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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Aviation  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish framework for an effective aviation program. Cancels DOE 5480.13A. Canceled by DOE O 440.2A.

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

2

Aviation  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the framework for an effective aviation program, and reduce or eliminate accidental losses and injuries in Departmental and contractor aviation operations. It includes Change 1, Change 2, and Change3. (Cancels DOE 5480.13A) Canceled DOE O 440.2A.

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

3

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HEALTH (ISH) HEALTH (ISH) OBJECTIVE ISH.1 A comprehensive industrial safety & health program has been implemented to address applicable safety requirements at the TA 55 SST Facility. (Core Requirements 1, 3, and 4) Criteria * Procedures are implemented to address applicable industrial & health safety issues. * An adequate number of trained personnel are available to support SST facility regarding industrial safety & health concerns. * Portable fire extinguishers are appropriate for the class of fire they are expected to fight and are located within the proper distance. * Cranes, hooks, slings, and other rigging are plainly marked as to their capacity and inspected prior to use. * Forklifts and other powered lifting devices are adequately inspected.

4

ISEE Smart Home (ISH): Smart video analysis for home security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a system of smart home for home security. Many previous papers on smart home try to address this issue, but most of the published systems rely on various sensors. With the development of video technology, video based smart home becomes more attractive, but there are few literatures discussing a complete system including system architecture, feature extraction, event modeling, decision making and final information retrieval. Motivated by this challenge, we propose a novel systematical video analysis architecture, providing rich source of information about the home environment. The proposed ISEE Smart Home (ISH) is capable of analyzing various abnormal behaviors, providing realtime alarm generation, flexible video retrieval and video synopsis. The contributions can be summarized as follows: (1) we propose and build a complete smart home system based on the intelligent video analysis for home security. (2) We propose a novel foreground segmentation method based on the history pattern, which is very suitable for indoor scene analysis. (3) An exact cutting based Region of Interest (ROI) generation and scene structure modeling method is proposed for fast human detection. (4) A concurrence relation graph of visual words is developed for reliable behavior analysis. The experimental results indicate that the ISH can provide the reliable assistance for better life.

Junge Zhang; Yanhu Shan; Kaiqi Huang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Aviation Management and Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the framework for an efficient, effective, secure, and safe aviation program in the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor aviation operations. Cancels DOE O 440.2A. Canceled by DOE O 440.2C.

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

6

Aviation Management and Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish the framework for an efficient, effective, secure, and safe aviation program in the Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor aviation operations. Cancels DOE O 440.2. Canceled by DOE O 440.2B.

2002-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

Aviation Management and Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive establishes the framework for an efficient, effective, secure, and safe aviation program in the DOE and its contractor operations. Cancels DOE O 440.2A, Aviation, dated 3-8-02.

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Federal Aviation Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transportation systems FAA's RDT&E Organization: Federal Laboratory for R&D of aviation systems IndependentFederal Aviation Administration Federal Aviation AdministrationNextGen: Primer, Challenges. Wilson N. Felder Director, FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center Date: 6 February 2012 #12;2Federal

9

Aviation Management and Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish a policy framework that will ensure safety, efficiency and effectiveness of government or contractor aviation operations. Cancels DOE O 440.2B.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Aviation turbine fuels, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1980 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1980 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 17 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 98 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5 and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Aviation turbine fuels, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1982 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1982 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 14 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 90 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and HP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.; Dickson, C.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Aviation turbine fuels, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1979 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1979 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 17 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 93 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Aviation turbine fuels, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1981 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1981 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 15 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 95 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and JP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

Shelton, E.M.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Aviation Management and Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish a policy framework that will ensure safety, efficiency and effectiveness of government or contractor aviation operations. Cancels DOE O 440.2B. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-22-11, cancels DOE O 440.2C.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Aviation Weather Information Requirements Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) has as its goal an improvement in aviation safety by a factor of 5 over the next 10 years and a factor of 10 over the next 20 years. Since weather has a big impact on aviation safety and is associated with 30 percent ...

Keel Byron M.; Stancil Charles E.; Eckert Clifford A.; Brown Susan M.; Gimmestad Gary G.; Richards Mark A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Federal Aviation Administration 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the extent necessary, to ensure compliance with international obligations of the United States and to protect Reconciliation Act of 1990, Public Law 101-508, Title IX, Aviation Safety and Capacity Expansion Act. · What investments in such initiatives. · Improve Space System Development and Procurement. · Strengthen Interagency

Waliser, Duane E.

17

TRANSPORTATION CENTER--NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Aviation Symposium: The Future for Aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRANSPORTATION CENTER--NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Aviation Symposium: The Future for Aviation April The Transportation Center has organized a special Aviation Symposium focusing on important aviation industry topics, Professor of Transportation at Northwestern University and former Director of the Transportation Center

Bustamante, Fabián E.

18

FAQS Reference Guide- Aviation Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the January 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1164-2003 Chg 1, Aviation Safety Officer Functional Area Qualification Standard.

19

Aviation Technology | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and better, with futuristic propulsion systems that solve today's flight challenges. Home > Innovation > Aviation Ceramic Matrix Composites Improve Engine Efficiency Ceramic...

20

Patricia Hagerty, Aviation Program Analyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OFFICE OF AVIATION MANAGEMENT Personal Profile Name: Patricia L. "Pat" Hagerty Title: Aviation Program Analyst Organization: Office of Aviation Management/MA-30 Address: Headquarters, United States Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 E-mail Address: patricia.hagerty@hq.doe.gov Phone Number: Office: (202) 586-5489, Mobile: (240) 477-3671 Fax Number: (202) 586-6008 Field of Expertise/ Experience: Prior to joining the Office of Aviation Management on March 28, 2008, Pat was a Transportation Industry Analyst (TIA) in the Department of Transportation's Office of the General Counsel, Aviation Consumer Protection Division. As a TIA, Pat evaluated domestic and foreign air carriers to ensure compliance with existing consumer protection

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Aviation emission inventory development and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An up to date and accurate aviation emission inventory is a prerequisite for any detailed analysis of aviation emission impact on greenhouse gases and local air quality around airports. In this paper we present an aviation emission inventory using real ... Keywords: Air traffic, Aviation emission, Emission inventory, Environmental modelling

Viet Van Pham; Jiangjun Tang; Sameer Alam; Chris Lokan; Hussein A. Abbass

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

aviation fuels | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aviation fuels aviation fuels Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other petroleum products. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords aviation fuels diesel fuel oil oil petrol Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon annual production, imports, and exports of all oil products (xls, 294.9 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon quarterly production of oil products by fuel type (xls, 272.4 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon total petrol (xls, 155.1 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon premium unleaded petrol (xls, 95.2 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon regular unleaded petrol (xls, 119.3 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon diesel (xls, 151 KiB)

23

An Operations Research approach to aviation security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, aviation security policy has remained a focus of national attention. We develop mathematical models to address some prominent problems in aviation security. We explore ...

Martonosi, Susan Elizabeth

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Aviation Symposium: The Future of Aviation Northwestern University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION · O'Hare and Midway International Airports · 85 million passengers/1.1 million;MIDWAY OVERVIEW · 17.6 million passengers in 2010 · Fastest growing airport in U.S. ­ 2009 · 250+ daily AT MIDWAY · Required Navigation Performance (RNP) procedures ­ GPS capabilities of aircraft for more

Bustamante, Fabián E.

25

Flow visualisation in inclined louvered fins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study the flow within an interrupted fin design, the inclined louvered fin, is investigated experimentally through visualisation. The inclined louvered fin is a hybrid of the offset strip fin and standard louvered fin, aimed at improved performance at low Reynolds numbers for compact heat exchangers. The flow behaviour is studied in six geometrically different configurations over a range of Reynolds numbers and quantified using the concept of 'fin angle alignment factor'. The transition from steady laminar to unsteady flow was studied in detail. The fin geometry had a very large impact on the transitional flow behaviour, especially on vortex shedding. (author)

T'Joen, C.; De Paepe, M. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University-UGent, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Jacobi, A. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Aviation Sustainable Biofuels: An Asian Airline Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aviation Sustainable Biofuels: An Asian Airline Perspective Dr Mark Watson Head of Environmental Affairs, Cathay Pacific Airways Ltd, Hong Kong Aviation Biofuels Session World Biofuels Markets, Rotterdam 24 March 2011 #12;Aviation Biofuels in Asia: Current Status · Focus on "2nd generation" sustainable

27

Aviation Manager | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Aviation Manager | National Nuclear Security Administration Aviation Manager | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Joseph Ginanni Aviation Manager Joseph Ginanni Joseph Ginanni Role: Aviation Manager Award: U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) Federal Aviation Professional Award

28

Aviation Manager | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aviation Manager | National Nuclear Security Administration Aviation Manager | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Joseph Ginanni Aviation Manager Joseph Ginanni Joseph Ginanni Role: Aviation Manager Award: U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) Federal Aviation Professional Award

29

Ferrin Moore, Senior Aviation Policy Officer  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ferrin Moore Ferrin Moore Title: Senior Aviation Policy Officer Organization: Office of Aviation Management/MA-30 Address: Headquarters, United States Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585 E-mail Address: Ferrin.Moore@hq.doe.gov Phone Number: Office: (202) 586-6171, Mobile: Fax Number: (202) 586-6008 Biographical Summary: Ferrin Moore is a highly experience aviation manager and leader with 30 years of aviation experience in the private and government sector. Prior to joining the Office of Aviation Management Ferrin served 15 years with the Federal Aviation Administration as an Aviation Safety Inspector and Manager. While in the private sector, he worked for United Airlines Maintenance Division in San Francisco and Washington D.C.

30

Aviation fuel demand development in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper analyzes the core factors and the impact path of aviation fuel demand in China and conducts a structural decomposition analysis of the aviation fuel cost changes and increase of the main aviation enterprises business profits. Through the establishment of an integrated forecast model for Chinas aviation fuel demand, this paper confirms that the significant rise in Chinas aviation fuel demand because of increasing air services demand is more than offset by higher aviation fuel efficiency. There are few studies which use a predictive method to decompose, estimate and analyze future aviation fuel demand. Based on a structural decomposition with indirect prediction, aviation fuel demand is decomposed into efficiency and total amount (aviation fuel efficiency and air transport total turnover). The core influencing factors for these two indexes are selected using path analysis. Then, univariate and multivariate models (ETS/ARIMA model and Bayesian multivariate regression) are used to analyze and predict both aviation fuel efficiency and air transport total turnover. At last, by integrating results, future aviation fuel demand is forecast. The results show that the aviation fuel efficiency goes up by 0.8% as the passenger load factor increases 1%; the air transport total turnover goes up by 3.8% and 0.4% as the urbanization rate and the per capita GDP increase 1%, respectively. By the end of 2015, Chinas aviation fuel demand will have increased to 28 million tonnes, and is expected to be 50 million tonnes by 2020. With this in mind, increases in the main aviation enterprises business profits must be achieved through the further promotion of air transport.

Jian Chai; Zhong-Yu Zhang; Shou-Yang Wang; Kin Keung Lai; John Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation service difficulty Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aviation Products GOES Aviation Products Summary: , Alabama for potential use by National Weather Service (NWS) Forecast Offices. 12;GOES Aviation Products... GOES Aviation...

32

DOE Federal Aviation Professional Awards  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Aviation Program Awards Federal Aviation Program Awards NOMINATION FORM ENTRIES MUST BE MAILED OR FAXED NOT LATER THAN JULY 14, 2006. Please type your information and use a separate form for each entry. Please attach the "Nomination Criteria Questionnaire" and up to four pages of justification to each form. In the justification, please describe your program-number of aircraft, number of people, mission, flying hours, cost of program, etc. Send to: Michael Miles, GSA, 1800 F St., NW, Room G-219, Washington, DC, 20405, or FAX 202-501-0349. For a digital copy of the nomination forms, send an e-mail to michael.miles@gsa.gov. Name of Professional: ___MICHAEL W. L. ASHER_________________ (Must be a civilian Federal Employee; contractors and uniformed military members are not eligible.)

33

DOE/Boeing Sponsored Projects in Aviation Fuel Cell Technology...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOEBoeing Sponsored Projects in Aviation Fuel Cell Technology at Sandia DOEBoeing Sponsored Projects in Aviation Fuel Cell Technology at Sandia Presentation by Lennie Klebanoff...

34

Aviation Safety Program Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety, Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck research project. It contains reference to past work as the other elements of NASA's Aviation Safety Program (AvSP). Without an integrated working relationshipAviation Safety Program Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Technical Plan Summary Principal

35

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) Period 2000 2001 (2) 2002 2003 2004 "gross" to "net" , was deemed impractical. (5) This report replaces the Gross Taxable Gasoline Gallons (Including Aviation Gasoline) report which will not be produced after December 2002. (6) The November 2007

36

AVIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS BYLAWS AND PROTOCOLS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AVIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS AVIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS BYLAWS AND PROTOCOLS The Department of Energy strives to manage its Aviation Program toward the highest standards of safety, efficiency, fairness in contracting, preservation of competition in the private sector, open communication, prudent property management, and the best examples of resource management. Toward these ends, the Department has established a management structure led by a Board of Directors comprising active Federal employee aviation managers from the Department. AUTHORITY: The following authorities serve as basis for this structure and system: Office of Management and Budget Circular A-126, FMR 102.33, DEAR 109, DOE Order 440.2B, Aviation Management Review Team Report, March 1999, and Secretary of Energy Appointment and Delegation of Authority, April 15, 1999.

37

Aviation Management Professional Award Nomination for:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Professional Nomination for Professional Nomination for Managerial/Official Award: Joseph M. Ginanni Aviation Manager US Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Bio Joseph M. Ginanni Aviation Manager National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Mr. Ginanni has worked for the Nevada Site Office (NSO) since 1991. For the past five years, he has served as the NSO Aviation Manager, managing and overseeing the Management and Operating contractor's aviation services department and their operation and maintenance of NSO's five aircraft (3 Beechcraft King Airs and 2 Bell 412s) which are stationed at both Nellis AFB, NV and Andrews AFB, MD. Prior to his position as Aviation Manager, he was the team leader for the Radioactive Waste

38

DOE Federal Aviation Professional Awards  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Professional Awards Professional Awards NOMINATION FORM ENTRIES MUST BE MAILED OR FAXED NOT LATER THAN May 19, 2006. Please type your information and use a separate form for each entry. Please attach the "Nomination Criteria Questionnaire" and up to four pages of justification to each form. In the justification, please include a brief biography of the nominee and a description of the nominee's duties. Send to: David N. Lopez, Headquarters U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Aviation Management/MA-30, Room 4B-218, 1000 Independence Ave, NW, , Washington, DC, 20585, or FAX 202-586-6008. Please send digital copies of the nomination forms by e-mail to david.lopez@hq.doe.gov. Name of Professional: ___________________________________________________

39

DOE Federal Aviation Program Awards  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Program Awards Program Awards NOMINATION FORM ENTRIES MUST BE MAILED OR FAXED NOT LATER THAN May 19, 2006. Please type your information and use a separate form for each entry. Please attach the "Nomination Criteria Questionnaire" and up to four pages of justification to each form. In the justification, please describe your program-number of aircraft, number of people, mission, flying hours, cost of program, etc. Send to: David N. Lopez, Headquarters U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Aviation Management/MA-30, Room 4B-218, 1000 Independence Ave, NW, , Washington, DC, 20585, or FAX 202-586-6008. Please send digital copies of the nomination forms by e-mail to david.lopez@hq.doe.gov. Name of Program: ______________________________________________________

40

Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One (MAWTS-1) sleep, fatigue, and aviator performance study .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Weapons and Tactics Instructor (WTI) course conducted at the Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One (MAWTS-1) command in Yuma, Arizona is considered the (more)

Maynard, Pamelyn L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Federal Aviation Administration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aviation Administration Aviation Administration Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Federal Aviation Administration Name Federal Aviation Administration Address 800 Independence Ave., SW Place Washington, District of Columbia Zip 20591 Year founded 1958 Website http://www.faa.gov/ Coordinates 38.8872756°, -77.0230138° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8872756,"lon":-77.0230138,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

are identified and corrected. 7. The LANL contractor's quality assurance program document addresses feedback and improvement through lessons learned, non-compliance...

43

A case for biofuels in aviation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last 15 years, the technical and the economic feasibility of biomass based fuels for general aviation piston engines has been proven. Exhaustive ground and flight tests performed at the Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) using ethanol, ethanol/methanol blends, and ETBE have proven these fuels to be superior to aviation gasoline (avgas) in all aspects of performance except range. Two series of Lycoming engines have been certified. Record flights, including a transatlantic flight on pure ethanol, were made to demonstrate the reliability of the fuel. Aerobatic demonstrations with aircraft powered by ethanol, ethanol/methanol, and ETBE were flown at major airshows around the world. the use of bio-based fuels for aviation will benefit energy security, improve the balance of trade, domestic economy, and environmental quality. The United States has the resources to supply the aviation community`s needs with a domestically produced fuel using current available technology. The adoption of a renewable fuel in place of conventional petroleum-based fuels for aviation piston and turbine engines is long overdue.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Sources in Aviation, Imperial College London. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Mapping expert perspectives of the aviation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aviation globally is characterised by significant change and consequently the future of the sector has always been difficult to predict. This study adopts a systemic approach based on findings from exploratory interviews with UK aviation academics to: determine the roles of stakeholders in the air transport system; report the current issues facing the sector; explore how these issues interact and impact on the stakeholders in the system; and speculate on the future implications. Six core stakeholders are identified: airlines, airports, consumers, manufacturers, governing institutions and interest groups. Nine core issues are reported, namely: local environment, climate change, peak oil, the state of the economy, social norms, demographics, disruptive events, national (or international) regulations and capacity. A matrix of interactions and their impacts and implications for managing the aviation system is then presented.

Namasoondrum P. Mootien; James P. Warren; Dick Morris; Marcus P. Enoch

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Federal Aviation Administration's Airport Capital Improvement Program Development Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Airport Capital Improvement Program (ACIP) serves as the primary tool for project planning and formulation by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The FAA relies on the ACIP to serve as the basis for the distribution of Aviation Trust...

Tener, Scott D.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

47

Future trends in local air quality impacts of aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The International Civil Aviation Organization is considering the use of cost-benefit analyses to estimate interdependencies between the industry costs and the major environmental impacts in policy-making for aviation. To ...

Rojo, Julien Joseph

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Alternative fuels : how can aviation cross the "Valley of Death"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aviation has used petroleum-derived fuels for over 100 years. With the rapidly rising price of oil and concerns about supply, the military and the commercial airlines are fostering the development of an alternative aviation ...

Harrison, William E. (William Elton)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Benefit-cost assessment of aviation environmental policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis aids in the development of a framework in which to conduct global benefit-cost assessments of aviation policies. Current policy analysis tools, such as the aviation environmental portfolio management tool (APMT), ...

Gilmore, Christopher K. (Christopher Kenneth)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A General Equilibrium Analysis of Climate Policy for Aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Technology and Policy at the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY June 2011 c Massachusetts Institute accounting matrix is re-balanced to include aviation, a non-unity income elasticity of demand is introduced.S.). However, the price of aviation and sector output are more responsive. When trading between an aviation

51

Aviation Safety + Security Program GLOBAL EXPERTS IN SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011- 2012 Aviation Safety + Security Program GLOBAL EXPERTS IN SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS of aviation safety. Endings signal new beginnings and new beginnings mean evolving challenges for safety. This was the world in which the USC Aviation Safety and Security Program was born in 1952 and this is the world

Wang, Hai

52

Aviation Safety + Security Program GLOBAL EXPERTS IN SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010- 2011 Aviation Safety + Security Program GLOBAL EXPERTS IN SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS Relevance and currency -- that is what drives the Aviation Safety and Security Program of the USC Viterbi that our core course, Aviation Safety Management Systems, is so necessary in ensuring the safety

Wang, Hai

53

Measurements and Predictions of the Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements and Predictions of the Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Transfer at the Tube-Fin Junction for Louvered Fin Heat Exchangers Abstract The dominant thermal resistance used to increase heat transfer by initiating new boundary layer growth and increasing surface area

Thole, Karen A.

54

Experimental and numerical investigation on air-side performance of fin-and-tube heat exchangers with various fin patterns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air-side heat transfer and friction characteristics of five kinds of fin-and-tube heat exchangers, with the number of tube rows (N = 12) and the diameter of tubes (D{sub o} = 18 mm), have been experimentally investigated. The test samples consist of five types of fin configurations: crimped spiral fin, plain fin, slit fin, fin with delta-wing longitudinal vortex generators (VGs) and mixed fin with front 6-row vortex-generator fin and rear 6-row slit fin. The heat transfer and friction factor correlations for different types of heat exchangers were obtained with the Reynolds numbers ranging from 4000 to 10000. It was found that crimped spiral fin provides higher heat transfer and pressure drop than the other four fins. The air-side performance of heat exchangers with the above five fins has been evaluated under three sets of criteria and it was shown that the heat exchanger with mixed fin (front vortex-generator fin and rear slit fin) has better performance than that with fin with delta-wing vortex generators, and the slit fin offers best heat transfer performance at high Reynolds numbers. Based on the correlations of numerical data, Genetic Algorithm optimization was carried out, and the optimization results indicated that the increase of VG attack angle or length, or decrease of VG height may enhance the performance of vortex-generator fin. The heat transfer performances for optimized vortex-generator fin and slit fin at hand have been compared with numerical method. (author)

Tang, L.H.; Zeng, M.; Wang, Q.W. [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Design of swimming fins to treat Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis project involves developing a pair of swimming fins to strengthen the Vastus Medialis, or inner quadriceps muscle, to help patients with Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Configurations of mock up fins, made from ...

Tsai, Helen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potentials and Policies Agency/Company /Organization: Pew Center on Global Climate Change Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Technical report Website: www.pewclimate.org/docUploads/aviation-and-marine-report-2009.pdf Cost: Free References: Greenhouse Gas emissions from aviation and marine transportation: mitigation potential and policies[1] "This paper provides an overview of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from aviation and marine transportation and the various mitigation options to

57

FAQS Job Task Analyses - DOE AVIATION MANAGER (AvM)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MANAGER (AvM) - JOB TASK ANALYSIS MANAGER (AvM) - JOB TASK ANALYSIS Job Analysis Worksheet for Tasks DOE AVIATION MANAGER Task Source Importance Frequency A Establishes goals for the field aviation program based on the anticipated requirements as applicable to DOE/NNSA, the field element, and other DOE/NNSA organizations that may require aviation services. DOE O 440.2C, chng 1 5 1 B Implements DOE/NNSA aviation management and safety policy and establishes the field element's standards for the aviation program that will ensure an effective, safe, secure and cost-efficient operation in accordance with this Order. DOE O 440.2C, chng 1 5 2 C Develops the organization's Aviation Implementation Documents (AID) and annually reviews the AID to ensure that it is current. DOE O 440.2C, chng 1 5 1

58

Finned Tube With Vortex Generators For A Heat Exchanger.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for and method of manufacturing a finned tube for a heat exchanger is disclosed herein. A continuous fin strip is provided with at least one pair of vortex generators. A tube is rotated and linearly displaced while the continuous fin strip with vortex generators is spirally wrapped around the tube.

Sohal, Monohar S. (Idaho Falls, ID); O'Brien, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

59

FAQS Qualification Card - Aviation Manager | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manager Manager FAQS Qualification Card - Aviation Manager A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-AviationManager.docx Description Aviation Manager Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - Aviation Safety Officer

60

FAQS Qualification Card - Aviation Safety Officer | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety Officer Safety Officer FAQS Qualification Card - Aviation Safety Officer A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-AviationSafetyOfficer.docx Description Aviation Safety Officer Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - Aviation Manager

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Nevada Field Office recognized for its outstanding aviation program...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nevada Field Office (NFO) and its contract partner, the National Security Technologies (NSTec) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) Aviation Department, have received the 2012 U.S....

62

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

See footnotes at end of table. 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State 386 Energy Information...

63

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marketing Annual 1999 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

64

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Marketing Annual 1995 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

65

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Marketing Annual 1998 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

66

Process for Converting Algal Oil to Alternative Aviation Fuel...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process for Converting Algal Oil to Alternative Aviation Fuel Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology The conversion process uses a Kolbe-based method of...

67

Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End...

68

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian aviation psychology Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aviation psychology Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: australian aviation psychology Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Contemporary Issues...

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation safety requirements Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Canadian business aviation community globally, advocating safety, security, and efficiency CBAA NEWS BRIEF... Operations, Skyservice Business Aviation Inc. Vice Chair ...

70

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation risk-management information Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

UMIST PO Box 88, Manchester M60... researcher Paul Upham, co-editor of the book Towards Sustainable Aviation (Earthscan, 2003). The Policy Note... by the proposed aviation...

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation safety Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aviation safety Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Bachelor of Science in Aviation Air Transport...

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidents aviation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 3 A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson Summary: A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson C....

73

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation accidents findings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 3 A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson Summary: A Historical Perspective on Aviation Accident Investigation C. W. Johnson C....

74

Human integration in the lifecycle of aviation systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While Human Factors is perhaps the most critical discipline to improving aviation safety, research and development is disproportionately small-scale, fragmented and unsustained. The key issue is the delivery of Human Factors knowledge throughout the ... Keywords: Human Factors, aviation, innovation, operational performance, research capability, safety, system improvement, system life-cycle, system models

Nick McDonald

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Greener aviation with virtual sensors: a case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The environmental impact of aviation is enormous given the fact that in the US alone there are nearly 6 million flights per year of commercial aircraft. This situation has driven numerous policy and procedural measures to help develop environmentally ... Keywords: Anomaly detection, Aviation, Ensemble learning, Environmental systems, Gaussian process

Ashok N. Srivastava

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

FAQS Job Task Analyses - DOE AVIATION SAFETY OFFICER (ASO)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SAFETY OFFICER (ASO) - JOB TASK ANALYSIS SAFETY OFFICER (ASO) - JOB TASK ANALYSIS Job Analysis Worksheet for Task DOE AVIATION SAFETY OFFICER Task Source Importance Frequency A Gathers, trends, and analyzes aviation safety performance data to ensure the safety of the field aviation program. DOE O 440.2C, chng 1 4 3 B Conducts periodic assessments of aviation activities to ensure that requirements, policies, and procedures are implemented and followed and prepares reports documenting assessment findings, concerns, and recommendations and tracks corrective actions to help prevent similar occurrences. DOE O 440.2C, chng 1 4 3 C Participates as directed in aviation accident or incident investigations and provides assistance to accident investigation boards during their investigations.

77

M.S. in Aviation and Space The Master's in Aviation and Space emphasizes management, regulation, finance,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5303 ­ Aviation and Space Quality Issues AVED 5453 ­ Advanced Aviation Security *AVED 5473 ­ Aerospace Education and Training Effectiveness AVED 5543 ­ Advanced Aerospace Communications *AVED 5593 ­ Influencing Public Policy in the Aerospace Industry AVED 5813 ­ Earth Observation Systems AVED 5823 ­ Space Science

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

78

Aviation Safety Officer Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

64-2003 64-2003 September 2003 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 January 2010 DOE STANDARD AVIATION SAFETY OFFICER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1164-2003 CH-1 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1164-2003 CH-1 iv List of Changes Page/paragraph Change Page ii Change to new FAQS format Page iii Change in approval signature Page iv Added list of changes Page v Updated Table of Contents Page vii Changes to organizational names and

79

Aviation Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-STD-1165-2003 September 2003 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 December 2009 DOE STANDARD AVIATION MANAGER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1165-2003 CH-1 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1165-2003 CH-1 iv List of Changes Page/paragraph Change Page ii Change to new FAQS format Page iii Change in approval signature Page iv Added list of changes Page v Changes to Table of Contents Page vii Changes to organizational names and

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation gas turbines Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

turbines Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aviation gas turbines...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation turbine fuels Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fuels Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aviation turbine fuels...

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation turbine fuel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fuel Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aviation turbine fuel...

83

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AND QUALIFICATION (TQ) AND QUALIFICATION (TQ) OBJECTIVE TQ.1 SST Trailer facility has a training and qualifications program in place to facilitate the selection of trained and qualified personnel performing the SST Trailer facility activities and a sufficient number of qualified personnel are available to ensure operations in a safe and compliant manner. NMT-4 management and support staff have the level of knowledge required to operate SST Trailer facility activities and to ensure that any modifications are controlled and reviewed for potential impacts on training and qualification requirements. SST Trailer facility personnel have been trained on emergency response activities and requirements. (CORE REQUIREMENTS 3, 4, 6, and 11) Criteria 1. The training and qualification program is identified for the SST Trailer facility that

84

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RADIATION PROTECTION (RP) RADIATION PROTECTION (RP) OBJECTIVE RP.1 The TA-55 SST Facility has a radiation protection program in-place to ensure adequate radiation protection for the worker and the public. (Core Requirements 2, 8, 11) Criteria 1. Radiation exposure to workers and the public is minimized through implementation of the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and radiological work permits (RWPs). 2. The generation and spread of radioactive contamination is minimized through radioactive contamination control, radioactive effluent control, and RWPs 3. A radiological control technician (RCT) will oversee operations that involve handling storage containers and provide radiation protection support, as required. 4. Radiation monitoring will be provided when appropriate. An RCT will determine

85

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OBJECTIVE MG.1 Formal agreements between the operating contractor and NNSA have been established via the contract or other enforceable mechanism to govern the safe operation of the facility. A systematic review of the facility's conformance to these requirements has been performed. These requirements have been implemented in the facility. (Core Requirement 14) Criteria 1. The formal agreements (Authorization Agreement) between the operating contractor and the NNSA were reviewed and in place for the current facility operations. The agreement was revised to include the TA-55 Facility activities and has been approved by the Site Office. 2. Any issues or actions identified as not fully implemented are evaluated for impact on TA- 55 Facility operations, and compensatory measures are identified.

86

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY & HEALTH (ISH)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BASIS (SB) BASIS (SB) OBJECTIVE SB.1 Facility safety documentation is in place and has been implemented that describes the "safety envelope" of the facility. The safety documentation should characterize the hazards/risks associated with the facility and should identify preventive and mitigating measures (systems, procedures, administrative controls, etc.) that protect workers and the public form those hazards/risks. Safety structures, systems and components (SSCs) are defined and a system to maintain control over their designs and modification is established. (Core Requirement 7) Criteria 1. The TA-55 SST Facility safety basis and related documentation address the full spectrum of hazards/risks associated with operations. 2. Controls designed to mitigate the consequence of analyzed TA-55 SST Facility

87

Comparative analysis of aviation safety information feedback systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the aviation system, there are several feedback systems to prevent an accident. First of all, the accident and serious incident reporting and investigation system is established by the Chicago Convention. In general, ...

Funahashi, Yoshifuru

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Use of Loran-C for general aviation aircraft navigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report describes an extensive evaluation of Loran-C for use by general aviation. Flight, ground, and antenna tests were done. Flight tests measured the accuracy and the ability to make approaches. Receiver reliability ...

Natarajan, Krishnan

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

FAQS Reference Guide - Aviation Safety Officer | Department of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Safety Officer FAQS Reference Guide - Aviation Safety Officer This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the January 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1164-2003 Chg 1,...

90

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-rotavirus al fin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anal fins differently in different gaits (Gordon et al., 2000; Hove et al., 2001). At swimming... fins provide thrust for the animal and the ... Source: Lauder, George V. -...

91

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''New Construction/Major Renovation Only''' Interior Lighting: $0.08/kwh annual energy savings LED Fixture (Exterior): $100 Induction Fixture (Exterior): $125 CFL Wallpack (Exterior): $30 Lighting Control (Exterior): $70 '''Retrofit Only''' Fluorescent Fixture Upgrades: $5-$20/fixture

92

Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Heat Pumps Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate General: 70% of energy efficiency project cost If incentive brings the simple payback below one year, the incentive is reduced so the simple payback equals one year. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T-8 Lighting Fixtures: $3-$7

93

Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express Pacific Power - FinAnswer Express < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Heat Pumps Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Lighting: 70% of cost Incentive amount cannot reduce the project simple payback below one year Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting T-8 Lighting Fixtures: $0.25-$21 T-5 Lighting Fixtures: $0.25-$20 Cold Cathode: $5

94

Rocky Mountain Power - Energy FinAnswer | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rocky Mountain Power - Energy FinAnswer Rocky Mountain Power - Energy FinAnswer Rocky Mountain Power - Energy FinAnswer < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Maximum Rebate Retrofit: 50% of eligible measure cost Lighting Energy Savings Limit: 50%-75% of savings Program Info State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.12/kWh annual energy savings + 50/kW average monthly on-peak demand savings Provider Rocky Mountain Power Rocky Mountain Power's Energy FinAnswer program provides cash incentives to help its commercial and industrial customers improve the efficiency of their existing facilities and build new facilities that are significantly

95

Preying on the predator : the shark fin controversy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The consumption of shark fin soup dates back to the Ming Dynasty in China, when it was served to emperors. Today, the cultural delicacy represents wealth, status, and power. Over the past 30 years, with the rising middle ...

Morris, Alexandra H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Development of a plate-fin type gas turbine recuperator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A plate-fin type recuperator for a gas turbine/fuel cell hybrid power generation system was designed, manufactured, and tested. Performance analysis shows that the performance of the system is directly affecte...

Jae Su Kwak; Inyoung Yang

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center Address One Bear Place #97413 Place Waco, Texas Zip 76798 Region Texas Area Coordinates 31.496762°, -97.305664° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.496762,"lon":-97.305664,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

98

Aviation environmental policy effects on national- and regional-scale air quality, noise, and climate impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The continued growth of the aviation industry poses a challenge to policy-makers and industry stakeholders as each decision represents a trade-off on efficiency, equity, and environmental impact. The Aviation environmental ...

Wolfe, Philip J. (Philip James)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

A system theoretic safety analysis of U.S. Coast Guard aviation mishap involving CG-6505  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During a 22-month period, between 2008 and 2010, the U.S. Coast Guard experienced seven Class-A aviation mishaps resulting in the loss of 14 Coast Guard aviators and seven Coast Guard aircraft. This represents the highest ...

Hickey, Jon (Jon Patrick)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Dynamics of implementation of mitigating measures to reduce CO? emissions from commercial aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increasing demand for air transportation and growing environmental concerns motivate the need to implement measures to reduce CO? emissions from aviation. Case studies of historical changes in the aviation industry have ...

Kar, Rahul, 1979-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Dynamics of Implementation of Mitigating Measures to Reduce CO2 Emissions from Commercial Aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Increasing demand for air transportation and growing environmental concerns motivate the need to implement measures to reduce CO2 emissions from aviation. Case studies of historical changes in the aviation industry have ...

Kar, Rahul

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

102

Civil aviation and technogeopolitics: the struggle for control of world air routes, 1910-1939  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the development of international civil aviation from 1910 to 1939 at four international conferences from 1910 to 1928. The impact of civil aviation technology on the geopolitical position of the United States, Britain...

Butler, David Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

The air quality impact of aviation in future-year emissions scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid growth of aviation is critical to the world and US economy, and it faces several important challenges among which lie the environmental impacts of aviation on noise, climate and air quality. The first objective ...

Ashok, Akshay

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A response surface model of the air quality impacts of aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aviation demand is expected to double in the coming decades, and there are growing concerns about its impacts on the environment. Governments seek to mitigate the impacts of aviation on climate, air quality, and noise by ...

Ma?ek, Tudor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Report of the DOE-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation: Workshop...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report of the DOE-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation: Workshop Summary and Action Plan Report of the DOE-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation: Workshop Summary and Action...

106

Hydrogen Production by Noncatalytic Autothermal Reformation of Aviation Fuel Using Supercritical Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production by Noncatalytic Autothermal Reformation of Aviation Fuel Using Supercritical Water ... Energy Fuels, 2009, 23 (12), ...

Jason W. Picou; Jonathan E. Wenzel; H. Brian Lanterman; Sunggyu Lee

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

Convergence Approach to Model Physical World and Cyber World of Aviation Cyber Physical System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aviation Cyber-Physical Systems are the integration of cyber systems and physical systems. Recent concentration to Aviation Cyber Physical Systems (ACPS) is driven by the demand for deeper Convergence of design disciplines that integrate physical and ... Keywords: Aviation Cyber Physical System CPS, Modelica, AADL, SysML, Spatial-Temporal Features, Dynamic Continuous Features

Lichen Zhang

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Economic and emissions impacts of renewable fuel goals for aviation in the US*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted 1 October 2013 Keywords: Aviation Biofuels Climate change Emissions abatement a b s t r a c t The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has a goal that one billion gallons of renewable jet fuel that meeting the aviation biofuel goal in 2020 will require an implicit subsidy from airlines to bio- fuel

109

Protozoa in Subsurface Sediments from Sites Contaminated with Aviation Gasoline or Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with Aviation Gasoline or Jet Fuel James L. Sinclair 1 * Don H...of aviation gasoline and jet fuel spill areas at a Coast Guard...aerobic bacteria, protozoa, algae, and fungae in deep subsurface...aviation gasoline and JP-4 jet fuel in subsurface core samples...

James L. Sinclair; Don H. Kampbell; Mike L. Cook; John T. Wilson

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Performance of Civil Aviation Receivers during Maximum Solar Activity Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of Civil Aviation Receivers during Maximum Solar Activity Events Lina DEAMBROGIO on the fields of ionosphere scintillations, solar energetic particles and on the implementation of operational the upcoming period of high solar activity. Emilien ROBERT got his PhD in 2005 and started to work on behalf

Boyer, Edmond

111

CALLBACKCALLBACKFrom NASA's Aviation Safety Reporting System Number 304 January 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of navigation aids and use "flight following." Among other things, wrong is a word that describes something as being out of normal working order or condition. When something "goes wrong" with an aircraft component, a piece of equipment, a schedule, a passenger, or the weather for example, that's when aviation

112

The Impact of Climate Policy on U.S. Aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the impact of an economy-wide cap-and-trade policy on U.S. aviation taking the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (H.R.2454) as a representative example. We use an economywide model to estimate the ...

Winchester, Niven

113

Fouling of HVAC fin and tube heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fin and tube heat exchangers are used widely in residential, commercial and industrial HVAC applications. Invariably, indoor and outdoor air contaminants foul these heat exchangers. This fouling can cause decreased capacity and efficiency of the HVAC equipment as well as indoor air quality problems related to microbiological growth. This paper describes laboratory studies to investigate the mechanisms that cause fouling. The laboratory experiments involve subjecting a 4.7 fins/cm (12 fins/inch) fin and tube heat exchanger to an air stream that contains monodisperse particles. Air velocities ranging from 1.5-5.2 m/s (295 ft/min-1024 ft/min) and particle sizes from 1--8.6 {micro}m are used. The measured fraction of particles that deposit as well as information about the location of the deposited material indicate that particles greater than about 1 {micro}m contribute to fouling. These experimental results are used to validate a scaling analysis that describes the relative importance of several deposition mechanisms including impaction, Brownian diffusion, turbophoresis, thermophoresis, diffusiophoresis, and gravitational settling. The analysis is extended to apply to different fin spacings and particle sizes typical of those found in indoor air.

Siegel, Jeffrey; Carey, Van P.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Certification of alternative aviation fuels and blend components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aviation turbine engine fuel specifications are governed by ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International, and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD). ASTM D1655 Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels and MOD Defence Standard 91-91 are the guiding specifications for this fuel throughout most of the world. Both of these documents rely heavily on the vast amount of experience in production and use of turbine engine fuels from conventional sources, such as crude oil, natural gas condensates, heavy oil, shale oil, and oil sands. Turbine engine fuel derived from these resources and meeting the above specifications has properties that are generally considered acceptable for fuels to be used in turbine engines. Alternative and synthetic fuel components are approved for use to blend with conventional turbine engine fuels after considerable testing. ASTM has established a specification for fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons under D7566, and the MOD has included additional requirements for fuels containing synthetic components under Annex D of DS91-91. New turbine engine fuel additives and blend components need to be evaluated using ASTM D4054, Standard Practice for Qualification and Approval of New Aviation Turbine Fuels and Fuel Additives. This paper discusses these specifications and testing requirements in light of recent literature claiming that some biomass-derived blend components, which have been used to blend in conventional aviation fuel, meet the requirements for aviation turbine fuels as specified by ASTM and the MOD. The 'Table 1' requirements listed in both D1655 and DS91-91 are predicated on the assumption that the feedstocks used to make fuels meeting these requirements are from approved sources. Recent papers have implied that commercial jet fuel can be blended with renewable components that are not hydrocarbons (such as fatty acid methyl esters). These are not allowed blend components for turbine engine fuels as discussed in this paper.

Wilson III, George R. (Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States)); Edwards, Tim; Corporan, Edwin (United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)); Freerks, Robert L. (Rentech, Incorporated, 1331 17th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202 (United States))

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Overview of Aviation Fuel Markets for Biofuels Stakeholders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is for biofuels stakeholders interested the U.S. aviation fuel market. Jet fuel production represents about 10% of U.S. petroleum refinery production. Exxon Mobil, Chevron, and BP top producers, and Texas, Louisiana, and California are top producing states. Distribution of fuel primarily involves transport from the Gulf Coast to other regions. Fuel is transported via pipeline (60%), barges on inland waterways (30%), tanker truck (5%), and rail (5%). Airport fuel supply chain organization and fuel sourcing may involve oil companies, airlines, airline consortia, airport owners and operators, and airport service companies. Most fuel is used for domestic, commercial, civilian flights. Energy efficiency has substantially improved due to aircraft fleet upgrades and advanced flight logistic improvements. Jet fuel prices generally track prices of crude oil and other refined petroleum products, whose prices are more volatile than crude oil price. The single largest expense for airlines is jet fuel, so its prices and persistent price volatility impact industry finances. Airlines use various strategies to manage aviation fuel price uncertainty. The aviation industry has established goals to mitigate its greenhouse gas emissions, and initial estimates of biojet life cycle greenhouse gas emissions exist. Biojet fuels from Fischer-Tropsch and hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids processes have ASTM standards. The commercial aviation industry and the U.S. Department of Defense have used aviation biofuels. Additional research is needed to assess the environmental, economic, and financial potential of biojet to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate long-term upward price trends, fuel price volatility, or both.

Davidson, C.; Newes, E.; Schwab, A.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Implementation Guide - Aviation Program Performance Indicators (Metrics) for use with DOE O 440.2B, Aviation Management And Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide provides information regarding Departmental expectations on provisions of DOE 440.2B, identifies acceptable methods of implementing Aviation Program Performance Indicators (Metrics) requirements in the Order, and identifies relevant principles and practices by referencing Government and non-Government standards. Canceled by DOE G 440.2B-1A.

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Pacific Power - Energy FinAnswer | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pacific Power - Energy FinAnswer Pacific Power - Energy FinAnswer Pacific Power - Energy FinAnswer < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Maximum Rebate Retrofit: 50% of the eligible energy efficiency measure cost Lighting: 50% of savings If incentive brings the simple payback below one year, the incentive is reduced so the simple payback equals one year. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $0.12/kWh-$0.18/kWh annual energy savings + $50/kW average monthly on-peak demand savings

118

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Lighting Retrofit: 70% of project cost Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Custom: $0.10/annual kWh saved Interior Lighting: $0.08/kwh annual energy savings LED Fixture (Exterior): $100 Induction Fixture (Exterior): $125 Lighting Control (Exterior): $70 Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps: $50-$100/ton

119

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express Rocky Mountain Power - FinAnswer Express < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Other Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Interior Lighting: $0.08/kWh annual savings Induction Fixture (Exterior): $125/unit LED Outdoor/Roadway Fixture (Exterior): $100/unit CFL Wall Pack (Exterior): $30/unit Lighting Controls: $75/sensor Wall Insulation: $0.07/sq. ft. Roof Insulation: $0.05/sq. ft.

120

Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http://http://www.escoot.co.uk Region United Kingdom LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Aviation_Enterprises_Ltd_see_Marine_Current_Turbines_Ltd&oldid=678251" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs MHK Companies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Growth scenarios for EU & UK aviation: contradictions with climate policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3 Conclusions 20 3. Reducing aviation industry emissions 21 3.1 Alternative fuels 21 3.1.1 Biodiesel 21 3.1.2 Biokerosene 21 3.1.3 Hydrogen 22 3.1.4 Other alternative fuels 23 3.1.5 Summary 23 3.2 Airframe and engine of figures and tables 5 Summary 7 1 Introduction 7 2 The Need for Extended National Climate Commitments 10 2

Watson, Andrew

122

DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF A FISH FIN-LIKE PROPULSOR FOR AUVS George V. Lauder1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for AUVs based on the mechanical design and performance of fish fins. II. THE SUNFISH MODEL SYSTEM Bluegill are able to execute highly effective yaw maneuvers using only their pectoral fins, and at speeds of less

Lauder, George V.

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - active vertical fin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: active to tilt the caudal fin at an angle to the vertical 26. In some fish, especially those known... . Low-aspect ratio pectoral fins in sharks function to alter...

124

Active Control of Smart Fin Model for Aircraft Buffeting Load Alleviation Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vertical fin structure, an investigation has been performed to understand the aerodynamic effects of high-speed vortical flows on the dynamic characteristics of vertical fin structures. Extensive wind-tunnel tests have increased with airflow speed as well as the vertical fin angle of attack relative to the airflow direction

Yaman, Yavuz

125

An experimental investigation of heat transfer in narrow, rectangular cooling channels with pin-fins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

][Ro]/[Ro] = 0.12). Heat transfer in a stationary pin-fin channel can be enhanced up to 3.8 times that of a smooth channel. Rotation enhances the heat transferred from the pin-fin channels 1.5 times that of the stationary pin-fin channels. Overall, rotation...

Wright, Lesley Mae

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Inhibits Zebrafish Caudal Fin Regeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Inhibits Zebrafish Caudal Fin Regeneration Jeanmarie M. Zodrow- chlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Zebrafish caudal fins were par- tially amputated, and the fish received. Key Words: zebrafish; fin regeneration; aryl hydrocarbon recep- tor; AHR; 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

Tullos, Desiree

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation personnel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the country. The US aircraft manufacturer says the strategic... that is researching algae-based aviation biofuels has been expanded to include other research institutions......

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation altitudes 2006-2008 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

local... regulatory authorities in making their decisions. (Abstract) Keywords-air pollution; aviation; data mining I Source: George Mason University, Center for Air...

129

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a lower estimate for the bunker inventory: Comment on Transport: Aviation and Marine (Bunker Fuels), see http://commonly referred to as bunker fuels to differentiate them

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Marketing Annual 1995 467 Table A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

131

Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Marketing Annual 1999 421 Table A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) -...

132

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation safety seminar Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aviation safety seminar Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Submisso de Trabalho Completo INTRODUCTION TO...

133

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation safety management Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aviation safety management Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 This certificate program was developed in...

134

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation safety program Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aviation safety program Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 This certificate program was developed in response...

135

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil. Aviation and marine fuels consumed during internationalthan IEA estimates. Marine fuel sales data reported to IEAthe best estimate of marine fuel use (Endresen, Srgrd et

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Prediction of forces and moments on finned bodies at high angle of attack in transonic flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a theoretical method for the prediction of fin forces and moments on bodies at high angle of attack in subsonic and transonic flow. The body is assumed to be a circular cylinder with cruciform fins (or wings) of arbitrary planform. The body can have an arbitrary roll (or bank) angle, and each fin can have individual control deflection. The method combines a body vortex flow model and lifting surface theory to predict the normal force distribution over each fin surface. Extensive comparisons are made between theory and experiment for various planform fins. A description of the use of the computer program that implements the method is given.

Oberkampf, W. L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Development of an income-based hedonic monetization model for the assessment of aviation-related noise impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aviation is an industry that has seen tremendous growth in the last several decades. With demand for aviation projected to rise at an annual rate of 5% over the next 20 to 25 years, it is important to consider technological, ...

He, Qinxian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Implementation Guide - Aviation Management, Operations, Maintenance, Security, and Safety for Use with DOE O 440.2B, Aviation Management and Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides detailed information to help all personnel, responsible for a part of the aviation program, understand and comply with the rules and regulations applicable to their assignments. Canceled by DOE G 440.2B-2A.

2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Rapid Monitoring of Hydrocarbon Blending Stocks in Modified Aviation Turbine Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......stocks in JP-4 aviation turbine fuel. Introduction High resolution capillary gas chromatography affords...principal Air Force aviation turbine fuel, and the incorporation...Model 3700 capillary gas chromatographic system...Products), to remove residual oxygen and/or water......

P.C. Hayes; Jr.; E.W. Pitzer

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Rapid Monitoring of Hydrocarbon Blending Stocks in Modified Aviation Turbine Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......JP-4 jet fuel. For JP-4 turbine fuel, the analysis is relatively...blending stocks in JP-4 aviation turbine fuel. Introduction High resolution...principal Air Force aviation turbine fuel, and the incorporation...Scientific). The column's efficiency was measured and found to be......

P.C. Hayes; Jr.; E.W. Pitzer

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Convective heat transfer characteristics of China RP-3 aviation kerosene at supercritical pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Convective heat transfer characteristics of China RP-3 aviation kerosene at supercritical pressure Keywords: Supercritical pressure Aviation kerosene Convective heat transfer Numerical study a b s t r a c convective in kerosene pipe flow is complicated. Here the convective heat transfer characteristics of China

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

142

Aviation Safety Reporting System 625 Ellis St. Suite 305 Mountain View California 94043  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the event. Those who work to improve aviation safety have long recognized that incident reporting fromAviation Safety Reporting System 625 Ellis St. Suite 305 Mountain View California 94043 Cabin Crew Safety Information Article Presented at the 17th International Aircraft Cabin Safety Symposium by Linda

143

Page i of 43 DOD-DOE Workshop Summary and Action Plan: Fuel Cells in Aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................14 Appendix A. DOD Energy Reduction Using Fuel CellsPage i of 43 #12;#12;Page i DOD-DOE Workshop Summary and Action Plan: Fuel Cells in Aviation Table ..........................................................................iv The Opportunity for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies in Aviation

144

Introduction In aviation, weather service is a combined effort of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types of weather observations: surface, upper air, radar, and satellite. Surface Aviation Weather12-1 Introduction In aviation, weather service is a combined effort of the National Weather Service, and individuals. Because of the increasing need for worldwide weather services, foreign weather organizations also

145

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bendix Aviation Corp Pioneer Div - IA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bendix Aviation Corp Pioneer Div - Bendix Aviation Corp Pioneer Div - IA 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: BENDIX AVIATION CORP., PIONEER DIV. (IA.05 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Pioneer Division, Bendix Aviation Corporation Bendix Aviation Corporation Bendix Pioneer Division IA.05-1 IA.05-2 IA.05-3 Location: Davenport , Iowa IA.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1990 IA.05-2 IA.05-4 Site Operations: Conducted studies to investigate the feasibility of using sonic cleaning equipment to decontaminate uranium contaminated drums. IA.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on limited operations at the site IA.05-2 IA.05-4 IA.05-5 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium IA.05-1

146

Report of the DOE-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation: Workshop Summary and Action Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

i of 43 i of 43 Page i DOD-DOE Workshop Summary and Action Plan: Fuel Cells in Aviation Table of Contents Executive Summary .............................................................................................................................................iii Drivers for Leaner, Cleaner Energy Use in Aviation .......................................................................... iv The Opportunity for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies in Aviation ............................................. v Potential Impacts ................................................................................................................................. vi Barriers and Challenges ...................................................................................................................... vii

147

Conjugate heat transfer in channels with internal longitudinal corrugated fins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@~ and @?, i' or Various K; F = 0. 020 and L = 0. 215 . 3. 10 Local Surface Temperature versus B, ~ and Q? for ql and q2 Boundary Conditions; F = 0. 020 and L = 0. 215 3. 11 Local Surface Heat Flux versus +~ and Rq~ for Various 6; F = 0. 02 3. 12 Local... axis length of the channel. Ar ? Flow cross-sectional area in the calculation domain. Ay~ ? Flow cross-sectional area in the calculation domain when there is no fin. c ? Specific heat of the flowing fluid, D ? Height of the flow cross section. Ds...

Ackermann, J. Albert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Failure analysis of spiral finned tube on the economizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes the results of an investigation about the failure of spiral finned tube on a newly designed and retrofitted low pressure economizer in a 300MW pulverized-coal-fired power plant. In order to find out the failure causes and to suggest preventive measures, phase compositions and macrostructure of the tube metal surface were investigated by X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy micro-analysis. The results show that the failure was principally owing to comprehensive multiphase erosion, an interaction of the fly ash wearing, flue gas washing and sulfurous acid corrosion. Recommendations are given to minimize such failures.

ZhiYuan Liang; QinXin Zhao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Laser in situ keratomileusis in United States Naval aviators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose To evaluate the safety and efficacy of femtosecond-assisted wavefront-guided laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) as well as higher-order aberrometric changes in a population of active-duty United States Naval aviators. Setting Navy Refractive Surgery Centers, San Diego, California, and Portsmouth, Virginia, USA. Design Prospective noncomparative 2-site study. Methods In this study of femtosecond-assisted wavefront-guided LASIK, 3 groups were differentiated according to the refractive status: myopia, mixed astigmatism, and hyperopia. Uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuities, refraction, mesopic low-contrast CDVA, higher-order aberrations (HOAs), and patient satisfaction were evaluated during a 3-month follow-up. Results The study enrolled, treated, and included for analysis 548 eyes with myopia, 60 eyes with mixed astigmatism, and 25 eyes with hyperopia. The UDVA was 20/20 or better in 98.3% of eyes with myopia and mixed astigmatism at all postoperative visits and in 95.7% of hyperopic eyes 3months postoperatively. The gain in CDVA was 1 or more lines in 39.2%, 41.1%, and 30.4% of myopic, mixed astigmatic and hyperopic eyes, respectively. Loss of 2 lines of CDVA after surgery occurred in 2 myopic eyes (0.4%). At 3 months, a mean change of +0.03 ?m 0.10(SD) and +0.05 0.08 ?m was observed in higher-order root mean square and primary spherical aberration, respectively. Of the patients, 95.9% said they believed that LASIK had helped their effectiveness as Naval aviators and 99.6% would recommend the same treatment to others. Conclusion Femtosecond-assisted wavefront-guided LASIK was an efficacious and safe option for refractive correction in Naval aviators, enabling a quick return to flight status. Financial Disclosure Drs. Tanzer and Schallhorn are consultants to Abbott Medical Optics, Inc. Noauthor has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned.

David J. Tanzer; Tyson Brunstetter; Richard Zeber; Elizabeth Hofmeister; Sandor Kaupp; Neil Kelly; Myah Mirzaoff; William Sray; Mitch Brown; Steven Schallhorn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

[Research and workshop on alternative fuels for aviation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) at Baylor University was granted U. S. Department of Energy (US DOE) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funds for research and development to improve the efficiency in ethanol powered aircraft, measure performance and compare emissions of ethanol, Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) and 100 LL aviation gasoline. The premise of the initial proposal was to use a test stand owned by Engine Components Inc. (ECI) based in San Antonio, Texas. After the grant was awarded, ECI decided to close down its test stand facility. Since there were no other test stands available at that time, RAFDC was forced to find additional support to build its own test stand. Baylor University provided initial funds for the test stand building. Other obstacles had to be overcome in order to initiate the program. The price of the emission testing equipment had increased substantially beyond the initial quote. Rosemount Analytical Inc. gave RAFDC an estimate of $120,000.00 for a basic emission testing package. RAFDC had to find additional funding to purchase this equipment. The electronic ignition unit also presented a series of time consuming problems. Since at that time there were no off-the-shelf units of this type available, one had to be specially ordered and developed. FAA funds were used to purchase a Super Flow dynamometer. Due to the many unforeseen obstacles, much more time and effort than originally anticipated had to be dedicated to the project, with much of the work done on a volunteer basis. Many people contributed their time to the program. One person, mainly responsible for the initial design of the test stand, was a retired engineer from Allison with extensive aircraft engine test stand experience. Also, many Baylor students volunteered to assemble the. test stand and continue to be involved in the current test program. Although the program presented many challenges, which resulted in delays, the RAFDC's test stand is an asset which provides an ongoing research capability dedicated to the testing of alternative fuels for aircraft engines. The test stand is now entirely functional with the exception of the electronic ignition unit which still needs adjustments.

NONE

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Glen F. Wattman Director, Office of Aviation Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Glen F. Wattman Glen F. Wattman Director, Office of Aviation Management A native of New York, Glen Wattman has served as a civilian Airline Pilot for more than thirteen years flying Boeing 757, 767 and 727 transport category aircraft. He has extensive experience operating flights domestically and throughout Central and South America and Europe. Mr. Wattman is currently a Major in the United States Air Force Reserve and serves as a subject matter expert as a liaison to the Florida Wing of the Civil Air Patrol. Mr. Wattman has expertise in all aspects of the CAP mission to include Disaster Relief, Search and Rescue, Civil Defense, Homeland Security, Drug Interdiction, and Aerospace Education. Prior to becoming an Airline Pilot, Mr. Wattman served as an Air Force Officer, Detachment Commander, Fighter Pilot, and

152

Understanding the Hydrodynamics of Swimming: From Fish Fins to Flexible Propulsors for Autonomous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the Hydrodynamics of Swimming: From Fish Fins to Flexible Propulsors for Autonomous. The research effort described here is concerned with developing a maneuvering propulsor for an autonomous

Lauder, George V.

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - active suichoku fin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vortical flows on the dynamic characteristics of vertical fin structures. Extensive wind-tunnel ... Source: Yaman, Yavuz - Department of Aerospace Engineering, Middle East...

154

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

,"U.S. Aviation Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aviation Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" Aviation Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Aviation Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes",2,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_c_nus_eppv_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_c_nus_eppv_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

156

,"Aviation Gasoline Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aviation Gasoline Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" Aviation Gasoline Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Aviation Gasoline Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_a_eppv_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_a_eppv_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

157

Glossary API Gravity: An  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 60 60 131 5 . . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on fin- ished aviation gasoline. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure for crude oil and petroleum products equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Bulk Sales: Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual

158

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

measur- measur- ing scale is calibrated in terms of degrees API; it may be calculated in terms of the following formula: Deg API sp gr degF degF = - 1415 60 60 1315 . . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on fin- ished aviation gasoline. Barrel: A volumetric

159

Glossary API Gravity: An  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

60 60 1315 . . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on fin- ished aviation gasoline. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure for crude oil and petroleum products equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Bulk Sales: Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual

160

Rocky Mountain Power - Energy FinAnswer | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

50% of eligible measure cost 50% of eligible measure cost Lighting Energy Savings Limit: 50%-75% of savings Payback Cap: 1 year; if incentive brings the simple payback below one year, the incenive is reduced so the simple payback equals one year Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $0.12/kWh annual energy savings + $50/kW average monthly on-peak demand savings Provider Rocky Mountain Power Rocky Mountain Power's Energy FinAnswer program provides incentives to help its customers improve the efficiency of existing facilities and build new facilities that are significantly more efficient than code. New construction and retrofit projects for all industrial facilities can participate as well as all new commercial projects and commercial retrofits in facilities larger than 20,000 square feet.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rocky Mountain Power - Energy FinAnswer | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

70% project cost 70% project cost New Construction: 50% Lighting: 50%-75% of savings Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $0.15/kWh annual energy savings + $50/kW average monthly demand savings Provider Rocky Mountain Power Rocky Mountain Power's Energy FinAnswer program provides incentives to help its customers improve the efficiency of existing facilities and build new facilities that are significantly more efficient than code. New construction and retrofit projects for all industrial facilities can participate as well as all new commercial projects and commercial retrofits in facilities larger than 20,000 square feet. Rocky Mountain Power will be involved from the beginning of the construction process. They will start by reviewing the facility plans and

162

Pacific Power - Energy FinAnswer | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Industrial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Retrofit: 60% of project cost Lighting: 50% of savings Incentives may not be available to reduce the project simple payback below one year Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $0.15/kWh annual energy savings + $50/kW average monthly demand savings Provider Pacific Power Pacific Power's Energy FinAnswer program provides cash incentives to help its commercial and industrial customers improve their heating, cooling, refrigeration, compressed air, lighting, pumping or industrial processes.

163

Methods and criteria for safety analysis (FIN L2535)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the NRC request for a proposal dated October 20, 1992, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) submit this proposal to provide contractural assistance for FIN L2535, ``Methods and Criteria for Safety Analysis,`` as specified in the Statement of Work attached to the request for proposal. The Statement of Work involves development of safety analysis guidance for NRC licensees, arranging a workshop on this guidance, and revising NRC Regulatory Guide 3.52. This response to the request for proposal offers for consideration the following advantages of WSRC in performing this work: Experience, Qualification of Personnel and Resource Commitment, Technical and Organizational Approach, Mobilization Plan, Key Personnel and Resumes. In addition, attached are the following items required by the NRC: Schedule II, Savannah River Site - Job Cost Estimate, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 1, NRC Form 189, Project and Budget Proposal for NRC Work, page 2, Project Description.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- North American Aviation Inc - CA 07  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

North American Aviation Inc - CA 07 North American Aviation Inc - CA 07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION, INC. (CA.07) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: None Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Downey , California CA.07-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 CA.07-1 Site Operations: Research and development on a bench scale using a small reactor; work done during the early 1950s. CA.07-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote based on limited scope of operations CA.07-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CA.07-3 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to NORTH AMERICAN AVIATION, INC. CA.07-1 - Memorandum/Checklist; Young to the File; Subject:

165

The impacts of aviation emissions on human health through changes in air quality and UV irradiance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World-wide demand for air transportation is rising steadily. The air transportation network may be limited by aviation's growing environmental impacts. These impacts take the form of climate impacts, noise impacts, and ...

Brunelle-Yeung, Elza

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Table A2. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- W 73.5 See footnotes at end of table. A2. RefinerReseller Prices of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Kerosene, by PAD District, 1983-Present Energy Information Administration ...

167

Assessing environmental benefits and economic costs of aviation environmental policy measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite the recent global economic downturn, longer term growth is anticipated for aviation with an increasing environmental impact, specifically in the areas of noise, air quality, and climate change. To ensure sustainable ...

Mahashabde, Anuja (Anuja Anil)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Chapter 27 - Sustainable Aviation Biofuels: A Development and Deployment Success Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter focuses on two aspects of aviation biofuels. It seeks to both inform of the unique fuel characteristics and to explain the process by which success came to pass. The first focus is the technology and process developments that have been successful in qualifying biofuels for safe and environmentally favorable operation in jet aircraft, which is the first aspect and a needed perquisite to enable acceptance and successful deployment. The second and as important focus for sustainable Aviation biofuels is the processes that are being put in place to enable deployment. Sustainable biofuels for aviation, should of course, be viewed as a work in progress. New developments are occurring on a regular basis as we move forward and through the twists and turns needed for large-scale usage. That said, sustainable, renewable sources to replace nonrenewable liquid fuels will ultimately be critical to the long-term viability of aviation.

Richard Altman

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - aviation-based team training Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

training for surgeons Summary: of aviation-based teamwork training on the attitudes of health-care professionals. J Am Coll Surg 199... team members do not all have the same...

170

Biologically-Inspired Adaptive Pectoral-Like Fin Control System For CFD Parameterized AUV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the normalized gradient scheme. In the closed-loop system, time-varying yaw an- gle reference trajectoriesBiologically-Inspired Adaptive Pectoral-Like Fin Control System For CFD Parameterized AUV Mugdha S fin control, Adaptive control, Yaw plane control. Abstract- This paper treats the question of adaptive

Mittal, Rajat

171

Development of New Grid-Fin Design for Aerodynamic Marco Debiasi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Development of New Grid-Fin Design for Aerodynamic Control Marco Debiasi1 Temasek Laboratories of attack = angle of the sharp leading edge = swept-back angle I. Introduction grid fin is an aerodynamic Aerodynamics Conference, Chicago, Illinois, 28 June - 1 July 2010, and as Paper 2012-2909 at the 30th AIAA

Debiasi, Marco

172

Heat transfer enhancement from micro pin fins subjected to an impinging jet , Hee Joon Lee 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fins fabricated using MEMS microfab- rication. The micro pin fins had diameters of 125 lm, heights of 230 lm, and pitches of 250 lm with an area enhancement of Atotal/Abase = 2.44. The jet stand-off ratio such as electronics cooling and turbine blade cooling. It has been also used for drying applications, metal

Peles, Yoav

173

Are Tax and Non-Tax Factors Associated with FIN 48 Disclosures?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aggressiveness. Finally, I split the sample based on firms use of discretion over recognizing the tax benefits of aggressive tax positions prior to FIN 48 adoption. I find that firms which aggressively recognize tax benefits prior to FIN 48 adoption (i.e. firms...

McDonald, Janet L.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

174

Boiling heat transfer in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boiling heat transfer in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink Ali Kos?ar, Yoav Peles-based micro pin fin heat sink was investigated. Average two-phase heat transfer coefficients were obtained intermittent and spray-annular flows. Heat transfer coefficient trends and flow morphologies were used to infer

Peles, Yoav

175

Scaling of Heat Transfer Coefficients Along Louvered Fins A. C. Lyman1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Scaling of Heat Transfer Coefficients Along Louvered Fins A. C. Lyman1 , R. A. Stephan2 , and K 23681-2199 #12;2 Abstract Louvered fins provide a method for improving the heat transfer performance for evaluating the spatially-resolved louver heat transfer coefficients using various reference temperatures

Thole, Karen A.

176

Heat transfer from multiple row arrays of low aspect ratio pin fins Seth A. Lawson a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer from multiple row arrays of low aspect ratio pin fins Seth A. Lawson a, , Alan A 18 March 2011 Available online 5 May 2011 Keywords: Pin fins Heat transfer augmentation Array to enhance heat transfer. In modern gas turbines, for exam- ple, airfoils are designed with sophisticated

Thole, Karen A.

177

3D numerical simulation on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics in multistage heat exchanger with slit fins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a numerical investigation is performed for three-stage heat exchangers with plain plate fins and slit ... are arranged in a staggered way, and heat conduction in fins is considered. In order ... av...

W. Q. Tao; Y. P. Cheng; T. S. Lee

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Implementation Guide - Aviation Management, Operations, Maintenance, Security, and Safety for Use with DOE O 440.2B Chg 1, Aviation Management and Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides detailed information to help all personnel, responsible for a part of the aviation program, understand and comply with the rules and regulations applicable to their assignments. Cancels DOE G 440.2B-2. Canceled by DOE N 251.110.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Towards greener aviation : a comparative study on the substitution of standard jet fuel with algal based second generation biofuels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The negative environmental impact of the aviation industry, related mainly to the gaseous emissions from turbine exhausts, is increasing with the increased demand on travel. (more)

Haddad, Mona Abdul Majid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Cooling system having reduced mass pin fins for components in a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cooling system having one or more pin fins with reduced mass for a gas turbine engine is disclosed. The cooling system may include one or more first surfaces defining at least a portion of the cooling system. The pin fin may extend from the surface defining the cooling system and may have a noncircular cross-section taken generally parallel to the surface and at least part of an outer surface of the cross-section forms at least a quartercircle. A downstream side of the pin fin may have a cavity to reduce mass, thereby creating a more efficient turbine airfoil.

Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Dopant characterization in self-regulatory plasma doped fin field-effect transistors by atom probe tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fin field-effect transistors are promising next-generation electronic devices, and the identification of dopant positions is important for their accurate characterization. We report atom probe tomography (APT) of silicon fin structures prepared by a recently developed self-regulatory plasma doping (SRPD) technique. Trenches between fin-arrays were filled using a low-energy focused ion beam to directly deposit silicon, which allowed the analysis of dopant distribution by APT near the surface of an actual fin transistor exposed to air. We directly demonstrate that SRPD can achieve a boron concentration above 1 x 10{sup 20} atoms/cm{sup 3} at the fin sidewall.

Takamizawa, H.; Shimizu, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Morita, H.; Yabuuchi, Y.; Ogura, M. [Panasonic Corporation, Moriguchi, Osaka 570-8501 (Japan)

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Design of a biomimetic pectoral fin joint in an artificial fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A biomimetic design of the muscle joint in a pectoral fish fin was produced based on comparisons with four design models. All four design models consisted of a mechanical joint connection and incorporated the functional ...

Pea, Vanessa, 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Towards a global scheme for carbon emissions reduction in aviation: Chinas role in blocking the extension of the European Unions Emissions Trading Scheme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2008, the European Union (EU) decided to include aviation in its Emissions Trading System (ETS) in order to realize...

Armin Ibitz

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

"Carbon emission offsets for aviation-generated emissions due to international travel to and from New Zealand" revised personal version of paper to appear in Energy Policy (in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Carbon emission offsets for aviation-generated emissions due to international travel to and from.1016/j.enpol.2008.10.046 1 CARBON EMISSION OFFSETS FOR AVIATION-GENERATED EMISSIONS DUE TO INTERNATIONAL. It is then shown that no single #12;"Carbon emission offsets for aviation-generated emissions due to international

Otago, University of

185

Study of junction flows in louvered fin round tube heat exchangers using the dye injection technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed studies of junction flows in heat exchangers with an interrupted fin design are rare. However, understanding these flow structures is important for design and optimization purposes, because the thermal hydraulic performance of heat exchangers is strongly related to the flow behaviour. In this study flow visualization experiments were performed in six scaled-up models of a louvered fin round tube heat exchanger. The models have three tube rows in a staggered layout and differ only in their fin spacing and louver angle. A water tunnel was designed and built and the flow visualizations were carried out using dye injection. At low Reynolds numbers the streakline follows the tube contours, while at higher Reynolds numbers a horseshoe vortex is developed ahead of the tubes. The two resulting streamwise vortex legs are destroyed by the downstream louvers (i.e. downstream the turnaround louver), especially at higher Reynolds numbers, smaller fin pitches and larger louver angles. Increasing the fin spacing results in a larger and stronger horseshoe vortex. This illustrates that a reduction of the fin spacing results in a dissipation of vortical motion by mechanical blockage and skin friction. Furthermore it was observed that the vortex strength and number of vortices in the second tube row is larger than in the first tube row. This is due to the thicker boundary layer in the second tube row, and the flow deflection, which is typical for louvered fin heat exchangers. Visualizations at the tube-louver junction showed that in the transition part between the angled louver and the flat landing a vortex is present underneath the louver surface which propagates towards the angled louver. (author)

Huisseune, H.; Willockx, A.; De Paepe, M. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium); T'Joen, C. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Department Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); De Jaeger, P. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium); NV Bekaert SA, Bekaertstraat 2, 8550 Zwevegem (Belgium)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

European Aviation Safety Agency announces acceptance of NCAMP material certification process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed through the FAA process described in Federal Aviation Administration Memorandum AIR100-2010 as certification data. NCAMP works with the FAA and industry partners to qualify material systems and populate 8552 Newport NCT4708 Cytec MTM45-1 Tencate TC250 (available Mar 2014) Cytec 5320-1 (available Aug

187

DATA FUSION ENABLES BETTER RECOGNITION OF CEILING AND VISIBILITY HAZARDS IN AVIATION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low cloud ceilings and poor visibility claim the lives of more general aviation (GA) pilots and passengers than any other cause of weather-related GA accidents. Experience shows that instrument-rated pilots as well as those rated only for visual ...

Paul Herzegh; Gerry Wiener; Richard Bateman; James Cowie; Jennifer Black

188

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation: Mitigation Potential and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Propulsion Alternative Fuels and Power Notes MarineMarine diesel oil (MDO), Liquefied natural gas (LNG), Wind power (sails) Aviation Airframe Design and PropulsionMarine Transportation (Based on Authors Calculations Using Multiple Sources, see Text and Table 4) Operations Aircraft/Ship and Propulsion

McCollum, David L; Gould, Gregory; Greene, David L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Novel Nanoscale Catalysts and Desulfurizers for Aviation Fuels Martin Duran* and Abdul-Majeed Azad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reforming catalysts for jet fuel", The Ohio Fuel Cell Symposium of the Ohio Fuel Cell Coalition, May 23Novel Nanoscale Catalysts and Desulfurizers for Aviation Fuels Martin Duran* and Abdul-Majeed Azad) to hydrogen through steam reforming poses a challenge since these fuels contain sulfur up to about 1000 ppm

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

190

Determination of heat transfer and friction characteristics of an adapted inclined louvered fin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of a fin-and-tube heat exchanger was performed. To this end a test rig was constructed to measure the heat transfer rate on the air and waterside of the heat exchanger. A wide range of Reynolds numbers on the airside was investigated. The resulting data was used to determine the convective heat transfer correlation (expressed using the Colburn factor) and the friction factor on the airside. The fin type used in the heat exchanger of this research is an adaptation of the standard inclined louvered type. A thorough error analysis was performed, to validate the results. (author)

T'Joen, C.; Steeman, H.-J.; Willockx, A.; De Paepe, M. [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University-UGent, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Gent (Belgium)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Management of Political Risk in the Overseas Mergers and Acquisitions of General Aviation Aircraft Company Limited of China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, at the background of the General Aviation Aircraft Co., Ltd. of China (GAAC) mergers successfully the Cirrus Corporation of American (CCA), by analyzing political risks which existing in the overse...

Xi-yu Han; Wei-li Xia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Uncertainty analysis of an aviation climate model and an aircraft price model for assessment of environmental effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating, presenting, and assessing uncertainties are important parts in assessment of a complex system. This thesis focuses on the assessment of uncertainty in the price module and the climate module in the Aviation ...

Jun, Mina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

DOE/Boeing Sponsored Projects in Aviation Fuel Cell Technology at Sandia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boeing Sponsored Projects in Boeing Sponsored Projects in Aviation Fuel Cell Technology at Sandia Lennie Klebanoff and Joe Pratt Sandia National Laboratories Livermore CA 94551 September 30, 2010 "Exceptional Service in the National Interest" DOE-DOD Workshop on Uses of Fuel Cells in Aviation * ~ 8,300 employees * ~ 1,500 PhDs; ~2800 MS/MA * ~ 700 on-site contractors Sandia National Laboratories Sandia is a government-owned/contractor operated (GOCO) facility. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, manages Sandia for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Website: www.sandia.gov Annual Budget ~ $2.2 Billion ($1.3 Billion DOE, $0.9 Billion work for others) 3 Origin: Boeing Interested in Bringing Fuel Cell Technology to Ground Support Equipment (GSE)

194

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Eclipse-Pioneer Div of Bendix Aviation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Eclipse-Pioneer Div of Bendix Eclipse-Pioneer Div of Bendix Aviation Corp - NJ 30 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Eclipse-Pioneer Div. of Bendix Aviation Corp. (NJ.30 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Allied Bendix Aerospace Corporation Sumitomo Machinery Corporation of America Metpath Incorporated NJ.30-7 Location: Teterboro , New Jersey NJ.30-4 Evaluation Year: Circa 1989 NJ.30-1 NJ.30-2 NJ.30-3 NJ.30-5 Site Operations: Plant #4 built by U.S. Navy on contractor property to cast magnesium-thorium alloy aircraft parts during WWII. Foundry operated till about 1966. Manufactured electronic components for MED 1940s-1950s. Operated under NRC license - closed out 22 October 1981. Property released for unrestricted use. NJ.30-6

195

Interpolated versus Polytopic Gain Scheduling Control Laws for Fin/Rudder Roll Stabilisation of Ships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interpolated versus Polytopic Gain Scheduling Control Laws for Fin/Rudder Roll Stabilisation be done through the use of gain-scheduling (GS) control law. In this study, a GS-control law is obtained and a desired stabilisation quality factor. Gain scheduling is a way to obtain parameter dependent controllers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

196

A GAIN SCHEDULED CONTROL LAW FOR FIN/RUDDER ROLL STABILISATION OF SHIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A GAIN SCHEDULED CONTROL LAW FOR FIN/RUDDER ROLL STABILISATION OF SHIPS Hervé Tanguy , Guy Lebret leads to a gain-scheduled control law. The synthesis is based on multi-objective optimisation stabilisation; H control; Gain Scheduled Control; polytopic representation; LMI. 1. INTRODUCTION A major

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

197

Design, fabrication and analysis of a body-caudal fin propulsion system for a microrobotic fish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design, fabrication and analysis of a body-caudal fin propulsion system for a microrobotic fish Kyu and fabrica- tion of a centimeter-scale propulsion system for a robotic fish. The key to the design are customized to provide the necessary work output for the microrobotic fish. The flexure joints, electrical

Wood, Robert

198

FY 2013 AgencY FinAnciAl RepoRt www.nasa.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FY 2013 AgencY FinAnciAl RepoRt www.nasa.gov National Aeronautics and Space Administration #12;Front Cover: Outside Front Main Image: Artist concept of planets space. (Credit: NASA) Outside Front of extrave- hicular activity (EVA) as work continues on the International Space Station. (Credit: NASA

Waliser, Duane E.

199

Effects of winglets to augment tube wall heat transfer in louvered fin heat exchangers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of winglets to augment tube wall heat transfer in louvered fin heat exchangers Paul A transfer along the tube wall of the compact heat exchanger through the use of winglets placed of attack, aspect ratio, direction, and shape, were all evaluated based on heat transfer augmentation

Thole, Karen A.

200

Error Analysis of Heat Transfer for Finned-Tube Heat-Exchanger Text-Board  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to reduce the measurement error of heat transfer in water and air side for finned-tube heat-exchanger as little as possible, and design a heat-exchanger test-board measurement system economically, based on the principle of test-board system...

Chen, Y.; Zhang, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fuel additives: Excluding aviation fuels. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning compositions, applications and performance of additives in fuels. Evaluations and environmental testing of additives in automotive, diesel, and boiler fuels are discussed. Additive effects on air pollution control, combustion stability, fuel economy and fuel storage are presented. Aviation fuel additives are covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Fuel additives: Excluding aviation fuels. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning compositions, applications and performance of additives in fuels. Evaluations and environmental testing of additives in automotive, diesel, and boiler fuels are discussed. Additive effects on air pollution control, combustion stability, fuel economy and fuel storage are presented. Aviation fuel additives are covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 231 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Local Heat Transfer for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers using Oval Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with either a circular tube or an elliptical tube in crossflow. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.56 x 10-3 to 15.6 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 630 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. The elliptical tube had an aspect ratio of 3:1 and a/H equal to 4.33. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of circular and oval tubes and their relationship to the complex horseshoe vortex system that forms in the flow stagnation region. Fin surface stagnation-region Nusselt numbers are shown to be proportional to the square-root of Reynolds number.

O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

La guerra del fin del mundo: historia e invencion en una novela historica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or inexplicable elements in human reality, and which finds the novel a vehicle for a more complete understanding of that reality as represented by histor- ical data. The text of this thesis is written in Spanish. iv INDICE DE MATERIAS CAPITULO I... ' INTRODUCCION Pagina Historia e invencion en la novela historica Historia e invencion: El concepto de Verges Llosa y algunos contemporaneos suyos La realidad historica y la invencion artistica en La uerra del fin del mundo 12 II EL ACONTECIHIENTO...

Loeffler, Lisa Bowe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-tube Heat Exchangers with Winglets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of an experimental study of forced convection heat transfer in a narrow rectangular duct fitted with a circular tube and/or a delta-winglet pair. The duct was designed to simulate a single passage in a fin-tube heat exchanger. Heat transfer measurements were obtained using a transient technique in which a heated airflow is suddenly introduced to the test section. High-resolution local fin-surface temperature distributions were obtained at several times after initiation of the transient using an imaging infrared camera. Corresponding local fin-surface heat transfer coefficient distributions were then calculated from a locally applied one-dimensional semi-infinite inverse heat conduction model. Heat transfer results were obtained over an airflow rate ranging from 1.51 x 10-3 to 14.0 x 10-3 kg/s. These flow rates correspond to a duct-height Reynolds number range of 670 6300 with a duct height of 1.106 cm and a duct width-toheight ratio, W/H, of 11.25. The test cylinder was sized such that the diameter-to-duct height ratio, D/H is 5. Results presented in this paper reveal visual and quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer distributions in the vicinity of a circular tube, a delta-winglet pair, and a combination of a circular tube and a delta-winglet pair. Comparisons of local and average heat transfer distributions for the circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Overall mean finsurface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement associated with the deployment of the winglets with the circular cylinder. At the lowest Reynolds numbers (which correspond to the laminar operating conditions of existing geothermal air-cooled condensers), the enhancement level is nearly a factor of two. At higher Reynolds numbers, the enhancement level is close to 50%.

O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Experimental investigation of plastic finned-tube heat exchangers, with emphasis on material thermal conductivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, two modified types of polypropylene (PP) with high thermal conductivity up to 2.3 W/m K and 16.5 W/m K are used to manufacture the finned-tube heat exchangers, which are prospected to be used in liquid desiccant air conditioning, heat recovery, water source heat pump, sea water desalination, etc. A third plastic heat exchanger is also manufactured with ordinary PP for validation and comparison. Experiments are carried out to determine the thermal performance of the plastic heat exchangers. It is found that the plastic finned-tube heat exchanger with thermal conductivity of 16.5 W/m K can achieve overall heat transfer coefficient of 34 W/m{sup 2} K. The experimental results are compared with calculation and they agree well with each other. Finally, the effect of material thermal conductivity on heat exchanger thermal performance is studied in detail. The results show that there is a threshold value of material thermal conductivity. Below this value improving thermal conductivity can considerably improve the heat exchanger performance while over this value improving thermal conductivity contributes very little to performance enhancement. For the finned-tube heat exchanger designed in this paper, when the plastic thermal conductivity can reach over 15 W/m K, it can achieve more than 95% of the titanium heat exchanger performance and 84% of the aluminum or copper heat exchanger performance with the same dimension. (author)

Chen, Lin; Li, Zhen; Guo, Zeng-Yuan [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Thermal behavior of spiral fin-and-tube heat exchanger having fly ash deposit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research investigates the effect of fly-ash deposit on thermal performance of a cross-flow heat exchanger having a set of spiral finned-tubes as a heat transfer surface. A stream of warm air having high content of fly-ash is exchanging heat with a cool water stream in the tubes. In this study, the temperature of the heat exchanger surface is lower than the dew point temperature of air, thus there is condensation of moisture in the air stream on the heat exchanger surface. The affecting parameters such as the fin spacing, the air mass flow rate, the fly-ash mass flow rate and the inlet temperature of warm air are varied while the volume flow rate and the inlet temperature of the cold water stream are kept constant at 10 l/min and 5 C, respectively. From the experiment, it is found that as the testing period is shorter than 8 h the thermal resistance due to the fouling increases with time. Moreover, the deposit of fly-ash on the heat transfer surface is directly proportional to the dust-air ratio and the amount of condensate on heat exchange surface. However, the deposit of fly-ash is inversely proportional to the fin spacing. The empirical model for evaluating the thermal resistance is also developed in this work and the simulated results agree well with those of the measured data. (author)

Nuntaphan, Atipoang [Thermal Technology Research Laboratory, Mae Moh Training Center, Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Mae Moh, Lampang 52220 (Thailand); Kiatsiriroat, Tanongkiat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sustainable bio kerosene: Process routes and industrial demonstration activities in aviation biofuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Alternative fuels are expected to play a major role in EU in the coming years due European Directives on the promotion of renewable energies and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in transports. However, while in road transports a variety of possible renewable fuels (mainly biofuels, but also electricity) can be considered, in aviation only high quality paraffinic biofuels can be adopted. This means that biomass must be converted through advanced processes into pure hydrocarbon fuels, fully compatible with the existing systems. The aviation sector is responsible for the 2% of the world anthropogenic CO2 emissions and the 10% of the fuel consumption: airlines costs for fuel reach 30% of operating costs. In addition, the aviation traffic is expected to double within 15years from 2012, while fuel consumption and CO2 emissions should double in 25years. Thus, more than 2 billion people and 40 Mt of good/cargo will have to be moved every year. In this context, the EU Flightpath set a target of 2Mt per year for aviation alternative fuel by 2020 (i.e. 4% of annual fuel consumption). New processes towards bio-hydrocarbons are being developed, demonstrated and soon industrialized. The present work explores the possible routes from biomass feedstock to sustainable paraffinic fuels, either through bio or thermo-chemical processes, as well as discusses those more mature, focusing on industrial demonstration initiatives. In fact, while the number of possible options towards paraffinic biofuel production is very large, and covers both thermochemical and biochemical routes, as well as hybrid one, only two pathways are today ready for testing a significant large scale: these are FT and Hydrotreating. Major industrial activities and testing experiences are thus reported in the present work. In this context, the ITAKA group is developing a full value-chain in Europe to produce sustainable drop-in Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (SPK) called HEFA in an economically, socially and environmentally sound manner, at large scale enough to allow testing its use in existing logistic systems and in normal flight operations in Europe. The generated knowledge will aim to identify and address barriers to innovation. Within ITAKA, possible pre-processing of used (waste) cooking oil (UCO) to make it compatible with current downstream hydroprocessing techniques are being investigated: this can includes esterification of waste oils, as well as catalytic thermal processing, which will be carried out in a pilot unit available at RE-CORD/CREAR. First samples of feedstock oils were collected and characterized, for further investigation towards their conversion into biokerosene through hydrotreatment.

David Chiaramonti; Matteo Prussi; Marco Buffi; Daniela Tacconi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

3D Numerical heat transfer and fluid flow analysis in plate-fin and tube heat exchangers with electrohydrodynamic enhancement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-dimensional laminar fluid flow and heat transfer over a four-row plate-fin and tube heat exchanger with electrohydrodynamic (EHD) wire electrodes...V E...=016kV) are investigated in detail...

Chia-Wen Lin; Jiin-Yuh Jang

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

O'Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Decisiones de la mscara neutra: Dramaturgia femenina y fin de siglo en Amrica Latina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

finesecular en Amrica Latina siempre desde una evaluacin de realidades en movimiento. Enajenacin discursiva y resistencia de la representacin en el fin de siglo El siglo XX se despide con el conocido agotamiento en los modos de representacin de... inmediata para una nueva formulacin del signo.2 La inflacin de materiales se agrava en las postrimeras del XX para cubrir el vaco o saturar el espacio con lo que Kermode llamara "the sense of an ending." De alguna forma, - y esto va a tener una gran...

Martí nez de Olcoz, Nieves

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Plate Fin Heat Exchanger Model with Axial Conduction and Variable Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Future superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, as part of Project X at Fermilab, will be cooled to superfluid helium temperatures by a cryogenic distribution system supplying cold supercritical helium. To reduce vapor fraction during the final Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion into the superfluid helium cooling bath, counter-flow, plate-fin heat exchangers will be utilized. Due to their compact size and ease of fabrication, plate-fin heat exchangers are an effective option. However, the design of compact and high-effectiveness cryogenic heat exchangers operating at liquid helium temperatures requires consideration of axial heat conduction along the direction of flow, in addition to variable fluid properties. Here we present a numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger. The model is used to guide design decisions on heat exchanger material choice and geometry. In addition, the J-T expansion process is modeled with the heat exchanger to analyze the effect of heat load and cryogenic supply parameters. A numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger was developed and the effect of various design parameters on overall heat exchanger size was investigated. It was found that highly conductive metals should be avoided in the design of compact JT heat exchangers. For the geometry considered, the optimal conductivity is around 3.5 W/m-K and can range from 0.3-10 W/m-K without a large loss in performance. The model was implemented with an isenthalpic expansion process. Increasing the cold side inlet temperature from 2K to 2.2 K decreased the liquid fraction from 0.856 to 0.839 which corresponds to a 0.12 g/s increase in supercritical helium supply needed to maintain liquid level in the cooling bath. Lastly, it was found that the effectiveness increased when the heat load was below the design value. Therefore, the heat exchanger should be sized on the high end of the required heat load.

Hansen, B.J.; White, M.J.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Experimental investigation of highly effective plate-fin heat exchanger surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results are presented of an experimental investigation of a new convective rational heat transfer augmentation law in plate-fin heat exchanger surfaces. This law is characterized by Nu/Nusm ? ?/?sm by comparing channels (heat transfer surfaces) with vortex promoters with similar smooth channels at equal Reynolds numbers. For experimental confirmation and investigation of this law, heat exchanger cores having three different plate-fin surfaces were developed and manufactured. Two surfaces are formed by short offset channels (interrupted surfaces) of equilateral triangular and rectangular cross sections. The third surface has channels of isosceles triangular cross sections, with transverse projections and grooves along the channel length direction. The experimental results and correlations are reported for the three surfaces. The experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel with specially developed precise instrumentation that ensured experimental uncertainties of ?? = 2.3% and ?Re = 1.7% at a 0.997 confidence level. Analysis of the results indicated that the fundamental character and causes limiting rational heat transfer augmentation to Nu/Nusm ? ?/?sm depend upon the heat transfer surface configuration. This paper consolidates the author's research on the subject reported in the Russian language over the last 25 years.

E.V. Dubrovsky

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Fin whale song characteristics recorded on ocean bottom seismometers in the Northeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fin whales produce low frequency sequences of vocalizations that can be detected opportunistically on ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs). Using an automatic detection algorithm we have analyzed fin whale calls recorded on OBSs in the Northeast Pacific Ocean over broad spatial and temporal scales. The Cascadia Initiative experiment consists of 70 OBSs deployed for a total of four years (20112015). It extends from Vancouver Island to Cape Mendocino and several hundred kilometers offshore. Additional OBS data that overlap spatially with the northern portion of the Cascadia Initiative instruments are available from the Neptune Canada cabled observatory which has been online since 2009 and from standalone deployments between 2003 and 2006. With this study we examine call characteristics and seasonal call counts for patterns that might indicate migratory movements or distinct acoustic populations. Both frequency and inter-pulse interval (IPI) are automatically extracted for each detected call and seasonal and inter-annual calling patterns are examined using daily binned call count histograms. Preliminary analysis of a subset of Cascadia Initiative data from 2011 to 2013 shows a dominant sequence of alternating classic and backbeat calls at center frequencies of 20 and 18.5 Hz respectively and preceding IPIs of 16 and 18 s respectively.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

DOE-STD-1165-2003; Aviation Manager Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5-2003 5-2003 September 2003 DOE STANDARD AVIATION MANAGER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1165-2003 ii This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000.

216

DOE-STD-1164-2003; Aviation Safety Officer Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4-2003 4-2003 September 2003 DOE STANDARD AVIATION SAFETY OFFICER FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA-TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1164-2003 This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000.

217

Determination of the Number of Tube Rows to Obtain Closure for Volume Averaging Theory Based Model of Fin-and-Tube Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fig. 3 Journal of Heat Transfer Grid system for 2-row caseDomain and Grid System. Since the fin-and- tube heat

Zhou, Feng; Hansen, Nicholas E; Geb, David J; Catton, Ivan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A new glide path: re-architecting the Flight School XXI Enterprise at the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis utilizes eight Enterprise Architecture views to analyze the U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence's Flight School XXI Enterprise and provides recommendations to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of ...

Enos, James R. (James Robert)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Heat transfer and pressure drop correlations for the rectangular offset strip fin compact heat exchanger  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of thermal-hydraulic design tools for rectangular offset strip fin compact heat exchangers and the associated convection process are delineated. On the basis of current understanding of the physical phenomena and enhancement mechanisms, existing empirical f and j data for actual cores are reanalyzed. The asymptotic behavior of the data in the deep laminar and fully turbulent flow regimes is identified. The respective asymptotes for f and j are shown to be correlated by power law expressions in terms of Re and the dimensionless geometric parameters ?, ?, and ?. Finally, rational design equations for f and j are presented in the form of single continuous expressions covering the laminar, transition, and turbulent flow regimes.

Raj M. Manglik; Arthur E. Bergles

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Accelerated (9-11 Month) MBA for UG Business Majors w/ Work Experience SAC(Fin/Actg) Fall Winter Spring Summer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bus. Leadership & Ethics MKTG 610 New Product Development ACTG 620 Entrepreneurial Actg MKTG 660 Industrial Ecology DSC 566 Project & Ops Management BA 610 Bus. Leadership & Ethics MGMT 610 Energy. Leadership & Ethics ACTG 617 Taxation of Business FIN 667 Fixed Income & Debt Mkts FIN 683 Investments ACTG

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Convective flow of refrigerant (R-123) across a bank of micro pin fins Ali Kosar, Yoav Peles *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and pressure drop of R-123 over a bank of shrouded micro pin fins 243 lm long with hydraulic diameter of 99.5 lm. Heat transfer coefficients and Nusselt numbers have been obtained over effective heat fluxes studied in the context of turbine blade cooling. Nusselt number and friction factor correlations

Peles, Yoav

222

Heat transfer augmentation along the tube wall of a louvered fin heat exchanger using practical delta winglets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer augmentation along the tube wall of a louvered fin heat exchanger using practical the formation of streamwise vortices and increase heat transfer between a working fluid and the surface on which the winglets are placed. This study investigates the use of delta winglets to augment heat transfer on the tube

Thole, Karen A.

223

Development of Friction Factor Correlation for Single-phase Flow in Micro-fin Tube Using Logistic Dose Response Curve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@umac.mo Abstract: Tam et al. [1] conducted simultaneous heat transfer and friction factor experiments for the plain the same as the plain tube. However, the friction factor characteristics of the micro-fin tubes in the transition region were different compared to the plain tube. This type of data cannot be easily correlated

Ghajar, Afshin J.

224

Miguel Navarro Menargues, ingeniero por la UA, galardonado en los Premios Nacionales de Fin de Carrera de Educacin Universitaria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Miguel Navarro Menargues, ingeniero por la UA, galardonado en los Premios Nacionales de Fin de Carrera de Educación Universitaria Alicante, 6 de junio de 2013 Miguel Navarro Menargues, ingeniero. Fotografía: Miguel Navarro Menargues, galardonado muestra su diploma de reconocimiento recibido el martes en

Escolano, Francisco

225

ARRA FEMP Technical Assistance -- Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 -- Control Tower and Support Building, Palm Springs, CA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 100% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be built in Palm Springs, California by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sales Type: Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales Type: Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Sales Type Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Aviation Gasoline 93.3 8.2 10.0 12.0 10.9 11.4 1983-2013 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 32,893.1 32,452.7 33,281.4 32,532.8 29,876.9 29,004.1 1983-2013 Propane (Consumer Grade) 6,321.3 6,161.4 5,990.4 6,377.7 6,892.8 3,264.5 1983-2013 Kerosene 3.5 2.4 3.6 2.2 3.6 8.8 1983-2013 No. 1 Distillate 45.2 31.9 36.3 32.5 44.6 103.0 1983-2013 No. 2 Distillate 11,266.8 11,311.6 11,647.9 11,375.1 11,192.1 12,138.1 1983-2013 No. 2 Diesel Fuel NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994-2013

227

Aviation fuel synthesis by catalytic conversion of biomass hydrolysate in aqueous phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a new route for biomass derived aviation fuel synthesis by catalytic conversion in aqueous phase. Furfural with the yield of 71% was produced by acid hydrolysis of raw corncob, and hydrogenated to 2-methylfuran with obtaining the yield of 89% over Raney Ni catalyst, both of which were implemented under mild reaction conditions. The hydroxyalkylation/alkylation condensation of 2-methylfuran and furfural to C15 intermediate was conducted by using organic and inorganic acid as the catalyst under the reaction condition of 328K and atmospheric pressure. The maximal 95% of the C15 intermediate was gained when using sulfuric acid as the catalyst. 83% of liquid alkanes (C8C15) yield and more than 90% of C14/C15 selectivity were produced by hydrodeoxygenation of the C15 intermediate over 10wt%Ni/ZrO2SiO2 catalyst. During the hydrodeoxygenation process, the catalyst showed excellent stability depended on the 110h of time-on-stream test, due to its significantly decreased carbon deposition.

Tiejun Wang; Kai Li; Qiying Liu; Qing Zhang; Songbai Qiu; Jinxing Long; Lungang Chen; Longlong Ma; Qi Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Emergence of green business models: The case of algae biofuel for aviation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Emergent business models seek to take advantage of new market mechanisms driven by technological changes, particularly those related to the production and delivery of clean or sustainable energy. Such business models often function at the intersection of various industries, with global views, and the resulting systems have distinct social, political, environmental, economic, technological, and business dimensions. Such holistic systems are not only difficult to develop but also require support from a broad range of actors with effective regulations and policies in place, such that the firm functions within a framework that integrates various factors. This study substantiates such a framework by detailing the nascent algae-based bio-fuel industry that caters to the aviation sector while arguing that businesses in the energy industry can emerge as a next-practice platform that drive a sixth wave of innovation. The framework begins with three basic enablers, innovation, flexibility, and sustainability, and explains how value from renewable energy technologies can be created and captured sustainably and innovatively with new market mechanisms implemented by firms with green business models.

Sujith Nair; Hanna Paulose

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

STUDEN T FIN ANCIAL AID AND SCHO LARSHIP S SE RVICE SUPPO RT SUCC ESS 1278 University of Oregon, Eugene OR 97403-1278 http://financialaid.uoregon.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDEN T FIN ANCIAL AID AND SCHO LARSHIP S SE RVICE SUPPO RT SUCC ESS 1278 University of Oregon #12;STUDEN T FIN ANCIAL AID AND SCHO LARSHIP S SE RVICE SUPPO RT SUCC ESS 1278 University of Oregon

Oregon, University of

230

X:\Data_Publication\Pma\current\ventura\pma00.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

calculated in terms of the following formula: calculated in terms of the following formula: Deg API sp gr degF degF = - 141 5 60 60 131 5 . . The higher the API gravity, the lighter the compound. Light crudes generally exceed 38 degrees API and heavy crudes are commonly labeled as all crudes with an API gravity of 22 degrees or below. Intermediate crudes fall in the range of 22 degrees to 38 degrees API gravity. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on fin- ished aviation gasoline. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure for crude oil and petroleum products equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons.

231

Development of a Solar Assisted Drying System Using Double-Pass Solar Collector with Finned Absorber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Energy Research Group, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, International Islamic University Malaysia and Yayasan FELDA has designed and constructed a solar assisted drying system at OPF FELDA Factory, Felda Bukit Sagu 2, Kuantan, Pahang. The drying system has a total of six double-pass solar collectors. Each collector has a length of 480 cm and a width of 120 cm. The first channel depth is 3.5 cm and the second channel depth is 7 cm. Longitudinal fins made of angle aluminium, 0.8 mm thickness were attached to the bottom surface of the absorber plate. The solar collectors are arranged as two banks of three collectors each in series. Internal manifold are used to connect the collectors. Air enters through the first channel and then through the second channel of the collector. An auxiliary heater source is installed to supply heat under unfavourable solar radiation condition. An on/off controller is used to control the startup and shutdown of the auxiliary heater. An outlet temperature of 7075 C can be achieved at solar radiation range of 800900 W/m2 and flow rate of 0.12 kg/s. The average thermal efficiency of a solar collector is approximately 37%.

M S M Azmi; M Y Othman; K Sopian; M H Ruslan; Z A A Majid; A Fudholi; J M Yasin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - auxerre glossed bibles Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and high gloss fin- ishes, so that the ink... brightness and vice versa. According to TAPPI standards,11 gloss is defined as the 75 ... Source: Abubakr, Said - Department of...

233

U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History Aviation Gasoline 413.1 602.6 593.2 547.1 431.5 432.6 1983-2013 Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel 26,119.1 27,197.0 28,168.9 27,226.7 25,645.0 27,379.5 1983-2013 Propane (Consumer Grade) 26,164.7 24,627.2 25,506.9 30,382.5 31,250.8 38,981.9 1983-2013 Kerosene 1,302.3 897.9 1,049.8 1,199.7 1,224.4 1,318.9 1983-2013 No. 1 Distillate 197.2 124.8 141.7 228.9 336.0 947.3 1983-2013 No. 2 Distillate 148,472.9 149,527.5 153,402.1 152,957.9 149,298.1 160,704.2 1983-2013 No. 2 Diesel Fuel NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994-2013 Ultra Low-Sulfur 140,589.9 143,645.5 145,899.9 142,352.7 139,922.9 151,092.7 2007-2013 Low-Sulfur 1,976.7 1,020.9 2,521.9 2,944.3 2,205.9 3,904.5 1994-2013 High-Sulfur

234

Experimental confirmation of the propulsion of marine vessels employing guided flexural waves in attached elastic fins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of the first experimental verification of the idea of wave-like aquatic propulsion of manned marine vessels first published by the first author in 1994. The idea is based on employing the unique type of guided flexural elastic waves propagating along edges of immersed wedge-like structures attached to a body of a small ship or a submarine as keels or wings and used for the propulsion. The principle of employing such guided flexural waves as a source of aquatic propulsion is similar to that used in nature by stingrays. It is vitally important for the application of this idea to manned vessels that, in spite of vibration of the fins, the main body of the craft remains undisturbed as the energy of guided elastic waves is concentrated away from it. The main expected advantages of this new propulsion method over the existing ones, e.g. jets and propellers, are the following: it is quiet, and it is environmentally friendly and safe for people and wildlife. To verify the idea experimentally, the first working prototype of a small catamaran using the above-mentioned wave-like propulsion via the attached rubber keel has been built and tested. The test results have shown that the catamaran was propelled efficiently and could achieve the speed of 36cm/s, thus demonstrating that the idea of wave-like propulsion of manned craft is viable. The reported proof of the viability of this idea may open new opportunities for marine craft propulsion, which can have far-reaching implications.

V.V. Krylov; G.V. Pritchard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

,"U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates" Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates",11,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_d_nus_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_d_nus_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm"

236

,"U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates" Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, Propane, No.1 and No. 2 Distillates",11,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1983" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refoth_d_nus_vwr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refoth_d_nus_vwr_mgalpd_m.htm"

237

Thermal management optimization of an air-cooled Li-ion battery module using pin-fin heat sinks for hybrid electric vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Three dimensional transient thermal analysis of an air-cooled module that contains prismatic Li-ion cells next to a special kind of aluminum pin fin heat sink whose heights of pin fins increase linearly through the width of the channel in air flow direction was studied for thermal management of Lithium-ion battery pack. The effects of pin fins arrangements, discharge rates, inlet air flow velocities, and inlet air temperatures on the battery were investigated. The results showed that despite of heat sinks with uniform pin fin heights that increase the standard deviation of the temperature field, using this kind of pin fin heat sink compare to the heat sink without pin fins not only decreases the bulk temperature inside the battery, but also decreases the standard deviation of the temperature field inside the battery as well. Increasing the inlet air temperature leads to decreasing the standard deviation of the temperature field while increases the maximum temperature of the battery. Furthermore, increasing the inlet air velocity first increases the standard deviation of the temperature field till reaches to the maximum point, and after that decreases. Also, increasing the inlet air velocity leads to decrease in the maximum temperature of the battery.

Shahabeddin K. Mohammadian; Yuwen Zhang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

EA-2000: Proposed Land Transfer to Develop a General Aviation Airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of the proposed land transfer to the Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority for the development of a general aviation airport at the East Tennessee Technology Park Heritage Center, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download No downloads found for this office.

239

System-of-systems iso-performance search to inform multi-actor policymaking to reduce aviation life cycle carbon emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a system-of-systems formalism for modeling and analyzing multi-actor policymaking to achieve a global system objective. In contrast to a single optimal solution that aggregates objectives of actors, the concept of iso-performance ... Keywords: aviation life cycle emissions, iso-performance, multi-actor policymaking, system-of-systems

Datu B. Agusdinata; Daniel A. DeLaurentis

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Preliminary assessment report for Virginia Army National Guard Army Aviation Support Facility, Richmond International Airport, Installation 51230, Sandston, Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Virginia Army National Guard (VaARNG) property in Sandston, Virginia. The Army Aviation Support Facility (AASF) is contiguous with the Richmond International Airport. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The PA is designed to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF, originally constructed as an active Air Force interceptor base, provides maintenance support for VaARNG aircraft. Hazardous materials used and stored at the facility include JP-4 jet fuel, diesel fuel, gasoline, liquid propane gas, heating oil, and motor oil.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

This is an earlier view of the accepted manuscript for the article "Fish fins as non-lethal surrogates for muscle tissues in freshwater food web studies using stable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is an earlier view of the accepted manuscript for the article "Fish fins as non- lethal is available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/rcm.6265/abstract. Fish fins as non-muscle relationships for 14 European freshwater fish species Nicolas Hette-Tronquart*a , Laurent Mazeasa , Liana

Boyer, Edmond

242

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 Control Tower and Support Building Oakland, CA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 70% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be build at Oakland, California by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specification that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 - Control Tower and Support Building, Las Vegas, NV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 70% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be built in Las Vegas, Nevada by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specification that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Composition-explicit distillation curves of aviation fuel JP-8 and a coal-based jet fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have recently introduced several important improvements in the measurement of distillation curves for complex fluids. The modifications to the classical measurement provide for (1) a composition explicit data channel for each distillate fraction (for both qualitative and quantitative analysis); (2) temperature measurements that are true thermodynamic state points; (3) temperature, volume, and pressure measurements of low uncertainty suitable for an equation of state development; (4) consistency with a century of historical data; (5) an assessment of the energy content of each distillate fraction; (6) a trace chemical analysis of each distillate fraction; and (7) a corrosivity assessment of each distillate fraction. The most significant modification is achieved with a new sampling approach that allows precise qualitative as well as quantitative analyses of each fraction, on the fly. We have applied the new method to the measurement of rocket propellant, gasoline, and jet fuels. In this paper, we present the application of the technique to representative batches of the military aviation fuel JP-8, and also to a coal-derived fuel developed as a potential substitute. We present not only the distillation curves but also a chemical characterization of each fraction and discuss the contrasts between the two fluids. 26 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

Beverly L. Smith; Thomas J. Bruno [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Division

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Preliminary assessment report for Army Aviation Support Facility 2, Installation 25075, Westover Air Force Base, Chicopee, Massachusetts. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Massachusetts Army National Guard (MAARNG) property known as the Army Aviation Support Facility 2 (AASF 2) near Chicopee, Massachusetts. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The AASF 2 is a 10-acre site located in the western portion of Massachusetts, in the town of Chicopee, in the county of Hampden. The facilities included in this PA are Building 7400, adjacent paved areas, grassy areas, and the hazardous waste drum storage buildings. The environmentally significant operations (ESOS) associated with the property are (1) the waste drum storage area, (2) abandoned underground storage tanks (USTs), and (3) refueling activities.

Haffenden, R.; Flaim, S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Disruption of Vessel-Spanning Bubbles with Sloped Fins in Flat-Bottom and 2:1 Elliptical-Bottom Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive sludge was generated in the K-East Basin and K-West Basin fuel storage pools at the Hanford Site while irradiated uranium metal fuel elements from the N Reactor were being stored and packaged. The fuel has been removed from the K Basins, and currently, the sludge resides in the KW Basin in large underwater Engineered Containers. The first phase to the Sludge Treatment Project being led by CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is to retrieve and load the sludge into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport the sludge to T Plant for interim storage. The STSCs will be stored inside T Plant cells that are equipped with secondary containment and leak-detection systems. The sludge is composed of a variety of particulate materials and water, including a fraction of reactive uranium metal particles that are a source of hydrogen gas. If a situation occurs where the reactive uranium metal particles settle out at the bottom of a container, previous studies have shown that a vessel-spanning gas layer above the uranium metal particles can develop and can push the overlying layer of sludge upward. The major concern, in addition to the general concern associated with the retention and release of a flammable gas such as hydrogen, is that if a vessel-spanning bubble (VSB) forms in an STSC, it may drive the overlying sludge material to the vents at the top of the container. Then it may be released from the container into the cells secondary containment system at T Plant. A previous study demonstrated that sloped walls on vessels, both cylindrical coned-shaped vessels and rectangular vessels with rounded ends, provided an effective approach for disrupting a VSB by creating a release path for gas as a VSB began to rise. Based on the success of sloped-wall vessels, a similar concept is investigated here where a sloped fin is placed inside the vessel to create a release path for gas. A key potential advantage of using a sloped fin compared to a vessel with a sloped wall is that a small fin decreases the volume of a vessel available for sludge storage by a very small fraction compared to a cone-shaped vessel. The purpose of this study is to quantify the capability of sloped fins to disrupt VSBs and to conduct sufficient tests to estimate the performance of fins in full-scale STSCs. Experiments were conducted with a range of fin shapes to determine what slope and width were sufficient to disrupt VSBs. Additional tests were conducted to demonstrate how the fin performance scales with the sludge layer thickness and the sludge strength, density, and vessel diameter based on the gravity yield parameter, which is a dimensionless ratio of the force necessary to yield the sludge to its weight.( ) Further experiments evaluated the difference between vessels with flat and 2:1 elliptical bottoms and a number of different simulants, including the KW container sludge simulant (complete), which was developed to match actual K-Basin sludge. Testing was conducted in 5-in., 10-in., and 23-in.-diameter vessels to quantify how fin performance is impacted by the size of the test vessel. The most significant results for these scale-up tests are the trend in how behavior changes with vessel size and the results from the 23-in. vessel. The key objective in evaluating fin performance is to determine the conditions that minimize the volume of a VSB when disruption occurs because this reduces the potential for material inside the STSC from being released through vents.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Chun, Jaehun; Russell, Renee L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Mastor, Michael M.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 Control Tower and Support Building, Reno, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Redhorse Corporation (Redhorse) conducted an energy audit on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) control tower and base building in Reno, Nevada. This report presents the findings of the energy audit team that evaluated construction documents and operating specifications (at the 100% level) and completed a site visit. The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

institution Service Fin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the up eed to have: eferred institut mary DUNS nu me, title, and em enter the infor ded verificatio st universit earching on th e n institution is r "List of Comp ent, or search for the institut thorized. Not Listed? ted, it may still uctions with th n or entity can HScompliant F o determine if i cies

Hutcheon, James M.

249

The evaluation of a coal-derived liquid as a feedstock for the production of high-density aviation turbine fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion of coal-derived liquids to transportation fuels has been the subject of many studies sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the US Department of Defense. For the most part, these studies evaluated conventional petroleum processes for the production of specification-grade fuels. Recently, however, the interest of these two departments expanded to include the evaluation of alternate fossil fuels as a feedstock for the production of high-density aviation turbine fuel. In this study, we evaluated five processes for their ability to produce intermediates from a coal-derived liquid for the production of high-density turbine fuel. These processes include acid-base extraction to reduce the heteroatom content of the middle distillate and the atmospheric and vacuum gas oils, solvent dewaxing to reduce the paraffin (alkane) content of the atmospheric and vacuum gas oils, Attapulgus clay treatment to reduce the heteroatom content of the middle distillate, coking to reduce the distillate range of the vacuum gas oil, and hydrogenation to remove heteroatoms and to saturate aromatic rings in the middle distillate and atmospheric gas oil. The chemical and physical properties that the US Air Force considers critical for the development of high-denisty aviation turbine fuel are specific gravity and net heat of combustion. The target minimum values for these properties are a specific gravity of at least 0.85 and a net heat of combustion of at least 130,000 Btu/gal. In addition, the minimum hydrogen content is 13.0 wt %, the maximum freeze point is {minus}53{degrees}F ({minus}47{degrees}C), the maximum amount of aromatics is about 25 to 30 vol %, and the maximum amount of paraffins is 10 vol %. 13 refs., 20 tabs.

Thomas, K.P.; Hunter, D.E.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Direct Trajectory Interpolation on the Surface using an Open CNC Xavier Beudaert Sylvain Lavernhe Christophe Tournier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct Trajectory Interpolation on the Surface using an Open CNC Xavier Beudaert � Sylvain Lavernhe format of the industrial CNC. Then, during the tool path interpolation, marks on fin- ished surfaces can of the data exchange between CAD/CAM and CNC opens new ways to optimize the manufacturing process. The Direct

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

251

Northwestern University Transportation Center Aviation Symposium: "The Future for Aviation"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and other governments have approved several Anti-Trust Immunity (ATI) agreements for Transatlantic travel #12;Joint Ventures Statistics 12 · Transatlantic capacity share 21% · Destinations ­ 117 Europe, 180 North America · 6 Major Hubs: DFW, JFK, LHR, MAD, MIA, ORD · Transatlantic capacity share 27

Bustamante, Fabián E.

252

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 1 Overview During 1998, the natural gas industry showed modest declines in both production and end-use consumption. Pro- duction decreased slightly, by 1 percent, to 18.7 trillion cubic feet. Consumption fell in nearly every end use sector, contributing to an overall drop of 3 percent. Declines in consumption were seen in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors. These decreases were somewhat offset by an increase in deliveries to electric utilities, attributed in part to the warmer-than-normal summer weather seen during 1998. Natural gas prices also fell in 1998 from the wellhead to every end use sector except vehicle fuel. Imports took on a greater role in meeting supply during 1998, contributing a 15-percent share of U.S. gas con- sumption, compared with a 5-percent share in the early 1980's. Underground

253

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 13. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1995-1999 Figure 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters O n s y s t e m C o m m e r c i a l R e s i d e n t i a l O n s y s t e m I n d u s t r i a l O n s y s t e m V e h i c l e F u e l E l e c t r i c U t i l i t i e s Note: Onsystem sales deliveries represent 66.1 percent of commercial deliveries, 17.4 percent of industrial deliveries, and 85.6 percent of vehicle fuel deliveries in 1999. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC- 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants." Cautionary Note: Number of Residential Consumers The Energy Information Administration

254

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 217,377 102,770 1.18 1,067 0.01 38 0.75 34,417 0.76 28,883 0.89 25,986 0.87 192,094 0.99 O r e g o n Oregon - Table 84 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oregon, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 19 17 18 17 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 4,200 2,520 1,743 1,382 1,263 From Oil Wells...........................................

255

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Southern California Gas Co ..................... CA 269,739,909 7.31 Pacific Gas and Elec Co........................... CA 224,402,286 6.32 Northern Illinois Gas Co ........................... IL 196,608,329 4.63 Consumers Pwr Co .................................. MI 153,128,350 4.92 Columbia Gas Dist Co.............................. OH,KY,PA,MD 138,064,908 7.21 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co........................ NJ 126,142,540 6.61 Michigan Consol Gas Co.......................... MI 125,456,377 5.35 East Ohio Gas Co .................................... OH 117,574,196 6.21 Peoples Gas Lt and Coke Co................... IL 89,685,006 6.81 Atlanta Gas Lt Co ..................................... GA 89,103,601 6.69 Lone Star Gas Co..................................... TX 84,559,915 5.95 Brooklyn Union Gas Co............................ NY

256

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,000,412 436,075 4.85 609,243 3.11 31 0.55 433,483 9.18 74,241 2.38 282,912 9.28 1,226,742 6.17 West North Central West North Central - Table 32 32. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 22,277 21,669 21,755 21,253 17,820 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 655,917 648,822 638,038 552,800 505,882 From Oil Wells........................................... 134,776 133,390 118,776 120,981

257

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 A1. Comparison of Electric Utility Natural Gas Consumption Data by State, 1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Form EIA-176 Form EIA-759 Difference MDP a Alabama ............................................ 17,039 20,918 3,879 22.8 Alaska ............................................... 29,720 30,529 810 2.7 Arizona .............................................. 51,577 50,875 -702 1.4 Arkansas ........................................... 38,197 40,088 1,891 5.0 California ........................................... 141,730 144,655 2,924 2.1 Colorado............................................ 20,048 19,155 -893 4.7 Connecticut ....................................... 13,704 13,095 -609 4.7 Delaware ........................................... 19,587 19,878 292 1.5

258

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 472,632 126,891 1.46 5,796 0.03 84 1.65 14,102 0.31 281,346 8.64 37,659 1.26 460,082 2.36 F l o r i d a Florida - Table 56 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 98 92 96 96 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

259

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama .................................... 3,526 4,105 4,156 4,171 4,204 Alaska ....................................... 100 102 141 148 99 Arizona ...................................... 7 7 8 8 8 Arkansas ................................... 3,988 4,020 3,700 3,900 3,650 California ................................... 997 978 930 847 1,152 Colorado.................................... 7,017 8,251 12,433 13,838 9,678 Illinois ........................................ 372 370 372 185 300 Indiana ...................................... 1,347 1,367 1,458 1,479 1,498 Kansas ...................................... 22,020 21,388 21,500 21,000 17,568 Kentucky ................................... 13,311 13,501 13,825 R 14,381 14,750 Louisiana ................................... 14,169 15,295 14,958 18,399 16,717 Maryland ...................................

260

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 55 13. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1995-1999 Figure 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 210 240 270 300 330 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters O n s y s t e m C o m m e r c i a l R e s i d e n t i a l O n s y s t e m I n d u s t r i a l O n s y s t e m V e h i c l e F u e l E l e c t r i c U t i l i t i e s Note: Onsystem sales deliveries represent 66.1 percent of commercial deliveries, 17.4 percent of industrial deliveries, and 85.6 percent of vehicle fuel deliveries in 1999. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC- 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants." Cautionary Note: Number

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Consumption - Table 18 State 1998 1999 Sales Transported Total Sales Transported Total 18. Number of Natural Gas Residential Consumers by State, 1998-1999 Table Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Please see the cautionary note regarding the number of residential customers located in the Consumption and Consumer Prices sections of this report. Alabama ...................... 788,464 0 788,464 775,311 0 775,311 Alaska.......................... 86,243 0 86,243 88,924 0 88,924 Arizona ........................ 764,167 0 764,167 802,469 0 802,469 Arkansas ..................... 550,017 0 550,017 554,121 0 554,121 California ..................... 9,177,195 4,733 9,181,928 9,318,830

262

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 12. Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Synthetic Natural Gas Propane- Air Refinery Gas Biomass Gas Other Total Alabama ...................... 0 4 0 0 0 4 Colorado...................... 0 10 0 0 a 4,517 4,526 Connecticut ................. 0 31 0 0 0 31 Georgia........................ 0 12 0 0 0 12 Hawaii.......................... 2,752 0 0 0 0 2,752 Illinois .......................... 0 14 2,513 0 0 2,527 Indiana......................... 0 0 0 0 b 5,442 5,442 Iowa............................. 0 12 0 0 0 12 Kentucky ..................... 0 3 0 0 0 3 Maine........................... 0 43 0 0 0 43 Maryland ..................... 0 498 0 0 0 498 Massachusetts ............ 0 134 0 0 0 134 Michigan ...................... 0 0 0 0 c 20,896 20,896 Minnesota.................... 0 64 0 0 0 64

263

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

264

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 1998 Alabama ...................... 46,544 23,084 97,052 2 12,423 179,106 Alaska.......................... 15,617 27,079 75,474 0 28,961 147,130 Arizona ........................ 36,100 31,577 27,688 152 39,077 134,593 Arkansas ..................... 38,190 24,208 128,768 1 40,128 231,296 California ..................... 549,931 239,363 533,172 2,732 4,472 1,329,670 Colorado...................... 110,839 61,339 50,714 9 8,417 231,318 Connecticut ................. 35,120 23,888 15,721 36 10,606 85,371 D.C. ............................. 13,249 5,629 0 0 0 18,878 Delaware ..................... 7,755 5,590 15,149 2 10,769 39,265 Florida ......................... 14,102 36,827 52,694 84 273,858 377,565 Georgia........................ 107,398 43,554 23,578 12 26,058 200,601 Hawaii.......................... 535 1,747 62 0 0 2,343 Idaho ...........................

265

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 82,678 28,157 0.32 457 0.00 152 2.99 36,100 0.80 38,674 1.19 31,788 1.06 134,871 0.69 A r i z o n a Arizona - Table 49 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 6 7 7 8 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 711 470 417 398 429 From Oil Wells...........................................

266

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 2,382,220 1,344,142 14.95 384,006 1.96 3,489 61.37 678,764 14.37 174,639 5.61 323,946 10.63 2,524,982 12.70 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous - Table 37 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,014 996 947 862 1,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 96,329 88,173 80,182 82,360 91,397 From Oil Wells........................................... 289,430 313,581 318,852 316,472

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 31,164 0 0.00 0 0.00 4 0.08 13,249 0.29 0 0.00 16,862 0.56 30,115 0.15 District of Columbia District of Columbia - Table 55 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

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1998 1998 Alabama Florida ...................................................................... 0 455,199 -455,199 Georgia .................................................................... 0 1,511,671 -1,511,671 Louisiana.................................................................. 0 b 1 -1 Mississippi................................................................ 2,868,594 b * 2,868,594 Oklahoma................................................................. 0 b * * South Carolina ......................................................... 0 b 7 -7 Tennessee ............................................................... 395 1,103,063 -1,102,668 Texas ....................................................................... 0 b 1 -1 Total ........................................................................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 330,620 104,610 1.20 0 0.00 32 0.63 110,449 2.44 7,738 0.24 82,345 2.75 305,174 1.57 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota - Table 70 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

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0 0 Year Supply Disposition Dry Production Withdrawals from Storage Imports Balancing Item Total Additions to Storage Exports Consumption Total 1930 ....................... 1,903,771 NA 21 -35,490 1,868,302 NA 1,798 1,866,504 1,868,302 1931 ....................... 1,659,614 NA 44 -35,466 1,624,192 NA 2,231 1,621,961 1,624,192 1932 ....................... 1,541,982 NA 38 -37,808 1,504,212 NA 1,693 1,502,519 1,504,212 1933 ....................... 1,548,393 NA 83 -41,199 1,507,277 NA 2,158 1,505,119 1,507,277 1934 ....................... 1,763,606 NA 68 -45,075 1,718,599 NA 5,801 1,712,798 1,718,599 1935 ....................... 1,913,475 NA 106 -41,074 1,872,507 11,294 6,800 1,854,413 1,872,507 1936 ....................... 2,164,413 NA 152 -46,677 2,117,888 10,998 7,436 2,099,454 2,117,888 1937 ....................... 2,403,273 NA 289 -52,157 2,351,405

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2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: N e w J e r s e y 524,707 204,791 2.36 0 0.00 0 0.00 196,658 4.35 30,996 0.95 146,653 4.89 579,099 2.97 New Jersey - Table 77 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 240,980 106,497 1.23 0 0.00 0 0.00 50,786 1.12 12,418 0.38 36,427 1.21 206,129 1.06 North Carolina North Carolina - Table 80 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

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9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 218,232 101,368 1.13 72,189 0.37 42 0.74 69,189 1.46 23,457 0.75 61,500 2.02 255,556 1.29 V i r g i n i a Virginia - Table 87 87. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Virginia, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,671 1,671 2,046 2,388 2,752 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 49,818 54,290 58,249 57,263 72,189 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

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9 9 Alabama.............. 6.86 100.0 7.22 100.0 8.35 100.0 8.21 100.0 8.34 100.0 Alaska ................. 3.63 100.0 3.42 100.0 3.77 100.0 3.67 100.0 3.64 100.0 Arizona................ 7.82 100.0 7.52 100.0 7.83 100.0 8.50 100.0 9.13 100.0 Arkansas ............. 5.48 100.0 5.92 100.0 6.67 100.0 6.85 100.0 7.22 100.0 California............. 6.42 99.4 6.44 99.3 6.81 99.2 6.92 99.3 6.62 99.3 Colorado ............. 4.80 100.0 4.39 100.0 4.81 100.0 5.22 100.0 5.38 100.0 Connecticut ......... 10.00 100.0 10.08 100.0 10.33 100.0 10.60 100.0 10.54 100.0 D.C...................... 8.03 100.0 9.19 100.0 9.39 100.0 8.91 99.6 8.70 93.2 Delaware............. 6.60 100.0 7.12 100.0 8.36 100.0 8.90 100.0 8.63 100.0 Florida ................. 9.85 99.4 10.74 99.3 11.90 99.2 11.29 99.3 11.59 99.2 Georgia ............... 6.18 100.0 6.69 100.0 7.41 100.0 6.78 99.9 4.37 60.2 Hawaii .................

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2 2 A1. Form EIA-176 Figure Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 213 EIA-176, ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION, 19 PART IV: SUPPLY OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS RECEIVED WITHIN OR TRANSPORTED INTO REPORT STATE RESPONDENT COPY Page 2 PART III: TYPE OF COMPANY AND GAS ACTIVITIES OPERATED IN THE REPORT STATE 1.0 Type of Company (check one) 1.0 Control No. 2.0 Company Name 3.0 Report State 4.0 Resubmittal EIA Date: a b c d e Investor owned distributor Municipally owned distributor Interstate pipeline Intrastate pipeline Storage operator f g h i j SNG plant operator Integrated oil and gas Producer Gatherer Processor k Other (specify) 2.0 Gas Activities Operated On-system Within the Report State (check all that apply) a b c d e Produced Natural Gas

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0 0 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,791,454 1,109,359 12.34 382,715 1.95 3,327 58.52 568,496 12.03 144,655 4.65 244,701 8.03 2,070,537 10.41 C a l i f o r n i a California - Table 45 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas California, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 997 978 930 847 1,152 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 93,808 86,431 78,800 81,097 89,842 From Oil Wells........................................... 289,430 313,581 318,852 316,472 342,372 Total.............................................................

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 10 nearly 59 percent of U.S. marketed production. In all, 32 States reported measureable production in 1998. · U.S. offshore production decreased slightly during 1998, declining 88 billion cubic feet (1 percent) from the 1997 level, to 5.8 trillion cubic feet. Offshore gross withdrawals accounted for 24 percent of the total U.S. gross withdrawals in 1998. Of the five States with off- shore gross withdrawals of natural gas, two showed declines: Texas had a decrease of 104 billion cubic feet (8 percent), and Alabama had a decrease of 16 bil- lion cubic feet (4 percent). These two States also had declines in onshore production during the same period. Alaska, California, and Louisiana, the remain- ing three States with offshore gross withdrawals of natural gas, showed increases in offshore production ranging from 1 percent

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,577,567 697,640 8.03 241,145 1.23 204 4.02 379,628 8.40 366,270 11.24 312,424 10.42 1,756,166 9.02 South Atlantic South Atlantic - Table 39 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 4,496 4,427 4,729 5,388 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 41,307 37,822 36,827 33,054 41,468 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Alabama.............. 5,043 19.8 5,213 19.9 5,470 18.9 11,432 35.3 5,009 19.5 Alaska ................. 0 - 5,019 20.1 9,990 36.6 12,241 45.5 13,649 50.4 Arizona................ 2,709 9.3 3,282 11.6 4,309 14.9 4,662 15.5 4,777 15.0 Arkansas ............. 1,351 4.9 1,104 4.0 1,550 5.0 1,699 5.8 2,576 9.2 California............. 134,346 51.3 133,483 47.9 106,531 45.3 125,836 49.6 144,864 51.3 Colorado ............. 3,403 5.2 3,863 5.8 4,702 6.8 4,998 7.2 3,573 5.7 Connecticut ......... 7,455 19.1 6,836 18.0 5,193 13.1 7,709 18.1 13,270 31.3 D.C...................... 1,343 9.1 3,954 23.2 4,823 29.5 8,122 45.1 8,045 47.7 Florida ................. 861 2.2 988 2.4 1,204 2.9 932 2.5 1,281 3.4 Georgia ............... 4,304 8.0 3,663 6.5 3,646 5.9 6,211 10.9 9,078 16.4 Idaho ................... 1,427 14.1 1,450 14.0 1,543

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2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 267,998 105,950 1.22 0 0.00 1 0.02 68,901 1.52 5,947 0.18 43,027 1.43 223,826 1.15 I o w a Iowa - Table 62 62. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

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0 0 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 6,597 2,550 0.03 0 0.00 0 0.00 957 0.02 0 0.00 2,547 0.08 6,054 0.03 M a i n e Maine - Table 60 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maine, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0

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243 243 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Selected Natural Gas and Related Reports Recurring Natural Gas Reports · Natural Gas Monthly, DOE/EIA-0130. Published monthly. Other Reports Covering Natural Gas, Natural Gas Liquids, and Other Energy Sources · Monthly Energy Review, DOE/EIA-0035. Published monthly. Provides national aggregate data for natural gas, natural gas liquids, and other energy sources. · Short-Term Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0202. Published quarterly. Provides forecasts for next six quarters for nat- ural gas and other energy sources. · U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves -1997 Annual Report, DOE/EIA-0216(97)/Ad- vance Summary, September 1998. · Annual Energy Review 1998, DOE/ EIA-0384(98), July 1999. Published annually. · Annual Report to Congress 1998, DOE/ EIA-0173(98), April 1999. Published

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 35,391 5,607 0.06 1,620 0.01 1 0.02 11,646 0.26 2,865 0.09 9,264 0.31 29,383 0.15 South Dakota South Dakota - Table 88 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Dakota, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 55 56 61 60 59 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 1,000 848 905 687 772 From Oil Wells...........................................

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 A1. Comparison of Electric Utility Natural Gas Consumption Data by State, 1998 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Form EIA-176 Form EIA-759 Difference MDP a Alabama ............................................ 26,165 25,546 -618 2.4 Alaska ............................................... 28,961 28,784 -177 0.6 Arizona .............................................. 39,137 38,674 -463 1.2 Arkansas ........................................... 40,150 40,576 426 1.1 California ........................................... 323,664 271,154 -52,510 19.4 Colorado............................................ 8,894 10,627 1,733 19.5 Connecticut ....................................... 10,655 10,719 64 0.6 Delaware ........................................... 10,828 11,135 307 2.8

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Minerals Management Service. None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001 and over 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Figure 5. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States, 1995-1999 Figure T e x a s L o u i s i a n a O k l a h o m a N e w M e x i c o W y o m i n g C o l o r a d o K a n s a s A l a b a m a A l a s k a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 95 96 97 98 99 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value

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Natural Natural Gas Annual 1999 11. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1999 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Salt Caverns Aquifers Depleted Fields Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama ................. 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 0 0 2 24 2 24 0.29 California................ 1 2 0 0 8 386 9 388 4.72 Colorado ................ 0 0 0 0 9 100 9 100 1.21 Illinois ..................... 0 0 17 745 13 153 30 899 10.92 Indiana ................... 0 0 17 95 11 19 28 113 1.38 Iowa ....................... 0 0 4 273 0 0 4 273 3.32 Kansas ................... 1 4 0 0 17 298 18 301 3.66 Kentucky ................ 0 0 3 10 22 210 25 220 2.67 Louisiana................ 6 34 0 0 8 530 14 564 6.85 Maryland ................ 0 0 0 0 1 62 1 62 0.75

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18 18 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 977,570 306,110 3.40 195 0.00 47 0.83 445,217 9.42 40,716 1.31 188,520 6.18 980,610 4.93 I l l i n o i s Illinois - Table 54 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 372 370 372 185 300 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 325 289 224 203 189 From Oil Wells........................................... 10 9 7 6 6 Total............................................................. 335 298 231 209 195 Repressuring

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -881,315 198,110 2.28 1,644,531 8.37 109 2.15 66,521 1.47 174,577 5.36 43,800 1.46 483,117 2.48 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma - Table 83 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,487 13,438 13,074 13,439 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 29,121 29,733 29,733 R 29,734 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 1,626,858

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -132,916 49,807 0.57 178,023 0.91 5 0.10 29,664 0.66 417 0.01 24,986 0.83 104,879 0.54 West Virginia West Virginia - Table 95 95. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,565 2,499 2,703 2,846 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 39,830 36,144 35,148 31,000 39,072 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 183,773 186,231

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 18 movements to and from every State in the two regions reflect a significant drop in throughput volumes. · Over the past several years, coalbed gas production has been increasing in Wyoming and areas adjacent to the Rocky Mountains, and several pipelines have ex- panded to accommodate the growth in productive capacity. Interstate natural gas flows in 1998 in the several States in the region not only reflect the greater production but also the expanded pipeline capacity on such systems as the KN Interstate Pipeline (with its new Pony Express line) and the Trailblazer System, both completed during the latter months of 1997. These two pipelines bring gas from the Rocky Moun- tain area to markets from Denver to Chicago. Imports and Exports Highlights of the developments in natural gas import and export crossborder trade during

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2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 766,728 332,955 3.83 108,542 0.55 432 8.51 296,576 6.56 7,663 0.24 156,630 5.22 794,255 4.08 O h i o Ohio - Table 82 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,094 1,054 1,113 985 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 34,731 34,520 34,380 34,238 34,098 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 132,151 126,336 119,251 116,246

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1999 1999 1 9 7 2 1 9 7 4 1 9 7 6 1 9 7 8 1 9 8 0 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 8 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Percent 7. Net Imports as a Percentage of Total Consumption of Natural Gas, 1972-1999 Figure Sources: 1972-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production 1979. 1980-1989: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report"; and Form FPC-14, "Annual Report for Importers and Exporters of Natural Gas"; 1990: EIA, Form EIA-176, Form EIA-759, Form FPC-14, and Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; 1991-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, Form EIA-759, Form FPC-14, Form EIA-64A,

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0 0 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -6,165,908 3,151,091 35.05 13,172,300 67.22 184 3.24 318,867 6.75 1,737,554 55.81 263,862 8.65 5,471,557 27.52 West South Central West South Central - Table 35 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 102,525 102,864 105,139 111,136 110,057 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 11,824,788 12,182,369 12,102,607 R 12,034,615 11,738,276 From Oil Wells...........................................

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7 7 98. Quantity and Average Price of Natural Gas Production in the United States, 1930-1998 (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet, Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Table Year Gross Withdrawals Used for Repressuring Nonhydro- carbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Extraction Loss Dry Production Average Wellhead Price of Marketed Production 1930 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,978,911 75,140 1,903,771 0.08 1931 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,721,902 62,288 1,659,614 0.07 1932 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,593,798 51,816 1,541,982 0.06 1933 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,596,673 48,280 1,548,393 0.06 1934 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,815,796 52,190 1,763,606 0.06 1935 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,968,963 55,488 1,913,475 0.06 1936 ...................... 2,691,512 73,507 NA 392,528 2,225,477 61,064 2,164,413

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80 80 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -6,144,473 3,290,856 37.89 13,439,527 68.41 120 2.36 351,740 7.78 1,776,122 54.51 265,515 8.85 5,684,353 29.20 West South Central West South Central - Table 41 41. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 88,034 88,734 62,357 62,348 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 94,233 102,525 102,864 R 105,139 111,136 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

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1999 1999 66 New England .................................... 170,809 2,010,577 136,563 210,094 256,496 12,372 Middle Atlantic .................................. 821,578 8,883,339 667,203 808,589 743,879 23,366 East North Central ............................ 1,393,303 12,651,969 690,776 1,049,640 1,404,685 79,100 West North Central ........................... 433,483 4,826,886 282,912 513,380 436,075 24,472 South Atlantic ................................... 389,544 6,027,575 309,295 640,635 721,597 17,540 East South Central ........................... 185,413 2,852,538 135,022 302,161 557,539 8,276 West South Central .......................... 318,867 5,997,832 263,862 529,890 3,151,091 11,533 Mountain........................................... 314,177 4,218,179 209,836 373,944 300,024 11,414 Pacific Contiguous............................

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An An overhead view of a natural gas processing plant. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 66 New England .................................... 163,483 1,980,506 156,146 202,286 210,342 15,556 Middle Atlantic .................................. 754,098 8,863,194 612,992 799,672 687,745 29,303 East North Central ............................ 1,282,157 12,433,376 649,117 1,030,125 1,351,611 63,863 West North Central ........................... 422,855 4,859,806 277,411 523,570 465,837 29,837 South Atlantic ................................... 379,628 5,794,996 312,424 526,487 697,640 16,213 East South Central ........................... 186,321 2,836,854 131,922 311,731 517,935 10,713 West South Central .......................... 351,740 5,990,194 265,515 543,636 3,290,856 14,326 Mountain...........................................

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Workmen perform maintenance on this offshore natural gas drilling platform. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 209 Summary of Data Collection Operations and Report Methodology The 1998 data for the Natural Gas Annual are taken primarily from Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supple- mental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report ." Each of these surveys and all other sources of data for this report are discussed separately in the following sections. Form EIA-176 Survey Design The original version of Form EIA-176 was approved in 1980 with a mandatory response requirement. Prior to 1980, pub- lished data were based on voluntary responses to Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior predecessor Forms BOM-6-1340-A and BOM-6-1341-A of the same title. In 1982, the

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 0 463 0.01 0 0.00 0 0.00 524 0.01 0 0.00 1,749 0.06 2,735 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii - Table 52 52. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -65,951 75,947 0.87 466,648 2.38 0 0.00 15,617 0.35 28,784 0.88 27,079 0.90 147,426 0.76 A l a s k a Alaska - Table 48 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,733 9,497 9,294 10,562 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 104 100 102 141 148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 180,639 179,470 183,747 179,534 182,993 From

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

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9 9 Consumer Prices Following the trend in wellhead prices, end-use consumers paid lower prices for natural gas in 1998 than in 1997. Price declines ranged from 2 percent in the residential sector to 14 percent in the electric utility sector. Consumers in the New England Census Division, which comprises six States (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont), paid the highest prices in all end-use sectors. Residential customers in New England paid $9.59 per thousand cubic feet in 1998, virtually the same as the $9.57 price paid the previous year, with prices in the individual States ranging from $6.54 to $10.60 per thousand cubic feet. New England also paid the highest prices for natural gas deliveries to commercial, industrial, and electric utility consumers where prices averaged $7.18, $4.79, and $2.90 per thousand cubic feet, respectively. Industrial

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -80,882 111,143 1.28 603,586 3.07 0 0.00 70,217 1.55 36,896 1.13 41,788 1.39 260,044 1.34 K a n s a s Kansas - Table 63 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,156 8,571 7,694 6,989 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 19,365 22,020 21,388 21,500 21,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 628,900 636,582 629,755 618,016

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4 4 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 Southern California Gas Co......................... 277,719,484 114,941,064 269,458,175 2,169,770 82,219,615 746,508,108 Pacific Gas and Elec Co.............................. 236,015,345 109,165,123 173,522,808 743,788 40,977,372 560,424,436 Lone Star Gas Co ........................................ 69,066,379 47,818,632 278,167,278 0 127,909,424 522,961,713 Nicor Gas..................................................... 222,803,478 91,585,840 137,592,440 5,656 37,794,659 489,782,073 Midcon Texas P L Operator Inc................... 0 0 365,563,289 0 114,011,139 479,574,428 Columbia Gas Dist Co ................................. 167,055,264 94,607,073 180,274,855 11,992 445,223 442,394,407 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co ........................... 133,426,119 124,790,684

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2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 238,205 64,868 0.75 0 0.00 6 0.12 110,779 2.45 16,035 0.49 61,995 2.07 253,682 1.30 M i s s o u r i Missouri - Table 72 72. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 12 15 24 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 8 16 25 5 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

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1 1 13. Consumption of Natural Gas by State, 1995-1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Table 1995 Total................................. 19,660,161 792,315 427,853 700,335 21,580,665 1996 Total................................. 20,005,508 799,629 450,033 711,446 21,966,616 1997 Total................................. 20,004,012 776,306 426,873 751,470 21,958,660 1998 Total................................. 19,469,047 R 773,049 401,314 635,477 R 21,278,888 1999 Total................................. 19,882,247 677,655 399,509 735,078 21,694,489 Alabama .................................... 295,414 9,954 5,336 22,109 332,813 Alaska ....................................... 150,054 224,355 41,149 4,475 420,033 Arizona ...................................... 142,216 35 0 18,570 160,821 Arkansas ................................... 249,371

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 Glossary Aquifer Storage Field: A sub-surface facility for storing natural gas consisting of water-bearing sands topped by an impermeable cap rock. Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differ- ences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-reporting problems. Reporting problems include differences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of variations in company accounting and billing practices; differences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data-reporting systems that vary in scope, format,

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9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

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4 4 · Regulated utilities began to sell their electric generation operations to nonregulated power producers in 1998. Fifty were sold during the year, with a relatively large number fueled by natural gas. It is anticipated that this is the beginning of a trend that will continue as the restruc- turing of the electric utility industry proceeds. Natural gas consumption at these facilities was previously included in electric utility consumption but is now included in industrial consumption. The inclusion of nonutility gas consumption in the industrial sector somewhat offset the decline in consumption by man- ufacturing groups that are intensive natural gas users. · Natural gas deliveries to electric utilities rose by 290 billion cubic feet to 3.3 trillion cubic feet, 10 percent above the 1997 level. Sustained periods of very high summer temperatures in the Southwest region,

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 153,537 53,053 0.61 1,695 0.01 0 0.00 40,771 0.90 5,044 0.15 28,911 0.96 127,779 0.66 N e b r a s k a Nebraska - Table 74 74. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Nebraska, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 87 87 88 91 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 2,093 1,557 1,328 1,144 1,214 From Oil Wells...........................................

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,566,960 721,597 8.03 254,154 1.30 209 3.68 389,544 8.25 415,634 13.35 309,295 10.14 1,836,280 9.24 South Atlantic South Atlantic - Table 33 33. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 37,822 36,827 33,054 41,468 39,335 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 236,072 224,264 230,634 R 237,327 248,222 From Oil Wells........................................... 7,133 6,706 6,907 6,547 6,702 Total.............................................................

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2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -1,908,113 324,585 3.74 3,294,184 16.77 577 11.36 317,559 7.03 156,010 4.79 211,438 7.05 1,010,169 5.19 Mountain Mountain - Table 42 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 37,366 39,275 38,944 38,505 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 38,539 38,775 41,236 49,573 52,282 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

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2 2 134,395 102,324 1.18 0 0.00 1 0.02 25,430 0.56 5,893 0.18 19,828 0.66 153,476 0.79 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina - Table 87 87. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 186,793 93,217 1.07 81,868 0.42 4 0.08 55,545 1.23 5,760 0.18 32,464 1.08 186,990 0.96 K e n t u c k y Kentucky - Table 64 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 969 1,044 983 1,364 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 13,036 13,311 13,501 13,825 13,825 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 73,081 74,754 81,435 79,547

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 0 373 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 535 0.01 0 0.00 1,747 0.06 2,654 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii - Table 58 58. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

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2 2 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 3,436,498 1,404,685 15.62 387,923 1.98 564 9.92 1,393,303 29.49 124,675 4.00 690,776 22.66 3,614,003 18.18 East North Central East North Central - Table 31 31. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas East North Central, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 41,497 41,943 42,893 42,762 42,530 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 273,230 321,023 366,288 336,352 331,007 From Oil Wells........................................... 97,557 50,290 62,330

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -1,874,900 1,952,355 21.72 6,117,653 31.22 2 0.04 175,907 3.72 1,207,293 38.78 171,758 5.63 3,507,315 17.64 T e x a s Texas - Table 84 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Texas, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 54,635 53,816 56,747 58,736 58,712 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 5,660,153 5,843,635 5,865,930 R 5,913,517 5,645,379 From Oil Wells........................................... 1,212,503 1,184,565 1,150,211 R 1,055,912

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0 0 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 508,613 140,740 1.57 5,933 0.03 82 1.44 13,797 0.29 319,274 10.25 36,269 1.19 510,162 2.57 F l o r i d a Florida - Table 50 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 7,133 6,706 6,907 6,547 6,702 Total............................................................. 7,133 6,706 6,907 6,547 6,702

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: Massachusetts Massachusetts - Table 62 62. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed...............

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80 80 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 43,788 45,501 0.52 277,340 1.41 136 2.68 56,843 1.26 5,945 0.18 30,955 1.03 139,380 0.72 U t a h Utah - Table 91 91. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Utah, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,789 1,580 1,633 1,839 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,303 1,127 1,339 1,475 1,643 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 304,347 262,400 233,594 231,368 253,761

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -229,385 96,739 1.08 553,419 2.82 1 0.02 68,146 1.44 35,889 1.15 39,683 1.30 240,458 1.21 K a n s a s Kansas - Table 57 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 22,020 21,388 21,500 21,000 17,568 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 636,582 629,755 618,016 532,594 488,328 From Oil Wells........................................... 86,807 85,876 71,037 72,626 66,590 Total.............................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


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40 40 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -18,588 120,201 1.34 111,021 0.57 1 0.02 24,562 0.52 101,623 3.26 20,265 0.66 266,652 1.34 M i s s i s s i p p i Mississippi - Table 65 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mississippi, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 535 568 560 527 560 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 113,401 117,412 119,347 120,588 121,004 From Oil Wells........................................... 6,051 6,210 7,276 8,628 5,750 Total.............................................................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 612,249 231,362 2.66 68,343 0.35 40 0.79 217,929 4.82 6,890 0.21 130,996 4.37 587,218 3.02 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania - Table 85 85. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pennsylvania, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,800 1,482 1,696 1,852 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 20,296 31,025 31,792 32,692 21,576 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 120,506

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9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: W y o m i n g -920,258 38,475 0.43 823,132 4.20 14 0.25 12,106 0.26 167 0.01 9,834 0.32 60,596 0.30 Wyoming - Table 91 91. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 4,196 4,510 5,160 5,166 4,950 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 988,671 981,115 1,043,797 1,029,403 1,091,320 From Oil Wells........................................... 111,442 109,434 109,318 132,044 108,918 Total.............................................................

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2 2 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -2,004,469 300,024 3.34 3,398,146 17.34 470 8.27 314,177 6.65 177,649 5.71 209,836 6.88 1,002,157 5.04 Mountain Mountain - Table 36 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 38,775 41,236 49,573 52,282 46,259 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 3,131,205 3,166,689 3,333,043 3,346,183 3,480,946 From Oil Wells........................................... 503,986 505,903 513,267 525,236 478,387

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,021,660 251,591 2.90 16,699 0.09 457 9.00 339,512 7.51 208,348 6.39 335,343 11.18 1,135,250 5.83 N e w Y o r k New York - Table 79 79. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 242 197 232 224 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 5,884 6,134 6,208 5,731 5,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 19,937 17,677 17,494 15,525

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0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 11,621 78,640 0.91 108,068 0.55 1 0.02 24,847 0.55 76,362 2.34 21,358 0.71 201,209 1.03 M i s s i s s i p p i Mississippi - Table 71 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mississippi, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 650 663 631 582 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 583 535 568 560 527 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 112,205 113,401 117,412 119,347 120,588

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6 6 New England .................................... 170,809 2,010,577 136,563 210,094 256,496 12,372 Middle Atlantic .................................. 821,578 8,883,339 667,203 808,589 743,879 23,366 East North Central ............................ 1,393,303 12,651,969 690,776 1,049,640 1,404,685 79,100 West North Central ........................... 433,483 4,826,886 282,912 513,380 436,075 24,472 South Atlantic ................................... 389,544 6,027,575 309,295 640,635 721,597 17,540 East South Central ........................... 185,413 2,852,538 135,022 302,161 557,539 8,276 West South Central .......................... 318,867 5,997,832 263,862 529,890 3,151,091 11,533 Mountain........................................... 314,177 4,218,179 209,836 373,944 300,024 11,414 Pacific Contiguous............................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 121,071 28,662 0.33 9 0.00 33 0.65 30,023 0.66 60,937 1.87 23,314 0.78 142,970 0.73 N e v a d a Nevada - Table 75 75. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Nevada, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 5 5 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 16 13 11 9 9 Total.............................................................

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3 3 Con Edison Co of New York Inc............... NY 102,311,001 3.84 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co........................ NJ 73,839,186 3.05 Southern California Gas Co ..................... CA 62,380,076 5.55 Pacific Gas and Elec Co........................... CA 58,692,831 6.82 Keyspan Energy Del Co ........................... NY 53,162,984 6.07 Minnegasco .............................................. MN 52,910,769 4.25 Entex Div of Noram Energy Corp ............. TX,LA,MS 47,337,378 4.81 Lone Star Gas Co..................................... TX 45,843,050 4.67 Consumers Energy Co ............................. MI 45,391,308 4.50 Michigan Consol Gas Co.......................... MI 41,336,416 5.38 Pub Svc Co of Colorado........................... CO 39,230,403 4.47 Columbia Gas Dist Co.............................. KY,PA,MD,OH 35,550,535 6.78

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8 8 Industrial 8,686,147 44.6% Commercial 2,999,491 15.4% Electric Utilities 3,258,054 16.7% Residential 4,520,276 23.2% Note: Vehicle fuel volume for 1998 was 5,079 million cubic feet. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s L o u i s i a n a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s L o u i s i a n a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1998 Figure

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96 96 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 92. Quantity and Average Price of Natural Gas Production in the United States, 1930-1999 (Volumes in Million Cubic Feet, Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Table Year Gross Withdrawals Used for Repressuring Nonhydro- carbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Extraction Loss Dry Production Average Wellhead Price of Marketed Production 1930 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,978,911 75,140 1,903,771 0.08 1931 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,721,902 62,288 1,659,614 0.07 1932 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,593,798 51,816 1,541,982 0.06 1933 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,596,673 48,280 1,548,393 0.06 1934 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,815,796 52,190 1,763,606 0.06 1935 ...................... NA NA NA NA 1,968,963 55,488 1,913,475 0.06 1936 ......................

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8 8 12. Supplemental Gas Supplies by State, 1998 (Million Cubic Feet) Table State Synthetic Natural Gas Propane- Air Refinery Gas Biomass Gas Other Total Alabama ...................... 0 2 0 0 0 2 Colorado...................... 0 6 0 0 a 5,285 5,292 Connecticut ................. 0 33 0 0 0 33 Georgia........................ 0 16 0 0 0 16 Hawaii.......................... 2,715 0 0 0 0 2,715 Illinois .......................... 0 50 2,686 0 0 2,736 Indiana......................... 0 716 0 0 b 2,433 3,149 Iowa............................. 0 17 0 0 0 17 Kentucky ..................... 0 2 0 0 0 2 Maine........................... 0 24 0 0 0 24 Maryland ..................... 0 80 0 0 0 80 Massachusetts ............ 0 68 0 0 0 68 Michigan ...................... 0 0 0 0 c 21,967 21,967 Minnesota.................... 0 50 0 0 0 50 Missouri ....................... 0 40 0 0 0 40 Nebraska .....................

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1999 1999 90 39. Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1999 Table State Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama.................................................................. 2.79 1.53 Alaska ..................................................................... 2.36 1.94 Arizona.................................................................... 0 0.74 Arkansas ................................................................. 0.87 1.20 California................................................................. 1.95 9.89 Colorado ................................................................. 3.77 1.46 Connecticut............................................................. 0 0.61 D.C..........................................................................

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -63,607 74,687 0.83 462,967 2.36 0 0.00 18,158 0.38 30,529 0.98 29,416 0.96 152,789 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous - Table 38 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 100 102 141 148 99 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 179,470 183,747 179,534 182,993 177,640 From Oil Wells........................................... 3,190,433 3,189,837 3,201,416 3,195,855

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the the Gulf of Mexico. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 90 45. Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1998 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama.................................................................. NA 2.87 1.54 Alaska ..................................................................... NA 2.38 2.05 Arizona.................................................................... NA 0 0.73 Arkansas ................................................................. NA 0.96 1.28 California................................................................. NA 1.61 9.48 Colorado ................................................................. NA 3.54 1.47 Connecticut .............................................................

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 24,315 21,416 0.25 57,645 0.29 9 0.18 19,172 0.42 522 0.02 12,952 0.43 54,071 0.28 M o n t a n a Montana - Table 73 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Montana, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 717 782 796 762 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 2,940 2,918 2,990 3,071 3,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 44,350 44,370 45,154 46,613 51,774 From Oil Wells...........................................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 33,635 0 0.00 0 0.00 9 0.16 14,147 0.30 0 0.00 17,837 0.59 31,993 0.16 District of Columbia District of Columbia - Table 49 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

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Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 9. Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,816,408 2,883,277 2,899,152 3,052,073 3,367,545 Mexico.............................. 6,722 13,862 17,243 14,532 54,530 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,823,130 2,897,138 2,916,394 3,066,605 3,422,075 LNG Algeria .............................. 17,918 35,325 65,675 68,567 75,763 Australia ........................... 0 0 9,686 11,634 11,904 Malaysia ........................... 0 0 0 0 2,576 Qatar ................................ 0 0 0 0 19,697 Trinidad ............................ 0 0 0 0 50,777 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 4,949 2,417 5,252 2,713 Total LNG Imports............. 17,918 40,274 77,778 85,453 163,430

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1998 1998 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Note: Commercial prices include natural gas delivered for use as vehicle fuel. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 16. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Residential Consumers, 1998 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure

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8 8 Consumption - Table 22 Alabama.................. 0 12,423 12,423 895 12,847 13,742 26,165 Alaska ..................... 20,330 8,631 28,961 0 0 0 28,961 Arizona.................... 3,978 35,098 39,077 0 60 60 39,137 Arkansas ................. 0 40,128 40,128 0 22 22 40,150 California................. 1 4,471 4,472 57,204 261,988 319,192 323,664 Colorado ................. 8,417 0 8,417 222 254 476 8,894 Connecticut ............. 0 10,606 10,606 1 47 49 10,655 Delaware................. 589 10,180 10,769 0 59 59 10,828 Florida ..................... 1,621 272,237 273,858 978 15,525 16,503 290,361 Georgia ................... 21,569 4,489 26,058 0 0 0 26,058 Illinois ...................... 6,158 53,692 59,850 7 0 7 59,857 Indiana .................... 502 3,146 3,649 0 2,435 2,435 6,084 Iowa ........................ 657 7,398 8,055 759 0 759 8,814 Kansas ....................

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2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -196,610 87,238 1.00 696,321 3.54 13 0.26 110,839 2.45 10,627 0.33 63,132 2.10 271,849 1.40 C o l o r a d o Colorado - Table 52 52. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Colorado, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 6,753 7,256 7,710 6,828 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 7,056 7,017 8,251 12,433 13,838 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 365,651 436,663 488,292

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1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 298,541 301,811 310,971 R 316,929 307,449 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 17,282,032 17,737,334 17,844,046 R 17,719,241 17,540,919 From Oil Wells........................................... 6,461,596 6,376,201 6,368,631 R 6,376,965 6,214,427 Total............................................................. 23,743,628 24,113,536 24,212,677 R 24,096,206 23,755,345 Repressuring ................................................ -3,565,023 -3,510,753 -3,491,542 R -3,437,062 -3,304,594 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............... -388,392 -518,425 -598,691 R -615,941 -609,717 Wet After Lease Separation ......................... 19,790,213

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78 78 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 265,626 517,935 5.96 755,135 3.84 18 0.35 186,321 4.12 113,882 3.50 131,922 4.40 950,078 4.88 East South Central East South Central - Table 40 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas East South Central, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 6,449 6,575 6,647 6,914 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 17,184 17,372 18,174 19,046 18,983 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

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0 0 Indiana - Table 61 I n d i a n a 540,755 290,973 3.35 615 0.00 67 1.32 140,122 3.10 9,096 0.28 73,117 2.44 513,375 2.64 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Indiana, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,348 1,347 1,367 1,458 1,479 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 107 249 360 526 615 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 107 249 360 526 615 Repressuring ................................................ NA NA NA NA NA Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed...............

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 94. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England - Table 29 New England 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1995-1999 Table 624,295 256,496 2.85 0 0.00 105 1.85 170,809 3.62 22,057 0.71 136,563 4.48 586,030 2.95 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

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8 8 11. Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1998 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama ................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 2 24 0 0 2 24 0.30 California................ 0 0 9 388 0 0 9 388 4.75 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.22 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 899 10.99 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.38 Iowa ....................... 4 273 0 0 0 0 4 273 3.34 Kansas ................... 16 294 2 8 0 0 18 301 3.68 Kentucky ................ 6 167 19 53 0 0 25 220 2.69 Louisiana................ 8 530 5 33 0 0 13 564 6.89 Maryland ................ 1 62 0 0 0 0 1

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 703,875 282,036 3.25 278,076 1.42 31 0.61 319,701 7.07 48,321 1.48 163,368 5.45 813,457 4.18 M i c h i g a n Michigan - Table 69 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,323 1,294 2,061 2,195 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 6,000 5,258 5,826 6,825 7,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 136,989 146,320 201,123

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -1,166,885 25,048 0.29 1,501,098 7.64 189 3.72 35,877 0.79 39,034 1.20 27,206 0.91 127,354 0.65 N e w M e x i c o New Mexico - Table 78 78. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Mexico, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 17,228 17,491 16,485 15,514 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 23,292 23,510 24,134 27,421 28,200 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 1,381,756

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8 8 1 9 7 2 1 9 7 4 1 9 7 6 1 9 7 8 1 9 8 0 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 8 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 Percent 7. Net Imports as a Percentage of Total Consumption of Natural Gas, 1972-1998 Figure Sources: 1972-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas An- nual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production 1979. 1980-1989: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report"; and Form FPC-14, "Annual Report for Importers and Exporters of Natural Gas"; 1990: EIA, Form EIA-176, Form EIA-759, Form FPC-14, and Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; 1991-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, Form EIA-759, Form FPC-14, Form EIA-64A, and

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -3,499,743 922,155 10.62 5,287,870 26.92 7 0.14 47,574 1.05 318,395 9.77 24,042 0.80 1,312,174 6.74 L o u i s i a n a Louisiana - Table 65 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Louisiana, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 a ..................................... 30,583 30,666 9,543 9,673 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 12,958 14,169 15,295 14,958 18,399 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 4,527,042

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Transmission Transmission Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 25 6. Principal Interstate Natural Gas Flow Summary, 1999 Figure 2,000 1,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 0 Billion Cubic Feet = Less than 100 BCF Flow WASHINGTON MONTANA IDAHO WYOMING OREGON CALIFORNIA NEVADA UTAH COLORADO NORTH DAKOTA SOUTH DAKOTA NEBRASKA KANSAS ARIZONA NEW MEXICO OKLAHOMA ARKANSAS MISSOURI IOWA MINNESOTA WISCONSIN MICH PA MD DELAWARE CONNECTICUT RHODE ISLAND MASS NH NJ ILL INDIANA OHIO VIRGINIA WV MAINE NEW YORK VT KY TENN NORTH CAROLINA SOUTH CAROLINA MISS GEORGIA FLORIDA ALA TEXAS LA 26 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 1 9 7 2 1 9 7 4 1 9 7 6 1 9 7 8 1 9 8 0 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 8 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Percent 7. Net Imports as a Percentage of Total Consumption of Natural Gas, 1972-1999 Figure Sources: 1972-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas"

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 905,377 465,837 5.36 660,086 3.36 42 0.83 422,855 9.35 74,525 2.29 277,411 9.25 1,240,670 6.37 West North Central West North Central - Table 38 38. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,663 9,034 8,156 7,468 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 19,623 22,277 21,669 21,755 21,253 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 41,343 21,075 0.23 0 0.00 2 0.04 8,862 0.19 19,878 0.64 6,119 0.20 55,936 0.28 D e l a w a r e Delaware - Table 48 48. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 36,749 16,287 0.19 0 0.00 2 0.04 7,755 0.17 11,135 0.34 5,590 0.19 40,769 0.21 D e l a w a r e Delaware - Table 54 54. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -1,860,130 2,023,278 23.29 6,318,754 32.16 3 0.06 199,454 4.41 1,242,574 38.14 169,610 5.65 3,634,920 18.67 T e x a s Texas - Table 90 90. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Texas, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 42,357 43,067 38,270 37,761 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 48,654 54,635 53,816 56,747 58,736 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 5,643,577

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 940,495 303,668 3.50 209 0.00 60 1.18 409,812 9.07 56,337 1.73 174,687 5.82 944,563 4.85 I l l i n o i s Illinois - Table 60 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 390 372 370 372 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 323 325 289 224 203 From Oil Wells...........................................

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -65,951 76,319 0.88 466,648 2.38 0 0.00 16,151 0.36 28,784 0.88 28,825 0.96 150,080 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous - Table 44 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,733 9,497 9,294 10,562 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 104 100 102 141 148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

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9 9 Alabama Florida ...................................................................... 0 494,657 -494,657 Georgia .................................................................... 0 1,631,329 -1,631,329 Mississippi................................................................ 2,865,222 0 2,865,222 Tennessee ............................................................... 402 992,686 -992,284 Texas ....................................................................... 0 b 1 -1 Total ........................................................................ 2,865,624 3,118,673 -253,049 Alaska Japan ....................................................................... 0 c 63,607 -63,607 Total ........................................................................ 0 63,607 -63,607

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ii ii Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 Contacts The Natural Gas Annual is prepared by the Energy Information Administration, Office of Oil and Gas, Natural Gas Division, under the direction of Joan E. Heinkel. General questions and comments concerning the contents of the Natural Gas Annual may be obtained from the National Energy Information Center, (202) 586-8800. Questions about specific areas should be referred to Ann M. Ducca, (202/586-6137) or Margo Natof (202/586-6303). Technical inquiries should be referred to the following subject specialists: Supply............................Sharon Belcher (202) 586-6119 Sbelcher@eia.doe.gov Transmission..................Dolly Tolson (202) 586-6664 Dtolson@eia.doe.gov Consumption..................Sylvia Norris (202) 586-6106 Snorris@eia.doe.gov Electronic versions.........Sheila

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361

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 114,838 32,498 0.37 0 0.00 77 1.52 35,329 0.78 10,719 0.33 42,333 1.41 120,955 0.62 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut - Table 53 53. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

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An An overhead pipeline crossing on the White River near Newport, Arkansas. 237 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables Metric Conversions Table B1 presents Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States for 1994 through 1998 in metric units of mea- sure. Volumes are shown in cubic meters instead of cubic feet. Prices are shown in dollars per thousand cubic meters instead of dollars per thousand cubic feet. The data in this ta- ble have been converted from the data that appear in Table 1 of this report. Thermal Conversions Table B2 presents the thermal (Btu) conversion factors and the converted data for natural gas supply and disposition from 1994 through 1998. A brief documentation for the ther- mal conversion factors follows: · Marketed Production. The conversion factor is calcu- lated by adding the total heat content

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3 3 100. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1998 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

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0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 5,734 2,297 0.03 0 0.00 0 0.00 910 0.02 0 0.00 2,456 0.08 5,663 0.03 M a i n e Maine - Table 66 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maine, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

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1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. R 17,737,334 R 6,376,201 R 24,113,536 R 3,510,753 a 518,425 272,117 R 19,812,241 1997 Total .............. 17,844,046 6,368,631 24,212,677 3,491,542 R 598,691 R 256,351 R 19,866,093 1998 Total .............. 17,558,621 6,365,612 23,924,233 3,433,323 611,226 234,130 19,645,554 Alabama Total ....... 597,424 8,414 605,839 13,994 26,604 1,462 563,779 Onshore ................ 204,055 8,414 212,470 13,994 14,652 1,166 182,658 State Offshore....... 222,000 0 222,000 0 11,952 296 209,752 Federal Offshore... 171,369 0 171,369 0 0 0 171,369 Alaska Total........... 182,993 3,195,855 3,378,848 2,904,028 0 8,171 466,648 Onshore ................ 57,762

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0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,818,366 827,401 9.53 315,277 1.60 2,732 53.79 549,931 12.17 271,154 8.32 282,153 9.41 1,933,371 9.93 C a l i f o r n i a California - Table 51 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas California, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,572 3,508 2,082 2,273 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,261 997 978 930 847 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 113,525 93,808

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8 8 A2. Form EIA-176, Short Form Figure Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 219 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 220 5.4.4.2 EIA-176, ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION, 19 RESPO NDENT CO PY Page 3 PART V: CONTINUATION, DISPOSITION OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS WITHIN OR TRANSPORTED OUT OF REPORT STATE 1.0 Control No. 2.0 Company Name 3.0 Report State 4.0 Resubmittal EIA Date Volume (Mcf at 14.73 psia) e or f Cost or Revenue (Including taxes) e or f 5.4.4 Other Nonutility Power Producer Sales 5.4.4.1 Firm Interruptible . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.4.5 Electric Utility Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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2 2 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 271,677 64,856 0.72 0 0.00 6 0.11 112,042 2.37 19,427 0.62 63,100 2.07 259,431 1.30 M i s s o u r i Missouri - Table 66 66. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 15 24 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 16 25 5 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 16 25 5 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 216,705 557,539 6.20 736,291 3.76 17 0.30 185,413 3.92 131,592 4.23 135,022 4.43 1,009,583 5.08 East South Central East South Central - Table 34 34. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas East South Central, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 17,372 18,174 19,046 R 19,539 19,934 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 756,345 769,753 818,196 R 799,882 776,831 From Oil Wells........................................... 19,806 19,295 19,248 18,463

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9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 365,058 146,428 1.63 0 0.00 37 0.65 127,607 2.70 14,077 0.45 81,689 2.68 369,839 1.86 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin - Table 90 90. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

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WA WA MT ID OR WY ND SD CA NV UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA IL IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Japan Mexico Mexico Algeria Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada United Arab Emirates Australia Australia Trinidad Qatar Malaysia Canada Mexico Interstate Movements of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Volumes Reported in Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To (T) AL TX MA NH CT RI MD DC DE MD RI MA MA CT VA DC (T) Trucked Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." E I A NERGY NFORMATION DMINISTRATION 837,902 415,636 225,138 232 308,214 805,614 803,034 800,345 685 147 628,589 9,786 790,088 17,369 278,302 40,727 214,076 275,629 51,935 843,280 826,638 9,988 998,603 553,440 896,187 11,817 629,551 98,423

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0 0 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -22,170 40,859 0.45 262,614 1.34 130 2.29 55,474 1.17 6,478 0.21 30,361 1.00 133,301 0.67 U t a h Utah - Table 85 85. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Utah, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,127 1,339 1,475 1,643 1,978 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 262,400 233,594 231,368 253,761 238,947 From Oil Wells........................................... 40,833 47,614 43,552 43,504 38,020 Total.............................................................

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6 6 New England .................................... 163,483 1,980,506 156,146 202,286 210,342 15,556 Middle Atlantic .................................. 754,098 8,863,194 612,992 799,672 687,745 29,303 East North Central ............................ 1,282,157 12,433,376 649,117 1,030,125 1,351,611 63,863 West North Central ........................... 422,855 4,859,806 277,411 523,570 465,837 29,837 South Atlantic ................................... 379,628 5,794,996 312,424 526,487 697,640 16,213 East South Central ........................... 186,321 2,836,854 131,922 311,731 517,935 10,713 West South Central .......................... 351,740 5,990,194 265,515 543,636 3,290,856 14,326 Mountain........................................... 317,559 4,048,727 211,438 361,974 324,585 10,081 Pacific Contiguous............................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 618,461 240,622 2.68 174,701 0.89 40 0.70 241,468 5.11 10,376 0.33 143,256 4.70 635,761 3.20 P e n n s y l v a n i a Pennsylvania - Table 79 79. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pennsylvania, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 31,025 31,792 32,692 21,576 23,822 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 111,000 135,000 80,000 R 130,317 174,701 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 161,005 32,039 0.36 0 0.00 93 1.64 38,364 0.81 13,095 0.42 47,553 1.56 131,143 0.66 C o n n e c t i c u t Connecticut - Table 47 47. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Connecticut, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

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9 9 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC 0.00-1.99 2.00-2.99 3.00-3.99 4.00-4.99 5.00-5.99 6.00-6.99 7.00+ 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Utilities, 1999 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure Sources: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants," and Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental

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0 0 Indiana - Table 55 I n d i a n a 587,213 319,890 3.56 855 0.00 48 0.84 151,529 3.21 7,655 0.25 73,643 2.42 552,765 2.78 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Indiana, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,347 1,367 1,458 1,479 1,498 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 249 360 526 615 855 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 249 360 526 615 855 Repressuring ................................................ NA NA NA NA NA Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............... NA NA NA NA NA Wet After Lease Separation ......................... 249 360 526 615 855 Vented and Flared........................................

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 295,768 139,261 1.55 1,230 0.01 9 0.16 58,983 1.25 3,460 0.11 51,378 1.69 253,091 1.27 T e n n e s s e e Tennessee - Table 83 83. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Tennessee, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 505 460 420 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 1,820 1,690 1,510 1,420 1,230 Total............................................................. 1,820 1,690 1,510

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9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -236,588 44,857 0.50 176,015 0.90 5 0.09 31,403 0.66 385 0.01 27,301 0.90 103,951 0.52 West Virginia West Virginia - Table 89 89. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 36,144 35,148 31,000 39,072 36,575 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 186,231 169,839 172,268 R 180,000 176,015 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

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9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 7,143 2,901 0.03 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,565 0.05 250 0.01 2,309 0.08 8,024 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont - Table 86 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 1,238,255 296,358 3.30 16,122 0.08 575 10.11 370,711 7.85 181,823 5.84 360,188 11.81 1,209,656 6.08 N e w Y o r k New York - Table 73 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 6,134 6,208 5,731 5,903 6,422 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 17,677 17,494 15,525 16,413 16,016 From Oil Wells........................................... 723 641 669 291 111 Total.............................................................

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4 4 Industrial 8,990,216 45.2% Commercial 3,048,832 15.3% Electric Utilities 3,113,419 15.7% Residential 4,724,094 23.8% Note: Vehicle fuel volume for 1999 was 5,685 million cubic feet. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a L o u i s i a n a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Industrial Billion Cubic Meters T e x a s L o u i s i a n a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Utilities Billion Cubic Meters N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Commercial Billion Cubic Meters C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 30 60 90 120 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Billion Cubic Meters 11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 1999 Figure

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 79,992 145,140 1.61 170,006 0.87 1 0.02 36,245 0.77 40,088 1.29 27,898 0.92 249,371 1.25 A r k a n s a s Arkansas - Table 44 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 3,988 4,020 3,700 3,900 3,650 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 161,390 182,895 172,642 159,769 156,798 From Oil Wells........................................... 33,979 41,551 38,145 29,941 20,362 Total.............................................................

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4 4 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: -63,607 74,224 0.83 462,967 2.36 0 0.00 17,634 0.37 30,529 0.98 27,667 0.91 150,054 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska - Table 42 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 100 102 141 148 99 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 179,470 183,747 179,534 182,993 177,640 From Oil Wells........................................... 3,190,433 3,189,837 3,201,416 3,195,855 3,184,441 Total.............................................................

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Appendix - Table A7 State 1997 1998 Sales Transported Total Sales Transported Total A7. Number of Natural Gas Residential Consumers by State, 1997-1998 Table Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Please see the cautionary note regarding the number of residential customers located in the Consumption and Consumer Prices sections of this report. Alabama ...................... 781,711 0 781,711 788,464 0 788,464 Alaska.......................... 83,596 0 83,596 86,243 0 86,243 Arizona ........................ 724,911 0 724,911 764,167 0 764,167 Arkansas ..................... 544,460 0 544,460 550,017 0 550,017 California .....................

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0 0 · Residential consumers continue to pay the highest price for natural gas. The average price of natural gas deliveries to the residential sector declined by 2 percent ($0.12 per thousand cubic feet) from $6.94 in 1997 to $6.82 per thousand cubic feet in 1998, which was the smallest decrease of any of the consuming sectors. In recent years, only modest changes in constant dollars have been seen for residential prices (Figure 14). Most of these consumers remain captive to LDC sales ser- vice in all but a few States. The LDCs are obligated to supply gas to residences at all times, including during heating seasons when demand is high. Providing this premium service usually results in higher prices. · The second-highest prices for natural gas deliveries were seen in the commercial sector. The average price paid by commercial consumers fell 5 percent ($0.31 per thousand cubic feet) from

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8 8 A4. Estimated Composition of Liquids Extracted at Natural Gas Processing Plants and the Resulting Heat Content Extraction Loss by State, 1998 (Liquid Volumes in Thousand Barrels, Heat Content in Billion Btu) Table Alabama ...................... 22 1,141 172 826 1,036 13,496 Alaska.......................... 0 1,319 3,490 9,724 19,356 150,419 Arkansas ..................... 39 51 29 110 137 1,536 California ..................... 18 2,159 2,523 1,377 2,274 34,826 Colorado...................... 6,345 5,096 875 2,205 2,946 65,730 Florida ......................... 546 521 0 335 157 5,856 Illinois .......................... 0 22 0 0 37 255 Kansas ........................ 6,605 14,223 2,450 4,751 4,823 127,491 Kentucky ..................... 274 823 79 275 211 6,476 Louisiana ..................... 33,494 29,514 9,727 10,370 18,252 384,288 Michigan ......................

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2 2 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: N e w J e r s e y 564,194 206,898 2.30 0 0.00 0 0.00 209,399 4.43 32,650 1.05 163,759 5.37 612,707 3.08 New Jersey - Table 71 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed...............

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0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 95,207 42,278 0.49 0 0.00 6 0.12 16,461 0.36 15,589 0.48 11,477 0.38 85,811 0.44 R h o d e I s l a n d Rhode Island - Table 86 86. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Rhode Island, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

390

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,737,334 6,376,201 24,113,536 3,510,753 a 518,425 272,117 19,812,241 1997 Total .............. 17,844,046 6,368,631 24,212,677 3,491,542 598,691 256,351 19,866,093 1998 Total .............. R 17,719,241 R 6,376,965 R 24,096,206 R 3,437,062 R 615,941 R 234,472 R 19,808,731 1999 Total .............. 17,540,919 6,214,427 23,755,345 3,304,594 609,717 245,180 19,595,854 Alabama Total ....... 579,057 7,048 586,105 13,793 23,956 1,085 547,271 Onshore ................ 200,815 7,048 207,863 13,793 14,061 782 179,227 State Offshore....... 212,673 0 212,673 0 9,895 303 202,474 Federal Offshore... 165,570 0 165,570 0 0 0 165,570 Alaska Total........... 177,640 3,184,441 3,362,082 2,892,017 0 7,098 462,967 Onshore ................ 58,738

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9 9 Alabama.................. 6.68 70.5 3.42 21.8 7.62 100.0 2.98 Alaska ..................... 2.18 55.4 1.25 99.1 - - 1.59 Arizona.................... 6.17 82.5 3.43 36.2 5.28 100.0 2.67 Arkansas ................. 5.38 89.3 3.45 9.6 5.03 100.0 2.59 California................. 6.17 57.1 3.34 8.5 4.43 79.0 2.76 Colorado ................. 4.43 97.6 2.82 8.1 2.09 100.0 2.65 Connecticut ............. 6.54 62.8 4.15 55.8 5.11 100.0 2.74 D.C.......................... 7.38 45.9 - - 2.80 100.0 - Delaware................. 7.00 98.8 4.07 16.6 2.91 100.0 2.98 Florida ..................... 6.51 94.5 4.03 5.4 4.56 100.0 3.10 Georgia ................... 3.87 61.0 3.41 23.0 3.98 94.2 2.57 Hawaii ..................... 14.33 100.0 8.21 100.0 - - - Idaho ....................... 4.77 85.9 3.29 2.7 3.58 100.0 - Illinois ...................... 5.20 42.8 4.06 9.1 2.94 100.0 2.41 Indiana

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 686,993 301,326 3.35 277,364 1.42 32 0.56 350,735 7.42 51,122 1.64 179,351 5.88 882,566 4.44 M i c h i g a n Michigan - Table 63 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 5,258 5,826 6,825 7,000 6,750 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 146,320 201,123 249,291 226,992 226,423 From Oil Wells........................................... 97,547 50,281 62,323 56,748 56,606 Total.............................................................

393

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Conversion Factor (Btu per cubic foot) Production Marketed ................................................... 1,105 1,106 1,109 1,107 1,110 Extraction Loss.......................................... 2,735 2,730 2,721 2,704 2,694 Total Dry Production............................... 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,026 1,031 Supply Dry Production........................................... 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,026 1,031 Receipts at U.S. Borders Imports ................................................... 1,022 1,021 1,022 1,023 1,023 Intransit Receipts ................................... 1,022 1,021 1,022 1,023 1,023 Withdrawals from Storage Underground Storage............................. 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,026 1,031 LNG Storage .......................................... 1,028

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5 5 Alabama.................. 6.65 80.5 3.30 23.1 1.98 100.0 2.58 Alaska ..................... 2.41 49.6 1.34 99.4 - - 1.80 Arizona.................... 6.00 85.0 3.26 33.4 4.46 100.0 2.42 Arkansas ................. 5.16 90.8 3.48 9.1 5.35 100.0 2.29 California................. 6.37 48.7 3.77 9.5 4.23 76.5 2.79 Colorado ................. 4.34 94.3 2.61 12.1 2.09 100.0 2.98 Connecticut ............. 6.90 68.7 4.34 55.8 5.21 100.0 2.44 D.C.......................... 7.36 52.3 - - 2.60 100.0 - Delaware................. 7.05 100.0 4.13 22.4 2.60 100.0 2.89 Florida ..................... 6.41 96.6 3.98 7.0 4.72 100.0 2.27 Georgia ................... 6.00 83.6 3.92 25.3 4.10 100.0 3.21 Hawaii ..................... 14.15 100.0 8.64 100.0 - - - Idaho ....................... 4.62 86.4 3.09 2.5 3.39 100.0 - Illinois ...................... 5.07 47.4 3.96 9.3 2.76 100.0 2.25 Indiana

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1994 Total................................. 15,513,667 - 1.85 19,709,525 36,535,940 1995 Total................................. 15,557,464 - 1.55 19,506,474 30,159,545 1996 Total................................. 14,822,258 - 2.17 R 19,812,241 R 42,951,353 1997 Total................................. R 17,105,855 - 2.32 R 19,866,093 R 46,131,323 1998 Total................................. 17,653,795 - 1.94 19,645,554 38,205,887 Alabama .................................... 563,779 1,237,275 2.19 563,779 1,237,274 Alaska ....................................... 192,982 254,039 1.32 466,648 614,291 Arizona ...................................... 411 775 1.88 457 861 Arkansas c .................................. 61,012 239,053 3.92 188,372 738,061 California ................................... 264,810 521,970 1.97 315,277

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Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 Southern California Gas Co ..................... CA 275,767,714 6.50 Pacific Gas and Elec Co........................... CA 234,195,449 6.61 Nicor Gas ................................................. IL 211,147,988 4.71 Consumers Energy Co ............................. MI 167,318,229 4.89 Michigan Consol Gas Co.......................... MI 134,432,032 5.42 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co........................ NJ 133,426,119 6.86 East Ohio Gas Co .................................... OH 127,141,913 5.81 Keyspan Energy Del Co ........................... NY 125,709,092 9.79 Columbia Gas Dist Co.............................. KY,PA,MD,OH 121,011,064 7.32 Peoples Gas Lt and Coke Co................... IL 98,758,164 6.77 Pub Svc Co of Colorado........................... CO 84,115,032 5.28

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6 6 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 205,093 45,750 0.51 1,395 0.01 0 0.00 40,588 0.86 4,555 0.15 27,586 0.90 118,478 0.60 N e b r a s k a Nebraska - Table 68 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Nebraska, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 87 88 91 95 96 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 1,557 1,328 1,144 1,214 1,040 From Oil Wells........................................... 683 548 526 480 356 Total............................................................. 2,240 1,876

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1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 163,837 165,146 166,474 167,223 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 291,773 298,541 301,811 R 310,971 316,373 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 17,351,060 17,282,032 R 17,737,334 17,844,046 17,558,621 From Oil Wells........................................... 6,229,645 6,461,596 R 6,376,201 6,368,631 6,365,612 Total............................................................. 23,580,706 23,743,628 R 24,113,536 24,212,677 23,924,233 Repressuring ................................................ -3,230,667 -3,565,023 R -3,510,753 -3,491,542 -3,433,323

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2 2 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION Washington, D.C. 20585 Form Approved OMB No. 19050175 Expiration Date: 12/31/02 (Revised 1999) ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION FORM EIA-176 REPORT YEAR This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). For the provisions concerning the confidentiality of information and sanctions statements, see Sections VII and VIII of the instructions. PART I: IDENTIFICATION Complete and return by March 1, 2000 to: Energy Information Administration: EI-45 Mail Station: 2G-024 FORSTL U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Attn: Form EIA-176 OR Fax to: (202) 586-1076 (ATTN: EIA-176) Questions? Call (202) 586-6303 Affix mailing label or enter mailing address

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: W y o m i n g -864,676 54,259 0.62 761,313 3.88 10 0.20 12,702 0.28 271 0.01 10,414 0.35 77,656 0.40 Wyoming - Table 97 97. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,879 12,166 12,320 13,562 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 3,942 4,196 4,510 5,160 5,166 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 949,343 988,671 981,115 1,043,797

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401

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 0 20 40 60 80 100 1968 1978 1988 1998 Wellhead Price Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 1968 1978 1988 1998 Net Imports 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 0 -0.2 -0.4 -0.6 0 10 20 0 -10 -20 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 1968 1978 1988 1998 Net Additions to Storage Millions 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Dry Production 1968 1978 1988 1998 Sources: 1960-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Forms EIA-191/FERC-8,

402

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 209 Summary of Data Collection Operations and Report Methodology The 1999 data for the Natural Gas Annual are taken primarily from Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supple- mental Gas Supply and Disposition" and Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report ." Each of these surveys and all other sources of data for this report are discussed separately in the following sections. Form EIA-176 Survey Design The original version of Form EIA-176 was approved in 1980 with a mandatory response requirement. Prior to 1980, published data were based on voluntary responses to Bureau of Mines, U.S. Department of the Interior predecessor Forms BOM-6-1340-A and BOM-6-1341-A of the same title. In 1982, the scope of the revised EIA-176 survey was expanded to collect the number of electric

403

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 State Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss Located Within the State Located Outside of the State Total Processed Volume (million cubic feet Estimated Heat Content (billion Btu) Alabama ...................... 105,708 3,137 108,845 3,756 4,783 15,572 Alaska.......................... 2,966,461 0 2,966,461 33,889 40,120 150,419 Arkansas ..................... 198,148 4 198,152 365 451 1,536 California ..................... 235,558 0 235,558 8,351 10,242 34,826 Colorado...................... 424,984 766 425,750 17,541 24,401 66,018 Florida ......................... 5,037 0 5,037 967 939 3,632 Illinois .......................... 468 0 468 59 70 255 Kansas ........................ 600,453 2,170 602,623

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32 32 Table A6. Estimated Total Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves by State, 1994-1998 (Billion Cubic Feet) State 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Alabama .................................... 4,830 4,868 5,033 4,968 NA Alaska ....................................... 9,733 9,497 9,294 10,562 NA Arkansas ................................... 1,607 1,563 1,470 1,475 NA California ................................... 2,402 2,243 2,082 2,273 NA Colorado.................................... 6,753 7,256 7,710 6,828 NA Florida ....................................... 98 92 96 96 NA Kansas ...................................... 9,156 8,571 7,694 6,989 NA Kentucky ................................... 969 1,044 983 1,364 NA Louisiana ................................... 9,748 9,274 9,543 9,673 NA Michigan .................................... 1,323 1,294 2,061 2,195

405

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0 0 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic - Table 36 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,042 1,679 1,928 2,076 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 26,180 37,159 38,000 38,423 27,479 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 140,444 128,677 152,494 95,525 84,756 From Oil Wells...........................................

406

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Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 2 occurred in 1973 at 22.6 trillion cubic feet. Four States continue to account for the majority of the natural gas produced in the United States comprising 74 percent of the total in 1999: Texas (31 percent), Louisiana (27 percent), Oklahoma (8 percent), and New Mexico (8 percent). At the State level in 1999, Texas and Oklahoma had the largest declines in marketed production, 282 billion cubic feet and 74 billion cubic feet, respectively. These volumes were equivalent to a 4-percent drop in each State. Marketed production in Louisiana in 1999 was nearly the same as in 1998, while production in New Mexico increased by 1 percent. The States with the largest increases in marketed production during 1999 were Cali- fornia and Wyoming, with increases of 67 billion cubic feet (21 percent) and 62 billion cubic feet (8 percent), respectively.

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Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Southern California Gas Co......................... 271,780,410 110,726,162 278,809,422 1,818,869 138,826,184 801,961,047 Pacific Gas and Elec Co.............................. 225,881,609 152,010,740 174,660,660 530,262 125,268,956 678,352,227 Midcon Texas P L Operator Inc................... 0 0 552,267,806 0 109,741,739 662,009,545 Lone Star Gas Co ........................................ 84,559,915 39,926,208 265,224,831 0 172,286,535 561,997,489 Northern Illinois Gas Co .............................. 205,099,056 82,609,756 133,712,245 2,251 48,524,867 469,948,175 Columbia Gas Dist Co ................................. 151,708,989 89,151,761 177,068,077 18,365 833,281 418,780,473 Pub Svc Elec and Gas Co ........................... 126,142,540 110,995,082 142,801,508

408

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9 9 B1. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States, Metric Equivalents, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 298,541 301,811 310,971 R 316,929 307,449 Production (million cubic meters) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 489,373 502,265 505,287 R 501,753 496,704 From Oil Wells........................................... 182,972 180,554 180,340 R 180,576 175,973 Total............................................................. 672,345 682,819 685,627 R 682,329 672,677 Repressuring ................................................ -100,950 -99,413 -98,869 R -97,327 -93,576 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............... -10,998 -14,680 -16,953 R -17,442 -17,265 Wet After Lease Separation .........................

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9 9 Alabama .................................... 2.89 3.48 3.65 3.17 3.21 Alaska ....................................... 1.67 1.58 1.81 1.72 1.32 Arizona ...................................... 2.10 2.78 3.15 2.55 2.72 Arkansas ................................... 2.32 2.76 3.23 2.94 2.81 California ................................... 2.03 2.59 2.98 2.38 2.61 Colorado.................................... 2.65 2.70 2.92 2.40 2.31 Connecticut ............................... 4.70 5.11 5.11 5.06 4.91 Delaware ................................... 2.70 3.68 3.53 3.02 3.45 Florida ....................................... 2.74 3.73 3.97 3.42 3.49 Georgia ..................................... 2.96 3.77 3.98 3.51 2.95 Hawaii ....................................... 5.20 6.05 6.42 5.33 5.62 Idaho .........................................

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9 9 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 380,767 126,799 1.41 0 0.00 111 1.95 71,704 1.52 6,693 0.21 50,735 1.66 256,042 1.29 W a s h i n g t o n Washington - Table 88 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Washington, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 362,128 141,980 1.63 0 0.00 59 1.16 115,946 2.57 16,348 0.50 81,316 2.71 355,650 1.83 W i s c o n s i n Wisconsin - Table 96 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wisconsin, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England - Table 35 New England 35. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1994-1998 Table 568,143 210,342 2.42 0 0.00 89 1.75 163,483 3.62 45,073 1.38 156,146 5.21 575,132 2.95 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

413

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 308,654 133,106 1.53 0 0.00 112 2.21 61,936 1.37 13,352 0.41 45,561 1.52 254,067 1.30 W a s h i n g t o n Washington - Table 94 94. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Washington, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells...........................................

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8 8 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 Year Supply Disposition Dry Production Withdrawals from Storage Imports Balancing Item Total Additions to Storage Exports Consumption Total 1930 ....................... 1,903,771 NA 21 -35,490 1,868,302 NA 1,798 1,866,504 1,868,302 1931 ....................... 1,659,614 NA 44 -35,466 1,624,192 NA 2,231 1,621,961 1,624,192 1932 ....................... 1,541,982 NA 38 -37,808 1,504,212 NA 1,693 1,502,519 1,504,212 1933 ....................... 1,548,393 NA 83 -41,199 1,507,277 NA 2,158 1,505,119 1,507,277 1934 ....................... 1,763,606 NA 68 -45,075 1,718,599 NA 5,801 1,712,798 1,718,599 1935 ....................... 1,913,475 NA 106 -41,074 1,872,507 11,294 6,800 1,854,413 1,872,507 1936 ....................... 2,164,413 NA 152 -46,677 2,117,888 10,998 7,436 2,099,454 2,117,888

415

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9 9 A2. Form EIA-895 Figure U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 Form Approval OMB No. 19050192 Expiration Date: 12/31/02 (Revised 1999) MONTHLY QUANTITY AND VALUE OF NATURAL GAS REPORT FORM EIA-895 This report is voluntary under Public Law 93-275. For the provisions concerning the confidentiality of information and sanctions, see Sections VI and VII of the instructions. PART I. IDENTIFICATION DATA 1. Name of State Reporting 2. Report Period: Month Year 2 0 3. Name of Office/Agency Complete and return forms to: Energy Information Administration, EI-45 Mail Station: 2G-024 FORSTL Washington, D. C. 20585 Attn: EIA-895 OR Fax to: (202) 586-1076 Questions? Call (202) 586-6119 4. Office Address (Street, City, State, Zip Code)

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5 5 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 Glossary Balancing Item: Represents differences between the sum of the components of natural gas supply and the sum of the components of natural gas disposition. These differ- ences may be due to quantities lost or to the effects of data-reporting problems. Reporting problems include dif- ferences due to the net result of conversions of flow data metered at varying temperature and pressure bases and converted to a standard temperature and pressure base; the effect of variations in company accounting and billing practices; differences between billing cycle and calendar period time frames; and imbalances resulting from the merger of data-reporting systems that vary in scope, for- mat, definitions, and type of respondents. Biomass Gas: A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action

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3 3 Consumption Total natural gas consumption declined during 1998 to 21.3 trillion cubic feet, 3 percent below the 1997 and 1996 levels. Warmer-than-normal winter temperatures in 1998 reduced the demand for natural gas for space heating in the residen- tial and commercial sectors. These declines during 1998 were partially offset by the increase in natural gas consump- tion by electric utilities. Since 1992, natural gas has accounted for nearly one-quarter of total energy consump- tion in the United States. · The residential sector had the largest decline (463 bil- lion cubic feet) in natural gas demand with 4.5 trillion cubic feet consumed, down 9 percent from the 1997 level and down 14 percent from the 1996 level. Much of the decline may be attributed to warmer-than-normal temperatures during the heating season (November through March) and the effects from El Nino in the Pacific region

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1998 1998 Alabama .................................... 3.44 2.89 3.48 3.65 3.17 Alaska ....................................... 1.62 1.67 1.58 1.81 1.72 Arizona ...................................... 2.53 2.10 2.78 3.15 2.55 Arkansas ................................... 2.54 2.32 2.76 3.23 2.94 California ................................... 2.57 2.03 2.59 2.98 2.38 Colorado.................................... 3.31 2.65 2.70 2.92 2.40 Connecticut ............................... 4.17 4.70 5.11 5.11 5.06 Delaware ................................... 2.95 2.70 3.68 3.53 3.02 Florida ....................................... 2.78 2.74 3.73 3.97 3.42 Georgia ..................................... 3.54 2.96 3.77 3.98 3.51 Hawaii ....................................... 4.94 5.20 6.05 6.42 5.33 Idaho .........................................

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8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 96,715 147,313 1.70 188,372 0.96 1 0.02 38,190 0.84 40,576 1.25 28,062 0.94 254,142 1.31 A r k a n s a s Arkansas - Table 50 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,607 1,563 1,470 1,475 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 3,500 3,988 4,020 3,700 3,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 161,967 161,390 182,895 172,642

420

FINS/BUDGET Janet Backe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developer Daisy Chan Developer SIMS Felix Chan Team Lead Catherine Chiu Business Analyst Cal Smith Team Lead

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 0 20 40 60 80 100 1969 1979 1989 1999 Wellhead Price Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 110 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 1969 1979 1989 1999 Net Imports 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 0 -0.2 -0.4 -0.6 0 10 20 0 -10 -20 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 1969 1979 1989 1999 Net Additions to Storage Millions 0 5 10 15 20 25 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters Dry Production 1969 1979 1989 1999 Sources: 1969-1975: Bureau of Mines, Minerals Yearbook, "Natural Gas" chapter. 1976-1978: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Energy Data Reports, Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Forms

422

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1999 1999 Consumption - Table 17 Alabama.............. 7,441 94.7 5,101 93.0 11,194 95.6 25,270 96.6 16,228 95.2 Alaska ................. 8,990 30.3 9,116 29.6 10,972 32.5 8,631 29.8 8,811 29.6 Arizona................ 25,867 99.9 26,662 99.9 31,829 99.4 35,158 89.8 45,742 88.7 Arkansas ............. 23,132 96.2 26,442 94.8 20,213 95.9 40,150 100.0 38,196 100.0 California............. 367,940 90.3 263,937 85.8 315,728 86.6 266,459 82.3 123,196 86.9 Colorado ............. 554 27.8 3,484 72.8 428 8.7 254 2.9 18,269 91.1 Connecticut ......... 16,058 88.1 8,427 83.6 12,677 98.6 10,653 100.0 13,703 100.0 Delaware............. 21,423 79.5 19,088 86.8 13,697 89.6 10,239 94.6 18,552 94.7 Florida ................. 308,563 99.5 269,460 99.6 297,298 99.6 287,762 99.1 328,964 99.5 Georgia ............... 0 - 0 - 0 - 4,489 17.2 23,599 99.5 Illinois .................. 35,703 88.1 24,894

423

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1995 Total................................. 15,557,464 - 1.55 19,506,474 30,159,545 1996 Total................................. 14,822,258 - 2.17 19,812,241 42,951,353 1997 Total................................. 17,105,855 - 2.32 19,866,093 46,131,323 1998 Total................................. 17,653,795 - R 1.95 R 19,808,731 R 38,609,198 1999 Total................................. 18,595,208 - 2.17 19,595,854 42,538,288 Alabama .................................... 547,271 1,262,507 2.31 547,271 1,262,505 Alaska ....................................... 186,727 256,216 1.37 462,967 635,255 Arizona ...................................... 439 915 2.08 474 987 Arkansas c .................................. 54,382 222,852 4.10 170,006 696,670 California ................................... 382,715 904,530 2.36 382,715 904,531

424

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1998 2 utility sector was offset by lower use in the residen- tial and commercial sectors, due to warmer-than- normal temperatures during the winter months. · The residential sector saw the largest decrease (463 billion cubic feet) with 4.5 trillion cubic feet con- sumed, down 9 percent from the 1997 level and 14 percent from the 1996 level. Commercial consump- tion of natural gas was 3.0 trillion cubic feet, a decline of 7 percent from the historical high of 3.2 trillion cubic feet in 1997. During 1998, natural gas consumption by the industrial sector fell to 8.7 trillion cubic feet, 2 percent below the 1997 level. Natural gas delivered to electric utilities rose to 3.3 trillion cubic feet, 10 percent (290 billion cubic feet) above the 1997 level. The increase in this sector was largely driven by utility use of natural gas for

425

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Alabama ............................................ - - 2.69 6.5 Alaska ............................................... 1.69 70.2 - - Arizona .............................................. 2.45 10.2 - - Arkansas ........................................... - - 8.71 1.9 California ........................................... 17.65 - 2.07 17.9 Colorado............................................ 2.93 100.0 2.81 46.6 Connecticut ....................................... - - 7.09 3.0 Delaware ........................................... 2.14 5.5 - - Florida ............................................... 3.11 0.6 1.87 5.9 Georgia ............................................. 0.87 82.8 - - Illinois ................................................ 2.59 10.3 5.19 100.0 Indiana ..............................................

426

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply Supply 17 Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1999 NJ WY AK AL CA AR CO CT DE FL GA HI ID KS IL IN IA IA KY LA ME MI MA MD MN MS MT MO NE ND OH NV NM NY NH NC OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT WA WV WI AZ VA DC Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Minerals Management Service. None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001 and over 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States, 1999 (Million Cubic Feet) Figure 5. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States, 1995-1999 Figure T e x a s L o u i s i a n a O k l a h o m a N e w M e x i c o W y o m i n g C o l o r a d o K a n s a s A l a b a m a A l a s k a C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Trillion Cubic Feet Billion Cubic Meters 95 96 97 98 99 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly Quantity

427

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1999 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 819,664 330,931 3.68 109,509 0.56 400 7.04 318,214 6.74 11,105 0.36 167,573 5.50 828,223 4.17 O h i o Ohio - Table 76 76. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Ohio, 1995-1999 Table 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 34,520 34,380 34,238 34,098 33,982 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 126,336 119,251 116,246 108,542 103,541 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 R 6,541 5,968 Total.............................................................

428

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 2,344,398 1,063,277 12.24 316,344 1.61 2,881 56.72 646,284 14.30 313,388 9.62 353,701 11.79 2,379,531 12.22 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous - Table 43 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,572 3,508 2,082 2,273 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 1,280 1,014 996 947 862 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

429

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama ............................................ 107,334 3,199 4,263 13,496 Alaska ............................................... 2,966,461 33,889 40,120 150,419 Arkansas ........................................... 198,148 365 451 1,536 California ........................................... 235,558 8,351 10,242 34,826 Colorado............................................ 425,083 17,467 24,365 65,730 Florida ............................................... 8,174 1,559 1,523 5,856 Illinois ................................................ 468 59 70 255 Kansas .............................................. 732,828 32,853 45,801 127,491 Kentucky ........................................... 37,929 1,661 2,263 6,476 Louisiana........................................... 4,610,969 101,358 144,609 384,288 Michigan............................................

430

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interregion Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 3,313,980 1,351,611 15.56 387,442 1.97 649 12.78 1,282,157 28.36 137,766 4.23 649,117 21.64 3,421,300 17.57 East North Central East North Central - Table 37 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas East North Central, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,417 2,348 3,174 3,180 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 42,469 41,497 41,943 42,893 42,762 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells.........................................

431

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1998 1998 Consumption - Table 17 Alabama.............. 3,271 89.6 7,441 94.7 5,101 93.0 11,194 95.6 25,270 96.6 Alaska ................. 8,368 29.6 8,990 30.3 9,116 29.6 10,972 32.5 8,631 29.8 Arizona................ 33,188 99.9 25,867 99.9 26,662 99.9 31,829 99.4 35,158 89.8 Arkansas ............. 18,625 95.9 23,132 96.2 26,442 94.8 20,213 95.9 40,150 100.0 California............. 556,557 93.3 367,940 90.3 263,937 85.8 315,728 86.6 266,459 82.3 Colorado ............. 2,685 63.6 554 27.8 3,484 72.8 428 8.7 254 2.9 Connecticut ......... 6,941 88.4 16,058 88.1 8,427 83.6 12,677 98.6 10,653 100.0 Delaware............. 16,120 92.3 21,423 79.5 19,088 86.8 13,697 89.6 10,239 94.6 Florida ................. 182,379 98.9 308,563 99.5 269,460 99.6 297,298 99.6 287,762 99.1 Georgia ............... 0 - 0 - 0 - 0 - 4,489 17.2 Illinois .................. 32,064 95.4 35,703 88.1 24,894

432

NGA_99fin.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 1997 Total................... 4,983,772 56,186,958 3,214,912 4,761,409 8,832,450 238,961 1998 Total................... 4,520,276 57,321,746 2,999,491 5,044,497 8,686,147 231,438 1999 Total................... 4,724,094 58,200,837 3,048,832 5,007,325 8,990,216 230,137 Alabama ...................... 42,647 775,311 27,581 64,185 204,263 2,626 Alaska.......................... 17,634 88,924 27,667 13,409 74,224 9 Arizona ........................ 32,940 802,469 31,333 53,023 27,000 554 Arkansas ..................... 36,245 554,121 27,898 71,389 145,140 1,395 California ..................... 568,496 9,331,206 244,701 416,791 1,109,359 37,266 Colorado......................

433

NGA98fin5.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 - Natural Gas 1998 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: 7,679 2,105 0.02 0 0.00 0 0.00 2,454 0.05 188 0.01 2,979 0.10 7,726 0.04 V e r m o n t Vermont - Table 92 92. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Vermont, 1994-1998 Table 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................

434

Orientation and disorientation in aviation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This situation is exemplified by an accident to a helicopter on the approach at night to a North Sea oil platform [10...]. Conditions were calm, but the approach was complicated by fog in the vicinity of the plat...

John Richard Rollin Stott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

International Aviation Security Technology Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory, US Dept. of Homeland Security, William J. Hughes Technical Center; Atlantic City, NJ, USA-wave Mach number as a function of distance from the explosion center. These data then yield a peak. Characterization of an explosive requires understanding of the energy released during detonation. Typically TNT

Settles, Gary S.

436

Aviation Combustion Toxicology: An Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......nitrogen dioxide gases have also been reported...Formation of these gases is associated with...cyanide, sulfur, and nitrogen moieties. Smoke...vironment sample by gas chromatography...because of their high water solubility. There- fore......

Arvind K. Chaturvedi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Explosives Detection for Aviation Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...have been purchased; some have been tested at John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York (JFK); Miami International Air-port; Dulles International Airport in the Washington, D.C., area; and Gatwick Airport, near London. The...

ANTHONY FAINBERG

1992-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Explosives Detection for Aviation Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...neutron beam may be scanned over the object as it moves past on a conveyor belt. This technique then yields a two-dimensional distribution...respond to specific tips or threats, and to examine suspicious parcels or vehicles. However, for some applications, dogs are not...

ANTHONY FAINBERG

1992-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

439

Poor show for aviation industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Soviet Union and China, there are only three practical suppliers of large civil aircraft (Boeing, McDonnell-Douglas and Airbus Industrie, the European consortium) and three manufacturers of large ... of its engines seems to have settled down at 1,000 million or thereabouts. (Boeing's past successes may owe something to its economical ways of working.) Even allowing ...

1984-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

440

Civil aviation faces green challenge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Last Sunday, Boeing rolled out its latest airliner, the 787. It boasts 20% improvements in fuel ... role in global warming, is scrambling to improve efficiency yet further. One place that Boeing and Airbus, which between them build all of the world's large civilian airliners, ...

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Aviation Combustion Toxicology: An Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in a radiant heat furnace. Rats...the produced combustion products in...in both the combustion tube and radiant heat systems proved...literature data for CO2, low...acrolein, and heat expo- sures...primary toxic combustion gases and are...structures. The hydrocarbon constituents......

Arvind K. Chaturvedi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Aviation Combustion Toxicology: An Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......relative toxicity of thermal decomposition products...Abbott. Elec- trical insulation fire characteristics...toxicity to rats of thermal de- composition products...operational performance specification for passenger protective...III. evaluation of thermal degradation prod- ucts......

Arvind K. Chaturvedi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

United states Department of the Interior, J. A. Krug> Secretary l"ish and Wildlife Service, Albert M. Day, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

50 to 200 miles offshore , with some spavming taldnt; place at least as far sea"';ard as 30G miles(;n., as they cio trJ'oughO'.lt life, on min',lte organisms, plant 2nd animal, -)'Thich livE' suspended L'1 the se2 their inshore nursery grounds and take up the pelagic offshore life of adclts. Then they make their first appea

444

+ +GJWclshJngtonBARN ISH UniversitylnStI.clJistal , UlIIYalthCare ScHOOLOF MBDICINB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

infusion. Initiate IV access Discontinue IV access at discharge IfOutpatient: Discharge patient after infusion. Labs: Dr. Pestronk's Labs - send to IWJ-404: D Immunocompetency Panel-label "Examine for CDl9L/hour via peripheral IV line D NS at KVO during infusion. Other: Medications: Pre-Medications: Give 30

Baloh, Bob

445

Field demonstration of aviation turbine fuel MIL-T-83133C, grade JP-8 (NATO code F-34) at Fort Bliss, TX. Interim report 1 Feb 89-31 Jul 90  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A JP-8 fuel demonstration was initiated at Ft. Bliss, TX, to demonstrate the impact of using aviation turbine fuel MIL-T-83133C, grade JP-8 in all military diesel fuel-consuming ground vehicles and equipment. Three major organizations, one ordnance battalion and two activities with a total of 2807 vehicles/equipment (V/E), were identified as participants in the demonstration program, which is authorized to continue through 30 September 1991. No fuel storage tank or V/E fuel cells were drained and flushed prior to introduction of JP-8 fuel. This procedure resulted in a commingling of JP-8 fuel with existing diesel fuel. As of 31 July 1990 approximately 4,700,000 gallons of JP-8 fuel had been dispensed to user units at Ft. Bliss and at Ft. Irwin National Training Center (NTC) in California. Three areas of concern arose from the beginning of the program: (1) plugging of fuel filters, (2) loss of power, and (3) overheating. The use of JP-8 fuel did not cause or exacerbate any V/E fuel filter plugging. Where power loss was apparent, generally it was commensurate with the difference in heating values between JP-8 and diesel fuel. The V/E at Ft. Bliss operated satisfactorily with the JP-8 fuel with no alterations, mechanical or otherwise, having to be made to any engines or fuel systems. There were no major differences in fuel procurement costs, V/E fuel consumption, AOAP-directed oil changes, and fuel-wetted component replacements.

Butler, W.E.; Alvarez, R.A.; Yost, D.M.; Westbrook, S.R.; Buckingham, J.P.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Microsoft Word - HighlightsFin.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October 2003 October 2003 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. EIA's outlook is for world oil prices to remain near $30 per barrel through the coming winter of 2003/2004. Prices remain firm rather than declining primarily because of OPEC's decision to lower oil production quotas. OPEC's decision to cut its production targets reduces the chances for a large end-of-year stockbuild that OPEC feared could undermine oil prices. Even before OPEC's decision to lower quotas, EIA had projected that the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) commercial inventory situation would remain tight until the end of the year. Until these inventories are rebuilt above observed 5-year lows, which is not expected to occur until early 2004, West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices should

447

Analytical solutions for extended surface electrochemical fin...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Exact solutions were obtained to simulate current passages in SOFC electrodes. &21; A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrode was selected as a test case for these studies. &21; Assess...

448

Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling experiments are conducted for saturation and subcooled conditions. Three...). .................................................................................................68 Fig. 19. Plots comparing the heat flux through the enhanced test surfaces (qw) with the heat flux through the bare test surface (qb) under 10 C sub-cooling condition for both nulceate and film boiling regimes. Heat flux data...

Sriraman, Sharan Ram

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling...

Sriraman, Sharan Ram

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

HAP FINS/BUDGET Janet Backe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alfredo Ledesma Technical Daisy Chan Technical SIMS Felix Chan Technical Lead Catherine Chiu Functional

451

AVIATION SAFETY OFFICER QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Safety Safety Officer Qualification Standard Reference Guide MARCH 2010 i This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents ii LIST OF FIGURES ..................................................................................................................... iii LIST OF TABLES ....................................................................................................................... iii ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................... iv PURPOSE...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ...........................................................................................................................................

452

FAQS Job Task Analyses- DOE Aviation Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

453

Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

The National Plan for Aviation Human Factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effective verification and validation of complex and integrated human-machine systems depends on the selection of appropriate performance measures and on the adequacy of the measurement tools and procedures us...

Joseph Pitts; Phyllis Kayten

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

AVIATION MANAGER QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

should be recognized by presentation of a certificate signed by the Secretary of Energy, and an appropriate memento. Group(s) should be recognized by presentation of a...

456

Thermochemical Conversion Proceeses to Aviation Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a presentation from the November 27, 2012, Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop given by John Holladay, PNNL

457

Aviation Safety Program Aircraft Aging & Durability Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Other Projects and Programs 8 2. Milestones & Metrics 10 2.1 10-Year Roadmap 10 2.2 Five Year Milestone for Characterization and Validation (1.5) 32 3.2 Level 2 ­ Discipline Level Capabilities 34 3.2.1 NDE / SHM Systems (2 Roadmap. 11 Figure 5. Representative development of capabilities for Detect Theme. 12 Figure 6

458

Transport impacts on atmosphere and climate: Aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen, and lique?ed biomethane. Of these fuels, ethanolrates (Eiff et al. , 1992). Biomethane was judged unsuitable

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Ceramic Processing.qrk  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processing Processing Manufacturing Technologies The Ceramics and Glass Department devel- ops fabrication processes for ceramic compo- nents used in weapon applications. All phases of ceramic processing, from powders to fin- ished products, are addressed; including pow- der processing, blending, granulation, com- paction, sintering, grinding, metallization, and property measurements. In addition, multilay- er processing techniques are used to fabricate layered electrical devices. Our department has extensive experience in ferroelectric (PZT) and alumina ceramics, including cermet composi- tions (alumina - molybdenum composites) developed for hermetic electrical feedthrus, and alumina ceramics with buried ruthenium oxide based resistors. Capabilities * Perform process development activities for

460

ORNL - Restart of the High Flux Isotope Reactor 2-07  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HYGIENE (IS&H) OBJECTIVE IS&H-1: The RRD industrial safety and hygiene (IS&H) program has been appropriately modified to reflect the CS modification and its...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fin ished aviation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

3-18-2010-WAPA _Meeks_ FinTestimony.pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NATURAL RESOURCES NATURAL RESOURCES U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES March 18, 2010 Madam Chairwoman and Members of the Subcommittee, I am Timothy J. Meeks, Administrator of the United States Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration (Western). I am pleased to be here today to discuss HR 4349, the Hoover Power Allocation Act of 2009. This legislation seeks to amend the Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984. The legislation proposes revised allocations of the generation capacity and energy from the Hoover Dam power plant, a feature of the Boulder Canyon Project (BCP), after the existing contracts expire on September 30, 2017. Western's mission is to market and deliver reliable, cost-based hydroelectric power from facilities such as Hoover Dam. Hoover Dam was authorized and constructed in accordance with the Boulder

462

Microsoft Word - win0304_Version3Fin.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) 1 Winter Fuels Outlook: 2003-2004 Introduction This report summarizes the winter outlook for demand, supply and prices for natural gas, heating oil, electricity and propane, with emphasis on residential space-heating demand. The outlook, which includes severe- and mild- weather cases, is consistent with the October 2003 Short-Term Energy Outlook. For the purposes of the analysis, the winter season is defined as the period from October through March. Highlights * Net changes in residential heating prices and expenditures compared to last winter are: Prices: almost no change for heating oil and propane; plus 9 percent for natural gas; plus 3 percent for electricity. Expenditures: minus 8 percent for heating oil; plus 5 percent for natural gas; plus 2 percent for electricity;

463

Microsoft Word - TKC Risk Paper.fin.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Primer on A Primer on Perceptions of Risk, Risk Communication and Building Trust Peter S. Adler, Ph.D. Jeremy L. Kranowitz, M.P.A., M.S. The Keystone Center February 2005 2 Table of Contents I. Introduction II. Problem Diagnostics and Typing III. Risk Evaluation IV. Risk Communication V. Stakeholding and Public Participation VI. Building Trust VII. Conclusion 3 PREFACE The Keystone Center with support from the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), produced this paper to aid in outreach and education for carbon sequestration activities, specifically to address methods for communicating any risks and benefits of geologic carbon sequestration to the public. Geologic sequestration (or geo-sequestration) involves injection of carbon dioxide in geologic formations, such as unused oil and gas wells or

464

5_13_09_HSS_Fin_Testimony.pdf  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Written Testimony of Glenn S. Podonsky Written Testimony of Glenn S. Podonsky Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer U.S. Department of Energy FY 2010 Appropriation Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services U.S. House of Representatives May 13, 2009 INTRODUCTION Chairman Tauscher, Ranking Member Turner, and members of the subcommittee, thank you for inviting me to testify today on the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Budget Request for the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). As the central organization within the Department of Energy (Department or DOE) responsible for health, safety, security, and environment, HSS provides the Department with effective and consistent policy, technical assistance, professional development and training, complex-wide independent oversight, and enforcement. As the Chief Health,

465

Microsoft Word - DOE_fin_rept_text.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 Frequency of Report: Final Reporting Period Start Date: March 1, 2004 Reporting Period End Date: September 30, 2006 Name of Submitting Organization: Joint Oceanographic Institutions Principal Authors: Dr. Frank R. Rack, and the IODP Expedition 311 Scientific Party* Date Report Issued: February 2007 Frank R. Rack (Joint Oceanographic Institutions; 1201 New York Ave., NW; Suite 400; Washington, DC, 20005; Tel: (202) 232-3900, ext. 1608; Email: frack@joiscience.org); and the IODP Expedition 311 Scientific Party*. DE-FC26-01NT41329 Joint Oceanographic Institutions In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution. 2 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the

466

Stat 39000/FinMath 34500 Lecture 8 STOCHASTIC INTEGRALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRAND IF t IS NONRANDOM: t 0 sdWs = limit of ti+1t ti Wti ti+1t ti Wti : · LINEAR COMBINATION OF NORMAL RANDOM VARIABLES IS A NORMAL RANDOM VARIABLE · MEAN: E ti+1t ti Wti = 0 · VARIANCE: Var ( ti+1t ti Wti ) = ti+1t 2 ti Var (Wti ) = ti+1t 2 ti ti IN THE LIMIT: t 0 sdWs: · NORMAL RANDOM VARIABLE · MEAN IS ZERO

Mykland, Per A.

467

Stat 39100/FinMath 34600 Lecture 8 STOCHASTIC INTEGRALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTEGRAND IF t IS NONRANDOM: t 0 sdWs = limit of ti+1t ti Wti ti+1t ti Wti : · LINEAR COMBINATION OF NORMAL RANDOM VARIABLES IS A NORMAL RANDOM VARIABLE · MEAN: E ti+1t ti Wti = 0 · VARIANCE: Var ( ti+1t ti Wti ) = ti+1t 2 ti Var (Wti ) = ti+1t 2 ti ti IN THE LIMIT: t 0 sdWs: · NORMAL RANDOM VARIABLE · MEAN IS ZERO

Mykland, Per A.

468

FedFinAssistOpportuntiesatDOEBooklet.pdf | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

efficient, scalable, and low cost thermoelectric waste heat recovery devices for vehicles CX-010152: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Clean Coal Power Initiative...

469

Microsoft Word - 12-9076324.001_fin.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Under Level A and B start-up shutdown Reactor trip conditions Under Level C Loss of heat sink Depressurized Conduction Cooldown situation (only for RPV) The ASME...

470

Design of small, low-cost, underwater fin manipulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis details the development of a small, low cost, underwater manipulator for use on the XAUV. At this time, there are no cheap underwater servos commercially available. The design involves modifying a commercially ...

Roberts, Megan Johnson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

2010/11 the year in pictures Fins and fingerprints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Race (part of the aeolus Wind energy Project). team bristol's design was the only electric vehicle the faculty of engineering took their wind-powered car to denmark to compete at the aeolus Wind- Powered Car

Bristol, University of

472

You Must Include: Fin/Grad Aid Verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charges only AMOUNT DEFERRED $0.00 PAYMENT SCHEDULE (2/3 of Summer Session Fees plus Housing) JUL 15th

Liebling, Michael

473

Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

99.6 99.6 92.9 52.3 52.2 67.4 56.6 February ............................. 99.8 93.2 52.2 52.0 62.8 55.2 March .................................. 99.0 93.1 50.5 50.1 59.4 52.8 April .................................... 101.3 96.6 52.8 52.6 56.1 56.0 May ..................................... 105.8 102.2 55.0 54.7 51.7 57.7 June .................................... 106.4 101.6 53.2 53.1 54.9 53.2 July ..................................... 101.8 100.1 51.9 51.3 51.3 52.3 August ................................ 99.2 98.9 53.4 53.1 53.3 54.9 September .......................... 101.3 98.7 55.7 55.2 57.3 58.0 October ............................... 96.8 96.3 54.9 54.1 56.5 57.0 November ........................... 95.4 94.2 57.0 56.3 62.8 60.5 December ........................... 96.0 95.3 59.2 58.6

474

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

64.8 64.8 1,113.8 54,765.4 50,474.8 14,751.6 15,834.7 30,586.3 February ................................... 668.4 1,109.1 51,874.7 53,325.1 15,057.1 18,393.2 33,450.3 March ........................................ 769.5 1,087.5 53,941.3 38,432.9 12,043.4 16,348.0 28,391.3 April .......................................... 802.8 911.4 54,353.2 30,216.7 8,771.4 14,743.5 23,515.0 May ........................................... 973.7 1,080.8 55,284.8 27,798.1 7,705.6 15,130.0 22,835.6 June .......................................... 1,000.6 991.1 56,209.3 28,204.2 9,455.4 13,696.5 23,151.9 July ........................................... 1,063.8 1,300.5 56,468.8 27,811.1 10,786.1 12,367.3 23,153.4 August ...................................... 1,098.5 1,188.9 57,758.7 32,654.7 10,893.1 15,430.4

475

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

41.8 41.8 706.1 57,805.1 57,186.2 19,255.2 18,038.2 37,293.4 February ................................... 603.8 735.2 58,810.1 55,734.5 14,352.8 19,882.7 34,235.5 March ........................................ 693.1 675.6 59,143.7 40,326.8 13,589.5 18,472.2 32,061.7 April .......................................... 816.1 567.3 60,408.7 33,387.8 9,591.6 17,777.5 27,369.1 May ........................................... 925.8 799.7 60,325.7 26,854.4 7,093.1 16,017.5 23,110.5 June .......................................... 950.1 877.4 61,257.3 26,771.1 8,852.7 17,544.1 26,396.8 July ........................................... 1,030.3 884.1 61,401.8 28,838.3 7,254.9 19,950.4 27,205.4 August ...................................... 1,059.8 881.6 61,710.5 34,944.4 7,342.1 20,393.7 27,735.8 September

476

Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

01.2 01.2 94.7 61.3 60.3 71.8 65.8 February ............................. 100.6 96.5 56.9 57.3 73.4 65.7 March .................................. 105.0 100.6 59.0 59.6 69.0 68.0 April .................................... 111.4 107.5 66.0 65.3 80.5 75.1 May ..................................... 114.4 110.0 63.3 62.2 68.4 66.1 June .................................... 113.5 107.0 57.7 57.5 58.5 59.8 July ..................................... 113.7 105.3 60.3 59.6 64.6 61.7 August ................................ 114.4 107.1 65.1 64.5 69.5 66.6 September .......................... 114.3 106.8 71.8 71.6 76.4 75.6 October ............................... 115.0 107.1 73.6 73.6 87.1 80.7 November ........................... 115.1 108.4 71.7 72.2 88.7 79.7 December ........................... 115.3

477

Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

71.7 71.7 588.5 56,673.6 54,346.7 12,106.5 21,030.6 33,137.1 February ................................... 834.8 890.3 57,750.3 47,277.7 10,579.0 22,424.4 33,003.4 March ........................................ 731.6 757.0 58,791.1 34,964.0 7,414.9 20,425.4 27,840.2 April .......................................... 766.9 730.9 60,322.2 31,714.4 6,811.5 18,166.1 24,977.7 May ........................................... 897.1 789.7 59,572.1 28,454.2 6,772.5 17,383.9 24,156.5 June .......................................... 940.7 714.1 62,704.7 27,177.7 6,415.2 18,715.9 25,131.1 July ........................................... 1,088.6 710.3 62,496.7 28,647.8 7,508.6 19,724.2 27,232.8 August ...................................... 1,028.5 837.4 62,747.5 31,743.2 8,180.1 18,800.6 26,980.7 September

478

Automated safety and training avionics for general aviation aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also drives a rule-based Pilot Advisor for generation of alarms and piloting advice. The pilot communicates with ASTRA through the Head-Down Display (HDD), which is configured similarly to the Multi-Function Displays found in many "glass cockpit...

Trang, Jeffrey Alan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Table 45. Refiner Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, No. 1...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

145.8 461.3 48,876.2 13,893.0 268.5 3,966.8 391.5 3,072.0 3,773.6 35,832.0 December ... 138.2 466.6 49,701.7 14,199.8 342.2 4,861.0 599.8 3,200.2...

480

Geographic Area Month Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

64.9 63.8 79.2 64.7 November ... 116.4 108.1 68.2 66.5 84.8 72.8 December ... 119.6 110.2 73.3 72.1 89.1 76.5 1999 Average...

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481

Table 45. Refiner Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Kerosene, No. 1...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 64.5 101.3 12,742.5 2,029.5 190.8 2,042.2 12.7 38.0 91.2 4,874.9 December ... 57.1 89.7 13,275.8 2,017.6 210.4 2,595.6 26.2 58.1 112.5...

482

Aviation Gasoline Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

May-14 Jun-14 Jul-14 Aug-14 Sep-14 Oct-14 View History U.S. W W W W W W 1983-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) W W W W W W 1983-2014 New England (PADD 1A) W W W W W - 1983-2014 Connecticut...

483

The engineering options for mitigating the climate impacts of aviation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...areas of daily life. Another factor...and the service life is long. Modest...impacts. For the remaining mechanisms...combustor to the turbine (figure 1...the mixing of gases before exhaust...hydrogen on aero gas turbine pollutant emissions...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

AviationWeek.com/awst Airlines to WAtch in 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and imple- ment innovative manufacturing pro- cesses--such as additive manufactur- ing--have referred A as much opportunity for small manufacturers with no access to cut- ting-edge R&D tools- tion of open-source materials research, plus a state-of-the-art Manufacturing Demonstration Facility

Pennycook, Steve

485

Modeling aviation's global emissions, uncertainty analysis, and applications to policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) fuel burn results below 3000 ft. For emissions, the emissions indices were the most influential uncertainties for the variance in model outputs. By employing the model, this thesis examined three policy options for ...

Lee, Joosung Joseph, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

A comparative analysis of area navigation systems for general aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the next decade area navigation is to become the primary method of air navigation within the United States. There are numerous radio navigation systems that offer the capabilities of area navigation to general ...

Dodge, Steven Malcolm

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Aviation and Marine Transportation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Change Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas, Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Technical report Website: www.pewclimate.org...

488

Aviation Best Safety First RSL's Aerial Measuring Systems program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lory Jones. Submit articles or ideas to: onevoice@nv.doe.gov Publication Management: NSTec Public Affairs and Community Relations and Workforce Enhancement & Communications...

489

The engineering options for mitigating the climate impacts of aviation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the coming years, including the vision of an ultra green air transport system...characteristic change possible gains turbine entry temperature increase with OPR...Effects of using hydrogen on aero gas turbine pollutant emissions, performance...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

FAQS Job Task Analyses- DOE Aviation Safety Officer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies.

491

Intelligent terrain avoidance agent for General Aviation Free Flight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the pilot handle this responsibility, a hierarchical agent system is under development. This system will take information from traffic, weather, and terrain to determine a safe and efficient flight path. The terrain agent in this system must avoid Controlled...

Gesting, Paul

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

492

Additive Manufacturing in China: Aviation and Aerospace Applications (Part 2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??? [Titanium Alloy 3D Printing2012 First Prize InventionLaunch Worlds First Use of 3D Printing Technology in New-3 Titanium Alloy 3D Printing2012 First Prize Invention in

ANDERSON, Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

The Potential of Turboprops to Reduce Aviation Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and adoption, is challenged by fuel price uncertainty.Fuel price uncertainty is due fuel and energy priceplanning under such fuel price uncertainty and environmental

Smirti, Megan; Hansen, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Authenticating Aviation Augmentation System Sherman C. Lo, Stanford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the national airspace (NAS). Assessing and developing security for these #12;systems can provide useful. INTRODUCTION An important function of augmentation systems for Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS systems is a useful first case study for developing and implementing enhanced information security

Stanford University

495

Preliminary Assessment of Alternative Navigation Means for Civil Aviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7 (HSPD-7) and National Security Presidential Directive 39 (NSPD Administration (FAA) is looking to develop alternative navigation means to global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) and GPS. While the national airspace (NAS) includes many navigation systems such as distance

Stanford University

496

NORMATIVA SOBRE LOS TRABAJOS DE FIN DE GRADO/TRABAJOS FIN DE MSTER EN LA UNIVERSIDAD DE ALICANTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. La carga de trabajo asociada al TFG/TFM, relativa al alumnado, se corresponderá con los créditos ECTS actividades del alumnado, realizar un seguimiento de las actividades durante el periodo de duración del

Escolano, Francisco

497

Alaska Justice Forum Page 1 Winter 1997 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Vol. 13, No. 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of stuttering, making grammar errors or leaving sentences unfin- ished. If she focuses too much attention on her

Pantaleone, Jim

498

Updated 11-12 Bruce B. Cwalina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Competency Department Head for Major Weapons Systems, Strike Weapons, Unmanned Aviation, Aviation Support

499

Human Factors Analysis of Power System Visualizations Thomas J. Overbye Douglas A. Wiegmann Aaron M. Rich Yan Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Rich Yan Sun Dept. Elect. & Comp. Eng. Institute of Aviation Institute of Aviation Dept. Elect. & Comp

500

Human Factors Aspects of Power System Voltage Visualizations Douglas A. Wiegmann Aaron M. Rich Thomas J. Overbye Yan Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thomas J. Overbye Yan Sun Institute of Aviation Institute of Aviation Elect. & Comp. Eng. Elect. & Comp