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1

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This Final ''Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement'' (HCP EIS) is being used by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its nine cooperating and consulting agencies to develop a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site. The DOE will use the Final HCP EIS as a basis for a Record of Decision (ROD) on a CLUP for the Hanford Site. While development of the CLUP will be complete with release of the HCP EIS ROD, full implementation of the CLUP is expected to take at least 50 years. Implementation of the CLUP would begin a more detailed planning process for land-use and facility-use decisions at the Hanford Site. The DOE would use the CLUP to screen proposals. Eventually, management of Hanford Site areas would move toward the CLUP land-use goals. This CLUP process could take more than 50 years to fully achieve the land-use goals.

N /A

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cover Sheet Cover Sheet Final HCP EIS | Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement 13 | (HCP EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 | 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HCP EIS Document Manager 18 | U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

3

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS EIS Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, Bureau 6 of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant counties; and 7 the City of Richland, Washington 8 | 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement 13 | (HCP EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 | 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HCP EIS Document Manager 18 | U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

4

EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan 22: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan EIS-0222: Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan SUMMARY DOE has prepared the EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with implementing a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site for at least the next 50 years. DOE is expected to use this land-use plan in its decision-making process to establish what is the "highest and best use" of the land (41 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 101-47, "Federal Property Management Regulations"). The final selection of a land-use map, land-use policies, and implementing procedures would create the working CLUP when they are adopted through the ROD for the EIS. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

5

Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Idaho...

6

EIS-0325: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Final...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0325: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0325 (January 2003) EIS-0325: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project...

7

COMPREHENSIVE CLOSURE PLAN FOR THE HANFORD CENTRAL PLATEAU  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a comprehensive and strategic plan that has been recently developed for the environmental closure of the Central Plateau area of the Hanford Site, a former weapons-production complex managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This approach was submitted to the DOE Richland Operations Office by Fluor Hanford to provide a framework and roadmap to integrate ongoing operations with closure of facilities that are no longer actively used--all with a view to closing the Central Plateau by 2035. The plan is currently under consideration by the DOE.

LACKEY, M.B.

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor Experience at Historic Reactor Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor Experience at Historic...

9

DOE/EIS-0222-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22-SA-O1 22-SA-O1 Supplement Analysis Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 June 2008 DOE/EIS-0222-SA-0 1 SUMMARY In September 1999 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HCP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0222-F). The HCP EIS analyzed the impacts of alternatives for implementing a land-use plan for the DOE's Hanford Site for at least the next 50-year planning period and lasting for as long as DOE retains legal control of some portion of the real estate. In November 1999 DOE issued its Record of Decision (ROD), establishing the Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (CLUP), which consisted of four key elements:

10

Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Idaho State Patrol Troopers Rick Stouse and Tony Anderson inspected the TRUPACTS, containers which contain TRU waste, and trailer containing the final shipment of Hanford offsite waste. The Idaho State Patrol officers have played an important role in AMWTP's success by inspecting every one of AMWTP's nearly 3,900 shipments. Idaho State Patrol Troopers Rick Stouse and Tony Anderson inspected the TRUPACTS, containers which contain TRU waste, and trailer containing the final shipment of Hanford offsite waste. The Idaho State Patrol officers have played an important role in AMWTP's success by inspecting every one of

11

Informe Final Sobre el Estudio de las Enfermedades de la Tiroides en Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resumen del Informe Final Sobre el Estudio de las Enfermedades de la Tiroides en Hanford WASHINGTON O R E G O N IDAHO HANFORD Acerca del Estudio Sobre las Enfermedades de la Tiroides en Hanford. (HTDS por su sigla en inglés) El estudio sobre las enfermedades de la tiroides en Hanford (HTDS por su sigla

12

FINAL FRONTIER AT HANFORD TACKLING THE CENTRAL PLATEAU  

SciTech Connect

The large land area in the center of the vast Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State is known as 'the plateau'--aptly named because its surface elevations are 250-300 feet above the groundwater table. By contrast, areas on the 585-square mile Site that border the Columbia River sit just 30-80 feet above the water table. The Central Plateau, which covers an ellipse of approximately 70 square miles, contains Hanford's radiochemical reprocessing areas--the 200 East and 200 West Areas--and includes the most highly radioactive waste and contaminated facilities on the Site. Five 'canyons' where chemical processes were used to separate out plutonium (Pu), 884 identified soil waste sites (including approximately 50 miles of solid waste burial trenches), more than 900 structures, and all of Hanford's liquid waste storage tanks reside in the Central Plateau. (Notes: Canyons is a nickname given by Hanford workers to the chemical reprocessing facilities. The 177, underground waste tanks at Hanford comprise a separate work scope and are not under Fluor's management). Fluor Hanford, a DOE prime cleanup contractor at the Site for the past 12 years, has moved aggressively to investigate Central Plateau waste sites in the last few years, digging more than 500 boreholes, test pits, direct soil 'pushes' or drive points; logging geophysical data sets; and performing electrical-resistivity scans (a non-intrusive technique that maps patterns of sub-surface soil conductivity). The goal is to identify areas of contamination areas in soil and solid waste sites, so that cost-effective and appropriate decisions on remediation can be made. In 2007, Fluor developed a new work plan for DOE that added 238 soil waste-site characterization activities in the Central Plateau during fiscal years (FYs) 2007-2010. This number represents a 50 percent increase over similar work previously done in central Hanford. Work Plans are among the required steps in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup process. The CERCLA process is used to oversee the investigation, decision-making and remediation of 'past practices' (historical) sites, as opposed to sites in active use. For the first several years of Hanford's cleanup work, everyone concerned--the Department, contractors, regulatory agencies, stakeholders and Indian nations and tribes--focused efforts on the rivershore. The magnificent Columbia River--eighth largest in the world--flows through and by the Hanford Site for 52 miles. Two million people live downstream from Hanford along the Columbia before it empties into the Pacific Ocean. Further, the part of the river known as the 'Hanford Reach' is a prime habitat for salmon, steelhead, sturgeon and other species of fish. In fact, it provides a spawning ground to more salmon than any other stretch of river in the United States outside of Alaska. For these reasons, protecting the Columbia by cleaning up waste directly along its shoreline was an early priority in Hanford's Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (or Tri-Party Agreement) signed in 1989 among the DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State to govern cleanup. However, Tri-Party Agreement signatories and others concerned with Hanford and the Columbia River, knew that the waste located in, and beneath, the Central Plateau could also pose dangers to the waterway. While the waste in central Hanford might move more slowly, and pose fewer immediate threats, it would have to be dealt with as cleanup progressed.

GERBER MS

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

13

Hanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Cleanup Site The Hanford Site mission focuses on environmental restoration, waste management, related scientific and environmental research and development of radioactive...

14

Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor Experience at Historic Reactor Hanford Railcars Make Final Stop at B Reactor: Move Enhances Visitor Experience at Historic Reactor May 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL (509) 376-6773 Andre_l_Armstrong@rl.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - Two locomotives that hauled irradiated fuel around the Hanford Site for a half-century will reach their final stop this week when they are delivered to the Historic B Reactor for preservation and public display. The two locomotives are among 16 railcars from Hanford's 200 North Area being removed by Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL).

15

Comprehensive testing to measure the response of fluorocarbon rubber (FKM) to Hanford tank waste simulant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the Chemical Compatibility Program developed to evaluate plastic packaging components that may be incorporated in packaging mixed-waste forms for transportation. Consistent with the methodology outlined in this report, the authors performed the second phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant Hanford tank mixed wastes on packaging seal materials. That effort involved the comprehensive testing of five plastic liner materials in an aqueous mixed-waste simulant. The testing protocol involved exposing the materials to {approximately}143, 286, 571, and 3,670 Krad of gamma radiation and was followed by 7-, 14-, 28-, 180-day exposures to the waste simulant at 18, 50, and 60 C. Fluorocarbon (FKM) rubber samples subjected to the same protocol were then evaluated by measuring seven material properties: specific gravity, dimensional changes, mass changes, hardness, compression set, vapor transport rates, and tensile properties. From the analyses, they determined that FKM rubber is not a good seal material to withstand aqueous mixed wastes having similar composition to the one used in this study. They have determined that FKM rubber has limited chemical durability after exposure to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford tank simulant mixed waste at elevated temperatures above 18 C.

NIGREY,PAUL J.; BOLTON,DENNIS L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1995/01eis0212_cl.html[6/27/2011 1:02:59 PM] 1995/01eis0212_cl.html[6/27/2011 1:02:59 PM] Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes DOE/EIS-0212 VOLUME 1 OF 2 VOLUME 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT SAFE INTERIM STORAGE OF HANFORD TANK WASTES Hanford Site Richland, Washington October, 1995 WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY NUCLEAR WASTE PROGRAM LACEY, WASHINGTON 98503 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE

17

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. 2.0 BACKGROUND The Sludge Treatment Project manages the removal of...

18

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. 2.0 BACKGROUND The Sludge Treatment Project manages the removal of radioactive...

19

Comprehensive testing to measure the response of butyl rubber to Hanford tank waste simulant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the Chemical Compatibility Program developed to evaluate plastic packaging components that may be incorporated in packaging mixed-waste forms for transportation. Consistent with the methodology outlined in this report, the authors performed the second phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant Hanford tank mixed wastes on packaging seal materials. That effort involved the comprehensive testing of five plastic liner materials in an aqueous mixed-waste simulant. The testing protocol involved exposing the materials to {approximately}143, 286, 571, and 3,670 krad of gamma radiation and was followed by 7-, 14-, 28-, 180-day exposures to the waste simulant at 18, 50, and 60 C. Butyl rubber samples subjected to the same protocol were then evaluated by measuring seven material properties: specific gravity, dimensional changes, mass changes, hardness, compression set, vapor transport rates, and tensile properties. From the analyses, they determined that butyl rubber has relatively good resistance to radiation, this simulant, and a combination of these factors. These results suggest that butyl rubber is a relatively good seal material to withstand aqueous mixed wastes having similar composition to the one used in this study.

NIGREY,PAUL J.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

DOE/EIS-0222 Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, April 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Draft Executive Summary Cover Sheet 1 2 3 Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 4 5 Cooperating Agencies: U.S. Department of the Interior (Bureau of Land Management, 6 Bureau of Reclamation, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service); Benton, Franklin, and Grant 7 counties; and the City of Richland 8 9 Consulting Tribal Governments: Nez Perce Tribe Department of Environmental Restoration 10 and Waste Management and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation 11 12 Title: Revised Draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement and 13 Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (HRA-EIS), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington 14 15 Contacts: For further information on this EIS call or contact: 16 17 Thomas W. Ferns, HRA-EIS Document Manager 18 U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement Bonneville Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy Bureau of Land Management Bureau of Reclamation Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Department of Interior Department of Army U.S. Department of Defense January 2003 Final Environmental Impact Statement Responsible Agencies: U.S. Department of Energy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Richland Operations Office (RL); U.S. Department of Defense, Department of Army (USDOA); U.S. Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Title of Proposed Project: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project - DOE/EIS-0325 State Involved: Washington Abstract: BPA proposes to construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in central Washington. This project

22

List of currently classified documents relative to Hanford Operations and of potential use in the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment, January 1, 1973--June 20, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project seeks to estimate the current risk from the Columbia River resulting from past and present Hanford activities. To resolve the question of the current risk, it is necessary for the CRCIA Project to have access to any classified information that may be relevant to this study. The purpose of this report is to present the results of the search for relevant classified information. There are two classified matter control centers operated by two prime contractors at the Hanford Site. One is operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the other is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Only the WHC collection contained information relevant to a study of the Columbia River in the time frame of interest: January 1, 1973 through June 20, 1994. A list of the classified documents in the WHC collection is maintained in the WHC Classified Document Control database. The WHC Classified Document Control database was searched. The search criteria were the dates of interest and the basic keywords used for the CRCIA Project`s data compendium (Eslinger et al. 1994). All Hanford-generated, Hanford-related entries that were applicable to the CRCIA Project and the dates of interest were provided. The resulting list of 477 titles comprises the Appendix of this report. The information give for each title is exactly as it appears in the database. Any inconsistencies are the result of duplicating the database.

Miley, T.B.; Huesties, L.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSW HSW EIS January 2004 1.6 Figure 1.2. States with Radioactive Waste Disposal Activities Final HSW EIS January 2004 1.12 Figure 1.3. Relationship of the HSW EIS to Other Hanford Cleanup Operations, Material Management Activities, and Key Environmental Reviews 2.17 Final HSW EIS January 2004 Figure 2.6. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Figure 2.7. X-Ray Image of Transuranic Waste Drum Contents M0212-0286.11 HSW EIS 12-10-02 M0212-0286.12 HSW EIS 12-10-02 2.17 Final HSW EIS January 2004 Figure 2.6. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Figure 2.7. X-Ray Image of Transuranic Waste Drum Contents M0212-0286.11 HSW EIS 12-10-02 M0212-0286.12 HSW EIS 12-10-02 Final HSW EIS January 2004 2.34 Figure 2.18. Typical Liner System Final HSW EIS January 2004 2.36

24

Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COVER SHEET COVER SHEET U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office TITLE: Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Benton County, Washington (DOE/EIS-0286F) CONTACT: For further information on this document, write or call: Mr. Michael S. Collins HSW EIS Document Manager Richland Operations Office U.S. Department of Energy, A6-38 P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352-0550 Telephone: (509) 376-6536 Fax: (509) 372-1926 Email: hsweis@rl.gov For further information on the Department's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact: Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, EH-42 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W.

25

GEOHYDROLOGICAL STUDIES FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION -- Vol. I: Executive Summary; Vol. II: Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION Volume I:of Washington state." Rockwell Hanford Operations Topicalmodel evaluation at the Hanford nuclear waste facility."

Apps, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

2005 Hanford FU Worker Vapor and Occ Med new blue-final.cdr  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

... 27 Abbreviations Used in This Report AMH AdvanceMed Hanford BNI Bechtel National, Incorporated CAIRS Computerized AccidentIncident Reporting...

27

Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Miron, Y. [Bureau of Mines (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Final Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement (9/22/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HCP EIS HCP EIS Appendix A | A-1 Appendix A - Treaties 1 2 3 The US GenWeb Archives provide genealogical and historical data to the 4 general public without fee or charge of any kind. It is intended that 5 this material not be used in a commercial manner. 6 7 Submitted by Kevin Fraley from public records Jan. 21, 1997. 8 Both above notices must remain when copied or downloaded. 9 10 swimref@cmc.net 11 12 13 Blackfeet Treaty of Fort Benton, 1855 14 15 16 Articles of agreement and convention made and concluded at the council-ground on the Upper 17 Missouri, near the mouth of the Judith River, in the Territory of Nebraska, this seventeenth day of 18 October, in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, by and between A. Cumming and 19 Isaac I. Stevens, commissioners duly appointed and authorized, on the part of the United States,

29

Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(the percentage of actual operating time). 1 Comprehensive Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Flowsheet and Throughput Specifically, the following questions were...

30

GEOHYDROLOGICAL STUDIES FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION -- Vol. I: Executive Summary; Vol. II: Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be D. Review'of Hanford Well Logs The work performed in 1978Hanford Operatibns (Rockwell) during Fiscal Year This workHanford Operations (Rockwell) during Fiscal Year 1978. This work

Apps, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

D-Area Sulfate Reduction Studty Comprehensive Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume emanates from the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (DCPRB) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), due to the contaminated runoff the basin receives from the D-Area coal pile. A Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP) (WSRC 2001) was implemented to evaluate the potential for the sulfate reduction remediation of the DCPRB acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume. The following studies, implemented as part of the TSWP, are documented herein: Bacteria Population and Organic Selection Laboratory Testing; DTT-1 Trench Evaluation; DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 1; and DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 2. Evaluation of sulfate reduction applicability actually began with a literature search and feasibility report in mid 2001, which fed into the TSWP. Physical completion of TSWP work occurred in late 2004 with the completion of the DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 2. The following are the primary conclusions drawn based upon this 3-year effort: (1) Pure soybean oil provides a long-term, indirect, SRB carbon source that floats on top of the water table (by indirect it means that the soybean oil must be degraded by other microbes prior to utilization by SRB) for the promotion of sulfate reduction remediation. Soybean oil produces no known SRB inhibitory response and therefore large quantities can be injected. (2) Sodium lactate provides a short-term, immediately available, direct, SRB carbon source that is miscible with the groundwater and therefore flows with the groundwater until it has been completely utilized for the promotion of sulfate reduction remediation. Lactate at elevated concentrations (greater than 6 g/L) does produce a SRB inhibitory response and therefore small quantities must be injected frequently. (3) The use of limestone to buffer the contaminated groundwater facilitates sulfate reduction remediation through the injection of organic substrate. Additionally conclusions and recommendations are made in Sections 8 and 9 regarding continuation of this study, the potential for an interim action, and the final remediation once discharge to the DCPRB has been discontinued.

Phifer, M

2005-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

Microsoft Word - 2010 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Visit _May 17-19 2010_ _final_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tour of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - May 17-19, 2010 Tour of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - May 17-19, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington during the period May 17-19, with DOE-RL managers/staff and contractor managers and supporting staff responsible for the ongoing K-Basins Sludge Treatment Project. The purpose of the visit was to ascertain ways in which HSS would be able to carry out its independent oversight responsibilities with respect to this project in a method that encourages collaboration with DOE-RL. The K-Basin Sludge Treatment Project involves transferring sludge that has been recovered from

33

Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report This is a comprehensive review ofthe Hanford WTP estimate at completion - assessing the project scope, contract requirements, management execution plant, schedule, cost estimates, and risks. Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report More Documents & Publications TBH-0042 - In the Matter of Curtis Hall

34

Fluor Daniel Hanford Inc. integrated safety management system phase 1 verification final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this review is to verify the adequacy of documentation as submitted to the Approval Authority by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH). This review is not only a review of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) System Description documentation, but is also a review of the procedures, policies, and manuals of practice used to implement safety management in an environment of organizational restructuring. The FDH ISMS should support the Hanford Strategic Plan (DOE-RL 1996) to safely clean up and manage the site's legacy waste; deploy science and technology while incorporating the ISMS theme to ''Do work safely''; and protect human health and the environment.

PARSONS, J.E.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

HERTING DL

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0189-FEIS-Summary-1996.HTM[6/27/2011 11:21:59 AM] The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to analyze the potential environmental impacts of their proposed actions to assist them in making informed decisions. A similar Washington State law, the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), requires State agencies, including the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), to analyze environmental impacts before making decisions that could impact the environment. A major emphasis of both laws is to promote public awareness of these actions and provide opportunities for public involvement. Because NEPA and SEPA requirements are similar, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Ecology

37

Hanford Tanks Initiative alternate retrieval system demonstrations - final report of testing performed by Grey Pilgrim LLC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A waste retrieval system has been defined to provide a safe and cost-effective solution to the Hanford Tanks Initiative. This system consists of the EMMA robotic manipulator (by GreyPilgrim LLC) and the lightweight Scarifier (by Waterjet Technology, Inc.) powered by a 36-kpsi Jet-Edge diesel powered high pressure pumping system. For demonstration and testing purposes, an air conveyance system was utilized to remove the waste from the simulated tank floor. The EMMA long reach manipulator utilized for this demonstration was 33 feet long. It consisted of 4 hydraulically controlled stages of varying lengths and coupling configurations. T

Berglin, E.J.

1997-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

Decommissioning of eight surplus production reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Addendum (Final Environmental Impact Statement)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first section of this volume summarizes the content of the draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) and this Addendum, which together constitute the final environmental impact statement (FEIS) prepared on the decommissioning of eight surplus plutonium production reactors at Hanford. The FEIS consists of two volumes. The first volume is the DEIS as written. The second volume (this Addendum) consists of a summary; Chapter 9, which contains comments on the DEIS and provides DOE`s responses to the comments; Appendix F, which provides additional health effects information; Appendix K, which contains costs of decommissioning in 1990 dollars; Appendix L, which contains additional graphite leaching data; Appendix M, which contains a discussion of accident scenarios; Appendix N, which contains errata; and Appendix 0, which contains reproductions of the letters, transcripts, and exhibits that constitute the record for the public comment period.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation -- Final project report by AST Environmental Services, LLC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a full-scale demonstration of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) package, manufactured by Arrow Construction, Inc. of Montgomery, Alabama. The HDPE package, called ARROW-PAK, was designed and patented by Arrow as both a method to macroencapsulation of radioactively contaminated lead and as an improved form of waste package for treatment and interim and final storage and/or disposal of drums of mixed waste. Mixed waste is waste that is radioactive, and meets the criteria established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for a hazardous material. Results from previous testing conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1994 found that the ARROW-PAK fabrication process produces an HDPE package that passes all helium leak tests and drop tests, and is fabricated with materials impervious to the types of environmental factors encountered during the lifetime of the ARROW-PAK, estimated to be from 100 to 300 years. Arrow Construction, Inc. has successfully completed full-scale demonstration of its ARROW-PAK mixed waste macroencapsulation treatment unit at the DOE Hanford Site. This testing was conducted in accordance with Radiological Work Permit No. T-860, applicable project plans and procedures, and in close consultation with Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc.`s project management, health and safety, and quality assurance representatives. The ARROW-PAK field demonstration successfully treated 880 drums of mixed waste debris feedstock which were compacted and placed in 149 70-gallon overpack drums prior to macroencapsulation in accordance with the US EPA Alternate Debris Treatment Standards, 40 CFR 268.45. Based on all of the results, the ARROW-PAK process provides an effective treatment, storage and/or disposal option that compares favorably with current mixed waste management practices.

Baker, T.L.

1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

Hanford - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality, August 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIS-0325: Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0325 (January 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

BPA proposes to construct a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in central Washington. This project would increase transmission system capacity north of Hanford.

42

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT [SEC 1 & 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L.L.

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

43

Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

44

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review, August 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review May 2011 August 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................... 2

45

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review May 2011 August 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................... 2

46

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Hanford Corporation - September 22, 1995 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Corporation - September Hanford Corporation - September 22, 1995 Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Hanford Corporation - September 22, 1995 September 22, 1995 Issued to Westinghouse Hanford Corporation related to Operational Safety Requirements Implementation at the B Plant/Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility at the Hanford Site This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of Westinghouse Hanford Company's (WHC) report of potential noncompliances with the requirements of 10 CFR 830.120 (Quality Assurance Requirements) at the Hanford B Plant/Waste Encapsulation Facility (WESF). These potential noncompliances were identified by WHC on May 8, 1995, during a self-initiated comprehensive assessment of the facilities Operational Safety Requirements (OSR) program

47

Redd Site Selection and Spawning Habitat Use by Fall Chinook Salmon, Hanford Reach, Columbia River : Final Report 1995 - 1998.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1995 through 1998 on identifying the spawning habitat requirements of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The project investigated whether traditional spawning habitat models could be improved in order to make better predictions of available habitat for fall chinook salmon in the Snake River. Results suggest models could be improved if they used spawning area-specific, rather than river-specific, spawning characteristics; incorporated hyporheic discharge measurements; and gave further consideration to the geomorphic features that are present in the unconstrained segments of large alluvial rivers. Ultimately the recovery of endangered fall chinook salmon will depend on how well we are able to recreate the characteristics once common in alluvial floodplains of large rivers. The results from this research can be used to better define the relationship between these physical habitat characteristics and fall chinook salmon spawning site selection, and provide more efficient use of limited recovery resources. This report is divided into four chapters which were presented in the author's doctoral dissertation which he completed through the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Each of the chapters has been published in peer reviewed journals or is currently under review. Chapter one is a conceptual spawning habitat model that describes how geomorphic features of river channels create hydraulic processes, including hyporheic flows, that influence where salmon spawn in unconstrained reaches of large mainstem alluvial rivers. Chapter two describes the comparison of the physical factors associated with fall chinook salmon redd clusters located at two sites within the Reach. Spatial point pattern analysis of redds showed that redd clusters averaged approximately 10 hectares in area and their locations were consistent from year to year. The tendency to spawn in clusters suggests fall chinook salmon's use of spawning habitat is highly selective. Hydraulic characteristics of the redd clusters were significantly different than the habitat surrounding them. Velocity and lateral slope of the river bottom were the most important habitat variables in predicting redd site selection. While these variables explained a large proportion of the variance in redd site selection (86 to 96%), some unmeasured factors still accounted for a small percentage of actual spawning site selection. Chapter three describes the results from an investigation into the hyporheic characteristics of the two spawning areas studied in chapter two. This investigation showed that the magnitude and chemical characteristics of hyporheic discharge were different between and within two spawning areas. Apparently, fall chinook salmon used chemical and physical cues from the discharge to locate spawning areas. Finally, chapter four describes a unique method that was developed to install piezometers into the cobble bed of the Columbia River.

Geist, David R.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES HANFORD SITE ASSETS AND ATTRIBUTES The Hanford Site provides the opportunity for long-term sustainable energy and industry development. The area boasts a specialized workforce that is highly educated and well-established; is rich in resources including land, infrastructure, low-cost energy, and available workforce; more scientists and engineers per capita than any other area in the Pacific Northwest; and is an optimum location for the development of sustainable energy solutions. Land The Hanford Site is one of the largest remaining land mega-sites available in the United States. * The 586-square-mile Hanford Site includes 39,000 acres designated for industrial use (9,000 acres for R&D). * The Comprehensive Land-Use Plan Environmental Impact Statement allows for a planning process

49

Development of A Bayesian Geostatistical Data Assimilation Method and Application to the Hanford 300 Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field, 300 Area, Hanford Site PNNL-18340, Pacific Northwestat the Hanford Site 300 Area, PNNL-16396, Pacific Northwestinjection: Final Report, PNNL-18529, Pacific Northwest

Murakami, Haruko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0222: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington The DOE has prepared this HCP EIS to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with implementing a comprehensive land-use plan (CLUP) for the Hanford Site for at least the next 50 years. The DOE is expected to use this land-use plan in its decision-making process to establish what is the "highest and best use" of the land (41 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 101-47, "Federal Property Management Regulations"). The final selection of a land-use map, land-use policies, and implementing procedures would create the working CLUP when they are adopted through the ROD for

51

Development of a high-resolution bathymetry dataset for the Columbia River through the Hanford Reach  

SciTech Connect

A bathymetric and topographic data collection and processing effort involving existing and newly collected data has been performed for the Columbia River through the Hanford Reach in central Washington State, extending 60-miles from the tailrace of Priest Rapids Dam (river mile 397) to near the vicinity of the Interstate 182 bridge just upstream of the Yakima River confluence (river mile 337). The contents of this report provide a description of the data collections, data inputs, processing methodology, and final data quality assessment used to develop a comprehensive and continuous merged 1m resolution bathymetric and topographic surface dataset for the Columbia River through the Hanford Reach.

Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.; Larson, Kyle B.; Lettrick, Joseph W.

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

52

HANFORD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY NEEDS STATEMENTS 2002  

SciTech Connect

This document: (a) provides a comprehensive listing of the Hanford sites science and technology needs for fiscal year (FY) 2002; and (b) identifies partnering and commercialization opportunities within industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community. These needs were prepared by the Hanford projects (within the Project Hanford Management Contract, the Environmental Restoration Contract and the River Protection Project) and subsequently reviewed and endorsed by the Hanford Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG). The STCG reviews included participation of DOE-RL and DOE-ORP Management, site stakeholders, state and federal regulators, and Tribal Nations. These needs are reviewed and updated on an annual basis and given a broad distribution.

WIBLE, R.A.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hanford wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

EIS-0286: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0286: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site Solid Waste Program, Richland, Washington Hanford...

55

Final AOP Renewal 2 Statement of Basis For Hanford Site Air Operating Permit No. 00-05-006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

referred to as the permitting agencies, as a separate supporting reference document to the Hanford Air Operating Permit (AOP). The Statement sets forth the legal and factual basis for the AOP conditions, and is not intended for enforcement purposes. The Statement includes references to the applicable statutory or regulatory provisions, technical supporting information on specific emission units, and clarifications of specific requirements. [Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-401-700(8)] In 1990, U.S. Congress amended the federal Clean Air Act (CAA). One of those amendments created air operating permits for industrial sources of air pollution (codified in Title 5 of the CAA). Prior to the creation of these permits, facility managers, regulators and the public had to look through many separate requirements to find those that applied to a certain facility. An air operating permit brings all applicable requirements into one place and requires the manager of the source to certify that it complies with all the applicable requirements. Further, the burden of proof for compliance changed from the regulating agencies to the sources.

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hanford wells  

SciTech Connect

The Site Characterization and Assessment Section of the Geosciences Department at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has compiled a list of wells located on or near the Hanford Site. Information has been updated on wells existing from the days before construction of the Hanford Works to the present. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The list of wells will be used by DOE contractors who need condensed, tabular information on well location, construction, and completion dates. This report does not include data on lithologic logs and ground-water contamination. Moreover, the completeness of this list is limited because of new well construction and existing well modifications, which are continually under way. Despite these limitations, this list represents the most complete description possible of data pertaining to wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

McGhan, V.L.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hanford recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals for all its sites to accomplish by 1999. Hanford is presently meeting the voluntary site goals, but may not be able to meet all the new DOE goals without changes to the program. Most of these new DOE goals are recycling goals: * Reduce the generation of radioactive (low-level) waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of low-level mixed waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of hazardous waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Recycle 33 percent of the sanitary waste from all operations. * Increase affirmative procurement of EPA-designated recycled items to 100 percent. The Hanford recycling program has made great strides-there has been a 98 percent increase in the amount of paper recycled since its inception in 1990. Hanford recycles paper, chemicals cardboard, tires, oil, batteries, rags, lead weights, fluorescent tubes, aerosol products, concrete, office furniture, computer software, drums, toner cartridges, and scrap metal. Many other items are recycled or reused by individual groups on a one time basis without a formal contract. Several contracts are closed-loop contracts which involve all parts of the recycle loop. Considerable savings are generated from recycling, and much more is possible with increased attention and improvements to this program. General methods for improving the recycling program to ensure that the new goals can be met are: a Contract and financial changes 0 Tracking database and methods improvements 0 Expanded recycling efforts. Specifically, the Hanford recycling program would be improved by: 0 Establishing one overall DOE recycling contract at the Hanford site and a central group to control the contract. 0 Using a BOA or MTS contract as a way to get proceeds from recycling back to site facilities to provide incentives for recycling. . Upgrading tracking mechanisms to track and recycle construction waste which is presently buried in onsite pits. . Establishing contract performance measures which hold each project accountable for specific waste reduction goals. * Recycling and reusing any material or equipment possible as buildings are dismantled.

Leonard, I.M.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fluor Hanford Project Focused Progress at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford is making significant progress in accelerating cleanup at the Hanford site. This progress consistently aligns with a new strategic vision established by the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office (RL).

HANSON, R.D.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Hanford Site waste treatment/storage/disposal integration  

SciTech Connect

In 1998 Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. began the integration of all low-level waste, mixed waste, and TRU waste-generating activities across the Hanford site. With seven contractors, dozens of generating units, and hundreds of waste streams, integration was necessary to provide acute waste forecasting and planning for future treatment activities. This integration effort provides disposition maps that account for waste from generation, through processing, treatment and final waste disposal. The integration effort covers generating facilities from the present through the life-cycle, including transition and deactivation. The effort is patterned after the very successful DOE Complex EM Integration effort. Although still in the preliminary stages, the comprehensive onsite integration effort has already reaped benefits. These include identifying significant waste streams that had not been forecast, identifying opportunities for consolidating activities and services to accelerate schedule or save money; and identifying waste streams which currently have no path forward in the planning baseline. Consolidation/integration of planned activities may also provide opportunities for pollution prevention and/or avoidance of secondary waste generation. A workshop was held to review the waste disposition maps, and to identify opportunities with potential cost or schedule savings. Another workshop may be held to follow up on some of the long-term integration opportunities. A change to the Hanford waste forecast data call would help to align the Solid Waste Forecast with the new disposition maps.

MCDONALD, K.M.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

60

Hanford Site sustainable development initiatives  

SciTech Connect

Since the days of the Manhattan Project of World War II, the economic well being of the Tri-Cities (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland) of Washington State has been tied to the US Department of Energy missions at the nearby Hanford Site. As missions at the Site changed, so did the economic vitality of the region. The Hanford Site is now poised to complete its final mission, that of environmental restoration. When restoration is completed, the Site may be closed and the effect on the local economy will be devastating if action is not taken now. To that end, economic diversification and transition are being planned. To facilitate the process, the Hanford Site will become a sustainable development demonstration project.

Sullivan, C.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hanford Site environmental management specification  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

Grygiel, M.L.

1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Hanford System Overview  

CHG0612-16.0 CH2M-32399-VA Hanford System Overview Hanford System Overview January 23-24, 2007 Paul Certa Tom Crawford Aluminum and Chromium Leaching for

64

Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations...

65

FINAL PROJECT REPORT: A Geophysical Characterization & Monitoring Strategy for Determining Hydrologic Processes in the Hyporheic Corridor at the Hanford 300-Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to advance the prediction of solute transport between the Uranium contaminated Hanford aquifer and the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area by improving understanding of how fluctuations in river stage, combined with subsurface heterogeneity, impart spatiotemporal complexity to solute exchange along the Columbia River corridor. Our work explored the use of continuous waterborne electrical imaging (CWEI), in conjunction with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensor (FO-DTS) and time-lapse resistivity monitoring, to improve the conceptual model for how groundwater/surface water exchange regulates uranium transport. We also investigated how resistivity and induced polarization can be used to generate spatially rich estimates of the variation in depth to the Hanford-Ringold (H-R) contact between the river and the 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site. Inversion of the CWEI datasets (a data rich survey containing ~60,000 measurements) provided predictions of the distributions of electrical resistivity and polarizability, from which the spatial complexity of the primary hydrogeologic units along the river corridor was reconstructed. Variation in the depth to the interface between the overlying coarse-grained, high permeability Hanford Formation and the underlying finer-grained, less permeable Ringold Formation, an important contact that limits vertical migration of contaminants, has been resolved along ~3 km of the river corridor centered on the IFRC site in the Hanford 300 Area. Spatial variability in the thickness of the Hanford Formation captured in the CWEI datasets indicates that previous studies based on borehole projections and drive-point and multi-level sampling likely overestimate the contributing area for uranium exchange within the Columbia River at the Hanford 300 Area. Resistivity and induced polarization imaging between the river and the 300 Area IFRC further imaged spatial variability in the depth to the Hanford-Ringold inland over a critical region where borehole information is absent, identifying evidence for a continuous depression in the H-R contact between the IFRC and the river corridor. Strong natural contrasts in temperature and specific conductance of river water compared to groundwater at this site, along with periodic river stage fluctuations driven by dam operations, were exploited to yield new insights into the dynamics of groundwater-surface water interaction. Whereas FO-DTS datasets have provided meter-scale measurements of focused groundwater discharge at the riverbed along the corridor, continuous resistivity monitoring has non-invasively imaged spatiotemporal variation in the resistivity inland driven by river stage fluctuations. Time series and time-frequency analysis of FO-DTS and 3D resistivity datasets has provided insights into the role of forcing variables, primarily daily dam operations, in regulating the occurrence of focused exchange at the riverbed and its extension inland. High amplitudes in the DTS and 3D resistivity signals for long periods that dominate the stage time series identify regions along the corridor where stage-driven exchange is preferentially focused. Our work has demonstrated how time-series analysis of both time-lapse resistivity and DTS datasets, in conjunction with resistivity/IP imaging of lithology, can improve understanding of groundwater-surface water exchange along river corridors, offering unique opportunities to connect stage-driven groundwater discharge observed with DTS on the riverbed to stage-driven groundwater and solute fluctuations captured with resistivity inland.

Lee Slater

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Hanford Integrated Planning Process: 1993 Hanford Site-specific science and technology plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the FY 1993 report on Hanford Site-specific science and technology (S&T) needs for cleanup of the Site as developed via the Hanford Integrated Planning Process (HIPP). It identifies cleanup problems that lack demonstrated technology solutions and technologies that require additional development. Recommendations are provided regarding allocation of funding to address Hanford`s highest-priority technology improvement needs, technology development needs, and scientific research needs, all compiled from a Sitewide perspective. In the past, the S&T agenda for Hanford Site cleanup was sometimes driven by scientists and technologists, with minimal input from the ``problem owners`` (i.e., Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC] staff who are responsible for cleanup activities). At other times, the problem-owners made decisions to proceed with cleanup without adequate scientific and technological inputs. Under both of these scenarios, there was no significant stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process. One of the key objectives of HIPP is to develop an understanding of the integrated S&T requirements to support the cleanup mission, (a) as defined by the needs of the problem owners, the values of the stakeholders, and the technology development expertise that exists at Hanford and elsewhere. This requires a periodic, systematic assessment of these needs and values to appropriately define a comprehensive technology development program and a complementary scientific research program. Basic to our success is a methodology that is defensible from a technical perspective and acceptable to the stakeholders.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hanford External Dosimetry Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the Hanford External Dosimetry Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include administrating the Hanford personnel dosimeter processing program and ensuring that the related dosimeter data accurately reflect occupational dose received by Hanford personnel or visitors. Specific chapters of this report deal with the following subjects: personnel dosimetry organizations at Hanford and the associated DOE and contractor exposure guidelines; types, characteristics, and procurement of personnel dosimeters used at Hanford; personnel dosimeter identification, acceptance testing, accountability, and exchange; dosimeter processing and data recording practices; standard sources, calibration factors, and calibration processes (including algorithms) used for calibrating Hanford personnel dosimeters; system operating parameters required for assurance of dosimeter processing quality control; special dose evaluation methods applied for individuals under abnormal circumstances (i.e., lost results, etc.); and methods for evaluating personnel doses from nuclear accidents. 1 ref., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Fix, J.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Fiscal year 1991 report on archaeological surveys of the 100 Areas, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Hanford Cultured Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey during FY 1991 of the 100-Area reactor compounds on the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site. This survey was conducted as part of a comprehensive resources review of 100-Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) operable units in support of CERCLA characterization activities. The work included a lite and records review and pedestrian survey of the project area following procedures set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan.

Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fiscal year 1991 report on archaeological surveys of the 100 Areas, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

In compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), and at the request of Westinghouse Hanford Company, the Hanford Cultured Resources Laboratory (HCRL) conducted an archaeological survey during FY 1991 of the 100-Area reactor compounds on the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. This survey was conducted as part of a comprehensive resources review of 100-Area Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) operable units in support of CERCLA characterization activities. The work included a lite and records review and pedestrian survey of the project area following procedures set forth in the Hanford Cultural Resources Management Plan.

Chatters, J.C.; Gard, H.A.; Minthorn, P.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

FLUOR HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford is completing D&D of the K East Basin at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State this spring, with demolition expected to begin in June. Located about 400 yards from the Columbia River, the K East Basin is one of two indoor pools that formerly contained irradiated nuclear fuel, radioactive sludge and tons of contaminated debris. In unique and path-breaking work, workers finished removing the spent fuel from the K Basins in 2004. In May 2007, workers completed vacuuming the sludge into containers in the K East Basin, and transferring it into containers in the K West Basin. In December, they finished vacuuming the remainder of K West Basin sludge into these containers. The K East Basin was emptied of its radioactive inventory first because it was more contaminated than the K West Basin, and had leaked in the past. In October 2007, Fluor Hanford began physical D&D of the 8,400-square foot K East Basin by pouring approximately 14-inches of grout into the bottom of it. Grout is a type of special cement used for encasing waste. Two months later, Fluor Hanford workers completed sluicing contaminated sand from the large filter that had sieved contaminants from the basin water for more than 50 years. Next, they poured grout into the filter housing and the vault that surrounds the filter, as well as into ion exchange columns that also helped filter basin water. For a six-week period in February and March, personnel drained the approximately one million gallons of contaminated water from the K East Basin. The effort required more than 200 tanker truck loads that transported the water to an effluent treatment facility for treatment and then release. A thin fixative was also applied to the basin walls as the water was removed to hold residual contamination in place. As soon as the water was out of the basin, Fluor pumped in approximately 18 feet of 'controlled density fill' material (somewhat similar to sand) to shield workers to a safe level from the residual radioactivity. Workers then continued preparations for demolishing the structure. Currently, they are isolating utilities, removing asbestos, draining oils, and removing other items not allowed to be disposed in Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The basin's superstructure will be demolished using a heavy industrial excavator equipped with a shear. This portion of the work is expected to be completed in September, with removal of the basin substructure to follow in 2009. D&D of the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream.

GERBER MS

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

71

Assessment of groundwater management at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive review of the groundwater management and environmental monitoring programs at the Hanford reservation was initiated in 1973. A large number of recommendations made as a result of this review are summarized. The purpose of the Hanford Hydrology Program is to maintain a groundwater surveillance network to assess contamination of the natural water system. Potential groundwater contamination is primarily a function of waste management decisions. The review revealed that although the hydrology program would greatly benefit from additional improvements, it is adequate to predict levels of contaminants present in the groundwater system. Studies are presently underway to refine advanced mathematical models to use results of the hydrologic investigation in forecasting the response of the system to different long-term management decisions. No information was found which indicates that a hazard through the groundwater pathway presently exists as a result of waste operations at Hanford. (CH)

Deju, R.A.

1975-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Hanford Corporation - September 22, 1995 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September September 22, 1995 Enforcement Letter, Westinghouse Hanford Corporation - September 22, 1995 September 22, 1995 Issued to Westinghouse Hanford Corporation related to Operational Safety Requirements Implementation at the B Plant/Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility at the Hanford Site This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of Westinghouse Hanford Company's (WHC) report of potential noncompliances with the requirements of 10 CFR 830.120 (Quality Assurance Requirements) at the Hanford B Plant/Waste Encapsulation Facility (WESF). These potential noncompliances were identified by WHC on May 8, 1995, during a self-initiated comprehensive assessment of the facilities Operational Safety Requirements (OSR) program and reported to DOE on May 24, 1995.

73

HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY  

SciTech Connect

Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by the Parties on October 26,2010, and are now in the process of being implemented.

BERGMAN TB

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater monitoring for FY 2006 on DOE's Hanford Site. Results of groundwater remediation, vadose zone monitoring, and characterization are summarized. DOE monitors groundwater at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Washington Administrative Code (WAC).

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hanford science and technology needs statements document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a compilation of the Hanford science and technology needs statements for FY 1998. The needs were developed by the Hanford Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) with full participation and endorsement of site user organizations, stakeholders, and regulators. The purpose of this document is to: (a) provide a comprehensive listing of Hanford science and technology needs, and (b) identify partnering and commercialization opportunities with industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community. The Hanford STCG reviews and updates the needs annually. Once completed, the needs are communicated to DOE for use in the development and prioritization of their science and technology programs, including the Focus Areas, Cross-Cutting Programs, and the Environmental Management Science Program. The needs are also transmitted to DOE through the Accelerating Cleanup: 2006 Plan. The public may access the need statements on the Internet on: the Hanford Home Page (www.hanford.gov), the Pacific Rim Enterprise Center`s web site (www2.pacific-rim.org/pacific rim), or the STCG web site at DOE headquarters (em-52.em.doegov/ifd/stcg/stcg.htm). This page includes links to science and technology needs for many DOE sites. Private industry is encouraged to review the need statements and contact the Hanford STCG if they can provide technologies that meet these needs. On-site points of contact are included at the ends of each need statement. The Pacific Rim Enterprise Center (206-224-9934) can also provide assistance to businesses interested in marketing technologies to the DOE.

Piper, L.L.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant | December 2009 Aerial View Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant | December 2009 Aerial View The Hanford Site mission focuses on environmental restoration, waste management, related scientific and environmental research and development of radioactive waste management technologies. Under the Tri-Party Agreement, lower-level hazardous wastes are buried in huge lined pits that will be sealed and monitored with sophisticated instruments for many years. Enforcement September 13, 2012 Enforcement Letter,CH2M HILL Plateau - NEL-2012-02 Issued to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company related to Radiological Work Control Deficiencies at the Plutonium Finishing Plant and 105 K-East

77

COMPREHENSIVE LEGACY MANAGEMENT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Revision 7.0 Final This page intentionally left blank LMSFERS03496-7.0 Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Volumes I and II Fernald Preserve Fernald,...

78

Washington Closure Hanford, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Mr. Neil Brosee President Washington Closure Hanford, LLC 2620 Fermi Avenue Richland, Washington 99354 WEA-201 0-02 Dear Mr. Brosee: This...

79

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

80

EA-0429: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment EA-0429: Final Environmental Assessment Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This environmental...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Patterns of fish assemblage structure and dynamics in waters of the Savannah River Plant. Comprehensive Cooling Water Study final report  

SciTech Connect

Research conducted as part of the Comprehensive Cooling Water Study (CCWS) has elucidated many factors that are important to fish population and community dynamics in a variety of habitats on the Savannah River Plant (SRP). Information gained from these studies is useful in predicting fish responses to SRP operations. The overall objective of the CCWS was (1) to determine the environmental effects of SRP cooling water withdrawals and discharges and (2) to determine the significance of the cooling water impacts on the environment. The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine the effects of thermal plumes on anadromous and resident fishes, including overwintering effects, in the SRP swamp and associated tributary streams; (2) assess fish spawning and locate nursery grounds on the SRP; (3) examine the level of use of the SRP by spawning fish from the Savannah River, this objective was shared with the Savannah River Laboratory, E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company; and (4) determine impacts of cooling-water discharges on fish population and community attributes. Five studies were designed to address the above topics. The specific objectives and a summary of the findings of each study are presented.

Aho, J.M.; Anderson, C.S.; Floyd, K.B.; Negus, M.T.; Meador, M.R.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Hanford ETR Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - External Flowsheet Review Team (Technical) Report Summary - Flowsheet for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility

83

Summary of the HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be welded. Some Tri-Party Agreement milestones completed in 2002 were related to work on Hanford tanks. #12 paragraphs. Solid waste may originate from work on the Hanford Site or from sources offsite, with contributions from CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.; S.M. Stoller Corporation; Fluor Hanford, Inc. and its

84

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LAW GLASSES VLS-10R1790-1 FINAL REPORT REV 0 12/1/2010  

SciTech Connect

About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently stored in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity waste fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will likely be directed to a national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) Facility and LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW pilot melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing the glass waste loading; and (4) Operating the melter at a slightly higher temperature. The Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA) and Energy Solutions, Inc. have evaluated several of these potential incremental improvements for ORP in support of its evaluation of WTP LAW facility optimization. Some of these incremental improvements have been tested at VSL including increasing the waste loading, increasing the processing temperature, and increasing the fraction of the sulfur in the feed that is partitioned to the off-gas (in the event that a decision is made to break the present WTP recycle loop). These approaches successfully demonstrated increases in glass production rates and significant increases in sulfate incorporation at the nominal melter operating temperature of 1150 C and at slightly higher than nominal glass processing temperatures. Subsequent tests demonstrated further enhancement of glass formulations for all of the LAW waste envelopes, thereby reducing the amount of glass to be produced by the WTP for the same amount of waste processed. The next phase of testing determined the applicability of these improvements over the expected range of sodium and sulfur concentrations for Hanford LAW. This approach was subsequently applied to an even wider range of LAW wastes types, including those with high potassium concentration. The feasibility of formulating higher waste loading glasses using SnO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in place of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} as glass former additives was also evaluated. The present report provides data from investigation of the effects of magnesium content (up to {approx}10 wt%) on LAW glass properties and from work to identify improved high waste loading glass formulations that meets all processing and product quality requirements for two waste compositions. The scope of testing is detailed in the Test Plan for this work. A glass composition previously developed and tested at VSL for LAW from tank AN-105 (LAWA187) was varied by substituting Mg for other glass former additives such as Ca, B and Si in an attempt to formulate a glass with improved properties, such as higher waste loading and greater sulfur tolerance. The results were used to reformulate another glass (ORPLG9) developed for LAW from tank AP-101 that contains high concentrations of alkalis (Na and K). Glass formulation goals for this waste were to increase the sulfur tolerance of the

KRUGER AA; MULLER IS; JOSEPH I; MATLACK KS; GAN H; PEGG IL

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

WASTE LOADING ENHANCEMENTS FOR HANFORD LAW GLASSES VLS-10R1790-1 FINAL REPORT REV 0 12/1/2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently stored in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity waste fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will likely be directed to a national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) Facility and LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW pilot melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing the glass waste loading; and (4) Operating the melter at a slightly higher temperature. The Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA) and Energy Solutions, Inc. have evaluated several of these potential incremental improvements for ORP in support of its evaluation of WTP LAW facility optimization. Some of these incremental improvements have been tested at VSL including increasing the waste loading, increasing the processing temperature, and increasing the fraction of the sulfur in the feed that is partitioned to the off-gas (in the event that a decision is made to break the present WTP recycle loop). These approaches successfully demonstrated increases in glass production rates and significant increases in sulfate incorporation at the nominal melter operating temperature of 1150 C and at slightly higher than nominal glass processing temperatures. Subsequent tests demonstrated further enhancement of glass formulations for all of the LAW waste envelopes, thereby reducing the amount of glass to be produced by the WTP for the same amount of waste processed. The next phase of testing determined the applicability of these improvements over the expected range of sodium and sulfur concentrations for Hanford LAW. This approach was subsequently applied to an even wider range of LAW wastes types, including those with high potassium concentration. The feasibility of formulating higher waste loading glasses using SnO{sub 2} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5} in place of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} as glass former additives was also evaluated. The present report provides data from investigation of the effects of magnesium content (up to {approx}10 wt%) on LAW glass properties and from work to identify improved high waste loading glass formulations that meets all processing and product quality requirements for two waste compositions. The scope of testing is detailed in the Test Plan for this work. A glass composition previously developed and tested at VSL for LAW from tank AN-105 (LAWA187) was varied by substituting Mg for other glass former additives such as Ca, B and Si in an attempt to formulate a glass with improved properties, such as higher waste loading and greater sulfur tolerance. The results were used to reformulate another glass (ORPLG9) developed for LAW from tank AP-101 that contains high concentrations of alkalis (Na and K). Glass formulation goals for this waste were to increase the sulfur tolerance of the

KRUGER AA; MULLER IS; JOSEPH I; MATLACK KS; GAN H; PEGG IL

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Hanford summit and sustainable development  

SciTech Connect

Since the days of the Manhattan Project of World War II, the economic well being of the Tri-Cities (Pasco, Kennewick, and Richland) of Washington State has been tied to the US Department of Energy missions at the nearby Hanford Site. As missions at the Site changed, so did the well being of the region. The Hanford Site is now poised to complete its final mission, that of environmental restoration. When restoration is compiled, the Site may be closed and the effect on the local economy will be devastating if action is not taken now. To that end, economic diversification and transition are being planned. To facilitate the process, the Hanford Site will become a sustainable development demonstration project -- a project with regional, national, and international application.

Sullivan, C.T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Hanford Needs Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Needs Assessment Hanford Needs Assessment July 1997 This Needs Assessment for former Hanford construction workers was developed for the purpose of collecting existing...

88

HANFORD REGULATORY EXPERIENCE REGULATION AT HANFORD A CASE STUDY  

SciTech Connect

Hanford has played a pivotal role in the United States' defense for more than 60 years, beginning with the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. During its history, the Hanford Site has had nine reactors producing plutonium for the United States' nuclear weapons program. All the reactors were located next to the Columbia River and all had associated low-level radioactive and hazardous waste releases. Site cleanup, which formally began in 1989 with the signing of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, involves more than 1,600 waste sites and burial grounds, and the demolition of more than 1,500buildings and structures, Cleanup is scheduled to be complete by 2035. Regulatory oversight of the cleanup is being performed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology(Ecology) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Revised Code of Washington, 'Hazardous Waste Management.' Cleanup of the waste sites and demolition of the many buildings and structures generates large volumes of contaminated soil, equipment, demolition debris, and other wastes that must be disposed of in a secure manner to prevent further environmental degradation. From a risk perspective, it is essential the cleanup waste be moved to a disposal facility located well away from the Columbia River. The solution was to construct very large engineered landfill that meets all technical regulatory requirements, on the Hanford Site Central Plateau approximately 10kilometers from the river and 100metersabovegroundwater. This landfill, called the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility or ERDF is a series of cells, each 150x 300 meters wide at the bottom and 20 meters deep. This paper looks at the substantive environmental regulations applied to ERDF, and how the facility is designed to protect the environment and meet regulatory requirements. The paper describes how the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE),EPA, and Ecology interact in its regulation. In addition, the response to a recent $1 million regulatory fine is described to show actual interactions and options in this aspect of the regulatory process. The author acknowledges the significant contributions by Messrs. Clifford Clark and Owen Robertson. Ms. Nancy Williams provided graphics support and Ms. Laurie Kraemer edited the report.

HAWKINS AR

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

89

HANFORD REGULATORY EXPERIENCE REGULATION AT HANFORD A CASE STUDY  

SciTech Connect

Hanford has played a pivotal role in the United States' defense for more than 60 years, beginning with the Manhattan Project in the 1940s. During its history, the Hanford Site has had nine reactors producing plutonium for the United States' nuclear weapons program. All the reactors were located next to the Columbia River and all had associated low-level radioactive and hazardous waste releases. Site cleanup, which formally began in 1989 with the signing of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, involves more than 1,600 waste sites and burial grounds, and the demolition of more than 1,500buildings and structures, Cleanup is scheduled to be complete by 2035. Regulatory oversight of the cleanup is being performed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology(Ecology) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Revised Code of Washington, 'Hazardous Waste Management.' Cleanup of the waste sites and demolition of the many buildings and structures generates large volumes of contaminated soil, equipment, demolition debris, and other wastes that must be disposed of in a secure manner to prevent further environmental degradation. From a risk perspective, it is essential the cleanup waste be moved to a disposal facility located well away from the Columbia River. The solution was to construct very large engineered landfill that meets all technical regulatory requirements, on the Hanford Site Central Plateau approximately 10kilometers from the river and 100metersabovegroundwater. This landfill, called the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility or ERDF is a series of cells, each 150x 300 meters wide at the bottom and 20 meters deep. This paper looks at the substantive environmental regulations applied to ERDF, and how the facility is designed to protect the environment and meet regulatory requirements. The paper describes how the U.S. Department of Energy(DOE),EPA, and Ecology interact in its regulation. In addition, the response to a recent $1 million regulatory fine is described to show actual interactions and options in this aspect of the regulatory process. The author acknowledges the significant contributions by Messrs. Clifford Clark and Owen Robertson. Ms. Nancy Williams provided graphics support and Ms. Laurie Kraemer edited the report.

HAWKINS AR

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

90

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed- Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford’s 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA – Hanford’s River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

91

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

Hanford Emergency Response Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

Wagoner, J.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Historical Photographs: Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Image 1. A facility at Hanford for treating persons injured by embedded radioactive particles (circa 1967). In this shielded operating cell, a mock patient is flanked by a...

95

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

EA-1111: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1111: Final Environmental Assessment K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the...

97

EA-1728: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1728: Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment for Integrated Vegetation Management of the Hanford Site, Richland, WA This EA evaluates the...

98

EIS-0325: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0325: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Schultz-Hanford Transmission...

99

EIS-0391: EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0391: EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Tank Closure and Waste...

100

EA-1189: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment EA-1189: Final Environmental Assessment Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for...

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101

EA-0978: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0978: Final Environmental Assessment Sludge Stabilization at the Plutonium Finishing Plant, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This EA...

102

EA-1682: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1682: Final Environmental Assessment Upgrades and Life Extension of the 242-A Evaporator, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This EA evaluates...

103

Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Identification (HID) PIA, Richland Operations Office...

104

Manhattan Project: Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex at Hanford, 1945 HANFORD BECOMES OPERATIONAL F Reactor Plutonium Production Complex at Hanford, 1945 HANFORD BECOMES OPERATIONAL (Hanford Engineer Works, 1943-1944) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 The plutonium production facilities at the Hanford Engineer Works took shape with the same wartime urgency as did the uranium facilities at Oak Ridge. In February 1943, Colonel Matthias returned to the location he had helped select the previous December and set up a temporary headquarters. In late March, Matthias received his assignment. The three water-cooled production reactor (piles), designated by the letters B, D, and F, would be built about six miles apart on the south bank of the Columbia River. The four chemical separation plants would be built in pairs at two sites nearly ten miles south of the piles. A facility to produce slugs and perform tests would be approximately twenty miles southeast of the separation plants near Richland. Temporary quarters for construction workers would be put up at the Hanford town site, while permanent facilities for other personnel would be located down the road in Richland, safely removed from the production and separation plants. Life at Hanford would soon come to resemble that of the other "atomic boomtowns" of the Manhattan Project, Los Alamos and Oak Ridge.

105

Performance Assessment Scoping - Hanford Example  

Performance Assessment Scoping - Hanford Example Linda Suttora Office of Environmental Compliance DOE-HQ Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010

106

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization, Revision 15  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Woody, Dave M.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the sixteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the seventeenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety and health, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Thorne, Paul D.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No statements of significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year's report is the thirteenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the fourteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (Weiss) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomics, occupational safety, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Eschbach, Tara O.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Goodwin, Shannon M.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Rohay, Alan C.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Waste Tank Plant PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford...

111

Summary of the HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

milestones completed in 2003 were related to work on Hanford waste storage tanks. During 2003, there were 36Summary of the HANFORD SITE Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2003 EDITORS R.W. HANF L Northwest National Laboratory under contract DE-AC06-76RL01830, with contributions from Bechtel Hanford, Inc

112

Washington Closure Hanford, LLC  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 19,2010 August 19,2010 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Mr. Neil Brosee President Washington Closure Hanford, LLC 2620 Fermi Avenue Richland, Washington 99354 WEA-201 0-02 Dear Mr. Brosee: This letter refers to the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the employee fall that occurred at the Hanford High Bay Testing Facility (336 Building) on July 1, 2009. The worker sustained serious injury to his back and broke bones in both legs. Based on an evaluation of the evidence in this matter, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that violations of 10 C.F.R. Part 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH) occurred. Accordingly, DOE is issuing the enclosed Preliminary Notice of

113

HANFORD ENGINEER WORKS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HANFORD ENGINEER WORKS HANFORD ENGINEER WORKS IJd *P-t - - ~~~ssiticatiC+n cwcetted rat G.E. NUCLEONICS PROJECT xi I ~@L.%&~--G-ENERAI,@ ELECTRIC z ,m ._.__.-. _ I--..-. By Authority of. COMPANY ._ Atmic Energy Commission Office of Hanford Dire&xl Operations Riohland, Washington Attention; Mr. Carleton Shugg, Manager ./ ALPKA-ROLLED EL'GIL%I jw -879 ' . *_ a. f' Richland, Washington February 6, 1948 , Thla Dclc.Jv-

114

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) is being designed to immobilize pretreated Hanford high-level waste and transuranic waste in borosilicate glass contained in stainless steel canisters. Testing is being conducted in the HWVP Technology Development Project to ensure that adapted technologies are applicable to the candidate Hanford wastes and to generate information for waste form qualification. Empirical modeling is being conducted to define a glass composition range consistent with process and waste form qualification requirements. Laboratory studies are conducted to determine process stream properties, characterize the redox chemistry of the melter feed as a basis for controlling melt foaming and evaluate zeolite sorption materials for process waste treatment. Pilot-scale tests have been performed with simulated melter feed to access filtration for solids removal from process wastes, evaluate vitrification process performance and assess offgas equipment performance. Process equipment construction materials are being selected based on literature review, corrosion testing, and performance in pilot-scale testing. 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Larson, D.E.; Allen, C.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Kruger, O.L.; Weber, E.T. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, 391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington EIS-0391: Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, Washington Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts for the following three key areas: (1) retrieval, treatment, and disposal of waste from 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks and closure of the SST system, (2) decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, a nuclear test reactor, and (3) disposal of Hanford's waste and other DOE sites' low-level and mixed low-level radioactive waste. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download December 13, 2013 EIS-0391: Record of Decision Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for

116

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement January 9, 2006 - 9:43am Addthis Richland, WA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Washington have entered into a settlement agreement that will lead to a final order and the dismissal of the challenge to Hanford's Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in the lawsuit Washington v. Bodman. DOE, with Washington State as a cooperating agency, will prepare a new EIS that will include updated, site-wide groundwater analysis. "With this agreement, both parties will be able to shift their focus and resources away from litigation and toward partnership and our shared

117

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement January 9, 2006 - 9:43am Addthis Richland, WA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Washington have entered into a settlement agreement that will lead to a final order and the dismissal of the challenge to Hanford's Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) in the lawsuit Washington v. Bodman. DOE, with Washington State as a cooperating agency, will prepare a new EIS that will include updated, site-wide groundwater analysis. "With this agreement, both parties will be able to shift their focus and resources away from litigation and toward partnership and our shared

118

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

119

Hanford Site Video Library  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Video Library currently makes 30 videos related to the siteĆs history and the clean-up available for online viewing. The Video Library (also referred to as the Broadcast Archive) can be searched by keywords in the title or description. They can also be browsed in a complete list.

120

FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, TN, and Columbus, GA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Technical Scope and Approach for the 2004 Composite Analysis of Low Level Waste Disposal at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A composite analysis is required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Manual 435.1-1 to ensure public safety through the management of active and planned low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities associated with the Hanford Site (DOE/HQ-Manual 435.1-1). A Composite Analysis is defined as ''a reasonably conservative assessment of the cumulative impact from active and planned low-level waste disposal facilities, and all other sources from radioactive contamination that could interact with the low-level waste disposal facility to affect the dose to future members of the public''. At the Hanford Site, a composite analysis is required for continued disposal authorization for the immobilized low-activity waste, tank waste vitrification plant melters, low level waste in the 200 East and 200 West Solid Waste Burial Grounds, and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste in the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The 2004 Composite Analysis will be a site-wide analysis, considering final remedial actions for the Columbia River corridor and the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site. The river corridor includes waste sites and facilities in each of the 100 Areas as well as the 300, 400, and 600 Areas. The remedial actions for the river corridor are being conducted to meet residential land use standards with the vision of the river corridor being devoted to a combination of recreation and preservation. The ''Central Plateau'' describes the region associated with operations and waste sites of the 200 Areas. DOE is developing a strategy for closure of the Central Plateau area by 2035. At the time of closure, waste management activities will shrink to a Core Zone within the Central Plateau. The Core Zone will contain the majority of Hanford's permanently disposed waste

Kincaid, Charles T.; Bryce, Robert W.; Buck, John W.

2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

123

Management of Hanford Site non-defense production reactor spent nuclear fuel, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) needs to provide radiologically, and industrially safe and cost-effective management of the non-defense production reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site. The proposed action would place the Hanford Site`s non-defense production reactor SNF in a radiologically- and industrially-safe, and passive storage condition pending final disposition. The proposed action would also reduce operational costs associated with storage of the non-defense production reactor SNF through consolidation of the SNF and through use of passive rather than active storage systems. Environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with existing non-defense production reactor SNF storage facilities have been identified. DOE has determined that additional activities are required to consolidate non-defense production reactor SNF management activities at the Hanford Site, including cost-effective and safe interim storage, prior to final disposition, to enable deactivation of facilities where the SNF is now stored. Cost-effectiveness would be realized: through reduced operational costs associated with passive rather than active storage systems; removal of SNF from areas undergoing deactivation as part of the Hanford Site remediation effort; and eliminating the need to duplicate future transloading facilities at the 200 and 400 Areas. Radiologically- and industrially-safe storage would be enhanced through: (1) removal from aging facilities requiring substantial upgrades to continue safe storage; (2) utilization of passive rather than active storage systems for SNF; and (3) removal of SNF from some storage containers which have a limited remaining design life. No substantial increase in Hanford Site environmental impacts would be expected from the proposed action. Environmental impacts from postulated accident scenarios also were evaluated, and indicated that the risks associated with the proposed action would be small.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Hanford ETR - Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Technical Review - Estimate at Completion (Cost) Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comprehensive Review of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Estimate at Completion Assessment Conducted by an Independent Team of External Experts March 2006 Comprehensive Review of the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Estimate at Completion Page i of vi Executive Summary Following an August 2005 corporate commitment to the Secretary of Energy, Bechtel National, Inc. chartered a team of industry experts to review the technical, cost, and schedule aspects of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project. This summary reflects the observations and recommendations of the EAC Review Team (ERT), comprised of six senior industry consultants, six retired Bechtel employees, one current Bechtel employee, three employees of Bechtel's competitors, and

125

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents being prepared by DOE contractors. No conclusions or recommendations are provided. This year's report is the twelfth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the thirteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological, and historical resources, socioeconomic, occupational safety, and noise. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100, 200, 300, and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 of this document can be adapted and supplemented with specific information for a chapter covering statutory and regulatory requirements in an environment assessment or environmental impact statement.

Neitzel, Duane A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Antonio, Ernest J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Fosmire, Christian J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Fowler, Richard A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Glantz, Clifford S. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Goodwin, Shannon M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Harvey, David W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hendrickson, Paul L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Horton, Duane G. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Poston, Ted M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Rohay, Alan C. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Thorne, Paul D. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wright, Mona K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, , Final for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards . Environmental Assessment Prepared for Southwestern Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy - _ . . . " Prepared by Black & Veatch October 13,1995 ' Table of Contents 1 . 0 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Description of the Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 Alternative 1 . No Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Alternative 2 . Mechanical and Manual Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Alternative 3 . Proposed Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 Foliar Spray Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2 Soil-Spot Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

127

HANFORD TANK CLEANUP UPDATE  

SciTech Connect

Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

BERRIOCHOA MV

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hanford Achieves a Cleanup First  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, Wash. – DOE contractors have completed cleanup of F Area, the first reactor area at the 586-square-mile Hanford site to be fully remediated.

129

Hanford, Former Production Workers Screening Projects | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Hanford, Former Production Workers Screening Projects Project Name: National Supplemental Screening Program Covered DOE Site:...

130

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Assurance Review ARPT-WTP-2011-002...

131

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 HANFORD SITE CLEANUP OBJECTIVES INCONSISTENTWITH PROJECTED LAND USES, IG-0446 The cleanup of the...

132

Manhattan Project: DuPont and Hanford, Hanford Engineer Works, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The president of DuPont, Walter Carpenter, with Generals Levin H. Campbell, Everett Hughes, and Charles T. Harris. DUPONT AND HANFORD The president of DuPont, Walter Carpenter, with Generals Levin H. Campbell, Everett Hughes, and Charles T. Harris. DUPONT AND HANFORD (Hanford Engineer Works, 1942) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 The scientists of the Met Lab had the technical expertise to design a production pile, but construction and management on an industrial scale required an outside contractor. The DuPont Corporation was an ideal candidate, but the giant chemical firm was hesitant to join the project due to concern over accusations that it had profiteered during World War I. On October 3, 1942, DuPont agreed to design and build the chemical separation plant for the production pile facility then planned for Oak Ridge. Leslie Groves tried to entice further DuPont participation by having the firm prepare an appraisal of the pile (reactor) project and by placing three DuPont staff members on the Lewis Committee. DuPont ultimately agreed to become the primary contractor for plutonium-related work, but because of continuing sensitivity about its public image its contract called for a total payment of only dollar over actual costs. In addition, DuPont vowed to stay out of the bomb business after the war and offered all patents to the United States government.

133

EA-1211: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1211: Final Environmental Assessment Relocation and Storage of Isotopic Heat Sources, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for...

134

EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment EA-1210: Final Environmental Assessment Lead Test Assembly Irradiation and Analysis Watts Bar Nuclear Plant, Tennessee and Hanford Site, Richland,...

135

EA-1934: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment EA-1934: Final Environmental Assessment Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of...

136

EIS-0119: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0119: Final Environmental Impact Statement Decommissioning of Eight Surplus Production Reactors at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington...

137

Hanford Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Hanford Site Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds Workers safely demolished a 175-foot-high exhaust stack at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state, a project supported by $420,000 in Recovery Act funds Slurry pumps are used in the tank farms to pick up liquid and solid particle mixture, or slurry, and provide the force necessary to transport the waste from tank to tank during retrieval operations Slurry pumps are used in the tank farms to pick up liquid and solid particle mixture, or slurry, and provide the force necessary to transport the waste from tank to tank during retrieval operations The Pretreatment Facility control room building pad (foreground) and the Low-Activity Waste Facility (background)

138

Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Environmental for the Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington September 1992 U.S. Department of Energy Richland, Washington 99352 Contents 1 . 0 Summary . . 2.0 Purpose of and Need for the Proposed Action . . . . . . 3.0 Proposed Action and Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1 Proposed Action 3.2 Onsite Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . 3.3 Offsite Alternatives . . . . . . . . . 3.4 No Action Alternative ~ ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 Affected Environment . . . . . . . . . . . 5.0 Environmental Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1 Construction Impacts 5.1.1 Atmospheric Impacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1.2 Terrestrial Impacts . 5.1.3 Impacts on CERCLA Remedial Actions . 5.1.4 Construction Accidents .

139

Hanford defense mission: Past, present and future  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the origin of Hanford, and its role in the Manhattan Project, its current role, and what is seen for Hanford in the future. Emphasis is on Hanford's defense mission. However, Hanford is a national resource in a number of areas and some of these are mentioned as well.

Munson, L.F.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Safe as mother's milk: the Hanford project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safe As Mother's Milk: The Hanford Project is a web site and physical installation exploring the atomic history of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. For more than forty years, Hanford released radioactive materials into the environment on an uninformed ... Keywords: Hanford, Manhattan Project, cold war, documentary, education resource, plutonium, radiation

Kim Stringfellow

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Program  

Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Program EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange November 17, 2010 Mike Thien

142

Overview of the spent nuclear fuel project at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project`s mission at Hanford is to {open_quotes}Provide safe, economic and environmentally sound management of Hanford spent nuclear fuel in a manner which stages it to final disposition.{close_quotes} The inventory of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Hanford Site covers a wide variety of fuel types (production reactor to space reactor) in many facilities (reactor fuel basins to hot cells) at locations all over the Site. The 2,129 metric tons of Hanford SNF represents about 80% of the total US Department of Energy (DOE) inventory. About 98.5% of the Hanford SNF is 2,100 metric tons of metallic uranium production reactor fuel currently stored in the 1950s vintage K Basins in the 100 Area. This fuel has been slowly corroding, generating sludge and contaminating the basin water. This condition, coupled with aging facilities with seismic vulnerabilities, has been identified by several groups, including stakeholders, as being one of the most urgent safety and environmental concerns at the Hanford Site. As a direct result of these concerns, the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project was recently formed to address spent fuel issues at Hanford. The Project has developed the K Basins Path Forward to remove fuel from the basins and place it in dry interim storage. Alternatives that addressed the requirements were developed and analyzed. The result is a two-phased approach allowing the early removal of fuel from the K Basins followed by its stabilization and interim storage consistent with the national program.

Daily, J.L. [Dept. of Energy, Richland, WA (United States). Richland Operations Office; Fulton, J.C.; Gerber, E.W.; Culley, G.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Retrospective assessment of personnel neutron dosimetry for workers at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to examine the specific issue of the potential for unrecorded neutron dose for Hanford workers, particularly in comparison with the recorded whole body (neutron plus photon) dose. During the past several years, historical personnel dosimetry practices at Hanford have been documented in several technical reports. This documentation provides a detailed history of the technology, radiation fields, and administrative practices used to measure and record dose for Hanford workers. Importantly, documentation has been prepared by personnel whose collective experience spans nearly the entire history of Hanford operations beginning in the mid-1940s. Evaluations of selected Hanford radiation dose records have been conducted along with statistical profiles of the recorded dose data. The history of Hanford personnel dosimetry is complex, spanning substantial evolution in radiation protection technology, concepts, and standards. Epidemiologic assessments of Hanford worker mortality and radiation dose data were initiated in the early 1960s. In recent years, Hanford data have been included in combined analyses of worker cohorts from several Department of Energy (DOE) sites and from several countries through the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Hanford data have also been included in the DOE Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR). In the analysis of Hanford, and other site data, the question of comparability of recorded dose through time and across the respective sites has arisen. DOE formed a dosimetry working group composed of dosimetrists and epidemiologists to evaluate data and documentation requirements of CEDR. This working group included in its recommendations the high priority for documentation of site-specific radiation dosimetry practices used to measure and record worker dose by the respective DOE sites.

Fix, J.J.; Wilson, R.H.; Baumgartner, W.B.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed 9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste to meet existing Federal and State regulatory standards for eventual land disposal at the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Finding of No Significant Impact Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Final Environmental Assessment Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste

145

Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project (DOE-eis-0325)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Record of Decision March 2003 Bonneville Power Administration Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Record of Decision Decision The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to construct the proposed Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project in Benton, Douglas, Grant, Kittitas, and Yakima Counties, Washington. BPA has decided to implement the Agency Preferred Alternative identified in the Schultz-Hanford Area Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0325, January 2003), with the exception of Option 1 of the Sickler-Schultz Reroute. Due to landowner concerns, BPA will now implement Option 2 of the Sickler-Schultz Reroute. The Agency Preferred Alternative consists of constructing a new 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission

146

EA-0904: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area 4: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-0904: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct an access road on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, from State Route 240 to Beloit Avenue in the 200 West Area. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 10, 1994 EA-0904: Finding of No Significant Impact Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site, Richland, Washington March 10, 1994 EA-0904: Final Environmental Assessment Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site,

147

Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office...

148

Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Dedicated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Dedicated to Potential Future Uses of the Hanford Site Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter...

149

Microbial Community Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters Jenniferof Energy site at Hanford, WA, has been historicallyof lactate-enriched Hanford well H-100 groundwater sample.

Mosher, Jennifer J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule The Hanford Site...

151

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 2011 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2011 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary More Documents & Publications Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary -...

152

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2010 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank...

153

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank...

154

Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People Core (HCP) PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford People...

155

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - February 2009 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - February 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank...

156

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

Not Available

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

HANFORD K BASINS SLUDGE RETREIVAL & TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

This paper shows how Fluor Hanford and BNG America have combined nuclear plant skills from the US and the UK to devise methods to retrieve and treat the sludge that has accumulated in K Basins at the Hanford site over many years. Retrieving the sludge is the final stage in removing fuel and sludge from the basins to allow them to be decontaminated and decommissioned, thus removing the threat of contamination of the Columbia River. A description is given of sludge retrieval using vacuum lances and specially developed nozzles and pumps into Consolidation Containers within the basins. The special attention that had to be paid to the heat generation and potential criticality issues with the irradiated uranium-containing sludge is described. The processes developed to re-mobilize the sludge from the Consolidation Containers and pump it through flexible and transportable hose-in-hose piping to the treatment facility are explained with particular note made of dealing with the abrasive nature of the sludge. The treatment facility, housed in an existing Hanford building is described, and the uranium-corrosion and grout encapsulation processes explained. The uranium corrosion process is a robust, tempered process very suitable for dealing with a range of differing sludge compositions. The grout process to produce the final waste form is backed by BNG America's 20 years experience of grouting radioactive waste at Sellafield and elsewhere. The use of transportable and re-usable equipment is emphasized and its role noted in avoiding new plant build that itself will require cleanup. The processes and techniques described in the paper are shown to have wide applicability to nuclear cleanup worldwide.

VASQUEZ, D.A.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

REVIEW OF RHEOLOGY MODIFIERS FOR HANFORD WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)?s strategic development scope for the Department of Energy ? Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste feed acceptance and product qualification scope, the SRNL has been requested to recommend candidate rheology modifiers to be evaluated to adjust slurry properties in the Hanford Tank Farm. SRNL has performed extensive testing of rheology modifiers for use with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulated melter feed ? a high undissolved solids (UDS) mixture of simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm sludge, nitric and formic acids, and glass frit. A much smaller set of evaluations with Hanford simulated waste have also been completed. This report summarizes past work and recommends modifiers for further evaluation with Hanford simulated wastes followed by verification with actual waste samples. Based on the review of available data, a few compounds/systems appear to hold the most promise. For all types of evaluated simulated wastes (caustic Handford tank waste and DWPF processing samples with pH ranging from slightly acidic to slightly caustic), polyacrylic acid had positive impacts on rheology. Citric acid also showed improvement in yield stress on a wide variety of samples. It is recommended that both polyacrylic acid and citric acid be further evaluated as rheology modifiers for Hanford waste. These materials are weak organic acids with the following potential issues: ? The acidic nature of the modifiers may impact waste pH, if added in very large doses. If pH is significantly reduced by the modifier addition, dissolution of UDS and increased corrosion of tanks, piping, pumps, and other process equipment could occur. Smaller shifts in pH could reduce aluminum solubility, which would be expected to increase the yield stress of the sludge. Therefore, it is expected that use of an acidic modifier would be limited to concentrations that do not appreciably change the pH of the waste. ? Organics are typically reductants and could impact glass REDOX if not accounted for in the reductant addition calculations. ? Stability of the modifiers in a caustic, radioactive environment is not known, but some of the modifiers tested were specifically designed to withstand caustic conditions. ? These acids will add to the total organic carbon content of the wastes. Radiolytic decomposition of the acids could result in organic and hydrogen gas generation. These potential impacts must be addressed in future studies with simulants representative of real waste and finally with tests using actual waste based on the rheology differences seen between SRS simulants and actual waste. The only non-organic modifier evaluated was sodium metasilicate. Further evaluation of this modifier is recommended if a reducing modifier is a concern.

Pareizs, J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Evolution of LTS at DOE's Hanford Site - 14189  

SciTech Connect

Hanford?s Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program has evolved from a small, informal process, with minimal support, to a robust program that provides comprehensive transitions from cleanup contractors to long-term stewardship for post-cleanup requirements specified in the associated cleanup decision documents. The LTS Program has the responsibility for almost 100,000 acres of land, along with over 200 waste sites and will soon have six cocooned reactors. Close to 2,600 documents have been identified and tagged for storage in the LTS document library. The program has successfully completed six consecutive transitions over the last two years in support of the U.S. DOE Richland Operations Office?s (DOE-RL) near-term cleanup objectives of significantly reducing the footprint of active cleanup operations for the River Corridor. The program has evolved from one that was initially responsible for defining and measuring Institutional Controls for the Hanford Site, to a comprehensive, post remediation surveillance and maintenance program that begins early in the transition process. In 2013, the first reactor area―the cocooned 105-F Reactor and its surrounding 1,100 acres, called the F Area was transitioned. In another ?first,? the program is expected to transition the five remaining cocooned reactors into the program through using a Transition and Turnover Package (TTP). As Hanford?s LTS Program moves into the next few years, it will continue to build on a collaborative approach. The program has built strong relationships between contractors, regulators, tribes and stakeholders and with the U.S. Department of Energy?s Office of Legacy Management (LM). The LTS Program has been working with LM since its inception. The transition process utilized LM?s Site Transition Framework as one of the initial requirement documents and the Hanford Program continues to collaborate with LM today. One example of this collaboration is the development of the LTS Program?s records management system in which, LM has been instrumental. The development of a rigorous data collection and records management systems has been influenced and built off of LMs success, which also ensures compatibility between what Hanford?s LTS Program develops and LM. In another example, we are exploring a pilot project to ship records from the Hanford Site directly to LM for long-term storage. This pilot would gain program efficiencies so that records would be handled only once. Rather than storage on-site, then shipment to an interim Federal Records Center in Seattle, records would be shipped directly to LM. The Hanford LTS Program is working to best align programmatic processes, find efficiencies, and to benchmark site transition requirements. Involving the Hanford LTS Program early in the transition process with an integrated contractor and DOE team is helping to ensure that there is time to work through details on the completed remediation of transitioning areas. It also will allow for record documentation and storage for the future, and is an opportunity for the program to mature through the experiences that will be gained by implementing LTS Program activities over time.

Moren, Richard J.; Grindstaff, Keith D.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Evolution of LTS at DOE's Hanford Site - 14189  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford?s Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program has evolved from a small, informal process, with minimal support, to a robust program that provides comprehensive transitions from cleanup contractors to long-term stewardship for post-cleanup requirements specified in the associated cleanup decision documents. The LTS Program has the responsibility for almost 100,000 acres of land, along with over 200 waste sites and will soon have six cocooned reactors. Close to 2,600 documents have been identified and tagged for storage in the LTS document library. The program has successfully completed six consecutive transitions over the last two years in support of the U.S. DOE Richland Operations Office?s (DOE-RL) near-term cleanup objectives of significantly reducing the footprint of active cleanup operations for the River Corridor. The program has evolved from one that was initially responsible for defining and measuring Institutional Controls for the Hanford Site, to a comprehensive, post remediation surveillance and maintenance program that begins early in the transition process. In 2013, the first reactor area?the cocooned 105-F Reactor and its surrounding 1,100 acres, called the F Area was transitioned. In another ?first,? the program is expected to transition the five remaining cocooned reactors into the program through using a Transition and Turnover Package (TTP). As Hanford?s LTS Program moves into the next few years, it will continue to build on a collaborative approach. The program has built strong relationships between contractors, regulators, tribes and stakeholders and with the U.S. Department of Energy?s Office of Legacy Management (LM). The LTS Program has been working with LM since its inception. The transition process utilized LM?s Site Transition Framework as one of the initial requirement documents and the Hanford Program continues to collaborate with LM today. One example of this collaboration is the development of the LTS Program?s records management system in which, LM has been instrumental. The development of a rigorous data collection and records management systems has been influenced and built off of LMs success, which also ensures compatibility between what Hanford?s LTS Program develops and LM. In another example, we are exploring a pilot project to ship records from the Hanford Site directly to LM for long-term storage. This pilot would gain program efficiencies so that records would be handled only once. Rather than storage on-site, then shipment to an interim Federal Records Center in Seattle, records would be shipped directly to LM. The Hanford LTS Program is working to best align programmatic processes, find efficiencies, and to benchmark site transition requirements. Involving the Hanford LTS Program early in the transition process with an integrated contractor and DOE team is helping to ensure that there is time to work through details on the completed remediation of transitioning areas. It also will allow for record documentation and storage for the future, and is an opportunity for the program to mature through the experiences that will be gained by implementing LTS Program activities over time.

Moren, Richard J.; Grindstaff, Keith D.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Hanford Site, in Richland, Washington. The assessment, which was conducted from May 11 through May 22, 1992, included a selective-review of the ES&H management systems and programs of the responsible DOE Headquarters Program Offices the DOE Richland Field Office, and the site contractors. The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Secretary of Energy`s continuing effort to institutionalize line management accountability and the self-assessment process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the Hanford Site ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Secretary with an independent assessment of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to address ES&H problems and requirements. They are not intended to be comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The point of reference for assessing programs at the Hanford Site was, for the most part, the Tiger Team Assessment of the Hanford Site, which was conducted from May 21 through July 18, 1990. A summary of issues and progress in the areas of environment, safety and health, and management is included.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

New strategy for accelerating cleanup of Hanford reactor areas  

SciTech Connect

The initial work plans for cleanup of the 100 areas at Hanford followed the traditional Superfund path with a somewhat linear and phased process of investigation and decision making. Due to the complexity of the waste sites, the need to characterize existing mixed waste and hazardous-waste contamination and the need to obtain high-quality data for decision making, the proposed investigation schedules were typically 7 to 9 yr long. In addition, a large amount of resources and funding was committed to this investigative phase without achieving any remediation or reduction in risk. To correct these deficiencies, a new strategy was developed for use at the Hanford site, the Hanford Past Practice Investigation Strategy (HPPIS). In late 1991, work plans were revised to reflect this strategy, and field work is under way. These changes will result in savings in excess of $100,000,000 in remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) costs. The plutonium production reactor areas at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site, near Richland, Washington, were included on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) National Priorities List (NPL) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) in 1989.

Krug, A.D.; Day, R.E.; Lauterbach, M.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hanford Site 1998 Environmental Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1998 Hanford Site activities; present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and groundwater protection and monitoring information; and discuss the activities to ensure quality.

RL Dirkes; RW Hanf; TM Poston

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Environmental Report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations. The report also highlights major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet reporting requirements and Guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) an to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to (a) describe the Hanford Site and its mission, (b) summarize the status in 1993 of compliance with environmental regulations, (c) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site, (d) discuss estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1993 Hanford activities, (e) present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including ground-water protection and monitoring, (f) discuss activities to ensure quality. More detailed information can be found in the body of the report, the appendixes, and the cited references.

Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Woodruff, R.K. [eds.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: (1) describe the Hanford Site and its mission; (2) summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; (3) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; (4) discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1999 Hanford Site activities; (5) present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, groundwater protection and monitoring information; and (6) discuss the activities to ensure quality.

TM Poston; RW Hanf; RL Dirkes

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

167

Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Comprehensive Technical A Comprehensive Technical Review of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System Technical Assessment Conducted by an Independent and External Team of Experts Volume 1 September 28, 2006 Chartered by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. Richland, Washington 99352 RPP-31314 Executive Summary In May 2006, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. chartered an Expert Review Panel (ERP) to review the current status of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS). It is the consensus of the ERP that bulk vitrification is a technology that requires further development and evaluation to determine its potential for meeting the Hanford waste stabilization mission. No fatal flaws (issues that would jeopardize the overall DBVS mission that cannot be mitigated) were found, given the current state of the project.

168

Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Hanford site exceeded its goal of reducing fleet vehicles by 15 percent in fiscal year 2012. The overall reduction that year was 25.4 percent. The Hanford site exceeded its goal of reducing fleet vehicles by 15 percent in fiscal year 2012. The overall reduction that year was 25.4 percent. An electric charging station for electric vehicles is located at the Hanford site. An electric charging station for electric vehicles is located at the Hanford site. Lead acid batteries are collected at the Hanford Centralized Consolidation/Recycling Center. Other items recycled at Hanford include aerosol products, aluminum cans and foil, audio tapes, boxes, cell phones, chemicals and computers.

169

Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible Green Initiatives Keep Hanford Site Environmentally Responsible May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Hanford site exceeded its goal of reducing fleet vehicles by 15 percent in fiscal year 2012. The overall reduction that year was 25.4 percent. The Hanford site exceeded its goal of reducing fleet vehicles by 15 percent in fiscal year 2012. The overall reduction that year was 25.4 percent. An electric charging station for electric vehicles is located at the Hanford site. An electric charging station for electric vehicles is located at the Hanford site. Lead acid batteries are collected at the Hanford Centralized Consolidation/Recycling Center. Other items recycled at Hanford include aerosol products, aluminum cans and foil, audio tapes, boxes, cell phones, chemicals and computers.

170

Hanford EM Report.pmd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance U.S. Department of Energy May 2004 SSA Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance OVERSIGHT Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................... 1 2.0 RESULTS ....................................................................................... 3 3.0 CONCLUSIONS ............................................................................ 5 4.0 RATINGS ....................................................................................... 7 APPENDIX A - SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ............................ 9 APPENDIX B - SITE-SPECIFIC FINDINGS .......................................11

171

Hanford internal dosimetry program manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry program. Program Services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessments of internal exposure and dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating internal radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. 13 refs., 16 figs., 42 tabs.

Carbaugh, E.H.; Sula, M.J.; Bihl, D.E.; Aldridge, T.L.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

HANFORD WASTE MINERALOGY REFERENCE REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report lists the observed mineral phases present in the Hanford tanks. This task was accomplished by performing a review of numerous reports that used experimental techniques including, but not limited to: x-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and particle size distribution analyses. This report contains tables that can be used as a quick reference to identify the crystal phases observed in Hanford waste.

DISSELKAMP RS

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

HANFORD WASTE MINEROLOGY REFERENCE REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report lists the observed mineral phase phases present in the Hanford tanks. This task was accomplished by performing a review of numerous reports using experimental techniques including, but not limited to: x-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and particle size distribution analyses. This report contains tables that can be used as a quick reference to identify the crystal phases present observed in Hanford waste.

DISSELKAMP RS

2010-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

175

Expert Panel Recommendations for Hanford Double-Shell Tank Life Extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expert workshops were held in Richland in May 2001 to review the Hanford Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project and make recommendations to extend the life of Hanford's double-shell waste tanks. The workshop scope was limited to corrosion of the primary tank liner, and the main areas for review were waste chemistry control, tank inspection, and corrosion monitoring. Participants were corrosion experts from Hanford, Savannah River Site, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and several consultants. This report describes the current state of the three areas of the program, the final recommendations of the workshop, and the rationale for their selection.

Stewart, Charles W.; Bush, Spencer H.; Berman, Herbert S.; Czajkowski, Carl J.; Divine, James R.; Posakony, Gerald J.; Johnson, A. B.; Elmore, Monte R.; Reynolds, D. A.; Anantatmula, Ramamohan P.; Sindelar, Robert L.; Zapp, Philip E.

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

176

MANHATTAN PROJECT B REACTOR HANFORD WASHINGTON [HANFORD'S HISTORIC B REACTOR (12-PAGE BOOKLET)  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site began as part of the United States Manhattan Project to research, test and build atomic weapons during World War II. The original 670-square mile Hanford Site, then known as the Hanford Engineer Works, was the last of three top-secret sites constructed in order to produce enriched uranium and plutonium for the world's first nuclear weapons. B Reactor, located about 45 miles northwest of Richland, Washington, is the world's first full-scale nuclear reactor. Not only was B Reactor a first-of-a-kind engineering structure, it was built and fully functional in just 11 months. Eventually, the shoreline of the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State held nine nuclear reactors at the height of Hanford's nuclear defense production during the Cold War era. The B Reactor was shut down in 1968. During the 1980's, the U.S. Department of Energy began removing B Reactor's support facilities. The reactor building, the river pumphouse and the reactor stack are the only facilities that remain. Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office offers escorted public access to B Reactor along a designated tour route. The National Park Service (NPS) is studying preservation and interpretation options for sites associated with the Manhattan Project. A draft is expected in summer 2009. A final report will recommend whether the B Reactor, along with other Manhattan Project facilities, should be preserved, and if so, what roles the DOE, the NPS and community partners will play in preservation and public education. In August 2008, the DOE announced plans to open B Reactor for additional public tours. Potential hazards still exist within the building. However, the approved tour route is safe for visitors and workers. DOE may open additional areas once it can assure public safety by mitigating hazards.

GERBER MS

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

THERMAL PROPERTIES OF GABLE MOUNTAIN BASALT CORES HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1974. 7. Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company, Research andGABLE MOUNTAIN BASALT CORES HANFORD NUCLEAR RESERVATION L.

Martinez-Baez, L.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Enforcement Letter, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc- July 31, 1998  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., related to Incomplete Corrective Actions at the Hanford Site, July 31, 1998

179

Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) for Hanford Assessments  

SciTech Connect

This data package was originally prepared to support a 2004 composite analysis (CA) of low-level waste disposal at the Hanford Site. The Technical Scope and Approach for the 2004 Composite Analysis of Low Level Waste Disposal at the Hanford Site (Kincaid et. al. 2004) identified the requirements for that analysis and served as the basis for initial preparation of this data package. Completion of the 2004 CA was later deferred, with the 2004 Annual Status Report for the Composite Analysis of Low-Level Waste Disposal in the Central Plateau at the Hanford Site (DOE 2005) indicating that a comprehensive update to the CA was in preparation and would be submitted in 2006. However, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recently decided to further defer the CA update and will use the cumulative assessment currently under preparation for the environmental impact statement (EIS) being prepared for tank closure and other site decisions as the updated CA. Submittal of the draft EIS is currently planned for FY 2008. This data package describes the facility-specific parameters (e.g. location, operational dates, etc.) used to numerically simulate contaminant flow and transport in large-scale Hanford assessments. Kincaid et al. (2004) indicated that the System Assessment Capability (SAC) (Kincaid et al. 2000; Bryce et al. 2002; Eslinger 2002a, 2002b) would be used to analyze over a thousand different waste sites. A master spreadsheet termed the Geographic and Operational Site Parameters List (GOSPL) was assembled to facilitate the generation of keyword input files containing general information on each waste site/facility, its operational/disposal history, and its environmental settings (past, current, and future). This report briefly describes each of the key data fields, including the source(s) of data, and provides the resulting inputs to be used for large-scale Hanford assessments.

Last, George V.; Nichols, William E.; Kincaid, Charles T.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria within which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria with in which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

182

Enforcement Documents - Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Enforcement Documents - Hanford September 13, 2012 Enforcement Letter,CH2M HILL Plateau - NEL-2012-02 Issued to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company related to...

183

COMPOSITE INDEX OF HANFORD ENGINEERING STANDARDS  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Atomic Production Operation composite index refers to subjects contained in the nine handbooks and manuals published under the Hanford Engineering Standard Program. This index is described in TID-4100(Suppl.). (N.W.R.)

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Screening assessment and requirements for a comprehensive assessment: Volume 1, Draft. Columbia River comprehensive impact assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the impact to the Columbia River from the Hanford Site-derived contaminants, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Washington State Department of Ecology initiated a study referred to as the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA). To address concerns about the scope and direction of CRCIA as well as enhance regulator, tribal, stockholder, and public involvement, the CRCIA Management Team was formed in August 1995. The Team agreed to conduct CRCIA using a phased approach. The initial phase, includes two components: 1) a screening assessment to evaluate the potential impact to the river, resulting from current levels of Hanford-derived contaminants in order to support decisions on Interim Remedial Measures, and 2) a definition of the essential work remaining to provide an acceptable comprehensive river impact assessment. The screening assessment is described in Part I of this report. The essential work remaining is Part II of this report. The objective of the screening assessment is to identify areas where the greatest potential exists for adverse effects on humans or the environment. Part I of this report discusses the scope, technical approach, and results of the screening assessment. Part II defines a new paradigm for predecisional participation by those affected by Hanford cleanup decisions.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Estimating Contaminant Release Concentrations from Hanford ...  

& Transport Model Long-Term Performance Assessment ... sludge provide upper limit on future releases. 9 Metals Concentrations in Hanford Tank ...

186

Threatened and endangered wildlife species of the Hanford Site related to CERCLA characterization activities  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site has been placed on the National Priorities List, which requires that it be remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) or Superfund. Potentially contaminated areas of the Hanford Site were grouped into operable units, and detailed characterization and investigation plans were formulated. The DOE Richland Operations Office requested Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to conduct a biological assessment of the potential impact of these characterization activities on the threatened, endangered, and sensitive wildlife species of the Hanford Site. Additional direction for WHC compliances with wildlife protection can be found in the Environmental Compliance Manual. This document is intended to meet these requirements, in part, for the CERCLA characterization activities, as well as for other work comparable in scope. This report documents the biological assessment and describes the pertinent components of the Hanford Site as well as the planned characterization activities. Also provided are accounts of endangered, threatened, and federal candidate wildlife species on the Hanford Site and information as to how human disturbances can affect these species. Potential effects of the characterization activities are described with recommendations for mitigation measures.

Fitzner, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Weiss, S.G.; Stegen, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP  

SciTech Connect

In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

BAZZELL, K.D.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

HANFORD DECOMMISSIONING UPDATE 09/2007  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford's K Basins Closure (KBC) Project tallied three major accomplishments at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State this past summer. The Project finished emptying the aging K East Basin of both sludge and the last pieces of scrap spent nuclear fuel. It also Completed vacuuming the bulk of the sludge in the K West Basin into underwater containers. The 54-year-old concrete basins once held more than four million pounds of spent nuclear fuel and sit less than 400 yards from the Columbia River. Each basin holds more than a million gallons of radioactive water. In 2004, Fluor finished removing all the spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins. Nearly 50 cubic meters of sludge remained--a combination of dirt, sand, small pieces of corroded uranium fuel and fuel cladding, corrosion products from racks and canisters, ion-exchange resin beads, polychlorinated biphenyls, and fission products that had formed during the decades that the spent nuclear fuel was stored underwater. Capturing the sludge into underwater containers in the K East Basin took more than two years, and vacuuming the much smaller volume of sludge into containers in the K West Basin required seven months. Workers stood on grating above the basin water and vacuumed the sludge through long, heavy hoses. The work was complicated by murky water and contaminated solid waste (debris). Pumping was paused several times to safely remove and package debris that totaled more than 370 tons. In October 2006, Fluor Hanford workers began pumping the sludge captured in the K East Basin containers out through a specially designed pipeline to underwater containers in the K West Basin, about a half mile away. They used a heavy but flexible, double-walled ''hose-in-hose'' system. Pumping work progressed slowly at first, but ramped up in spring 2007 and was completed on May 31. Just a week before sludge transfers finished, the KBC Project removed the last few small pieces of irradiated fuel (about 19 pounds) found as the last remnants of sludge were vacuumed up. The fuel was loaded into a cask that sat underwater. The cask was hoisted out of the water, decontaminated, and transported to the K West Basin, where it is now being stored underwater until it can be dried and taken to storage in central Hanford. Removing the sludge and fuel from the K East Basin eliminated the final major radioactive sources there, and made the Columbia River and the adjacent environment safer for everyone who lives downstream. Fluor's priority at the K East Basin quickly turned to final preparations for demolishing the structure. Final activities to sort debris are progressing, along with plans to de-water the basin and turn it to rubble in the next two years. At the K West Basin, after the bulk sludge was removed July 3, workers began preparing to load out the last of the ''found'' nuclear fuel and to complete final pass sludge collection this coming year.

GERBER, M.S.

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements regarding significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year’s report is the eighteen revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the nineteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. Two chapters are included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6), numbered to correspond to chapters typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. When possible, subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, for the 100, 200, 300 and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 can be adapted and supplemented with specific information covering statutory and regulatory requirements for use in an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement. When preparing environmental assessments and EISs, authors should consult Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight (DOE 2004). Additional direction and guidance on the preparation of DOE NEPA documents can be found at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/guidance.html. Individuals seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities may also use the information contained in this document to evaluate projected activities and their impacts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff prepared individual sections of this document, with input from other Hanford Site contractors with the best available information through May 2007. More detailed data are available from reference sources cited or from the authors. For this 2007 revision, the following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through May 2005: Climate and Meteorology Air Quality Geology – Seismicity section only Hydrology – Flow charts for the Columbia and Yakima rivers only Ecology – Threatened and Endangered Species subsection only Socioeconomics Occupational Safety All of Chapter 6.

Duncan, Joanne P.; Burk, Kenneth W.; Chamness, Mickie A.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Thorne, Paul D.

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

EA-1203: Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, 3: Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1203: Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to widen and operate the unused Trench 33 in the 218-W-5 Low-Level Burial Ground at the U.S. Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 28, 1997 EA-1203: Finding of No Significant Impact Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington July 28, 1997 EA-1203: Final Environmental Assessment Trench 33 Widening in 218-W-5 Low-level Burial Ground, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

192

Oversight Reports - Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 13, 2013 December 13, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - December 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality September 26, 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - July 2013 Operational Awareness of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity [HIAR-WTP-2013-07-31] September 23, 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site - September 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Hanford Site August 30, 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Office of River Protection - May 2013 Operational Awareness Visit at the Office of River Protection

193

TRACKING CLEAN UP AT HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA), is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), The Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for cleaning up the Hanford Site. Established in the 1940s to produce material for nuclear weapons as part of the Manhattan Project, Hanford is often referred to as the world's large environmental cleanup project. The Site covers more than 580 square miles in a relatively remote region of southeastern Washington state in the US. The production of nuclear materials at Hanford has left a legacy of tremendous proportions in terms of hazardous and radioactive waste. From a waste-management point of view, the task is enormous: 1700 waste sites; 450 billion gallons of liquid waste; 70 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater; 53 million gallons of tank waste; 9 reactors; 5 million cubic yards of contaminated soil; 22 thousand drums of mixed waste; 2.3 tons of spent nuclear fuel; and 17.8 metric tons of plutonium-bearing material and this is just a partial listing. The agreement requires that DOE provide the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to the lead regulatory agency to help guide then in making decisions. The agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in it, or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The Action Plan that supports the TPA requires that Ecology and EPA have access to all data that is relevant to work performed, or to be performed, under the Agreement. Further, the Action Plan specifies two additional requirements: (1) that EPA, Ecology and their respective contractor staffs have access to all the information electronically, and (2) that the databases are accessible to, and used by, all personnel doing TPA-related work. The Hanford Environmental Databases document and track the progress of Site cleanup--Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS), Hanford Well Information Data System (HWIS), the Waste Information Data System (WIDS), and the Hanford Geographic Information System (HGIS). HEIS contains the date, time, location, and results from samples taken during activities such as field investigations and groundwater monitoring. HWIS contains the details of the wells and boreholes on the Site. WIDS tracks the waste sites--from discovery through cleanup. Each of the databases is supported by several applications for entering or retrieving information. HGIS keeps track of the locations for waste (WIDS) sites, wells and boreholes, and other sampling site locations. Of the applications used to extract data from the Environmental Databases, the Hanford Map Portal (QMAP) is the newest, and perhaps the most efficient. QMAP combines the HGIS spatial information with the information from the other databases so that users may browse to, or query, the waste site or well of interest. A query of a waste site or well engages QMAP to find the object and then the user may access the appropriate database. This paper describes the Environmental Databases and their maintenance, as well as the applications used to access them. Collectively, these databases are a critical element in formally documenting the work and associated decisions made during the cleanup of Hanford.

CONNELL, C.W.

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

HIGH ALUMINUM HLW GLASSES FOR HANFORDS WTP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The world's largest radioactive waste vitrification facility is now under construction at the United State Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is designed to treat nearly 53 million gallons of mixed hazardous and radioactive waste now residing in 177 underground storage tanks. This multi-decade processing campaign will be one of the most complex ever undertaken because of the wide chemical and physical variability of the waste compositions generated during the cold war era that are stored at Hanford. The DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) has initiated a program to improve the long-term operating efficiency of the WTP vitrification plants with the objective of reducing the overall cost of tank waste treatment and disposal and shortening the duration of plant operations. Due to the size, complexity and duration of the WTP mission, the lifecycle operating and waste disposal costs are substantial. As a result, gains in High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) waste loadings, as well as increases in glass production rate, which can reduce mission duration and glass volumes for disposal, can yield substantial overall cost savings. EnergySolutions and its long-term research partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of the Catholic University of America, have been involved in a multi-year ORP program directed at optimizing various aspects of the HLW and LAW vitrification flow sheets. A number of Hanford HLW streams contain high concentrations of aluminum, which is challenging with respect to both waste loading and processing rate. Therefore, a key focus area of the ORP vitrification process optimization program at EnergySolutions and VSL has been development of HLW glass compositions that can accommodate high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations while maintaining high processing rates in the Joule Heated Ceramic Melters (JHCMs) used for waste vitrification at the WTP. This paper, reviews the achievements of this program with emphasis on the recent enhancements in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loadings in HLW glass and its processing characteristics. Glass formulation development included crucible-scale preparation and characterization of glass samples to assess compliance with all melt processing and product quality requirements, followed by small-scale screening tests to estimate processing rates. These results were used to down-select formulations for subsequent engineering-scale melter testing. Finally, further testing was performed on the DM1200 vitrification system installed at VSL, which is a one-third scale (1.20 m{sup 2}) pilot melter for the WTP HLW melters and which is fitted with a fully prototypical off-gas treatment system. These tests employed glass formulations with high waste loadings and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} contents of {approx}25 wt%, which represents a near-doubling of the present WTP baseline maximum Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} loading. In addition, these formulations were processed successfully at glass production rates that exceeded the present requirements for WTP HLW vitrification by up to 88%. The higher aluminum loading in the HLW glass has an added benefit in that the aluminum leaching requirements in pretreatment are reduced, thus allowing less sodium addition in pretreatment, which in turn reduces the amount of LAW glass to be produced at the WTP. The impact of the results from this ORP program in reducing the overall cost and schedule for the Hanford waste treatment mission will be discussed.

KRUGER AA; JOSEPH I; BOWMAN BW; GAN H; KOT W; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

195

REVIEW OF RHEOLOGY MODIFIERS FOR HANFORD WASTE  

SciTech Connect

As part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)?s strategic development scope for the Department of Energy ? Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste feed acceptance and product qualification scope, the SRNL has been requested to recommend candidate rheology modifiers to be evaluated to adjust slurry properties in the Hanford Tank Farm. SRNL has performed extensive testing of rheology modifiers for use with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulated melter feed ? a high undissolved solids (UDS) mixture of simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm sludge, nitric and formic acids, and glass frit. A much smaller set of evaluations with Hanford simulated waste have also been completed. This report summarizes past work and recommends modifiers for further evaluation with Hanford simulated wastes followed by verification with actual waste samples. Based on the review of available data, a few compounds/systems appear to hold the most promise. For all types of evaluated simulated wastes (caustic Handford tank waste and DWPF processing samples with pH ranging from slightly acidic to slightly caustic), polyacrylic acid had positive impacts on rheology. Citric acid also showed improvement in yield stress on a wide variety of samples. It is recommended that both polyacrylic acid and citric acid be further evaluated as rheology modifiers for Hanford waste. These materials are weak organic acids with the following potential issues:  The acidic nature of the modifiers may impact waste pH, if added in very large doses. If pH is significantly reduced by the modifier addition, dissolution of UDS and increased corrosion of tanks, piping, pumps, and other process equipment could occur. Smaller shifts in pH could reduce aluminum solubility, which would be expected to increase the yield stress of the sludge. Therefore, it is expected that use of an acidic modifier would be limited to concentrations that do not appreciably change the pH of the waste.  Organics are typically reductants and could impact glass REDOX if not accounted for in the reductant addition calculations.  Stability of the modifiers in a caustic, radioactive environment is not known, but some of the modifiers tested were specifically designed to withstand caustic conditions.  These acids will add to the total organic carbon content of the wastes. Radiolytic decomposition of the acids could result in organic and hydrogen gas generation. These potential impacts must be addressed in future studies with simulants representative of real waste and finally with tests using actual waste based on the rheology differences seen between SRS simulants and actual waste. The only non-organic modifier evaluated was sodium metasilicate. Further evaluation of this modifier is recommended if a reducing modifier is a concern.

Pareizs, J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hanford Site waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site WMin/P2 program is an organized, comprehensive, and continual effort to systematically reduce the quantity and toxicity of hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary wastes; conserve resources; and prevent or minimize pollutant releases to all environmental media from all Site activities. The Hanford Site WMin/P2 program plan reflects national and DOE waste minimization and pollution prevention goals and policies, and represents an ongoing effort to make WMin/P2 part of the Site operating philosophy. In accordance with these policies, a hierarchical approach to environmental management has been adopted and is applied to all types of polluting and waste generating activities. Pollution prevention and waste minimization through source reduction are first priority in the Hanford WMin/P2 program, followed by environmentally safe recycling. Treatment to reduce the quantity, toxicity, and/or mobility will be considered only when prevention or recycling are not possible or practical. Environmentally safe disposal is the last option.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Implementation of a Comprehensive On-Line Closed-Loop Diagnostic System for Roll-to-Roll Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Production: Final Subcontract Report, 23 April 2003 - 30 September 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes Energy Conversion Devices' diagnostic systems that were developed in this program, as well as ECD's other major accomplishments. This report concentrates on work carried out in the final (third) phase of this program, beginning in the fall of 2004 and ending in the fall of 2006. ECD has developed a comprehensive in-situ diagnostic system that: Reduces the time between deposition in the a-Si machine and device characterization from about 200 h to about 1 h; The Photovoltaic Capacitive Diagnostic systems measure the open-circuit voltage and charging rate (a measure of the short-circuit current) and intra-cell series resistance for each cell in the triple-junction device prior to deposition of the top conductive-oxide coating in a subsequent deposition machine. These systems operate with an rms precision of about 0.03% and have operated for almost 4 years with no need for servicing of the electronics or for calibration; Spectrometers are used to measure the ZnO thickness of the backreflector, a Si thickness, and top conductive-oxide, coatings.

Ellison, T.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hanford/Rocky Flats collaboration on development of supercritical carbon dioxide extraction to treat mixed waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proposals for demonstration work under the Department of Energy`s Mixed Waste Focus Area, during the 1996 through 1997 fiscal years included two applications of supercritical carbon dioxide to mixed waste pretreatment. These proposals included task RF15MW58 of Rocky Flats and task RL46MW59 of Hanford. Analysis of compatibilities in wastes and work scopes yielded an expectation of substantial collaboration between sites whereby Hanford waste streams may undergo demonstration testing at Rocky Flats, thereby eliminating the need for test facilities at Hanford. This form of collaboration is premised the continued deployment at Rocky Flats and the capability for Hanford samples to be treated at Rocky Flats. The recent creation of a thermal treatment contract for a facility near Hanford may alleviate the need to conduct organic extraction upon Rocky Flats wastes by providing a cost effective thermal treatment alternative, however, some waste streams at Hanford will continue to require organic extraction. Final site waste stream treatment locations are not within the scope of this document.

Hendrickson, D.W.; Biyani, R.K. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Brown, C.M.; Teter, W.L. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant project Preliminary Safety Analysis Report comment response records  

SciTech Connect

The initial draft version of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) was issued for review and comment on July 17, 1989, and was designated as Revision A. Following resolution of comments arising from the Revision A review, the PSAR was revised as a final draft. This version, which was designated as HWVP PSAR, Revision B, was issued for review and comment on July 16, 1990. The PSAR was again revised as Revision O following the resolution of the Revision B comments. The HWVP PSAR, Revision O, was approved by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) on May 21, 1991, and issued as WHC-EP-0250, Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant Preliminary Safety Analysis Report to the Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). While Westinghouse Hanford organizations were reviewing the drafts of the HWVP PSAR (i.e., Revisions A and B), a parallel review was being performed by the DOE-RL on both versions. This supporting document provides a summary of the PSAR Comment Response Databases for the Westinghouse Hanford and DOE-RL reviews of HWVP PSAR, Revisions A and B. This document also provides copies of all the closed-out Review Comment Records (RCR) submitted by these organizations. 8 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Herborn, D.I.; Campbell, L.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - September 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Isotopic Studies of Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site, WA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MR-0132. Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland WA. Bretz,in recharge at the Hanford Site. Northwest Science. 66:237-M.J. , ed. 2000. Hanford Site groundwater Monitoring

Christensen, J.N.; Conrad, M.E.; DePaolo, D.J.; Dresel, P.E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

203

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - July 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2010 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - July 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm...

204

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2009 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

09 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - May 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

205

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

206

Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 To operate the Hanford Site (Site),...

207

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2011 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - January 2011 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting...

208

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - October 2009 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 2009 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - October 2009 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Hanford Site C Tank Farm...

209

Hanford Site Videos on YouTube  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

For more than forty years, reactors located at Hanford produced plutonium for America's defense program. The process of making plutonium is extremely inefficient in that a massive amount of liquid and solid waste is generated while only a small amount of plutonium is produced. Additionally, all of the facilities and structures that were associated with Hanford's defense mission must also be deactivated, decommissioned, decontaminated, and demolished. That environmental cleanup project is the work that approximately 11,000 Hanford employees are involved with today [copied from http://www.hanford.gov/page.cfm/HanfordsPresentMission]. Snapshots of the work, the issues, and the cleanup successes can be seen on the Hanford Site's YouTube channel. Short clips illustrate demolition projects, installtion of components such as a liner for the landfill, events such as the site fire in 2007 and Secretary of Energy Chu's visit in 2010. Recovery Act Work is highlighted as well.

210

Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of selected aspects of the 105-KW Basin Final Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. HSS's review of the K-West Basin FSAR found it to be generally adequate with respect to the scope of this review. However, some aspects of the FSAR accident analyses of two events may warrant further review: MCO transport cask drop into the K-Basin, and the fire accident event involving the cask

211

Fire hazard analysis for the Westinghouse Hanford Company managed low-level mixed waste Trench 31 and 34  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis is to assess comprehensively the risks from fire within the new lined landfills, provided by W-025 and designated Trench 31 and 34 of Burial Ground 218-W-5; they are located in the 200 West area of the Hanford Site, and are designed to receive low-level mixed waste.

Howard, B.J.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. (comps.)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Hanford Generic Interim Safety Basis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to identify WHC programs and requirements that are an integral part of the authorization basis for nuclear facilities that are generic to all WHC-managed facilities. The purpose of these programs is to implement the DOE Orders, as WHC becomes contractually obligated to implement them. The Hanford Generic ISB focuses on the institutional controls and safety requirements identified in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Lavender, J.C.

1994-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

214

Oversight Reports - Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 27, 2010 May 27, 2010 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - June 2010 Inspection of the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program January 20, 2010 Independent Specific Administrative Controls Review, Office of River Protection - December 2010 Specific Administrative Controls Review with the Office of Environmental Management at the Office of River Protection January 20, 2010 Independent Specific Administrative Controls Review, Richland Operations Office - December 2010 Specific Administrative Controls Review with the Office of Environmental Management at DOE-Richland Operations Office July 22, 2009 Independent Oversight Follow-Up Review, Hanford Site - June 2005 Review of Worker Vapor Exposures and Occupational Medicine Program at the Hanford Site, June 2005

215

Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facilityl.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Siting the International Linear Collider at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Review of the proposed International Linear Collider, applications in high energy physics, and evaluation of the Hanford Site as a possible location for siting the facility.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Asner, David M.; Brodzinski, Ronald L.; Fast, James E.; Miley, Harry S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Richland Operations Office (Hanford) - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc. - Press Release, December 16, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Fluor Hanford, Incorporated, related to Deficiencies with the Design and Safety Basis of the...

218

Hanford Needs Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 1997 This Needs Assessment for former Hanford production workers was developed for the purpose of collecting existing information relevant to exposure and health outcomes...

219

Hanford Needs Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 1997 This Needs Assessment for former Hanford construction workers was developed for the purpose of collecting existing information relevant to exposure and health outcomes...

220

Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Accelerated Closure of the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cleanup of the Hanford Site is currently planned to take until 2046 and another approximately $SOB. In the summer of 1999, Fluor Hanford initiated an ''Accelerated Closure Team'' to evaluate opportunities to reduce this long schedule and high cost for the parts of the Hanford Site which they manage. To-date, this breakthrough team has developed two approaches which will move > 50 million curies away from the Columbia River sooner than planned and at a significantly reduced cost. The approaches successfully applied so far are presently being applied to other opportunities at Hanford.

WILDE, R.T.

2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(VSL). Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) is the contractor responsible for the design and construction of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) for the...

223

Hanford site technical baseline data dictionary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Data Dictionary is to provide information concerning the structure and information contained in the Hanford Site Technical Baseline Database (HSTD).

Baynes, P.A. [Lockheed Martin Hanford Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual defines the Hanford Site radioactive, hazardous, and sanitary solid waste acceptance criteria. Criteria in the manual represent a guide for meeting state and federal regulations; DOE Orders; Hanford Site requirements; and other rules, regulations, guidelines, and standards as they apply to acceptance of radioactive and hazardous solid waste at the Hanford Site. It is not the intent of this manual to be all inclusive of the regulations; rather, it is intended that the manual provide the waste generator with only the requirements that waste must meet in order to be accepted at Hanford Site TSD facilities.

Not Available

1993-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan: Site planning  

SciTech Connect

This plan revises the Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan submitted by Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988. It separates the Hanford Site facilities into two categories: ''strategically required'' facilities and ''marginal'' facilities. It provides a comparison of future facility requirements against existing capacities and proposed projects to eliminate or consolidate marginal facilities (i.e., those facilities that are not fully utilized or are no longer required to accomplish programmatic missions). The objective is to enhance the operating efficiency of the Hanford Site by maximizing facility use and minimizing unnecessary facility operating and maintenance costs. 11 refs.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

conducted an independent review of selected aspects of construction quality at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Project (WTP). The review, which was performed May...

227

MULTIPLE OXIDANT CHROMIUM LEACHING FROM HANFORD WASTE  

MULTIPLE OXIDANT CHROMIUM LEACHING FROM HANFORD WASTE USDOE Aluminum Chromium Leaching Workshop January 24th, 2007 Jennifer E. Holland, Ph.D. Chairman, President, CEO

228

Hanford Boehmite/Chromium Dissolution Data  

Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division Hanford Boehmite/Chromium Dissolution Data R. Peterson, S. Fiskum, J. Geeting, H. Smith, R. Russell, L. Snow, B. Rapko, S. Sinkov,

229

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Working Session (7) ChangeRelease Summary of meeting between DOE-ORP and Hanford Site regulatorsstakeholders regarding Description: Waste Management Area C...

230

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARPT-WTP-2011-002 Site: DOE Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the...

231

Hanford whole body counting manual  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Hanford Whole Body Counting Program as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy--Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its Hanford contractors. Program services include providing in vivo measurements of internally deposited radioactivity in Hanford employees (or visitors). Specific chapters of this manual deal with the following subjects: program operational charter, authority, administration, and practices, including interpreting applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for in vivo measurement frequency, etc., for the plant-wide whole body counting services; state-of-the-art facilities and equipment used to provide the best in vivo measurement results possible for the approximately 11,000 measurements made annually; procedures for performing the various in vivo measurements at the Whole Body Counter (WBC) and related facilities including whole body counts; operation and maintenance of counting equipment, quality assurance provisions of the program, WBC data processing functions, statistical aspects of in vivo measurements, and whole body counting records and associated guidance documents. 16 refs., 48 figs., 22 tabs.

Palmer, H.E.; Rieksts, G.A.; Lynch, T.P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of...

233

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hanford Engineer Works ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Engineer Works - WA 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Hanford Engineer Works (WA.01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

234

Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement Energy Secretary Bodman Statement on Hanford Solid Waste Settlement Agreement January 9, 2006 - 9:43am Addthis Richland, WA -...

235

Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Tank Waste Cleanup Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Tank Waste Cleanup September...

236

Secretary Moniz Meets with Employees, Tribal Leaders during Hanford...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Moniz Meets with Employees, Tribal Leaders during Hanford Visit and Site Tour Secretary Moniz Meets with Employees, Tribal Leaders during Hanford Visit and Site Tour July...

237

New Approaches for Understanding the Hanford 300 Area Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Science New Approaches for Understanding the Hanford 300 Area New Approaches for Understanding the Hanford 300 Area Yoram.jpg Key Challenges: Simultaneously...

238

Hanford Workers Achieve Success in Difficult Glove Box Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Workers Achieve Success in Difficult Glove Box Project at Plutonium Finishing Plant Hanford Workers Achieve Success in Difficult Glove Box Project at Plutonium Finishing...

239

Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with Educational Workshops Hanford Site Celebrates National Native American Heritage Month with Educational...

240

Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - March 2010 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2010 Hanford Site C Tank Farm Meeting Summary - March 2010 Meeting Summary for Development of the Hanford Site C Tank Farm Performance Assessment Meeting Summary for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plan Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plan Project PIA, Richland Operations Office Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plan Project PIA, Richland Operations...

242

Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

DOE Hanford Network Upgrades and Disaster Recovery Exercise Support the Cleanup Mission Now and into the Future - 14303  

SciTech Connect

In 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Hanford Site, located in Washington State, funded an update to the critical network infrastructure supporting the Hanford Federal Cloud (HFC). The project, called ET-50, was the final step in a plan that was initiated five years ago called ?Hanford?s IT Vision, 2015 and Beyond.? The ET-50 project upgraded Hanford?s core data center switches and routers along with a majority of the distribution layer switches. The upgrades allowed HFC the network intelligence to provide Hanford with a more reliable and resilient network architecture. The culmination of the five year plan improved network intelligence and high performance computing as well as helped to provide 10Gbps capable links between core backbone devices (10 times the previous bandwidth). These improvements allow Hanford the ability to further support bandwidth intense applications, such as video teleconferencing. The ET-50 switch upgrade, along with other upgrades implemented from the five year plan, have prepared Hanford?s network for the next evolution of technology in voice, video, and data. Hand-in-hand with ET-50?s major data center outage, Mission Support Alliance?s (MSA) Information Management (IM) organization executed a disaster recovery (DR) exercise to perform a true integration test and capability study. The DR scope was planned within the constraints of ET-50?s 14 hour datacenter outage window. This DR exercise tested Hanford?s Continuity of Operations (COOP) capability and failover plans for safety and business critical Hanford Federal Cloud applications. The planned suite of services to be tested was identified prior to the outage and plans were prepared to test the services ability to failover from the primary Hanford datacenter to the backup datacenter. The services tested were: ? Core Network (backbone, firewall, load balancers) ? Voicemail, ? Voice over IP (VoIP) ? Emergency Notification ? Virtual desktops and; ? Select set of production applications and data. The primary objective of the exercise was to test COOP around the emergency operations at Hanford to provide information on capabilities and dependencies of the current system to insure improved focus of emergency, safety and security capacity in a disaster situation. The integration of the DR test into the ET-50 project allowed the testing of COOP at Hanford and allowed the lessons learned to be defined. These lessons learned have helped improve the understanding of Hanford?s COOP capabilities and will be critical for future planning. With the completion of the Hanford Federal Cloud network upgrades and the disaster recovery exercise, the MSA has a clearer path forward for future technology implementations as well as network improvements to help shape the usability and reliability of the Hanford network in support of the cleanup mission.

Eckman, Todd J.; Hertzel, Ali K.; Lane, James J.

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

244

Oversight Reports - Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 8, 2012 August 8, 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant - May 2012 Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant [HIAR-RL-2012-05-14] July 12, 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site - July 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs May 4, 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - March 2012 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality April 30, 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance - April 2012 Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations

245

Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - September 2006 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site - September 2006 Hanford Site - September 2006 Independent Oversight Inspection, Hanford Site - September 2006 September 2006 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health and Emergency Management Programs at the Hanford Site Waste Stabilization and Disposition Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Security and Safety Performance Assurance, conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Hanford Site Waste Stabilization and Disposition Project (WSD) during August and September 2006. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. EM senior managers demonstrated that they clearly understand their safety management roles and responsibilities, and are engaged in making safety

246

Hanford ARI Overview | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford ARI Overview Hanford ARI Overview Hanford ARI Overview The Hanford Site provides the opportunity for long-term sustainable energy and industry development. The area boasts a specialized workforce that is highly educated and well-established; is rich in resources including land, infrastructure, low-cost energy, and available workforce; more scientists and engineers per capita than any other area in the Pacific Northwest; and is an optimum location for the development of sustainable energy solutions. Hanford_Asset_Revitalization_Initiative.pdf More Documents & Publications $300,000 Block Grant Awarded to Tri-City Industrial Development Council (TRIDEC) Department of Energy Awards $300,000 to Tri-City Industrial Development Council in Washington State Department of Energy Awards $600,000 to Tri-City Industrial Development

247

Hanford Single-Shell Tank Integrity Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations Contract Hanford Single Hanford Single- -Shell Shell Hanford Single Hanford Single Shell Shell Tank Integrity Tank Integrity Program Program Herbert S Berman Herbert S Berman Herbert S. Berman Herbert S. Berman July 29, 2009 July 29, 2009 1 Page 1 Tank Operations Contract Introduction * The Hanford site's principle historic mission was plutonium production for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. * Between 1944 and 1988, the site operated nine graphite- moderated light-water production reactors to irradiate moderated, light-water, production reactors to irradiate fuel and produce plutonium. * Four large chemical separations plants were run to extract plutonium from the fuel, and a variety of laboratories, support facilities, and related infrastructure to support production

248

Senator Murray Visits Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Senator Murray Visits Hanford Senator Murray Visits Hanford Senator Murray Visits Hanford June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis In this photo, U.S. Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) receives an update on activities at C Farm from Office of River Protection (ORP) Manager Kevin Smith, left, and ORP Tank Farms Assistant Manager Tom Fletcher. In this photo, U.S. Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) receives an update on activities at C Farm from Office of River Protection (ORP) Manager Kevin Smith, left, and ORP Tank Farms Assistant Manager Tom Fletcher. U.S. Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) visited the Hanford site in Washington state recently, where she received an update on activities at C Farm, which is one of the groups of underground waste tanks at Hanford. Murray also toured the site's largest groundwater treatment facility. The 200 West

249

Hanford Patrol Academy demolition sites closure plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site is owned by the U.S. Government and operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. Westinghouse Hanford Company is a major contractor to the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and serves as co-operator of the Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites, the unit addressed in this paper. This document consists of a Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application, Form 3 (Revision 4), and a closure plan for the site. An explanation of the Part A Form 3 submitted with this closure plan is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. This Hanford Patrol Academy Demolition Sites Closure Plan submittal contains information current as of December 15, 1994.

Not Available

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

DuraLith Alkali-Aluminosilicate Geopolymer Waste Form Testing for Hanford Secondary Waste  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the work reported here was to develop additional information regarding the DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer as a waste form for liquid secondary waste to support selection of a final waste form for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant secondary liquid wastes to be disposed in the Integrated Disposal Facility on the Hanford Site. Testing focused on optimizing waste loading, improving waste form performance, and evaluating the robustness of the waste form with respect to waste variability.

Gong, W. L.; Lutz, Werner; Pegg, Ian L.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

251

Selection of Pretreatment Processes for Removal of Radionuclides from Hanford Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's), Office of River Protection (ORP) located at Hanford Washington has established a contract (1) to design, construct, and commission a new Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that will treat and immobilize the Hanford tank wastes for ultimate disposal. The WTP is comprised of four major elements, pretreatment, LAW immobilization, HLW immobilization, and balance of plant facilities. This paper describes the technologies selected for pretreatment of the LAW and HLW tank wastes, how these technologies were selected, and identifies the major technology testing activities being conducted to finalize the design of the WTP.

Carreon, R.; Mauss, B. M.; Johnson, M. E.; Holton, L. K.; Wright, G. T.; Peterson, R. A.; Rueter, K. J.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

retrieved, transferred and Final Environmental Impact Statement Safe Interim Storage Of Hanford Tank Wastes file:I|Data%20Migration%20TaskEIS-0212-FEIS-Summary-1995.html6...

253

Colloid-Facilitated Cs Transport through Water-Saturated Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be welded. Some Tri-Party Agreement milestones completed in 2002 were related to work on Hanford tanks. #12 paragraphs. Solid waste may originate from work on the Hanford Site or from sources offsite, with contributions from CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.; S.M. Stoller Corporation; Fluor Hanford, Inc. and its

Flury, Markus

254

Hanford K-Basin Sludge Characterization Overview February 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hanford K-Basin Sludge Characterization Overview February 2005 1 Hanford K-Basin Sludge Characterization Overview February 2005 1. Summary The Hanford K-East and K-West Basins were used to store of the irradiated fuel reprocessing facility at Hanford (the PUREX facility) the N-Reactor irradiated fuel remained

255

Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1959  

SciTech Connect

This document provides details of activities of Hanford Laboratories Operation for the month of June 1959.

1959-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability; DOE/EIS-0286: Final Hanford Site Solid Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Washington (2/13/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 15 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 30 / Friday, February 13, 2004 / Notices ratings assigned to draft environmental impact statements (EISs) was published in FR dated April 04, 2003 (68 FR 16511). Draft EISs ERP No. D-AFS-J65397-WY Rating LO, Woodrock Project, Proposal for Timber Sale, Travel Management and Watershed Restoration, Implementation, Bighorn National Forest, Tongue Ranger District, Sheridan County, WY. Summary: EPA has lack of objections to the proposed action based on the predicted overall improvement of forest resource conditions. EPA suggests that the final EIS provide qantification sediment from erosion estimates and monitor water quality and habitat quality in streams. ERP No. D-AFS-K65265-AZ Rating LO, Bar T Bar Anderson Springs Allotment Management Plans to

257

Manhattan Project: Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, 1944 OAK RIDGE AND HANFORD COME THROUGH Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, 1944 OAK RIDGE AND HANFORD COME THROUGH (Oak Ridge [Clinton] and Hanford, 1944-1945) Events > Bringing It All Together, 1942-1945 Establishing Los Alamos, 1942-1943 Early Bomb Design, 1943-1944 Basic Research at Los Alamos, 1943-1944 Implosion Becomes a Necessity, 1944 Oak Ridge and Hanford Come Through, 1944-1945 Final Bomb Design, 1944-1945 Atomic Rivals and the ALSOS Mission, 1938-1945 Espionage and the Manhattan Project, 1940-1945 None of Los Alamos's bomb design work would be of any use if Oak Ridge or Hanford did not come through with enough uranium-235 or plutonium for at least one bomb. Spending on the Manhattan Project reached $100 million per month by mid-1944, yet it was still far from clear that enough of either fissionable substance could be produced before war's end. In the summer of 1944, Oak Ridge's Y-12 Electromagnetic Plant (above) was plagued by operational problems, and the ongoing barrier crisis at the K-25 Gaseous Diffusion Plant threatened to render it useless. At Hanford, the first production reactor had not yet been completed. In addition, officials feared that not enough of the uranium-containing slugs to feed the pile would be available. Even assuming that enough uranium or plutonium could be delivered by Oak Ridge or Hanford, there was no guarantee that the Los Alamos laboratory would be able to design and fabricate weapons in time. Only the most optimistic in the Manhattan Project would have predicted, as Groves did when he met with Marshall in August of 1944, that a bomb or bombs powerful enough to make a difference in the current war would be ready by August 1, 1945.

258

Hanford Site pollution prevention progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Richland Operations Office (RL) and Office of River Protection (ORP) are pleased to issue the attached Pollution Prevention Progress Report. We have just met the most aggressive waste reduction and A recycling goals to date and are publishing this report to recognize A the site's progress, and to ensure it will sustain success beyond 1 Fiscal Year 2000. This report was designed to inform the been made by RL and ORP in Waste Minimization (WMin) and Pollution Prevention (P2). RL, ORP and their contractors are committed to protecting the environment, and we reiterate pollution prevention should continue to be at the forefront of the environmental cleanup and research efforts. As you read the attached report, we believe you will see a clear demonstration of RL and ORP's outstanding performance as it has been responsible and accountable to the nation, its employees, and the community in which we live and work. commitment that all employees have for environmental stewardship. The report provides useful information about the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE'S) environmental policy and programs, and contains countless examples of waste minimization projects. This year was the first year our site received the White House Closing the Circle in the category of Affirmative Procurement. This Award recognizes our site for designing a comprehensive strategy for achieving 100 percent purchases of the U.S.Environmenta1 Protection Agency designated recycled items. DOE-Headquarters also acknowledged the site in 1999 for its public outreach efforts in communicating pollution prevention to Hanford Site employees and the community. Our site is truly a recognized leader in outreach as it has kept this title for two consecutive years. In previous years, we received the White House Closing the Circle Honorable Mention in Affirmative Procurement and several other National DOE Awards. Through partnership with the local community and stakeholders, the site and its contractors have a clear sense of direction toward achieving environmental protection, cleanup, and research.

BETSCH, M.D.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

DEWATERING TREATMENT SCALE-UP TESTING RESULTS OF HANFORD TANK WASTES  

SciTech Connect

This report documents CH2M HILL Hanford Group Inc. (CH2M HILL) 2007 dryer testing results in Richland, WA at the AMEC Nuclear Ltd., GeoMelt Division (AMEC) Horn Rapids Test Site. It provides a discussion of scope and results to qualify the dryer system as a viable unit-operation in the continuing evaluation of the bulk vitrification process. A 10,000 liter (L) dryer/mixer was tested for supplemental treatment of Hanford tank low-activity wastes, drying and mixing a simulated non-radioactive salt solution with glass forming minerals. Testing validated the full scale equipment for producing dried product similar to smaller scale tests, and qualified the dryer system for a subsequent integrated dryer/vitrification test using the same simulant and glass formers. The dryer system is planned for installation at the Hanford tank farms to dry/mix radioactive waste for final treatment evaluation of the supplemental bulk vitrification process.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

260

Hanford Site emergency response needs, Volumes 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a comprehensive third party needs assessment of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD), conducted by Hughes Associates Inc. The assessment was commissioned with the intent of obtaining an unbiased report which could be used as a basis for identifying needed changes/modifications to the fire department and its services. This report serves several functions: (1) it documents current and future site operations and associated hazards and risks identified as a result of document review, site and facility surveys, and interviews with knowledgeable personnel; (2) describes the HFD in terms of organization, existing resources and response capabilities; (3) identifies regulatory and other requirements that are applicable to the HFD and includes a discussion of associated legal liabilities; and (4) provides recommendations based on applicable requirements and existing conditions. Each recommendation is followed by a supporting statement to clarify the intent or justification of the recommendation. This report will be followed by a Master Plan document which will present an implementation method for the recommendations (with associated costs) considered to be essential to maintaining adequate, cost effective emergency services at the Hanford site in the next five to seven years.

Good, D.E.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heater Experiment at Hanford. Berkeley, Lawre ;e BerkeleyTest Facility, Hole DC-11, Hanford Reservation. Prepared forof Gable Mountain Basalt Cores, Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Isotopic Tracking of Hanford 300 Area Derived Uranium in the Columbia River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

F. ; and Webber, W. D.. Hanford Site Groundwater MonitoringGeochemistry at the Hanford Site. PNNL-17031. 2007. (13)contamination at the Hanford Site in Washington using high-

Christensen, John N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Contaminant desorption during long-term leaching of hydroxide-weathered Hanford sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

137 in sediments at the Hanford Site, Washington. Environ.during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks. Appl.subsurface sediments from the Hanford site, USA. Geochim.

Thompson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Development of A Bayesian Geostatistical Data Assimilation Method and Application to the Hanford 300 Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4.3.1 Hanford 300Area IFRC Site . . . . . . . . . . . .aquifer characterization at the Hanford 300 area 3.14.4 Data Assimilation at the Hanford IFRC

Murakami, Haruko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Microsoft PowerPoint - 7-03 Suttora Tech Exchange - Hanford Scoping...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Hanford Example Linda Suttora Office of Environmental Compliance DOE-HQ Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010 Print Close Scoping of the Hanford PA * Reason for new Hanford C...

266

Hanford tank clean up: A guide to understanding the technical issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most difficult technical challenges in cleaning up the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington State will be to process the radioactive and chemically complex waste found in the Site`s 177 underground storage tanks. Solid, liquid, and sludge-like wastes are contained in 149 single- and 28 double-shelled steel tanks. These wastes contain about one half of the curies of radioactivity and mass of hazardous chemicals found on the Hanford Site. Therefore, Hanford cleanup means tank cleanup. Safely removing the waste from the tanks, separating radioactive elements from inert chemicals, and creating a final waste form for disposal will require the use of our nation`s best available technology coupled with scientific advances, and an extraordinary commitment by all involved. The purpose of this guide is to inform the reader about critical issues facing tank cleanup. It is written as an information resource for the general reader as well as the technically trained person wanting to gain a basic understanding about the waste in Hanford`s tanks -- how the waste was created, what is in the waste, how it is stored, and what are the key technical issues facing tank cleanup. Access to information is key to better understanding the issues and more knowledgeably participating in cleanup decisions. This guide provides such information without promoting a given cleanup approach or technology use.

Gephart, R.E.; Lundgren, R.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models: FINAL REPORT of grant Grant No. DE-FG02-04ER63726  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes research undertaken collaboratively between Princeton University, the NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory on the Princeton University campus, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and the University of California, Los Angeles between September 1, 2000, and November 30, 2006, to do fundamental research on ocean iron fertilization as a means to enhance the net oceanic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere. The approach we proposed was to develop and apply a suite of coupled physical-ecologicalbiogeochemical models in order to (i) determine to what extent enhanced carbon fixation from iron fertilization will lead to an increase in the oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 and how long this carbon will remain sequestered (efficiency), and (ii) examine the changes in ocean ecology and natural biogeochemical cycles resulting from iron fertilization (consequences). The award was funded in two separate three-year installments: • September 1, 2000 to November 30, 2003, for a project entitled “Ocean carbon sequestration by fertilization: An integrated biogeochemical assessment.” A final report was submitted for this at the end of 2003 and is included here as Appendix 1. • December 1, 2003 to November 30, 2006, for a follow-on project under the same grant number entitled “Carbon sequestration by patch fertilization: A comprehensive assessment using coupled physical-ecological-biogeochemical models.” This report focuses primarily on the progress we made during the second period of funding subsequent to the work reported on in Appendix 1. When we began this project, we were thinking almost exclusively in terms of long-term fertilization over large regions of the ocean such as the Southern Ocean, with much of our focus being on how ocean circulation and biogeochemical cycling would interact to control the response to a given fertilization scenario. Our research on these types of scenarios, which was carried out largely during the first three years of our project, led to several major new insights on the interaction between ocean biogeochemistry and circulation. This work, which is described in 2 the following Section II on “Large scale fertilization,” has continued to appear in the literature over the past few years, including two high visibility papers in Nature. Early on in the first three years of our project, it became clear that small "patch-scale" fertilizations over limited regions of order 100 km diameter were much more likely than large scale fertilization, and we carried out a series of idealized patch fertilization simulations reported on in Gnanadesikan et al. (2003). Based on this paper and other results we had obtained by the end of our first three-year grant, we identified a number of important issues that needed to be addressed in the second three-year period of this grant. Section III on “patch fertilization” discusses the major findings of this phase of our research, which is described in two major manuscripts that will be submitted for publication in the near future. This research makes use of new more realistic ocean ecosystem and iron cycling models than our first paper on this topic. We have several major new insights into what controls the efficiency of iron fertilization in the ocean. Section IV on “model development” summarizes a set of papers describing the progress that we made on improving the ecosystem models we use for our iron fertilization simulations.

Sarmiento, Jorge L; Gnanadesikan, Anand; Gruber, Nicolas

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

268

AN INTEGRATED BIOLOGICAL CONTROL SYSTEM AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

In 1999 an integrated biological control system was instituted at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Successes and changes to the program needed to be communicated to a large and diverse mix of organizations and individuals. Efforts at communication are directed toward the following: Hanford Contractors (Liquid or Tank Waste, Solid Waste, Environmental Restoration, Science and Technology, Site Infrastructure), General Hanford Employees, and Hanford Advisory Board (Native American Tribes, Environmental Groups, Local Citizens, Washington State and Oregon State regulatory agencies). Communication was done through direct interface meetings, individual communication, where appropriate, and broadly sharing program reports. The objectives of the communication efforts was to have the program well coordinated with Hanford contractors, and to have the program understood well enough that all stakeholders would have confidence in the work performed by the program to reduce or elimated spread of radioactive contamination by biotic vectors. Communication of successes and changes to an integrated biological control system instituted in 1999 at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site have required regular interfaces with not only a diverse group of Hanford contractors (i.e., those responsible for liquid or tank waste, solid wastes, environmental restoration, science and technology, and site infrastructure), and general Hanford employees, but also with a consortium of designated stake holders organized as the Hanford Advisory Board (i.e., Native American tribes, various environmental groups, local citizens, Washington state and Oregon regulatory agencies, etc.). Direct interface meetings, individual communication where appropriate, and transparency of the biological control program were the methods and outcome of this effort.

JOHNSON AR; CAUDILL JG; GIDDINGS RF; RODRIGUEZ JM; ROOS RC; WILDE JW

2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

269

Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwatermonitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons.

Connell, Carl W. Jr. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Carr, Jennifer S. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Hildebrand, R. Douglas [Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA (United States); Schatz, Aaron L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Conley, S. F. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Brown, W. L. [Lockheed Martin Systems Information, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hanford Production Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Needs Assessment for Medical Surveillance of Needs Assessment for Medical Surveillance of Former Hanford Workers Phase I - October 1, 1997 Report Submitted by: University of Washington Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359739 Seattle, WA 98104 October 1, 1997 Authors Scott Barnhart, MD, MPH Principal Investigator Tim Takaro, MD, MPH, MS Co-Principal Investigator Bert Stover, BA Kate Durand, MHS, CIH Bill Trejo, BS Chris Mack, MS Kathy Ertell, MS, CIH Cooperative Agreement # DE-FCO3-96SF21-2581A000 TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Tables iv List of Figures v Executive Summary vi Introduction 1 II. Methods A. Human Subjects 3 B. Population Identification - Available Databases 3 C. Pending Databases 4 D. Assembly of Master Database 5 E. Estimation of Mortality 6 F. Estimation of Exposure* 6 C. Estimate of Need of Medical Surveillance

271

Hanford Production Workers Needs Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Surveillance of Medical Surveillance of Former Hanford Workers Phase I - October 1, 1997 Report Submitted by: University of Washington Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359739 Seattle, WA 98104 October 1, 1997 Authors Scott Barnhart, MD, MPH Principal Investigator Tim Takaro, MD, MPH, MS Co-Principal Investigator Bert Stover, BA Kate Durand, MHS, CIH Bill Trejo, BS Chris Mack, MS Kathy Ertell, MS, CIH Cooperative Agreement # DE-FCO3-96SF21-2581A000 TABLE OF CONTENTS List of Tables iv List of Figures v Executive Summary vi Introduction 1 II. Methods A. Human Subjects 3 B. Population Identification - Available Databases 3 C. Pending Databases 4 D. Assembly of Master Database 5 E. Estimation of Mortality 6 F. Estimation of Exposure* 6 C. Estimate of Need of Medical Surveillance

272

Hanford Construction Workers Needs Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION WORKES AT HANFORD: A NEEDS ASSESSMENT Submitted by Center to Protect Workers' Rights on behalf of The Building and Construction Trades Dept., AFL-CIO and The Central Washington Building and Construction Trades Council In cooperation with United Brotherhood of Carpenters University of Cincinnati Occupational Health Foundation George Washington University Zenith Administrators, Inc. Duke University July 1, 1997 Table bt Cóütn 1. Introduction and Background a. Specific Aims b. Rationale for Program 2. Need for Establishing Medical Evaluation and Notification a. Medical Surveillance b. History of Site c. Special Issues for Construction Workers 3. Size of Construction Workers' Population (Since 1943) a. Crude Estimate of Population Size b. Population Before 1950 c. Population After 1950

273

Hanford cultural resources management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a federal agency, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has been directed by Congress and the President to provide leadership in the preservation of prehistoric, historical, and cultural resources on lands it administers, to manage these in a spirit of stewardship for future generations, and to protect and preserve the rights of Native Americans to religious freedom. The purpose of this document is to describe how the DOE-Richland Operations (DOE-RL) will meet those responsibilities on the Hanford Site, pursuant to guidelines for Agency Responsibilities under the Historic Preservation Act (FR 53:31, February 17, 1988). This document is intended for multiple uses. Among other things, the text is designed as a manual for cultural resource managers to follow and as an explanation of the process of cultural resource regulatory compliance for the DOE-RL and Site contractors. 10 refs., 17 figs., 11 tabs.

Chatters, J.C. (ed.)

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses. The original scope of the project was to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). Although Milestone M-48-14 has been met, Revision I is being issued to address external review comments with emphasis on changes in the modeling of anchor bolts connecting the concrete dome and the steel primary tank. The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that a nonlinear soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis be performed on the DSTs. The analysis is required to include the effects of sliding interfaces and fluid sloshing (fluid-structure interaction). SSI analysis has traditionally been treated by frequency domain computer codes such as SHAKE (Schnabel, et al. 1972) and SASSI (Lysmer et al. 1999a). Such frequency domain programs are limited to the analysis of linear systems. Because of the contact surfaces, the response of the DSTs to a seismic event is inherently nonlinear and consequently outside the range of applicability of the linear frequency domain programs. That is, the nonlinear response of the DSTs to seismic excitation requires the use of a time domain code. The capabilities and limitations of the commercial time domain codes ANSYS{reg_sign} and MSC Dytran{reg_sign} for performing seismic SSI analysis of the DSTs and the methodology required to perform the detailed seismic analysis of the DSTs has been addressed in Rinker et al (2006a). On the basis of the results reported in Rinker et al. (2006a), it is concluded that time-domain SSI analysis using ANSYS{reg_sign} is justified for predicting the global response of the DSTs. The most significant difference between the current revision (Revision 1) of this report and the original issue (Revision 0) is the treatment of the anchor bolts that tie the steel dome of the primary tank to the concrete tank dome.

MACKEY TC; RINKER MW; CARPENTER BG; HENDRIX C; ABATT FG

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS OF HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site double-shell tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project--DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST system at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14, The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work statement provided to M&D (PNNL 2003) required that the seismic analysis of the DSTs assess the impacts of potentially non-conservative assumptions in previous analyses and account for the additional soil mass due to the as-found soil density increase, the effects of material degradation, additional thermal profiles applied to the full structure including the soil-structure response with the footings, the non-rigid (low frequency) response of the tank roof, the asymmetric seismic-induced soil loading, the structural discontinuity between the concrete tank wall and the support footing and the sloshing of the tank waste. The seismic analysis considers the interaction of the tank with the surrounding soil and the effects of the primary tank contents. The DSTs and the surrounding soil are modeled as a system of finite elements. The depth and width of the soil incorporated into the analysis model are sufficient to obtain appropriately accurate analytical results. The analyses required to support the work statement differ from previous analysis of the DSTs in that the soil-structure interaction (SSI) model includes several (nonlinear) contact surfaces in the tank structure, and the contained waste must be modeled explicitly in order to capture the fluid-structure interaction behavior between the primary tank and contained waste.

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Office of River Protection (Hanford) - Enforcement Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Documents Enforcement Documents Office of River Protection (Hanford) Enforcement Letter issued to Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, related to a positive Unreviewed Safety Question involving the Tank Farm Waste Transfer System at the Hanford Site, (NEL-2012-01) February 28, 2012 Consent Order issued to Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC related to deficiencies in the corrective action management program, radiation control program, and sealed radioactive source accountability and control program (NCO-2011-01) May 27, 2011 Consent Order issued to Bechtel National, Inc. for Deficiencies in Vendor Commercial Grade Dedication Processes at the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project (NCO-2010-03) September 22, 2010 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Bechtel National, Inc., related to Deficiencies at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant at the Hanford Site, December 3, 2008 (NEA-2008-04)

277

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, March 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation March 1963. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

1963-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, March 1964  

SciTech Connect

The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, March 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, and applied mathematics operation, and programming operations are discussed.

1964-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, October 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1963-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, September 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, September 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1963-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, August 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, August 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1963-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

282

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, June 1963  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, June 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

1963-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, April 1964  

SciTech Connect

This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, applied mathematics, programming operation, and radiation protection are discussed.

1964-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Hanford Activity Report for Specific Administrative Controls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on its Participation in a Review of Selected Aspects of Nuclear Safety at the Hanford Site Tank Farms, December 6-10, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of...

285

First Chapter of Hanford Story Released | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter of Hanford Story Released Chapter of Hanford Story Released First Chapter of Hanford Story Released April 20, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoff_Tyree@rl.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the first chapter of "The Hanford Story" to the public. The Hanford Story is a multimedia presentation that provides an overview of the Hanford Site-its history, today's cleanup activities, and a glimpse into the possibilities of future uses of the 586-square-mile government site in southeast Washington State. The 17-minute video has been posted to the site's YouTube Channel on www.youtube.com/hanfordsite, as well as the Department of Energy's Hanford website on www.hanford.gov. The Hanford Story will be delivered in a series of video-based chapters

286

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates):Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. [comps.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates.

Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. [comps.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Special Report Order, Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc.- October 22, 2001  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Multiple Nuclear Safety Issues at the Hanford Site

289

Enforcement Letter, Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., H5-20- July 7, 1997  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., related to Potential Quality Assurance Rule Violations at the Hanford Site

290

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SEISMIC ANALYSIS IN SUPPORT OF INCREASED LIQUID LEVEL IN 241-AP TANK FARMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The "Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Project" is in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14.

MACKEY TC; ABBOTT FG; CARPENTER BG; RINKER MW

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Archaeological survey of the 200 East and 200 West Areas, Hanford Site, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responding to a heavy demand for cultural resource reviews of excavation sites, the Westinghouse Hanford Company contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory to conduct a comprehensive archaeological resource review for the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site, Washington. This was accomplished through literature and records review and an intensive pedestrian survey of all undisturbed portions of the 200 East Area and a stratified random sample of the 200 West Area. The survey, followed the Secretary of the Interior's guidelines for the identification of historic properties. The result of the survey is a model of cultural resource distributions that has been used to create cultural resource zones with differing degrees of sensitivity. 11 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Chatters, J.C.; Cadoret, N.A.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes, Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes, Hanford Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington; Record of Decision (ROO). This Record of Decision has been prepared pursuant to the Council on Environme~tal Quality ~egulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of the National Environmental Pol icy Act (NEPAl (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and the Department of Energy NEPA Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). It is based on DOE's "Environmental Impact Statement for the Oi sposal of Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic, and Tank Wastes'' (OOE/EIS-0113) and consideration of ~11 public and agency comments received on the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). fJECISION The decision is to implement the ''Preferred Alternative'' as discussed in

293

Resolution of the Hanford site ferrocyanide safety issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ferrocyanide Safety Issue at the Hanford Site was officially resolved in December 1996. This paper summarizes the key activities that led to final resolution of this safety hazard, a process that began in 1990 after it and other safety concerns were identified for the underground high-level waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. At the time little was known about ferrocyanide-nitrate/nitrite reactions and their potential to cause offsite releases of radioactivity. The ferrocyanide hazard was a perceived problem, but it took six years of intense studies and analyses of tank samples to prove that the problem no longer exists. The issue revolved around the fact that ferrocyanide and nitrate mixtures can be made to explode violently if concentrated, dry, and heated to temperatures of at least 250 {degrees}C. The studies conducted over the last six years have shown that the combined effects of temperature, radiation, and pH during 40 or more years of storage have destroyed almost all of the ferrocyanide originally added to tanks. This was shown in laboratory experiments using simulant wastes and confirmed by actual samples taken from the ferrocyanide tanks. The tank waste sludges are now too dilute to support a sustained exothermic reaction, even if dried out and heated to high temperatures. 2 tabs., 18 refs.

Cash, R.J.; Lilga, M.A.; Babad, H., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

Evaporation of a Large Decontaminated Hanford Tank Sample  

SciTech Connect

A radioactive sample (approximately 15 L) from Hanford tank 241-AN-102 was concentrated via evaporation at reduced pressure and temperature, to support flowsheet development and regulatory approval for the Hanford River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP). The received sample (Envelope C) had been pretreated at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for removal of strontium and transuranic ions by precipitation and removal of cesium and technetium via ion exchange. The resulting pretreated Low Activity Waste (LAW) stream was the feed material for this evaporation test. The goals of this evaporation were to: (1) provide operating data -- including foaming and scaling tendencies -- for scale-up purposes, (2) obtain liquid and off-gas samples during steady-state operation for regulatory analysis, (3) conduct a ''final boildown'' after the steady-state operation to determine the solubility endpoint of the solution and the major precipitants, and (4) provide concentrated feed for a melter vitrification study to produce several kilograms of immobilized LAW glass product.

Crawford, C.L.

2001-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours Hanford Grows Young Minds Through Site Tours June 3, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis John Britton, with Office of River Protection contractor Washington River Protection Solutions, explains the Hanford tank waste program to Western Washington University students in a recent tour of the Hanford site. John Britton, with Office of River Protection contractor Washington River Protection Solutions, explains the Hanford tank waste program to Western Washington University students in a recent tour of the Hanford site. RICHLAND, Wash. - It is harvest season for cherries, raspberries and rhubarb in Washington state. But employees at the Hanford site are helping grow the young minds of the nation's future science, technology,

296

DOE Cites Washington Closure Hanford for Safety Violations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Department of Energy issues a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to contractor Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) for violations of DOE's worker safety and health program regulations in 2009 at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

297

Operational Awarness at Hanford Tank Farms, April 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-HANFORD-2013-04-15 Site: Hanford - Office of River Protection Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of...

298

Fourth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public Fourth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public February 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Carrie Meyer, DOE, (509) 372-0810...

299

Local Scouts Train with Hanford Safety Experts - 52 Boy Scouts...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Scouts Train with Hanford Safety Experts - 52 Boy Scouts Earn Merit Badges at the HAMMER Training Facility Local Scouts Train with Hanford Safety Experts - 52 Boy Scouts Earn...

300

Hanford Cr | VIMSS - Virtual Institute for Microbial Stress and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactor building HCB (Visit Website) Hanford Chromium Bioremediation Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at Hanford 100H. The objective of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Statements of work for FY 1996 to 2001 for the Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Performance Assessment Project  

SciTech Connect

The statements of work for each activity and task of the Hanford Low-Level Tank Waste Performance Assessment project are given for the fiscal years 1996 through 2001. The end product of this program is approval of a final performance assessment by the Department of Energy in the year 2000.

Mann, F.M.

1995-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes environmental information for the Hanford Site in Washington State for the calendar year 2001.

Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Morasch, Launa F.

2002-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

303

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant- May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant [HIAR-RL-2012-05-14

304

Project Hanford nuclear facilities list and authorization basis information  

SciTech Connect

Rev. 4 documents and updates the Nuclear Facilities list and associated Authorization Basis (AB) information for applicable Project Hanford facilities.

EVANS, C.B.

1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste  

AREVA NC Inc. Modified Bayer Process for Alumina Removal from Hanford Waste January 24, 2007 Don Geniesse AREVA NC Inc.

306

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the status of groundwater monitoring at the Hanford Site during fiscal year 2001.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hanford Tank 241-C-106: Residual Waste Contaminant Release Model and Supporting Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL is producing risk/performance assessments to support the closure of single-shell tanks at the DOE's Hanford Site. As part of this effort, staff at PNNL were asked to develop release models for contaminants of concern that are present in residual sludge remaining in tank 241-C-106 (C-106) after final retrieval of waste from the tank. This report provides the information developed by PNNL.

Deutsch, William J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Schaef, Herbert T.

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

308

NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule  

SciTech Connect

Title 44 United States Code, Public Printing and Documents,'' regulations cited in the General Services Administration's (GSA) Federal Information Resources Management Regulations'' (FIRMR), Part 201-9, Creation, Maintenance, and Use of Records,'' and regulation issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter XII, Subchapter B, Records Management,'' require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA's General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 2, contains NRC's Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,'' and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 2 totally reorganizes the records schedules from a functional arrangement to an arrangement by the host office. A subject index and a conversion table have also been developed for the NRC schedules to allow staff to identify the new schedule numbers easily and to improve their ability to locate applicable schedules.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Independent Oversight Inspection of Emergency Management at the Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Hanford Site August 2001 Washington, DC 20585 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE HANFORD SITE VOLUME III Table of Contents Acronyms .....................................................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ...........................................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results ...................................................................................................................................................................3 3.0 Conclusions............................................................................................................................................

310

In Situ Colloid Mobilization in Hanford Sediments under  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on CT transformations in Hanford soil. This work assessed the potential for in situ CT biotransColumn Studies of Anaerobic Carbon Tetrachloride Biotransformation with Hanford Aquifer Material a column reactor system containing Hanford Aquifer material in order to assess the potential of in situ

Hren, Michael

311

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a at the US DOE Hanford Site, Washington, caus- ing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact mimicking tank leak conditions at the US DOE Hanford Site. In batch experiments, Si-rich solutions

Flury, Markus

312

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrate-Cancrinite Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions B A R R Y R . B minerals at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington. Nitrate-cancrinite began's (DOE) Hanford Site in southeast Washington since the late 1950s (1). To predict the fate

Illinois at Chicago, University of

313

Enclosure 1 Additional Information on Hanford Tank Wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enclosure 1 Additional Information on Hanford Tank Wastes Introduction The U. S. Nuclear Regulatory of Energy to the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency addressing the Hanford Tank and K Basin Wastes (CBFO stored in two tanks (designated as tanks 241-AW-103 and 241-AW-105) at the Hanford Site are not high

314

Reading Comprehension Passages  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Reading Comprehension Passages! Welcome to Reading Comprehension Passages! Select one of the passages listed below. Complete the passage by selecting the words that best fit the context of the passage. Press the 'Check My Answers!' button when you are done to see how you did! Attention Teachers!! Add your own reading comprehension passages for your class to use! If you are reading this, your browser is NOT running JavaScript. JavaScript MUST be enabled for this section of our site to work. Once you have turned JavaScript on, reload this page and this warning will go away. The Scientific Method in the Lab* Charges and Electricity The Earth's Energy Budget The Water Cycle The Water Cycle #2* Minerals* 3rd Grade Resources* Where Plants and Animals Live* Internet Safety Looking for Quarks Inside the Atom

315

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

MJ Hartman; PE Dresel; JW Lindberg; DR Newcomer; EC Thornton

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2011 September 13, 2011 Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount. Last year, workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company treated 600 mil- lion gallons of groundwater at the site. "It's great to know the amount of treated groundwater is increasing. We are meeting our goals, which means we are protecting the Columbia River," said Bill Barrett, CH2M HILL director of pump and treat operations and maintenance. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work to expand Hanford's capacity for treating contami- nated groundwater led to the 2011 record amount. The Recovery Act funded the installation of more

318

HANFORD SITE SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM RICHLAND WASHINGTON - 12464  

SciTech Connect

In support of implementation of Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy and Economic Performance, the Hanford Site Sustainability Plan was developed to implement strategies and activities required to achieve the prescribed goals in the EO as well as demonstrate measurable progress in environmental stewardship at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site Sustainability Program was developed to demonstrate progress towards sustainability goals as defined and established in Executive Order (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy and Economic Performance; EO 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy and Transportation Management, and several applicable Energy Acts. Multiple initiatives were undertaken in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 to implement the Program and poise the Hanford Site as a leader in environmental stewardship. In order to implement the Hanford Site Sustainability Program, a Sustainability Plan was developed in conjunction with prime contractors, two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Offices, and key stakeholders to serve as the framework for measuring progress towards sustainability goals. Based on the review of these metrics and future plans, several activities were initiated to proactively improve performance or provide alternatives for future consideration contingent on available funding. A review of the key metric associated with energy consumption for the Hanford Site in FY 2010 and 2011 indicated an increase over the target reduction of 3 percent annually from a baseline established in FY 2003 as illustrated in Figure 1. This slight increase was attributed primarily from the increased energy demand from the cleanup projects funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) in FY 2010 and 2011. Although it is forecasted that the energy demand will decrease commensurate with the completion of ARRA projects, several major initiatives were launched to improve energy efficiency.

FRITZ LL

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

319

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double shell waste tanks. The analysis is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raise by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review (in April and May 2001) of work being performed on the double-shell tank farms, and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system.

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products (/sup 58/Co, /sup 60/Co, /sup 54/Mn, and /sup 59/Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation; and bioassay follow-up treatment. 64 refs., 42 figs., 118 tabs.

Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Hanford Site Regional Population - 2010 Census  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy conducts radiological operations in south-central Washington State. Population dose estimates must be performed to provide a measure of the impact from site radiological releases. Results of the U.S. 2010 Census were used to determine counts and distributions for the residential population located within 50-miles of several operating areas of the Hanford Site. Year 2010 was the first census year that a 50-mile population of a Hanford Site operational area exceeded the half-million mark.

Hamilton, Erin L.; Snyder, Sandra F.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

324

Comprehensive Environmental Management Process  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information about Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Environmental Management Plan. The topics covered include: waste minimization, waste generation, environmental concerns, public relations of the laboratory, and how this plan will help to answer to the demands of the laboratory as their mission changes.

Hjeresen, D.L.; Roybal, S.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Hanford ETR Bulk Vitrification System - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) Review Report Summary - Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) for Low-Actvity Waste at Hanford More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - November 2013 SRS Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project Technology Readiness Assessment External Technical Review for Evaluation of System Level Modeling and Simulation Tools in Support of Hanford Site Liquid Waste Process

326

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 February 2011 Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Assurance Review [ARPT-WTP-2011-002] The purpose of the visit was to perform a review of construction quality assurance at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site activities concurrently with the Department of Energy (DOE) WTP staff. One focus area for this visit was piping and pipe support installations. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment Plant - February 2011 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - August 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant -

327

Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Hanford | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Hanford Site Programs & Cooperative Agreements: Hanford Hanford The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR), Nez Perce Tribe, and Yakama Nation are important stakeholders with Treaty rights and interests at the Hanford Site. DOE environmental cleanup activities have the potential to impact natural and cultural resources and to interfere with American Indian religious practices. Through cooperative agreements, tribal staff and consultants of the Yakama, Nez Perce, and CTUIR are engaged on a daily basis with DOE and its contractors. The principle activities by tribes include reviewing and commenting on plans and documents, participating in meetings at the request of DOE, monitoring cultural resource sites, participating in site surveys, and identifying

328

Software configuration management plan for the Hanford site technical database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Technical Database (HSTD) is used as the repository/source for the technical requirements baseline and programmatic data input via the Hanford Site and major Hanford Project Systems Engineering (SE) activities. The Hanford Site SE effort has created an integrated technical baseline for the Hanford Site that supports SE processes at the Site and project levels which is captured in the HSTD. The HSTD has been implemented in Ascent Logic Corporation (ALC) Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) package referred to as the Requirements Driven Design (RDD) software. This Software Configuration Management Plan (SCMP) provides a process and means to control and manage software upgrades to the HSTD system.

GRAVES, N.J.

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

SPECIAL SECTION: HANFORD SITE Hanford Site Vadose Zone Studies: An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a sparsely populated area in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains, adjacent to the Columbia River in southeastern Washington State (Fig. 1). The Hanford Site was set aside in the early 1940s by the U.S. Government to perform a top-secret mission, the Manhattan Project, for production of plutonium for atomic weapons used to end World War II and later to support the Cold War with the Soviet Union. Starting in 1943– 1945, Hanford employed thousands of workers on the largest construction project in the world at that time. The workers built a series of nuclear reactors along with large monolithic concrete buildings used to reprocess wastes. Plutonium production continued at Hanford for over 40 yr. During the late 1980s, in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident, plutonium production was suspended at Hanford (Gephart, 2003). Since then, efforts at

G. W. Gee; M. Oostrom; M. D. Freshley; M. L. Rockhold; J. M. Zachara

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Outcome-Based Planning-Hanford's Shift Towards Closure and Shrinking the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Over the past two years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) has formulated a focused, outcomes-based vision for accelerated cleanup of the Hanford Site. The primary elements, or outcomes, of this vision are to (1) accelerate restoration of the Columbia River Corridor, (2) transition the Central Plateau to long-term waste management, thereby shrinking the footprint of active site cleanup and operations, and (3) prepare for the future. The third outcome includes operation of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a key element of the foundation for Hanford's future; leveraging DOE's assets; and working with the community to understand their vision and reflect it as appropriate in the execution of the Hanford 2012 Vision. The purpose of these three outcomes is to provide a near term focus, aimed at achieving definitive end points over the next decade, while not precluding any long-term end-state associated with the completion of the Environmental Management (EM) mission at Hanford. The sheer expanse of the Hanford Site, the inherent hazards associated with the significant inventory of nuclear materials and wastes, the large number of aging contaminated facilities, the diverse nature and extent of environmental contamination, and the proximity to the Columbia River make the Hanford Site arguably the world's largest and most complex environmental cleanup project. Current projections are that it will cost over $80 billion and take over four decades to complete the cleanup at Hanford. Accelerated cleanup of the River Corridor portion of the Site will allow the remediation effort to focus on specific, near-term outcomes. Hanford's success in achieving these outcomes will reduce urgent risk, shrink the Site, remove contamination and wastes from the proximity of the river, and consolidate waste management activities on the Central Plateau. Hanford has begun implementation of this vision. Performance-based contracts are being realigned to reflect the outcome orientation, including issuing a new River Corridor closure contract. This paper summarizes the outcome-based planning approach for other sites and interested parties. A brief introduction to the Hanford Site, along with detailed descriptions of the three outcomes is provided. This paper also summarizes the analyses and resulting products that were prepared in shifting to an outcome-based approach for closing the Hanford Site.

Ballard, W. W.; Holten, R.; Johnson, W.; Reichmuth, B.; White, M.; Wood, T.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

331

Explosive Demolitions To Change Hanford's Skyline | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Explosive Demolitions To Change Hanford's Skyline Explosive Demolitions To Change Hanford's Skyline Explosive Demolitions To Change Hanford's Skyline February 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis 284W Power House on the Hanford Site 284W Power House on the Hanford Site Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Andre Armstrong, CHPRC (509) 376-6773 andre_l_armstrong@rl.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) will use explosives to demolish several structures near the center of the Hanford Site on two separate days - February 18 and March 4. CHPRC subcontractor, Controlled Demolition Inc. (CDI), will detonate explosive charges to bring down industrial structures at central Hanford that have stood for over 50 years. On February 18, explosive demolition of the support structures of the 284

332

The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indiv. indiv. Gilbertetal. (Hanford & Combined) Gilbertetal.on both radiation and the Hanford facility. The data used toG. Radiation exposures of Hanford workers dying from cancer

Britton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Identifying the sources of subsurface contamination at the Hanford site in Washington using high-precision uranium isotopic measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Batches Processed Through Hanford Separations Plants, 1944Rev. 0, Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA,11) Hartman, M.J. , ed. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring:

Christensen, John N.; Dresel, P. Evan; Conrad, Mark E.; Maher, Kate; DePaolo, Donald J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Using Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotope Compositions of Nitrate to Distinguish Contaminant Sources in Hanford Soil and Groundwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stable isotopes at the Hanford Site, WA: Environ. Sci.Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site, WA: Vadose ZoneRev. 0, Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA.

Conrad, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Sequestration and release mechanisms of strontium and cesium in zeolite/feldspathoid systems and laboratory reacted Hanford sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the subsurface at Hanford (Bickmore et al. , 2001;The radioactivity at the Hanford site is predominantly fromthrough Waste-Weathered Hanford Sediments. Environmental

Rivera, Nelson Antonio Jr.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Demolishing Decay at the Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Check out this epic demolition video from the Hanford Site in Washington state. But its more than just great footage -- this represents important progress in the cleanup of the environmental legacy of one of America's most famous scientific undertakings -- the Manhattan Project.

337

Hanford emergency management plan - release 15  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford emergency management plan for the US Department of Energy Richland, WA and Office of River Protection. The program was developed in accordance with DOE Orders as well as Federal and State regulations to protect workers and public health and safety.

CARPENTER, G.A.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hanford Works monthly report, May 1950  

SciTech Connect

This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of May 1950. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

Prout, G.R.

1950-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hanford Works monthly report, October 1950  

SciTech Connect

This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of October 1950. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

Prout, G.R.

1950-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hanford as a site for large accelerators  

SciTech Connect

The Ramsey Panel recommended that two very large accelerators be constructed during the next few years to meet urgent U. S. needs in high energy physics. Two studies have been made. The Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley has studied a 200 to 300 BeV accelerator, while the Brooknaven National Laboratory on Long Island has made an analysis of a still larger accelerator--600 to 800 BeV. This special report is in response to a request for information on the suitability of the Atomic Energy Commission' s Hanford Project as a site for a large accelerator. Using criteria recommended by Lawrence and Brookhaven, the Hanford site offers significant economic advantages both in original installed cost and in annual operating expense. These advantages are: (1) Land--Hanford has available more than 150 square miles of govermnentowned land that readily meets topographic, geologic, and seismic criteria; (2) Power--- Hanford has surplus electrical capacity already installed to meet the demands of the largest accelerator--- at the lowest rates in the U. S. This alone offers an annual savings of several million dollars over any other location; (3) Water--- the Columbia River offers the largest supply of pure, cold water in the U. S.; there are excellent surplus reactor water plants available; (4) Transportation---four major railroads have direct connections to the Hanford Project rail system; multi- 1000-ton barge service is also available; (5) manpower---a high level of scientific and technical personnel as well as construction and craft labor is already in residence; (6) Services---complete support-type services, such as industrial shops, bus transportation, radiation protection, and plant security, are immediately available; and (7) Community--the area has an exceptionally high educational level, equal to the outstanding areas of the U. S. At the present time, the Hanford location has some disadvantages according to the cited criteria. These are: (1) lack of proximity to a university; (2) lack of a major jet airport; and (3) relative isolation from a major metropolitan area. The first two are even now under vigorous study and action by both state and local bodies. The third, though often a disadvantage, appears to have considerable appeal to many. In total, the many tangible assets of the Hanford Project offer tremendous potential dollar savings to the Government. The shutdown of preduction reactors makes many millions of dollars worth of excellent support facilities and manpower readily available. The minor disadvantages can be met almost entirely by the state and community. (auth)

Leonard, B.R. Jr.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Just in Time DSA-The Hanford Nuclear Safety Basis Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for 30 hazard category 2 and 3 nuclear facilities that are operated by its prime contractors, Fluor Hanford Incorporated (FHI), Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The publication of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 830, Subpart B, Safety Basis Requirements (the Rule) in January 2001 imposed the requirement that the Documented Safety Analyses (DSA) for these facilities be reviewed against the requirements of the Rule. Those DSA that do not meet the requirements must either be upgraded to satisfy the Rule, or an exemption must be obtained. RL and its prime contractors have developed a Nuclear Safety Strategy that provides a comprehensive approach for supporting RL's efforts to meet its long term objectives for hazard category 2 and 3 facilities while also meeting the requirements of the Rule. This approach will result in a reduction of the total number of safety basis documents that must be developed and maintained to support the remaining mission and closure of the Hanford Site and ensure that the documentation that must be developed will support: compliance with the Rule; a ''Just-In-Time'' approach to development of Rule-compliant safety bases supported by temporary exemptions; and consolidation of safety basis documents that support multiple facilities with a common mission (e.g. decontamination, decommissioning and demolition [DD&D], waste management, surveillance and maintenance). This strategy provides a clear path to transition the safety bases for the various Hanford facilities from support of operation and stabilization missions through DD&D to accelerate closure. This ''Just-In-Time'' Strategy can also be tailored for other DOE Sites, creating the potential for large cost savings and schedule reductions throughout the DOE complex.

Olinger, S. J.; Buhl, A. R.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Characterization Report, Revision 17  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hanford Site environment. It is updated each year and is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many environmental documents being prepared by DOE contractors concerning the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). No statements about significance or environmental consequences are provided. This year’s report is the seventeenth revision of the original document published in 1988 and is (until replaced by the eighteenth revision) the only version that is relevant for use in the preparation of Hanford NEPA, State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) documents. The two chapters included in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is typically presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Hanford Site NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes Hanford Site climate and meteorology; air quality; geology; hydrology; ecology; cultural, archaeological, and historical resources; socioeconomics; noise; and occupational health and safety. Sources for extensive tabular data related to these topics are provided in the chapter. Most subjects are divided into a general description of the characteristics of the Hanford Site, followed by site-specific information, where available, of the 100, 200, 300, and other areas. This division allows the reader to go directly to those sections of particular interest. When specific information on each of these separate areas is not complete or available, the general Hanford Site description should be used. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and presidential executive orders that are applicable to the NEPA documents prepared for Hanford Site activities. Information in Chapter 6 of this document can be adapted and supplemented with specific information for a chapter covering statutory and regulatory requirements in an environmental assessment or environmental impact statement. When preparing environmental assessments and EISs, authors should also be cognizant of the document titled Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements published by the DOE Office of NEPA Oversight (DOE 2004). Additional guidance on preparing DOE NEPA documents can be found at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/nepa/guidance.html. Any interested individual seeking baseline data on the Hanford Site and its past activities may also use the information contained in this document to evaluate projected activities and their impacts. For this 2005 revision, the following sections of the document were reviewed by the authors and updated with the best available information through May 2005: Climate and Meteorology Air Quality Geology – Seismicity section only Hydrology – Flow charts for the Columbia and Yakima rivers only Ecology – Threatened and Endangered Species subsection only Socioeconomics Occupational Safety All of Chapter 6.

Neitzel, Duane A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Cannon, Sandra D.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Fowler, Richard A.; Fritz, Brad G.; Harvey, David W.; Hendrickson, Paul L.; Hoitink, Dana J.; Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Poston, Ted M.; Prendergast-Kennedy, Ellen L.; Reidel, Steve P.; Rohay, Alan C.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Scott, Michael J.; Thorne, Paul D.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

Rathbone, Bruce A.

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

HIGH SENSITIVITY NEUTRON ASSAY OF GROUTED SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL SLUDGE AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of the North Loadout Pit (NLOP) waste at Hanford will produce 208-liter grouted sludge drums bearing transuranic (TRU) radionuclides and fission products. Discrimination between low level waste (LLW) and TRU waste requires a lower limit of detection (LLD) of less than 100 nCi (3700 Bq) of TRU alpha activity per gram of waste matrix in order to correctly certify the final waste form. Hanford's Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility operates two identical Imaging Passive Active Neutron (IPAN{trademark}) systems which had previously demonstrated this low detection limit capability for debris waste. These two IPAN{trademark} systems were selected as the appropriate technology to assay this challenging waste stream.

ABDURRAHMAN NM

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

345

ORISE: Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

weapons plants, such as Hanford, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Savannah River Site, and Rocky Flats. These studies primarily use death certificate information to identify excess...

346

Effects of simulant Hanford tank waste on plastic packaging components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors describe a chemical compatibility testing program for packaging components which might be used to transport mixed wastes. They mention the results of the screening phase of this program and then present the results of the second phase of this experimental program. This effort involved the comprehensive testing of five plastic liner materials in the aqueous mixed waste simulant. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to {approximately} 140, 290, 570, and 3,670 krads of gamma radiation followed by 7, 14, 28, 180 day exposures to the waste simulant at 18, 50, and 60 C. From the data analysis performed to date in this study, they have identified the fluorocarbon Kel-F{trademark} as having the greatest chemical compatibility after being exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the poor performance of Teflon under these conditions. The data obtained from this testing program will be available to packaging designers for the development of mixed waste packagings. The implications of the testing results on the selection of appropriate materials as packaging components are discussed.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

HAZARD CATEGORIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION SITES AT HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Environmental restoration activities, defined here as work to identify and characterize contaminated sites and then contain, treat, remove or dispose of the contamination, now comprises a significant fraction of work in the DOE complex. As with any other DOE activity, a safety analysis must be in place prior to commencing restoration. The rigor and depth of this safety analysis is in part determined by the site's hazard category. This category in turn is determined by the facility's hazardous material inventory and the consequences of its release. Progressively more complicated safety analyses are needed as a facility's hazard category increases from radiological to hazard category three (significant local releases) to hazard category two (significant on-site releases). Thus, a facility's hazard category plays a crucial early role in helping to determine the level of effort devoted to analysis of the facility's individual hazards. Improper determination of the category can result in either an inadequate safety analysis in the case of underestimation of the hazard category, or an unnecessarily cumbersome analysis in the case of overestimation. Contaminated sites have been successfully categorized and safely restored or remediated at the former DOE production site at Hanford, Washington. This paper discusses various means used to categorize former plutonium production or support sites at Hanford. Both preliminary and final hazard categorization is discussed. The importance of the preliminary (initial) hazard categorization in guiding further DOE involvement and approval of the safety analyses is discussed. Compliance to DOE direction provided in ''Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports'', DOE-STD-1027-92, is discussed. DOE recently issued 10 CFR 830, Subpart B which codifies previous DOE safety analysis guidance and orders. The impact of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B on hazard categorization is also discussed.

BISHOP, G.E.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

EIS-0286: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0286: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) provides environmental and technical information concerning U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site. The HSW EIS updates analyses of environmental consequences from previous documents and provides evaluations for activities that may be implemented consistent with the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Records of Decision (RODs). EIS-0286-FEIS-01-2004.pdf EIS-0286-FEIS-02-2004.pdf EIS-0286-FEIS-03-2004.pdf EIS-0286-FEIS-FiguresTables-2004.pdf

349

EA-1660: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1660: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1660: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1660: Final Environmental Assessment Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This Environmental Assessment (EA) provides information and analyses of proposed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with consolidating existing communications operations and removing excess facilities and infrastructure within the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington. Environmental Assessment for the Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, DOE/EA-1660 (July 2009)

350

Effect of Saline Waste Solution Infiltration Rates on Uranium Retention and Spatial Distribution in Hanford Sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EM/GJ1302-2006, Stoller Hanford Office, Richland, WA. 2006.BY tank farms. CH2M Hill, Hanford Group. Inc. : Richland, WAT. E. ; Kincaid, C. T. Hanford soil inventory model (SIM)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation of the field-scale cation exchange capacity of Hanford sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richland, WA: CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. Lichtner, P.C. &A.R. 2003. Estimation of Hanford SX tank waste compositionsS. 2003. Cesium migration in Hanford sediments: a multisite

Steefel, C.I.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Field evidence for strong chemical separation of contaminants in the Hanford Vadose Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Transport in the Hanford vadose zone Conrad et al.Chemical Transport in the Hanford vadose zone Conrad et al.Vadose Zone Pore Fluids at Hanford, Washington: Vadose Zone

Conrad, Mark E.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Katharine; Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Strontium and cesium release mechanisms during unsaturated flow through waste-weathered Hanford sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plutonium from Simulated Hanford Tank-Waste Sludges. Separ.Containing Tank Waste at Hanford. Separ. Sci. Technol. 2005,T. B. , Sr/TRU Removal from Hanford High Level Waste. Separ.

Chang, H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Review: The Hanford Reach: A Land of Contrasts by Susan Zwinger and Stamford D. Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: The Hanford Reach: A Land of Contrasts By SusanSmith (Photographer).The Hanford Reach: A Land of Contrasts.addition. Simply put, The Hanford Reach: A Land of Contrasts

Sowards, Adam M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

PRELIMINARY THERMAL AND THERMOMECHANICAL MODELING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY HEATER EXPERIMENTS AT HANFORD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotherms in Vertical Plane, Hanford Full-Scale Experiment:Isotherms in Vertical Plane, Hanford Full-Scale Experiment:Isotherms in Vertical Plane, Hanford Full-Scale Experiment:

chan, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reducer isolated from the Hanford 100H site capable of Iron(study for bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H area RomyVI)contamination at Hanford ?? Cr(VI) highly soluble, toxic

Chakraborty, Romy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Audit of Groundwater Monitoring at Hanford, WR-B-97-03 | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Hanford, WR-B-97-03 Audit of Groundwater Monitoring at Hanford, WR-B-97-03 Audit of Groundwater Monitoring at Hanford, WR-B-97-03 More Documents & Publications Audit Report...

358

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - April 2013 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tank Farms - April 2013 Tank Farms - April 2013 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - April 2013 April 2013 Operational Awareness at the Hanford Tank Farms [HIAR-HANFORD-2013-04-15] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) Site Lead conducted an operational awareness visit to the Office of River Protection (ORP) to tour the Hanford Tank Farms, observe video inspection of single shell and double shell tanks, and observe Tank Farm project and staff meetings. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - April 2013 More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Activity Report, Office of River Protection - May 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June 2013 Independent Activity Report, Office of River Protection Waste Treatment

359

Hanford's Recovery Act Payments Jump Past $1 Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WASH. - The Richland Operations Office's WASH. - The Richland Operations Office's (RL) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act payments at Hanford recently surpassed $1 billion. RL was allocated $1.63 billion from the Recovery Act in 2009 in order to create jobs and reduce the footprint of active cleanup at Hanford. In key Recovery Act accomplishments, RL: * Reduced Hanford's cleanup footprint by a total of 143 square miles by re- moving more than 20 facilities and hundreds of debris sites on the Hanford Reach National Monument, a 300-square mile area around Hanford formerly used for military activity and research. * Demolished 56 facilities, which reduces surveillance and maintenance costs. * Completed expansion of Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facil- ity (ERDF) ahead of schedule and under budget, increasing its capacity to

360

Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 Independent Oversight Investigation, Hanford Site - April 2004 April 2004 Investigation of Worker Vapor Exposure and Occupational Medicine Program Allegations at the Hanford Site At the direction of the Secretary of Energy, the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an investigation of selected aspects of worker safety and health systems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in February-April 2004. In February 2004, the Secretary of Energy directed OA to evaluate recent allegations of deficient safety and medical practices and to assess past practices and current operations to determine whether additional actions are needed to ensure a safe work environment at the Hanford Site.

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361

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Closure Hanford, LLC - Washington Closure Hanford, LLC - WEA-2010-02 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington Closure Hanford, LLC - WEA-2010-02 August 19, 2010 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Washington Closure Hanford, LLC related an Employee Fall at the High Bay Testing Facility (336 Building) at the Hanford Site This letter refers to the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement investigation into the facts and circumstances surrounding the employee fall that occurred at the Hanford High Bay Testing Facility (336 Building) on July 1, 2009. The worker sustained serious injury to his back and broke bones in both legs. Based on an evaluation of the evidence in this matter, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that violations of 10 C.F.R. Part 851, Worker Safety and Health Program, by

362

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June 2013 June 2013 Office of River Protection Assessment of Contractor Quality Assurance, Operational Awareness at the Hanford Tank Farms [HIAR NNSS-2012-12-03] The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (Independent Oversight) Site Lead conducted an operational awareness visit to the ORP Hanford Tank Farms, observed a Tank Farms morning meeting, toured the C Tank Farm, and observed a heavy (34,000 pound) lift. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Tank Farms - June 2013 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Office of River Protection Waste Treatment

363

Independent Activity Report, Hanford - May 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Activity Report, Hanford - May 2010 Independent Activity Report, Hanford - May 2010 Independent Activity Report, Hanford - May 2010 May 2010 Hanford Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility Meetings The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted various meetings with Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) managers/staff responsible for WESF during the period May 17-19, 2010. The purpose of the visit was to ascertain ways in which HSS would be able to carry out its independent oversight responsibilities with respect to WESF in a method that encourages collaboration with DOE-RL. Independent Activity Report, Hanford - May 2010 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Hanford - May 2010

364

Hanford Contractor Receives Awards for Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Contractor Receives Awards for Safety Hanford Contractor Receives Awards for Safety Hanford Contractor Receives Awards for Safety September 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A Hanford site contractor supporting EM's cleanup program has again received a prestigious safety award from DOE's Voluntary Protection Program (VPP). Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International (ATL) was presented the Star of Excellence Award for safety at the 29th annual VPP Participants Association Conference in Nashville, Tenn. Since it became a prime contractor at Hanford in 2005, ATL has received the award twice for committing to the principles of VPP, reaching established safety and health goals and attaining an injury and illness rate well below the average for similar businesses. ATL also received the 2013 Outreach Award alongside other Hanford prime

365

FATE AND TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES [U(VI), Sr, Cs] IN VADOSE ZONE SEDIMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conference Center (NCC) Lansdowne, Virginia Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) This work Hanford IFRC--Zachara ..................................................................................................101 Hanford IFRC

Flury, Markus

366

Towards Comprehensive Training  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is the result of a joint partnership between the Social Protection Unit of the World Bank and the Korean Ministry of Labor on Skills Development. This partnership was aimed at better understanding the Korean skills development strategy and drawing lessons and best practices for developing countries. This paper benefited from the financial support of the Korean Ministry of Labor and the World Bank. The paper expresses the author's own views on the topic which are not necessarily those endorsed by the World Bank or the Korean Ministry of Labor. Abstract: Training programs are the most common active labor market interventions around the world. Whether designed to develop skills of young job seekers or upgrading skills of adult workers, training programs are aimed at counteracting employability barriers that hinder the integration of people into the labor markets. Training approaches vary greatly across countries and regions. Some have a focus on classroom lectures while others emphasize training in the workplace. Based on a dataset of studies of training programs from 90 countries around the world, this paper examines the incidence of different training types over time and their impact on labor market outcomes of trainees. We find a general pattern of transition from in-classroom training to comprehensive measures that combine classroom and workplace training with supplementary services. Moreover, this transition has paid off. Comprehensive training interventions tend to increase the probability of having positive labor market

Jean Fares; Olga Susana Puerto; Jean Fares; Olga Susana Puerto

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARPT-WTP-2011-002 ARPT-WTP-2011-002 Site: DOE Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Subject: Office of Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Activity Report for the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Construction Quality Review Dates of Activity 02/14/2011 - 02/17/2011 Report Preparer Joseph Lenahan Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of the visit was to perform a review of construction quality assurance at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site activities concurrently with the Department of Energy (DOE) WTP staff. One focus area for this visit was piping and pipe support installations. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) attended several Bechtel National Incorporated (BNI) project meetings, reviewed the WTP project quality assurance program, reviewed DOE-WTP inspection reports completed by the DOE-WTP

368

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project monthly report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction MDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in envirorunental pathways. epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering. radiation dosimetry. and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture; and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

McMakin, A.H., Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. [comps.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. [comps.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Microsoft Word - Solid Waste at Hanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use of American Recovery and Use of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Funds on Solid Waste Project Activities at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site OAS-RA-L-11-08 May 2011 DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum DATE: May19, 2011 Audit Report Number: OAS-RA-L-11-08 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A10RA041) SUBJECT: Report on "Use of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Funds on Solid Waste Project Activities at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site" TO: Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE The Department of Energy's (Department), Richland Operations Office (Richland), awarded a contract, effective October 1, 2008, to CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to

371

Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in, and/or referenced in, this Annual Hanford Site Environmental Permitting Status Report addresses Permit Condition II.W (Other Permits and/or Approvals) of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit for the Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Dangerous Waste, issued by the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA7890008967). Condition II.W specifies that the Permittees are responsible for obtaining all other applicable federal, state, and local permits authorizing the development and operation of the Hanford Facility. Condition II.W further specifies that the Permittees are to use their best efforts to obtain such permits. For the purposes of this Permit Condition, ''best efforts'' mean submittal of documentation and/or approval(s) in accordance with schedules specified in applicable regulations, or as determined through negotiations with the applicable regulatory agencies.

SONNICHSEN, J.C.

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

Record of Decision for the Hanford Comprehensive Land-Use Plan (11/12/1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 218 / Friday, November 12, 1999 / Notices proactive approach in evaluating the status of the nation's schools after January 1st through a random sample survey of 1,200 elementary/secondary school districts and 1,950 postsecondary institutions located in the 50 states, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia. Information obtained from this survey will help assess the status of the nation's schools after the year 2000 transition. Survey results will be reported not only to ED's management, but also to The President's Council on Year 2000 Conversion's Information Coordination Center, Office of Management and Budget, major education associations, and other Year 2000 oversight authorities, as well as the public. Additional Information: This survey

373

Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2002  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared annually to satisfy the requirements of DOE Orders. The report provides an overview of activities at the Hanford Site during 2002 and demonstrates the site's compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, executive orders, and DOE policies; and to summarize environmental data that characterize Hanford Site environmental management performance. The purpose of the report is to provide useful summary information to members of the public, public officials, regulators, Hanford contractors, and elected representatives.

Poston, Ted M.; Hanf, Robert W.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Morasch, Launa F.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

EIS-0325: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental 25: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0325: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Schultz-Hanford Transmission Line Project New 500 kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line Construction, Central Washington, north of Hanford connecting to existing line at the Schultz Substation, Kittitas, Yakima, Grant, and Benton Counties, Washington U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability of the Schultz-Hanford Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0325 (January 2003) (68 FR 5019) More Documents & Publications EIS-0318: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0323: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final

375

Hanford personnel dosimeter supporting studies FY-1981  

SciTech Connect

This report examined specific functional components of the routine external personnel dosimeter program at Hanford. Components studied included: dosimeter readout; dosimeter calibration; dosimeter field response; dose calibration algorithm; dosimeter design; and TLD chip acceptance procedures. Additional information is also presented regarding the dosimeter response to light- and medium-filtered x-rays, high energy photons and neutrons. This study was conducted to clarify certain data obtained during the FY-1980 studies.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant technical manual  

SciTech Connect

A key element of the Hanford waste management strategy is the construction of a new facility, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP), to vitrify existing and future liquid high-level waste produced by defense activities at the Hanford Site. The HWVP mission is to vitrify pretreated waste in borosilicate glass, cast the glass into stainless steel canisters, and store the canisters at the Hanford Site until they are shipped to a federal geological repository. The HWVP Technical Manual (Manual) documents the technical bases of the current HWVP process and provides a physical description of the related equipment and the plant. The immediate purpose of the document is to provide the technical bases for preparation of project baseline documents that will be used to direct the Title 1 and Title 2 design by the A/E, Fluor. The content of the Manual is organized in the following manner. Chapter 1.0 contains the background and context within which the HWVP was designed. Chapter 2.0 describes the site, plant, equipment and supporting services and provides the context for application of the process information in the Manual. Chapter 3.0 provides plant feed and product requirements, which are primary process bases for plant operation. Chapter 4.0 summarizes the technology for each plant process. Chapter 5.0 describes the engineering principles for designing major types of HWVP equipment. Chapter 6.0 describes the general safety aspects of the plant and process to assist in safe and prudent facility operation. Chapter 7.0 includes a description of the waste form qualification program and data. Chapter 8.0 indicates the current status of quality assurance requirements for the Manual. The Appendices provide data that are too extensive to be placed in the main text, such as extensive tables and sets of figures. The Manual is a revision of the 1987 version.

Larson, D.E. [ed.; Watrous, R.A.; Kruger, O.L. [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Hanford Site air operating permit application  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, which amended the Federal Clean Air Act of 1977, required that the US Environmental Protection Agency develop a national Air Operating Permit Program, which in turn would require each state to develop an Air Operating Permit Program to identify all sources of ``regulated`` pollutants. Regulated pollutants include ``criteria`` pollutants (oxides of nitrogen, sulfur oxides, total suspended particulates, carbon monoxide, particulate matter greater than 10 micron, lead) plus 189 other ``Hazardous`` Air Pollutants. The Hanford Site, owned by the US Government and operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, is located in southcentral Washington State and covers 560 square miles of semi-arid shrub and grasslands located just north of the confluence of the Snake and Yakima Rivers with the Columbia River. This land, with restricted public access, provides a buffer for the smaller areas historically used for the production of nuclear materials, waste storage, and waste disposal. About 6 percent of the land area has been disturbed and is actively used. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application consists of more than 1,100 sources and in excess of 300 emission points. Before January 1995, the maintenance and operations contractor and the environmental restoration contractor for the US Department of Energy completed an air emission inventory on the Hanford Site. The inventory has been entered into a database so that the sources and emission points can be tracked and updated information readily can be retrieved. The Hanford Site Air Operating Permit Application contains information current as of April 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. This includes three recently acquired Transportable Array stations located at Cold Creek, Didier Farms, and Phinney Hill. For the Hanford Seismic Network, ten local earthquakes were recorded during the first quarter of fiscal year 2009. All earthquakes were considered as “minor” with magnitudes (Mc) less than 1.0. Two earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), most likely in the Columbia River basalts; five earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the sub-basalt sediments); and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, four earthquakes occurred in known swarm areas and six earthquakes were classified as random events.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Review of Documented Safety Analysis Development for the Hanford...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Subject: Review of Documented Safety Analysis Development for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immob ilization Plant (LBL Facilities) - C riteria and...

380

Data Summary Report for Hanford Site Coal Ash Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to present data and findings from sampling and analysis of five distinct areas of coal ash within the Hanford Site River Corridor

Sulloway, H. M.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

First Quarter Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. The Hanford Seismic Network recorded 16 local earthquakes during the first quarter of FY 2011. Six earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km), seven earthquakes at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km), most likely in the pre-basalt sediments, and three earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the basement. Geographically, thirteen earthquakes were located in known swarm areas and three earthquakes were classified as random events. The highest magnitude event (1.8 Mc) was recorded on October 19, 2010 at depth 17.5 km with epicenter located near the Yakima River between the Rattlesnake Mountain and Horse Heaven Hills swarm areas.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Progress Continues Post-Recovery Act Award at Hanford Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 21, 2011 RICHLAND, Wash. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work at the Hanford site continues with several projects intended to reduce the Cold War cleanup foot-...

383

Stewardship of the Hanford Site Now and Into the Future  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Into the Future Bob Suyama Vice-Chair Hanford Advisory Board Stewardship Roundtable Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs Meeting April 29, 2010...

384

Historical Time Line and Information About the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Historical time line of the Hanford Site spanning from 1940 through 1997, including photographs and other information regarding the town sites and living conditions.

Briggs Jr, David

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

385

(FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) with Hanford Low Activity Wastes ... Level Waste at the Defense Waste Processing Facility through Sludge Batch 7b.

386

Microsoft Word - CX-Hanford-Wautoma_Spacers_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Action: Spacer replacement along the Hanford-Wautoma 1 and 2 (substation to substation) transmission lines Budget Information: Work Order 00255064 PP&A Project No.: 1512 and...

387

Independent Oversight Inspection of the Hanford Site Chronic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IH Industrial Hygiene IHT Industrial Hygiene Technician JHA Job Hazard Analysis LIBS Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Abbreviations Used in This Report iv | Hanford Site...

388

Hanford Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations at the Hanford Site. The following sections: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status in 1992 of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss public dose estimates from 1992 Hanford activities; present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including ground-water protection and monitoring, and discuss activities to ensure quality.

Woodruff, R.K.; Hanf, R.W.; Lundgren, R.E. [eds.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilizati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - December 2013 December 2013 Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality This report...

390

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, August 2013 August 2013 Review of the...

391

Hanford tanks initiative (HTI) work breakdown structure (WBS)dictionary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This dictionary lists the scope, deliverables, and interfaces for the various work elements of the Hanford Tanks Initiative. Cost detail is included for information only.

Mckinney, K.E.

1997-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Security (HSS), conducted a criticality safety information meeting with Hanford site criticality safety engineers on May 14, 2012, to discuss criticality safety...

393

Independent Oversight Review of Hanford Tank Farms Safety Basis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Tank Farms Safety Basis Amendment for Double-Shell Tank Ventilation System Upgrades November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of...

394

Hanford's Recovery Act Payments Jump Past $1 Billion | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richland Operations Office's (RL) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act payments at Hanford recently surpassed 1 billion. RL was allocated 1.63 billion from the Recovery Act...

395

Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs, July 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and...

396

Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs, July 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Employee Concerns Programs May 2011 July 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and...

397

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Hanford Former Construction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hanford Worker Population Served: Construction Workers Principal Investigator: Knut Ringen, DrPH, MHA, MPH Toll-free Telephone: (800) 866-9663 Local Outreach Office: Sherry Gosseen...

398

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WTP Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant ii Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality 1.0 PURPOSE The U....

399

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The...

400

Hanford Shipment Arrives Safely At Waste Isolation Pilot Plant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transuranic radioactive waste from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site arrived safely today at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The shipment...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Former Worker Medical Screening Program - Hanford Former Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Covered DOE Site: Hanford Worker Population Served: Production Workers Principal Investigator: Donna Cragle, PhD Toll-free Telephone: (866) 812-6703 Website: http:...

402

Dissolution of Uranium Metal from Hanford K Basin Sludge Simulant ...  

Dissolution of Uranium Metal from Hanford K Basin Sludge Simulant, Without Producing Hydrogen Stephanie Bruffey and Paul Taylor Background About 2100 metric tons of ...

403

Process Chemistry and Operations Planning for Hanford Waste ...  

Process Chemistry and Operations Planning for Hanford Waste Alternatives L. T. Smith,* R. K. Toghiani, and J. S. Lindner Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET ...

404

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success...

405

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

406

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WTP Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant ii Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Construction Quality 1.0 PURPOSE The...

407

Parameters Impacting Crossflow Filter Performance of Hanford Tank ...  

Parameters Impacting Crossflow Filter Performance of Hanford Tank Waste Simulants Reid Peterson Justin Billings, Carolyn Burns, Richard Daniel, Phil Schonewill, Rick ...

408

Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project 1 Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Project Construction Quality 1.0...

409

Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

In the Garden of the Apocalypse: Narrating Myth and Reality in the Hanford Landscape.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores the line between myth and reality in the contemporary landscape of the Hanford nuclear reservation. As landscape of well-preserved sagebrush desert, Hanford… (more)

Pineo, Christopher Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Bechtel Hanford, Inc.- EA-97-08  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Bechtel Hanford, Inc., related to Unplanned Radioactive Material Uptakes by Five Workers at the Hanford Site, (EA-97-08)

412

Identification of contaminants of concern Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) Project at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is evaluating the current human and ecological risks from contaminants in the Columbia River. The risks to be studied are those attributable to past and present activities on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site is located in southcentral Washington State near the town of Richland. Human risk from exposure to radioactive and hazardous materials will be addressed for a range of river use options. Ecological risk will be evaluated relative to the health of the current river ecosystem. The overall purpose of the project is to determine if enough contamination exists in the Columbia River to warrant cleanup actions under applicable environmental regulations. This report documents an initial review, from a risk perspective, of the wealth of historical data concerning current or potential contamination in the Columbia River. Sampling data were examined for over 600 contaminants. A screening analysis was performed to identify those substances present in such quantities that they may pose a significant human or ecological risk. These substances will require a more detailed analysis to assess their impact on humans or the river ecosystem.

Napier, B.A.; Batishko, N.C.; Heise-Craff, D.A.; Jarvis, M.F.; Snyder, S.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Fernald Preserve, Fernald, Ohio Comprehensive Legacy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

September 2013 September 2013 LMS/FER/S03496-7.0 Revision 7.0 Draft This page intentionally left blank LMS/FER/S03496-7.0 Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Volumes I and II Fernald Preserve Fernald, Ohio September 2013 Revision 7 Draft This page intentionally left blank Volume I Legacy Management Plan January 2013September 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Revision 67 FinalDraft This page intentionally left blank Emergency Contact Legacy Management 24-hour Monitored Security Telephone Number (877) 695-5322 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Comprehensive Legacy Management and Institutional Controls Plan Doc. No. S03496-7.0-Draft Volume I-Legacy Management Plan

414

Comprehensive research on the stability and electronic properties of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H alloys and devices. Final subcontract report, 10 March 1991--30 August 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work on the growth of a-Si:H and a-(Si,Ge):H materials and devices using well-controlled growth techniques. The a-Si:H materials were grown at higher temperatures (300{degrees}-375{degrees}C) using electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) plasma techniques with a remote H beam. These films have excellent electronic quality and show significant improvements in stability compared with glow-discharge-produced a-Si:H materials. Several problems were encountered during the fabrication of devices in these materials, and we were able to overcome them by a systematic work on buffer layers in these cells. We also studied alternative designs for improving the stability of a-Si:H cells and produced graded-gap a-Si:H cells using glow-discharge that are more stable than comparable standard, ungraded glow discharge devices. Finally, systematic work was done to produce good-quality a-(Si,Ge):H films, using triode radio frequency (RF) glow-discharge with ion bombardment during growth. Diagnostic devices were made using these films, and the properties of the material, such as Urbach energies and hole mobility-lifetime products, were measured in these devices. We found a systematic increase in the Urbach energies, and a corresponding decrease in the hole and electron {mu}{tau} products, as the Ge content of the alloys increases.

Dalal, V. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Technitium Management at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford tank waste contains -26,000 Ci of technetium-99 (Tc-99), the majority of which is in the supernate fraction. Tc-99 is a long-lived radionuclide with a half-life of -212,000 years and, in its predominant pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}) fonn, is highly soluble and very mobile in the vadose zone and ultimately the groundwater. Tc-99 is identified as the major dose contributor (in groundwater) by past Hanford site performance assessments and therefore considered a key radionuclide of concern at Hanford. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) River Protection Project's (RPP) long-term Tc-99 management strategy is to immobitize the Tc-99 in a waste fonn that will retain the Tc-99 for many thousands of years. To achieve this, the RPP flowsheet will immobilize the majority of the Tc-99 as a vitrified low-activity waste product that will be ultimately disposed on site in the Integrated Disposal Facility. The Tc-99 will be released gradually from the glass at very low rates such that the groundwater concentrations at any point in time would be substantially below regulatory limits.The liquid secondary waste will be immobilized in a low-temperature matrix (cast stone) and the solid secondary waste will be stabilized using grout. Although the Tc-99 that is immobilized in glass will meet the release rate for disposal in IDF, a proportion is driven into the secondary waste stream that will not be vitrified and therefore presents a disposal risk. If a portion of the Tc-99 were to be removed from the Hanford waste inventory and disposed off-site, (e.g., as HLW), it could lessen a major constraint on LAW waste form performance, i.e., the requirement to retain Tc-99 over thousands of years and have a positive impact on the IDF Performance Assessment. There are several technologies available at various stages of technical maturity that can be employed for Tc-99 removal. The choice of technology and the associated efficacy of the technology are dependent on the chemical fonn of the technetium in the waste, the removal location in the tlowsheet. and the ultimate disposition path chosen for the technetium product. This paper will discuss the current plans for the management of the technetium present in the Hanford tank waste. It will present the risks associated with processing technetium in the current treatment tlowsheet and present potential mitigation opportunities, the status of available technetium removal technologies, the chemical speciation of technetium in the tank waste, and the available disposition paths and waste fonns for technetium containing streams.

Robbins, Rebecca A.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

List of currently classified documents relative to Hanford Production Facilities Operations originated on the Hanford Site between 1961 and 1972  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has declared that all Hanford plutonium production- and operations-related information generated between 1944 and 1972 is declassified. Any documents found and deemed useful for meeting Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) objectives may be declassified with or without deletions in accordance with DOE guidance by Authorized Derivative Declassifiers. The September 1992, letter report, Declassifications Requested by the Technical Steering Panel of Hanford Documents Produced 1944--1960, (PNWD-2024 HEDR UC-707), provides an important milestone toward achieving a complete listing of documents that may be useful to the HEDR Project. The attached listing of approximately 7,000 currently classified Hanford-originated documents relative to Hanford Production Facilities Operations between 1961 and 1972 fulfills TSP Directive 89-3. This list does not include such titles as the Irradiation Processing Department, Chemical Processing Department, and Hanford Laboratory Operations monthly reports generated after 1960 which have been previously declassified with minor deletions and made publicly available. Also Kaiser Engineers Hanford (KEH) Document Control determined that no KEH documents generated between January 1, 1961 and December 31, 1972 are currently classified. Titles which address work for others have not been included because Hanford Site contractors currently having custodial responsibility for these documents do not have the authority to determine whether other than their own staff have on file an appropriate need-to-know. Furthermore, these documents do not normally contain information relative to Hanford Site operations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

CLOSURE WELDING RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS CONTAINERS AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) responsibility for the disposition of radioactive materials has given rise to several unique welding applications. Many of these materials require packaging into containers for either Interim or long-term storage. It is not uncommon that final container fabrication, i.e., closure welding, is performed with these materials already placed into the container. Closure welding is typically performed remote to the container, and routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE) are often times not feasible. Fluor Hanford has packaged many such materials in recent years as park of the Site's cleanup mission. In lieu of post-weld testing and NDE, the Fluor-Hanford approach has been to establish weld quality through ''upfront'' development and qualification of welding parameters, and then ensure parameter compliance during welding. This approach requires a rigor not usually afforded to typical welding development activities, and may involve statistical analysis and extensive testing, including burst, drop, sensitive leak testing, etc. This paper provides an instructive review of the development and qualification activities associated with the closure of radioactive materials containers, including a brief report on activities for closure welding research reactor, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site.

CANNELL, G.R.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Data Packages in Hanford Site's Administrative Record (AR) and Public Information Repository (PIR)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

In 1989, the Department of Energy joined with the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in signing the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order more commonly known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). The TPA outlines legally enforceable milestones for Hanford cleanup over the next several decades. The AR is the body of documents and information that is considered or relied upon to arrive at a final decision for remedial action or hazardous waste management. An AR is established for each operable unit (OU); treatment, storage, or disposal unit (TSD); or Expedited Response Action (ERA) group and will contain all documents having information considered in arriving at a Record of Decision or permit. Documents become part of the AR after they have been designated as an AR by the TPA or after EPA, DOE, or other official parties have identified a document or set of documents for inclusion. Furthermore, AR documents are to be kept in a Public Information Repository (PIR).Thousands of data packages that support the AR documents are available to the public in the Hanford PIR.

419

PROGRESS WITH K BASINS SLUDGE RETRIEVAL STABILIZATION & PACKAGING AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE  

SciTech Connect

This paper shows how Fluor Hanford and BNG America have combined nuclear plant skills from the U.S. and the U.K. to devise methods to retrieve and treat the sludge that has accumulated in K Basins at the Hanford Site over many years. Retrieving the sludge is the final stage in removing fuel and sludge from the basins to allow them to be decontaminated and decommissioned, so as to remove the threat of contamination of the Columbia River. A description is given of sludge retrieval using vacuum lances and specially developed nozzles and pumps into Consolidation Containers within the basins. The special attention that had to be paid to the heat generation and potential criticality issues with the irradiated uranium-containing sludge is described. The processes developed to re-mobilize the sludge from the Consolidation Containers and pump it through flexible and transportable hose-in-hose piping to the treatment facility are explained with particular note made of dealing with the abrasive nature of the sludge. The treatment facility, housed in an existing Hanford building, is described, and the uranium-corrosion and grout packaging processes explained. The uranium corrosion process is a robust, tempered process very suitable for dealing with a range of differing sludge compositions. Optimization and simplification of the original sludge corrosion process design is described and the use of transportable and reusable equipment is indicated. The processes and techniques described in the paper are shown to have wide applicability to nuclear cleanup.

KNOLLMEYER, P.M.; PHILLIPS, C; TOWNSON, P.S.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

HANFORD TANK FARM RESOURCE CONVERVATION & RECOVERY ACT (RCRA) CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

As a consequence of producing special nuclear material for the nation's defense, large amounts of extremely hazardous radioactive waste was created at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in south central Washington State. A little over 50 million gallons of this waste is now stored in 177 large, underground tanks on Hanford's Central Plateau in tank farms regulated under the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource, Conservation, and Recovery Act (RCRA). Over 60 tanks and associated infrastructure have released or are presumed to have released waste in the vadose zone. In 1998, DOE's Office of River Protection established the Hanford Tank Farm RCRA Corrective Action Program (RCAP) to: (1) characterize the distribution and extent of the existing vadose zone contamination; (2) determine how the contamination will move in the future; (3) estimate the impacts of this contamination on groundwater and other media; (4) develop and implement mitigative measures; and (5) develop corrective measures to be implemented as part of the final closure of the tank farm facilities. Since its creation, RCAP has made major advances in each of these areas, which will be discussed in this paper.

KRISTOFZSKI, J.G.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final hanford comprehensive" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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421

AUTOMATED LEAK DETECTION OF BURIED TANKS USING GEOPHYSICAL METHODS AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE  

SciTech Connect

At the Hanford Nuclear Site in Washington State, the Department of Energy oversees the containment, treatment, and retrieval of liquid high-level radioactive waste. Much of the waste is stored in single-shelled tanks (SSTs) built between 1943 and 1964. Currently, the waste is being retrieved from the SSTs and transferred into newer double-shelled tanks (DSTs) for temporary storage before final treatment. Monitoring the tanks during the retrieval process is critical to identifying leaks. An electrically-based geophysics monitoring program for leak detection and monitoring (LDM) has been successfully deployed on several SSTs at the Hanford site since 2004. The monitoring program takes advantage of changes in contact resistance that will occur when conductive tank liquid leaks into the soil. During monitoring, electrical current is transmitted on a number of different electrode types (e.g., steel cased wells and surface electrodes) while voltages are measured on all other electrodes, including the tanks. Data acquisition hardware and software allow for continuous real-time monitoring of the received voltages and the leak assessment is conducted through a time-series data analysis. The specific hardware and software combination creates a highly sensitive method of leak detection, complementing existing drywell logging as a means to detect and quantify leaks. Working in an industrial environment such as the Hanford site presents many challenges for electrical monitoring: cathodic protection, grounded electrical infrastructure, lightning strikes, diurnal and seasonal temperature trends, and precipitation, all of which create a complex environment for leak detection. In this discussion we present examples of challenges and solutions to working in the tank farms of the Hanford site.

CALENDINE S; SCHOFIELD JS; LEVITT MT; FINK JB; RUCKER DF

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

EIS-0286: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0286: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site Solid Waste Program, Richland, Washington Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program, New Information on Waste Management Alternatives, Waste Management Practices Enhancement for Low-Level Radioactive Waste, Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Transuranic Waste, Richland, Benton County, Washington. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability; DOE/EIS-0286: Final Hanford Site Solid Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Washington (February 2004) More Documents & Publications EIS-0337: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact

423

EIS-0286: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

286: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental 286: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0286: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site Solid Waste Program, Richland, Washington Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program, New Information on Waste Management Alternatives, Waste Management Practices Enhancement for Low-Level Radioactive Waste, Mixed Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Transuranic Waste, Richland, Benton County, Washington. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability; DOE/EIS-0286: Final Hanford Site Solid Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Washington (February 2004) More Documents & Publications EIS-0337: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact

424

Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report Calendar Year 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford CY 2002 dangerous waste generation and management forms. The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, electronic copies of the report are also transmitted to the regulatory agency.

FREEMAN, D.A.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Groundwater maps of the Hanford Site, June 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Groundwater Maps of the Hanford Site, June 1992 is an update to the series of reports that document the configuration of the water table in the unconsolidated sediments beneath the Hanford Site (Figure 1). Water level measurements for these reports are collected from site groundwater monitoring wells each June and December. The groundwater data are portrayed on a series of maps to illustrate the hydrologic conditions at the Hanford Site and are also tabulated in an appendix. The purpose of this report series is to document the changes in the groundwater level at Hanford as the site transitions from a nuclear material production role to environmental restoration and remediation. In addition, these reports provide water level data in support of the site characterization and groundwater monitoring programs on the Hanford Site. Groundwater maps of the Hanford Site are prepared for the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, by the Hanford Site Operations and Engineering Contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC).

Kasza, G.L.; Hartman, M.J.; Hodges, F.N.; Weekes, D.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank S-110 Sludge  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Hanford Tank S-110 sludge caustic leaching test conducted in FY 2001 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The data presented here can be used to develop the baseline and alternative flowsheets for pretreating Hanford tank sludge. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the work through the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP; EM?50).

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carson, Katharine J.; Darnell, Lori P.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoopes, Francis V.; Sell, Richard L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, John J.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Groundwater maps of the Hanford site, June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Groundwater Maps of the Hanford Site, June 1995 is a continuation of a series of reports (see Serkowski et al. 1995) that document the configuration of the water table aquifer beneath the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This series presents the results of the semiannual water level measurement program and the water table maps generated from these measurements. The reports document the changes in the groundwater level at the Hanford Site during the transition from nuclear material production to environmental restoration and remediation. In addition, these reports provide water level data to support the various site characterization and groundwater monitoring programs currently in progress on the Hanford Site. Groundwater Maps of the Hanford Site is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy by the Hanford Site Operations and Engineering Contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This document fulfills reporting requirements specified in WHC-CM-7-5, Section 8.0 ``Water Quality`` and described in the environmental monitoring plan for the Hanford Site. (DOE-RL 1993a) This document highlights the three major operations areas (the 100, 200 and 300/1100 Areas) where wastes were discharged to the soil. Each area includes a summary discussion of the data, a well index map, and a contoured map of the water table surface. Appendix A contains all of the data collected for this program.

Sweeney, M.D.

1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

A Short History of Waste Management at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"The world’s first full-scale nuclear reactors and chemical reprocessing plants built at the Hanford Site in the desert of eastern Washington State produced two-thirds of the plutonium generated in the United States for nuclear weapons. Operating these facilities also created large volumes of radioactive and chemical waste, some of which was released into the environment exposing people who lived downwind and downstream. Hanford now contains the largest accumulation of nuclear waste in the Western Hemisphere. Hanford’s last reactor shut down in 1987 followed by closure of the last reprocessing plant in 1990. Today, Hanford’s only mission is cleanup. Most onsite radioactive waste and nuclear material lingers inside underground tanks or storage facilities. About half of the chemical waste remains in tanks while the rest persists in the soil, groundwater, and burial grounds. Six million dollars each day, or nearly two billion dollars each year, are spent on waste management and cleanup activities. There is significant uncertainty in how long cleanup will take, how much it will cost, and what risks will remain for future generations. This paper summarizes portions of the waste management history of the Hanford Site published in the book “Hanford: A Conversation about Nuclear Waste and Cleanup.”(1) "

Gephart, Roy E.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Comprehensive facilities plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s Comprehensive Facilities Plan (CFP) document provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly future development of land and capital assets at the Berkeley Lab site. The CFP directly supports Berkeley Lab`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). The CFP is revised annually on Berkeley Lab`s Facilities Planning Website. Major revisions are consistent with DOE policy and review guidance. Facilities planing is motivated by the need to develop facilities for DOE programmatic needs; to maintain, replace and rehabilitate existing obsolete facilities; to identify sites for anticipated programmatic growth; and to establish a planning framework in recognition of site amenities and the surrounding community. The CFP presents a concise expression of the policy for the future physical development of the Laboratory, based upon anticipated operational needs of research programs and the environmental setting. It is a product of the ongoing planning processes and is a dynamic information source.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Annual Hanford Seismic Report for Fiscal Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Seismic Assessment Program (HSAP) provides an uninterrupted collection of high-quality raw and processed seismic data from the Hanford Seismic Network for the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors. The HSAP is responsible for locating and identifying sources of seismic activity and monitoring changes in the historical pattern of seismic activity at the Hanford Site. The data are compiled, archived, and published for use by the Hanford Site for waste management, natural phenomena hazards assessments, and engineering design and construction. In addition, the HSAP works with the Hanford Site Emergency Services Organization to provide assistance in the event of a significant earthquake on the Hanford Site. The Hanford Seismic Network and the Eastern Washington Regional Network consist of 44 individual sensor sites and 15 radio relay sites maintained by the Hanford Seismic Assessment Team. During fiscal year 2008, the Hanford Seismic Network recorded 1431 triggers on the seismometer system, which included 112 seismic events in the southeast Washington area and an additional 422 regional and teleseismic events. There were 74 events determined to be local earthquakes relevant to the Hanford Site. The highest-magnitude event (3.7 Mc) occurred on May 18, 2008, and was located approximately 17 km east of Prosser at a depth of 20.5 km. With regard to the depth distribution, 13 earthquakes were located at shallow depths (less than 4 km, most likely in the Columbia River basalts), 45 earthquakes were located at intermediate depths (between 4 and 9 km, most likely in the pre-basalt sediments), and 16 earthquakes were located at depths greater than 9 km, within the crystalline basement. Geographically, 54 earthquakes were located in swarm areas and 20 earthquakes were classified as random events. The May 18 earthquake was the highest magnitude event recorded since 1975 in the vicinity of the Hanford Site (between 46 degrees and 47 degrees north latitude and 119 degrees and 120 degrees west longitude). The event was not reported as being felt on the Hanford Site or causing any damage and was communicated to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Operations Center per HSAP communi¬cations procedures. The event is not considered to be significant with regard to site safety and not unprecedented given the site’s seismic history. The Hanford strong motion accelerometer (SMA) stations at the 200 East Area, 300 Area, and 400 Area were triggered by the May 18 event. The maximum acceleration recorded at the SMA stations (0.17% at the 300 Area) was 12 times smaller than the reportable action level (2% g) for Hanford Site facilities.

Rohay, Alan C.; Sweeney, Mark D.; Hartshorn, Donald C.; Clayton, Ray E.; Devary, Joseph L.

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

431

History and stabilization of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex, Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 231-Z Isolation Building or Plutonium Metallurgy Building is located in the Hanford Site`s 200 West Area, approximately 300 yards north of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) (234-5 Building). When the Hanford Engineer Works (HEW) built it in 1944 to contain the final step for processing plutonium, it was called the Isolation Building. At that time, HEW used a bismuth phosphate radiochemical separations process to make `AT solution,` which was then dried and shipped to Los Alamos, New Mexico. (AT solution is a code name used during World War II for the final HEW product.) The process was carried out first in T Plant and the 224-T Bulk Reduction Building and B Plant and the 224-B Bulk Reduction Building. The 224-T and -B processes produced a concentrated plutonium nitrate stream, which then was sent in 8-gallon batches to the 231-Z Building for final purification. In the 231-Z Building, the plutonium nitrate solution underwent peroxide `strikes` (additions of hydrogen peroxide to further separate the plutonium from its carrier solutions), to form the AT solution. The AT solution was dried and shipped to the Los Alamos Site, where it was made into metallic plutonium and then into weapons hemispheres.` The 231-Z Building began `hot` operations (operations using radioactive materials) with regular runs of plutonium nitrate on January 16, 1945.

Gerber, M.S., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hanford Facility Highlights EM's Success in Meeting Cost and Schedule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Facility Highlights EM's Success in Meeting Cost and Hanford Facility Highlights EM's Success in Meeting Cost and Schedule Targets Hanford Facility Highlights EM's Success in Meeting Cost and Schedule Targets August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin speaks during the operational kickoff event for the 200 West Pump and Treat System this month. EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin speaks during the operational kickoff event for the 200 West Pump and Treat System this month. An aerial view of the 200 West Pump and Treat System at the Hanford site. An aerial view of the 200 West Pump and Treat System at the Hanford site. EM Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Tracy Mustin speaks during the operational kickoff event for the 200 West Pump and Treat System this month.

433

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP December 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Richland, WA - In direct support of Hanford cleanup and the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) accelerated cleanup initiatives, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) is teaming with the Site services contractor, Mission Support Alliance, LLC (MSA), CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems. Wi-Fi and WiMAX are both considered last mile technologies that carry signals from telecommunications backbones (in this case hubs or access

434

Much Accomplished at Hanford in 2010: Richland Operations Office Prime  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Much Accomplished at Hanford in 2010: Richland Operations Office Much Accomplished at Hanford in 2010: Richland Operations Office Prime Contractors Cite Past Year's Cleanup Progress Much Accomplished at Hanford in 2010: Richland Operations Office Prime Contractors Cite Past Year's Cleanup Progress January 5, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office contractors achieved a great deal of cleanup progress at the Hanford Site in 2010. Below are just some of the major accomplishments of our River Corridor, Central Plateau, and Mission Support contractors: River Corridor To date, approximately half of the cleanup in the Hanford Site's 220-square-mile River Corridor is complete. The River Corridor cleanup

435

EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, 28: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1728: Integrated Vegetation Management on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts from vegetation management in the "project area" of the Hanford Site. The project area excludes most of the Hanford Reach National Monument that is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) under permit from DOE. Vegetation managment under the EA would be consistent with and complement similar efforts currently being performed by the USFWS on the Monument. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE determined that the proposed action is not a major federal action that would significantly affect the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA, and that preparation of

436

Independent Oversight Follow-Up Review, Hanford Site - June 2005 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independent Oversight Follow-Up Review, Hanford Site - June 2005 Independent Oversight Follow-Up Review, Hanford Site - June 2005 Independent Oversight Follow-Up Review, Hanford Site - June 2005 June 2005 Review of Worker Vapor Exposures and Occupational Medicine Program at the Hanford Site, June 2005 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted a follow-up review in May-June 2005 of its 2004 investigation of allegations of deficiencies in worker protection and medical practices at the DOE Hanford Site. The purpose of this OA follow-up review was to assess the status of the corrective actions for selected findings identified by OA during its 2004 investigation. This OA review did not result in any new findings. Recommendations for continued improvement and enhancements to ongoing initiatives are provided

437

Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Tank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Tank Waste Cleanup Congressional, State Officials Tour Hanford's Test Site for Safe Tank Waste Cleanup September 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Ben Harp, center, manager of Hanford’s Waste Treatment Plant Start-up and Commissioning Integration, discusses the advantages of ORP's Cold Test Facility to a group of congressional and state legislative staffers during a recent tour. Ben Harp, center, manager of Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant Start-up and Commissioning Integration, discusses the advantages of ORP's Cold Test Facility to a group of congressional and state legislative staffers during a recent tour. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Office of River Protection (ORP) recently hosted a group of congressional and state legislative staffers on a tour of the

438

Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility | National Nuclear Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility Hanford, WA Selected as Plutonium Production Facility January 16, 1943 Hanford, WA

439

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms - November 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review, Hanford Tank Farms - November 2011 Review, Hanford Tank Farms - November 2011 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Tank Farms - November 2011 November 2011 Review of Hanford Tank Farms Safety Basis Amendment for Double-Shell Tank Ventilation System Upgrades The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent oversight review of the draft amendment to the Hanford Tank Farms safety basis for upgrading the double-shell tank (DST) primary tank ventilation (PTV) systems to safety-significant designation. The Tank Farms are Hazard Category 2 DOE nuclear facilities. The review was performed during the period July 25 - August 12, 2011 by the HSS Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management

440

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC Department of Energy Awards Hanford River Corridor Contract To Washington Closure, LLC March 23, 2005 - 10:56am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman today announced that Washington Closure, LLC has been awarded the contract to manage the clean up and remediation of the Columbia River Corridor at the Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation in the state of Washington. The five-member team includes the Washington Group International Inc., Bechtel National Inc., CH2M Hill Inc., Eberline Services Inc., and Integrated Logistics Services Inc. The Columbia River Corridor is composed of roughly 210 square miles along the outer edge of the Hanford Site. The contract calls for cleaning up and

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441

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil March 11, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis An aerial view of Hanford’s D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. An aerial view of Hanford's D Area shows the D Reactor (lower left) and DR Reactor. Workers are digging 85 feet to groundwater at two sites there to remove chromium contamination. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River. Workers remove soil contaminated with sodium dichromate to prevent the chemical from reaching the groundwater and eventually the Columbia River.

442

Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Contractor Spent Two Years Preparing to Remediate 618-10 Digging Begins at Hazardous Hanford Burial Ground - River Corridor Contractor Spent Two Years Preparing to Remediate 618-10 August 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov 509-376-5365 Todd Nelson, Washington Closure media@wch-rcc.com 509-372-9097 RICHLAND, WASH. - After careful preparation and characterization, the Department of Energy's (DOE) River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has begun remediation of one of the most hazardous burial grounds tackled to date on the Hanford Site's River Corridor. The $57 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project began with nearly two years of preparation and characterization before reaching their

443

Multiple missions: The 300 Area in Hanford Site history  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an historical overview of the role of the 300 Area buildings at the Hanford Reservation. Topics covered are: Early fuel fabrication at the Hanford site (313 and 314 Buildings); N reactor fuel fabrication in the 300 Area; 305 test pile was Hanford`s first operating reactor; Early process improvement chemical research (321 and 3706 Buildings); Major 1952 and 1953 expansions in the 300 area (325 and 329 Buildings); Early 300 area facilities constructed to support reactor development (326 and 327 Buildings); Hanford site ventures with the peaceful atom (309, 308 and 318 Buildings); Modern 300 Area Buildings; Significant miscellaneous buildings in the 300 area; 300 Area process waste handling and disposal.

Gerber, M.S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hanford Site National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) characterization. Revision 10  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site environment and is numbered to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in Hanford Site NEPA related documents. The document is intended to provide a consistent description of the Hanford Site environment for the many NEPA documents that are being prepared by contractors. The two chapters in this document (Chapters 4 and 6) are numbered this way to correspond to the chapters where such information is presented in environmental impact statements (EISs) and other Site-related NEPA or CERCLA documentation. Chapter 4.0 (Affected Environment) describes the Hanford Site environment, and includes information on climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology, ecology, cultural, archaeological and historical resources, socioeconomics, and noise. Chapter 6.0 (Statutory and Regulatory Requirements) describes applicable federal and state laws and regulations, DOE directives and permits, and environmental standards directly applicable to the NEPA documents on the Hanford Site.

Neitzel, D.A. [ed.] [ed.; Fosmire, C.J.; Fowler, R.A. [and others] [and others

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations Massive Cement Pour into Hanford Site Nuclear Facility Underway: Recovery Act Funding Puts U Canyon in Home Stretch of Demolition Preparations June 14, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Hanford workers are pouring enough cement-like material to fill six Olympic-size wimming pools in one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) largest nuclear facilities at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State to prepare the massive building for demolition.

446

Hanford Firefighters Compete in Combat Challenge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Firefighters Compete in Combat Challenge Firefighters Compete in Combat Challenge Hanford Firefighters Compete in Combat Challenge October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Hanford Fire Department Lt. Anthony Lovato, Jr. (left) urges his teammate, Capt. Sean Barajas, to carry the 175-pound life-sized dummy across the finish line at the Scott Firefighter Combat Challenge in Everett, Wash. Hanford Fire Department Lt. Anthony Lovato, Jr. (left) urges his teammate, Capt. Sean Barajas, to carry the 175-pound life-sized dummy across the finish line at the Scott Firefighter Combat Challenge in Everett, Wash. Hanford Fire Department Lt. Anthony Lovato, Jr. performs the 40-pound tower hoisting leg of the Scott Firefighter Combat Challenge in Everett, Wash. Hanford Fire Department Lt. Anthony Lovato, Jr. performs the 40-pound tower

447

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP WIMAX TECHNOLOGY AT HANFORD: UPDATING INFRASTRUCTURE, ACCELERATING CLEANUP December 1, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Richland, WA - In direct support of Hanford cleanup and the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) accelerated cleanup initiatives, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) is teaming with the Site services contractor, Mission Support Alliance, LLC (MSA), CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company and Washington River Protection Services Company to implement a WiMAX-based communications infrastructure at Hanford to augment the existing fiber optic and Wi-Fi-based systems. Wi-Fi and WiMAX are both considered last mile technologies that carry signals from telecommunications backbones (in this case hubs or access

448

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site - September 2013 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site - September 2013 Hanford Site - September 2013 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site - September 2013 September 2013 Review of Preparedness for Severe Natural Phenomena Events at the Hanford Site This report documents the results of an independent oversight review of the preparedness of the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE/RL) and the various Hanford Site contractors to deal with severe natural phenomena events (NPE). The review was conducted April - May 2013 by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, which is within the DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security. The HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations performed this review to evaluate the processes for identifying emergency response capabilities

449

Secretary Moniz Meets with Employees, Tribal Leaders during Hanford Visit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary Moniz Meets with Employees, Tribal Leaders during Hanford Secretary Moniz Meets with Employees, Tribal Leaders during Hanford Visit and Site Tour Secretary Moniz Meets with Employees, Tribal Leaders during Hanford Visit and Site Tour July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz tours the 200 West Pump and Treat System, which treats chemical and radionuclide contamination in Hanford’s groundwater. Pictured, left to right, are Special Assistant to the Secretary Mark Appleton, Bob Popielarczyk of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Special Assistant to the Secretary T.J. Augustine, Secretary Ernest Moniz, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and DOE Richland Operations Office Deputy Manager Doug Shoop. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz tours the 200 West Pump and Treat System, which treats chemical and radionuclide contamination in Hanford's

450

EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1934: Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of expansion or continued use of existing sand and gravel pits located on the Hanford Site (Pits F, H, N, 6, 9, 18, 21, 23, 24, 30, and 34) and establishing one new borrow area source in the 100 Area for ongoing construction activities and fill material following remediation activities. The scope of this EA does not include borrow sources for silt-loam material. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 15, 2013 EA-1934: Mitigation Action Plan Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

451

Business Manangement System(BMS), RL-2008/Project Hanford Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Business Manangement System(BMS), RL-2008/Project Hanford Business Manangement System(BMS), RL-2008/Project Hanford Management Contract PHMC (Flour), Office of the Chief Information Officer Business Manangement System(BMS), RL-2008/Project Hanford Management Contract PHMC (Flour), Office of the Chief Information Officer Business Manangement System(BMS), RL-2008/Project Hanford Management Contract PHMC (Flour), Office of the Chief Information Officer Business Manangement System(BMS), RL-2008/Project Hanford Management Contract PHMC (Flour), Office of the Chief Information Officer More Documents & Publications iManage Strategic Integrated Procurement Enterprise System (STRIPES) PIA, Office of Procurement and Assistance Management PIA - Security Clearance Work Tracking and Budget System Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Billing System PIA, Office of Health,

452

Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells May 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers at the Hanford Site have surpassed goals for drilling wells to detect and remove contamination from groundwater. The groundwater was contaminated by radioactive waste and chemicals generated during decades of producing plutonium for the Cold War at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The Department of Energy (DOE) had set a goal for its contractor, CH2M HILL

453

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 August 2012 Review of Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations The purpose of this independent oversight review by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) was to observe the operations associated with processing a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) of "found fuel" (small