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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

EIR Report Template  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Template Report Template An EIR typically results in both a Draft and Final EIR Report. Where follow-up actions are required, a Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Review Report and Addendum to the Final EIR Report is also generated. The EIR Report shall be organized into the following sections:. Acronyms Key Definitions Executive Summary 1.0 Cost 2.0 Schedule 3.0 Scope 4.0 Risk 5.0 Management (Contract and Project) 6.0 ES&H, QA, Safety Report Appendices: A. EIR Team Members, Assignments, and Biographical Sketches B. Detailed Comments on Project Execution Plan (if applicable) C. Detailed Comments on Other Documents (if applicable) D. Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Recommendations OECM and the EIR Contractor may mutually agree to add or delete particular sections, based

2

External Independent Review (EIR) Report Template | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Statement of Work (SOW) Template (Combined EIRICE Support Contractor) Microsoft Word - EIR SOP Updated 101110 frank clean EIR SOP...

3

External Independent Review (EIR) Standard Operating Procedure...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) External Independent Review (EIR) Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) EIR SOP.pdf More Documents & Publications ICR-ICE Standard Operating...

4

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Comments and Responses to Comments volume of the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report prepared for the proposed Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project (Final EIS/EIR). This volume of the Final EIS/EIR provides copies of the written comments received on the Draft EIS/EIR and the leady agency responses to those comments in conformance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

None

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Contractor Statement of Work (SOW) Template (for EIR) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Statement of Work (SOW) Template (Combined EIRICE Support Contractor) EIR SOP Septmebr 2010 Microsoft Word - EIR SOP Updated 101110 frank...

6

Contractor Statement of Work (SOW) Template for EIR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement of Work (SOW) Template for EIR Statement of Work (SOW) Template for EIR The template presented below is a Statement of Work (SOW) for services of an EIR Contractor for conducting an EIR. Project and review specific information should be incorporated. Explanatory text appears in italics, while information that should be selected appears in >. The format and contents of this SOW is not compulsory, and the use is at the discretion of the OECM Analysts. Statement of Work for External Independent Review (EIR) > <EIR( i.e., Performance Baseline (CD-2), Construction/Execution Readiness EIR (CD-3) , Rebaseline the Performance Baseline>> > > Project Background Project Name:

7

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management Programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy April 2002 Volume II...

8

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Emergency Management Programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy April 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II April 2002 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................2 3.0 Conclusions .................................................................................................................................4

9

DOE's Entrepreneur in Residence (EIR) Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entrepreneur in Residence (EIR) Program Entrepreneur in Residence (EIR) Program DOE's Entrepreneur in Residence (EIR) Program October 24, 2007 - 3:45pm Addthis "It is in our vital interest to diversify America's energy supply - and the way forward is through technology." - President George W. Bush, 2007 State of the Union Address DOE's Commercialization Team The Commercialization Team is focused on broad market adoption of clean energy technologies. Crucial to this effort, is supporting the move of these technologies from DOE's National Laboratories to the private sector. About the EIR Program The Entrepreneur in Residence (EIR) Program will bring venture capital sponsored entrepreneurs into three of DOE's National Laboratories to develop plans to commercialize new clean energy technologies. The

10

EIS-0256: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

256: Final Environmental Impact Statement 256: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0256: Final Environmental Impact Statement Sierra Pacific Power Company Alturas Transmission Line Project This Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/S) describes the environmental setting and consequences of the construction and operation of the proposal Alturas Transmission Line Project. Sierra Pacific Power Company (SPPCO) has proposed this electric power transmission line to improve the existing operational capacity and reliability of its power transmission system and provide for anticipated growth in demand for electric power. This volume contains the Executive Summary. Environmental Impact Statement for Sierra Pacific Power Company Alturas Transmission Line Project, DOE/EIS-0256 (November 1995)

11

EIS-0285: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume 2 EIS-0285: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 2 Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Volume 2: Appendices Appendix A...

12

Volume I Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Volume I Volume I Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Searchlight Wind Energy Project NVN-084626 and NVN-086777 Bureau of Land Management Las Vegas Field Office in cooperation with Western Area Power Administration National Park Service December 2012 Searchlight Wind Energy Project FEIS Executive Summary Page | i Executive Summary The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Searchlight Wind Energy Project is summarized in the following sections. This summary provides a general overview of the project and its purpose and need; briefly describes the Proposed Action and other alternatives; and summarizes major impacts for key resources. Searchlight Wind Energy, LLC, (the Applicant) a wholly-owned subsidiary of Duke Energy has applied

13

Final cost reduction study for the Geysers Recharge Alternative. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not cost reduction opportunities exist for the Geysers Recharge Alternative as defined in the Santa Rosa Subregional Long-Term Wastewater Project EIR/EIS. The City of Santa Rosa has been directed to have a plan for reclaimed water disposal in place by 1999 which will meet future capacity needs under all weather conditions. A Draft EIR/EIS released in July 1996 and a Final EIR certified in June 1997 examine four primary alternatives plus the No Action Alternative. Two of the primary alternatives involve agricultural irrigation with reclaimed water, either in western or southern Sonoma County. Another involves increased discharge of reclaimed water into the Russian River. The fourth involves using reclaimed water to replenish the geothermal reservoir at the Geysers. The addition of this water source would enable the Geysers operators to produce more steam from the geothermal area and thereby prolong the life and economic production level of the steamfield and the geothermal power plants supplied by the steamfield. This study provides additional refined cost estimates for new scenarios which utilize an alternative pipeline alignment and a range of reclaimed water flows, which deliver less water to the Geysers than proposed in the EIR/EIS (by distributing flow to other project components). Also, electrical power rates were revised to reflect the recent changes in costs associated with deregulation of the power industry. In addition, this report provides information on sources of potential public and private funding available and future environmental documentation required if the cost reduction scenarios were to be selected by the City as part of their preferred alternative.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Statement of Work (SOW) Template (Combined EIR/ICE Support Contractor...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement of Work (SOW) Template (Combined EIRICE Support Contractor) Statement of Work (SOW) Template (Combined EIRICE Support Contractor) Contractor SOW Template - EIR &...

15

EIS-0312: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 3 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0312: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 3 EIS-0312: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 3 EIS-0312: Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 3 Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Volume 3 In this final environmental impact statement (FEIS), with the benefit of public comment and participation, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has developed and proposes a Preferred Alternative (PA 2002) that substantially combines elements of the Weak Stock and Sustainable Use alternatives and that falls within the established range of potential Policy Direction alternatives. This FEIS evaluates the environmental consequences of BPA's implementation and funding of sample actions that could emerge from any of the Policy Directions. Fish & Wildlife Implementation Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement,

16

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Secretary of Energy August 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II August 2002 i INDEPENDENT...

17

Final Report, Volume 77-5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the following Tasks: Task 76.1.21--Color photos: Stereo color aerial photographs were made available to industry for copying at industry's expense on November 28, 1977 at 11:00 a.m. This final report on this task merely records that fact. Task 77.1.14--Proposal Review (MOD A002)--All activities under this task have been completed. No tangible deliverables were required. Task 76.1.14--Simultaneous modeling of multiple data sets: A technique for simultaneous inversion of MT and Schlumberger data was developed and tested on some available deep crustal data from South Africa. The publication resulting and included herewith is: 'Ridge Regression Inversion Applied to Crustal Resistivity Sounding Data from South Africa', Geophysics, Volume 42, No.5, pages 995-1005. Joint inversion of Schlumberger and electromagnetic sounding data was developed and applied to geothermal data from Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA. The publication resulting and included herewith is: 'Electromagnetic and Schlumberger Resistivity Sounding in the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA', Geophysics, in press. To utilize multiple inversion schemes at a convective hydrothermal system in the Eastern Great Basin will require applications of three-dimensional forward algorithms now available for gravity, magnetics, and AMT/MT. Unfortunately the pertinent data sets available for Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA (or Monroe Hot Springs KGRA, for that matter) are not compatible since the physical property distributions giving rise to the gravity field is not coincident with that giving rise to the magnetic field, and so on. Thus, they have turned to interpreting each data set independently and then drawing a schematic model of the subsurface which accepts all data sets. An example of this procedure is contained in 'Geophysics of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah', submitted to Geology and included in Final Report Volume 77-2. Task 76.1.11--Drill and Log 10 Heat Flow Holes: All thermal gradients and heat flows appear in Technical Report 77-3. The summary of drilling progress, costs, and lithologs is enclosed.

Ward, S.H.; Whelan, J.A. (and others)

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Microsoft Word - EIR SOP Updated 101110 frank clean  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

documentation for the EIR in Support of CD-2, as well as proposed LOIs are provided in Appendix B. Additional resources for LOIs, including those that can be found in the Program Offices (NA, SC and EM) Independent Project Reviews' guidance are listed below, and can be consulted in the construction of the LOIs. Critical LOIs and those that should be included as a minimum are in bold-faced type in the Appendix B and C. Also, it should be emphasized that DOE Guides are a resource for best practices, but are not requirements. Alternative methods may be employed, but the methodology and assumptions should be explained and have a supporting basis. As a minimum LOIs should encompass the RCA/CAP items expressed in Appendix A, as well as a budget tables and milestone schedule

19

WIPP Volume I - ESH - Final 2.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Waste Isolation Pilot Plant August 2002 ISM Volume I Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume I August 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume I Table of Contents Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction .................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results ........................................................................................................................................3

20

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Isolation Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy August 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II August 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II Table of Contents Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pantex Volume 1 - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Plant Pantex Plant Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy November 2002 ISM Volume I INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE PANTEX PLANT Volume I November 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE PANTEX PLANT Volume I Table of Contents Acronyms ......................................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................

22

Microsoft Word - Volume I _Final_ 04-26-07.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CRTD-85 CRTD-85 National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Report Carbon Sequestration Project Review Meeting Greater Pittsburgh International Airport Hyatt Hotel September 25-28, 2006 Volume I Meeting Summary and Recommendations José D. Figueroa NETL Project Manager and Meeting Coordinator National Energy Technology Laboratory Final Report Carbon Sequestration Project Review Meeting Greater Pittsburgh International Airport Hyatt Hotel September 25-28, 2006 Volume I Meeting Summary and Recommendations José D. Figueroa NETL Project Manager and Meeting Coordinator 412/386-4966 Meeting Host Organization National Research Center for Coal and Energy West Virginia University Richard Bajura, NRCCE Director 304/293-2867 ext. 5401

23

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 1, summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The South Coast Alternative Fuels Demonstration, called CleanFleet, was conducted in the Los Angeles area from April 1992 through September 1994. The demonstration consisted of 111 package delivery vans operating on five alternative fuels and the control fuel, unleaded gasoline. The alternative fuels were propane gas, compressed natural gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol with 15 percent RFG (called M-85), and electricity. This volume of the eight volume CleanFleet final report is a summary of the project design and results of the analysis of data collected during the demonstration on vehicle maintenance and durability, fuel economy, employee attitudes, safety and occupational hygiene, emissions, and fleet economics.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Optical properties of fly ash. Volume 2, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research performed under this contract was divided into four tasks under the following headings: Task 1, Characterization of fly ash; Task 2, Measurements of the optical constants of slags; Task 3, Calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions; and Task 4, Measurements of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. Tasks 1 and 4 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Sarbajit Ghosal, while Tasks 2 and 3 constituted the Ph.D. research topic of Jon Ebert. Together their doctoral dissertations give a complete account of the work performed. This final report, issued in two volumes consists of an executive summary of the whole program followed by the dissertation of Ghosal and Ebert. Volume 2 contains the dissertation of Ebert which covers the measurements of the optical constants of slags, and calculations of the radiant properties of fly ash dispersions. A list of publications and conference presentations resulting from the work is also included.

Self, S.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Photovoltaic systems concept study. Volume IV. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared in nine sections plus appendices, separated into five separate volumes. This volume contains three sections. Separate abstracts were prepared for each section. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix T (Second Continued Volume): Comments & Responses.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is Appendix T (second continued volume) giving public comments and responses to the final environmental impact statement for the Columbia River System.

Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Final LLNL Volume 1 - ES&H 2002.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lawrence Livermore Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy July 2002 ISM Volume I INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume I July 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume I Table Of Contents Acronyms .........................................................................................................................................iii 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1

28

Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program, conduced by PNNL for DOE-BTP, including a summary of outcomes and lessons learned.

Parker, Graham B.; Mapes, Terry S.; Zalis, WJ

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

PL FINAL DESIGN REPORT. VOLUME II. PLANT DRAWINGS  

SciTech Connect

Plant drawings for the final design for the Army Reactor (PL-2) are presented. Two hundred and twenty-eight figures are included. (M.C.G.)

Combustion Engineering, Inc. Nuclear Div., Windsor, Conn.

1961-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Microsoft Word - Pantex Volume 2 - Technical Appendices - FINAL.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AT THE PANTEX PLANT Volume II Technical Appendices February 2005 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AT THE PANTEX PLANT Volume II Technical Appendices Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii Appendix C - Core Function Implementation (Core Functions 1-4) ........................................................... 1 Appendix D - Feedback and Continuous Improvement (Core Function 5) ............................................... 39 Appendix E - Safety System Functionality

31

Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. The technology has previously been developed for astronautical applications. The report is organized in four volumes, each focused as much as possible on the needs of a particular audience. Volume 1 contains Part A, the Executive Summary. This Executive Summary describes the accomplishments of the Program in brief, but assumes the reader's familiarity with the thermionic process and the technical issues associated with the Program. For this reason, Volume 1 also contains Part B, a minimally technical overview of the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program. Volume 2 (Part C) concentrates on the progress made in developing and fabricating the ''current generation'' of chemical vapor deposited hot shell thermionic converters and is addressed to those primarily concerned with today's capabilities in terrestrial thermionic technology. Volume 3 (Part D) contains the results of systems studies of primary interest to those involved in identifying and evaluating applications for thermionics. Volume 4 (Part E) is a highly technical discussion of the attempts made by the program to push the state-of-the-art beyond the current generation of converters and is directed toward potential researchers engaged in this same task. These technical discussions are complemented with Appendices where appropriate.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

San Joaquin Final EA December 2011--Main Volume  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment for Right-of-Way Maintenance in the San Joaquin Valley, California December 2011 Prepared for: Western Area Power Administration, Sierra Nevada Region San Joaquin Valley ROW Maintenance EA This page intentionally left blank San Joaquin Valley ROW Maintenance EA December 2011 iii Final EA CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION ...................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Introduction ............................................................................................. 1-1 1.2 Background ............................................................................................. 1-1 1.3 Purpose and Need for Action .................................................................. 1-3

33

Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Environmental Analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is volume 1 of the final environmental impact statement of the Bonneville Power Administration Information is included on the following: Purpose of and need for action; alternatives including the proposed action; affected environment; and environmental consequences.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

MHD Advanced Power Train Phase I, Final Report, Volume 7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix provides additional data in support of the MHD/Steam Power Plant Analyses reported in report Volume 5. The data is in the form of 3PA/SUMARY computer code printouts. The order of presentation in all four cases is as follows: (1) Overall Performance; (2) Component/Subsystem Information; (3) Plant Cost Accounts Summary; and (4) Plant Costing Details and Cost of Electricity.

A. R. Jones

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Engineering development of advanced froth flotation. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is an account of findings related to the Engineering and Development of Advanced Froth Flotation project. The results from benchscale and proof-of-concept (POC) level testing are presented and the important results from this testing are used to refine a conceptual design and cost estimate for a 20 TPH Semi-Works Facility incorporating the final proposed technology.

Ferris, D.D.; Bencho, J.R.; Torak, E.R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

OTEC SKSS preliminary designs. Volume IV. Appendixes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains appendices to the Station Keeping Subsystem design study for the 40 MeW Modular Experiment OTEC platforms. Appendices presented include: detailed drag calculations; sample CALMS computer printouts for SPAR and BARGE static analyses; sample time domain computer printouts (Hydromechanics, Inc.) program; extreme value and fatigue load calculations; anchor design calculations; deployment calculations; bottom slope plots; time domain analysis report by Hydromechanics Inc.; detailed cost analysis; control systems study report by Sperry Systems Management; cost estimates for model basin tests; and hydrodynamic loading on the mooring cables. (WHK)

,

1980-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Three dimensional magnetotelluric modeling. Final: volume 77-15  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-dimensional (3D) volume integral equation solution was refined and adapted to magnetotelluric (MT) modeling. The refinement, incorporating an integro-difference scheme, increases the accuracy somewhat without increasing the computer time. Utilizing the two symmetry planes for a plane wave source decreases the computer storage by a factor of 8 and greatly reduces the computer time. Convergence checks and comparisons with other solutions show that our results are valid. Because of space charges at resistivity boundaries, low-frequency 3D responses are much different from 1D and 2D responses. Hence 3D models are required for interpreting MT data in the complex geothermal environment.

Hohmann, G.W.; Ting, S.C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 2. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. The technology has previously been developed for astronautical applications. Volume 2 (Part C) concentrates on the progress made in developing and fabricating the ''current generation'' of chemical vapor deposited hot shell thermionic converters and is addressed to those primarily concerned with today's capabilities in terrestrial thermionic technology. 30 refs., 83 figs.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 4. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. Volume 4 (Part E) is a highly technical discussion of the attempts made by the Program to push the state-of-the-art beyond the current generation of converters and is directed toward potential researchers engaged in this same task. These technical discussions are complemented with Appendices where appropriate.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Large stationary Stirling engine. Final report. Volume II. Program plan  

SciTech Connect

A program plan for the design, fabrication and testing of two 1000 HP stationary Stirling engines was developed. The program duration is expected to be approximately 5-1/2 years, with engine site installation occurring in the beginning and mid-1986, respectively; including a substantial effort for the design/development of a heat transport system, a development and design verification testing program and a user-demonstration program for both the engines. The total program cost including fee is $22.5M, assuming that the heat source is furnished completely checked out. The overall program was structured in six major tasks which are as follows: project management, preliminary design, development testing, final design, fab and assembly, and installation and test.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 3. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. Volume 3 (Part D) contains the results of systems studies of primary interest to those involved in identifying and evaluating applications for thermionics. As a general rule of thumb, cogeneration technologies are most attractive to industries when those technologies naturally produce a ration of electrical to thermal output which closely matches the demand within the industrial facilities themselves. Several of the industries which consume the largest amounts of energy have an electrical-to-thermal ratio of about ten percent, as can be seen in Exhibit D-1.1. This closely matches the electrical efficiency of thermionic converters. Thermionic cogeneration has several other unique advantages relative to alternative technologies for cogeneration which should lead to a much broader application of cogeneration in industry. These advantages accrue from the much higher temperatures at which thermionic energy conversion takes place, its suitability for very small as well as large process heaters, and, of course, its production of direct heat rather than process steam. In fact, thermionics can even be coupled to more conventional cogeneration technologies (e.g., steam turbines) to extend their applicability to processes requiring a greater electrical-to-thermal ratio than either cogeneration technology alone can provide. Several examples of thermionic cogeneration are presented in greater detail: copper refining by the Noranda process; thermionic topping cycles for gas turbine; and combined cycle and fossil-fuel steam power plants. 13 refs., 71 figs.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Porject - Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEAs wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II  

SciTech Connect

The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEAs wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Microsoft Word - Outside_CoverFinalEIS Volume IV.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IV - Public Comments IV - Public Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers DOE/EIS-0377 Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume IV - Public Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers VOLUME CONTENTS Volume I Executive Summary Acronyms Table of Contents Chapter 1 - Introduction Chapter 2 - Proposed Project, Proposed Federal Actions, and Alternatives Chapter 3 - Affected Environment Chapter 4 - Environmental Consequences

45

Non-Federal Participation in AC Intertie Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume2:Appendices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-Federal Participation in AC Intertie Final Non-Federal Participation in AC Intertie Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume2:Appendices Bonneville DOE/eis- 0145 POWER ADMINISTRATION January 1994 Non-Federal Participation in AC Intertie Draft Environmental Impact Statement Table of Contents Appendix A Life-of-Facilities Capacity Ownership Proposal A1 Appendix B Long-Term Intertie Access Policy B1 Appendix C Glossary C1 Appendix D Biological Assessment ad Supporting Materials

46

Volume 1, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Volume 1 Executive Summary Chapters 1-7, 14-16 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

47

Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 4, Comments and Responses.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume of the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) contains public comments addressing the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Draft EIS, August 1990 and Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) responses. The Introduction provides information about the process BPA follows in addressing these comments. Part I contains a listing of the Alternative Actions evaluated in the Final EIS; Part II is organized by Alternatives and includes summaries of the comments and BPA responses; Part III provides copies of the original comments letters, and, for ease of identification, are coded in the margins according to the alternative(s) addressed.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sierra Pacific Power Company Alturas Transmission Line Project, Final Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Comments and responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sierra Pacific Power Company has proposed the construction and operation of a 345,000 volt overhead electric power transmission line from Alturas, California to Reno, Nevada. This Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement will assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed project and alternatives. This report contains public comments which were received on the Draft EIR/S. Significant issues may be identified through public and agency comments.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico, Volume 1: executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. The final report, prepared in three volumes, describes the extent of the contribution of OCS development to coastal land loss. Volume I is the Executive Summary. The report provides a detailed description of both direct and indirect impacts.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Final report, Supplemental Volume 2. Sources and documentation  

SciTech Connect

This volume and its appendixes supplement the Advisory Committee`s final report by reporting how we went about looking for information concerning human radiation experiments and intentional releases, a description of what we found and where we found it, and a finding aid for the information that we collected. This volume begins with an overview of federal records, including general descriptions of the types of records that have been useful and how the federal government handles these records. This is followed by an agency-by-agency account of the discovery process and descriptions of the records reviewed, together with instructions on how to obtain further information from those agencies. There is also a description of other sources of information that have been important, including institutional records, print resources, and nonprint media and interviews. The third part contains brief accounts of ACHRE`s two major contemporary survey projects (these are described in greater detail in the final report and another supplemental volume) and other research activities. The final section describes how the ACHRE information-nation collections were managed and the records that ACHRE created in the course of its work; this constitutes a general finding aid for the materials deposited with the National Archives. The appendices provide brief references to federal records reviewed, descriptions of the accessions that comprise the ACHRE Research Document Collection, and descriptions of the documents selected for individual treatment. Also included are an account of the documentation available for ACHRE meetings, brief abstracts of the almost 4,000 experiments individually described by ACHRE staff, a full bibliography of secondary sources used, and other information.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Microsoft Word - Outside_CoverFinalEIS Volume I.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers DOE/EIS-0377 Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume I June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Department of Defense, Army Corps of Engineers Title: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Location: Proposed Big Stone II Plant: Big Stone City, Grant County, South Dakota

54

Energia Sierra Juarez U.S. Transmission Line Final EIS Volume 3a, part 1 of 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energia Sierra Juarez U.S. Transmission Line Project Energia Sierra Juarez U.S. Transmission Line Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume 3 - Comments and Responses Document May 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Washington, DC 20585 Cooperating Agency - County of San Diego San Diego, CA DOE/EIS-0414 Energia Sierra Juarez U.S. Transmission Line Final EIS i May2012 Table of Contents VOLUME 1 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT Distribution Letter Cover Sheet Summary ................................................................................................................................................... S-1 S.1 Background and Overview ............................................................................................... S-1

55

Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Volume 1. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume I) is the main body of the FEIS/R and includes a 4(f) Statement on the proposed location of an electrification facility in the Great Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

NONE

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Microsoft Word - Outside_CoverFinalEIS Volume II.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

II - Responses to Comments II - Responses to Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers DOE/EIS-0377 Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume II - Responses to Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS af acre-feet afy acre-feet per year APP Avian Protection Plan BA Biological Assessment Barr Barr Engineering Company BMPs Best Management Practices Btu British thermal unit CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule

57

Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2, Book 2: Accident model document: Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This section of the Accident Model Document (AMD) presents the appendices which describe the various analyses that have been conducted for use in the Galileo Final Safety Analysis Report II, Volume II. Included in these appendices are the approaches, techniques, conditions and assumptions used in the development of the analytical models plus the detailed results of the analyses. Also included in these appendices are summaries of the accidents and their associated probabilities and environment models taken from the Shuttle Data Book (NSTS-08116), plus summaries of the several segments of the recent GPHS safety test program. The information presented in these appendices is used in Section 3.0 of the AMD to develop the Failure/Abort Sequence Trees (FASTs) and to determine the fuel releases (source terms) resulting from the potential Space Shuttle/IUS accidents throughout the missions.

Not Available

1988-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 2, Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents information on low-level mixed waste forms.The descriptions of the low-level mixed waste (LLMW) streams that are considered by the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) are given in Appendix A. This information was taken from descriptions generated by the Mixed Waste Treatment Program (MWTP). Appendix B provides a list of characteristic properties initially considered by the Final Waste Form (FWF) Working Group (WG). A description of facilities available to test the various FWFs discussed in Volume I of DOE/MWIP-3 are given in Appendix C. Appendix D provides a summary of numerous articles that were reviewed on testing of FWFS. Information that was collected by the tests on the characteristic properties considered in this report are documented in Appendix D. The articles reviewed are not a comprehensive list, but are provided to give an indication of the data that are available.

Mayberry, J.L.; Huebner, T.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ross, W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nakaoka, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Schumacher, R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Cunnane, J.; Singh, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Greenhalgh, W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 2: Public comments and responses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the draft Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DARHT EIS) for review by the State of New Mexico, Indian Tribes, local governments, other Federal agencies, and the general public. DOE invited comments on the accuracy and adequacy of the draft EIS and any other matters pertaining to their environmental reviews. The formal comment period ran for 45 days, to June 26, 1995, although DOE indicated that late comments would be considered to the extent possible. As part of the public comment process, DOE held two public hearings in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 31 and June 1, 1995. In addition, DOE made the draft classified supplement to the DARHT EIS available for review by appropriately cleared individuals with a need to know the classified information. Reviewers of the classified material included the State of New Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, and certain Indian Tribes. Volume 2 of the final DARHT EIS contains three chapters. Chapter 1 includes a collective summary of the comments received and DOE`s response. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the draft DARHT EIS received by DOE. Chapter 3 contains DOE`s responses to the public comments and an indication as to how the comments were considered in the final EIS.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fundamental aspects of coal-water fuel droplet combustion and secondary atomization of coal-water mixtures. Volume I, final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Final Report is issued in two volumes, covering research into the combustion of coal-water fuels (CWF). Two separate but related tasks are discussed; the present report, Volume I, contains results obtained under Task ...

Sarofim, Adel F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume I of III: methodology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report develops and demonstrates the methodology for the National Utility Regulatory (NUREG) Model developed under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. It is accompanied by two supporting volumes. Volume II is a user's guide for operation of the NUREG software. This includes description of the flow of software and data, as well as the formats of all user data files. Finally, Volume III is a software description guide. It briefly describes, and gives a listing of, each program used in NUREG.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

62

Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 2: Book 1, Accident model document  

SciTech Connect

The Accident Model Document (AMD) is the second volume of the three volume Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Galileo outer planetary space science mission. This mission employs Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) as the prime electrical power sources for the spacecraft. Galileo will be launched into Earth orbit using the Space Shuttle and will use the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) booster to place the spacecraft into an Earth escape trajectory. The RTG's employ silicon-germanium thermoelectric couples to produce electricity from the heat energy that results from the decay of the radioisotope fuel, Plutonium-238, used in the RTG heat source. The heat source configuration used in the RTG's is termed General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS), and the RTG's are designated GPHS-RTGs. The use of radioactive material in these missions necessitates evaluations of the radiological risks that may be encountered by launch complex personnel as well as by the Earth's general population resulting from postulated malfunctions or failures occurring in the mission operations. The FSAR presents the results of a rigorous safety assessment, including substantial analyses and testing, of the launch and deployment of the RTGs for the Galileo mission. This AMD is a summary of the potential accident and failure sequences which might result in fuel release, the analysis and testing methods employed, and the predicted source terms. Each source term consists of a quantity of fuel released, the location of release and the physical characteristics of the fuel released. Each source term has an associated probability of occurrence. 27 figs., 11 tabs.

Not Available

1988-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Geothermal completion technology life cycle cost model (GEOCOM). Volume I. Final report. Volume II. User instruction manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Just as with petroleum wells, drilling and completing a geothermal well at minimum original cost may not be the most cost-effective way to exploit the resource. The impacts of the original completion activities on production and costs later in the life of the well must also be considered. In order to evaluate alternate completion and workover technologies, a simple computer model has been developed to compare total life-cycle costs for a geothermal well to total production or injection. Volume I discusses the mechanics of the model and then presents detailed results from its application to different completion and workover questions. Volume II is the user instruction manual.

Anderson, E.R.; Hoessel, W.C.; Mansure, A.J.; McKissen, P.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Final report. Volume 2. Technical  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this program was to assess the feasibility of using solar energy to provide a significant fraction of the energy needs of commercial buildings that have energy demands greater than 200 kWe. This volume of the final report discusses the approach employed to develop: (1) STES concept configurations and component data, (2) commercial buildings application data, and (3) computer simulation programs for evaluating various STES concept-commercial buildings applications. Various solar thermal and photovoltaic solar total energy systems (STES) configurations were considered. Concurrently, data on commercial buildings (e.g., categories, energy demand, demographic population, etc.) were developed and used to define six model building configurations which could be used as representative commercial buildings within six various regions (12 specific sites) of the United States. The six configurations included four building types (a low rise office building, a large retail store, a medium-size shopping center and a large shopping center) typifying current building designs. The remaining two configurations used the large shopping center model except that the energy demand was changed to reflect future building designs. The STESEP Computer Code was developed for a quick evaluation method for tradeoffs related to (1) cascading of thermal power conversion systems, (2) determination of optimum collector sizes and operating conditions (make or buy decisions for auxiliary energy), and (3) comparison of solar total energy concepts in various parts of the country and in various types of commercial buildings to assess their future economic potential for various economic scenarios. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 3, vehicle maintenance and durability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CleanFleet is a demonstration of panel vans operating on five alternative motorfuels in commercial package delivery operations in the South Coast Air Basin of California. The five alternative fuels are propane gas, compressed natural gas (CNG), California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol (M-85 with 15 percent RFG), and electricity. Data were gathered on in-use emissions, operations, and fleet economics. This volume of the final report summarizes the maintenance required on these vans from the time they were introduced into the demonstration (April through early November 1992) until the end of the demonstration in September 1994. The vans were used successfully in FedEx operations; but, to varying degrees, the alternative fuel vehicles required more maintenance than the unleaded gasoline control vehicles. The maintenance required was generally associated with the development state of the fuel-related systems. During the demonstration, no non-preventive maintenance was required on the highly developed fuel-related systems in any of the unleaded gasoline production vehicles used either as controls or as RFG test vehicles. The maintenance problems encountered with the less developed systems used in this demonstration may persist in the short term with vehicles featuring the same or similar systems. This means that fleet operators planning near-term acquisitions of vehicles incorporating such systems should consider the potential for similar problems when (1) selecting vendors and warranty provisions and (2) planning maintenance programs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 2, Project report. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second volume contains detailed information on a number of specific topics relevant to the recovery/recycling of plastics.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

National Utility Financial Statement model (NUFS). Volume III of III: software description. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains a description of the software comprising the National Utility Financial Statement Model (NUFS). This is the third of three volumes describing NUFS provided by ICF Incorporated under contract DEAC-01-79EI-10579. The three volumes are entitled: model overview and description, user's guide, and software guide.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

68

FY 93 thermal loading systems study final report: Volume 2. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to meet the overall performance requirements for the proposed Mined Geology Disposal System at Yucca Mountain, Nevada requires the two major subsystem (natural barriers and engineered barriers) to positively contribute to containment and radionuclide isolation. In addition to the postclosure performance the proposed repository must meet preclosure requirements of safety, retrievability, and operability. Cost and schedule were also considered. The thermal loading strategy chosen may significantly affect both the postclosure and preclosure performance of the proposed repository. Although the current Site Characterization Plan reference case is 57 kilowatts (kW)/acre, other thermal loading strategies (different areal mass loadings) have been proposed which possess both advantages and disadvantages. The objectives of the FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study were to (1) place bounds on the thermal loading which would establish the loading regime that is ``too hot`` and the loading regime that is ``too cold``, to (2) ``grade`` or evaluate the performance, as a function of thermal loading, of the repository to contain high level wastes against performance criteria and to (3) evaluate the performance of the various options with respect to cost, safety, and operability. Additionally, the effort was to (4) identify important uncertainties that need to be resolved by tests and/or analyses in order to complete a performance assessment on the effects of thermal loading. The FY 1993 Thermal Loading Study was conducted from December 1, 1992 to December 30, 1993 and this final report provides the findings of the study. Volume 2 consists of 10 appendices which contain the following: Waste Stream Analysis; Waste Package Design Inputs; Subsurface Design Inputs; Thermal-Hydrologic Model Inputs; Near-Field Calculations; Far-Field; Reliability of Electronics as a Function of Temperature; Cost Analysis Details; Geochemistry; and Areas of Uncertainty in Thermal Loading.

NONE

1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

EIR SOP Septmebr 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

have been satisfactory, or if respective items have significant issues associated. A Corrective Action Plan (CAP) shell will be attached to the report which summarized the...

70

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Chicago Bridge and Iron Company. System design final report, Volume 2. Appendix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume II of CBI's final report of work under Phase 1 of the desalination project, submitted in August 1981, is an appendix containing detailed equipment specifications and descriptions of all major subsystems of the proposed pilot desalination plant. Piping and instrumentation drawings, electrical power distribution diagrams, and building floor plans are also provided. The appendix includes technical specifications for all pumps, storage tanks, heat exchangers, the turbine and diesel generators, oil heater, melter assembly and counterwasher.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF-ternary catalyst materials for higher performance, documents enhanced durability under multiple types of accelerated tests by factors of 10x to 50x over conventional catalysts, & demonstrates their performance & durability in large area MEA FC stack tests. The PEMFC ion exchange membrane is the other key functioning FC component on which work was completed. While improvements have been made to standard PFSA type membranes, they still require humidification to achieve adequate proton conductivity & so their use at elevated temperatures & drier operating conditions is limited. Membranes with increased durability & conductivity under hotter, drier conditions allow the use of FC's in many applications, particularly automotive. Towards this goal, 2 approaches were pursued in the work reported here. The first part was designed for immediate application at drier conditions & operating temperatures between 85C and 120C, focused on the development of a membrane based on a low equivalent weight (EW), perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer for good ionic conductivity at low humidification, & the use of stabilizing additives for improved oxidative stability. The ionomer used was developed at 3M & has a shorter acid containing side-chain than the Nafion ionomer. This ionomer also has a higher T? & higher modulus than that of a Nafion membrane of the same EW, allowing lower EW ionomers to be prepared with very good mechanical properties. In addition, more than 50 stabilizing additives were evaluated in ex-situ, Fentons tests & more than 10 of these were incorporated into membranes & evaluated in accelerated FC tests. This work led to thin (25-30 micron) cast membranes with substantially improved conductivity & durability under simulated automotive conditions, compared to membranes currently available. The 2nd body of membrane work was focused on developing & characterizing 3 approaches for making new PEM's for operation under hot (>120C) & dry (dew point with enhanced proton conductivity, polymer matrices swollen with lo

Debe, Mark K.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF-ternary catalyst materials for higher performance, documents enhanced durability under multiple types of accelerated tests by factors of 10x to 50x over conventional catalysts, & demonstrates their performance & durability in large area MEA FC stack tests. The PEMFC ion exchange membrane is the other key functioning FC component on which work was completed. While improvements have been made to standard PFSA type membranes, they still require humidification to achieve adequate proton conductivity & so their use at elevated temperatures & drier operating conditions is limited. Membranes with increased durability & conductivity under hotter, drier conditions allow the use of FC's in many applications, particularly automotive. Towards this goal, 2 approaches were pursued in the work reported here. The first part was designed for immediate application at drier conditions & operating temperatures between 85C and 120C, focused on the development of a membrane based on a low equivalent weight (EW), perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer for good ionic conductivity at low humidification, & the use of stabilizing additives for improved oxidative stability. The ionomer used was developed at 3M & has a shorter acid containing side-chain than the Nafion ionomer. This ionomer also has a higher T? & higher modulus than that of a Nafion membrane of the same EW, allowing lower EW ionomers to be prepared with very good mechanical properties. In addition, more than 50 stabilizing additives were evaluated in ex-situ, Fentons tests & more than 10 of these were incorporated into membranes & evaluated in accelerated FC tests. This work led to thin (25-30 micron) cast membranes with substantially improved conductivity & durability under simulated automotive conditions, compared to membranes currently available. The 2nd body of membrane work was focused on developing & characterizing 3 approaches for making new PEM's for operation under hot (>120C) & dry (dew point <80C) FC conditions: inorganic materials with enhanced proton conductivity, polymer matrices swollen with lo

Debe, Mark K.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Microsoft Word - ANL 2005 ESH - Volume II -FINAL FORMATTED.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY VOLUME II TECHNICAL APPENDICES May 2005 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AT ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II Technical Appendices Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii Appendix C - Core Function Implementation (Core Functions #1 - #4)..................................................... 1 Appendix D - Feedback and Continuous Improvement (Core Function #5) ............................................. 35 Appendix E - Essential System Functionality ............................................................................................

74

Final Technical Progress Report; Closeout Certifications; CSSV Newsletter Volume I; CSSV Newsletter Volume II; CSSV Activity Journal; CSSV Final Financial Report  

SciTech Connect

This Project?s third year of implementation in 2007-2008, the final year, as designated by Elizabeth City State University (ECSU), in cooperation with the National Association of Mathematicians (NAM) Inc., in an effort to promote research and research training programs in computational science ? scientific visualization (CSSV). A major goal of the Project was to attract the energetic and productive faculty, graduate and upper division undergraduate students of diverse ethnicities to a program that investigates science and computational science issues of long-term interest to the Department of Energy (DoE) and the nation. The breadth and depth of computational science?scientific visualization and the magnitude of resources available are enormous for permitting a variety of research activities. ECSU?s Computational Science-Science Visualization Center will serve as a conduit for directing users to these enormous resources.

Houston, Johnny L [PI; Geter, Kerry [Division of Business and Finance

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

75

AFBC (atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion) conversion at Northern States Power Company: Volume 1, Project origins: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This is the first volume in a series of four reports detailing the conversion of Northern States Power Company's (NSP) Black Dog unit 2 from pulverized-coal firing to atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (AFBC). This particular report describes the important events and decisions that led to NSP's selection of its Black Dog unit 2 for conversion to AFBC, and it provides an overview of AFBC technology and a discussion of the AFBC conversion market. The purpose of these reports is to disseminate the information gathered during the Black Dog AFBC Conversion Project to utilities evaluating the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of converting units within their systems from pulverized-coal firing to AFBC. To this end, each volume in this series of reports presents material about a different aspect of the Black Dog project. Volume 2 - Unit Design describes the design of the new AFBC system and the important decisions that led to its final configuration; Volume 3 - Unit Demolition describes the major activities that occurred during the demolition and relocation phase; and Volume 4 - Unit Construction describes the major activities that occurred during the construction phase of the project. 17 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

deBrun Duffy, J.; Hinrichsen, D.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Conceptual design and systems analysis of photovoltaic systems. Volume II. Study results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This investigation of terrestrial PV systems considered the technical and economic feasibility for systems in three size categories: a small system of about 12 kW peak output for on-site residential use; a large 1500 MW central power plant contributing to the bulk energy of a utility system power grid; and an intermediate size system of about 250 kW for use on public or commercial buildings. In each category, conceptual designs were developed, performance was analyzed for a range of climatic regions, economic analyses were performed, and assessments were made of pertinent institutional issues. The report consists of three volumes. Volume I contains a Study Summary of the major study results. This volume contains the detailed results pertaining to on-site residential photovoltaic systems, central power plant photovoltaic systems, and intermediate size systems applied to commercial and public buildings. Volume III contains supporting appendix material. (WHK)

Kirpich, A.

1977-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains reports on habitat improvement and fisheries enhancement projects conducted in the following subbasins: (1) Clackamas River; (2) Hood River; :(3) Deschutes River; (4) John Day River; (5) Umatilla River; and (6) Grande Ronde River. (ACR)

Miller, Rod

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Final environmental statement, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented under the following section headings: LMFBR program options and their compatibility with the major issues affecting commercial development, Proposed Final Environmental Statement for the LMFBR program, December 1974, WASH-1535, supplemental material, and material relating to Proposed Final Environmental Statement review. (DG)

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

ASEAN--USAID Buildings Energy Conservation Project final report. Volume 2, Technology  

SciTech Connect

This volume reports on research in the area of energy conservation technology applied to commercial buildings in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) region. Unlike Volume I of this series, this volume is a compilation of original technical papers prepared by different authors in the project. In this regard, this volume is much like a technical journal. The papers that follow report on research conducted by both US and ASEAN researchers. The authors representing Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand, come from a range of positions in the energy arena, including government energy agencies, electric utilities, and universities. As such, they account for a wide range of perspectives on energy problems and the role that technology can play in solving them. This volume is about using energy more intelligently. In some cases, the effort is towards the use of more advanced technologies, such as low-emittance coatings on window glass, thermal energy storage, or cogeneration. In others, the emphasis is towards reclaiming traditional techniques for rendering energy services, but in new contexts such as lighting office buildings with natural light, or cooling buildings of all types with natural ventilation. Used in its broadest sense, the term ``technology`` encompasses all of the topics addressed in this volume. Along with the more customary associations of technology, such as advanced materials and equipment and the analysis of their performance, this volume treats design concepts and techniques, analysis of ``secondary`` impacts from applying technologies (i.e., unintended impacts, or impacts on parties not directly involved in the purchase and use of the technology), and the collection of primary data used for conducting technical analyses.

Levine, M.D.; Busch, J.F. [eds.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOE/EIS-0294; Sutter Power Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume I (April 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sutter Power Project Final EIS Sutter Power Project Final EIS April, 1999 1 - 3 CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION TO THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT 1.1 INTRODUCTION Western Area Power Administration (Western) is a power marketing administration of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Western owns and operates a grid of electrical transmission lines in 15 western states, including California. The Calpine Corporation (Calpine) has requested an interconnection to Western's Keswick- Elverta/Olinda-Elverta double-circuit 230-kV transmission line to transmit electricity generated by their proposed Sutter Power Project (SPP). The SPP is a proposed 500- megawatt (MW) natural gas-fueled, combined-cycle, electric generation facility. This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) can be viewed on DOE's National

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Solar central receiver prototype heliostat CDRL item B. d. Final technical report, Volume 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is volume II of a two volume report which presents the results of a study to define a low-cost approach to the production, installation, and operation of heliostats for central receiver solar thermal power plants. Performance and cost analyses are presented, and critical R and D areas are identified. Also, computer printed work sheets are included for heliostat investment, maintenance equipment investment, initial spares investment, and first years operations and maintenance for 2,500, 25,000, 250,000, and 1,000,000 units per year production. (WHK)

Easton, C. R.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 2 discusses the following topics: Fuel Rod Extraction System Test Results and Analysis Reports and Clamping Table Test Results and Analysis Reports.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 1 discusses the following topics: the background of the project; test program description; summary of tests and test results; problem evaluation; functional requirements confirmation; recommendations; and completed test documentation for tests performed in Phase 3.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Prototypical Rod Construction Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 3 discusses the following topics: Downender Test Results and Analysis Report; NFBC Canister Upender Test Results and Analysis Report; Fuel Assembly Handling Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; and Fuel Canister Upender Test Results and Analysis Report.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

"FutureGen 2.0 Project Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume II"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPENDIX F APPENDIX F Cultural Surveys F1 - Phase I - Site Characterization Locale Survey F2 - Phase I - Meredosia Energy Center Survey F3 - Phase I - Bluff Area Pipeline Right-of-Way Segment Survey F4 - Phase I - Soil Gas Monitoring Locations Survey for the Final Environmental Impact Statement FutureGen 2.0 Project Meredosia, Illinois (Morgan County) Note: This appendix was updated for the Final EIS.

86

Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 2. Technical studies. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume II) presents additional technical studies to supplement Volume III of the DEIS/R issued in October 1993 (PB94-111838).

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Combined cycle solar central receiver hybrid power system study. Volume III. Appendices. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design study for a 100 MW gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle solar/fossil-fuel hybrid power plant is presented. This volume contains the appendices: (a) preconceptual design data; (b) market potential analysis methodology; (c) parametric analysis methodology; (d) EPGS systems description; (e) commercial-scale solar hybrid power system assessment; and (f) conceptual design data lists. (WHK)

None

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Inertial Fusion Energy reactor design studies: Prometheus-L, Prometheus-H. Volume 2, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a review of design studies for Inertial Confinement reactor. This second of three volumes discussions is some detail the following: Objectives, requirements, and assumptions; rationale for design option selection; key technical issues and R&D requirements; and conceptual design selection and description.

Waganer, L.M.; Driemeyer, D.E.; Lee, V.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Low-rank coal research: Volume 2, Advanced research and technology development: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II contains articles on advanced combustion phenomena, combustion inorganic transformation; coal/char reactivity; liquefaction reactivity of low-rank coals, gasification ash and slag characterization, and fine particulate emissions. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Mann, M.D.; Swanson, M.L.; Benson, S.A.; Radonovich, L.; Steadman, E.N.; Sweeny, P.G.; McCollor, D.P.; Kleesattel, D.; Grow, D.; Falcone, S.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 1-B. Commercial fusion electric plant  

SciTech Connect

Volume 1-B contains the following chapters: (1) blanket and reflector; (2) central cell shield; (3) central cell structure; (4) heat transport and energy conversion; (5) tritium systems; (6) cryogenics; (7) maintenance; (8) safety; (9) radioactivity, activation, and waste disposal; (10) instrumentation and control; (11) balance of plant; (12) plant startup and operation; (13) plant availability; (14) plant construction; and (15) economic analysis.

Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E. (eds.)

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 1-A. Commercial fusion electric plant  

SciTech Connect

Volume 1-A contains the following chapters: (1) plasma engineering, (2) magnets, (3) ecr heating systems, (4) anchor ion-cyclotron resonance heating system, (5) sloshing ion neutral beam, (6) end cell structure, (7) end plasma technology, (8) fueling, (9) startup ion cyclotron resonant heating systems, and (10) end cell radiation analysis. (MOW)

Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E. (eds.)

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Regional load-curve models. Volume 5. Data base. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In preparing to build the models detailed in the first four volumes of the EA-1672 reports, a substantial data gathering, clean-up, and organizing effort was conducted. This volume describes that process and documents the data banks sent to EPRI. Three types of data concepts were needed to explore hourly load forecasting: hourly load, hourly weather and related socioeconomic data concepts. These materials were gathered for the project. EPRI has 32 data tapes that include hourly load and weather data for 32 regions for the period 1962 to 1977. Two other data banks, EPRIDATAA and EPRIDATAM, contain annual and monthly data respectively, gathered for use in this project. Hourly load forecasts out to the year 2000 have also been received by EPRI. DRI's forecasts are contained in the data bank FORECASTBANK. QUERI's forecasts are also available. These data series may prove useful to other researchers exploring related topics.

Platt, H.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Microsoft Word - 2004 LLNL Volume 2 - FINAL FORMATTED for pdf2.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II Technical Appendices December 2004 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY, AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT AT THE LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY Table of Contents Acronyms.....................................................................................................................................................iii Appendix C - Core Function Implementation (Core Functions 1-4) ........................................................... 1 Appendix D - Core Function #5 - Feedback and Continuous Improvement ............................................. 49 Appendix E - Essential System Functionality............................................................................................

96

Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

97

INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC POWER GENERATION. VOLUME I. SYSTEM ANALYSIS AND ENVIRONMENTAL TESTING. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A system analysis was performed to establish the design and performance characteristics of 250- and 1000-Mev MHD generators. The results are presented, and the necessary equations are derived. The results of environmental tests that investigated boundary and bulk conductivity, structural concepts, and combustion phenomena are included. The other five volumes of the report are summarized, together with the principal conclusions. (D.C.W.)

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

Not Available

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Economic evaluation of the annual cycle energy system (ACES). Final report. Volume III, appendices  

SciTech Connect

This volume consists of seven appendices related to ACES, the first three of which are concerned with computer programs. The appendices are entitled: (A) ACESIM: Residential Program Listing; (B) Typical Inputs and Outputs of ACESIM; (C) CACESS: Commercial Building Program Listing; (D) Typical Weather-Year Selection Requirements; (E) Building Characteristics; (F) List of Major Variables Used in the Computer Programs; and (G) Bibliography. 79 references.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS). Final report. Volume 2. Commercial fusion synfuels plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains the following chapters: (1) synfuels; (2) physics base and parameters for TMR; (3) high-temperature two-temperature-zone blanket system for synfuel application; (4) thermochemical hydrogen processes; (5) interfacing the sulfur-iodine cycle; (6) interfacing the reactor with the thermochemical process; (7) tritium control in the blanket system; (8) the sulfur trioxide fluidized-bed composer; (9) preliminary cost estimates; and (10) fuels beyond hydrogen. (MOW)

Donohue, M.L.; Price, M.E. (eds.)

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Advanced Neutron Source enrichment study -- Volume 1: Main report. Final report, Revision 12/94  

SciTech Connect

A study has been performed of the impact on performance of using low enriched uranium (20% {sup 235}U) or medium enriched uranium (35% {sup 235}U) as an alternative fuel for the Advanced Neutron Source, which is currently designed to use uranium enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. Higher fuel densities and larger volume cores were evaluated at the lower enrichments in terms of impact on neutron flux, safety, safeguards, technical feasibility, and cost. The feasibility of fabricating uranium silicide fuel at increasing material density was specifically addressed by a panel of international experts on research reactor fuels. The most viable alternative designs for the reactor at lower enrichments were identified and discussed. Several sensitivity analyses were performed to gain an understanding of the performance of the reactor at parametric values of power, fuel density, core volume, and enrichment that were interpolations between the boundary values imposed on the study or extrapolations from known technology. Volume 2 of this report contains 26 appendices containing results, meeting minutes, and fuel panel presentations.

Bari, R.A.; Ludewig, H.; Weeks, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Advanced Technology

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Final safety analysis report for the Galileo Mission: Volume 1, Reference design document  

SciTech Connect

The Galileo mission uses nuclear power sources called Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide the spacecraft's primary electrical power. Because these generators contain nuclear material, a Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is required. A preliminary SAR and an updated SAR were previously issued that provided an evolving status report on the safety analysis. As a result of the Challenger accident, the launch dates for both Galileo and Ulysses missions were later rescheduled for November 1989 and October 1990, respectively. The decision was made by agreement between the DOE and the NASA to have a revised safety evaluation and report (FSAR) prepared on the basis of these revised vehicle accidents and environments. The results of this latest revised safety evaluation are presented in this document (Galileo FSAR). Volume I, this document, provides the background design information required to understand the analyses presented in Volumes II and III. It contains descriptions of the RTGs, the Galileo spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), the trajectory and flight characteristics including flight contingency modes, and the launch site. There are two appendices in Volume I which provide detailed material properties for the RTG.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 4. Comment letters and public hearing transcripts. Northeast corridor improvement project electrication: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume IV) reprints the comments received on the DEIS/R.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following well test data are included: final report of field test data, IGT compiled data, ERMI raw data, Gas Producer's Associated tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, IGT combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids, well test analysis, sampling and chemical analysis procedures, and scale and corrosion evaluation. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Final environmental statement, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Included are copies of fifty-six comment letters on the Proposed Final Environmental Statement together with the ERDA replies to these letters. The letters were received from Federal, State, and local agencies, environmental and public interest groups, members of the academic and industrial communities, and individual citizens. (DG)

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Solar/hydrogen systems for the 1985 to 2000 time frame. Volume I. Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The findings of a study of opportunities for commercialization of systems capable of producing hydrogen from solar energy are presented in two volumes. A compendium of monographs by specialists in the fields of solar energy conversion technologies, hydrogen production technologies and related technology descriptions from the general literature comprise Volume II. This data base was used to support an evaluation and selection process that identified four candidate solar/hydrogen systems best suited to commercialization within the next two decades. Volume I first reviews the background of the work and the methods used. Then an evaluation of the hydrogen product costs that might be achieved by the four selected candidate systems (photovoltaic/water electrolysis, thermal-heat engine/water electrolysis, wind energy/water electrolysis, small hydrogen/water electrolysis) is compared with the pricing structure and practices of the commodity gas market. Subsequently, product cost and market price match is noted to exist in the small user sector of the hydrogen marketplace. Barriers to and historical time lags in, commercialization of new technologies are then reviewed. Finally, recommendations for development and demonstration programs designed to accelerate the commercialization of the candidate systems are presented.

Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Escher, W. J.D.; Hanson, J. A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit Final Safety Analysis Report (LWRHU FSAR): Volume 3, Nuclear Risk Analysis Document  

SciTech Connect

The Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit (LWRHU) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), Volume 2, Accident Model Document (AMD) describes potential accident scenarios during the Galileo mission and evaluates the response of the LWRHUs to the associated accident environments. Any resulting source terms, consisting of PuO2 (with Pu-238 the dominant radionuclide), are then described in terms of curies released, particle size distribution, release location, and probabilities. This volume (LWRHU-FSAR, Volume 3, Nuclear Risk Analysis Document (NRAD)) contains the radiological analyses which estimate the consequences of the accident scenarios described in the AMD. It also contains the quantification of mission risks resulting from the LWRHUs based on consideration of all accident scenarios and their probabilities. Estimates of source terms and their characteristics derived in the AMD are used as inputs to the analyses in the NRAD. The Failure Abort Sequence Trees (FASTs) presented in the AMD define events for which source terms occur and quantify them. Based on this information, three types of source term cases (most probable, maximum, and expectation) for each mission phase were developed for use in evaluating the radiological consequences and mission risks. 4 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 4 - System Description. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first section of this Volume will discuss the ''Conventional Drilling System''. Today's complex arrangement of numerous interacting systems has slowly evolved from the very simple cable tool rigs used in the late 1800s. Improvements to the conventional drilling rig have varied in size and impact over the years, but the majority of them have been evolutionary modifications. Each individual change or improvement of this type does not have significant impact on drilling efficiency and economics. However, the change is almost certain to succeed, and over time--as the number of evolutionary changes to the system begin to add up--improvements in efficiency and economics can be seen. Some modifications, defined and described in this Volume as Advanced Modifications, have more than just an evolutionary effect on the conventional drilling system. Although the distinction is subtle, there are several examples of incorporated advancements that have had significantly more impact on drilling procedures than would a truly evolutionary improvement. An example of an advanced modification occurred in the late 1970s with the introduction of Polycrystalline Diamond Compact (PDC) drill bits. PDC bits resulted in a fundamental advancement in drilling procedures that could not have been accomplished by an evolutionary improvement in materials metallurgy, for example. The last drilling techniques discussed in this Volume are the ''Novel Drilling Systems''. The extent to which some of these systems have been developed varies from actually being tested in the field, to being no more than a theoretical concept. However, they all have one thing in common--their methods of rock destruction are fundamentally different from conventional drilling techniques. When a novel drilling system is introduced, it is a revolutionary modification of accepted drilling procedures and will completely replace current techniques. The most prominent example of a revolutionary modification in recent history was the complete displacement of cable tool rigs by rotary drilling rigs in the late 1920s.

Anderson, E.E.; Maurer, W.C.; Hood, M.; Cooper, G.; Cook, N.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

ASEAN-USAID buildings energy conservation project. Volume 1, Energy standards: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Mandatory or voluntary energy-efficiency standards for new or existing buildings can play an important role in a national program aimed at promoting energy conservation. Building codes and standards can provide a degree of control over design and building practices throughout the construction process, and encourage awareness of energy-conscious design. Studies in developed countries indicate that efficiency standards can produce energy reductions on the order of 20 to 40% or more. Within ASEAN, analyses of the savings potential from the proposed standards suggest that if implemented, these standards would produce savings over current new design practice of 19% to 24%. In this volume we provide an overview of the ASEAN-USAID project aimed at promulgating standards for energy efficiency in commercial buildings. The process of developing and implementing energy-efficiency standards for buildings can be subdivided into two key components: policy development; and technical and economic analysis. Each of these involves a number of steps and processes, as outlined in Figure 1-1. This volume describes the technical and economic analyses used to develop the proposed energy efficiency standards for four countries (Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Indonesia), and to refine an energy standard existing in Singapore since 1979. Though oriented toward the ASEAN region, the analysis methods described here are applicable in a range of settings, provided appropriate modifications are made for local building construction, climatic, economic, and political conditions. Implementation issues are not specifically addressed here; rather this volume is oriented towards the analytical work needed to establish or revise an energy standard for buildings.

Levine, M.D.; Busch, J.F. [eds.][Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Deringer, J.J. [Deringer Group, Riva, MD (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document, Part 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: Comment and Response Document 2: Comment and Response Document June 2004 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Comment & Response Document Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE FEDERAL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Environmental Impact Statement for Construction and Operation of a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky, Site (DOE/EIS-0359) CONTACT: For further information on this environmental impact statement (EIS), contact: Gary S. Hartman DOE-ORO Cultural Resources Management Coordinator U.S. Department of Energy-Oak Ridge Operations P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 e-mail: Pad_DUF6@anl.gov phone: 1-866-530-0944 fax: 1-866-530-0943 For general information on the DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process,

111

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project. Final report. Volume 1. Project summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SOLERAS Project Summary - Final Report contains a synopsis of each completed project based on contractors final report. Additionally, a brief description of the limited testing completed by the SOLERAS staff on the collectors is included. SOLERAS comments or opinions expressed in the report are solely based on experiences with the SOLERAS Installations. It must be recognized that many product improvements and design modifications have been made since installation completion, many of which are the result of SOLERAS experience. The last chapter of this report is a synopsis of suggested new research areas for the solar cooling program. These suggestions were made by the participants of the cooling workshop held in Phoenix, Arizona in August 1984.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 1, Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This first volume provides a summary of the entire project. The study utilized the talents of a large number of participants, including a significant number of peer reviewers from industrial companies, government agencies, and research institutes. in addition, an extensive analysis of relevant literature was carried out. In considering the attractiveness of recycling technologies that are alternatives to waste-to-energy combustion units, a systems approach was utilized. Collection of waste streams containing plastics, sortation, and reclamation of plastics and plastic mixtures, reprocessing or chemical conversion of the reclaimed polymers, and the applicability of the products to specific market segments have been analyzed in the study.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Economic Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) study. Volume I. ERTG design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop and evaluate an ERTG design for a high power, Curium-244 fueled system based on the tubular thermoelectric module technology; (2) to prepare a program plan for the development of a flight qualified ERTG; and (3) to estimate the costs associated with the production of one, ten and twenty flight qualified ERTG's. This volume presents the Reference Design ERTG approach, the results of the engineering trade studies leading to its selection, and the Second Generation ERTG Design proposed for development. (WHK)

Not Available

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Deep Drilling Basic Research: Volume 5 - System Evaluations. Final Report, November 1988--August 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is aimed at decreasing the costs and increasing the efficiency of drilling gas wells in excess of 15,000 feet. This volume presents a summary of an evaluation of various drilling techniques. Drilling solutions were compared quantitatively against typical penetration rates derived from conventional systems. A qualitative analysis measured the impact of a proposed system on the drilling industry. The evaluations determined that the best candidates f o r improving the speed and efficiency of drilling deep gas wells include: PDC/TSD bits, slim-hole drilling, roller-cone bits, downhole motors, top-driven systems, and coiled-tubing drilling.

None

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part C describes test facility support, data acquisition and control system design, cost data, energy self-sufficiency, and test facility applications.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal central Gulf of Mexico. Volume 3. Appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. Volume 3 contains five appendices providing methodological details and data listings.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Final Waste Forms (FWF) Technical Area Status Report (TASR) Working Group, the Vitrification Working Group (WG), and the Performance Standards Working Group were established as subgroups to the FWF Technical Support Group (TSG). The FWF TASR WG is comprised of technical representatives from most of the major DOE sites, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the EPA Office of Solid Waste, and the EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). The primary activity of the FWF TASR Working Group was to investigate and report on the current status of FWFs for LLNM in this TASR. The FWF TASR Working Group determined the current status of the development of various waste forms described above by reviewing selected articles and technical reports, summarizing data, and establishing an initial set of FWF characteristics to be used in evaluating candidate FWFS; these characteristics are summarized in Section 2. After an initial review of available information, the FWF TASR Working Group chose to study the following groups of final waste forms: hydraulic cement, sulfur polymer cement, glass, ceramic, and organic binders. The organic binders included polyethylene, bitumen, vinyl ester styrene, epoxy, and urea formaldehyde. Section 3 provides a description of each final waste form. Based on the literature review, the gaps and deficiencies in information were summarized, and conclusions and recommendations were established. The information and data presented in this TASR are intended to assist the FWF Production and Assessment TSG in evaluating the Technical Task Plans (TTPs) submitted to DOE EM-50, and thus provide DOE with the necessary information for their FWF decision-making process. This FWF TASR will also assist the DOE and the MWIP in establishing the most acceptable final waste forms for the various LLMW streams stored at DOE facilities.

Mayberry, J.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Non-Federal Participation in AC Intertie : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Appendices.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the appendices for the Non-Federal Participation in AC Intertie Final Environmental Impact Statement. It contains all the supporting materials, documents and data for the EIS in nine appendices: A. Life-of-facilities capacity ownership proposal; B. Long-term Intertie access policy; C. Glossary; D. Biological assessment and supporting materials; E. Environmental impacts of generic resource types; F. Technical information on analysis methods and results; G. Affected environment supporting documentation; H. Public involvement activities; and I. Bibliography.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Volume 5, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 New Mexico and Utah Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapters 12 and 13 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM)

120

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume III. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall, long term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumpton, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains appendices to the conceptual design and systems analysis studies gien in Volume II, Books 1 and 2. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Volume 2, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Arizona and California Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapters 8 and 9 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation;

122

DOE/EIS-0294; Sutter Power Project Final Environmental Impact Statement, Volume I (April 1999)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COVER SHEET COVER SHEET Project Title: Sutter Power Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement Sutter County, California Federal Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy Related Actions: California Energy Commission's Certification for the Sutter Power Project Calpine Corporation's Application for Certification for the Sutter Power Project Sutter County General Plan Amendment and a Planned Development Rezone Western's Sutter Powerplant -- Interconnection Feasibility Study Technical Assistance: Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation CH2M Hill R. W. Beck ABSTRACT Western Area Power Administration operates and maintains a high-voltage electric transmission system in California to deliver power to qualified customers. Calpine Corporation has requested that Western study

123

Volume 7, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Comments and Responses July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies participated in the preparation of this PEIS: U.S. Department of Defense; U.S. Bureau of Reclamation;

124

Volume 3, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Colorado Proposed Solar Energy Zones Chapter 10 July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies

125

Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report (Final EIS/EIR) has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The Proposed Action includes the construction, operation, and decommissioning of a 48 megawatt (gross) geothermal power plant with ancillary facilities (10-12 production well pads and 3-5 injection well pads, production and injection pipelines), access roads, and a 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Modoc National Forest in Siskiyou County, California. Alternative locations for the power plant site within a reasonable distance of the middle of the wellfield were determined to be technically feasible. Three power plant site alternatives are evaluated in the Final EIS/EIR.

None

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

DOE Plutonium Disposition Study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document, Volume 1, presents a technical description of the various elements of the System 80 + Standard Plant Design upon which the Plutonium Disposition Study was based. The System 80 + Standard Design is fully developed and directly suited to meeting the mission objectives for plutonium disposal. The bass U0{sub 2} plant design is discussed here.

Not Available

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Coal liquefaction: A research and development needs assessment: Final report, Volume II  

SciTech Connect

Volume II of this report on an assessment of research needs for coal liquefaction contains reviews of the five liquefaction technologies---direct, indirect, pyrolysis, coprocessing, and bioconversion. These reviews are not meant to be encyclopedic; several outstanding reviews of liquefaction have appeared in recent years and the reader is referred to these whenever applicable. Instead, these chapters contain reviews of selected topics that serve to support the panel's recommendations or to illustrate recent accomplishments, work in progress, or areas of major research interest. At the beginning of each of these chapters is a brief introduction and a summary of the most important research recommendations brought out during the panel discussions and supported by the material presented in the review. A review of liquefaction developments outside the US is included. 594 refs., 100 figs., 60 tabs.

Schindler, H.D.; Burke, F.P.; Chao, K.C.; Davis, B.H.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Klier, K.; Kruse, C.W.; Larsen, J.W.; Lumpkin, R.E.; McIlwain, M.E.; Wender, I.; Stewart, N.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 1. Export trade information  

SciTech Connect

The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 1 of the study.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 3. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 3 of the study.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Mazheikiai refinery modernization study. Final report. Volume 2. Export trade information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study, conducted by Foster Wheeler Corporation, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of Lithuania's Ministry of Energy. The Mazheikiai Oil Refinery is the only one in the Baltic Region and serves the needs of Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, and Kaliningrad. Before Lithuania's independence in 1990, the refinery was assured of crude supplies from Russia. However, since then the need has arisen to secure alternate sources of crude oil and the ability to process them. The purpose of the report is to provide recommendations to the Ministry of Energy for process improvements, environmental control measures, physical rehabilitation and energy conservation plans for the Mazheikiai Oil Refinery. This is Volume 2 of the study.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.  

SciTech Connect

In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Committee to evaluate Sandia`s risk expertise: Final report. Volume 1: Presentations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On July 1--2, 1997, Sandia National Laboratories hosted the External Committee to Evaluate Sandia`s Risk Expertise. Under the auspices of SIISRS (Sandia`s International Institute for Systematic Risk Studies), Sandia assembled a blue-ribbon panel of experts in the field of risk management to assess their risk programs labs-wide. Panelists were chosen not only for their own expertise, but also for their ability to add balance to the panel as a whole. Presentations were made to the committee on the risk activities at Sandia. In addition, a tour of Sandia`s research and development programs in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission was arranged. The panel attended a poster session featuring eight presentations and demonstrations for selected projects. Overviews and viewgraphs from the presentations are included in Volume 1 of this report. Presentations are related to weapons, nuclear power plants, transportation systems, architectural surety, environmental programs, and information systems.

Dudley, E.C.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Horizontal oil well applications and oil recovery assessment. Volume 2: Applications overview, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal technology has been applied in over 110 formations in the USA. Volume 1 of this study addresses the overall success of horizontal technology, especially in less-publicized formations, i.e., other than the Austin Chalk, Bakken, and Niobrara. Operators in the USA and Canada were surveyed on a formation-by-formation basis by means of a questionnaire. Response data were received describing horizontal well projects in 58 formations in the USA and 88 in Canada. Operators` responses were analyzed for trends in technical and economic success based on lithology (clastics and carbonates) and resource type (light oil, heavy oil, and gas). The potential impact of horizontal technology on reserves was also estimated. A forecast of horizontal drilling activity over the next decade was developed.

Deskins, W.G.; McDonald, W.J.; Knoll, R.G.; Springer, S.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Economic Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) study. Volume II. Development plan. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop and evaluate an ERTG design for a high power, Curium-244 fueled system based on the tubular thermoelectric module technology; (2) to prepare a program plan for the development of a flight qualified ERTG; and (3) to estimate the costs associated with the production of one, ten and twenty flight qualified ERTG's. This volume summarizes the program plan for developing and producing flight qualified ERTG's. The information presented explains what will be accomplished and when, in relation to the overall technical and management effort - defining a program geared to the design, development, qualification, and delivery within six years of ERTG hardware satisfying specified USAF performance objectives. In addition, cost estimates are supplied for producing ten and twenty follow-on ERTG units based on the Second Generation ERTG Design. (WHK)

Not Available

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume IV. Field activities. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume describes those activities which took place at the Sperry DOE Gravity Head plant site at the East Mesa Geothermal Reservoir near Holtville, California between February 1980, when site preparation was begun, and November 1982, when production well 87-6 was permanently abandoned. Construction activities were terminated in July 1981 following the liner collapse in well 87-6. Large amounts of program time manpower, materials, and funds had been diverted in a nine-month struggle to salvage the production well. Once these efforts proved futile, there was no rationale for continuing with the site work unless and until sufficient funding to duplicate well 87-6 was obtained. Activities reported here include: plant construction and pre-operational calibration and testing, drilling and completion of well 87-6, final repair effort on well 87-6, abandonment of well 87-6, and performance evaluation of well 87.6. (MHR)

Harvey, C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Federal Express CleanFleet Final Report Volume 8: Fleet Economics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

8 8 F l e e t E c o n o m i c s FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsor- ship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report.

138

Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Supplemental Volume 2a, Sources and documentation appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This large document provides a catalog of the location of large numbers of reports pertaining to the charge of the Presidential Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Research and is arranged as a series of appendices. Titles of the appendices are Appendix A- Records at the Washington National Records Center Reviewed in Whole or Part by DoD Personnel or Advisory Committee Staff; Appendix B- Brief Descriptions of Records Accessions in the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments (ACHRE) Research Document Collection; Appendix C- Bibliography of Secondary Sources Used by ACHRE; Appendix D- Brief Descriptions of Human Radiation Experiments Identified by ACHRE, and Indexes; Appendix E- Documents Cited in the ACHRE Final Report and other Separately Described Materials from the ACHRE Document Collection; Appendix F- Schedule of Advisory Committee Meetings and Meeting Documentation; and Appendix G- Technology Note.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document: Chapter 2: Comment Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 2 COMMENT DOCUMENTS This section provides copies of the actual letters or other documents containing public comments on the draft EISs that were submitted to DOE, including comments extracted from the transcripts of the public hearings. Table 2.1 contains an index of the comment documents by document number. Table 2.2 provides an index of comment documents by the commentors last name. Table 2.3 contains an index of comment documents by company or organization. Individual comments are denoted with vertical lines in the right margin. TABLE 2.1 Index of Commentors by Document Number Document Number Name Company/Organization Page D0001 Driver, Charles M. Individual 2-5 D0002 Kilrod, John Individual 2-7 D0003 Colley, Vina Portsmouth/Piketon Residents for Environmental Safety and Security

140

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1  

SciTech Connect

Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 15001508), and DOEs NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOEs Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Deschutes River Spawning Gravel Study, Volume II, Appendices I-XIV, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spawning habitat in the Deschutes River was inventoried, gravel permeability and composition were sampled at selected gravel bars, historical flow records for the Deschutes were analyzed, salmon and trout utilization of spawning habitat was examined, and potential methods of enhancing spawning habitat in the river were explored. Some changes in river conditions since the mid-1960's were identified, including a reduction in spawning habitat immediately downstream from the hydroelectric complex. The 1964 flood was identified as a factor which profoundly affected spawning habitat in the river, and which greatly complicated efforts to identify recent changes which could be attributed to the hydrocomplex. A baseline on present gravel quality at both chinook and steelhead spawning areas in the river was established using a freeze-core methodology. Recommendations are made for enhancing spawning habitat in the Deschutes River, if it is independently determined that spawning habitat is presently limiting populations of summer steelhead or fall chinook in the river. Volume II contains appendices to the study.

Huntington, Charles W.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 4 (Appendix IV)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 4 contains the following appendix sections: Radiative heat transfer properties for black liquor combustion -- Facilities and techniques and Spectral absorbance and emittance data; and Radiate heat transfer determination of the optical constants of ash samples from kraft recovery boilers -- Calculation procedure; Computation program; Density determination; Particle diameter determination; Optical constant data; and Uncertainty analysis.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 2. Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains appendices of supplementary data on waste management systems, geologic disposal, radiological standards, radiation dose calculation models, related health effects, baseline ecology, socio-economic conditions, hazard indices, comparison of defense and commercial wastes, design considerations, and wastes from thorium-based fuel cycle alternatives. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Concentrating-collector mass-production feasibility. Volume I. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Prototype Trough (PPT) Concentrating Collector consists of four 80-foot modules in a 320-foot row. The collector was analyzed, including cost estimates and manufacturing processes to produce collectors in volumes from 100 to 100,000 modules per year. The four different reflector concepts considered were the sandwich reflector structure, sheet metal reflector structure, molded reflector structure, and glass laminate structure. The sheet metal and glass laminate structures are emphasized with their related structure concepts. A preliminary manufacturing plan is offered that includes: documentation of the manufacturing process with production flow diagrams; labor and material costs at various production levels; machinery and equipment requirements including preliminary design specifications; and capital investment costs for a new plant. Of five reflector designs considered, the two judged best and considered at length are thin annealed glass and steel laminate on steel frame panel and thermally sagged glass. Also discussed are market considerations, costing and selling price estimates, design cost analysis and make/buy analysis. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

146

Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 5 (Appendix V)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 5 contains model validation simulations and comparison with data.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Ecosystem approach: Healthy ecosystems and sustainable economies. Volume 3. Case studies. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The case study report of the Interagency Ecosystem Management Task Force presents findings and recommendations from seven survey teams, details the nature, history, and current status of each ecosystem, and summarizes survey team interviews with many participating parties. The volume targets those interested in how ecosystem partnerships work. Ecosystems include: Anacostia River watershed--state and local agencies are restoring components of this system of marshes, rivers, forests in urban environments: Coastal Louisiana--a federal task force and the state of Louisiana are restoring wetlands to reverse the trend of losses; Great Lakes basin--local communities joined with governmental agencies to reverse pollution and habitat degradation; Pacific Northwest forests--an interagency effort is protecting both forest ecosystems and the region`s economic health; Prince William Sound--a state/federal trustee council is restoring the ecosystem following the Exxon Valdez oil spill: South Florida--a federal task force is restoring habitat in the Everglades; and Southern Appalachians--the Man and Biosphere program is working with communities to restore habitats.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands: Volume 2. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The program is composed of 20 projects, of which 17 are laboratory bench or laboratory pilot scale processes or computer process simulations that are performed in existing facilities on the University of Utah campus in north-east Salt Lake City. These tasks are: (1) coupled fluidized-bed bitumen recovery and coked sand combustion; (2) water-based recovery of bitumen; (3) oil sand pyrolysis in a continuous rotary kiln reactor; (4) oil sand pyrolysis in a large diameter fluidized bed reactor; (5) oil sand pyrolysis in a small diameter fluidized bed reactor; (6) combustion of spent sand in a transport reactor; (7) recovery and upgrading of oil sand bitumen using solvent extraction methods; (8) fixed-bed hydrotreating of Uinta Basin bitumens and bitumen-derived hydrocarbon liquids; (9) ebullieted bed hydrotreating of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; (10) bitumen upgrading by hydropyrolysis; (11) evaluation of Utah`s major oil sand deposits for the production of asphalt, high-energy jet fuels and other specialty products; (12) characterization of the bitumens and reservoir rocks from the Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (13) bitumen upgrading pilot plant recommendations; (14) liquid-solid separation and fine tailings thickening; (15) in-situ production of heavy oil from Uinta Basin oil sand deposits; (16) oil sand research and development group analytical facility; and (17) process economics. This volume contains reports on nine of these projects, references, and a bibliography. 351 refs., 192 figs., 65 tabs.

Oblad, A.G.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

1997-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

150

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 4 discusses the following topics: Rod Compaction/Loading System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Collection System Test Results and Analysis Report; Waste Container Transfer Fixture Test Results and Analysis Report; Staging and Cutting Table Test Results and Analysis Report; and Upper Cutting System Test Results and Analysis Report.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, TN, and Columbus, GA

152

Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 2, Appendices A-C  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NW, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this EN there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constricting Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER, which consists of Appendices A, B, and C, assesses the potential geologic impacts of the proposed Section 8B construction, presents the results of the Section 8B soil survey, and describes the water quality studies and analyses performed for the ER. The following summary sections provide information for geology, soils, and water quality.

Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ASEAN-USAID Buildings Energy Conservation Project. Final report, Volume 3: Audits  

SciTech Connect

The auditing subproject of the ASEAN-USAID Buildings Energy Conservation Project has generated a great deal of auditing activity throughout the ASEAN region. Basic building characterisfic and energy consumption data were gathered for over 200 buildings and are presented in this volume. A large number of buildings were given more detailed audits and were modeled with either the ASEAM-2 computer program or the more complex DOE-2 program. These models were used to calculate the savings to be generated by conservabon measures. Specially audits were also conducted, including lighting and thermal comfort surveys. Many researchers in the ASEAN region were trained to perform energy audits in a series of training courses and seminars. The electricity intensifies of various types of ASEAN buildings have been calculated. A comparison to the electricity intensity of the US building stock tentatively concludes that ASEAN office buildings are comparable, first class hotels and retail stores are more ewctricity intensive than their US counterparts, and hospitals are less intensive. Philippine and Singapore lighting surveys indicate that illuminance levels in offices tend to be below the minimum accepted standard. Computer simulations of the energy use in various building types generally agree that for most ASEAN buildings, electricity consumption for air-conditioning (including fan power) consumes approximately 60% of total building electricity. A review of the many studies made during the Project to calculate the savings from energy conservation opportunities (ECOS) shows a median potential savings of approximately 10%, with some buildings saving as much as 50%. Singapore buildings, apparently as a result of previously implemented efficient energy-use practices, shows a lower potential for savings than the other ASEAN nations. Air-conditioning ECOs hold the greatest potential for savings.

Loewen, J.M.; Levine, M.D.; Busch, J.F. [eds.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 2, Idaho, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1984, and under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council, the Clear-water National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement to improve anadromous fish habitat in Lolo Creek. This was to be the second and final year of instream enhancement work in Lolo Creek, a major tributary to the Clearwater River. The project was again entitled Lolo Creek Habitat Improvement (No.84-6) which was scheduled from April 1, 1984, through March 31, 1985. Project costs were not to exceed $39,109. The following report is a description of the project objectives, methodology, results, and conclusions of this year's work, based on the knowledge and experience gained through 2 years of enhancement work. The primary objective was to partially mitigate the juvenile and adult anadromous fish losses accrued through hydroelectric development in the Columbia and Snake River systems by enhancing the spawning and rearing habitats of selected Clearwater River tributaries for spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout. The enhancement was designed to ameliorate the ''limiting production factors'' by the in-stream placement of habitat structures that would positively alter the pool-riffle structure and increase the quality of over-winter habitat.

Hair, Don

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development of flame retardant PV module encapsulants: Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase 1 final report covers the work performed by Springborn Testing and Research, Inc., for the period October 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998 under the Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC36-97GO10255, entitled Development of Flame Retardant PV Module Encapsulants. While use of roof-mounted arrays has always been an attractive means of deploying PV, only within recent years have such building integrated concepts (BIPV) found renewed interest among module makers and end-users. Prior to building integrated and rooftop applications, flammability requirements for modules have not been a great industry concern. However, with growing interest in BIPV and the requirement for building code requirements for commercial and industrial structures, flammability issues have become a barrier to entry for many module constructions into this potentially huge domestic market for PV. The overall goal of the 3 phase PV BONUS two project is to develop and commercialize a line of fire retardant encapsulation materials to serve the emerging building integrated and building mounted PV market. The objectives of the Phase 1 effort are limited to concept development and business planning activities.

Galica, J.P.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 3, Appendix D  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER inventories the fishes and benthic macroinvertebrates inhabiting the aquatic ecosystems potentially affected by the proposed construction of Section 8B. Stream biological surveys were completed at 31 stream sites during the Fall of 1994. The sampling strategy for both invertebrates and fish was to survey the different taxa from all available habitats. For benthic invertebrates, a standardized qualitative manual collection technique was employed for all 31 stations. For fish, all streams of sufficient water were sampled using various methods of electroshocking. Two listed species were identified during the surveys: the Allegheny snaketail dragonfly (formerly a C2 federal candidate species found at six of the stream survey sites) and the tangerine darter (a Tennessee state special concern species found at two of the stream survey sites).

Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 6, Appendix N  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER documents the results of the architectural, historical, and cultural resources assessment for the entire Section 8B ROW that was completed in May 1995 to document the architectural, historical, and cultural resources located within the project area. The assessment included evaluation of the potential for cultural (i.e., rural historic) landscapes in the area of the ROW. The assessment showed that one National Register-listed property is located 0.3 mile south of the ROW, and seven properties appear to meet National Register criteria. For six of these seven sites, no audible or visual effects were predicted to result from the construction and operation of the build alternatives of Section 8B. Three areas were evaluated to determine if they could be considered rural historic landscapes: the Cosby Valley, Pittman Center, and Rocky Flats. None of these landscapes met National Register criteria for rural historic landscapes.

Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 4, Appendices E-I  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west. The major deliverables for the project are listed. From August 1995 through October 1996, NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff interacted with Federal Highway Administration staff to develop a conceptual design plan for Section 8B with the intent of protecting critical, resources identified during the ER process to the extent possible. In addition, ORNL arranged for bioengineering experts to discuss techniques that might be employed on Section 8B with NPS, GSMNP, and ORNL staff during September 1996. For the purposes of this ER, there are two basic alternatives under consideration: (1) a build alternative and (2) a no-build alternative. Within the build alternative are a number of options including constructing Section 8B with no interchanges, constructing Section 8B with an interchange at SR 416 or U.S. 321, constructing Section 8B with a spur road on Webb Mountain, and considering operation of Section 8B both before and after the operation of Section 8C. The no-build alternative is considered the no-action alternative and is not to construct Section 8B. This volume of the ER consists of Appendices E through I (all ecological survey reports), which are summarized individually in the sections that follow. The following conclusions result from the completion of these surveys and the ER impact analysis: (1) Forest clearing should be limited as much as possible; (2) Disturbed areas should be replanted with native trees; (3) Drainages should be bridged rather than leveled with cut and fill; (4) For areas of steep slopes and potential erosion, bioengineering techniques should be implemented; (5) The Webb Mt. spur road is not recommended. If the spur road is built no grass shoulders should be used (to minimize forest fragmentation impacts); and (6) Transplanting of protected plants should be done when possible. Construction in wetland areas should be avoided and erosion and sedimentation mitigation measures discussed under water resources and aquatic ecology should be implemented.

Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hawaii demand-side management resource assessment. Final report, Reference Volume 1: Building prototype analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed description of, and the baseline assumptions and simulation results for, the building prototype simulations conducted for the building types designated in the Work Plan for Demand-side Management Assessment of Hawaii`s Demand-Side Resources (HES-4, Phase 2). This report represents the second revision to the initial building prototype description report provided to DBEDT early in the project. Modifications and revisions to the prototypes, based on further calibration efforts and on comments received from DBEDT Staff have been incorporated into this final version. These baseline prototypes form the basis upon which the DSM measure impact estimates and the DSM measure data base were developed for this project. This report presents detailed information for each of the 17 different building prototypes developed for use with the DOE-21E program (23 buildings in total, including resorts and hotels defined separately for each island) to estimate the impact of the building technologies and measures included in this project. The remainder of this section presents some nomenclature and terminology utilized in the reports, tables, and data bases developed from this project to denote building type and vintage. Section 2 contains a more detailed discussion of the data sources, the definition of the residential sector building prototypes, and results of the DOE-2 analysis. Section 3 provides a similar discussion for the commercial sector. The prototype and baseline simulation results are presented in a separate section for each building type. Where possible, comparison of the baseline simulation results with benchmark data from the ENERGY 2020 model or other demand forecasting models specific to Hawaii is included for each building. Appendix A contains a detailed listing of the commercial sector baseline indoor lighting technologies included in the existing and new prototypes by building type.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, , Final for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards . Environmental Assessment Prepared for Southwestern Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy - _ . . . " Prepared by Black & Veatch October 13,1995 ' Table of Contents 1 . 0 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Description of the Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 Alternative 1 . No Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Alternative 2 . Mechanical and Manual Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Alternative 3 . Proposed Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 Foliar Spray Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2 Soil-Spot Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental ImpactReport  

SciTech Connect

This environmental impact report (EIR) has been prepared pursuant to the applicable provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and its implementing guidelines (CEQA Guidelines), and the Amended University of California Procedures for Implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (UC CEQA Procedures). The University of California (UC or the University) is the lead agency for this EIR, which examines the overall effects of implementation of the proposed 2006 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP; also referred to herein as the 'project' for purposes of CEQA) for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL; also referred to as 'Berkeley Lab,' 'the Laboratory,' or 'the Lab' in this document). An LRDP is a land use plan that guides overall development of a site. The Lab serves as a special research campus operated by the University employees, but it is owned and financed by the federal government and as such it is distinct from the UC-owned Berkeley Campus. As a campus operated by the University of California, the Laboratory is required to prepare an EIR for an LRDP when one is prepared or updated pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21080.09. The adoption of an LRDP does not constitute a commitment to, or final decision to implement, any specific project, construction schedule, or funding priority. Rather, the proposed 2006 LRDP describes an entire development program of approximately 980,000 gross square feet of new research and support space construction and 320,000 gross square feet of demolition of existing facilities, for a total of approximately 660,000 gross square feet of net new occupiable space for the site through 2025. Specific projects will undergo CEQA review at the time proposed to determine what, if any, additional review is necessary prior to approval. As described in Section 1.4.2, below, and in Chapter 3 of this EIR (the Project Description), the size of the project has been reduced since the Notice of Preparation for this EIR was issued. This reduction was in response to consultation with the City of Berkeley as well as other factors. CEQA requires that, before a decision can be made by a state or local government agency to approve a project that may have significant environmental effects, an EIR must be prepared that fully describes the environmental effects of the project. The EIR is a public informational document for use by University decision-makers and the public. It is intended to identify and evaluate potential environmental consequences of the proposed project, to identify mitigation measures that would lessen or avoid significant adverse impacts, and to examine feasible alternatives to the project. The information contained in the EIR is reviewed and considered by the lead agency prior to its action to approve, disapprove, or modify the proposed project.

Philliber, Jeff

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

162

Electric and Magnetic Fields (EMF) RAPID Program Engineering Project 8: FINAL REPORT, Evaluation of Field Reduction Technologies, Volume 1 (Report) and Volume 2 (Appendices)  

SciTech Connect

This draft report consists of two volumes. Volume 1, the main body, contains an introducto~ sectionj an overview of magnetic fields sectio~ and field reduction technology evaluation section. Magnetic field reduction methods are evalpated for transmission lines, distribution Iines,sulxtations, building wiring applkmd machinery, and transportation systems. The evaluation considers effectiveness, co% and other ftiors. Volume 2 contains five appendices, Append~ A presents magnetic field shielding information. Appendices B and C present design assumptions and magnetic field plots for transmission and distribution lines, respectively. Appendices D and E present cost estimate details for transmission and distribution limes, respectively.

Commonwealth Associates, Inc.; IIT Research Institute

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

National Utility Financial Statement model (NUFS). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume is a User's Guide for the National Utility Financial Statement Model (NUFS). This is the second of three volumes describing NUFS provided by ICF Incorporated under contract DEAC01-79EI10579. The three volumes are entitled: Model Overview and Description; User's Guide; and Software Description. This volume describes each necessary input file, discusses user options, and describes the job stream necessary to run the model.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

164

Conceptual design of advanced central receiver power systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Volume 4. Commercial and pilot plant cost data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume of the advanced central receiver final report presents the cost data using the cost breakdown structure identified in the preliminary specification. Cost summaries are presented in the following sections for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plant and a 10-MWe pilot plant. Cost substantiation data for this volume are presented in the appendices. Other cost summary data include Nth plant data for the 100-MWe and 281-MWe commercial plants, and a summary for the alternative concept air-rock storage system. The main description of the plant costing technique occurs as part of Section II for the 100-MWe baseline concept.

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume IV, market penetration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume first describes the residential consumption of energy in each of the 11 STES regions by fuel type and end-use category. The current and projected costs and availability of fossil fuels and electricity for the STES regions are reported. Projections are made concerning residential building construction and the potential market for residential STES. The effects of STES ownership options, institutional constraints, and possible government actions on market penetration potential were considered. Capital costs for two types of STES were determined, those based on organic Rankine cycle (ORC) heat engines and those based on flat plate, water-cooled photovoltaic arrays. Both types of systems utilized parabolic trough collectors. The capital cost differential between conventional and STE systems was calculated on an incremental cost per dwelling unit for comparison with projected fuel savings in the market penetration analysis. The market penetration analysis was planned in two phases, a preliminary analysis of each of the geographical regions for each of the STE systems considered; and a final, more precise analysis of those regions and systems showing promise of significant market penetration. However, the preliminary analysis revealed no geographical regions in which any of the STES considered promised to be competitive with conventional energy systems using utility services at the prices projected for future energy supplies in the residential market. Because no promising situations were found, the analysis was directed toward an examination of the parameters involved in an effort to identify those factors which make a residential STES less attractive than similar systems in the commercial and industrial areas. Results are reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume III of III: software description. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is the software description for the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG). This is the third of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual describes the software which has been developed for NUREG. This includes a listing of the source modules. All computer code has been written in FORTRAN.

None

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

167

Methodologies for Assessing the Cumulative Environmental Effects of Hydroelectric Development of Fish and Wildlife in the Columbia River Basin, Volume 1, Recommendations, 1987 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume is the first of a two-part set addressing methods for assessing the cumulative effects of hydropower development on fish and wildlife in the Columbia River Basin. Species and habitats potentially affected by cumulative impacts are identified for the basin, and the most significant effects of hydropower development are presented. Then, current methods for measuring and assessing single-project effects are reviewed, followed by a review of methodologies with potential for use in assessing the cumulative effects associated with multiple projects. Finally, two new approaches for cumulative effects assessment are discussed in detail. Overall, this report identifies and reviews the concepts, factors, and methods necessary for understanding and conducting a cumulative effects assessment in the Columbia River Basin. Volume 2 will present a detailed procedural handbook for performing a cumulative assessment using the integrated tabular methodology introduced in this volume. 308 refs., 18 figs., 10 tabs.

Stull, Elizabeth Ann

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Coal conversion and biomass conversion: Volume 1: Final report on USAID (Agency for International Development)/GOI (Government of India) Alternate Energy Resources and Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Agency for International Development (AID), in joint collaboration with the Government of India (GOI), supported a research and development program in Alternate Energy Resources during the period March 1983 to June 1987. The primary emphasis of this program was to develop new and advanced coal and biomass conversion technologies for the efficient utilization of coal and biomass feedstocks in India. This final ''summary'' report is divided into two volumes. This Report, Volume I, covers the program overview and coal projects and Volume II summarizes the accomplishments of the biomass projects. The six projects selected in the area of coal were: Evaluation of the Freeboard Performance in a Fluidized-Bed Combustor; Scale-up of AFBC boilers; Rheology, Stability and Combustion of Coal-Water Slurries; Beneficiation of Fine Coal in Dense Medium Cyclones; Hot Gas Cleanup and Separation; and Cold Gas Cleanup and Separation.

Kulkarni, A.; Saluja, J.

1987-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes, Volume I, Part 2. Final report, September 1986--September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work pertaining to the development of models for coal gasification and combustion processes. This volume, volume 1, part 2, contains research progress in the areas of large particle oxidation at high temperatures, large particle, thick-bed submodels, sulfur oxide/nitrogen oxides submodels, and comprehensive model development and evaluation.

Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [and others

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

Matthews, Hugh B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

DOE EIR FM.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of the Results of External Assessment of the Results of External Independent Reviews for U.S. Department of Energy Projects Committee on Assessing the Results of External Independent Reviews for U.S. Department of Energy Projects Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS Washington, D.C. www.nap.edu THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS 500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the

172

Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-1992/01eis0157_rg.html[6/24/2011 4:00:49 PM] 1-1992/01eis0157_rg.html[6/24/2011 4:00:49 PM] READER'S GUIDE The Final EIS/EIR is organized to assist the reader's understanding of the complex operations at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Organization of Documents The EIS/EIR is divided into five volumes and two companion reports: Volume I. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR, which in part relies on the detailed information in the appendices, and comprehensively discusses the proposed action, the alternatives, and the existing conditions and impacts of the proposed action and the alternatives. Volume II. This volume contains the Final EIS/EIR technical appendices which provide technical support for the analyses in Volume I and also provide additional information and references. Appendix E was originally identified in

173

Remedial Action Plan and final design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings at Green River, Utah. Volume 3, Appendix F, Final design, specifications, and drawings: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains: bidding requirements; terms and conditions; specifications for general requirements and sitework; and subcontract drawings.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), Slick Rock, Colorado, Revision 1. Volume 2, Calculations, Final design for construction  

SciTech Connect

Volume two contains calculations for: embankment design--slope stability analysis; embankment design--excavation stability; embankment design--settlement and cover cracking analysis; radon barrier design--statistical analysis of ra-226 concentrations for North Continent and Union Carbide sites; radon barrier design--RAECOM input data; radon barrier design--design thickness; and cover design--frost penetration depth.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Solar thermal enhanced oil recovery. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report, October 1, 1979-June 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal enhanced oil recovery is widely used in California to aid in the production of heavy oils. Steam injection either to stimulate individual wells or to drive oil to the producing wells, is by far the major thermal process today and has been in use for over 20 years. Since steam generation at the necessary pressures (generally below 4000 kPa (580 psia)) is within the capabilities of present day solar technology, it is logical to consider the possibilities of solar thermal enhanced oil recovery (STEOR). The present project consisted of an evaluation of STEOR by a team from various Exxon affiliates, Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and Honeywell Inc. The results of the study are presented in three volumes. This volume contains the executive summary. Volume II contains Sections 2 through 8 together with Appendices A through K and in essence is the response to the original contract statement of work. Volume III summarizes the additional work performed to evaluate STEOR as a privately financed commercial venture at Exxon's Edison Field near Bakersfield, California. (WHK)

Elzinga, E.; Arnold, C.; Allen, D.; Garman, R.; Joy, P.; Mitchell, P.; Shaw, H.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept-definition study for solar Brayton power plants. Final technical report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The detailed results are presented of a technical and economic assessment of phase change and thermochemical energy storage systems in a solar power plant employing a high temperature Brayton cycle thermal engine with helium as the heat transport fluid. The assessment included an examination of the storage system operation, efficiency, power plant interaction, design, materials, safety, maintenance, environmental impact, system life, and economics. These considerations are implemented in the conceptual design of three baseline storage systems and their components for use in a solar power plant module of 50 megawatt electrical power output. Rationale is provided to support the configuration, operation and material choices. A preliminary assessment of the technology development and experimental test program requirements are also included. The report is contained in four separate volumes. This volume is the technical report.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

FINAL REPORT U.S. Department of Energy Waste Volume Reduction Using Surface Characterization and Decontamination by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REPORT REPORT U.S. Department of Energy Waste Volume Reduction Using Surface Characterization and Decontamination by Laser Ablation Principal Investigator: Michael J. Pellin Institution: Argonne National Laboratory Collaborators: Michael R, Savina, Claude B. Reed, Zhiyue Xu, Yong Wang Institutions: Argonne National Laboratory Project Number: 60283 Grant Number: W-31-109-ENG-38 Grant Project Officers: C. Miller Project Duration: October 1, 1997 - October 1, 2000 2 Table of Contents Table of Contents............................................................................................................................ 2 Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 3 Research Objectives........................................................................................................................

178

Cogeneration for industrial and mixed-use parks. Volume 3. A guide for park developers, owners, and tenants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Using cogeneration in mixed-use and industrial parks can cut energy costs ad smooth out peak load demands - benefits for servicing utilities and park owners and tenants. The two handbooks developed by this project can help utilities identify existing or planned parks as potential cogeneration sites as well as help developers and park owners evaluate the advantages of cogeneration. The second handbook (volume 3) describes the benefits of cogeneration for park developers, owners, and tenants.

Schiller, S.R.; Minicucci, D.D.; Tamaro, R.F.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Phase I, Final report. Appendix C: preliminary design data package. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix to the final report on the Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program contans data on Na-S batteries, Ni-Zn batteries; vehicle body design; tire characteristics; and results of computer simulations of vehicle yaw, pitch, and roll under various driving and aerodynamic conditions. (LCL)

Piccolo, R.

1979-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume II, energy requirements. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project analyzed the application of solar total energy systems to appropriate segments of the residential sector and determined their market penetration potential. This volume covers the work done on energy requirements definition and includes the following: (1) identification of the single-family and multi-family market segments; (2) regionalization of the United States; (3) electrical and thermal load requirements, including time-dependent profiles; (4) effect of conservation measures on energy requirements; and (5) verification of simulated load data with real data.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Unit final safety analysis report (LWRHU-FSAR): Volume 2: Accident Model Document (AMD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this volume of the LWRHU SAR, the Accident Model Document (AMD), are to: Identify all malfunctions, both singular and multiple, which can occur during the complete mission profile that could lead to release outside the clad of the radioisotopic material contained therein; Provide estimates of occurrence probabilities associated with these various accidents; Evaluate the response of the LWRHU (or its components) to the resultant accident environments; and Associate the potential event history with test data or analysis to determine the potential interaction of the released radionuclides with the biosphere.

Johnson, E.W.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Appendices A--L.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of appendices A-L of the final environmental impact statement for the Bonneville Power Administration. The appendices provide information on the following: Ninth circuit Court opinion in Forelaws on Board v. Johnson; guide to Northwest Power act contracts; guide to hydro operations; glossary; affected environment supporting documentation; environmental impacts of generic resource types; information on models used; technical information on analysis; public involvement activities; bibliography; Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act; and biological assessment. (CBS)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 3, Appendix M, Contract Copies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report, is part of the final environmental impact statement of the Bonneville Power Administration, consists of an appendix of contract copies related to the following: Detailed Index to Generic Utility Power Sales Contracts, Text of Generic Utility Contract, Detailed Index to Generic DSI Power Sales Contracts, Text of Generic DSI Contract, Text of Residential Purchase and Sale Agreement (Residential Exchange), and Detailed Index to General Contract Provisions -- GCP Form PSC-2 (Incorporated into all three types of contracts as an Exhibit).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Analysis of the permitting processes associated with exploration of Federal OCS leases. Final report. Volume II. Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under contract to the Office of Leasing Policy Development (LPDO), Jack Faucett Associates is currently undertaking the description and analysis of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) regulatory process to determine the nature of time delays that affect OCS production of oil and gas. This report represents the results of the first phase of research under this contract, the description and analysis of regulatory activity associated with exploration activities on the Federal OCS. Volume 1 contains the following three sections: (1) study results; (2) Federal regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases which involved the US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, US Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, and National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration; and (3) state regulatory activities during exploration of Federal OCS leases of Alaska, California, Louisiana, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina and Texas. Volume II contains appendices of US Geological Survey, Environmental Protection Agency, Coast Guard, Corps of Engineers, the Coastal Zone Management Act, and Alaska. The major causes of delay in the regulatory process governing exploration was summarized in four broad categories: (1) the long and tedious process associated with the Environmental Protection Agency's implementation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit; (2) thelack of mandated time periods for the completion of individual activities in the permitting process; (3) the lack of overall coordination of OCS exploratory regulation; and (4) the inexperience of states, the Federal government and industry relating to the appropriate level of regulation for first-time lease sale areas.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

ETX-I: First-generation single-shaft electric propulsion system program: Volume 2, Battery final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research and development program was to advance ac powertrain technology for electric vehicles (EV). The program focused on the design, build, test, and refinement of an experimental advanced electric vehicle powertrain suitable for packaging in a Ford Escort or equivalent-size vehicle. A Mercury LN7 was subsequently selected for the test bed vehicle. Although not part of the initial contract, the scope of the ETX-I Program was expanded in 1983 to encompass the development of advanced electric vehicle batteries compatible with the ETX-I powertrain and vehicle test bed. The intent of the battery portion of the ETX-I Program was to apply the best available battery technology based on existing battery developments. The battery effort was expected to result in a practical scale-up of base battery technologies to the vehicle battery subsystem level. With the addition of the battery activity, the ETX-I Program became a complete proof-of-concept ''ac propulsion system'' technology development program. In this context, the term ''propulsion system'' is defined as all components and subsystems (from the driver input to the vehicle wheels) that are required to store energy on board the vehicle and, using that energy, to provide controlled motive power to the vehicle. This report, Volume II, describes the battery portion of the ETX-I Program. The powertrain effort is reported in Volume I.

Not Available

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Volume 6, Part 1, Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, Part 1 6, Part 1 Appendices A-I July 2012 Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Energy FES 12-24 * DOE/EIS-0403 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States (FES 12-24; DOE/EIS-0403) Responsible Agencies: The U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are co-lead agencies. Nineteen cooperating agencies

188

Alaska railroad's future freight market. Volume III. Final report 1 Jul 74-30 Apr 76  

SciTech Connect

The study forecasts the freight market of the Alaska Railroad (ARR) due to natural resource development and pipeline construction in Alaska. This has been done through: (a) evaluation of those resources with commercial development potential which could generate rail service demand; and (b) development and analysis of petroleum development schedules and pipeline construction scenarios. Detailed price and market analysis of Alaskan coal and copper resources were performed. Forecasts of ARR traffic were based upon econometric relationships between the Alaskan economy and petroleum royalties and construction expenditures. Volume three provides a detailed review of ARR's recent freight market, pipeline construction scenarios and other activities which could significantly affect the ARR, and provides forecasts of the Alaska Railroad's freight traffic through 1990.

Hillegas, B.D.; Pernela, L.M.; Lewis, D.C.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Alaska railroad's future freight market. Volume II. Final report 1 Jul 74--30 Apr 76  

SciTech Connect

The study forecasts the freight market of the Alaska Railroad (ARR) due to natural resource development and pipeline construction in Alaska. This has been done through: (a) evaluation of these resources with commercial development potential which could generate rail service demand; and (b) development and analysis of petroleum development schedules and pipeline construction scenarios. Detailed price and market analysis of Alaskan coal and copper resources were performed. Forecasts of ARR traffic were based upon econometric relationships between the Alaskan economy and petroleum royalties and construction expenditures. Volume Two inventories Alaskan natural resources. It includes detailed coal and copper evaluations, describes petroleum related growth and development in Alaska, and contains schedules of petroleum production, employment, state revenues, and pipeline construction employment by scenario.

Hillegas, B.D.; Pernela, L.M.; Lewis, D.C.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The Alaska railroad's future freight market. Volume I. Final report, 1 Jul 1974--30 Apr 1976  

SciTech Connect

The study forecasts the freight market of The Alaska Railroad (ARR) due to natural resource development and pipeline construction in Alaska. This has been done through: (a) evaluation of those resources with commercial development potential which could generate rail service demand; and (b) development and analysis of petroleum development schedules and pipeline construction scenarios. Detailed price and market analyses of Alaskan coal and copper resources were performed. Forecasts of ARR traffic were based upon econometric relationship between the Alaska economy and petroleum royalties and construction expenditures. Volume One contains the Executive Summary; it describes the study scope and methodology, and highlights ARR's recent experiences, the Alaskan economy, and resource development status.

Hillegas, B.D.; Pernela, L.M.; Lewis, D.C.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Causes of wetland loss in the coastal central Gulf of Mexico. Volume 2. Technical narrative. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1985, the Minerals Management Service initiated an investigation to study the causes of wetland loss in the coastal Gulf of Mexico as part of its Outer Continental Shelf environmental-studies program. The purpose of the two-year study was to investigate the factors that contribute to wetland loss and to determine specifically what percentage of the loss is directly and indirectly related to Federal offshore oil and gas development. The primary goal of the Coastal Effects Program is to delineate the onshore impacts of offshore oil and gas development activities. Volume II provides an introduction to the study, direct impacts of OCS activities, saltwater intrusion, subsidence and sedimentation, and landscape patterns and aerial imagery.

Turner, R.E.; Cahoon, D.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Environmental considerations of selected energy-conserving manufacturing process options. Volume XVII. Nitrogen oxides summary report. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Arthur D. Little, Inc. undertook a study of the 'Environmental Consideration of Selected Energy-Conserving Manufacturing Process Options.' Some 80 industrial process options were examined in 13 industrial sectors. Results were published in 15 volumes, including a summary, industry prioritization report, and 13 industry oriented reports. The present report summarizes the information regarding nitrogen oxide pollutants in the 13 industry reports. Topics considered include the following: Processes and potential nitrogen oxide emissions--(Bases of calculations, NOx control methods, petroleum refining industry, cement industry, olefins industry, alumina and aluminum industry, glass industry, copper industry, fertilizer industry, ammonia, iron and steel, phosphorus/phosphoric acid, textile industry, pulp and paper industry, and chlor-alkali industry).

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Volume 2, Task 3, Testing of process improvement concepts: Final report, September 1987--May 1991  

SciTech Connect

This final report, Volume 2, on ``Process Improvement Concepts`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). Results of work on electroseparation of shale oil and fines conducted by IIT is included in this report, as well as work conducted by IGT to evaluate the restricted pipe discharge system. The work was conducted as part of the overall program on ``Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales.``

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Mixed strategies for energy conservation and alternative energy utilization (solar) in buildings. Final report. Volume III. Appendixes. [10 appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix summarizes building characteristics used to determine heating and cooling loads for each of the five building types in each of the four regions. For the selected five buildings, the following data are attached: new and existing construction characteristics; new and existing construction thermal resistance; floor plan and elevation; people load schedule; lighting load schedule; appliance load schedule; ventilation schedule; and hot water use schedule. For the five building types (single family, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, office buildings, and schools), data are compiled in 10 appendices. These are Building Characteristics; Alternate Energy Sources and Energy Conservation Techniques Description, Costs, Fuel Price Scenarios; Life Cycle Cost Model; Simulation Models; Solar Heating/Cooling System; Condensed Weather; Single and Multi-Family Dwelling Characteristics and Energy Conservation Techniques; Mixed Strategies for Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Utilization in Buildings. An extensive bibliography is given in the final appendix. (MCW)

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

SOLERAS - Solar Energy Water Desalination Project: Catalytic. System design final report. Volume 1. System requirement definition and system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic Inc. was awarded a contract to conduct a preliminary system design and cost analysis for a brackish water desalination project to be located in Brownsville, Texas. System analyses and economic analyses were performed to define the baseline solar energy desalination system. The baseline system provides an average daily product water capacity of 6000 mT. The baseline system is optimal relative to technological risk, performance, and product water cost. Subsystems and their interfaces have been defined and product water cost projections made for commercial plants in a range of capacities. Science Applications, Inc. (SAI), subcontractor to Catalytic, had responsibility for the solar power system. This, the final report, summarizes the work performed under the Phase I effort.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Imprinting Hatchery Reared Salmon and Steelhead Trout for Homing, Volume II of III; Data Summaries, 1978-1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main functions of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) aquaculture task biologists and contractual scientists involved in the 1978 homing studies were primarily a surveillance of fish physiology, disease, and relative survival during culture in marine net-pens, to determine if there were any unusual factors that might affect imprinting and homing behavior. The studies were conducted with little background knowledge of the implications of disease and physiology on imprinting and homing in salmonids. The health status or the stocks were quite variable as could be expected. The Dworshak and Wells Hatcheries steelhead suffered from some early stresses in seawater, probably osmoregulatory. The incidences of latent BKD in the Wells and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead and Kooskia Hatchery spring chinook salmon were extremely high, and how these will affect survival in the ocean is not known. Gill enzyme activity in the Dworshak and Chelan Hatcheries steelhead at release was low. Of the steelhead, survival in the Tucannon Hatchery stock will probably be the highest, with Dworshak Hatchery stock the lowest. This report contains the data for the narratives in Volume I.

Slatick, Emil; Ringe, R.R.; Zaugg, Waldo S. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and Estuarine Studies Division, Seattle, WA)

1988-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

197

Final environmental information volume for the coke oven gas cleaning project at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Sparrows Point Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bethelehem Steel Corporation (BSC) is planning to conduct a demonstration project involving an integrated system that can be retrofitted into coke oven gas handling systems to address a variety of environmental and operational factors in a more cost-effective manner. Successful application of this technology to existing US coke plants could: (1) reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide, cyanide, and volatile organic compounds (including benzene) (2) reduce the cost and handling of processing feed chemicals, (3) disposal costs of nuisance by-products and (4) increase reliability and reduce operation/maintenance requirements for coke oven gas desulfurization systems. The proposed system will remove sulfur from the coke oven gas in the form of hydrogen sulfide using the ammonia indigenous to the gas as the primary reactive chemical. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide are also removed in this process. The hydrogen sulfide removed from the coke oven gas in routed to a modified Claus plant for conversion to a saleable sulfur by-product. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide will be catalytically converted to hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. The tail gas from the sulfur recovery unit is recycled to the coke oven gas stream, upstream of the new gas cleaning system. The proposed demonstration project will be installed at the existing coke oven facilities at BSC's Sparrows Point Plant. This volume describes the proposed actions and the resulting environmental impacts. 21 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

198

Commercial applications of solar total energy systems. Volume 4. Appendices. Final report. [Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed by Atomics International under contract to the Department of Energy to define the applicability of solar total energy systems (STES) to the commercial sector (e.g., retail stores, shopping centers, offices, etc.) in the United States. Candidate STES concepts were selected to provide on-site power generation capability, as well as thermal energy for both heating and cooling applications. Each concept was evaluated on the basis of its cost effectiveness (i.e., as compared to other concepts) and its ability to ultimately penetrate and capture a significant segment of this market, thereby resulting in a saving of fossil fuel resources. This volume contains the appendices. Topics include deterministic insolation model computer code; building energy usage data; computer simulation programs for building energy demand analysis; model buildings for STES evaluation; Solar Total Energy System Evaluation Program (STESEP) computer code; transient simulation of STES concept; solar data tape analysis; program listings and sample output for use with TRNSYS; transient simulation, and financial parameters sensitivities. (WHK)

Boobar, M.G.; McFarland, B.L.; Nalbandian, S.J.; Willcox, W.W.; French, E.P.; Smith, K.E.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Final environmental impact statement. Management of commercially generated radioactive waste. Volume 3. Public comments hearing board report  

SciTech Connect

This EIS analyzes the significant environmental impacts that could occur if various technologies for management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes from commercial nuclear power reactors were to be developed and implemented. This EIS will serve as the environmental input for the decision on which technology, or technologies, will be emphasized in further research and development activities in the commercial waste management program. The action proposed in this EIS is to (1) adopt a national strategy to develop mined geologic repositories for disposal of commercially generated high-level and transuranic radioactive waste (while continuing to examine subseabed and very deep hole disposal as potential backup technologies) and (2) conduct a R and D program to develop such facilities and the necessary technology to ensure the safe long-term containment and isolation of these wastes. The Department has considered in this statement: development of conventionally mined deep geologic repositories for disposal of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors and/or radioactive fuel reprocessing wastes; balanced development of several alternative disposal methods; and no waste disposal action. This volume contains written public comments and hearing board responses and reports offered on the draft statement.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study: Volume 3, Burner tests and combustion modeling: Final report, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen enriched combustion (OEC) has been shown to have significant energy savings potential in industrial furnace applications. High temperature industrial furnaces, such as glass melting furnaces, appear to be the most promising applications for oxygen enriched combustion. In these applications, the principal energy savings result from minimizing the fuel energy required to heat the diluent nitrogen in air. The results of technical and economic assessment of OEC and market assessment were reported in Volume 1 and 2 of the current study. This report describes the results of burner evaluation tests over a range of oxygen enrichment and a numerical simulation study. The first part refers to the experimental results of both conventional air-fired burners and specially designed oxygen-fuel burners, evaluated at two scales. Part 2 of this report is concerned with the application of a computer code to extrapolate the results from small scale combustion tests to industrial furnaces. The experiments were designed as a comparative evaluation to: determine the operating range of different burner designs with oxygen enrichment; measure detailed flame characteristics for both air and enriched oxygen conditions; and estimate expected performance from research furnace results to actual industrial applications. 14 refs., 76 figs., 20 tabs.

Kwan, Y.; Abele, A.R.; Richter, W.; Chen, S.L.; Payne, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Silver, S.L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 3 (Appendices II, sections 2--3 and III)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 3 contains the following appendix sections: Formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in recovery boilers; Sintering and densification of recovery boiler deposits laboratory data and a rate model; and Experimental data on rates of particulate formation during char bed burning.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 2 (Appendices I, section 5 and II, section 1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 2 contains the last section of Appendix I, Radiative heat transfer in kraft recovery boilers, and the first section of Appendix II, The effect of temperature and residence time on the distribution of carbon, sulfur, and nitrogen between gaseous and condensed phase products from low temperature pyrolysis of kraft black liquor.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report. [In Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to determine the energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept. Three different classes of building are investigated, namely: single-family residence; multi-family residence; and commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in three different climatic regions: Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. Computer programs - ACESIM for the residences and CACESS for the office building - were used, each comprised of four modules: loads; design; simulation; and economic. For each building type in each geographic location, the economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of a number of conventional systems. The results of this analysis indicate that the economic viability of the ACES is very sensitive to the assumed value of the property tax, maintenace cost, and fuel-escalation rates, while it is relatively insensitive to the assumed values of other parameters. Fortunately, any conceivable change in the fuel-escalation rates would tend to increase the viability of the ACES concept. An increase in the assumed value of the maintenance cost or property tax would tend to make the ACES concept less viable; a decrease in either would tend to make the ACES concept more viable. The detailed results of this analysis are given in Section 5.4 of Volume II. 2 figures, 21 tables.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 1. System criteria and design description. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume documents the preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas. Current system, subsystem, and component designs are described and additional studies which support selection among significant design alternatives are presented. Overall system requirements which form the system design basis are presented. These include program objectives; performance and output load requirements; industrial, statutory, and regulatory standards; and site interface requirements. Material in this section will continue to be issued separately in the Systems Requirements Document and maintained current through revision throughout future phases of the project. Overall system design and detailed subsystem design descriptions are provided. Consideration of operation and maintenance is reflected in discussion of each subsystem design as well as in an integrated overall discussion. Included are the solar collector subsystem; the thermal storage subsystem, the power conversion sybsystem (including electrical generation and distribution); the heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystems; overall instrumentation and control; and the STES building and physical plant. The design of several subsystems has progressed beyond the preliminary stage; descriptions for such subsystems are therefore provided in more detail than others to provide complete documentation of the work performed. In some cases, preliminary design parameters require specific verificaton in the definitive design phase and are identified in the text. Subsystem descriptions will continue to be issued and revised separately to maintain accuracy during future phases of the project. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume III, conceptual design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work described in this volume was to conceptualize suitable designs for solar total energy systems for the following residential market segments: single-family detached homes, single-family attached units (townhouses), low-rise apartments, and high-rise apartments. Conceptual designs for the total energy systems are based on parabolic trough collectors in conjunction with a 100 kWe organic Rankine cycle heat engine or a flat-plate, water-cooled photovoltaic array. The ORC-based systems are designed to operate as either independent (stand alone) systems that burn fossil fuel for backup electricity or as systems that purchase electricity from a utility grid for electrical backup. The ORC designs are classified as (1) a high temperature system designed to operate at 600/sup 0/F and (2) a low temperature system designed to operate at 300/sup 0/F. The 600/sup 0/F ORC system that purchases grid electricity as backup utilizes the thermal tracking principle and the 300/sup 0/F ORC system tracks the combined thermal and electrical loads. Reject heat from the condenser supplies thermal energy for heating and cooling. All of the ORC systems utilize fossil fuel boilers to supply backup thermal energy to both the primary (electrical generating) cycle and the secondary (thermal) cycle. Space heating is supplied by a central hot water (hydronic) system and a central absorption chiller supplies the space cooling loads. A central hot water system supplies domestic hot water. The photovoltaic system uses a central electrical vapor compression air conditioning system for space cooling, with space heating and domestic hot water provided by reject heat from the water-cooled array. All of the systems incorporate low temperature thermal storage (based on water as the storage medium) and lead--acid battery storage for electricity; in addition, the 600/sup 0/F ORC system uses a therminol-rock high temperature storage for the primary cycle. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Individual plant examination program: Perspectives on reactor safety and plant performance. Parts 2--5: Final report; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This report provides perspectives gained by reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals pertaining to 108 nuclear power plant units. IPEs are probabilistic analyses that estimate the core damage frequency (CDF) and containment performance for accidents initiated by internal events. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviewed the IPE submittals with the objective of gaining perspectives in three major areas: (1) improvements made to individual plants as a result of their IPEs and the collective results of the IPE program, (2) plant-specific design and operational features and modeling assumptions that significantly affect the estimates of CDF and containment performance, and (3) strengths and weaknesses of the models and methods used in the IPEs. These perspectives are gained by assessing the core damage and containment performance results, including overall CDF, accident sequences, dominant contributions to component failure and human error, and containment failure modes. Methods, data, boundary conditions, and assumptions used in the IPEs are considered in understanding the differences and similarities observed among the various types of plants. This report is divided into three volumes containing six parts. Part 1 is a summary report of the key perspectives gained in each of the areas identified above, with a discussion of the NRC`s overall conclusions and observations. Part 2 discusses key perspectives regarding the impact of the IPE Program on reactor safety. Part 3 discusses perspectives gained from the IPE results regarding CDF, containment performance, and human actions. Part 4 discusses perspectives regarding the IPE models and methods. Part 5 discusses additional IPE perspectives. Part 6 contains Appendices A, B and C which provide the references of the information from the IPEs, updated PRA results, and public comments on draft NUREG-1560 respectively.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Osiris and SOMBRERO inertial confinement fusion power plant designs. Volume 2, Designs, assessments, and comparisons, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was to provide the Office of Fusion Energy with an evaluation of the potential of inertial fusion for electric power production. The term reactor studies is somewhat of a misnomer since these studies included the conceptual design and analysis of all aspects of the IFE power plants: the chambers, heat transport and power conversion systems, other balance of plant facilities, target systems (including the target production, injection, and tracking systems), and the two drivers. The scope of the IFE Reactor Design Studies was quite ambitious. The majority of our effort was spent on the conceptual design of two IFE electric power plants, one using an induction linac heavy ion beam (HIB) driver and the other using a Krypton Fluoride (KrF) laser driver. After the two point designs were developed, they were assessed in terms of their (1) environmental and safety aspects; (2) reliability, availability, and maintainability; (3) technical issues and technology development requirements; and (4) economics. Finally, we compared the design features and the results of the assessments for the two designs.

Meier, W.R.; Bieri, R.L.; Monsler, M.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Economic assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization processes. Final report. Volume 2. Appendices G, H, and I  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a project sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The purpose of the study was to perform an economic and market assessment of advanced flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes for application to coal-fired electric utility plants. The time period considered in the study is 1981 through 1990, and costs are reported in 1980 dollars. The task was divided into the following four subtasks: (1) determine the factors affecting FGD cost evaluations; (2) select FGD processes to be cost-analyzed; (3) define the future electric utility FGD system market; and (4) perform cost analyses for the selected FGD processes. The study was initiated in September 1979, and separate reports were prepared for the first two subtasks. The results of the latter two subtasks appear only in this final report, since the end-date of those subtasks coincided with the end-date of the overall task. The Subtask 1 report, Criteria and Methods for Performing FGD Cost Evaluation, was completed in October 1980. A slightly modified and condensed version of that report appears as Appendix B to this report. The Subtask 2 report, FGD Candidate Process Selection, was completed in January 1981, and the principal outputs of that subtask appear in Appendices C and D to this report.

Bierman, G. R.; May, E. H.; Mirabelli, R. E.; Pow, C. N.; Scardino, C.; Wan, E. I.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Intelligent Mobile Sensor System for drum inspection and monitoring -- Volume 2. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 22, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Intelligent Mobile Sensor System (IMSS) project was to develop an operational system for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations at several DOE sites. Specifically, the product of this effort was a robotic device with enhanced intelligence and maneuverability capable of conducting routine inspection of stored waste drums. The system has an integrated sensor suite for problem-drum detection, and creates and maintains a site database both for inspection planning and for data correlation, updating, and report generation. The system is capable of departing on an assigned mission, collecting required data, recording which portions of its mission had to be aborted or modified due to environmental constraints, and reporting back when the mission is complete. Successful identification of more than 96% of drum defects has been demonstrated in a high fidelity waste storage facility mockup. Identified anomalies included rust spots, rust streaks, areas of corrosion, dents, and tilted drums. All drums were positively identified and correlated with the site database. This development effort was separated into three phases of which phase three is now complete. The first phase demonstrated an integrated system (maturity level IVa) for monitoring and inspection activities for waste storage facility operations. The second phase demonstrated a prototype system appropriate for operational use in an actual storage facility. The prototype employed an integrated design that considered operational requirements, hardware costs, maintenance, safety, and robustness. The final phase has demonstrated the commercial viability of the vehicle in operating waste storage facilities at Fernald, Ohio and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This report summarizes the system upgrades performed in phase 3 and the evaluation of the IMSS Phase 3 system and vehicle.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Environmental impacts of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2}. Final report volume 2, September 1994--August 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One option to reduce atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels is to capture and sequester power plant CO{sub 2}. Commercial CO{sub 2} capture technology, though expensive, exists today. However, the ability to dispose of large quantities of CO{sub 2} is highly uncertain. The deep ocean is one of only a few possible CO{sub 2} disposal options (others are depleted oil and gas wells or deep, confined aquifers) and is a prime candidate because the deep ocean is vast and highly unsaturated in CO{sub 2}. Technically, the term `disposal` is really a misnomer because the atmosphere and ocean eventually equilibrate on a time scale of 1000 years regardless of where the CO{sub 2} is originally discharged. However, peak atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations expected to occur in the next few centuries could be significantly reduced by ocean disposal. The magnitude of this reduction will depend upon the quantity of CO{sub 2} injected in the ocean, as well as the depth and location of injection. Ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will only make sense if the environmental impacts to the ocean are significantly less than the avoided impacts of atmospheric release. In this project, we examined these ocean impacts through a multi-disciplinary effort designed to summarize the current state of knowledge. In the process, we have developed a comprehensive method to assess the impacts of pH changes on passive marine organisms. This final report addresses the following six topics: CO{sub 2} loadings and scenarios, impacts of CO{sub 2} transport, near-field perturbations, far-field perturbations, environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} release, and policy and legal implications of CO{sub 2} release.

Herzog, H.J.; Adams, E.E. [eds.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Final environmental impact statement/report. Volume 3. Response to comments on draft environmental impact statement/report. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven CT to Boston, MA  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume III) of the FEIS/R presents summaries of comments received on the DEIS/R and responses to these comments.

NONE

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Analysis of the economic potential of solar thermal energy to provide industrial process heat. Final report, Volume I. [In-depth analysis of 78 industries  

SciTech Connect

The process heat data base assembled as the result of this survey includes specific process applications from 78 four-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) groups. These applications account for the consumption of 9.81 quadrillion Btu in 1974, about 59 percent of the 16.6 quadrillion Btu estimated to have been used for all process heat in 1974. About 7/sup 1///sub 2/ percent of industrial process heat is used below 212/sup 0/F (100/sup 0/C), and 28 percent below 550/sup 0/F (288/sup 0/C). In this study, the quantitative assessment of the potential of solar thermal energy systems to provide industrial process heat indicates that solar energy has a maximum potential to provide 0.6 quadrillion Btu per year in 1985, and 7.3 quadrillion Btu per year in 2000, in economic competition with the projected costs of conventional fossil fuels for applications having a maximum required temperature of 550/sup 0/ (288/sup 0/C). A wide variety of collector types were compared for performance and cost characteristics. Performance calculations were carried out for a baseline solar system providing hot water in representative cities in six geographical regions within the U.S. Specific industries that should have significant potential for solar process heat for a variety of reasons include food, textiles, chemicals, and primary metals. Lumber and wood products, and paper and allied products also appear to have significant potential. However, good potential applications for solar process heat can be found across the board throughout industry. Finally, an assessment of nontechnical issues that may influence the use of solar process heat in industry showed that the most important issues are the establishment of solar rights, standardization and certification for solar components and systems, and resolution of certain labor-related issues. (Volume 1 of 3 volumes.)

1977-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Preliminary design report. Volume 3. Appendixes D, E, and F. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a 40 to 50 MW closed cycle ammonia OTEC commercial plant, the preliminary design of a 10 MW OTEC module analogous to the 50 MW module, and the preliminary design of heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50 MW heat exchangers for testing in OTEC-1 are presented. This volume includes the appendices: D) system equipment (hardware breakdown structure; 10-MW hardware listing; list of support and maintenance equipment, tools and spare parts; sacrificial anodes; M.A.N. brush; and Alclad 3004 data); E) heat exchanger supporting data (analyses/configuration, contract tooling, manufacturing plan, specification, and evaporator ammonia liquid distribution system); and F) rotating machinery (performance characteristics, radial inflow turbine; item descriptions; weight calculation-rotor; producibility analysis; long lead-time items; spares; support equipment; non recurring costs; performance characteristics-axial flow turbine; Worthington pump data; and American M.A.N. Corporation data). Also included is attachment 1 to the phase I final report which presents details of the system modeling; design, materials considerations, and systems analysis of the baseline module; system cost analysis; and supporting data. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

214

Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80{sup +} design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 1, Chapters 1--14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the System 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of Abb-CE`s System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design included: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors, and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 1, contains Chapters 1 through 14 of this report.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the System 80{sup +} design (Docket No. 52-002). Volume 2, Chapters 15--22 and appendices  

SciTech Connect

This final safety evaluation report (FSER) documents the technical review of the System 80+ standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the system 80+ design was submitted by Combustion Engineering, Inc., now Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. System 80+ is a pressurized water reactor with a rated power of 3914 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 3992 MWt at which accidents are analyzed. Many features of the System 80+ are similar to those of ABB-CE`s System 80 design from which it evolved. Unique features of the System 80+ design include: a large spherical, steel containment; an in-containment refueling water storage tank; a reactor cavity flooding system, hydrogen ignitors and a safety depressurization system for severe accident mitigation; a combustion gas turbine for an alternate ac source; and an advanced digitally based control room. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that ABB-CE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the System 80+ standard design. This document, Volume 2, contains Chapters 15 through 22 and Appendices A through E.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the construction and operation of Claiborne Enrichment Center, Homer, Louisiana (Docket No. 70-3-70). Volume 2, Public comments and NRC response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (Volume 1), was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in accordance with regulation 10 CFR Part 51, which implements the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), to assess the potential environmental impacts for licensing the construction and operation of a proposed gaseous centrifuge enrichment facility to be built in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana by Louisiana Energy Services, L.P. (LES). The proposed facility would have a production capacity of about 866 metric tons annually of up to 5 weight percent enriched UF{sub 6}, using a proven centrifuge technology. Included in the assessment are co on, both normal operations and potential accidents (internal and external events), and the eventual decontamination and decommissioning of the site. In order to help assure that releases from the operation of the facility and potential impacts on the public are as low as reasonably achievable, an environmental monitoring program was developed by LES to detect significant changes in the background levels of uranium around the site. Other issues addressed include the purpose and need for the facility, the alternatives to the proposed action, potential disposition of the tails, the site selection process, and environmental justice. The NRC staff concludes that the facility can be constructed and operated with small and acceptable impacts on the public and the environment, and proposes to issue a license to the applicant, Louisiana Energy Services, to authorize construction and operation of the proposed facility. The letters in this Appendix have been divided into three sections. Section One contains letters to which the NRC responded by addressing specific comments. Section Two contains the letters that concerned the communities of Forest Grove and Center Springs. Section Three is composed of letters that required no response. These letters were generally in support of the facility.

Zeitoun, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 3. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume III of III. This is the third volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 2. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume II of III. This is the second volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Installation Restoration Program. Site inspection report. Volume 1. 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site Inspection Report, 102nd Air Control Squadron, North Smithfield Air National Guard Station, Slatersville, Rhode Island, Volume I of III. This is the first volume of a three volume site inspection report. Three areas of concern (AOCs) were investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A passive soil gas survey was conducted of the entire station. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. Low level contamination of fuel-related compounds were detected below state action levels. No further action was recommended.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado: Final report. Volume 3, Appendix F, Final design, specifications, and drawings  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains Appendix F, bid schedule and specifications for remedial action on three sites: Old Rifle processing site; New Rifle processing site and Estes Gulch disposal site.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Supplement analysis for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore. Volume 2: Comment response document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE), prepared a draft Supplement Analysis (SA) for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL-L), in accordance with DOE`s requirements for implementation of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 1021.314). It considers whether the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (1992 EIS/EIR) should be supplement3ed, whether a new environmental impact statement (EIS) should be prepared, or no further NEPA documentation is required. The SA examines the current project and program plans and proposals for LLNL and SNL-L, operations to identify new or modified projects or operations or new information for the period from 1998 to 2002 that was not considered in the 1992 EIS/EIR. When such changes, modifications, and information are identified, they are examined to determine whether they could be considered substantial or significant in reference to the 1992 proposed action and the 1993 Record of Decision (ROD). DOE released the draft SA to the public to obtain stakeholder comments and to consider those comments in the preparation of the final SA. DOE distributed copies of the draft SA to those who were known to have an interest in LLNL or SNL-L activities in addition to those who requested a copy. In response to comments received, DOE prepared this Comment Response Document.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Solar production of industrial process steam ranging in temperature from 300/sup 0/F to 550/sup 0/F (Phase I). Volume 2. Appendices. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the following appendices: (1) equipment requisitions, (2) instrument list, (3) mechanical subcontract requisition, (4) electrical subcontract requisition, (5) site preparation and subcontract requisition, (6) building subcontract requisition, and (7) job specifications. (MOW)

Not Available

1979-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Installation Restoration Program. Remedial investigation report. Site 1. Fire Training Area. Volk Field Air National Guard Base, Camp Douglas, Wi. Volume 2. Final remedial investigation report  

SciTech Connect

Volume II of this report contains data tables and field notes of information gathered from the sampling of soils and ground water. Hydrocarbons and aromatic volatile organics are among the contaminants listed.

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Conceptual design of a coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline commercial plant. Volume V. Alternate design studies. Second interim final report, August 31, 1977-March 1, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Three design cases have been investigated for converting methanol to gasoline using the Mobil process. These are defined as Case A, which produces gasoline and byproduct LPG; Case B, which produces gasoline, high Btu gas, and byproduct LPG; and Case C which produces gasoline only. The LPG includes propane LPG and high purity isobutane. Base Case B is described in Volumes I and IV of this report. Alternate Cases A and C are described in part I of Volume V. Part II of this volume (V) contains additional process studies. Under Contract EX-76-C-01-2416 Modification No. A006, item (4) of the General Requirements requires economy of scale evaluations, and item (24) of the Scope of Work includes studies of Lurgi methanol synthesis recommendations, integration of Methanol-to-Gasoline facilities with a refinery, and recovery of aromatics from stabilized synthetic gasoline.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Final report from VFL Technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC appendices, Volume 4, Appendix V-C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the the final verification run data package for pilot scale thermal treatment of lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. Included are data on volatiles, semivolatiles, and TCLP volatiles.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

1980 survey and evaluation of utility conservation, load management, and solar end-use projects. Volume 3: utility load management projects. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the 1980 survey of electric utility-sponsored energy conservation, load management, and end-use solar energy conversion projects are described. The work is an expansion of a previous survey and evaluation and has been jointly sponsored by EPRI and DOE through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. There are three volumes and a summary document. Each volume presents the results of an extensive survey to determine electric utility involvement in customer-side projects related to the particular technology (i.e., conservation, solar, or load management), selected descriptions of utility projects and results, and first-level technical and economic evaluations.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Remedial action plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Volume 3, Appendix F, Final plans and specifications: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume deals with the main construction subcontract for the uranium mill tailings remedial action of Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Contents of subcontract documents AMB-4 include: bidding requirements; terms and conditions; specifications which cover general requirements and sitework; and subcontract drawings.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 1. Project summaries. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Phase II research project on emission of potentially toxic organic compounds (PTOCs) from wastewater treatment plants were fivefold: (1) assessment of the importance of gaseous emissions from municipal wastewater collection systems; (2) resolution of the discrepancy between the measured and estimated emissions (Phase I), from the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant (JWPCP) operated by the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (CSDLAC); (3) determination of airborne concentrations of PTOCS immediately downwind of an activated sludge aeration process at the City of Los Angeles' Hyperion Treatment Plant (HTP); (4) a modeling assessment of the effects of transient loading on emissions during preliminary and primary treatment at a typical municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWTP); (5) a preliminary investigation of effects of chlorination practices on haloform production. Volume 1, for which the abstract was prepared, contains a summary of results from each project; Volume 2 contains the discussion regarding the modeling of collection system emissions; Volume 3 addresses methods development and field sampling efforts at the JWPCP and HTP, data on emissions from a mechanically ventilated sewer and results of some preliminary haloform formation studies in wastewaters; and Volume 4 discusses aspects of the emissions modeling problem.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Schroeder, E.D.; Corsi, R.L.; Guensler, R.; Meyerhofer, J.A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Relocation of Technical Area 18 Capabilities and Materials at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

vii vii TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME 1 Page Cover Sheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii List of Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix Acronyms, Abbreviations, and Conversion Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxv 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1.1 General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 1.1.2

231

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Relocation of Technical Area 18 Capabilities and Materials at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

v v TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME 2 Page Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v List of Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix List of Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi Acronyms, Abbreviations, and Conversion Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv APPENDIX A CRITICAL ASSEMBLY DESCRIPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1 A.1 Critical Assembly Machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1 A.1.1 Flattop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3 A.1.2 Godiva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 A.1.3 Comet . . .

232

District heating and cooling systems for communities through power plant retrofit distribution network. Phase 2. Final report, 1 March 1980-31 January 1984. Volume VII. Appendix C  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains: Hudson No. 2 Limited Retrofit Cost Estimates provided by Stone and Webster Engineering Corp. (SWEC); backup data and basis of estimate for SWEC Heater Plant and Gas Turbine Plant (Kearny No. 12) cost estimates; and Appendices - Analysis of Relevant Tax Laws.

Not Available

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices: Final environmental impact statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains Appendix F--hydrology report, and Appendix G--flood plain and wetland assessment. Contents of the hydrology report include: surface water; ground water; potentially affected hydrogeologic environment-processing site; potentially affected hydrogeologic environment-Cheney reservoir site; potentially affected hydrogeologic environment-Two Road site; and conclusions-ground water.

none,

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Gulf of Mexico Sales 147 and 150: Central and western planning areas. Volume 2, Sections 4.D. through 9: Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume II contains: environmental consequences, part D which includes environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives for the proposed Central Gulf sale 147 and for the proposed Western Gulf sale 150; consultation and coordination; bibliography and special references; preparers; glossary; and appendices.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Final report from VFL technologies for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils. LEFPC Appendices, Volume 2, Appendix V-A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains information concerning validation of analytical data for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Floodplain soils located at the Y-12 Plant site. This volume is an appendix of compiled data from this validation process.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Surface mine pollution abatement and land use impact investigation. Volume III. Considerations of post mining land use, mine inventory and abatement plan for the quicksand watershed. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume III of the five volume series primarily presents three general topics. The first of these is a discussion of considerations relating to post-mining land use. Following this discussion, an evaluation of factors relating to more important environmental and land use impacts of the surface mining industry in Eastern Kentucky is presented. The last topic presents a mine inventory of the 33 surface mines located in the Quicksand Watershed in Breathitt County, Kentucky. Surface mines have several environmental and land use impacts. Those considered in the discussion which are of special importance to Eastern Kentucky are hydrologic influence, sedimentation, spoil bank stability, the impact on the public road system and mine access roads, and haul road abandonment. A number of major conclusions of general applicability are given along with some conclusions specifically related to the Quicksand Watershed.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Applied research on energy storage and conversion for photovoltaic and wind energy systems. Volume II. Photovoltaic systems with energy storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume of the General Electric study was directed at an evaluation of those energy storage technologies deemed best suited for use in conjunction with a photovoltaic energy conversion system in utility, residential and intermediate applications. Break-even cost goals are developed for several storage technologies in each application. These break-even costs are then compared with cost projections presented in Volume I of this report to show technologies and time frames of potential economic viability. The form of the presentation allows the reader to use more accurate storage system cost data as they become available. The report summarizes the investigations performed and presents the results, conclusions and recommendations pertaining to use of energy storage with photovoltaic energy conversion systems. Candidate storage concepts studied include (1) above ground and underground pumped hydro, (2) underground compressed air, (3) electric batteries, (4) flywheels, and (5) hydrogen production and storage. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Installation Restoration Program. Remedial investigation report. Site 1. Fire Training Area. Volk Field Air National Guard Base, Camp Douglas, Wi. Volume 1. Final remedial investigation report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 1 of this report covers the Remedial Investigation conducted on Site 1, Fire Training Area at Volk Field Air National Guard Base. The remedial work is described and the testing conducted after remediation to insure all contamination has been removed. The study as conducted under the Air National Guard's Installation Restoration Program. Partial contents include: Meteorology; Hydrology; Soils; Water wells; Groundwater; Borings; Samplings; Chemical contamination; Migration; Decontamination.

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Technology assessment of offshore industry. The United States offshore industry. Current status, trends and forecast 1976-2000. Volume I. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume One presents a description of the current status of the U.S. offshore industry together with developing trends in the industry and an examination of the various forces that influence development. A 25 year forecast of offshore industry development is included. Also included is a description of the U.S. commercial ocean fishing industry and a 25 year forecast of industry development.

Durfee, J.H.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Industrial sector end use. Energy Consumption Data Base (ECDB) for 1975 and 1976. Volume I. Summary of 1976 results. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is the summary document of a three-volume report. It contains an introduction followed by tables of data containing the following information: 1976 national energy consumption by industry fuel type, and end use; 1976 regional energy consumption by industry fuel type, and census division; 1976 regional energy consumption by industry fuel type, and federal regions; 1976 regional energy consumption by industry fuel type, and PAD district; 1976 state energy consumption by industry fuel type, and by state. (PLG)

1980-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Comparative ranking of 0. 1-10 MW/sub e/ solar thermal electric power systems. Volume II. Supporting data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1-10 MW/sub e/, operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW/sub e/, a range that is attractive to industrial and other nonutility applications. Volume I summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 1.0 MW/sub e/. Volume II presents data on the performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development: I. Preliminary design report. Phase I. Volume 5. Appendixes H, I, J, and K. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a 40 to 50 MW closed cycle ammonia OTEC commercial plant, the preliminary design of a 10 MW OTEC module analogous to the 50 MW module, and the preliminary design of heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50 MW heat exchangers for testing in OTEC-1 are presented. This volume of the report includes the following appendices: H) conceptual design description of the electrical systems; I) control and instrumentation; J) OTEC power module assembly; and K) cost estimates for each of the cost components. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

245

Development of solar assisted heat pumps for the heating and cooling of buildings. Volume II. Final technical report, February 1, 1978-June 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A second volume containing the appendices to the report on the development of high efficiency vapor compression cycle heat pumps for use in solar assisted heat pump (SAHP) systems is presented. A water source heat pump and a solar powered absorption chiller are studied for their feasibility in improving the performance of a SAHP system. A two speed multiple level heat pump compressor is analyzed. The product data for two advanced water source heat pump models are provided along with operating instructions for a parallel compressor water source heat pump. Marketing data for SAHP systems are included.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Rifle, Colorado. Volume 2, Appendices D and E: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix assesses the present conditions and data gathered about the two inactive uranium mill tailings sites near Rifle, Colorado, and the designated disposal site six miles north of Rifle in the area of Estes Gulch. It consolidates available engineering, radiological, geotechnical, hydrological, meteorological, and other information pertinent to the design of the Remedial Action Plan (RAP). The data characterize conditions at the mill, tailings, and disposal site so that the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) may complete final designs for the remedial actions.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Security assessment of power systems including energy storage and with the integration of wind energy. Volume I. Digital transient simulation effort consulting Agreement No. 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the effort reported has been to adapt the MOD-2 simulation models for implementation on a digital transient stability program. This has involved: selection of an appropriate host program, examination of the host program interface, analysis of the analog models for digital implementation, FORTRAN coding of the model equations, installation and debugging on the host program, and final model verification. Synchronous machine equations are analyzed, with particular emphasis on numerical solution. (LEW)

Anderson, P. M.

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume III. Final report: demonstration plant equipment descriptions, test plan, and operating instructions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The elements of the final, detailed design of the demonstration plant for the copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal steam are summarized. Descriptions are given of all items of equipment in sufficient detail that they can serve as purchase specifications. The process and mechanical design criteria which were used to develop the specifications, and the process descriptions and material and energy balance bases to which the design criteria were applied are included. (MHR)

Brown, F.C.; Harvey, W.W.; Warren, R.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Volume 2. Engineering evaluation report. Final technical report. [Oil-fired boiler to solvent-refined coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 2 of this report gives the results of an engineering evaluation study and economic analysis of converting an existing 560-MW residual (No. 6) oil-fired unit to burn solvent refined coal (SRC) fuel forms. Volume 1 represents an integrated overview of the test program conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. Three SRC forms (pulverized SRC, a solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates, and a slurry of SRC and water) were examined. The scope of modifications necessary to convert the unit to each of the three SRC fuel forms was identified and a capital cost of the necessary modifications estimated. A fuel conversion feasibility study of the boiler was performed wherein boiler modifications and performance effects of each fuel on the boiler were identified. An economic analysis of the capital and operating fuel expenses of conversion of the unit was performed. It was determined that conversion of the unit to any one of the three SRC fuel forms was feasible where appropriate modifications were made. It also was determined that the conversion of the unit can be economically attractive if SRC fuel forms can be manufactured and sold at prices discounted somewhat from the price of No. 16 Fuel Oil. As expected, greater discounts are required for the pulverized SRC and the slurry than for the solution of SRC dissolved in process-derived distillates.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Preliminary design study of underground pumped hydro and compressed-air energy storage in hard rock. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) and Acres American Incorporated (AAI) have carried out a preliminary design study of water-compensated Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) and Underground Pumped Hydroelectric (UPH) plants for siting in geological conditions suitable for hard rock excavations. The work was carried out over a period of three years and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and PEPCO. The study was divided into five primary tasks as follows: establishment of design criteria and analysis of impact on power system; selection of site and establishment of site characteristics; formulation of design approaches; assessment of environmental and safety aspects; and preparation of preliminary design of plant. The salient aspects considered and the conclusions reached during the consideration of the five primary tasks for both CAES and UPH are presented in this Executive Summary, which forms Volume 1 of the series of reports prepared during the study. The investigations and analyses carried out, together with the results and conclusions reached, are described in detail in Volumes 2 through 13 and ten appendices.

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Gulf of Mexico Sales 147 and 150: Central and Western planning areas. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 1: Sections 1 through 4.C  

SciTech Connect

This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1994 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales [Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 147 (March 1994) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 150 (August 1994)]. This document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the descriptions of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Remedial actions at the former Vitro Rare Metals plant site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania. Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of the conceptual design and other information necessary to understand the proposed remedial action at the expanded Canonsburg, Pennsylvania site. This design constitutes the current approach to stabilizing the radioactively contaminated materials in place in a manner that would fully protect the public health and environment. This summary is intended to provide sufficient detail for the reader to understand the proposed remedial action and the anticipated environmental impacts. The site conceptual design has been developed using available data. In some cases, elements of the design have not been developed fully and will be made final during the detailed design process.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Development of a High Volume Capable Process to Manufacture High Performance Photovoltaic Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-322  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intent of the work is for RFMD and NREL to cooperate in the development of a commercially viable and high volume capable process to manufacture high performance photovoltaic cells, based on inverted metamorphic (IMM) GaAs technology. The successful execution of the agreement will result in the production of a PV cell using technology that is capable of conversion efficiency at par with the market at the time of release (reference 2009: 37-38%), using RFMD's production facilities. The CRADA work has been divided into three phases: (1) a foundation phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of a basic PV cell at RFMD's production facilities; (2) a technology demonstration phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of prototype PV cells using IMM technology at RFMD's production facilities, and; (3) a production readiness phase where the teams will demonstrate the capability to manufacture PV cells using IMM technology with high yields, high reliability, high reproducibility and low cost.

Geisz, J. F.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Criteria for the development and use of the methodology for environmentally-acceptable fossil energy site evaluation and selection. Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as a companion document to the report, Volume 1: Environmentally-Acceptable Fossil Energy Site Evaluation and Selection: Methodology and Users Guide, in which a methodology was developed which allows the siting of fossil fuel conversion facilities in areas with the least environmental impact. The methodology, known as SELECS (Site Evaluation for Energy Conversion Systems) does not replace a site specific environmental assessment, or an environmental impact statement (EIS), but does enhance the value of an EIS by thinning down the number of options to a manageable level, by doing this in an objective, open and selective manner, and by providing preliminary assessment and procedures which can be utilized during the research and writing of the actual impact statement.

Eckstein, L.; Northrop, G.; Scott, R.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Preliminary design of a solar central receiver for site-specific repowering application (Saguaro Power Plant). Volume II. Preliminary design. Final report, October 1982-September 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar central receiver technology, site, and specific unit for repowering were selected in prior analyses and studies. The objectives of this preliminary design study were to: develop a solar central receiver repowering design for Saguaro that (1) has potential to be economically competitive with fossil fueled plants in near and long term applications, (2) has the greatest chance for completion without further government funding, (3) will further define technical and economic feasibility of a 66 MWe gross size plant that is adequate to meet the requirements for utility and industrial process heat applications, (4) can potentially be constructed and operated within the next five years, and (5) incorporates solar central receiver technology and represents state-of-the-art development. This volume on the preliminary design includes the following sections: executive summary; introduction; changes from advanced conceptual design; preliminary design; system characteristics; economic analysis; and development plan.

Weber, E.R.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

New Concepts in Fish Ladder Design, Volume III of IV, Assessment of Fishway Development and Design, 1982-1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume covers the broad, though relatively short, historical basis for this project. The historical developments of certain design features, criteria and research activities are traced. Current design practices are summarized based on the results of an international survey and interviews with agency personnel and consultants. The fluid mechanics and hydraulics of fishway systems are discussed. Fishways (or fishpasses) can be classified in two ways: (1) on the basis of the method of water control (chutes, steps (ladders), or slots); and (2) on the basis of the degree and type of water control. This degree of control ranges from a natural waterfall to a totally artificial environment at a hatchery. Systematic procedures for analyzing fishways based on their configuration, species, and hydraulics are presented. Discussions of fish capabilities, energy expenditure, attraction flow, stress and other factors are included.

Powers, Patrick D.; Orsborn, John F.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

In-situ biological treatment test at Kelly Air Force Base. Volume 3. Appendices. Final report, 1 June 1985-31 May 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to field-test in-situ biological degradation for removal of organic contaminants from soils and groundwater. In-situ biological degradation involves stimulation of the indigenous subsurface microbial population by the addition of nutrients and an oxygen source (hydrogen peroxide) to promote degradation of organic contaminants present in soils and groundwater. The results of the test at Kelly AFB allowed for a number of conclusions regarding in situ treatment. The low and variable permeabilities at the test site resulted in a slower delivery of nutrients and oxygen source than anticipated, as well as difficult operating conditions, but did not prevent degradation from occuring. This volume III report includes, in Appendix form, the analytical data collected during the demonstration project and analytical methods used.

Wetzel, R.S.; Durst, C.M.; Davidson, D.H.; Sarno, D.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Applied research on energy storage and conversion for photovoltaic and wind energy systems. Volume III. Wind conversion systems with energy storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The variability of energy output inherent in wind energy conversion systems (WECS) has led to the investigation of energy storage as a means of managing the available energy when immediate, direct use is not possible or desirable. This portion of the General Electric study was directed at an evaluation of those energy storage technologies deemed best suited for use in conjunction with a wind energy conversion system in utility, residential and intermediate applications. Break-even cost goals are developed for several storage technologies in each application. These break-even costs are then compared with cost projections presented in Volume I of this report to show technologies and time frames of potential economic viability. The report summarizes the investigations performed and presents the results, conclusions and recommendations pertaining to use of energy storage with wind energy conversion systems.

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

U. S. research safety vehicle (RSV) phase I program. Volume III. RSV characteristics and performance specifications. Final report, Jan 1974--Apr 1975  

SciTech Connect

Current passenger car usage patterns and factors influencing usage are analyzed and projections of usage patterns in the mid-1980's are made. Current available data on six categories of vehicle accidents are analyzed and projections made of national accident patterns in the mid-80's; the effect of potential reductions in these projections as a result of safety programs and other factors related to driving safety are estimated. Based on the usage and accident projections, the characteristics of an RSV (weighing under 3,000 lbs C.W.) for operation in the mid-1980 traffic environment are described. A recommended set of specifications for the RSV are developed considering the potential safety payoff accruing to an increased level of safety performance, the need for energy conservation, availability of material resources, and changes in vehicle mix. (An executive summary of this report is presented in Volume I).

Andon, J.; Dodson, E.; Khadilkar, A.; Olson, R.; Pauls, L.

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Use of recycled chunk rubber asphalt concrete (CRAC) on low volume roads and use of recycled crumb rubber modifier in asphalt pavements. Final report, June 1993-June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of this project was to formulate a Chunk Rubber Asphalt Concrete (CRAC) mix for use on low volume roads. CRAC is a rubber modified asphalt concrete product produced by the `dry process` where rubber chunks of 1/2 inch size are used as aggregate in a cold mix with a type C fly ash. The second objective of this project was to develop guidelines concerning the use of rubber modified asphalt concrete hot mix to include: (1) Design methods for use of asphalt-rubber mix for new construction and overlay, (2) Mix design method for asphalt-rubber, and (3) Test method for determining the amount of rubber in an asphalt-rubber concrete for quality control purposes.

Hossain, M.; Funk, L.P.; Sadeq, M.A.; Marucci, G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco fee. Volume III. Final report. Annual report, February 1982-March 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the testing of Sand 3 (15,245 to 15,280 feet in depth) which occurred from November 1983 to March 1984 and evaluates these new data in comparison to results from the testing of Sand 5 (15,385 to 15,415 feet in depth) which occurred from June 1981 to February 1982. It also describes the reworking of the production and salt water disposal wells preparatory to the Sand 3 testing as well as the plug and abandon procedures requested to terminate the project. The volume contains two parts: Part 1 includes the text and accompanying plates, figures and tables; Part 2 consists of the appendixes including auxiliary reports and tabulations.

Durham, C.O. Jr.; O'Brien, F.D.; Rodgers, R.W. (eds.) [eds.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Applied research on energy storage and conversion for photovoltaic and wind energy systems. Volume I. Study summary and concept screening. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was directed at a review of storage technologies, and particularly those which might be best suited for use in conjunction with wind and photovoltaics. The potential ''worth'' added by incorporating storage was extensively analyzed for both wind and photovoltaics. Energy storage concepts studied include (1) above ground pumped hydro storage, (2) underground pumped hydro storage, (3) thermal storage-oil, (4) thermal storage-steam, (5) underground compressed air storage, (6) pneumatic storage, (7) lead-acid batteries, (8) advanced batteries, (9) inertial storage (flywheel), (10) hydrogen generation and storage, and (11) superconducting magnetic energy storage. The investigations performed and the major results, conclusions, and recommendations are presented in this volume. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document: Chapters 3 and 4: Response to Documents and References  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 3 RESPONSES TO COMMENTS This section provides DOE's responses to comments received during the public comment period. Indices of the DOE responses are provided by document number (Table 3.1), by commentors' last name (Table 3.2), and by commentors' company/organization (Table 3.3). Most of the comments received apply to both the Portsmouth and the Paducah conversion facility EISs. However, there are some comment documents that apply specifically to one EIS or the other. An index of comment documents indicating their applicability to each EIS is given in Table 3.4. Table 3.5 lists only those comment documents that apply to the Portsmouth EIS, and Table 3.6 lists those comment documents that apply to the Paducah EIS. Table 3.7 lists the

264

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and Response Document: Chapters 3 and 4: Responses to Comments and References  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 3 RESPONSES TO COMMENTS This section provides DOE's responses to comments received during the public comment period. Indices of the DOE responses are provided by document number (Table 3.1), by commentors' last name (Table 3.2), and by commentors' company/organization (Table 3.3). Most of the comments received apply to both the Portsmouth and the Paducah conversion facility EISs. However, there are some comment documents that apply specifically to one EIS or the other. An index of comment documents indicating their applicability to each EIS is given in Table 3.4. Table 3.5 lists only those comment documents that apply to the Portsmouth EIS, and Table 3.6 lists those comment documents that apply to the Paducah EIS. Table 3.7 lists the

265

Mixed strategies for energy conservation and alternative energy utilization (solar) in buildings. Final report. Volume II. Detailed results. [New York, Atlanta, Omaha, and Albuquerque  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mixed-strategy analysis was a tradeoff analysis between energy-conservation methods and an alternative energy source (solar) considering technical and economic benefits. The objective of the analysis was to develop guidelines for: reducing energy requirements; reducing conventional fuel use; and identifying economic alternatives for building owners. The analysis was done with a solar system in place. This makes the study unique in that it is determining the interaction of energy conservation with a solar system. The study, therefore, established guidelines as to how to minimize capital investment while reducing the conventional fuel consumption through either a larger solar system or an energy-conserving technique. To focus the scope of energy-conservation techniques and alternative energy sources considered, five building types (house, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, schools, and office buildings) were selected. Finally, the lists of energy-conservation techniques and alternative energy sources were reduced to lists of manageable size by using technical attributes to select the best candidates for further study. The resultant energy-conservation techniques were described in detail and installed costs determined. The alternative energy source reduced to solar. Building construction characteristics were defined for each building for each of four geographic regions of the country. A mixed strategy consisting of an energy-conservation technique and solar heating/hot water/cooling system was analyzed, using computer simulation to determine the interaction between energy conservation and the solar system. Finally, using FEA fuel-price scenarios and installed costs for the solar system and energy conservation techniques, an economic analysis was performed to determine the cost effectiveness of the combination. (MCW)

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 1. Conceptual design, Sections 1 through 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume presents in detail the market analysis, parametric analysis, and the selection process for the preferred system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Regional load-curve models: QUERI's model long-run forecasts and sensitivity analysis. Volume 4. Final report. [Hourly demand in 32 US regions  

SciTech Connect

This report presents detailed forecasts of the hourly demand for electricity in 32 regions of the US through the year 2000. The forecasts are generated by a load curve model estimated by QUERI and described in Volume II of this report. Two primary sets of input assumptions for this model are utilized: one based on DRI's macro, regional and sectoral models is called the Baseline Scenario while the other, which is a projection of historical trends, is the Extrapolation Scenario. Under both assumptions, the growth rates of electricity are forecast to slow from historical levels. Load factors are generally projected to continue to decline; most regions are forecast to remain Summer peaking but this is rather sensitive to the choice of scenario. By considering other scenarios which are small perturbations of the Baseline assumptions, elasticities of average, peak and hourly loads are calculated. Different weather assumptions are also examined for the sensitivity of the load shapes to changes in the weather.

Engle, R.F.; Granger, C.W.J.; Ramanathan, R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Study of capital requirements for solar energy. Final report, Volume 1. Analysis of the macroeconomic effects of increased solar energy market penetration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report defines the analytical framework for, and presents the results of, a study to determine the macroeconomic effects of increased market penetration of solar energy technologies over the 1977-2000 time period. For the purposes of this document, solar technologies are defined as wind, photovoltaics, ocean thermal electric (OTEC), small-scale (non-utility) hydroelectric and all solar active and passive thermal technologies. This research has been undertaken in support of the National Plan to Accelerate Commercialization (NPAC) of Solar Energy. The capital and operating requirements for three market penetration levels are first determined; the effects of these requirements on economic performance are then estimated using the Hudson-Jorgenson Energy/Economic Model. The analytical design, computational methods, data sources, assumptions and scenario configurations for this analysis are defined in detail. The results of the analysis of the economic impact of solar energy are presented in detail, and the implications of these results are discussed. Appendix A explains the methodology for transforming investment to capital stocks. Appendix B, which is provided in a separate volume, describes the Hudson-Jorgenson Model in greater detail. (WHK)

Pleatsikas, C.J.; Hudson, E.A.; O'Connor, D.C.; Funkhouser, D.H.

1979-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

Reduction of NO/sub x/ through staged combustion in combined cycle supplemental boilers. Volume I. Systems optimization analyses. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An investigation directed to control of emissions from supplemental-fired combined cycles with the use of staged combustion in the steam generating portion of the system is discussed. A combined cycle, as considered in this report, is the assembly of any number of gas turbines, steam generators, and steam turbines for electric power generation in which the exhaust of the gas turbines is passed through the steam generators. A supplementary-fired combined cycle employs combustion of fuel in the gas turbine exhaust to increase temperatures in the steam system. Staged combustion is achieved by the separation of the exhaust from the gas turbines into two streams prior to entering the steam generator with provisions for primary combustion of fuel in one stream with a deficiency of air. Combustion is completed in a secondary stage by mixing the unfired stream into the products of the fired stream. The use of staged combustion provides conditions favorable for the occurrence of chemical reactions that result in a reduction of mass flow of nitric oxide (NO) present in the gas turbine exhaust. Volume I is concerned with the engineering analysis of combined cycle performance and NO/sub x/ reduction potential. (GRA)

1975-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power Systems sodium-cooled receiver concept. Final report. Volume II, Book 2. Conceptual design, Sections 5 and 6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall, long-term objective of the Solar Central Receiver Hybrid Power System program is to identify, characterize, and ultimately demonstrate the viability and cost effectiveness of solar/fossil, steam Rankine cycle, hybrid power systems that: (1) consist of a combined solar central receiver energy source and a nonsolar energy source at a single, common site, (2) may operate in the base, intermediate, and peaking capacity modes, (3) produce the rated output independent of variations in solar insolation, (4) provide a significant savings (50% or more) in fuel consumption, and (5) produce power at the minimum possible cost in mills/kWh. It is essential that these hybrid concepts be technically feasible and economically competitive with other systems in the near to mid-term time period (1985-1990) on a commercial scale. The program objective for Phase I is to identify and conceptually characterize solar/fossil steam Rankine cycle, commercial-scale, power plant systems that are economically viable and technically feasible. This volume contains the detailed conceptual design and cost/performance estimates and an assessment of the commercial scale solar central receiver hybrid power system. (WHK)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Black liquor combustion validated recovery boiler modeling: Final year report. Volume 1 (Main text and Appendix I, sections 1--4)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was initiated in October 1990, with the objective of developing and validating a new computer model of a recovery boiler furnace using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code specifically tailored to the requirements for solving recovery boiler flows, and using improved submodels for black liquor combustion based on continued laboratory fundamental studies. The key tasks to be accomplished were as follows: (1) Complete the development of enhanced furnace models that have the capability to accurately predict carryover, emissions behavior, dust concentrations, gas temperatures, and wall heat fluxes. (2) Validate the enhanced furnace models, so that users can have confidence in the predicted results. (3) Obtain fundamental information on aerosol formation, deposition, and hardening so as to develop the knowledge base needed to relate furnace model outputs to plugging and fouling in the convective sections of the boiler. (4) Facilitate the transfer of codes, black liquid submodels, and fundamental knowledge to the US kraft pulp industry. Volume 1 contains the main body of the report and the first 4 sections of Appendix 1: Modeling of black liquor recovery boilers -- summary report; Flow and heat transfer modeling in the upper furnace of a kraft recovery boiler; Numerical simulation of black liquor combustion; and Investigation of turbulence models and prediction of swirling flows for kraft recovery furnaces.

Grace, T.M.; Frederick, W.J.; Salcudean, M.; Wessel, R.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Status and Habitat Requirements of the White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam Volume II; Supplemental Papers and Data Documentation, 1986-1992 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report for research on white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus from 1986--92 and conducted by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF). Findings are presented as a series of papers, each detailing objectives, methods, results, and conclusions for a portion of this research. This volume includes supplemental papers which provide background information needed to support results of the primary investigations addressed in Volume 1. This study addresses measure 903(e)(1) of the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1987 Fish and Wildlife Program that calls for ''research to determine the impact of development and operation of the hydropower system on sturgeon in the Columbia River Basin.'' Study objectives correspond to those of the ''White Sturgeon Research Program Implementation Plan'' developed by BPA and approved by the Northwest Power Planning Council in 1985. Work was conducted on the Columbia River from McNary Dam to the estuary.

Beamesderfer, Raymond C.; Nigro, Anthony A. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR (US)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Technology and market assessment of gas-fueled vehicles in New York State. Volume III. Institutional barriers and market assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume III deals primarily with the institutional barriers and market forces affecting the potential conversion of vehicles in New York State (NYS) to gaseous fuels. The results of a market research survey are presented along wth the current supply conditions for fuels in NYS. The indigenous resources of gaseous fuels in NYS are identified and quantified. The potential number of vehicles in NYS that are favorable candidates for conversion are estimated, and the effect of these potential gaseous-fueled vehicles on NYS gaseous fuels supplies is presented. The market research survey found that fleet managers appear to be more aware of the specifics of LPG vehicles relative to CNG vehicles. In those fleets with some LPG or CNG vehicles, a tentativeness to further conversion was detected. Many fleet managers are deferring conversion plans due to uncertain conversion costs and future fuel prices. The need for fleet manager education about gaseous fuel vehicle (GFV) operation and economics was identified. NYS currently has an excess supply of natural gas and could support a significant GFV population. However, the pipeline system serving NYS may not be able to serve a growing GFV population without curtailment in the future if natural gas demands in other sectors increase. LPG supply in NYS is dependent primarily on how much LPG can be imported into NYS. A widespread distribution system (pipeline and truck transport) exists in NYS and could likely support a signficant LPG vehicle population. It is estimated that about 35% of the passenger cars and 43% of the trucks in NYS are potential candidates for conversion to CNG. For LPG, about 36% and 46% of passenger cars and trucks are potential candidates. Applying a gross economic screen results in an estimated potential liquid fuel displacement of 1.3 billion gallons in 1990. 20 figs., 63 tabs.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

NURE aerial gamma-ray and magnetic-reconnaissance survey portions of New Mexico, Arizona, and Texas. Volume I. Instrumentation and data reduction. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, a rotary-wing high sensitivity radiometric and magnetic survey was flown covering portions of the State of New Mexico, Arizona and Texas. The survey encompassed six 1:250,000 scale quadrangles, Holbrook, El Paso, Las Cruces, Carlsbad, Fort Sumner and Roswell. The survey was flown with a Sikorsky S58T helicopter equipped with a high sensitivity gamma ray spectrometer which was calibrated at the DOE calibration facilities at Walker Field in Grand Junction, Colorado, and the Dynamic Test Range at Lake Mead, Arizona. The radiometric data were processed to compensate for Compton scattering effects and altitude variations. The data were normalized to 400 feet terrain clearance. The reduced data is presented in the form of stacked profiles, standard deviation anomaly plots, histogram plots and microfiche listings. The results of the geologic interpretation of the radiometric data together with the profiles, anomaly maps and histograms are presented in the individual quadrangle reports. The survey was awarded to LKB Resources, Inc. which completed the data acquisition. In April, 1980 Carson Helicopters, Inc. and Carson Geoscience Company agreed to manage the project and complete delivery of this final report.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Microseismic monitoring for evidence of geothermal heat in the capital district of New York. Volume 5. Phases I-III. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The seismic monitoring aspect of this work consisted of setting up and operating a network of seven seismograph stations within and around the study area capable of detecting and locating small earthquakes. To supplement the evidence from present day seismic activity, a list of all known historical and early instrumental earthquakes was compiled and improved from original sources for a larger region centered on the study area. Additional field work was done to determine seismic velocities of P and S phases by special recording of quarry blasts. The velocity results were used both as an aid to improve earthquake locations based on computer programs and to make inferences about the existence of temperature anomalies, and hence geothermal potential, at depths beneath the study area. Finally, the level in the continuous background earth vibration, microseisms, was measured throughout the study area to test a possibility that a relationship may exist at the surface between the level in microseisms and the geothermal or related activity. The observed seismic activity within the study area, although considerably higher (two to three times) than inferred from the historical and early instrumental data, is still not only low for a potential geothermal area but appears to be related to coherent regional tectonic stresses and not to the proposed more localized geothermal activity reflected in the mineralized, CO/sub 2/ rich spring discharge.

Not Available

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A REVIEW OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR SAFETY STUDIES. VOLUME 3 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), in 9 volumes,Commission Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), in 9 volumes,Commission Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-75/014), in 9 volumes,

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Liquid phase Fischer-Tropsch (II) demonstration in the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit. Volume 1/2, Main Report. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results from a demonstration of Liquid Phase Fischer-Tropsch (LPFT) technology in DOE`s Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. The run was conducted in a bubble column at the AFDU in May--June 1994. The 10-day run demonstrated a very high level of reactor productivity for LPFT, more than five times the previously demonstrated productivity. The productivity was constrained by mass transfer limitations, perhaps due to slurry thickening as a result of carbon formation on the catalyst. With a cobalt catalyst or an improved iron catalyst, if the carbon formation can be avoided, there is significant room for further improvements. The reactor was operated with 0.7 H{sub 2}/CO synthesis gas in the range of 2400--11700 sl/hr-kg Fe, 175--750 psig and 270--300C. The inlet gas velocity ranged from 0.19 to 0.36 ft/sec. The demonstration was conducted at a pilot scale of 5 T/D. Catalyst activation with CO/N{sub 2} proceeded well. Initial catalyst activity was close to the expectations from the CAER autoclave runs. CO conversion of about 85% was obtained at the baseline condition. The catalyst also showed good water-gas shift activity and a low {alpha}. At high productivity conditions, reactor productivity of 136 grams of HC/hr -- liter of slurry volume was demonstrated, which was within the target of 120--150. However, mass transfer limitations were observed at these conditions. To alleviate these limitations and prevent excessive thickening, the slurry was diluted during the run. This enabled operations under kinetic control later in the run. But, the dilution resulted in lower conversion and reactor productivity. A new reactor internal heat exchanger, installed for high productivity conditions, performed well above design,and the system never limited the performance. The control can expected, the reactor temperature control needed manual intervention. The control can be improved by realigning the utility oil system.

Bhatt, B.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Remedial actions at the former Climax Uranium Company, Uranium Mill site, Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. Volume 1, Text: Final environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This statement evaluates and compares the environmental impacts associated with the remedial actions of the residual radioactive materials remaining at the inactive uranium processing site and associated vicinity properties at Grand Junction, Mesa County, Colorado. This statement is also intended to aid the BLM in amending their management framework plans and final resource management plan, as well as assisting in compliance with the withdrawal application as appropriate. The site is a 114-acre tract of private and state owned land which contains approximately 3.1 million cubic yards of tailings and associated contaminated soils. The vicinity properties are homes, businesses, public buildings, and vacant lots which may have been contaminated during construction by the use of tailings as building material. An estimated 3465 vicinity properties would be cleaned up during remedial action of the tailings pile. The tailings were produced by the former Climax Uranium Company which processed uranium ore, which it sold to the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1951 to 1966 and to private sources from 1966 to 1970. This statement evaluates six alternatives for stabilization and disposal of the tailings and other contaminated materials: (1) No action. (2) Stabilization at the Grand Junction site. (3) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with truck transport. (4) Disposal at the Cheney Reservoir site with train and truck transport. (5) Disposal at the Two Road site with truck transport. (6) Disposal at the Two Road site with train and truck transport. All of the alternatives except no action include remedial action at an estimated 3465 vicinity properties. Alternative 3 is DOE`s preferred alternative.

None

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

VOLUME I: TEXT AND APPENDICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enclosed is the Final Reclamation Plan for American Nuclear Corporations's (ANC's) Tailings Pond #2, which also includes preliminary reclamation design for Pond #1. The final reclamation plan incorporates NRC staff comments on the preliminary plan submitted in November, 1995. Two volumes are included; the first contains the body of the report and the appendices. The second volume contains 31 large drawings. Please call me or Bob Medlock if you have any questions. Best regards, SHEPHERD MILLER, INC.

Shepherd Miller; Mr. Mark Moxley; Kent Bruxvoort P. E; Ken Hooks Nrc; Rick Chancellor Deq; Jim Voeller Avi; Bill Salisbury; For Tailings Pond

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fabrication of large-volume, low-cost ceramic lanthanum halide scintillators for gamma ray detection : final report for DHS/DNDO/TRDD project TA-01-SL01.  

SciTech Connect

This project uses advanced ceramic processes to fabricate large, optical-quality, polycrystalline lanthanum halide scintillators to replace small single crystals produced by the conventional Bridgman growth method. The new approach not only removes the size constraint imposed by the growth method, but also offers the potential advantages of both reducing manufacturing cost and increasing production rate. The project goal is to fabricate dense lanthanum halide ceramics with a preferred crystal orientation by applying texture engineering and solid-state conversion to reduce the thermal mechanical stress in the ceramic and minimize scintillation light scattering at grain boundaries. Ultimately, this method could deliver the sought-after high sensitivity and <3% energy resolution at 662 keV of lanthanum halide scintillators and unleash their full potential for advanced gamma ray detection, enabling rapid identification of radioactive materials in a variety of practical applications. This report documents processing details from powder synthesis, seed particle growth, to final densification and texture development of cerium doped lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3}) ceramics. This investigation demonstrated that: (1) A rapid, flexible, cost efficient synthesis method of anhydrous lanthanum halides and their solid solutions was developed. Several batches of ultrafine LaBr{sub 3}:Ce{sup +3} powder, free of oxyhalide, were produced by a rigorously controlled process. (2) Micron size ({approx} 5 {micro}m), platelet shape LaBr{sub 3} seed particles of high purity can be synthesized by a vapor phase transport process. (3) High aspect-ratio seed particles can be effectively aligned in the shear direction in the ceramic matrix, using a rotational shear-forming process. (4) Small size, highly translucent LaBr{sub 3} (0.25-inch diameter, 0.08-inch thick) samples were successfully fabricated by the equal channel angular consolidation process. (5) Large size, high density, translucent LaBr{sub 3} ceramics samples (3-inch diameter, > 1/8-inch thick) were fabricated by hot pressing, demonstrating the superior manufacturability of the ceramic approach over single crystal growth methods in terms of size capability and cost. (6) Despite all these advances, evidence has shown that LaBr{sub 3} is thermally unstable at temperatures required for the densification process. This is particularly true for material near the surface where lattice defects and color centers can be created as bromine becomes volatile at high temperatures. Consequently, after densification these samples made using chemically prepared ultrafine powders turned black. An additional thermal treatment in a flowing bromine condition proved able to reduce the darkness of the surface layer for these densified samples. These observations demonstrated that although finer ceramic powders are desirable for densification due to a stronger driving force from their large surface areas, the same desirable factor can lead to lattice defects and color centers when these powders are densified at higher temperatures where material near the surface becomes thermally unstable.

Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Yang, Pin; Chen, Ching-Fong; Sanchez, Margaret R.; Bell, Nelson Simmons

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Volume Tracking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" ,"Daily Period",,"Containment Total" ,"Oil","Gas","Oil","Gas" "End Period","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery" "Date and Time","Rate","Rate","Cumulative","Cumulative" "MM/DD/YY 00:00","(bo)","(mmcf)","(bbls)","(mmcf)","Comment" 40333,16.486,0,16.486,0,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40334,6060.70543,15.666,6077.19143,15.666,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40335,10496.19429,22.00800001,16573.38572,37.674,"Oil rate based on metered volume"

282

Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 2 - hydrogenative and hydrothermal pretreatments and spectroscopic characterization using pyrolysis-GC-MS, CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and FT-IR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been indicated by DOE COLIRN panel that low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process. This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals. As the second volume of the final report, here we summarize our work on spectroscopic characterization of four raw coals including two subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-extracted but unreacted coals, the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been thermally pretreated. in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent, and the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been catalytically pretreated in the presence of a dispersed Mo sulfide catalyst in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent.

Chunshan Song; Hatcher, P.G.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

ETTP Volume I - final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Management at the Oak Ridge Operations Office East Tennessee Technology Park and Officeof Independent Oversight and...

284

Pantex Volume 1 - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PSM Process Safety Management QA Quality Assurance rpm Revolutions Per Minute RSD Radiation Safety Department SBRT Safety Basis Review Team SGT Safeguards Transport SRID...

285

WIPP Volume I - ESH - Final 2.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act RCT Radiological Control Technician RWP Radiation Work Permit SAR Safety Analysis Report SRAS Status Report and Assessment Strategy SRID Standards and Requirements...

286

Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

NONE

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

287

Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Volume Comparison  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume Comparison Volume Comparison Data for October 2013 | Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Complete XLS File Beginning with data for August 2010, natural gas consumption for the residential and commercial sectors was derived from the total system sendout reported by local distribution companies on Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries." The new methodology was designed to yield estimates that more closely reflect calendar month consumption patterns. Total system sendout is the sum of all volumes dispatched into the service territory during the report month, less any storage injections and deliveries to points outside the service territory. Previously, residential and commercial consumption estimates were based solely on reported sector

290

Final report: geothermal exploration in Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the performance period of the contract, 15 volumes of topical reports and 21 volumes of final technical reports were issued concerning geothermal exploration. These reports are listed. In this ultimate volume of the final technical report, abstracts of all reports, a summary of the highlights of achievements under these reports, and copies of published papers which acknowledge financial support from the contract are included.

Not Available

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

San Luis Unit technical record of design and construction. Volume 5. Construction Dos Amigos Pumping Plant, Pleasant Valley Pumping Plant. Central Valley Project, West San Joaquin Division, San Luis Unit, California. A water resources technical publication. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The technical record of design and construction of the San Luis unit is divided into seven volumes. This volume, number V, deals with the construction of two specific features of the San Luis unit, Dos Amigos Pumping Plant and Pleasant Valley Pumping Plant.

1974-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

NONE

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

Installation restoration program. Site investigation report for IRP site No. 12 and 13, South Dakota Air National Guard, 114th Fighter Wing, Joe Foss Field, Sioux Falls, South Dakota - Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Site Investigation Report for IRP Site No 12 and 13, South Dakota Air National Guard, 114th Fighter Wing, Joe Foss Field, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Volume I. This is the first volume of a two volume site investigation report. Two sites (Site 12 - Ramp area and Site 13 - Motor Vehicle Maintenance Facility) was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. Soil and groundwater samples were collected and analyzed. No further action was recommended on site 13 and quarterly sampling was recommended for site 12. South Dakota Regulators have agreed to both recommendations. Decision documents will be prepared for each site.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Sage Final EA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Environmental Assessment for DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR SAGE ELECTROCHROMICS SAGEGLASS® HIGH VOLUME MANUFACTURING (HVM) FACILITY IN FARIBAULT, MN U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 July 2009 DOE/EA-1645 Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Sage Electrochromics SageGlass® High Volume Manufacturing Facility in Faribault, MN DOE/EA-1645 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS iii Executive Summary 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 2 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2 2.1 Description of Proposed Action 2 2.2 Alternatives Considered but Eliminated 7 2.3 No Action Alternative 8 3.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS 9

296

Volume State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22 22 Volume State State or Country From/To Receipts/ Imports From Deliveries/ Exports To Net a Alabama Florida .................................................................. 0 722,558 -722,558 Georgia................................................................. 0 1,352,308 -1,352,308 Gulf of Mexico....................................................... 123,132 0 123,132 Mississippi ............................................................ 2,758,595 0 2,758,595 Tennessee............................................................ 1,744 764,749 -763,005 Total..................................................................... 2,883,471 2,839,615 43,856

297

4-80 Two rigid tanks connected by a valve to each other contain air at specified conditions. The volume of the second tank and the final equilibrium pressure when the valve is opened are to be determined.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Treating air as an ideal gas, the volume of the second tank and the mass of air in the first tank temperatures and pressures in ideal gas calculations. Using gage pressures would result in pressure drop of 04-40 4-80 Two rigid tanks connected by a valve to each other contain air at specified conditions

Bahrami, Majid

298

Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II.

Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

State Volume  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss Located Within the State Located Outside of the State Total Processed Volume (million cubic feet Estimated Heat Content (billion Btu) Alabama...................... 111,656 2,614 114,270 4,476 5,810 18,610 Alaska ......................... 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 148,444 Arkansas..................... 214,868 161 215,029 237 474 977 California..................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 41,037 Colorado ..................... 493,748 1,249 494,997 16,891 23,420 63,411 Florida......................... 5,900 0 5,900 1,130 1,143 4,202 Illinois.......................... 578 0 578 63 64 271 Kansas........................ 825,825 2,731 828,556 30,617 41,115 120,221 Kentucky .....................

300

FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast volume summary - Volume 1 and Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste forecast volumes to be generated or received ;at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste program over the life cycle of the site are described in this report. Previous forecast summary reports have covered only a 30-year period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted for this FY 1996 report to ensure consistency with waste volumes reported in the 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans (MYPP). The volume data were collected on a life-cycle basis from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently ship or plan to ship solid waste to the Solid Waste program. The volumes described in detail are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic-mixed (TRU(M)) waste. The volumes reported in this document represent the external volume of the containers selected to ship the waste. Summary level information pertaining to low-level waste (LLW) is described in Appendix B. Hazardous waste volumes are also provided in Appendices E and F but are not described in detail since they will be managed by a commercial facility. Emphasis is placed on LLMW and TRU(M) waste because it will require processing and storage at Hanford Solid Waste`s Central Waste Complex (CORK) prior to final disposal. The LLW will generally be sent directly to disposal. The total baselines volume of LLMW and TRU(M) waste forecast to be received by the Solid Waste program (until 2070) is approximately 100,900 cubic meters. This total waste volume is composed of the following waste categories: 077,080 cubic meters of LLMW; 23,180 cubic meters of TRU(M); 640 cubic meters of greater-than-class III LLMW. This total is about 40% of the total volume reported last year (FY 1995).

Valero, O.J.

1996-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand.Oglesby Executive Director #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

302

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 2: Electricity Demand The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous California Energy previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare

303

Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume I. Gas blends flow in distribution system, mixing points, and regulatory standards. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [10 and 20% hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume of the subject study ''Blending of Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes studies on the determination of gas distribution system flows with hydrogen - natural gas blends, potential hydrogen admission points to gas distribution systems, and the impact of hydrogen - natural gas blends on regulatory standards for gas distribution systems. The studies resulted in the following principal findings: (1) Most existing natural gas distribution systems could adequately transport 20% blends of hydrogen by volume with little or no modification. (2) The best point of admission of the hydrogen into a natural gas distribution system would be at the meter and regulating stations supplying a particular distribution system. (3) The impact of hydrogen - natural gas blends on state regulatory standards appears to be minimal for PSE and G, but requires further study for various National Codes and for other states.

None

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Northeast Corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. to Boston, MA. Volume 3. Technical appendices. Final report, September 1992-September 1993  

SciTech Connect

The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 x 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. The volume Number III contains the detailed technical studies that were performed in order to identify and evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed project. Some of these studies have been included entirely in the Draft Environmental Impact Statements-draft (DEIS/R) (Volume 1). The technical evaluations performed were based upon regulatory requirements as well as substantive issues raised by individuals and public agencies as part of the public participation program.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 3. Waste-water treatment-plant emissions. Experimental phase. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 3 describes the measurements and experimental data obtained to assess emissions from various points within a POTW. Included are a discussion of sampling methods development, emissions studies of activated carbon bed odor control units located at various points of a large municipal wastewater treatment plant and its collection system, upwind/downwind sampling from an activated sludge aeration basins at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant, and preliminary studies of haloform formation as a result of chlorination of wastewater.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Guensler, R.; Kim, J.O.; Chou, T.L.; Uyeminami, D.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate. (MOW)

Lee, J.D. (ed.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Final Reminder:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Please save your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 imporant files by 4/30/12 April 27, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) Franklin batch system is drained, and all batch queues are stopped as of 4/26 23:59pm. This is the final reminder that please make sure to save important files on your Franklin $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2. ALL FILES THERE WILL BE DELETED, and there will be no mechanisms to recover any of the files after May 1. Mon Apr 30: Last day to retrieve files from Franklin scratch file systems Mon Apr 30, 23:59: User logins are disabled If you need help or have any concerns, please contact "consult at nersc dot gov". Post your comment You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here. Comments No one has commented on this page yet.

309

Blending of hydrogen in natural gas distribution systems. Volume II. Combustion tests of blends in burners and appliances. Final report, June 1, 1976--August 30, 1977. [8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31% hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emerging ''hydrogen economy'' is a strong contender as one method to supplement or extend the domestic natural gas supply. This volume of the subject study ''Blending Hydrogen in Natural Gas Distribution Systems'' describes combustion studies to determine the maximum amount of hydrogen that can be blended in natural gas and utilized satisfactorily in typical appliances with no adjustment or conversion. Eleven pilot burners and twenty-three main burners typical of those in current use were operated on hydrogen-natural gas mixtures containing approximately 8, 11, 14, 20, 22, 25, and 31 percent, by volume, hydrogen. The eleven pilot burners and thirteen main burners were tested outside the appliance they were a part of. Ten main burners were tested in their respective appliances. Performance of the various burners tested are as follows: (1) Gas blends containing more than 6 to 11% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for target type pilot burners. (2) Gas blends containing more than 20 to 22% hyrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners operating in the open. (3) Gas blends containing more than 22 to 25% hydrogen are the limiting mixtures for main burners tested in appliances. (4) Modification of the orifice in target pilots or increasing the supply pressure to a minimum of 7 inches water column will permit the use of gas blends with 20% hydrogen.

None

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Magnetic and electric field testing of the Amtrak Northeast Corridor and New Jersey transit/North Jersey coast line rail systems. Volume 2. Appendices. Final report, May 1993-March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safety of magnetically levitated (maglev) and high speed rail (HSR) trains proposed for application in the United States is the responsibility of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). The characterization of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by both steady (dc) and alternating currents (ac) at power frequency (50 Hz in Europe and 60 Hz in the U.S.) and above, in the Extreme Low Frequency (ELF) range (3-3000 Hz), is of interest with respect to any potential health effects these fields may have on the public and on transportation workers. An EMF survey of National Rail Passengers Corporation trains operating on the Northeast Corridor (NEC) was performed, as part of a comprehensive comparative safety assessment of the German Transrapid (TR-07) maglev system and of existing (NEC and transit trains) and advanced rail systems (the French TGV). The report is Volume 2 of two volumes. A portable magnetic field monitoring system (augmented to include an electric fields probe) was used to sample, record and store three-axis static and ac magnetic fields waveforms simultaneously, at multiple locations. A real time Digital Audio Tape (DAT) recorder able to capture EMF transients, and two personal power-frequency magnetic field monitors were used to collect complementary data.

Dietrich, F.M.; Robertson, D.C.; Steiner, G.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Magnetic and electric field testing of the Amtrak Northeast Corridor and New Jersey Transit/North Jersey coast line rail systems. Volume 1. Analysis. Final report, May 1992-March 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The safety of magnetically levitated (maglev) and high speed rail (HSR) trains proposed for application in the United States is the responsibility of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). The characterization of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by both steady (dc) and alternating currents (ac) at power frequency (50 Hz in Europe and 60 Hz in the U.S.) and above, in the Extreme Low Frequency (ELF) range (3-3000 Hz), is of interest with respect to any potential health effects these fields may have on the public and on transportation workers. An EMF survey of National Rail Passengers Corporation trains operating on the Northeast Corridor (NEC) was performed, as part of a comprehensive comparative safety assessment of the German Transrapid (TR-07) maglev system, and of existing (NEC and transit trains) and advanced rail systems (the French TGV). The report is Volume 1 of two volumes. A portable magnetic field monitoring system (augmented to include an electric fields probe) was used to sample, record and store three-axis static and ac magnetic fields waveforms simultaneously, at multiple locations. A real time Digital Audio Tape (DAT) recorder able to capture EMF transients, and two personal power-frequency magnetic field monitors were used to collect complementary data.

Dietrich, F.M.; Feero, W.E.; Papas, P.N.; Steiner, G.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Final Report to Improved Reservoir Access Through Refracture Treatments in Tight Gas Sands and Gas Shales 07122-41.FINAL June 2013 PI Mukul M. Sharma The University of Texas at Austin 200 E. Dean Keeton St. Stop C0300 Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471---3257 msharma@mail.utexas.edu LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by The University of Texas at Austin as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT, OR THAT THE

313

Petroleum supply annual 1994, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Yankee Rowe Decommissioning Experience Record: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Yankee Atomic Electric Company's (YAEC) recent experiences in the process of decommissioning the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. This volume supplements Volume 1 by presenting more lessons learned during work finished by September 1998. In 1999, EPRI will publish a final report completing the experience record. The recommendations and insights in this report will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shut down plants.

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

315

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report  

SciTech Connect

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the {prime}978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Northeast corridor improvement project draft environmental impact statement/report for electrification of Northwest Corridor, New Haven, CT. To Boston, MA. Volume 1. Final report, September 1992-September 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of extending electrification on the National Railroad Passenger Corporation's (Amtrak) Northeast Corridor (NEC) from New Haven, Connecticut to Boston, Massachusetts are of direct concern to the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA). To improve rail service and increase ridership between New York and Boston, Amtrak proposes the electrification of the NEC main line between New Haven, CT and Boston, MA using an overhead 2 X 25,000 volt - 60 hertz power system. This volume considers impacts on the Human and Natural Environment utilizing guidance as outlined in CFR Part 1500, Council on Environmental Quality, Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA as amended and the Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) regulations (301 CMR 11:00). Impacts analyzed include changes in the natural environment (air quality, noise and vibration, energy, electromagnetic fields, natural resources, hazardous materials and visual/aesthetics), changes in the social environment (land use and recreation, transportation and traffic), impacts on historic and archaeological sites, changes in transit service and patronage, associated changes in highway and airport congestion, capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and financial implications. Impacts are identified both for the proposed construction period and for the long-term operation of the alternatives.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

White River Falls Fish Passage Project, Tygh Valley, Oregon : Final Technical Report, Volume III, Appendix B, Fisheries Report; Appendix C, Engineering Alternative Evaluation; Appendix D, Benefit/Cost Analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies were conducted to describe current habitat conditions in the White River basin above White River Falls and to evaluate the potential to produce anadromous fish. An inventory of spawning and rearing habitats, irrigation diversions, and enhancement opportunities for anadromous fish in the White River drainage was conducted. Survival of juvenile fish at White River Falls was estimated by releasing juvenile chinook and steelhead above the falls during high and low flow periods and recapturing them below the falls in 1983 and 1984. Four alternatives to provide upstream passage for adult salmon and steelhead were developd to a predesign level. The cost of adult passage and the estimated run size of anadromous fish were used to determine the benefit/cost of the preferred alternative. Possible effects of the introduction of anadromous fish on resident fish and on nearby Oak Springs Hatchery were evaluated. This included an inventory of resident species, a genetic study of native rainbow, and the identification of fish diseases in the basin. This volume contains appendices of habitat survey data, potential production, resident fish population data, upstream passage designs, and benefit/cost calculations. (ACR)

Oregon. Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Mount Hood National Forest (Or.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

FY 2010 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-038 Volume 4 Science May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 4 DOE/CF-038 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2010 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7 Funding by Site .......................................................................................................................................21

322

FY 2012 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Volume 7 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Nuclear Energy D f N l W t Di l Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 7 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 7 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ........................................................................................................... 3

323

State Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 State Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Pipeline (Canada) Eastport, ID..................... 830,351 3.79 802,182 4.71 759,647 2.83 R 623,652 4.72 707,885 5.30 Calais, ME ...................... 123,521 4.50 152,486 4.47 124,991 3.49 R 115,301 R 5.85 102,292 6.44 Detroit, MI ....................... 6,171 3.82 405 9.34 1,948 3.56 2,514 5.96 1,117 6.27 Marysville, MI.................. 0 -- 0 -- 74 3.95 0 -- 303 7.80 St. Clair, MI..................... 17,198 4.45 21,747 4.54 28,441 3.19 5,202 5.84 22,853 6.50 International Falls, MN .... 3,022 2.77 617 4.85 602 3.01 0 -- 0 -- Noyes, MN...................... 469,361 3.75 448,898 4.19 402,621 3.09 R 359,801 5.04 399,298 5.77 Warroad, MN .................. 4,576 3.95 5,318 4.52

324

FY 2012 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Science Science February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0060 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Science Science February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview ...................................................................................................................................................7

325

FINAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FINAL REPORT AEC-ERDA Research Contract AT (11-1) 2174 Columbia University's Nevis Laboratories "Research in Neutron Velocity Spectroscopy" James RainwatGr DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

326

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 With Data for 2012 | Release Date: September 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: August 28, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Re-release of the Petroleum Supply Annual with data for 2011 Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV 2 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 3 PAD District 1 PDF CSV 4 Daily Average PAD District 1 PDF CSV

327

Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' 6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' w V' - > DOE/EIS--00 96-F-Vol.1 //C^ DE84 0 0 1 4 4 6 Final Environmental Impact Statement Remedial Actions at the Former Vitro Rare Metals Plant Site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania United States Department of Energy July 1983 Volume I r NOTICE } IPORTIONS OF THIS REPORT ARE ILLEGIBLE.' / It has been reproduced from the besi ' available copy to permit the broadest possible availability. This document is PUBLICLY RELEASABLl Authorizmg OfFtciai Date: Z P l ^ o " ? isTWBUTim ef T H I S m\jM] IS mm\m DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

328

Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better distribution of TiO2 particles on the activated carbon surface. A method for pore volume impregnation using microwave irradiation was also developed. A commercial microwave oven (800 W) was used as the microwave source. Under 2450 MHz microwave irradiation, TTIP was quickly hydrolyzed and anatase TiO2 was formed in a short time (pellets, and

David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT FINDINGS IN CONNECTION WITH THE AMENDMENT TO THE 2003 LRDP AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND APPROVAL OF THE WEST VILLAGE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN, DAVIS CAMPUS I. ADOPTION OF ADDENDUM #1 TO THE UC DAVIS") of Addendum #1 to the Final Environmental Impact Report ("Final EIR") for the University of California, Davis #1 is twofold: (i) to make minor technical changes and additions to the Final EIR which reflect

California at Davis, University of

331

Documents: Final PEIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final PEIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Final Programmatic EIS DOEEIS-0269 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for...

332

Illustrating surfaces in volume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel framework for illustrating surfaces in a volume. Surfaces are illustrated by drawing only feature lines, such as silhouettes, valleys, ridges, and surface hatching strokes, and are embedded in volume renderings. This framework ...

Xiaoru Yuan; Baoquan Chen

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

FY 2013 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ............................................................................................................................................ 3 Appropriation Language .......................................................................................................................................................... 5

334

FY 2007 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-006 Volume 5 Environmental management Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-006 Volume 5 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental management Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2007 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .........................................................................................................3 Overview................................................................................................................................................5 Defense Environmental Cleanup Appropriation Cleanup .................................................................107 Carlsbad

335

FY 2009 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-027 Volume 4 Science February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 4 DOE/CF-027 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2009 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7 Funding by Site

336

FY 2008 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-018 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-018 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Strategic Overview....................................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

337

FY 2011 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-0050 Volume 4 Science Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0050 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Department of Energy/ Science FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

338

FY 2011 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-0051 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0051 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

339

41146_R01_Volume I.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUMES I & II GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUMES I & II BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS ALSTOM Power Inc. May 15, 2003 i GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE 1 - A PRELIMINARY SYSTEMS EVALUATION FINAL REPORT VOLUME I EVALUATION OF ADVANCED COAL COMBUSTION & GASIFICATION POWER PLANTS WITH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL VOLUME II BENCH-SCALE FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION TESTING SUBMITTED BY ALSTOM POWER INC. POWER PLANT LABORATORIES 2000 DAY HILL ROAD WINDSOR, CT 06095 (860) 688-1911 PREPARED FOR NETL AAD DOCUMENT CONTROL BLDG. 921 US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15236-0940

340

41146_R01_Volume II.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN VOLUME II: BENCH-SCALE FBC TERSTING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN VOLUME II: BENCH-SCALE FBC TERSTING FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOLIERS ALSTOM Power Inc. May 15, 2003 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE 1 - A PRELIMINARY SYSTEMS EVALUATION FINAL REPORT VOLUME I EVALUATION OF ADVANCED COAL COMBUSTION & GASIFICATION POWER PLANTS WITH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUME II BENCH-SCALE FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION TESTING SUBMITTED BY ALSTOM POWER INC. POWER PLANT LABORATORIES 2000 DAY HILL ROAD WINDSOR, CT 06095 (860) 688-1911 PREPARED FOR NETL AAD DOCUMENT CONTROL BLDG. 921 US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15236-0940

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

FY 2012 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Volume 5 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

342

Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better distribution of TiO2 particles on the activated carbon surface. A method for pore volume impregnation using microwave irradiation was also developed. A commercial microwave oven (800 W) was used as the microwave source. Under 2450 MHz microwave irradiation, TTIP was quickly hydrolyzed and anatase TiO2 was formed in a short time (< 20 minutes). Due to the volumetric heating and selective heating of microwave, the solvent and by-products were quickly removed which reduced energy consumption and processing time. Activated carbon and TiO{sub 2}/AC were also tested for the removal of hydrogen sulfide, which was chosen as the representative total reduced sulfur (TRS) species. The BioNuchar AC support itself was a good H{sub 2}S remover. After coating TiO{sub 2} by dry impregnation, H{sub 2}S removal efficiency of TiO{sub 2}/AC decreased compared with the virgin AC due to the change of surface pH. Under UV light irradiation, H{sub 2}S removal efficiency of TiO{sub 2}/AC composite doubled, and its sulfate conversion efficiency was higher than that of AC. The formation of sulfate is preferred since the sulfate can be removed from the composite by rising with water. A pilot-scale fluidized bed reactor was designed to test the efficiency of methanol oxidation with TiO{sub 2}/AC in the presence of UV light. TiO{sub 2}/AC was prepared using the spray desiccation method. The TiO{sub 2}/AC was pre-loaded with (1) methanol (equivalent to about 2%wt) and (2) methanol and water. When the TiO{sub 2}/AC loaded with methanol only was exposed to UV light for one hour in the reactor, most of the methanol remained in the carbon pores and, thus, was not oxidized. The TiO{sub 2}/AC loaded with methanol and water desorbed about 2/3 of the methanol from its pores during fluidization, however, only a small portion of this desorbed methanol was oxidized. A biofilter system employing biological activated carbon was developed for methanol removal. The biofilter contained a mixed packing with Westvaco BioNuchar granular activated carbon, perlite, Osmocote slow release ammonium nitrate pellets, and

David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

EIS-0414: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

14: Final Environmental Impact Statement 14: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0414: Final Environmental Impact Statement Energia Sierra Juarez Transmission Project This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts from DOE's proposed Federal action of granting a Presidential permit to Energia Sierra Juarez U.S. Tranmssion, LLC (ESJ-U.S.), a subsidiary of Sempra Generation, to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a 1.7-mile transmission line (0.65 miles in the U.S.) across the international border between the U.S. and Mexico, near the town of Jacumba, California. The County of San Diego is a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EIS. EIS-0414-FEIS-2012-Volume1.pdf EIS-0414-FEIS-2012-Volume2a.pdf EIS-0414-FEIS-2012-Volume2b.pdf EIS-0414-FEIS-2012-Volume3a.pdf EIS-0414-FEIS-2012-Volume3b.pdf

344

EIS-0414: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0414: Final Environmental Impact Statement Energia Sierra Juarez Transmission Project This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts from DOE's proposed Federal action of granting a Presidential permit to Energia Sierra Juarez U.S. Tranmssion, LLC (ESJ-U.S.), a subsidiary of Sempra Generation, to construct, operate, maintain, and connect a 1.7-mile transmission line (0.65 miles in the U.S.) across the international border between the U.S. and Mexico, near the town of Jacumba, California. The County of San Diego is a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EIS. EIS-0414-FEIS-2012-Volume1.pdf EIS-0414-FEIS-2012-Volume2a.pdf EIS-0414-FEIS-2012-Volume2b.pdf EIS-0414-FEIS-2012-Volume3a.pdf EIS-0414-FEIS-2012-Volume3b.pdf

345

Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the results of a DOE funded joint effort of Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR), SRI International (SRI), and ABB Lummus (ABB) to develop facilitated transport membranes for olefin/paraffin separations. Currently, olefin/paraffin separation is done by distillationan extremely energy-intensive process because of the low relative volatilities of olefins and paraffins. If facilitated transport membranes could be successfully commercialized, the potential energy savings achievable with this membrane technology are estimated to be 48 trillion Btu per year by the year 2020. We discovered in this work that silver salt-based facilitated transport membranes are not stable even in the presence of ideal olefin/paraffin mixtures. This decline in membrane performance appears to be caused by a previously unrecognized phenomenon that we have named olefin conditioning. As the name implies, this mechanism of performance degradation becomes operative once a membrane starts permeating olefins. This project is the first study to identify olefin conditioning as a significant factor impacting the performance of facilitated olefin transport membranes. To date, we have not identified an effective strategy to mitigate the impact of olefin conditioning. other than running at low temperatures or with low olefin feed pressures. In our opinion, this issue must be addressed before further development of facilitated olefin transport membranes can proceed. In addition to olefin conditioning, traditional carrier poisoning challenges must also be overcome. Light, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and acetylene exposure adversely affect membrane performance through unwanted reaction with silver ions. Harsh poisoning tests with these species showed useful membrane lifetimes of only one week. These tests demonstrate a need to improve the stability of the olefin complexing agent to develop membranes with lifetimes satisfactory for commercial application. A successful effort to improve membrane coating solution stability resulted in the finding that membrane performance loss could be reversed for all poisoning cases except hydrogen sulfide exposure. This discovery offers the potential to extend membrane lifetime through cyclic regeneration. We also found that certain mixed carriers exhibited greater stability in reducing environments than exhibited by silver salt alone. These results offer promise that solutions to deal with carrier poisoning are possible. The main achievement of this program was the progress made in gaining a more complete understanding of the membrane stability challenges faced in the use of facilitated olefin transport membranes. Our systematic study of facilitated olefin transport uncovered the full extent of the stability challenge, including the first known identification of olefin conditioning and its impact on membrane development. We believe that significant additional fundamental research is required before facilitated olefin transport membranes are ready for industrial implementation. The best-case scenario for further development of this technology would be identification of a novel carrier that is intrinsically more stable than silver ions. If the stability problems could be largely circumvented by development of a new carrier, it would provide a clear breakthrough toward finally recognizing the potential of facilitated olefin transport. However, even if such a carrier is identified, additional development will be required to insure that the membrane matrix is a benign host for the olefin-carrier complexation reaction and shows good long-term stability.

Merkel, T.C.; Blanc, R.; Zeid, J.; Suwarlim, A.; Firat, B.; Wijmans, H.; Asaro, M. (SRI); Greene, M. (Lummus)

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

346

Deschutes River Spawning Gravel Study, Volume I, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spawning habitat in the Deschutes River was inventoried, gravel permeability and composition were sampled at selected gravel bars, historical flow records for the Deschutes were analyzed, salmon and trout utilization of spawning habitat was examined, and potential methods of enhancing spawning habitat in the river were explored. Some changes in river conditions since the mid-1960's were identified, including a reduction in spawning habitat immediately downstream from the hydroelectric complex. The 1964 flood was identified as a factor which profoundly affected spawning habitat in the river, and which greatly complicated efforts to identify recent changes which could be attributed to the hydrocomplex. A baseline on present gravel quality at both chinook and steelhead spawning areas in the river was established using a freeze-core methodology. Recommendations are made for enhancing spawning habitat in the Deschutes River, if it is independently determined that spawning habitat is presently limiting populations of summer steelhead or fall chinook in the river. 53 refs., 40 figs., 21 tabs.

Huntington, Charles W.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Foothills Parkway Section 8B Final Environmental Report, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

In 1994, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the National Park Service (NPS) to prepare an Environmental Report (ER) for Section 8B of the Foothills Parkway in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GSMNP). Section 8B represents 27.7 km (14.2 miles) of a total of 115 km (72 miles) of the planned Foothills Parkway and would connect the Cosby community on the east to the incorporated town of Pittman Center to the west.

Blasing, T.J.; Cada, G.F.; Carer, M.; Chin, S.M.; Dickerman, J.A.; Etnier, D.A.; Gibson, R.; Harvey, M.; Hatcher, B.; Lietzske, D.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; Petrich, C.H.; Pounds, L.; Ranney, J.; Reed, R.M.; Ryan, P.F.; Schweitzer, M.; Smith, D.; Thomason, P.; Wade, M.C.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Photovoltaic venture analysis. Final report. Volume III. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix contains a brief summary of a detailed description of alternative future energy scenarios which provide an overall backdrop for the photovoltaic venture analysis. Also included is a summary of a photovoltaic market/demand workshop, a summary of a photovoltaic supply workshop which used cross-impact analysis, and a report on photovoltaic array and system prices in 1982 and 1986. The results of a sectorial demand analysis for photovoltaic power systems used in the residential sector (single family homes), the service, commercial, and institutional sector (schools), and in the central power sector are presented. An analysis of photovoltaics in the electric utility market is given, and a report on the industrialization of photovoltaic systems is included. A DOE information memorandum regarding ''A Strategy for a Multi-Year Procurement Initiative on Photovoltaics (ACTS No. ET-002)'' is also included. (WHK)

Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Schiffel, D.; Doane, J.; Bishop, C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Microsoft Word - Pantex Volume 2 - Technical Appendices - FINAL...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

All hoisting equipment used in weapons procedures has three markings. The first is a brass tag stamped with the date the weight test was performed. The second is a sticker...

350

Photovoltaic venture analysis. Final report. Volume II. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of the integrating model for photovoltaic venture analysis is given; input assumptions for the model are described; and the integrating model program listing is given. The integrating model is an explicit representation of the interactions between photovoltaic markets and supply under alternative sets of assumptions. It provides a consistent way of assembling and integrating the various assumptions, data, and information that have been obtained on photovoltaic systems supply and demand factors. Secondly, it provides a mechanism for understanding the implications of all the interacting assumptions. By representing the assumptions in a common, explicit framework, much more complex interactions can be considered than are possible intuitively. The integrating model therefore provides a way of examining the relative importance of different assumptions, parameters, and inputs through sensitivity analysis. Also, detailed results of model sensitivity analysis and detailed market and systems information are presented. (WHK)

Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Schiffel, D.; Doane, J.; Bishop, C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Volume 2: Comment and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

enrichment plant ALARA as low as reasonably achievable ANL Argonne National Laboratory ANP Advanced Nuclear Power, Inc. ATSDR Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry BAT...

352

PL FINAL DESIGN REPORT. VOLUME VI. PLANT PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Data and information are presented concerning analyses of PL-2 transient performance, normal startup and shutdown procedures, and shield design. (J.R.D.)

1962-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

Solar Central Receiver Prototype Heliostat. Volume I. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to support the Solar Central Receiver Power Plant research, development and demonstration effort by: (1) Establishment of a heliostat design, with associated manufacturing, assembly, installation and maintenance approaches, that, in quantity production will yield significant reductions in capital and operating costs over an assumed 30 year plant lifetime as compared with existing designs; and (2) Identification of needs for near term and future research and development in heliostat concept, materials, manufacture, installation, maintenance, and other areas, where successful accomplishment and application would offer significant payoffs in the further reduction of the cost of electrical energy from solar central receiver power plants. The prototype heliostat design is presented in detail; and manufacturing, installation, and maintenance procedures described. (WHK)

None

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Microsoft Word - ANL 2005 ESH - Volume II -FINAL FORMATTED...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

87 ii This page intentionally left blank. iii Acronyms AGHC Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell AGHCF Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility ALARA As Low As Reasonably Achievable ANL...

355

Devon station repowering study: Volume 2, Appendixes: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents the results of a site specific conceptual design and economic evaluation of a combined cycle repowering scheme for four non-reheat steam turbines. The site considered is the Devon Station of Connecticut Light and Power (CL and P) located in Milford, Connecticut. The first and major objective of the study from EPRI's perspective was to document the methodology of the study so that other utilities that may be planning similar studies in the future may benefit from knowledge developed in this study. The second objective was to select a repowering scheme and develop a site specific conceptual engineering design and associated budget capital and operating estimates. The third objective was to evaluate the feasibility of repowering the plant in stages. The fourth objective was to evaluate the economics of the repowering scheme as an alternative to other generating options. To meet the first objective, the study's team set up a screening approach to identify and evaluate all possible alternatives for repowering the four steam turbines and select the scheme for detailed engineering. To meet the second and third objectives, the project team prepared conceptual level capital cost estimates for both a complete dismantlement and reconstruction project. Although these estimates have been based on the Devon site, the data has been presented in a manner such that the technology may be evaluated at other sites. To meet the fourth objective, NUSCO evaluated the repowered plant against other generating options using a levelized bus bar analysis. In addition, NUSCO compared the repowered plant with a pulverized coal steam plant on a year-by-year basis over the forty year life of the plant.

Rorstrom, E.G.; Pishko, D.A.; Athas, J.G.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Photovoltaic venture analysis. Final report. Volume I. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study, government programs under investigation, and a brief review of the approach are presented. Potential markets for photovoltaic systems relevant to the study are described. The response of the photovoltaic supply industry is then considered. A model which integrates the supply and demand characteristics of photovoltaics over time was developed. This model also calculates the economic benefits associated with various government subsidy programs. Results are derived under alternative possible supply, demand, and macroeconomic conditions. A probabilistic analysis of the costs and benefits of a $380 million federal photovoltaic procurement initiative, as well as certain alternative strategies, is summarized. Conclusions and recommendations based on the analysis are presented.

Costello, D.; Posner, D.; Schiffel, D.; Doane, J.; Bishop, C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Auburn low-temperature geothermal well. Volume 6. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Auburn well was drilled to explore for low temperature geothermal resources in central New York State. The Auburn site was selected based on: its proximity to the Cayuga County anomaly (30/sup 0/C/km), its favorable local geological conditions and the potential to provide hot water and space heating to two educational facilities. The well was drilled to a total depth of 5250 feet and into the Pre-Cambrian Basement. The well was extensively logged, flow and stress tested, hydraulically stimulated, and pump (pressure transient analysis) tested. The low-temperature geothermal potential was assessed in terms of: geological environment; hydrological conditions; reservoir characteristics; and recoverable hydrothermal reserves. The average geothermal gradient was measured to be as high as 26.7/sup 0/C/km with a bottom-hole temperature of 126/sup 0/ +- 1/sup 0/F. The proved volumetric resources were estimated to be 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ stock tank barrels (STB) with a maximum initial deliverability of approx.11,600 STB/D and a continuous deliverability of approx.3400 STB/D. The proved hydrothermal reserves were estimated to be 21.58 x 10/sup 10/ Btu based on a volumetric component (4.13 x 10/sup 10/ Btu), and a reinjection component (17.45 x 10/sup 10/ Btu). The conclusion was made that the Auburn low-temperature reservoir could be utilized to provide hot water and space heating to the Auburn School District.

Lynch, R.S.; Castor, T.P.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Microsoft Word - Volume I _Final_ 04-26-07.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director of Energy Research for Occidental Petroleum Corp and President of Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. * Focus: Clean Coal Technology * Located: Steamboat Springs, CO 25 APPENDIX D...

359

Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concepts are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Microsoft Word - ANL 2005 ESH - Volume II -FINAL FORMATTED...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

described in the following three paragraphs. Dust-producing machine shop equipment (i.e., grinding wheels and belt sanders) is present in numerous laboratory office module machine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Final LLNL Volume 1 - ES&H 2002.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 years) in non-optimal storage conditions (many drums are stored outside, exposed to weather). The disposition of legacy wastes, and other waste management activities, at LLNL...

362

Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concept are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

PL FINAL DESIGN REPORT. VOLUME I. PLANT DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

The plant design for PL-2, a 1000-kw net electric direct cycle boiling water nuclear power plant, is presented. The design includes all buildings, foundations, and structures required for the installation of the plant in a snow tunnel. (M.C.G.)

1961-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

364

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix F; Conversion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

would be packaged and sent either for disposal or storage. The HF would be neutralized to calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) and separately packaged for disposal or sale. It was assumed...

365

Delays in nuclear power plant construction. Volume II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report identifies barriers to shortening nuclear power plant construction schedules and recommends research efforts which should minimize or eliminate the identified barriers. The identified barriers include (1) Design and Construction Interfacing Problems; (2) Problems Relating to the Selection and Use of Permanent Materials and Construction Methods; (3) Construction Coordination and Communication Problems; and (4) Problems Associated with Manpower Availability and Productivity.

Mason, G.E.; Larew, R.E.; Borcherding, J.D.; Okes, S.R. Jr.; Rad, P.F.

1977-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

366

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 5, employee attitude assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The experiences of couriers, operations managers, vehicle handlers (refuelers), and mechanics who drove and/or worked with alternative fuel vehicles, and the attitudes and perceptions of people with these experiences, are examined. Five alternative fuels studied in the CleanFleet project are considers& compressed natural gas, propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline, M-85, and electricity. The three major areas of interest include comparative analysis of issues such as health, safety and vehicle performance, business issues encompassing several facets of station operations, and personal commentary and opinions about the CleanFleet project and the alterative fuels. Results of the employee attitude assessment are presented as both statistical and qualitative analysis.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 4, fuel economy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel economy estimates are provided for the CleanFleet vans operated for two years by FedEx in Southern California. Between one and three vehicle manufacturers (Chevrolet, Dodge, and Ford) supplied vans powered by compressed natural gas (CNG), propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), methanol (M-85), and unleaded gasoline as a control. Two electric G-Vans, manufactured by Conceptor Corporation, were supplied by Southern California Edison. Vehicle and engine technologies are representative of those available in early 1992. A total of 111 vans were assigned to FedEx delivery routes at five demonstration sites. The driver and route assignments were periodically rotated within each site to ensure that each vehicle would experience a range of driving conditions. Regression analysis was used to estimate the relationships between vehicle fuel economy and factors such as the number of miles driven and the number of delivery stops made each day. The energy adjusted fuel economy (distance per energy consumed) of the alternative fuel vans operating on a typical FedEx duty cycle was between 13 percent lower and 4 percent higher than that of control vans from the same manufacturer. The driving range of vans operating on liquid and gaseous alternative fuels was 1 percent to 59 percent lower than for vans operating on unleaded gasoline. The driving range of the electric G-Vans was less than 50 miles. These comparisons are affected to varying degrees by differences in engine technology used in the alterative fuel and control vehicles. Relative fuel economy results from dynamometer emissions tests were generally consistent with those obtained from FedEx operations.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 7, vehicle emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of exhaust and evaporative emissions from Clean Fleet vans running on M-85, compressed natural gas (CNG), California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG), propane gas, and a control gasoline (RF-A) are presented. Three vans from each combination of vehicle manufacturer and fuel were tested at the California Air Resources Board (ARB) as they accumulated mileage in the demonstration. Data are presented on regulated emissions, ozone precursors, air toxics, and greenhouse gases. The emissions tests provide information on in-use emissions. That is, the vans were taken directly from daily commercial service and tested at the ARB. The differences in alternative fuel technology provide the basis for a range of technology options. The emissions data reflect these differences, with classes of vehicle/fuels producing either more or less emissions for various compounds relative to the control gasoline.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 6, occupational hygiene  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CleanFleet project was a 24-month demonstration of FedEx delivery vans operating on each of four gaseous or liquid alternative fuels: compressed natural gas (CNG), propane gas, methanol M-85, and California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG). Two electric vans were also demonstrated. Each alternative fuel fleet was operated from a different FedEx station site in the Los Angeles area. Gasoline-fueled control vans located at each site allowed for comparisons between fleets. The alternative fuels used in the CleanFleet project differ from conventional fuels both in their physical properties and in their potential health effects. These differences can result in occupational health implications for fleet users of these fuels. Therefore, as part of the CleanFleet project a limited occupational hygiene survey was performed.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 8, fleet economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The costs that face a fleet operator in implementing alternative motor fuels into fleet operations are examined. Five alternatives studied in the CleanFleet project are considered for choice of fuel: compressed natural gas, propane gas, California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline, M-85, and electricity. The cost assessment is built upon a list of thirteen cost factors grouped into the three categories: infrastructure costs, vehicle owning costs, and operating costs. Applicable taxes are included. A commonly used spreadsheet was adapted as a cost assessment tool. This tool was used in a case study to estimate potential costs to a typical fleet operator in package delivery service in the 1996 time frame. In addition, because electric cargo vans are unlikely to be available for the 1996 model year from original equipment manufacturers, the case study was extended to the 1998 time frame for the electric vans. Results of the case study are presented in cents per mile of vehicle travel for the fleet. Several options available to the fleet for implementing the fuels are examined.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Operation Castle. Radiological Safety. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is designed to cover the overall Operation Castle radiological safety matters from the viewpoint of those issues of direct concern to Headquarters, Joint Task Force Seven. It was written for the express purpose of assisting in the development of future radiological safety plans by presenting detailed discussion of the problems and solutions arising during Operation Castle. Included is a discussion of fallout forecasting techniques.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Operation Castle. Radiological Safety. Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is designed to cover the overall Operation Castle radiological safety matters from the viewpoint of those issues of direct concern to Headquarters, Joint Task Force Seven. It was written for the express purpose of assisting in the development of future radiological safety plans by presenting detailed discussion of the problems and solutions arising during Operation Castle.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Blanket comparison and selection study. Final report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The study focused on: (1) Development of reference design guidelines, evaluation criteria, and a methodology for evaluating and ranking candidate blanket concepts. (2) Compilation of the required data base and development of a uniform systems analysis for comparison. (3) Development of conceptual designs for the comparative evaluation. (4) Evaluation of leading concepts for engineering feasibility, economic performance, and safety. (5) Identification and prioritization of R and D requirements for the leading blanket concepts. Sixteen concepts (nine TMR and seven tokamak) which were identified as leading candidates in the early phases of the study, were evaluated in detail. The overall evaluation concluded that the following concepts should provide the focus for the blanket R and D program: (Breeder/Coolant/Structure), Lithium/Lithium/Vanadium Alloy, Li/sub 2/O/Helium/Ferritic Steel, LiPb Alloy/LiPb Alloy/Vanadium Alloy, and Lithium/Helium/Ferritic Steel. The primary R and D issues for the Li/Li/V concept are the development of an advanced structural alloy, resolution of MHD and corrosion problems, provision for an inert atmosphere (e.g., N/sub 2/) in the reactor building, and the development of non-water cooled near-plasma components, particularly for the tokamak. The main issues for the LiPb/LiPb/V concepts are similar to the Li/Li/V blanket with the addition of resolving the tritium recovery issue. The R and D issues for Li/sub 2/O/He/FS concept include resolution of the tritium recovery/containment issue, achieving adequate tritium breeding and resolving other solid breeder issues such as swelling and fabrication concerns. Major concerns for the Li/He/FS concept are related to its rather poor economic performance. Improvement of its economic performance will be somewhat concept-dependent and will be more of a systems engineering issue.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Final DUF6 PEIS: Volume 2: Appendix J; Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-i APPENDIX J: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF TRANSPORTATION OF UF 6 CYLINDERS, URANIUM OXIDE, URANIUM METAL, AND ASSOCIATED MATERIALS Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-ii Transportation Depleted UF 6 PEIS J-iii CONTENTS (APPENDIX J) NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-vi J.1 SUMMARY OF TRANSPORTATION OPTION IMPACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-3 J.2 TRANSPORTATION MODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-8 J.2.1 Truck Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-8 J.2.2 Rail Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-9 J.2.3 Transportation Options Considered But Not Analyzed in Detail . . . . . . . . . . J-9 J.3 IMPACTS OF OPTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J-10 J.3.1

375

Microsoft Word - Pantex Volume 2 - Technical Appendices - FINAL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and development of advanced technology for high explosives, and (3) weapon materials testing and analytical services. To perform these activities, the Applied Technology Division...

376

Photovoltaic systems concept study. Final report. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conceptual system designs were developed for three sizes of photovoltaic solar electric power systems: a single family residence, a central station power plant, and two on-site intermediate systems (shopping center and commercial retrofit). A brief system description and a summary of primary performance and economic characteristics are included for each of the three system designs. Principal conclusions for each are highlighted and overall system comparisons and recommendations are set forth. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) system: Volume I. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a portable laboratory system for the analysis of soils, ground water, and surface waters for the detection and quantification of hazardous materials, organics, and radioactive contaminants. The goal of the Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory (RTAL) is a sample throughput of 20 samples per day, providing a full range of analysis on each sample within 16 hours of preparation with high accuracy.

Finger, S.M.; De Avila, J.C.; Keith, V.F.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20142024 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 2014­2024 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity Demand in this report. #12;i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The demand forecast is the combined product of the hard work to the contributing authors listed previously, Mohsen Abrishami prepared the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad

379

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY DEMAND 20122022 FINAL FORECAST Volume 1: Statewide Electricity forecast is the combined product of the hard work and expertise of numerous staff members in the Demand the commercial sector forecast. Mehrzad Soltani Nia helped prepare the industrial forecast. Miguel Garcia

380

Draft Title 40 CFR 191 compliance certification application for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Volume 4: Appendix BIR Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of the waste stream profile for the WIPP transuranic waste baseline inventory at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The following assumptions/modifications were made by the WTWBIR team in developing the LL waste stream profiles: since only current volumes were provided by LL, the final form volumes were assumed to be the same as the current volumes; the WTWBIR team had to assign identification numbers (IDs) to those LL waste streams not given an identifier by the site, the assigned identification numbers are consistent with the site reported numbers; LL Final Waste Form Groups were modified to be consistent with the nomenclature used in the WTWBID, these changes included word and spelling changes, the assigned Final Waste Form Groups are consistent with the information provided by LL; the volumes for the year 1993 were changed from an annual rate of generation (m{sup 3}/year) to a cumulative value (m{sup 3}).

NONE

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

FY 2013 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0072 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 2 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

382

FY 2012 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Volume 3 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 3 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 3 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

383

FY 2005 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0032 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Printed with soy ink on recycled paper National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

384

FY 2009 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-024 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 1 DOE/CF-024 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2009 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents

385

FY 2010 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-037 Volume 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 3 DOE/CF-037 Volume 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Department of Energy/ Volume 3 FY 2010 Congressional Budget

386

FY 2012 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Better Building Pilot Loan Guarantee Initiative for Universities Schools and Hospitals Universities, Schools, and Hospitals Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 g y Pensions Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 2 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

387

FY 2007 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chief Financial Officer Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-002 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-002 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2007 Congressional Budget

388

FY 2010 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-039 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 5 DOE/CF-039 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Department of Energy FY 2010Congressional Budget Environmental Management/ Defense Nuclear Waste/Nuclear Waste Disposal Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3

389

FY 2013 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-0076 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration

390

FY 2007 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-005 Volume 4 Science Nuclear waste disposal Defense nuclear waste disposal Departmental administration Inspector general Working capital fund Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-005 Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear waste disposal Defense nuclear waste disposal Departmental administration Inspector general Working capital fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents

391

FY 2013 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-0074 Volume 4 Science Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0074 Volume 4 Science Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Science Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy Science Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy Department of Energy/Science/ Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ............................................................................................................................................ 3

392

FY 2008 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-014 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-014 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents

393

FY 2006 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 4 February 2005 DOE/ME-0049 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 4 February 2005 DOE/ME-0049 Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund

394

FY 2010 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-035 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 1 DOE/CF-035 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2010 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3

395

Precision volume measurement system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

FY 2013 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 DOECF-0073 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery...

397

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This DOE project DE-FC36-04GO14052 ''Plasma Pilot Plant Test for Treating VOC Emissions from Wood Products Plants'' was conducted by Drexel University in cooperation with Georgia-Pacific (G-P) and Kurchatov Institute (KI). The objective of this project was to test the Plasma Pilot Plant capabilities in wood industry. The final goal of the project was to replace the current state-of-the-art, regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology by Low-Temperature Plasma Technology (LTPT) in paper and wood industry for Volatile Organic Components (VOC) destruction in High Volume Low Concentration (HVLC) vent emissions. MetPro Corporation joined the team as an industrial partner from the environmental control business and a potential leader for commercialization. Concurrent Technology Corporation (CTC) has a separate contract with DOE for this technology evaluation. They prepared questionnaires for comparison of this technology and RTO, and made this comparison. These data are presented in this report along with the description of the technology itself. Experiments with the pilot plant were performed with average plasma power up to 3.6 kW. Different design of the laboratory and pilot plant pulsed coronas, as well as different analytical methods revealed many new peculiarities of the VOC abatement process. The work reported herein describes the experimental results for the VOCs removal efficiency with respect to energy consumption, residence time, water effect and initial concentration.

Alexander Fridman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

FY 2012 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration

399

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Windows The Windows Volume Purchase RFP to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on AddThis.com... Home About FAQs Low-E Storm Windows Request for Proposal Contacts For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers

400

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.5 Household Demographics of U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.8 Household Demographics of Homes...

402

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.1 Household Demographics of U.S....

403

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.7 Household Demographics of U.S....

404

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.6 Household Demographics of U.S....

405

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.3 Household Demographics of U.S....

406

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.4 Household Demographics of U.S....

407

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.11 Household Demographics of Homes...

408

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.10 Household Demographics of Homes...

409

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.9 Household Demographics of Homes...

410

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.2 Household Demographics of U.S....

411

FY 2010 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-040 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 6 DOE/CF-040 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

412

FY 2008 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-017 Volume 4 Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-017 Volume 4 Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund

413

FY 2005 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2004 Volume 6 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0037 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration

414

FY 2009 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-026 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 3 DOE/CF-026 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management

415

FY 2007 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-004 Volume 3 Energy supply and Conservation Energy efficiency and renewable energy Electricity delivery and energy reliability Nuclear energy Environment, safety and health Legacy management Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 DOE/CF-004 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy supply and Conservation Energy efficiency and renewable energy Electricity delivery and energy reliability Nuclear energy Environment, safety and health Legacy management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety and Health Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability

416

FY 2007 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-007 Volume 6 Power marketing administrations Southeastern power administration Southwestern power administration Western power administration Bonneville power administration Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-007 Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Power marketing administrations Southeastern power administration Southwestern power administration Western power administration Bonneville power administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

417

FY 2011 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional

418

FY 2006 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 February 2005 DOE/ME-0050 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non-Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 5 February 2005 DOE/ME-0050 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non-Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion

419

FY 2009 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration

420

FY 2005 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Volume 3 February 2004 Volume 3 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Environment, Safety & Health Environment, Safety & Health Future Liabilities Future Liabilities Legacy Management Legacy Management Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0034 Volume 3 Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "final eir volume" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

FY 2007 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-003 Volume 2 Other defense activities Security & Safety Performance assurance Environment, safety & health Legacy management Nuclear energy Defense related administrative support Hearings and appeals Safeguards & security crosscut Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-003 Volume 2 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other defense activities Security & Safety Performance assurance Environment, safety & health Legacy management Nuclear energy Defense related administrative support Hearings and appeals Safeguards & security crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy/

422

FY 2006 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut

423

FY 2011 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2011 Congressional Budget

424

FY 2006 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 February 2005 DOE/ME-0051 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 6 February 2005 DOE/ME-0051 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration

425

FY 2009 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-029 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 6 DOE/CF-029 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration

426

FY 2008 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-019 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-019 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

427

FY 2010 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-036 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-036 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program

428

Unsteady flow volumes  

SciTech Connect

Flow volumes are extended for use in unsteady (time-dependent) flows. The resulting unsteady flow volumes are the 3 dimensional analog of streamlines. There are few examples where methods other than particle tracing have been used to visualize time varying flows. Since particle paths can become convoluted in time there are additional considerations to be made when extending any visualization technique to unsteady flows. We will present some solutions to the problems which occur in subdivision, rendering, and system design. We will apply the unsteady flow volumes to a variety of field types including moving multi-zoned curvilinear grids.

Becker, B.G.; Lane, D.A.; Max, N.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

FY 2006 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 February 2005 DOE/ME-0052 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 7 February 2005 DOE/ME-0052 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development

430

FY 2013 Volume I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget

431

Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

NONE

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

432

FY 2008 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy/ Other Defense Activities FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page

433

FY 2006 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 1 February 2005 DOE/ME-0046 Volume 1 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 1 February 2005 DOE/ME-0046 Volume 1 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2006 Congressional Budget

434

FY 2006 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 3 February 2005 DOE/ME-0048 Volume 3 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 3 February 2005 DOE/ME-0048 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety and Health Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

435

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

436

Guidelines Volume I  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

I I Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 1: Electricity Supply Sector Part 2: Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Part 3: Industrial Sector Electricity Supply Sector-Page 1.iii Contents of Volume I This volume, the first of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program,

437

2001volume1.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passenger Volumes Passenger Volumes Eng Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Displ Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume (liters) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Acura 3.2cl 3.2 90 14 0 0 0 0 Acura 3.2tl 3.2 0 0 96 14 0 0 Acura 3.5rl 3.5 0 0 96 15 0 0 Acura Integra 1.8 0 0 83 12 77 13 Audi A4 1.8 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A4 Avant Quattro 1.8 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi A4 Quattro 1.8 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A6 2.8 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A6 Avant Quattro 2.8 0 0 99 36 0 0 Audi A6 Quattro 2.7 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A8 L 4.2 0 0 104 18 0 0 Audi A8 Quattro 4.2 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi S4 2.7 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi S4 Avant 2.7 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi S8 Quattro 4.2 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi TT Coupe 1.8 0 0 0 0 65 14 Audi TT Coupe Quattro 1.8 0 0 0 0 65 11 BMW 325ci 2.5 84 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 325ci Convertible 2.5 74 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 325i 2.5 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 325i Sport Wagon 2.5 0 0 91 26 0 0 BMW 325xi 2.5 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 325xi Sport Wagon 2.5

438

Final Design RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Final Design (FD) Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists Department of Energy (DOE) federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the final design prior to CD-3...

439

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.10 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

440

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.11 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

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441

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

442

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

443

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...