe the FCC and DOE guidelines regarding proper use of communication systems. 2.02.05 Describe general attributes of good communications. 2.02.06 Explain the importance of knowing how to contact key personnel. i 2.02.07 Identify the communication systems available at your site and methods available to contact key personnel. i 2.02.08 Describe the emergency communication systems available at your site.

433

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Radiation Survey Instrumentation 6 Radiation Survey Instrumentation Instructor's Guide 2.16-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiation Survey Instrumentation Module Number: 2.16 Objectives: 2.16.01 List the factors which affect an RCT's selection of a portable radiation survey instrument, and identify appropriate instruments for external radiation surveys. L 2.16.02 Identify the following features and specifications for ion chamber instruments used at your facility: a. Detector type b. Instrument operating range c. Detector shielding d. Detector window e. Types of radiation detected/measured f. Operator-adjustable controls g. Markings for detector effective center h. Specific limitations/characteristics. L 2.16.03 Identify the following features and specifications for high range

434

Good Practices for Ocupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Not Measurement Not Measurement Sensitive DOE- STD-1128-2013 April 2013 DOE STANDARD GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN PLUTONIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1128-2013 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-STD-1128-2013 Foreword This Technical Standard does not contain any new requirements. Its purpose is to provide information on good practices, update existing reference material, and discuss practical lessons learned relevant to the safe handling of plutonium. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) health

435

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-HDBK-1122-99 July 1999 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL TECHNICIAN TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Foreword This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in DOE Guide G441.1-1, Management and Administration of Radiation Protection Programs and as

436

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Radiological Control Technician Training Technician Qualification Standard Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers Dave Lent Coleman Research Joe DeMers EG&G Mound Applied Technologies (formerly) Andy Hobbs FERMCO Dennis Maloney RUST - GJPO Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Eva Lauber West Valley Nuclear Services Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy Peter O'Connell U.S. Department of Energy

437

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

External Exposure Control External Exposure Control Instructor's Guide 1.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: External Exposure Control Module Number: 1.11 Objectives: 1.11.01 Identify the four basic methods for minimizing personnel external exposure. 1.11.02 Using the Exposure Rate = 6CEN equation, calculate the gamma exposure rate for specific radionuclides. 1.11.03 Identify "source reduction" techniques for minimizing personnel external exposures. 1.11.04 Identify "time-saving" techniques for minimizing personnel external exposures. 1.11.05 Using the stay time equation, calculate an individual's remaining allowable dose equivalent or stay time. 1.11.06 Identify "distance to radiation sources" techniques for minimizing personnel external exposures.

438

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Counting Errors and Statistics Counting Errors and Statistics Instructor's Guide 2.03-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Errors and Statistics Module Number: 2.03 Objectives: 2.03.01. Identify five general types of errors that can occur when analyzing radioactive samples, and describe the effect of each source of error on sample measurements. 2.03.02. State two applications of counting statistics in sample analysis. 2.03.03. Define the following terms: a. mode b. median c. mean 2.03.04. Given a series of data, determine the mode, median, or mean. 2.03.05. Define the following terms: a. variance b. standard deviation 2.03.06. Given the formula and a set of data, calculate the standard deviation. 2.03.07. State the purpose of a Chi-squared test. L 2.03.08. State the criteria for acceptable Chi-squared values at your site.

439

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dosimetry Dosimetry Instructor's Guide 2.04-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Dosimetry Module Number: 2.04 Objectives: 2.04.01 Identify the DOE external exposure limits for general employees. 2.04.02 Identify the DOE limits established for the embryo/fetus of a declared pregnant female general employee. L 2.04.03 Identify the administrative exposure control guidelines at your site, including those for the: a. General Employee b. Member of the Public/Minor c. Incidents and emergencies d. Embryo/Fetus L 2.04.04 Identify the requirements for a female general employee who has notified her employer in writing that she is pregnant. 2.04.05 Determine the theory of operation of a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). 2.04.06 Determine how a TLD reader measures the radiation dose from a TLD.

440

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Instructor's Guide Instructor's Guide 2.14-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Personnel Decontamination Module Number: 2.14 Objectives: 2.14.01 List the three factors which determine the actions taken in decontamination of personnel. L 2.14.02 List the preliminary actions and notifications required by the RCT for an individual suspected to be contaminated. L 2.14.03 List the actions to be taken by the RCT when contamination of clothing is confirmed. L 2.14.04 List the actions to be taken by the RCT when skin contamination is confirmed. L 2.14.05 List the steps for using decontamination reagents to decontaminate personnel. References: (Site Specific) Instructional Aids: 1. Overheads 2. Overhead projector/screen 3. Chalkboard/whiteboard 4. Lessons learned DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Module 2.14 Personnel Decontamination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Study Guide Study Guide 2.18-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Air Sampling Equipment Module Number: 2.18 Objectives: 2.18.01 Identify the factors that affect the operator's selection of a portable air sampler. i 2.18.02 Identify the physical and operating characteristics and the limitation(s) of the Staplex and Radeco portable air samplers. i 2.18.03 Identify the physical and operating characteristics and the limitation(s) of Motor air pumps. i 2.18.04 List the steps for a preoperational checkout of a portable air sampler. i 2.18.05 Identify the physical and operational characteristics and the limitation(s) of beta-gamma constant air monitors (CAMs). i 2.18.06 Identify the physical and operating characteristics and the limitation(s) of alpha constant air monitors (CAMs).

442

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biological Effects of Radiation Biological Effects of Radiation Instructor's Guide 1.08-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Biological Effects of Radiation Module Number: 1.08 Objectives: 1.08.01 Identify the function of the following cell structures: a. Cell membrane b. Cytoplasm c. Mitochondria d. Lysosome e. Nucleus f. DNA g. Chromosomes 1.08.02 Identify effects of radiation on cell structures. 1.08.03 Define the law of Bergonie and Tribondeau. 1.08.04 Identify factors which affect the radiosensitivity of cells. 1.08.05 Given a list of types of cells, identify which are most or least radiosensitive. 1.08.06 Identify primary and secondary reactions on cells produced by ionizing radiation. 1.08.07 Identify the following definitions and give examples of each: a. Stochastic effect b. Non-stochastic effect

443

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

External Exposure Control External Exposure Control Study Guide 1.11-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: External Exposure Control Module Number: 1.11 Objectives: 1.11.01 Identify the four basic methods for minimizing personnel external exposure. 1.11.02 Using the Exposure Rate = 6CEN equation, calculate the gamma exposure rate for specific radionuclides. 1.11.03 Identify "source reduction" techniques for minimizing personnel external exposures. 1.11.04 Identify "time-saving" techniques for minimizing personnel external exposures. 1.11.05 Using the stay time equation, calculate an individual's remaining allowable dose equivalent or stay time. 1.11.06 Identify "distance to radiation sources" techniques for minimizing personnel external exposures.

444

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radioactive Source Control Radioactive Source Control Study Guide 2.08-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radioactive Source Control Module Number: 2.08 Objectives: 2.08.01 Describe the requirements for radioactive sources per 10 CFR 835. i 2.08.02 Identify the characteristics of radioactive sources that must be controlled at your site. i 2.08.03 Identify the packaging, marking, and labeling requirements for radioactive sources. i 2.08.04 Describe the approval and posting requirements for radioactive materials areas. i 2.08.05 Describe the process and procedures used at your site for storage and accountability of radioactive sources. INTRODUCTION A radioactive source is material used for its emitted radiation. Sources are constructed as sealed or unsealed and are classified as accountable or exempt.

445

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Respiratory Protection Respiratory Protection Instructor's Guide 2.07-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Respiratory Protection Module Number: 2.07 Objectives: 2.07.01 Explain the purpose of respiratory protection standards and regulations. 2.07.02 Identify the OSHA, ANSI, and DOE respiratory protection program requirements. 2.07.03 Identify the standards which regulate respiratory protection. 2.07.04 Describe the advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of each of the following respirators: a. Air purifying, particulate removing filter respirators b. Air purifying, Chemical Cartridge and Canister respirators for Gases and Vapors c. Full-face, supplied-air respirators d. Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) e. Combination atmosphere supplying respirators 2.07.05

446

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Internal Exposure Control Internal Exposure Control Study Guide 1.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Internal Exposure Control Module Number: 1.12 Objectives: 1.12.01 Identify four ways in which radioactive materials can enter the body. 1.12.02 Given a pathway for radioactive materials into the body, identify one method to prevent or minimize entry by that pathway. 1.12.03 Identify the definition and distinguish between the terms "Annual Limit on Intake" (ALI) and "Derived Air Concentration" (DAC). 1.12.04 Identify the basis for determining Annual Limit on Intake (ALI). 1.12.05 Identify the definition of "reference man". 1.12.06 Identify a method of using DACs to minimize internal exposure potential. 1.12.07 Identify three factors that govern the behavior of radioactive materials in the

447

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 Radioactive Source Control 8 Radioactive Source Control Instructor's Guide 2.08-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radioactive Source Control Module Number: 2.08 Objectives: 2.08.01 Describe the requirements for radioactive sources per 10 CFR 835. L 2.08.02 Identify the characteristics of radioactive sources that must be controlled at your site. L 2.08.03 Identify the packaging, marking, and labeling requirements for radioactive sources. L 2.08.04 Describe the approval and posting requirements for radioactive materials areas. L 2.08.05 Describe the process and procedures used at your site for storage and accountability of radioactive sources. References: 1. 10 CFR 835, "Occupational Radiation Protection," (1998) Instructional Aids: 1. Overheads 2. Overhead projector and screen

448

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Radioactivity and Radioactive Decay Study Guide - Radioactivity and Radioactive Decay Study Guide 1.06-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radioactivity & Radioactive Decay Module Number: 1.06 Objectives: 1.06.01 Identify how the neutron to proton ratio is related to nuclear stability. 1.06.02 Identify the definition for the following terms: a. radioactivity b. radioactive decay 1.06.03 Identify the characteristics of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 1.06.04 Given simple equations identify the following radioactive decay modes: a. alpha decay b. beta decay c. positron decay d. electron capture 1.06.05 Identify two aspects associated with the decay of a radioactive nuclide. 1.06.06 Identify differences between natural and artificial radioactivity. 1.06.07 Identify why fission products are unstable.

449

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Number TRNG-0003 Number TRNG-0003 Module 1.13 Radiation Detector Theory Study Guide 1.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiation Detector Theory Module Number: 1.13 Objectives: 1.13.01 Identify the three fundamental laws associated with electrical charges. 1.13.02 Identify the definition of current, voltage and resistance and their respective units. 1.13.03 Select the function of the detector and readout circuitry components in a radiation measurement system. 1.13.04 Identify the parameters that affect the number of ion pairs collected in a gas- filled detector. 1.13.05 Given a graph of the gas amplification curve, identify the regions of the curve. 1.13.06 Identify the characteristics of a detector operated in each of the useful regions of the gas amplification curve.

450

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Instructor's Guide Instructor's Guide 2.19-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Room Equipment Module Number: 2.19 Objectives: L 2.19.01 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used laboratory counter or scalers: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding c. Detector window d. Types of radiation detected and measured e. Operator-adjustable controls f. Source check g. Procedure for sample counting L 2.19.02 Describe the following features and specifications for low-background automatic counting systems: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding c. Detector window d. Types of radiation detected and measured e. Operator-adjustable controls d. Source check e. Procedures for sample counting L 2.19.03 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used

451

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radioactivity & Radioactive Decay Radioactivity & Radioactive Decay Instructor's Guide 1.06-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radioactivity & Radioactive Decay Module Number: 1.06 Objectives: 1.06.01 Identify how the neutron to proton ratio is related to nuclear stability. 1.06.02 Identify the definition for the following terms: a. radioactivity b. radioactive decay 1.06.03 Identify the characteristics of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 1.06.04 Given simple equations identify the following radioactive decay modes: a. alpha decay b. beta decay c. positron decay d. electron capture 1.06.05 Identify two aspects associated with the decay of a radioactive nuclide. 1.06.06 Identify differences between natural and artificial radioactivity. 1.06.07 Identify why fission products are unstable.

452

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Instructor's Guide Instructor's Guide 2.18-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Air Sampling Equipment Module Number: 2.18 Objectives: 2.18.01 Identify the factors that affect the operator's selection of a portable air sampler. L 2.18.02 Identify the physical and operating characteristics and the limitation(s) of the Staplex and Radeco portable air samplers. L 2.18.03 Identify the physical and operating characteristics and the limitation(s) of Motor air pumps. L 2.18.04 List the steps for a preoperational checkout of a portable air sampler. L 2.18.05 Identify the physical and operational characteristics and the limitation(s) of beta-gamma constant air monitors (CAM's). L 2.18.06 Identify the physical and operating characteristics and the limitation(s) of alpha constant air monitors (CAM's).

453

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 Radiation Detector Theory 3 Radiation Detector Theory Instructor's Guide 1.13-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiation Detector Theory Module Number: 1.13 Objectives: 1.13.01 Identify the three fundamental laws associated with electrical charges. 1.13.02 Identify the definition of current, voltage and resistance and their respective units. 1.13.03 Select the function of the detector and readout circuitry components in a radiation measurement system. 1.13.04 Identify the parameters that affect the number of ion pairs collected in a gas- filled detector. 1.13.05 Given a graph of the gas amplification curve, identify the regions of the curve. 1.13.06 Identify the characteristics of a detector operated in each of the useful regions of the gas amplification curve. 1.13.07

454

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Counting Errors and Statistics Counting Errors and Statistics Study Guide 2.03-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Counting Errors and Statistics Module Number: 2.03 Objectives: 2.03.01. Identify five general types of errors that can occur when analyzing radioactive samples, and describe the effect of each source of error on sample measurements. 2.03.02. State two applications of counting statistics in sample analysis. 2.03.03. Define the following terms: a. mode b. median c. mean 2.03.04. Given a series of data, determine the mode, median, or mean. 2.03.05. Define the following terms: a. variance b. standard deviation 2.03.06. Given the formula and a set of data, calculate the standard deviation. 2.03.07. State the purpose of a Chi-squared test. i 2.03.08. State the criteria for acceptable Chi-squared values at your site.

455

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Physics Nuclear Physics Instructor's Guide 1.04-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Nuclear Physics Module Number: 1.04 Objectives: 1.04.01 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. Nucleon b. Nuclide c. Isotope 1.04.02 Identify the basic principles of the mass-energy equivalence concept. 1.04.03 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. Mass defect b. Binding energy c. Binding energy per nucleon 1.04.04 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. Fission b. Criticality c. Fusion References: 1. "Nuclear Chemistry"; Harvey, B. G. 2. "Physics of the Atom"; Wehr, M. R. and Richards, J. A. Jr. 3. "Introduction to Atomic and Nuclear Physics"; Oldenburg, O. and Holladay, W. G. 4. "Health Physics Fundamentals"; General Physics Corp.

456

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Study Guide Study Guide 2.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Shipment/Receipt of Radioactive Material Module Number: 2.12 Objectives: 2.12.01 List the applicable agencies which have regulations that govern the transport of radioactive material. 2.12.02 Define terms used in DOT regulations. 2.12.03 Describe methods that may be used to determine the radionuclide contents of a package. 2.12.04 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on packages and state the applicable limits. 2.12.05 Describe the necessary radiation and contamination surveys to be performed on exclusive use vehicles and state the applicable limits. 2.12.06 Identify the proper placement of placards on a transport vehicle. i 2.12.07 Identify inspection criteria that should be checked prior to releasing a

457

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Sources of Radiation - Sources of Radiation Study Guide 1.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Sources of Radiation Module Number: 1.05 Objectives: 1.05.01 Identify the following four sources of natural background radiation including the origin, radionuclides, variables, and contribution to exposure. a. Terrestrial b. Cosmic c. Internal Emitters d. Radon 1.05.02 Identify the following four sources of artificially produced radiation and the magnitude of dose received from each. a. Nuclear Fallout b. Medical Exposures c. Consumer Products d. Nuclear Facilities INTRODUCTION Apart from the amount of radiation a worker may receive while performing work, they will also be exposed to radiation because of the very nature of our environment. All individuals are subject to some irradiation even though they may not work with

458

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Instructor's Guide Instructor's Guide 2.17-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Contamination Monitoring Instrumentation Module Number: 2.17 Objectives: 2.17.01 List the factors which affects an RCT's selection of a portable contamination monitoring instrument. L 2.17.02 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used count rate meter probes used at your site for beta/gamma and/or alpha surveys: a. Detector type b. Detector shielding and window c. Types of radiation detected/measured d. Energy response for measured radiation e. Specific limitations/characteristics L 2.17.03 Describe the following features and specifications for commonly used count rate instruments used at your site: a. Types of detectors available for use b. Operator-adjustable controls

459

DOE-HDBK-1131-98; General Employee Radiological Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HDBK-1131-98 HDBK-1131-98 December 1998 Change Notice No. 1 November 2003 Reaffirmation with Errata April 2004 DOE HANDBOOK GENERAL EMPLOYEE RADIOLOGICAL TRAINING U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000.

460

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Internal Exposure Control Internal Exposure Control Instructor's Guide 1.12-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Internal Exposure Control Module Number: 1.12 Objectives: 1.12.01 Identify four ways in which radioactive materials can enter the body. 1.12.02 Given a pathway for radioactive materials into the body, identify one method to prevent or minimize entry by that pathway. 1.12.03 Identify the definition and distinguish between the terms "Annual Limit on Intake" (ALI) and "Derived Air Concentration" (DAC). 1.12.04 Identify the basis for determining Annual Limit on Intake (ALI). 1.12.05 Identify the definition of "reference man". 1.12.06 Identify a method of using DACs to minimize internal exposure potential. 1.12.07 Identify three factors that govern the behavior of radioactive materials in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 Biological Effects of Radiation 8 Biological Effects of Radiation Study Guide 1.08-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Biological Effects of Radiation Module Number: 1.08 Objectives: 1.08.01 Identify the function of the following cell structures: a. Cell membrane b. Cytoplasm c. Mitochondria d. Lysosome e. Nucleus f. DNA g. Chromosomes 1.08.02 Identify effects of radiation on cell structures. 1.08.03 Define the law of Bergonie and Tribondeau. 1.08.04 Identify factors which affect the radiosensitivity of cells. 1.08.05 Given a list of types of cells, identify which are most or least radiosensitive. 1.08.06 Identify primary and secondary reactions on cells produced by ionizing radiation. 1.08.07 Identify the following definitions and give examples of each: a. Stochastic effect b. Non-stochastic effect

462

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dosimetry Dosimetry Study Guide 2.04-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Dosimetry Module Number: 2.04 Objectives: 2.04.01 Identify the DOE external exposure limits for general employees. 2.04.02 Identify the DOE limits established for the embryo/fetus of a declared pregnant female general employee. i 2.04.03 Identify the administrative exposure control guidelines at your site, including those for the: a. General employee b. Member of the public/minor c. Incidents and emergencies d. Embryo/fetus i 2.04.04 Identify the requirements for a female general employee who has notified her employer in writing that she is pregnant. 2.04.05 Determine the theory of operation of a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). 2.04.06 Determine how a TLD reader measures the radiation dose from a TLD.

463

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Sampling Program/Methods Air Sampling Program/Methods Study Guide 2.06-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Air Sampling Program/Methods Module Number: 2.06 Objectives: 2.06.01 State the primary objectives of an air monitoring program. 2.06.02 Describe the three physical states of airborne radioactive contaminants. 2.06.03 List and describe the primary considerations to ensure a representative air sample is obtained. 2.06.04 Define the term "isokinetic sampling" as associated with airborne radioactivity sampling. 2.06.05 Identify the six general methods for obtaining samples or measurements of airborne radioactivity concentrations and describe the principle of operation for each method. a. Filtration b. Volumetric c. Impaction/impingement d. Adsorption e.

464

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Instrumentation Study Guide Instrumentation Study Guide 2.16-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Radiation Survey Instrumentation Module Number: 2.16 Objectives: 2.16.01 List the factors which affect an RCT's selection of a portable radiation survey instrument, and identify appropriate instruments for external radiation surveys. i 2.16.02 Identify the following features and specifications for ion chamber instruments used at your facility: a. Detector type b. Instrument operating range c. Detector shielding d. Detector window e. Types of radiation detected/measured f. Operator-adjustable controls g. Markings for detector effective center h. Specific limitations/characteristics i 2.16.03 Identify the following features and specifications for high range instruments used at your facility:

465

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 - Nuclear Physics 4 - Nuclear Physics Study Guide 1.04-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Nuclear Physics Module Number: 1.04 Objectives: 1.04.01 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. Nucleon b. Nuclide c. Isotope 1.04.02 Identify the basic principles of the mass-energy equivalence concept. 1.04.03 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. Mass defect b. Binding energy c. Binding energy per nucleon 1.04.04 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. Fission b. Criticality c. Fusion INTRODUCTION Nuclear power is made possible by the process of nuclear fission. Fission is but one of a large number of nuclear reactions which can take place. Many reactions other than fission are quite important because they affect the way we deal with all aspects of

466

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Respiratory Protection Respiratory Protection Study Guide 2.07-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Respiratory Protection Module Number: 2.07 Objectives: 2.07.01 Explain the purpose of respiratory protection standards and regulations. 2.07.02 Identify the OSHA, ANSI, and DOE respiratory protection program requirements. 2.07.03 Identify the standards which regulate respiratory protection. 2.07.04 Describe the advantages and disadvantages (limitations) of each of the following respirators: a. Air purifying, particulate removing filter respirators b. Air purifying, Chemical Cartridge and Canister respirators for Gases and Vapors c. Full-face, supplied-air respirators d. Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) e. Combination atmosphere supplying respirators 2.07.05 Define the term protection factor (PF).

467

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sources of Radiation Sources of Radiation Instructor's Guide 1.05-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Sources of Radiation Module Number: 1.05 Objectives: 1.05.01 Identify the following four sources of natural background radiation including the origin, radionuclides, variables, and contribution to exposure. a. Terrestrial b. Cosmic c. Internal Emitters d. Radon 1.05.02 Identify the following four sources of artificially produced radiation and the magnitude of dose received from each. a. Nuclear Fallout b. Medical Exposures c. Consumer Products d. Nuclear Facilities References: 1. "Basic Radiation Protection Technology"; Gollnick, Daniel; Pacific Radiation Press; 1983. 2. ANL-88-26 (1988) "Operational Health Physics Training"; Moe, Harold; Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago.

468

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Communication Systems Communication Systems Study Guide 2.02-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Communication Systems Module Number: 2.02 Objectives: 2.02.01 Explain the importance of good communication. 2.02.02 Identify two methods of communication and be able to determine different types of each. 2.02.03 Describe different types of communication systems. 2.02.04 Describe the FCC and DOE guidelines regarding proper use of communication systems. 2.02.05 Describe general attributes of good communications. 2.02.06 Explain the importance of knowing how to contact key personnel. i 2.02.07 Identify the communication systems available at your site and methods available to contact key personnel. i 2.02.08 Describe the emergency communication systems available at your site.

469

DOE-HDBK-1122-99; Radiological Control Technician Training  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 Interaction of Radiation with Matter 7 Interaction of Radiation with Matter Instructor's Guide 1.07-1 Course Title: Radiological Control Technician Module Title: Interaction of Radiation with Matter Module Number: 1.07 Objectives: 1.07.01 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. ionization b. excitation c. bremsstrahlung 1.07.02 Identify the definitions of the following terms: a. specific ionization b. linear energy transfer (LET) c. stopping power d. range e. W-value 1.07.03 Identify the two major mechanisms of energy transfer for alpha particulate radiation. 1.07.04 Identify the three major mechanisms of energy transfer for beta particulate radiation. 1.07.05 Identify the three major mechanisms by which gamma photon radiation interacts with matter. 1.07.06 Identify the four main categories of neutrons as they are classified by kinetic

470

An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site including three neighboring areas during August and September 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the Nevada Test Site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey included the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The results of the aerial survey showed a terrestrial background exposure rate that varied from less than 6 microroentgens per hour (mR/h) to 50 mR/h plus a cosmic-ray contribution that varied from 4.5 mR/h at an elevation of 900 meters (3,000 feet) to 8.5 mR/h at 2,400 meters (8,000 feet). In addition to the principal gamma-emitting, naturally occurring isotopes (potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228), the man-made radioactive isotopes found in this survey were cobalt-60, cesium-137, europium-152, protactinium-234m an indicator of depleted uranium, and americium-241, which are due to human actions in the survey area. Individual, site-wide plots of gross terrestrial exposure rate, man-made exposure rate, and americium-241 activity (approximating the distribution of all transuranic material) are presented. In addition, expanded plots of individual areas exhibiting these man-made contaminations are given. A comparison is made between the data from this survey and previous aerial radiological surveys of the Nevada Test Site. Some previous ground-based measurements are discussed and related to the aerial data. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from the gamma-ray measurements collected during this survey agreed very well with the exposure rates inferred from previous aerial surveys.

Hendricks, T J; Riedhauser, S R

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: Data and dose assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests, especially from those conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds between 1946 and 1958, contaminated areas of the Northern Marshall Islands. A radiological survey at some Northern Marshall Islands was conducted from September through November 1978 to evaluate the extent of residual radioactive contamination. The atolls included in the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS) were Likiep, Ailuk, Utirik, Wotho, Ujelang, Taka, Rongelap, Rongerik, Bikar, Ailinginae, and Mejit and Jemo Islands. The original test sites, Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, were also visited on the survey. An aerial survey was conducted to determine the external gamma exposure rate. Terrestrial (soil, food crops, animals, and native vegetation), cistern and well water samples, and marine (sediment, seawater, fish and clams) samples were collected to evaluate radionuclide concentrations in the atoll environment. Samples were processed and analyzed for {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am. The dose from the ingestion pathway was calculated using the radionuclide concentration data and a diet model for local food, marine, and water consumption. The ingestion pathway contributes 70% to 90% of the estimated dose. Approximately 95% of the dose is from {sup 137}Cs accounts for about 10% to 30% of the dose. {sup 239+240}Pu and {sup 241}Am are the major contributors to dose via the inhalation pathway; however, inhalation accounts for only about 1% of the total estimated dose, based on surface soil levels and resuspension studies. All doses are computed for concentrations decay corrected to 1996. The maximum annual effective dose from manmade radionuclides at these atolls ranges from .02 mSv y{sup -1}. The background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} to 4.5 mSv y{sup -1}. The 50-y integral dose ranges from 0.5 to 65 mSv. 35 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.; Conrado, C.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

NTSF Spring 2010 Final Agenda  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Final Agenda for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Transportation Stakeholder Forum taking place in Chicago, Illinois.

473

Campus Climate Project Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Campus Climate Project Final Report Oregon State University January 2005 #12;Rankin & Associates, Consulting OSU Campus Climate Assessment Project Final Report January 2005 1 Table of Contents Executive Campus Climate Assessment Project Final Report January 2005 i Executive Summary Resistance begins

Escher, Christine

474

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" 3 Air Conditioning in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950 to 1959","1960 to 1969","1970 to 1979","1980 to 1989","1990 to 1999","2000 to 2009" "Air Conditioning" "Total Homes",113.6,14.4,5.2,13.5,13.3,18.3,17,16.4,15.6 "Air Conditioning Equipment" "Use Air Conditioning Equipment",94,10.5,4,10.6,10.5,15.1,14.1,14.7,14.4 "Have Air Conditioning Equipment But" "Do Not Use It",4.9,0.9,0.2,0.8,0.6,0.8,0.9,0.3,0.4 "Do Not Have Air Conditioning Equipment",14.7,3,0.9,2.2,2.2,2.4,2,1.3,0.8

475

NETL Final Report Outline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Transmission Pipeline Remote Leak Detection Final Report December 2002 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas J. Kulp Diagnostics and Remote Sensing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969, MS 9056 Livermore, CA 94551 and Wayne Einfeld Environmental Monitoring and Characterization Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0755 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy 2 Abstract The pipeline industry would benefit considerably from the development of systems that could provide early warning capabilities for major pipeline integrity and safety issues caused by leaks.

476

Final Report.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Production Enhancement, Mocane-Laverne Field, Oklahoma Final Report October, 2000 - September 30, 2003 Scott Reeves Advanced Resources International 9801 Westhemier, Suite 805 Houston, Texas 77042 and Buckley Walsh Oneok Resources 100 West Fifth Street Tulsa, OK 74103-0871 September, 2002 U.S. Department of Energy DE-FG26-00NT40789 i Disclaimers U.S. Department of Energy This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United Sates Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

477

Final_Report.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Energy, Offi ce of Fossil Energy Technology International Inc.: Seismic While Drilling Project Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final Report for the period of June 11-14, 2008 Completed February 2009 This document may contain protected Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) information and is not to be further disclosed for a period of 5 years from the date it was produced except as expressly provided for in the CRADA. DISCLAIMER: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors or their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied,

478

Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' 6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' w V' - > DOE/EIS--00 96-F-Vol.1 //C^ DE84 0 0 1 4 4 6 Final Environmental Impact Statement Remedial Actions at the Former Vitro Rare Metals Plant Site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania United States Department of Energy July 1983 Volume I r NOTICE } IPORTIONS OF THIS REPORT ARE ILLEGIBLE.' / It has been reproduced from the besi ' available copy to permit the broadest possible availability. This document is PUBLICLY RELEASABLl Authorizmg OfFtciai Date: Z P l ^ o " ? isTWBUTim ef T H I S m\jM] IS mm\m DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

479

FINAL CEf VED  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOElEA 1147 DOElEA 1147 FINAL CEf VED 6 I 3 I996 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME ~ ~ O S T I for the LOW ENERGY DEMONSTRATION ACCELERATOR TECHNICAL AREA 53 LUS ALAMUS NATFUNAL LABORATORY LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO . . - . - . I Date Prepared: April 1, 1996 ~ Prepared for: Office of Defense Programs US Department of Energy Los Alamos Area Q S c e DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any

480

AIPM Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final AIPM project report consists of six sections. Each section includes information on the original AIPM project and extension work on the high temperature design. The first section (1) provides an overview of the program and highlights the significant targets to meet at the end of the program. The next section (2) summarizes the significant technical accomplishments by the SEMIKRON AIPM team during the course of the project. Greater technical details are provided in a collection of all the quarterly reports which can be found in the appendix. Section three (3) presents some the more significant technical data collected from technology demonstrators. Section four (4) analyzes the manufacturing cost or economic aspects of producing 100,000 units/yr. Section five (5) describes the commercialization efforts of the AIPM technology into the automotive market. The last section (6) recommends follow on work that will build on the efforts and achievements of the AIPM program.

John Mookken

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final radiological conditions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

FINAL/ SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Chattanooga fuel cell demonstrations project was to develop and demonstrate a prototype 5-kW grid-parallel, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system that co-produces hydrogen, based on Ion America’s technology. The commercial viability of the 5kW SOFC system was tested by transporting, installing and commissioning the SOFC system at the Alternative Energy Laboratory at the University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. The system also demonstrated the efficiency and the reliability of the system running on natural gas. This project successfully contributed to the achievement of DOE technology validation milestones from the Technology Validation section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. Results of the project can be found in the final technical report.

McDonald, Henry; Singh, Suminderpal

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

482

Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

483

NETL Final Report Outline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Instrument for Airborne Remote Sensing of Transmission Instrument for Airborne Remote Sensing of Transmission Pipeline Leaks Final Report August 2004 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas J. Kulp Diagnostics and Remote Sensing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969, MS 9056 Livermore, CA 94551 and Wayne Einfeld Environmental Monitoring and Characterization Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0755 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas, Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy Abstract The pipeline industry would benefit considerably from the development of systems that could provide early warning capabilities for major pipeline integrity and safety issues indicated by

484

Clean Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

3 3 V e h i c l e M a i n t e n a n c e a n d D u r a b i l i t y FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsor- ship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report. The District or

485

Blackout Final Implementation Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy September 2006 Final Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force September 2006 Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy Acknowledgments This document was prepared by staff of Natural Resources Canada and the U.S. Department of Energy. The principal contributors are listed in Annex 1. The staff wish to acknowledge the contributions of the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Ontario Ministry of Energy. The staff also wish to acknowl- edge the support and cooperation of the North American Electric Reliability Council and, in particular, of Mr. David Nevius, Senior Vice President and Direc- tor of Reliability Assessment & Performance

486

Clean Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

2 2 P r o j e c t D e s i g n a n d I m p l e m e n t a t i o n FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report.

487

Status Update on the NCRP Scientific Committee SC 5-1 Report: Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents - 13450  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 2008, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued its final Protective Action Guide (PAG) for radiological dispersal device (RDD) and improvised nuclear device (IND) incidents. This document specifies protective actions for public health during the early and intermediate phases and cleanup guidance for the late phase of RDD or IND incidents, and it discusses approaches to implementing the necessary actions. However, while the PAG provides specific guidance for the early and intermediate phases, it prescribes no equivalent guidance for the late-phase cleanup actions. Instead, the PAG offers a general description of a complex process using a site-specific optimization approach. This approach does not predetermine cleanup levels but approaches the problem from the factors that would bear on the final agreed-on cleanup levels. Based on this approach, the decision-making process involves multifaceted considerations including public health, the environment, and the economy, as well as socio-political factors. In an effort to fully define the process and approach to be used in optimizing late-phase recovery and site restoration following an RDD or IND incident, DHS has tasked the NCRP with preparing a comprehensive report addressing all aspects of the optimization process. Preparation of the NCRP report is a three-year (2010-2013) project assigned to a scientific committee, the Scientific Committee (SC) 5-1; the report was initially titled, Approach to Optimizing Decision Making for Late- Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Terrorism Incidents. Members of SC 5-1 represent a broad range of expertise, including homeland security, health physics, risk and decision analysis, economics, environmental remediation and radioactive waste management, and communication. In the wake of the Fukushima nuclear accident of 2011, and guided by a recent process led by the White House through a Principal Level Exercise (PLE), the optimization approach has since been expanded to include off-site contamination from major nuclear power plant accidents as well as other nuclear or radiological incidents. The expanded application under the current guidance has thus led to a broadened scope of the report, which is reflected in its new title, Decision Making for Late-Phase Recovery from Nuclear or Radiological Incidents. The NCRP report, which is due for publication in 2013, will substantiate the current DHS guidance by clarifying and elaborating on the processes required for the development and implementation of procedures for optimizing decision making for late-phase recovery, enabling the establishment of cleanup goals on a site-specific basis. The report will contain a series of topics addressing important issues related to the long-term recovery from nuclear or radiological incidents. Special topics relevant to supporting the optimization of the decision-making process will include cost-benefit analysis, radioactive waste management, risk communication, stakeholder interaction, risk assessment, and decontamination approaches and techniques. The committee also evaluated past nuclear and radiological incidents for their relevance to the report, including the emerging issues associated with the Fukushima nuclear accident. Thus, due to the commonality of the late-phase issues (such as the potential widespread contamination following an event), the majority of the information pertaining to the response in the late-phase decision-making period, including site-specific optimization framework and approach, could be used or adapted for use in case of similar situations that are not due to terrorism, such as those that would be caused by major nuclear facility accidents or radiological incidents. To ensure that the report and the NCRP recommendations are current and relevant to the effective implementation of federal guidance, SC 5-1 has actively coordinated with the agencies of interest and other relevant stakeholders throughout the duration of the project. The resulting report will be an important resource to guide those involved

Chen, S.Y. [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Results of the radiological survey at the Sacandaga site Glenville, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sacandaga site, located on Sacandaga Road, Glenville, New York, was operated by the General Electric Company for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1947 and 1951. Originally used for the study and development of radar during World War II, the facilities housed later operations involving physics studies and sodium technology development in support of breeder reactor design and other AEC programs. Though not in use since the original equipment was dismantled and removed in the early 1950s, portions of the 51-acre site are known to contain buried rubble from demolished structures used in former operations. At the request of the Office of Naval Reactors through the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, a characterization of current radiological conditions over the site was performed between August and October 1989. The survey included the measurement of direct radiation levels (gamma, alpha, and beta-gamma) over all surfaces both inside and outside the building and tunnel, radionuclide analysis of systematic, biased, and auger hole soil samples, and analysis of sediments from underground structures. Gamma logging of auger holes was conducted and removable contamination levels inside the tunnel were determined. Samples of soil and structural materials from within and around an excavated concrete bunker were analyzed to determine concentrations of radionuclides and nonradioactive elemental beryllium.

Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Carrier, R.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Air Conditioning in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" 0 Air Conditioning in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South Central Census Division",,,"West South Central Census Division" ,,,,,,,,,"Total East South Central",,,"Total West South Central" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,"Total South Atlantic" ,,"Total South",,,,,"DC, DE, MD, WV",,,,"AL, KY, MS",,,"AR, LA, OK" "Air Conditioning",,,,"VA","GA","FL",,"NC, SC",,"TN",,,"TX" "Total Homes",113.6,42.1,22.2,3,3.5,7,3.4,5.4,7.1,2.4,4.6,12.8,8.5,4.2

490

DOE-HDBK-1141-2001; Radiological Assessor Training, Instructor's Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

13-1 13-1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LESSON PLAN Course Material Topic: Radiological Aspects of Accelerators Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, the participant will be able to: 1. Identify the general characteristics of accelerators. 2. Identify the types of particles accelerated. 3. Identify the two basic types of accelerators. 4. Identify uses for accelerators. 5. Define prompt radiation. 6. Identify prompt radiation sources. 7. Define radioactivation. 8. Explain how contaminated material differs from activated material with regard to radiological concerns. 9. Identify activation sources. 10. Identify engineered and administrative controls at accelerator facilities. 11. Identify the special radiological concern and recommended instrument for each