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1

Caustic Recovery Technology | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Caustic Recovery Technology Caustic Recovery Technology Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Caustic Recovery Technology Summary - Caustic Recovery...

2

Summary - Caustic Recovery Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Caustic Recovery Technology Caustic Recovery Technology ETR Report Date: July 2007 ETR-7 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Caustic Recovery Technology Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office (EM-21) has been developing caustic recovery technology for application to the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to reduce the amount of Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrified. Recycle of sodium hydroxide with an efficient caustic recovery process could reduce the amount of waste glass produced by greater than 30%. The Ceramatec Sodium (Na), Super fast Ionic CONductors (NaSICON) membrane has shown promise for directly producing 50% caustic with high sodium selectivity. The external review

3

Moist caustic leaching of coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for reducing the sulfur and ash content of coal. Particulate coal is introduced into a closed heated reaction chamber having an inert atmosphere to which is added 50 mole percent NaOH and 50 mole percent KOH moist caustic having a water content in the range of from about 15% by weight to about 35% by weight and in a caustic to coal weight ratio of about 5 to 1. The coal and moist caustic are kept at a temperature of about 300.degree. C. Then, water is added to the coal and caustic mixture to form an aqueous slurry, which is washed with water to remove caustic from the coal and to produce an aqueous caustic solution. Water is evaporated from the aqueous caustic solution until the water is in the range of from about 15% by weight to about 35% by weight and is reintroduced to the closed reaction chamber. Sufficient acid is added to the washed coal slurry to neutralize any remaining caustic present on the coal, which is thereafter dried to produce desulfurized coal having not less than about 90% by weight of the sulfur present in the coal feed removed and having an ash content of less than about 2% by weight.

Nowak, Michael A. (Elizabeth, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Caustic Recovery Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

366, REVISON 0 366, REVISON 0 Key Words: Waste Treatment Plant Sodium Recovery Electrochemical Retention: Permanent Review of Ceramatec's Caustic Recovery Technology W. R. Wilmarth D. T. Hobbs W. A. Averill E. B. Fox R. A. Peterson UNCLASSIFIED DOES NOT CONTAIN UNCLASSIFIED CONTROLLED NUCLEAR INFORMATION ADC & Reviewing Official:_______________________________________ (E. Stevens, Manager, Solid Waste and Special Programs) Date:______________________________________ JULY 20, 2007 Washington Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 Prepared for the U. S. Department of Energy Under Contract Number DE-AC09-96SR18500 Page 1 of 28 WSRC-STI-2007-00366, REVISON 0 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared for the United States Department of Energy under

5

Chemical equilibria between C–S–H and ettringite, at 20 and 85 °C  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mixes of C–S–H and ettringite were synthesized in suspension systems and their equilibria were studied at 20 and 85 °C. Concentrations in solution (calcium, sulfate, aluminium) were measured and the mineralogical state of the systems was studied by means of X-ray diffraction. The equilibria between C–S–H and ettringite are described. The relative importance of sulfate bound to the C–S–H is evaluated. The kinetics of ettringite reprecipitation from a “C–S–H–ettringite” system at 85 °C placed at 20 °C are also evaluated.

R. Barbarulo; H. Peycelon; S. Leclercq

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Role of interatomic bonding in the mechanical anisotropy and interlayer cohesion of CSH crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic scale properties of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH), the main binding phase of hardened Portland cement, are not well understood. Over a century of intense research has identified almost 50 different crystalline CSH minerals which are mainly categorized by their Ca/Si ratio. The electronic structure and interatomic bonding in four major CSH crystalline phases with structures close to those found in hardened cement are investigated via ab initio methods. Our result reveals the critical role of hydrogen bonding and importance of specifying precise locations for water molecules. Quantitative analysis of contributions from different bond types to the overall cohesion shows that while the Si-O covalent bonds dominate, the hydrogen bonding and Ca-O bonding are also very significant. Calculated results reveal the correlation between bond topology and interlayer cohesion. The overall bond order density (BOD) is found to be a more critical measure than the Ca/Si ratio in classifying different CSH crystals.

Dharmawardhana, C.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Misra, A. [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States)] [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Aryal, S.; Rulis, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Ching, W.Y., E-mail: ccdxz8@mail.umkc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Rotary filtration system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary filtration apparatus for filtering a feed fluid into permeate is provided. The rotary filtration apparatus includes a container that has a feed fluid inlet. A shaft is at least partially disposed in the container and has a passageway for the transport of permeate. A disk stack made of a plurality of filtration disks is mounted onto the shaft so that rotation of the shaft causes rotation of the filtration disks. The filtration disks may be made of steel components and may be welded together. The shaft may penetrate a filtering section of the container at a single location. The rotary filtration apparatus may also incorporate a bellows seal to prevent leakage along the shaft, and an around the shaft union rotary joint to allow for removal of permeate. Various components of the rotary filtration apparatus may be removed as a single assembly.

Herman, David T. (Aiken, SC); Maxwell, David N. (Aiken, SC)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

8

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) System Integration Project, Phase 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the task (Task 6) covered in this document was to operate the refurbished/modified test circuit of the Gravimeh Process in a continuous integrated manner to obtain the engineering and operational data necessary to assess the technical performance and reliability of the circuit. This data is critical to the development of this technology as a feasible means of producing premium clean burning fuels that meet New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Significant refurbishments and design modifications had been made to the facility (in particular to the vacuum filtration and evaporation units) during Tasks 1 and 2, followed by off-line testing (Task 3). Two weeks of continuous around-the-clock operation of the refurbished/modified MCL test circuit were performed. During the second week of testing, all sections of the plant were operated in an integrated fashion for an extended period of time, including a substantial number of hours of on-stream time for the vacuum filters and the caustic evaporation unit. A new process configuration was tested in which centrate from the acid wash train (without acid addition) was used as the water makeup for the water wash train, thus-eliminating the one remaining process waste water stream. A 9-inch centrifuge was tested at various solids loadings and at flow rates up to 400 lbs/hr of coal feed to obtain a twenty-fold scaleup factor over the MCL integrated test facility centrifuge performance data.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

A Ceramic membrane to Recycle Caustic  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A A Ceramic Membrane to Recycle Caustic in Low-Activity Waste Stream Processing The Office of Waste Processing is sponsoring an R&D project with Ceramatec, Inc. to develop a ceramic membrane capable of separating sodium from the Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) stream. The Hanford High-Level Waste (HLW) tanks must be maintained in a caustic environment to inhibit corrosion. Consequently, they contain large quantities of NaOH. Ultimately the HLW will be retrieved, separated into HLW and LAW streams, with both streams being vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). Prior to processing, additional NaOH will be added to the LAW stream to solubilize the alumina, preventing alumina precipitation, but further increasing the NaOH quantity. This project's goal is to separate the sodium from the LAW stream prior to vitrification which will allow the NaOH to be recycled and further

11

Optical evaluation of heliostat mirrors using caustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar thermal power generation is based on the concept of concentrating solar radiation to provide high temperature heat for electricity generation via conventional power cycles. The high relative cost of optical subsystems necessitates a careful study of their components. Solar collector fields are typically modeled by ray-tracing or convolution methods; however no general method is available for engineering analysis. We propose the use of caustics to predict the image of the sun reflected by an arbitrary mirror of focal length F and aperture a on a target. The mirror surface is described parametrically by a quadric and placed at a distance L from the target on a heliostat. The method of caustics was validated against SolTRACE a ray-tracing code developed by U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratories . We show that there is a value of a F which depends on a L for which the incident average energy flux to the target reaches a maximum. The method of caustics allows the efficient computation of the image on an arbitrary target surface and obviates many of the difficulties with ray-tracing methods.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

THE GEODESIC X-RAY TRANSFORM WITH FOLD CAUSTICS The ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aug 28, 2012 ... THE GEODESIC X-RAY TRANSFORM WITH FOLD CAUSTICS. PLAMEN STEFANOV AND GUNTHER UHLMANN. ABSTRACT. We give a ...

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

13

ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

14

CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall project consists of several integrated research phases related to the applicability, continued development, demonstration, and commercialization of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration process. Work performed during this reporting period consisted of Phase 2 evaluation of the SpinTek centrifugal membrane filtration technology and Phase 3, Technology Partnering. During Phase 1 testing conducted at the EERC using the SpinTek ST-IIL unit operating on a surrogate tank waste, a solids cake developed on the membrane surface. The solids cake was observed where linear membrane velocities were less than 17.5 ft/s and reduced the unobstructed membrane surface area up to 25%, reducing overall filtration performance. The primary goal of the Phase 2 research effort was to enhance filtration performance through the development and testing of alternative turbulence promoter designs. The turbulence promoters were designed to generate a shear force across the entire membrane surface sufficient to maintain a self-cleaning membrane capability and improve filtration efficiency and long-term performance. Specific Phase 2 research activities included the following: System modifications to accommodate an 11-in.-diameter, two-disk rotating membrane assembly; Development and fabrication of alternative turbulence promoter designs; Testing and evaluation of the existing and alternative turbulence promoters under selected operating conditions using a statistically designed test matrix; and Data reduction and analysis; The objective of Phase 3 research was to demonstrate the effectiveness of SpinTek's centrifugal membrane filtration as a pretreatment to remove suspended solids from a liquid waste upstream of 3M's WWL cartridge technology for the selective removal of technetium (Tc).

Daniel J. Stepan; Bradley G. Stevens; Melanie D. Hetland

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Preconceptual Design Description for Caustic Recycle Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify both high-level and low-activity waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. One aspect of the planning includes a need for a caustic recycle process to separate sodium hydroxide for recycle. Sodium is already a major limitation to the waste-oxide loading in the low-activity waste glass to be vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant, and additional sodium hydroxide will be added to remove aluminum and to control precipitation in the process equipment. Aluminum is being removed from the high level sludge to reduce the number of high level waste canisters produced. A sodium recycle process would reduce the volume of low-activity waste glass produced and minimize the need to purchase new sodium hydroxide, so there is a renewed interest in investigating sodium recycle. This document describes an electrochemical facility for recycling sodium for the WTP.

Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.

2008-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

Primary caustics and critical points behind a Kerr black hole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary optical caustic surface behind a Kerr black hole is a four-cusped tube displaced from the line of sight. We derive the caustic surface in the nearly asymptotic region far from the black hole through a Taylor expansion of the lightlike geodesics up to and including fourth-order terms in m/b and a/b, where m is the black hole mass, a the spin, and b the impact parameter. The corresponding critical locus in the observer's sky is elliptical and a pointlike source inside the caustics will be imaged as an Einstein cross. With regard to lensing near critical points, a Kerr lens is analogous to a circular lens perturbed by a dipole and a quadrupole potential. The caustic structure of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center could be probed by lensing of low mass x-ray binaries in the galactic inner regions or by hot spots in the accretion disk.

Sereno, Mauro; De Luca, Fabiana [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Primary caustics and critical points behind a Kerr black hole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The primary optical caustic surface behind a Kerr black hole is a four-cusped tube displaced from the line of sight. We derive the caustic surface in the nearly asymptotic region far from the black hole through a Taylor expansion of the lightlike geodesics up to and including fourth-order terms in m/b and a/b, where m is the black hole mass, a the spin, and b the impact parameter. The corresponding critical locus in the observer’s sky is elliptical and a pointlike source inside the caustics will be imaged as an Einstein cross. With regard to lensing near critical points, a Kerr lens is analogous to a circular lens perturbed by a dipole and a quadrupole potential. The caustic structure of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center could be probed by lensing of low mass x-ray binaries in the galactic inner regions or by hot spots in the accretion disk.

Mauro Sereno and Fabiana De Luca

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

Advanced Electrodes for Solid Acid Fuel Cells by Platinum Deposition on CsH2PO4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Advanced Electrodes for Solid Acid Fuel Cells by Platinum Deposition on CsH2PO4 ... The unique characteristics of the CDP electrolyte pose several challenges to SAFC optimization, particularly in the area of cathode microstructure. ... 1% CO demonstrates the potential of this approach with optimized reforming catalysts and also the tolerance to CO poisoning at these elevated temps. ...

Alexander B. Papandrew; Calum R.I. Chisholm; Ramez A. Elgammal; Mustafa M. Özer; Strahinja K. Zecevic

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Sodium Hydroxide Extraction From Caustic Leaching Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes experiments conducted to demonstrate the proof-of-principle of a method to recover NaOH from Hanford tank sludge leaching solutions. Aqueous solutions generated from leaching actual Hanford tank waste solids were used. The process involves neutralization of a lipophilic weak acid (t-octylphenol was used in these experiments) by reaction with NaOH in the aqueous phase. This results in the transfer of Na into the organic phase. Contacting with water reverses this process, reprotonating the lipophilic weak acid and transferring Na back into the aqueous phase as NaOH. The work described here confirms the potential application of solvent extraction to recover and recycle NaOH from solutions generated by leaching Hanford tank sludges. Solutions obtained by leaching sludges from tanks S-110 and T-110 were used in this work. It was demonstrated that Na+ is transferred from caustic leaching solution to the organic phase when contacted with t-octylphenol solutions. This was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the aqueous-phase hydroxide ion concentration. Seventy to 80 % of the extracted Na was recovered by 3 to 4 sequential contacts of the organic phase with water. Cesium was co-extracted by the procedure, but Al and Cr remained in the feed stream.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Garza, Priscilla A.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Brown, Gilbert M.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

20

An Example of Uniform Approximation near a Caustic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the region inside a caustic having two rays through each point ray acoustics approximates a sound field due to a point harmonic source of frequency ? by e?Im(T1)[A1ei?T 1+A2e(i?T 2+ir/2) ]. When the caustic is smooth Ludwig approximates the field everywhere by a constant times e i?? [B 1 Ai (?? 2 3 ?)?i? ? 1 2 B 2 Ai ?(?? 1 2 ?)] where Ai is the usual Airy function. An example of Ludwig's approximation is presented in parameterless form for the unbounded layered medium having speed c(z)?=?z ? 1 2 . This approximation of course agrees with ray theory on the source side of the caustic rises to a large but finite value near the caustic and exhibits exponential decay on the other side of the caustic. For the record the results are expressed in horizontal range x and depth z with the source at x = 0 z = z 0: T n ?=?( 2 3 )[??+?(???1) n ?] 1 2 [????(??1?) n ?/2] where ? = z + z 0 and r2 = 4zz0 ? x2; An ?2 = 2r(? + (? 1) n ?); 2? = ? ? R where R 2 = (z ? z 0)2 + x 2 3? 1 2 ?=???+?R ; B 1 2 ?=?2?? 1 3 /(rR 2 ) and B 2 ?=?? ? 1 2 /R .

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Physics of Caustics and Protein Folding: Mathematical Parallels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy for protein folding arises from multiple sources and is not large in total. In spite of the many specific successes of energy landscape and other approaches, there still seems to be some missing guiding factor that explains how energy from diverse small sources can drive a complex molecule to a unique state. We explore the possibility that the missing factor is in the geometry. A comparison of folding with other physical phenomena, together with analytic modeling of a molecule, led us to analyze the physics of optical caustic formation and of folding behavior side-by-side. The physics of folding and caustics is ostensibly very different but there are several strong parallels. This comparison emphasizes the mathematical similarity and also identifies differences. Since the 1970's, the physics of optical caustics has been developed to a very high degree of mathematical sophistication using catastrophe theory. That kind of quantitative application of catastrophe theory has not previously been applied to folding nor have the points of similarity with optics been identified or exploited. A putative underlying physical link between caustics and folding is a torsion wave of non-constant wave speed, propagating on the dihedral angles and $\\Psi$ found in an analytical model of the molecule. Regardless of whether we have correctly identified an underlying link, the analogy between caustic formation and folding is strong and the parallels (and differences) in the physics are useful.

Walter Simmons; Joel L. Weiner

2011-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

Physics of Caustics and Protein Folding: Mathematical Parallels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy for protein folding arises from multiple sources and is not large in total. In spite of the many specific successes of energy landscape and other approaches, there still seems to be some missing guiding factor that explains how energy from diverse small sources can drive a complex molecule to a unique state. We explore the possibility that the missing factor is in the geometry. A comparison of folding with other physical phenomena, together with analytic modeling of a molecule, led us to analyze the physics of optical caustic formation and of folding behavior side-by-side. The physics of folding and caustics is ostensibly very different but there are several strong parallels. This comparison emphasizes the mathematical similarity and also identifies differences. Since the 1970's, the physics of optical caustics has been developed to a very high degree of mathematical sophistication using catastrophe theory. That kind of quantitative application of catastrophe theory has not previously been applied ...

Simmons, Walter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

24

Health benefits of particle filtration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Health benefits of particle filtration Health benefits of particle filtration Title Health benefits of particle filtration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fisk, William J. Journal Indoor Air Date Published 02/12/2013 Abstract The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

25

Health Benefits of Particle Filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

Fisk, William J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank S-110 Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Hanford Tank S-110 sludge caustic leaching test conducted in FY 2001 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The data presented here can be used to develop the baseline and alternative flowsheets for pretreating Hanford tank sludge. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the work through the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP; EM?50).

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carson, Katharine J.; Darnell, Lori P.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoopes, Francis V.; Sell, Richard L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, John J.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Caustic formation in expanding condensates of cold atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the evolution of density in an expanding Bose-Einstein condensate that initially has a spatially varying phase, concentrating on behavior when these phase variations are large. In this regime large density fluctuations develop during expansion. Maxima have a characteristic density that diverges with the amplitude of phase variations and their formation is analogous to that of caustics in geometrical optics. We analyze in detail caustic formation in a quasi-one-dimensional condensate, which before expansion is subject to a periodic or random optical potential, and we discuss the equivalent problem for a quasi-two-dimensional system. We also examine the influence of many-body correlations in the initial state on caustic formation for a Bose gas expanding from a strictly one-dimensional trap. In addition, we study a similar arrangement for noninteracting fermions, showing that Fermi surface discontinuities in the momentum distribution give rise in that case to sharp peaks in the spatial derivative of the density. We discuss recent experiments and argue that fringes reported in time of flight images [Chen et al., Phys. Rev. A 77, 033632 (2008)] are an example of caustic formation.

Chalker, J. T. [Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Shapiro, B. [Theoretical Physics, Oxford University, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Economic Feasibility of Electrochemical Caustic Recycling at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a review of potential cost benefits of NaSICON Ceramic membranes for the separation of sodium from Hanford tank waste. The primary application is for caustic recycle to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreatment leaching operation. The report includes a description of the waste, the benefits and costs for a caustic-recycle facility, and Monte Carlo results obtained from a model of these costs and benefits. The use of existing cost information has been limited to publicly available sources. This study is intended to be an initial evaluation of the economic feasibility of a caustic recycle facility based on NaSICON technology. The current pretreatment flowsheet indicates that approximately 6,500 metric tons (MT) of Na will be added to the tank waste, primarily for removing Al from the high-level waste (HLW) sludge (Kirkbride et al. 2007). An assessment (Alexander et al. 2004) of the pretreatment flowsheet, equilibrium chemistry, and laboratory results indicates that the quantity of Na required for sludge leaching will increase by 6,000 to 12,000 MT in order to dissolve sufficient Al from the tank-waste sludge material to maintain the number of HLW canisters produced at 9,400 canisters as defined in the Office of River Protection (ORP) System Plan (Certa 2003). This additional Na will significantly increase the volume of LAW glass and extend the processing time of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Future estimates on sodium requirements for caustic leaching are expected to significantly exceed the 12,000-MT value and approach 40,000-MT of total sodium addition for leaching (Gilbert, 2007). The cost benefit for caustic recycling is assumed to consist of four major contributions: 1) the cost savings realized by not producing additional immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, 2) caustic recycle capital investment, 3) caustic recycle operating and maintenance costs, and 4) research and technology costs needed to deploy the technology. In estimating costs for each of these components, several parameters are used as inputs. Due to uncertainty in assuming a singular value for each of these parameters, a range of possible values is assumed. A Monte Carlo simulation is then performed where the range of these parameters is exercised, and the resulting range of cost benefits is determined.

Poloski, Adam P.; Kurath, Dean E.; Holton, Langdon K.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Fountain, Matthew S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) System Integration Project, Phase 2. Topical report for test circuit operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the task (Task 6) covered in this document was to operate the refurbished/modified test circuit of the Gravimeh Process in a continuous integrated manner to obtain the engineering and operational data necessary to assess the technical performance and reliability of the circuit. This data is critical to the development of this technology as a feasible means of producing premium clean burning fuels that meet New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Significant refurbishments and design modifications had been made to the facility (in particular to the vacuum filtration and evaporation units) during Tasks 1 and 2, followed by off-line testing (Task 3). Two weeks of continuous around-the-clock operation of the refurbished/modified MCL test circuit were performed. During the second week of testing, all sections of the plant were operated in an integrated fashion for an extended period of time, including a substantial number of hours of on-stream time for the vacuum filters and the caustic evaporation unit. A new process configuration was tested in which centrate from the acid wash train (without acid addition) was used as the water makeup for the water wash train, thus-eliminating the one remaining process waste water stream. A 9-inch centrifuge was tested at various solids loadings and at flow rates up to 400 lbs/hr of coal feed to obtain a twenty-fold scaleup factor over the MCL integrated test facility centrifuge performance data.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A mathematical and experimental study of caustic flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Dr. Ching Buang Wu A simple non-equilibrium chemical displacement model for continuous, linear, caustic flooding of crude oil is presented. The laboratory experiments were conducted to support the numerical simulation and to verify the results.... The unique feature of this mathematic study is that it includes the chemistry of the acid hydrolysis to produce surfactants and the chemical reaction rate under the non- equilibrium state. The in-situ generated surfactant was presumed to alter the oil...

Shen, Tsu-Cheng

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Ultrarich Filtration Combustion of Ethane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultrarich filtration combustion of ethane is studied in a porous medium composed of alumina spheres with the aim to achieve optimized conversion to hydrogen and syngas. ... Dhamrat, R. S.; Ellzey, J. L.Numerical and experimental study of the conversion of methane to hydrogen in a porous media reactor Combust. ...

Mario Toledo; Khriscia Utria; Alexei V. Saveliev

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

32

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) System Integration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report of the results obtained from the operation of an integrated test circuit for the Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) process for the desulfurization and demineralization of coal. The objectives of operational testing of the 20 pounds of coal per hour integrated MCL test circuit are: (1) to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS); (2) to determine the range of effective process operation; (3) to test process conditions aimed at significantly lower costs; and (4) to deliver product coal.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Growth of sheets in 3D confinements - a model for the C-S-H meso 2 structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.20 2.0 0 02 5 6 8 P0 rog resVaVNeoml i eet al. di al TmVGl Tewt Vhl eRWwWDml di al TmVGl Tewt Vhl eWi RWwWDml rhVaal TWi f ehI TRl en h p022ei ewt Al Tl Figure 6: Example scattering curves obtained for structure (h) in Figure 3 together with small... ] H. M. Jennings, Refinements to colloid model of C-S-H in cement: CM-II, Cem. Conc. Res 38 (3) (2008) 275–289.293 [7] R. F. Feldman, P. J. Sereda, New model for hydrated portland cement and its practical implications, Eng.J.-Canada294 53 (8/9) (1970...

Etzold, Merlin A.; McDonald, Peter J.; Routh, Alexander F.

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

VELOCITY ANISOTROPY AND SHAPE BIAS IN THE CAUSTIC TECHNIQUE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use the Millennium Simulation to quantify the statistical accuracy and precision of the escape-velocity technique for measuring cluster-sized halo masses at z {approx} 0.1. We show that in three dimensions one can measure nearly unbiased (<4%) halo masses (>1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} h {sup -1}) with 10%-15% scatter. Line-of-sight projection effects increase the scatter to {approx}25%, where we include the known velocity anisotropies. The classical ''caustic'' technique incorporates a calibration factor that is determined from N-body simulations. We derive and test a new implementation that eliminates the need for calibration and utilizes only the observables: the galaxy velocities with respect to the cluster mean v, the projected positions r{sub p} , an estimate of the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density concentration, and an estimate of the velocity anisotropies {beta}. We find that differences between the potential and density NFW concentrations induce a 10% bias in the caustic masses. We also find that large (100%) systematic errors in the observed ensemble average velocity anisotropies and concentrations translate to small (5%-10%) biases in the inferred masses.

Gifford, Daniel; Miller, Christopher J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

Sandusky Water Filtration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Filtration Filtration Jump to: navigation, search Name Sandusky Water Filtration Facility Sandusky Water Filtration Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sandusky Water Filtration Energy Purchaser Sandusky Water Filtration Location Sandusky OH Coordinates 41.45008487°, -82.67055273° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.45008487,"lon":-82.67055273,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Filtration of Sludge and Sodium Nonatitanate Solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed facility designs for the ion exchange and solvent extraction flowsheets under development to treat high level waste at the Savannah River Site use crossflow filtration to remove entrained sludge and monosodium titanate (MST). Bench-scale and pilot-scale testing performed with simulated feed streams showed much lower filtration rates than desired for the process. This report documents an investigation of the impact on filtration of using Honeywell sodium nonatitanate (ST), rather than MST, for strontium and actinide removal.

Poirier, M.R.

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

37

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines (ANLCorningHyundai CRADA) June 19, 2014 DOE Annual Merit Review & Peer Evaluation Meeting PI: Kyeong Lee Co-investigators: Seung Choi,...

38

Interactive Caustics Using Local Precomputed Irradiance Chris Wyman Charles Hansen Peter Shirley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Computing, The University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah, USA Abstract Bright patterns of lightInteractive Caustics Using Local Precomputed Irradiance Chris Wyman Charles Hansen Peter Shirley

Wyman, Chris

39

Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy Ready Homes Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy...

40

Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report assesses side stream filtration options for cooling towers with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings and provide information about specific technology and implementation options.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Linear Thermodynamics of Rodlike DNA Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linear thermodynamics transportation theory is employed to study filtration of rodlike DNA molecules. Using the repeated nanoarray consisting of alternate deep and shallow regions, it is demonstrated that the complex ...

Li, Zirui

42

Caustic washing for refining of direct coal liquefaction products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive research and development sponsored by the U.S. DOE/PETC over the past two decades has resulted in dramatic improvements in the quality of direct coal liquefaction products. High-quality coal-derived distillates are obtainable from catalytic two-stage liquefaction (TSL) processes, such as those developed at the Wilsonville, AL pilot plant and the Hydrocarbon Technologies Inc. (HTI) pilot plant and bench units. The products of the Wilsonville and HTI TSL operations are suitable as high quality feedstocks for producing transportation fuels in a refinery. These products have important quality advantages over crude petroleum: they are distillates boiling below about 700{degrees}F and are thus virtually free of resid and metals, and they have very low sulfur contents and low nitrogen contents. The coal liquids have carbon and hydrogen contents and Watson characterization factors within the range of crude petroleums. However, relative to crude petroleum, the crude coal products have elevated oxygen contents. This report describes the removal of phenols from coal liquids by caustic washing, and the the recovery of the cresylic acid by-product.

Winschel, R.A.; Burke, F.P.; Robbins, G.A.; Brandes, S.D. [CONSOL, Inc., Library, PA (United States); Zhou, P. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

SEEN AND UNSEEN TIDAL CAUSTICS IN THE ANDROMEDA GALAXY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Indirect detection of high-energy particles from dark matter interactions is a promising avenue for learning more about dark matter, but is hampered by the frequent coincidence of high-energy astrophysical sources of such particles with putative high-density regions of dark matter. We calculate the boost factor and gamma-ray flux from dark matter associated with two shell-like caustics of luminous tidal debris recently discovered around the Andromeda galaxy, under the assumption that dark matter is its own supersymmetric antiparticle. These shell features could be a good candidate for indirect detection of dark matter via gamma rays because they are located far from the primary confusion sources at the galaxy's center, and because the shapes of the shells indicate that most of the mass has piled up near the apocenter. Using a numerical estimator specifically calibrated to estimate densities in N-body representations with sharp features and a previously determined N-body model of the shells, we find that the largest boost factors do occur in the shells but are only a few percent. We also find that the gamma-ray flux is an order of magnitude too low to be detected with Fermi for likely dark matter parameters, and about two orders of magnitude less than the signal that would have come from the dwarf galaxy that produces the shells in the N-body model. We further show that the radial density profiles and relative radial spacing of the shells, in either dark or luminous matter, is relatively insensitive to the details of the potential of the host galaxy but depends in a predictable way on the velocity dispersion of the progenitor galaxy.

Sanderson, R. E.; Bertschinger, E., E-mail: robyn@mit.ed [MIT Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) system integration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were to design, construct, shakedown and operate an integrated MCL test circuit to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), to test process conditions aimed at lower costs, and to deliver product coal. These objectives were met by the procurement, construction, and operation of the integrated test circuit. Shakedown and a 63-test process matrix resulted in the production of about 3,700 pounds of treated coal. Product MCL coal may be used to displace oil in some turbine and diesel engines and may be used in the retrofit of oil-fired boilers. Two high sulfur, high ash coals and one medium sulfur, high ash coal representative of the Eastern United States coal production were processed: Pittsburgh No. 8 (Powhatan No. 6 mine), Kentucky No. 9, and Pittsburgh No. 8 (Blacksville No. 2 mine). Although mild kiln operating conditions (325 to 415{degree}C and 1 to 2.3 hours residence time) and low caustic to coal ratios (1:1 to 3:1) were used, the combination of continuous operation and rigorous exclusion of air from the system allowed the production of MCL coal that had product sulfur content was well below NSPS standards, very low carbonate production, very little volatile losses, and low alkali retention by the product MCL coal. Optimization testing resulted in a product coal containing 0.2 to 0.4 percent sulfur (0.26 to 0.6 lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu) and 0.15 to 0.5 percent ash with more than 90 percent organic sulfur removal, {approximately}95 percent SO{sub 2} reduction from run-of-mine coal, {approximately}91 percent SO{sub 2} reduction from precleaned process feed coal, and with heat content of about 14,000 Btu per pound.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. ‘preliminary’) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

Peters, T. B.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

46

An overview of the chemistry of the molten-caustic-leaching process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The molten-caustic leaching (MCL) process is quite effective in its ability to remove both organic and pyritic sulfur, mineral matter, and trace elements from coal. This paper reports how the chemistry of various reactions taking place in the process has been examined by several researchers. For example, Ames Laboratory of Iowa State University is actively studying the chemistry of MCL desulfurization and reagent regeneration reactions, and researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center are examining the reactions of molten caustic with the organosulfur compounds present in coal. As a result of these research efforts, reactions of mineral pyrite, benzothiophene, and minerals commonly found in coal (quartz, illite, etc.) with molten caustic are well characterized.

Gala, H.B.; Srivastava, R.D. (Burns and Roe Services Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Rhee, K.H.; Hucko, R.E. (US Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Changes in the pore network structure of Hanford sediment after reaction1 with caustic tank wastes2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in the pore network structure of Hanford sediment after reaction1 with caustic tank wastes2@princeton.edu9 10 11 Abstract12 At the former nuclear weapons production site in Hanford, WA, caustic radioactive due to these geochemical reactions. The reacted Hanford sediment column had been18 imaged in 3D using

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

48

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K- Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a novel method for cleaning a filter surface using a plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system. The method involves utilizing plasma discharges to induce short electric pulses of nanoseconds duration at high voltages. These electrical pulses generate strong Shockwaves that disintegrate and dislodge particulate matter located on the surface of the filter.

Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Gutsol, Alexander F.; Yang, Yong

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

50

Development of Model Filtration Media for Investigating Size-Dependent Filtration Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A novel method for fabricating custom porous filtration media for emission control has been developed. Controlled pore sizes could be used to optimize high-capture efficiency with low backpressure.

51

A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE VOLUME1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1413 A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE with the quantities of chemical added and sludge produced. The pH and metals concentrations do not change linearlyH and the corresponding effluent composition and sludge volume can not be accurately determined without empirical

52

Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Side Stream Filtration Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program By Pacific Northwest National Laboratory X. Duan, J.L. Williamson, K.L McMordie Stoughton and B.K. Boyd October 2012 FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM i Contact Will Lintner, PE Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Phone: (202) 586-3120 E-mail: william.lintner@ee.doe.gov Cover photo: Cooling Towers. Photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ii Acknowledgements The authors of the report would like to thank the following individuals that provided support to

53

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing Summary Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic. The work described in this report addresses the kinetics of caustic leach under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed at the lab-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to caustic leach chemistry to support a scale-up factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. The scale-up factor will take the form of an adjustment factor for the rate constant in the boehmite leach kinetic equation in the G2 model.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

54

High-Temperature Phase Transitions in CsH2PO4 Under Ambient and High-Pressure Conditions: A Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To clarify the microscopic origin of the temperature-induced three-order-of-magnitude jump in the proton conductivity of CsH2PO4 (superprotonic behavior), we have investigated its crystal structure modifications within the 25-300 C temperature range under both ambient- and high-pressure conditions using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. Our high-pressure data show no indication of the thermal decomposition/polymerization at the crystal surface recently proposed as the origin of the enhanced proton conductivity. Instead, we found direct evidence that the superprotonic behavior of the title material is associated with a polymorphic structural transition to a high-temperature cubic phase. Our results are in excellent agreement with previous high-pressure ac impedance measurements.

Botez,C.; Hermosillo, J.; Zhang, J.; Qian, J.; Zhao, Y.; Majzlan, J.; Chianelli, R.; Pantea, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Washing and Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge: Results of FY 1998 Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge washing and parametric caustic leaching tests were performed on sludge samples tiom five Hanford tanks: B-101, BX-1 10, BX-112, C-102, and S-101. These studies examined the effects of both dilute hydroxide washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the residual sludge solids. ` Dilute hydroxide washing removed from <1 to 25% of the Al, -20 to 45% of the Cr, -25 to 97% of the P, and 63 to 99% of the Na from the Hdord tank sludge samples examined. The partial removal of these elements was likely due to the presence of water-soluble sodium salts of aluminate, chromate, hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate, either in the interstitial liquid or as dried salts.

GJ Lumetta; BM Rapko; J Liu; DJ Temer; RD Hunt

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

56

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, adionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Chase, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During third quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in four of the six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells (PAC 2, 5, and 6). Radium-228 exceeded Level 2 Flagging Criteria in one well (PAC 2); however this was an estimated value because quantitation in the sample did not meet specifications. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard (50 NTU) are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludge: Results of FY 1997 studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The tank wastes will be partitioned into high-level and low-level fractions. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of immobilized high-level waste (IHLW). Caustic leaching (sometimes referred to as enhanced sludge washing or ESW) represents the baseline method for pretreating Hanford tank sludges. Caustic leaching is expected to remove a large fraction of the Al, which is present in large quantities in Hanford tank sludges. A significant portion of the P is also expected to be removed from the sludge by metathesis of water-insoluble metal phosphates to insoluble hydroxides and soluble Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Similar metathesis reactions can occur for insoluble sulfate salts, allowing the removal of sulfate from the HLW stream. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching tests performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 1996. The sludges used in this study were taken from Hanford tanks AN-104, BY-108, S-101, and S-111.

Lumetta, G.J.; Burgeson, I.E.; Wagner, M.J.; Liu, J.; Chen, Y.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Demand Controlled Filtration in an Industrial Cleanroom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an industrial cleanroom, significant energy savings were realized by implementing two types of demand controlled filtration (DCF) strategies, one based on particle counts and one on occupancy. With each strategy the speed of the recirculation fan filter units was reduced to save energy. When the control was based on particle counts, the energy use was 60% of the baseline configuration of continuous fan operation. With simple occupancy sensors, the energy usage was 63% of the baseline configuration. During the testing of DCF, no complaints were registered by the operator of the cleanroom concerning processes and products being affected by the DCF implementation.

Faulkner, David; DiBartolomeo, Dennis; Wang, Duo

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A rigid porous filter and filtration method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention involves a porous rigid filter comprising a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulate from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulate. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area- to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas, Straub L.; Dennis, Richard A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Foster) - Honda Motor in Japan Complimentary Part Supply - Iljin Electric Co. (DPF heating systems for regeneration) 18 - - Summary Experimental setup for DPF filtration...

64

CFD Analysis of Particle Deposition During DPF Filtration Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A 3-D DPF model is developed to predict thermo-physical properties during filtration processes and to quantitatively investigate particle deposition regarding its size and number distribution.

65

CMI Unique Facility: Filtration Test Facility | Critical Materials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and it addresses the grand challenge of developing technologies for separating the rare earth elements. For more information, and to explore using the filtration test facility,...

66

EM Task 9 - Centrifugal Membrane Filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is designed to establish the utility of a novel centrifugal membrane filtration technology for the remediation of liquid mixed waste streams at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in support of the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has teamed with SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., a small business and owner of the novel centrifugal membrane filtration technology, to establish the applicability of the technology to DOE site remediation and the commercial viability of the technology for liquid mixed waste stream remediation. The technology is a uniquely configured process that makes use of ultrafiltration and centrifugal force to separate suspended and dissolved solids from liquid waste streams, producing a filtered water stream and a low-volume contaminated concentrate stream. This technology has the potential for effective and efficient waste volume minimization, the treatment of liquid tank wastes, the remediation of contaminated groundwater plumes, and the treatment of secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, as well as the liquid waste stream generated during decontamination and decommissioning activities.

Stevens, B.G.; Stepan, D.J.; Hetland, M.D.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Mill Integration-Pulping, Stream Reforming and Direct Causticization for Black Liquor Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MTCI/StoneChem developed a steam reforming, fluidized bed gasification technology for biomass. DOE supported the demonstration of this technology for gasification of spent wood pulping liquor (or 'black liquor') at Georgia-Pacific's Big Island, Virginia mill. The present pre-commercial R&D project addressed the opportunities as well as identified negative aspects when the MTCI/StoneChem gasification technology is integrated in a pulp mill production facility. The opportunities arise because black liquor gasification produces sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) and sodium (as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in separate streams which may be used beneficially for improved pulp yield and properties. The negative aspect of kraft black liquor gasification is that the amount of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which must be converted to NaOH (the so called causticizing requirement) is increased. This arises because sulfur is released as Na{sub 2}S during conventional kraft black liquor recovery, while during gasification the sodium associated Na{sub 2}S is partly or fully converted to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The causticizing requirement can be eliminated by including a TiO{sub 2} based cyclic process called direct causticization. In this process black liquor is gasified in the presence of (low sodium content) titanates which convert Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium content) titanates. NaOH is formed when contacting the latter titanates with water, thereby eliminating the causticizing requirement entirely. The leached and low sodium titanates are returned to the gasification process. The project team comprised the University of Maine (UM), North Carolina State University (NCSU) and MTCI/ThermoChem. NCSU and MTCI are subcontractors to UM. The principal organization for the contract is UM. NCSU investigated the techno-economics of using advanced pulping techniques which fully utilize the unique cooking liquors produced by steam reforming of black liquor (Task 1). UM studied the kinetics and agglomeration problems of the conversion of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium) titanates during gasification of black liquor in the presence of (low sodium) titanates or TiO{sub 2} (Task 2). MTCI/ThermoChem tested the performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization in their Process Development Unit (PDU) (Task 3). The specific objectives were: (1) to investigate how split sulfidity and polysulfide (+ AQ) pulping can be used to increase pulp fiber yield and properties compared to conventional kraft pulping; (2) to determine the economics of black liquor gasification combined with these pulping technologies in comparison with conventional kraft pulping and black liquor recovery; (3) to determine the effect of operating conditions on the kinetics of the titanate-based direct causticization reaction during black liquor gasification at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); (4) to determine the mechanism of particle agglomeration during gasification of black liquor in the presence of titanates at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); and (5) to verify performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization of black liquor in a pilot scale fluidized bed test facility.

Adriaan van Heiningen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Christoph Beckermann Associate Beckermann, C., "Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration," in Proceedings of the 46th, 1992. #12;Abstract This paper presents an analysis of water modeling of steel pouring to study (1) air

Beckermann, Christoph

69

Plastic-lined valves are virtually trouble-free in caustic, acid pipelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chevron renovated the naphthenic acid plant, part of the Pascagoula, Mississippi Refinery of Chevron U.S.A. Inc., in mid-1979. They installed plastic-lined valves in the caustic and acid water piping systems. The valves combine the excellent sealing characteristics of a plug valve with the minimal rotary contact surface and low pressure drop of a butterfly valve. The valve has a molded-in-place PTFE liner resistant to abrasives and corrosives at temperatures of 450/sup 0/F, and is rated for pressures from full vacuum to 150 psi.

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) System Integration Project. Topical report for test circuit operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report of the results obtained from the operation of an integrated test circuit for the Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) process for the desulfurization and demineralization of coal. The objectives of operational testing of the 20 pounds of coal per hour integrated MCL test circuit are: (1) to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS); (2) to determine the range of effective process operation; (3) to test process conditions aimed at significantly lower costs; and (4) to deliver product coal.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filtration technologies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Verification Statement TECHNOLOGY TYPE: BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS APPLICATION: CONTROL OF PM2... .5 EMISSIONS BY BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS TECHNOLOGY NAME: QG061...

72

CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE OPERATING EXPERIENCE AND LESSONS LEARNED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) is the first, production-scale Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction process for cesium separation to be constructed. The process utilizes an engineered solvent to remove cesium from waste alkaline salt solution resulting from nuclear processes. While the application of this solvent extraction process is unique, the process uses commercially available centrifugal contactors for the primary unit operation as well as other common methods of physical separation of immiscible liquids. The fission product, cesium-137, is the primary focus of the process due to the hazards associated with its decay. The cesium is extracted from the waste, concentrated, and stripped out of the solvent resulting in a low-level waste salt solution and a concentrated cesium nitrate stream. The concentrated cesium stream can be vitrified into borosilicate glass with almost no increase in glass volume, and the salt solution can be dispositioned as a low-level grout. The unit is deployed as an interim process to disposition waste prior to start-up of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The Salt Waste Processing Facility utilizes the same cesium removal technology, but will treat more contaminated waste. The MCU is not only fulfilling a critical need, it is the first demonstration of the process at production-scale.

Brown, S.

2010-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

73

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (first quarter 1995 is the third of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in wells FAC 3 and 11C. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (second quarter 1995 is the fourth of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and radium-226 exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west at a rate of 1300 feet per year. Groundwater flow in the Barnwell/McBean was to the northeast at a rate of 50 feet per year.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Mechanism of Phosphorus Removal from Hanford Tank Sludge by Caustic Leaching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two experiments were conducted to explore the mechanism by which phosphorus is removed from Hanford tank sludge by caustic leaching. In the first experiment, a series of phosphate salts were treated with 3 M NaOH under conditions prototypic of the actual leaching process to be performed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The phosphates used were aluminum phosphate, bismuth phosphate, chromium(III) phosphate, and ?-tri-calcium phosphate; all of these phases have previously been determined to exist in Hanford tank sludge. The leachate solution was sampled at selected time intervals and analyzed for the specific metal ion involved (Al, Bi, Ca, or Cr) and for P (total and as phosphate). The solids remaining after completion of the caustic leaching step were analyzed to determine the reaction product. In the second experiment, the dependence of P removal from bismuth phosphate was examined as a function of the hydroxide ion concentration. It was anticipated that a plot of log[phosphate] versus log[hydroxide] would provide insight into the phosphorus-removal mechanism. This report describes the test activities outlined in Section 6.3.2.1, Preliminary Investigation of Phosphate Dissolution, in Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, Rev.1. The objectives, success criteria, and test conditions of Section 6.3.2.1 are summarized here.

Lumetta, Gregg J.

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

Enertech partners with CCI Thermal Technologies on nuclear filtration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Curtiss-Wright Flow Control Co's Enertech business unit and CCI Thermal Technologies Inc have signed an agreement to work together to provide heating and filtration solutions and products to the nuclear industry worldwide.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Filtration Combustion in Hydrocarbon Desorption from a Porous Medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have investigated theoretically and experimentally the process of filtration combustion with hydrocarbon desorption from a porous skeleton realized, in particular, in heat cleaning of porous media out of resid...

S. I. Fut'ko; K. V. Dobrego; E. S. Shmelev…

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energy Implications of In-Line Filtration in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effect of filtration and filter loading on the HVAC systemChapter 2: Field Testing of Filter Impacts on HVAC System67   4.6 Modeling Filter Effects on HVAC

Walker, Iain S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Hydrogen production in a reversible flow filtration combustion reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The noncatalytic process of syngas production by means of partial oxidation of ... by air oxygen in a reversible flow filtration combustion reactor has been investigated experimentally. We have ... providing the ...

Yu. M. Dmitrenko; P. A. Klevan

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Filtration problems with a piecewise-linear resistance law  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article discusses elementary solutions of problems of nonlinear filtration with a piece-wise-linear resistance law, and analyzes their behavior with a relative increase in the resistance in the region of smal...

V. M. Entov; T. A. Malakhova

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Improved filtration membranes through self-organizing amphiphilic comb copolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The operating cost of a membrane filtration system is generally determined by two major factors: the permeability of the membrane to water, and the lifetime of the membrane. Both of these are strongly affected by the ...

Asatekin Alexiou, Ayse

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Characterization and modification of particulate properties to enhance filtration performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The specific objectives of this project are to characterize the particulate properties that determine the filtration performance of fabric filters, and to investigate methods for modifying these particulate properties to enhance filtration performance. Inherent in these objectives is the development of an experimental approach that will lead to full-scale implementation of beneficial conditioning processes identified during the project. The general approach has included a large number of laboratory evaluations to be followed by optional field tests of a new successful conditioning processes performed on a sidestream device. This project was divided into five tasks. The schedule followed for these tasks is shown in Figure 4. Tasks 2 and 3 each focus on one of the two complementary parts of the project. Task 2 Parametric Tests of Ashes and Fabrics, evaluates the degree to which ash properties and fabric design determine filtration performance. Task 3 Survey of Methods to Modify the Particle Filtration Properties, provides a literature review and laboratory study of techniques to modify ash properties. The results of these two tasks were used in Task 4 Proof-of-Concept Tests of Methods to Modify Particle Filtration Properties to demonstrate the effects on filtration performance of modifying ash properties. The findings of all the tasks are summarized in this Final Report. 13 refs.

Snyder, T.R.; Vann Bush, P.; Robinson, M.S.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic-Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. The work described in this report addresses caustic leaching under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. Because gibbsite leaching kinetics are rapid (gibbsite is expected to be dissolved by the time the final leach temperature is reached), boehmite leach kinetics are the main focus of the caustic-leach tests. The tests were completed at the laboratory-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. Two laboratory-scale caustic-leach tests were performed for each of the PEP runs. For each PEP run, unleached slurry was taken from the PEP caustic-leach vessel for one batch and used as feed for both of the corresponding laboratory-scale tests.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

PEP Integrated Test D Run Report Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes" of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario (Test B and D) has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario (Test A) has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In Test D, 19M sodium hydroxide (NaOH, caustic) was added to the waste slurry in the UFP VSL T02 vessel after the solids were concentrated to ~20% undissolved solids. The NaOH was added to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by heating to 85°C using direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. The main difference of Test D compared to Test B is that the leach temperature is 85°C for 24 hrs as compared to 100°C for 12 hours. The other difference is the Test D simulant had Cr in the simulant from the start of processing and Test B had Cr added to adjust the simulant composition after aluminum leaching. Following the caustic leach, the UFP-VSL-T02A vessel contents are cooled using the vessel cooling jacket. The slurry was then concentrated to 17 wt% undissolved solids and washed with inhibited water to remove NaOH and other soluble salts. Next, the slurry was oxidatively leached using sodium permanganate to solubilize chrome. The slurry was then washed to remove the dissolved chrome and concentrated.

Sevigny, Gary J.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

Evans, S.K.

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. On this report, results are discussed for sonically assisted crossflow filtration of V-1067 resid, diluted with No. 2 fuel oil, and sonically assisted batch filtrations of solids concentrates from continuous cross-flow filtration experiments.

Slomka, B.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

The effect of concentration on the structure and crystallinity of a cementitious waste form for caustic wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cement-based waste forms have long been considered economical technologies for disposal of various types of waste. A solidified cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, was developed to immobilize the radioactive secondary waste from vitrification processes. In this work, Cast Stone was considered for a Na-based caustic liquid waste, and its physical properties were analyzed as a function of liquid waste loading up to 2 M Na. Differences in crystallinity (phase composition), microstructure, mesostructure (pore size distribution, surface area), and macrostructure (density, compressive strength) were investigated using various analytical techniques, in order to assess the suitability of Cast Stone as a chemically durable waste. It was found that the concentration of secondary waste simulant (caustic waste) had little effect on the relevant engineering properties of Cast Stone, showing that Cast Stone could be an effective and tolerant waste form for a wide range of concentrations of high sodium waste.

Chung, Chul-Woo; Turo, Laura A.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Johnson, Bradley R.; McCloy, John S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Water purification by shock electrodialysis: Deionization, filtration, separation, and disinfection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

purification is performed primarily by reverse osmosis (RO) plants and in some cases by electrodialysis (EDWater purification by shock electrodialysis: Deionization, filtration, separation, and disinfection H L I G H T S · Experiments demonstrate the multi- functionality of shock electrodialysis. · Besides

Bazant, Martin Z.

90

Air filtration: Choosing the right filter class for HVAC systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As anyone who works with air filtration knows, getting the best from a system is about more than choosing efficient media and correct installation. Thomas Carlson of Vokes Air explains the importance of using and selecting the right filter class for a typical HVAC system.

Thomas Carlson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Filtration plant for drinking water James Tarchala [1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filtration plant for drinking water James Tarchala [1] Alexandre Selhorst [2] Cheny Thao [3] 1 2 3 Riley, Wang, Aaron Nolan (Not Pictured) 12/1/2014 #12;Reclaiming waste HEAT TO PRE- HEAT WATER IN a FACTORY HOT WATER SYSTEM Group 5: Joseph Von Arx(1) Aaron McKeown(2) Kyle Swanson(3) Ian Klecka(4) 1 2 3 4

Kostic, Milivoje M.

92

Colony filtration blot: a new screening method for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a small tag and can therefore, for most applications, go directly into scale-up. The process for analysis of soluble expression in small liquid cultures, in which filtration, centrifugation and/or affinity purification are combined with dot-blot or SDS-PAGE analysis4,6. The general usefulness

Cai, Long

93

Results from Alloy 600 And Alloy 690 Caustic SCC Model Boiler Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A versatile model boiler test methodology was developed and used to compare caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of mill annealed Alloy 600 and thermally treated Alloy 690. The model boiler included simulated crevice devices that efficiently and consistently concentrated Na2CO3, resulting in volatilization of CO2 with the steam and concentration of NaOH at the tube surfaces. The test methodology also included variation in tube stress, either produced by the primary to secondary side pressure differential, or by a novel method that reproducibly yields a higher stress condition on the tube. The significant effect of residual stress on tube SCC was also considered. SCC of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 were evaluated as a function of temperature and stress. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) evaluations of the cracks and the grain boundaries ahead of the cracks were performed, providing insight into the SCC mechanism. This model boiler test methodology may be applicable to a range of bulkwater secondary chemistries that concentrate to produce aggressive crevice environments.

Miller, Frederick D.; Thomas, Larry E.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

94

CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

95

Changes in the pore network structure of Hanford sediment after reaction with caustic tank wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the former nuclear weapon production site in Hanford, WA, caustic radioactive tank waste leaks into subsurface sediments and causes dissolution of quartz and aluminosilicate minerals, and precipitation of sodalite and cancrinite. This work examines changes in pore structure due to these reactions in a previously-conducted column experiment. The column was sectioned and 2D images of the pore space were generated using backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A pre-precipitation scenario was created by digitally removing mineral matter identified as secondary precipitates. Porosity, determined by segmenting the images to distinguish pore space from mineral matter, was up to 0.11 less after reaction. Erosion-dilation analysis was used to compute pore and throat size distributions. Images with precipitation had more small and fewer large pores. Precipitation decreased throat sizes and the abundance of large throats. These findings agree with previous findings based on 3D X-ray CMT imaging, observing decreased porosity, clogging of small throats, and little change in large throats. However, 2D imaging found an increase in small pores, mainly in intragranular regions or below the resolution of the 3D images. Also, an increase in large pores observed via 3D imaging was not observed in the 2D analysis. Changes in flow conducting throats that are the key permeability-controlling features were observed in both methods.

Crandell, L. E.; Peters, Catherine A.; Um, Wooyong; Jones, Keith W.; Lindquist, W.Brent

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Recommended Guanidine Suppressor for the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The guanidine recommended for the Next-Generation Caustic-Side is N,N ,N -tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). Systematic testing has shown that it is significantly more lipophilic than the previously recommended guanidine DCiTG, the active extractant in the commercial guanidine product LIX -79, while not otherwise changing the solvent performance. Previous testing indicated that the extent of partitioning of the DCiTG suppressor to the aqueous strip solution is significantly greater than expected, potentially leading to rapid depletion of the suppressor from the solvent and unwanted organic concentrations in process effluents. Five candidate guanidines were tested as potential replacements for DCiTG. The tests included batch extraction with simulated waste and flowsheet solutions, third-phase formation, emulsion formation, and partition ratios of the guanidine between the solvent and aqueous strip solution. Preliminary results of a thermal stability test of the TiDG solvent at one month duration indicated performance approximately equivalent to DCiTG. Two of the guanidines proved adequate in all respects, and the choice of TiDG was deemed slightly preferable vs the next best guanidine BiTABG.

Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL; Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL; Duncan, Nathan C [ORNL; Ensor, Dale [Tennessee Technological University; Hill, Talon G [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Roach, Benjamin D [ORNL; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V [ORNL; Williams, Neil J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hot Gas Filtration of Fine and Ultra fine Particles with Liquid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hot Gas Filtration of Fine and Ultra fine Particles with Liquid Phase Sintered SiC Ceramic DPF Hot Gas Filtration of Fine and Ultra fine Particles with Liquid Phase Sintered SiC...

98

Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

Delmau, L.H.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

99

Modified approaches for high pressure filtration of fine clean coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of moisture from fine (minus 28 mesh) clean coal to 20% or lower level is difficult using the conventional vacuum dewatering technique. High pressure filtration technique provides an avenue for obtaining low moisture in fine clean coal. This paper describes a couple of novel approaches for dewatering of fine clean coal using pressure filtration which provides much lower moisture in fine clean coal than that obtained using conventional pressure filter. The approaches involve (a) split stream dewatering and (b) addition of paper pulp to the coal slurry. For Pittsburgh No. 8 coal slurry, split stream dewatering at 400 mesh provided filter cake containing 12.9% moisture compared to 24.9% obtained on the feed material. The addition of paper pulp to the slurry provided filter cake containing about 17% moisture.

Yang, J.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K. [Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Demonstration of Advanced Filtration Technologies: Developing Energy-rebate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Advanced Filtration Technologies: Developing Energy-rebate Demonstration of Advanced Filtration Technologies: Developing Energy-rebate Criteria through Performing Standard Laboratory Tests and Statistical Analyses Title Demonstration of Advanced Filtration Technologies: Developing Energy-rebate Criteria through Performing Standard Laboratory Tests and Statistical Analyses Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-61684 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., and Duo Wang Call Number LBNL-61684 Abstract Fan-filter unit systems are used for re-circulating clean air in cleanrooms are gaining popularity in California as well as in the rest of the world. Under normal operation, fan-filter units require high power demand, typically ranging from 100 to 300 W per square meter of cleanroom floor area (or approximately 10-30 W/ft2). Operating 7 by 24, they normally consume significant electric energy, while providing required contamination control for cleanrooms in various industries. Previous studies focused on development of a standard test procedure for fan-filter units. This project is to improve the methods, and develop new information to demonstrate the methods can be used to assist the industries to apply more energy-efficient fan-filter units in cleanrooms.

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101

GPS Data Filtration Method for Drive Cycle Analysis Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When employing GPS data acquisition systems to capture vehicle drive-cycle information, a number of errors often appear in the raw data samples, such as sudden signal loss, extraneous or outlying data points, speed drifting, and signal white noise, all of which limit the quality of field data for use in downstream applications. Unaddressed, these errors significantly impact the reliability of source data and limit the effectiveness of traditional drive-cycle analysis approaches and vehicle simulation software. Without reliable speed and time information, the validity of derived metrics for drive cycles, such as acceleration, power, and distance, become questionable. This study explores some of the common sources of error present in raw onboard GPS data and presents a detailed filtering process designed to correct for these issues. Test data from both light and medium/heavy duty applications are examined to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed filtration process across the range of vehicle vocations. Graphical comparisons of raw and filtered cycles are presented, and statistical analyses are performed to determine the effects of the proposed filtration process on raw data. Finally, an evaluation of the overall benefits of data filtration on raw GPS data and present potential areas for continued research is presented.

Duran, A.; Earleywine, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Caustic stress corrosion cracking of E-Brite and Carpenter 7-MO stainless steels welded to Nickel 200 and Inconel 600  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF E-BRITE AND CARPENTER 7 MO STAINLESS STEELS NELDED TO NIC~~ 200 AND INCONEL 600 A Thesis STEVEN MILES STOCKt1AN Approved as to style and content by: Dr R, R? Griffin (ME) (Chairman of the Committee) Dr..., LE R. Cornwell (ME) (Committee Member) Dr? AD %olfe den (ME) (Committee Member) Dr T, CD Poll ck (EDG) (Committee Member) Dr, G? H Hopld. ns ( (Head of epartment) December 1962 ABSTRACT Caustic Stress Corrosion Cracking of E...

Stockman, Steven Miles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater adaptability of the process to DOE alkaline salt wastes, and greater readiness for implementation. Such benefits accrue from optimal sizing of centrifugal contactors for application of the CSSX process for the IPS; more accurate modeling of cesium extraction with greater flexibility and applicability to a variety of feeds and flowsheet conditions; and further improving and optimizing the alternative CSSX solvent and scrub/strip system.

Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Life extension program for the modular caustic side solvent extraction unit at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. At SRS, the CSSX process is deployed in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. Coalescers and decanters process the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) and Strip Effluent (SE) streams to allow recovery and reuse of the organic solvent and to limit the quantity of solvent transferred to the downstream facilities. MCU is operated in series with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) which removes strontium and actinides from salt waste utilizing monosodium titanate. ARP and MCU were developed and implemented as interim salt processing until future processing technology, the CSSX-based Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), is operational. SWPF is slated to come on-line in October 2014. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU process, however, was reached in April 2011. Nevertheless, most of the individual process components are capable of operating longer. An evaluation determined ARP/MCU can operate until 2015 before major equipment failure is expected. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU Life Extension (ARP/MCU LE) program will bridge the gap between current ARP/MCU operations and the start of SWPF operation. The ARP/MCU LE program introduces no new technologies. As a portion of this program, a Next Generation Solvent (NGS) and corresponding flowsheet are being developed to provide a major performance enhancement at MCU. This paper discusses all the modifications performed in the facility to support the ARP/MCU Life Extension. It will also discuss the next generation chemistry, including NGS and new stripping chemistry, which will increase cesium removal efficiency in MCU. Possible implementation of the NGS chemistry in MCU accomplishes two objectives. MCU serves as a demonstration facility for improved flowsheet deployment at SWPF; operating with NGS and boric acid validates improved cesium removal performance and increased throughput as well as confirms Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) ability to vitrify waste streams containing boron. NGS implementation at MCU also aids the ARP/MCU LE operation, mitigating the impacts of delays and sustaining operations until other technology is able to come on-line.

Samadi-Dezfouli, Azadeh

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

106

Determination of glomerular filtration rate by external counting methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparing the DTPA to other accepted methods; the results were very favorable for the use of ggmTC-DTPA. Klopper et al. , sa1d mTc-DTPA ". . . rapidly prepared by a kit method, is a useful addition to the list of radiopharmaceuticals that can be used... points. First, the external counting method is suitable as a true means of determining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Second, the method is applicable to cats. To do this, five dogs were injected with ggmTc(Sn)-DTPA. Plasma samples were drawn...

Sartor, Tammy Lee

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced membrane filtration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recycling... osmosis (RO) membrane filtration processes have been widely used in water recycling due... partitioning and possible breakthrough of such contaminants in NFRO...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filtration-based intervention Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: air filtration-based intervention Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health...

109

Water purification by shock electrodialysis: Deionization, filtration, separation, and disinfection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The development of energy and infrastructure efficient water purification systems is among the most critical engineering challenges facing our society. Water purification is often a multi-step process involving filtration, desalination, and disinfection of a feedstream. Shock electrodialysis (shock ED) is a newly developed technique for water desalination, leveraging the formation of ion concentration polarization (ICP) zones and deionization shock waves in microscale pores near to an ion selective element. While shock ED has been demonstrated as an effective water desalination tool, we here present evidence of other simultaneous functionalities. We show that shock ED can thoroughly filter micron-scale particles and aggregates of nanoparticles present in the feedwater. We also demonstrate that shock ED can enable disinfection of feedwaters, as approximately 99% of viable bacteria (here Escherichia coli) in the inflow were killed or removed by our prototype. Shock ED also separates positive from negative particles, contrary to claims that ICP acts as a virtual barrier for all charged particles. By combining these functionalities (filtration, separation and disinfection) with deionization, shock ED has the potential to enable highly compact and efficient water purification systems.

Daosheng Deng; Wassim Aouad; William A. Braff; Sven Schlumpberger; Matthew E. Suss; Martin Z. Bazant

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Water Purification by Shock Electrodialysis: Deionization, Filtration, Separation, and Disinfection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of energy and infrastructure efficient water purification systems are among the most critical engineering challenges facing our society. Water purification is often a multi-step process involving filtration, desalination, and disinfection of a feedstream. Shock electrodialysis (shock ED) is a newly developed technique for water desalination, leveraging the formation of ion concentration polarization (ICP) zones and deionization shock waves in microscale pores near to an ion selective element. While shock ED has been demonstrated as an effective water desalination tool, we here present evidence of other simultaneous functionalities. We show that, unlike electrodialysis, shock ED can thoroughly filter micron-scale particles and aggregates of nanoparticles present in the feedwater. We also demonstrate that shock ED can enable disinfection of feedwaters, as approximately $99\\%$ of viable bacteria (here \\textit{E. coli}) in the inflow were killed or removed by our prototype. Shock ED also separates positive from negative particles, contrary to claims that ICP acts as a virtual barrier for all charged particles. By combining these functionalities (filtration, separation and disinfection) with deionization, shock ED has the potential to enable more compact and efficient water purification systems.

Daosheng Deng; Wassim Aouad; William A. Braff; Sven Schlumpberger; Matthew E. Suss; Martin Z. Bazant

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

POTENTIAL FOR STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF A537 CARBON STEEL NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS CONTAINING HIGHLY CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evaporator recycle streams of nuclear waste tanks may contain waste in a chemistry and temperature regime that exceeds the current corrosion control program, which imposes temperature limits to mitigate caustic stress corrosion cracking (CSCC). A review of the recent service history found that two of these A537 carbon steel tanks were operated in highly concentrated hydroxide solution at high temperature. Visual inspections, experimental testing, and a review of the tank service history have shown that CSCC has occurred in uncooled/un-stress relieved tanks of similar construction. Therefore, it appears that the efficacy of stress relief of welding residual stress is the primary corrosion-limiting mechanism. The objective of this experimental program is to test A537 carbon steel small scale welded U-bend specimens and large welded plates (30.48 x 30.38 x 2.54 cm) in a caustic solution with upper bound chemistry (12 M hydroxide and 1 M each of nitrate, nitrite, and aluminate) and temperature (125 C). These conditions simulate worst-case situations in these nuclear waste tanks. Both as-welded and stress-relieved specimens have been tested. No evidence of stress corrosion cracking was found in the U-bend specimens after 21 days of testing. The large plate test was completed after 12 weeks of immersion in a similar solution at 125 C except that the aluminate concentration was reduced to 0.3 M. Visual inspection of the plate revealed that stress corrosion cracking had not initiated from the machined crack tips in the weld or in the heat affected zone. NDE ultrasonic testing also confirmed subsurface cracking did not occur. Based on these results, it can be concluded that the environmental condition of these tests was unable to develop stress corrosion cracking within the test periods for the small welded U-bends and for the large plates, which were welded with an identical procedure as used in the construction of the actual nuclear waste tanks in the 1960s. The absence of evidence of stress corrosion cracking and general corrosion in the laboratory-scaled specimens indicate that this type of nuclear waste tank is not susceptible to highly caustic solutions up to 12 M hydroxide at 125 C when sufficient nitrite inhibitor is present.

Lam, P.; Stripling, C.; Fisher, D.; Elder, J.

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

DISSELKAMP RS

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

Water Purification by Shock Electrodialysis: Deionization, Filtration, Separation, and Disinfection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of energy and infrastructure efficient water purification systems are among the most critical engineering challenges facing our society. Water purification is often a multi-step process involving filtration, desalination, and disinfection of a feedstream. Shock electrodialysis (shock ED) is a newly developed technique for water desalination, leveraging the formation of ion concentration polarization (ICP) zones and deionization shock waves in microscale pores near to an ion selective element. While shock ED has been demonstrated as an effective water desalination tool, we here present evidence of other simultaneous functionalities. We show that, unlike electrodialysis, shock ED can thoroughly filter micron-scale particles and aggregates of nanoparticles present in the feedwater. We also demonstrate that shock ED can enable disinfection of feedwaters, as approximately $99\\%$ of viable bacteria (here \\textit{E. coli}) in the inflow were killed or removed by our prototype. Shock ED also separates...

Deng, Daosheng; Braff, William A; Schlumpberger, Sven; Suss, Matthew E; Bazant, Martin Z

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Domestic wastewater treatment with membrane filtration—two years experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study tested domestic wastewater treatment membrane filtration without external cleaning in sustained long term operation. Domestic wastewater treatment plant monitoring was performed at the municipal wastewater treatment plant Devínska Nová Ves, Bratislava between February 2005 and July 2007. Two membrane modules were tested by immersion in the domestic wastewater treatment plant. The flat sheet membrane module was operated without external cleaning at a flux of 20–60 L/m2 h for 6 months. The hollow fiber membrane module was operated for 4 months without external cleaning with a flux of 20–45 L/m2 h. Parallel operation of flat sheet and hollow fiber membrane modules showed similar results in effluent water quality. Both membrane modules were able to effectively remove organic matter (as much as 91%) and more than 97% of NH4+?N. Nitrogen removal via denitrification was observed during the short periods with low oxygen concentration. Treated water contained suspended solids under measurable limits.

A. Blšt’áková; I. Bodík; L. Dan?ová; Z. Jakub?ová

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Advanced precoat filtration and competitive processes for water purification. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced precoat filtration process system is introduced. Also presented and discussed are major competitive processes for water purification, such as conventional precoat filtration, conventional physical-chemical process, lime softening, carbon adsorption, ion exchange, activated alumina, reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration, microfiltration, electrodialysis, and packed aeration column.

Wang, L.K.; Wang, M.H.S.

1989-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

Geosynthetics International, 2003, 10, No. 4 Long-term filtration performance of nonwoven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geosynthetics International, 2003, 10, No. 4 Long-term filtration performance of nonwoven, Pore constriction size, Sludge REFERENCE: Aydilek, A. H. & Edil, T. B. (2003). Long-term filtration. INTRODUCTION The retirement of large industrial waste storage facilities in accordance with environmental

Aydilek, Ahmet

117

Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. Crossflow filtration is suitable for continuous flow operation and, when coupled with a sonic or ultrasonic field, may constitute a solution to operational problems of solids separation in coal liquefaction. However, for the efficient and trouble-free operation of crossflow filters the problems arising from dealing with highly viscous coal liquefaction resids need to be avoided. Either crossflow filters suitable for work at elevated temperatures at reduced resid viscosity should be used or the coal liquefaction process network should be modified to allow for dilution of resids using a distillate fraction, e.g., naphtha, diesel oil, etc., to reduce the viscosity of resids. As perhaps even a more practical alternative, field-assisted crossflow filtration of the reactor`s effluent stream prior to the distillation step should be considered. Such an approach will circumvent the more difficult separation of fine and ultrafine solids from highly viscous coal liquefaction resids.

Slomka, B.J. [Ames Laboratory, IA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Laboratory Tests on Post-Filtration Precipitation in the WTP Pretreatment Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes et al. 2006). The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF).

Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Crum, Jarrod V.

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

119

The Role of Filtration in Maintaining Clean Heat Exchanger Coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of the study was to investigate the role of filtration in maintaining clean heat exchanger coils and overall performance. Combinations of 6 different levels of filtration (MERV 14, 11, 8, 6, 4, and no filter) and 4 different coils (an eight-row lanced-fin coil, HX8L), (an eight-row wavy-fin coil, HX8W), (a four-row lanced-fin coil, HX4L) and (a two-row lanced-fin coil, HX2L) were tested at 4 different air velocities (1.52, 2.03, 2.54,3.05 m/s (300, 400, 500, 600 ft/min)). The fouled conditions were obtained after injection of 600 grams of ASHRAE standard dust upstream of the filter/coil combination. This magnitude of dust is representative of a year of normal operation for an air conditioning system. The air-side pressure drops of the coils and filters and air-side heat transfer coefficients of the coils were determined from the measurements under the clean and fouled conditions. Depending upon the filter and coil test, the coil pressure drops increased in the range of 6%-30% for an air velocity at 2.54 m/s (500 ft/min). The impact was significantly greater for tests performed without a filter. The largest relative effect of fouling on pressure drop occurs for coils with fewer rows and having lanced fins. Coils with a greater number of rows can hold more dust so that a fixed amount of dust has a relatively smaller impact. The impact of fouling on air-side heat transfer coefficients was found to be relatively small. In some cases, heat transfer was actually enhanced due to additional turbulence caused by the presence of dust. The experimental results for pressure drops and heat transfer coefficients were correlated and the correlations were implemented within computer models of prototypical rooftop air conditioners and used to evaluate the impact of fouling on cooling capacity and EER. The equipment cooling capacity is reduced with fouling primarily because of a decrease in air flow due to the increase pressure drop rather than due to changes in h eat transfer coefficient. In most cases, the EER was reduced with fouling primarily due to increased fan power. However, the changes in EER were relatively small, in the range of 1%-9% (10%). For most cases, equipment having low efficiency filters had higher EER after fouling than equipment with high efficiency filters, because the high efficiency filter caused significantly higher pressure drops than the low efficiency filters. The extra filter pressure drop outweighed the reduced coil pressure drop after fouling. The impact of fan efficiency curves was also investigated in the study. The energy penalty associated with high efficiency filters was reduced considerably with higher efficiency fans. There is an energy penalty associated with the use of high efficiency filtration. However, the primary reason for selecting high efficiency filters for a particular application would be improved air quality. For HX8L, the quantity of dust passing through the coil with a MERV4 filter was approximately 30 times the dust passing the coil with a MERV14 filter. Without an upstream filter, the quantity of dust passing through the coil was approximately 60 times the value for a MERV14 filter.

Li Yang; James E. Braun; Eckhard A. Groll

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration Technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology evaluation was performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory on behalf of the Federal Energy Management Program. The objective was to quantify the benefits side stream filtration provides to a cooling tower system. The evaluation assessed the performance of an existing side stream filtration system at a cooling tower system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Spallation Neutron Source research facility. This location was selected because it offered the opportunity for a side-by-side comparison of a system featuring side stream filtration and an unfiltered system.

Boyd, Brian K.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ALTERNATE HIGH EFFICIENCY PARTICULATE AIR (HEPA) FILTRATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Phase IIA of this project, CeraMem has further developed and scaled up ceramic HEPA filters that are appropriate for use on filtration of vent gas from HLW tanks at DOE sites around the country. This work included procuring recrystallized SiC monoliths, developing membrane and cement materials, and defining a manufacturing process for the production of prototype full sizes HEPA filters. CeraMem has demonstrated that prototype full size filters can be manufactured by producing 9 full size filters that passed DOP aerosol testing at the Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility. One of these filters was supplied to the Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) for process tests using simulated HLW tank waste. SRTC has reported that the filter was regenerable (with some increase in pressure drop) and that the filter retained its HEPA retention capability. CeraMem has also developed a Regenerable HEPA Filter System (RHFS) design and acceptance test plan that was reviewed by DOE personnel. The design and acceptance test plan form the basis of the system proposal for follow-on work in Phase IIB of this project.

Bruce Bishop; Robert Goldsmith; Karsten Nielsen; Phillip Paquette

2002-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, And Caustic Wash Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 4 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), and Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) samples from several of the ?microbatches? of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (?Macrobatch?) 4 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by inductively-coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES). Furthermore, samples from the CWT have been analyzed by a variety of methods to investigate a decline in the decontamination factor (DF) of the cesium observed at MCU. The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate generally consistent operations. There is no indication of a disruption in plutonium and strontium removal. The average cesium DF and concentration factor (CF) for samples obtained from Macrobatch 4 are slightly lower than for Macrobatch 3, but still well within operating parameters. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in Actinide Removal Process (ARP).

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

Measurement-Based Evaluation of Installed Filtration System Performance in Single-Family Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factors in single-family homes in the U.S." Building andbenefits from filtration in homes and commercial buildings (are being installed in U.S. homes. However, particle removal

Chan, Wanyu Rengie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Vit Plant receives and sets key air filtration equipment for Low Activity Waste Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WTP lifted a nearly 100-ton carbon bed absorber into the Low-Activity Waste Facility. This key piece of air-filtration equipment will remove mercury and acidic gases before air is channeled through...

125

Generalized Volume-Averaged Filtration Combustion Model and Its Application for Calculating Carbon Gasifiers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a generalized volume-averaged model of filtration combustion of gases taking into account the spatial inhomogeneity of a porous medium and the change in porosity due to the heterogeneous chem...

K. V. Dobrego; I. A. Koznacheev

126

Design of a small-scale continuous linear motion pharmaceutical filtration module  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new small-scale continuous linear motion pharmaceutical filtration prototype was designed, fabricated, and tested. The goal of this unit is to filter an Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) from a mixture of API ...

Wong, Katherine Wing-Shan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Reverse-Osmosis Filtration Based Water Treatment and Special Water Purification for Nuclear Power Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the development and operation of specialized water treatment and water purification systems, based on the principle of reverse-osmosis filtration of water, for the operation of ... P. Ale...

V. N. Epimakhov; M. S. Oleinik; L. N. Moskvin

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Methane-to-hydrogen conversion in a reversible flow filtration combustion reactor at a high pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The noncatalytic process of partial oxidation of methane to syngas in a reversible flow filtration combustion reactor at high pressures has been considered. ... conversion process — the maximum temperature in the...

Yu. M. Dmitrenko; P. A. Klyovan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Design and testing of an experiment to measure self-filtration in particulate suspensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment for measuring self-filtration in terms of change in volume fraction downstream of a constriction compared to volume fraction upstream of said constriction was designed and tested. The user has the ability to ...

Flander, Mattias S. (Mattias Simon)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Brief Review of Filtration Studies for Waste Treatment at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document completes the requirements of Milestone 1-2, PNNL Draft Literature Review, discussed in the scope of work outlined in the EM-31 Support Project task plan WP-2.3.6-2010-1. The focus of task WP 2.3.6 is to improve the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) understanding of filtration operations for high-level waste (HLW) to enhance filtration and cleaning efficiencies, thereby increasing process throughput and reducing the sodium demand (through acid neutralization). Developing the processes for fulfilling the cleaning/backpulsing requirements will result in more efficient operations for both the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Savannah River Site (SRS), thereby increasing throughput by limiting cleaning cycles. The purpose of this document is to summarize Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL’s) literature review of historical filtration testing at the laboratory and of testing found in peer-reviewed journals. Eventually, the contents of this document will be merged with a literature review by SRS to produce a summary report for DOE of the results of previous filtration testing at the laboratories and the types of testing that still need to be completed to address the questions about improved filtration performance at WTP and SRS. To this end, this report presents 1) a review of the current state of crossflow filtration knowledge available in the peer-reviewed literature, 2) a detailed review of PNNL-related filtration studies specific to the Hanford site, and 3) an overview of current waste filtration models developed by PNNL and suggested avenues for future model development.

Daniel, Richard C.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Impact of Filtration Velocities and Particulate Matter Characteristics on Diesel Particulate Filter Wall Loading Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of different types of diesel particulate matter (PM) and different sampling conditions on the wall deposition and early soot cake build up within diesel particulate filters has been investigated. The measurements were made possible by a newly developed Diesel Exhaust Filtration Analysis (DEFA) system in which in-situ diesel exhaust filtration can be reproduced with in small cordierite wafer disks, which are essentially thin sections of a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) wall. The different types of PM were generated from selected engine operating conditions of a single-cylinder heavy-duty diesel engine. Two filtration velocities 4 and 8 cm/s were used to investigate PM deep-bed filtration processes. The loaded wafers were then analyzed in a thermal mass analyzer that measures the Soluble Organic Fraction (SOF) as well as soot and sulfate fractions of the PM. In addition, the soot residing in the wall of the wafer was examined under an optical microscope illuminated with Ultraviolet light and an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (E-SEM) to determine the bulk soot penetration depth for each loading condition. It was found that higher filtration velocity results in higher wall loading with approximately the same penetration depth into the wall. PM characteristics impacted both wall loading and soot cake layer characteristics. Results from imaging analysis indicate that soot the penetration depth into the wall was affected more by PM size (which changes with engine operating conditions) rather than filtration velocity.

Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Yapaulo, Renato A [ORNL; Orita, Tetsuo [ORNL; Wirojsakunchai, Ekathai [University of Wisconsin; Foster, David [University of Wisconsin; Akard, Michael [Horiba Instruments Inc.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economizer use in data centers is an energy efficiency strategy that could significantly limit electricity demand in this rapidly growing economic sector. Widespread economizer implementation, however, has been hindered by potential equipment reliability concerns associated with exposing information technology equipment to particulate matter of outdoor origin. This study explores the feasibility of using economizers in data centers to save energy while controlling particle concentrations with high-quality air filtration. Physical and chemical properties of indoor and outdoor particles were analyzed at an operating northern California data center equipped with an economizer under varying levels of air filtration efficiency. Results show that when improved filtration is used in combination with an economizer, the indoor/outdoor concentration ratios for most measured particle types were similar to levels when using conventional filtration without economizers. An energy analysis of the data center reveals that, even during the summer months, chiller savings from economizer use greatly outweigh any increase in fan power associated with improved filtration. These findings indicate that economizer use combined with improved filtration could reduce data center energy demand while providing a level of protection from particles of outdoor origin similar to that observed with conventional design.

Shehabi, Arman; Ganguly, Srirupa; Gundel, Lara A.; Horvath, Arpad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Nazaroff, William W

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

133

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economizer use in data centers is an energy efficiency strategy that could significantly limit electricity demand in this rapidly growing economic sector. Widespread economizer implementation, however, has been hindered by potential reliability concerns associated with exposing information technology equipment to particulate matter of outdoor origin. This study explores the feasibility of using economizers in data centers to save energy while controlling particle concentrations with high-quality air filtration. Physical and chemical properties of indoor and outdoor particles were analyzed at an operating northern California data center equipped with an economizer under varying levels of air filtration efficiency. Results show that when improved filtration is used in combination with an economizer, the indoor/outdoor concentration ratios for most measured particle types were similar to levels when using conventional filtration without economizers. An energy analysis of the data center reveals that, even during the summer months, chiller savings from economizer use greatly outweigh any increase in fan power associated with improved filtration. These findings indicate that economizer use combined with improved filtration could reduce data center energy demand while providing a level of protection from particles of outdoor origin similar to that observed with conventional design.

Arman Shehabi; Srirupa Ganguly; Lara A. Gundel; Arpad Horvath; Thomas W. Kirchstetter; Melissa M. Lunden; William Tschudi; Ashok J. Gadgil; William W. Nazaroff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

CHARACTERIZING LOW-MASS BINARIES FROM OBSERVATION OF LONG-TIMESCALE CAUSTIC-CROSSING GRAVITATIONAL MICROLENSING EVENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the astrophysical importance of binary star systems, detections are limited to those located in small ranges of separations, distances, and masses and thus it is necessary to use a variety of observational techniques for a complete view of stellar multiplicity across a broad range of physical parameters. In this paper, we report the detections and measurements of two binaries discovered from observations of microlensing events MOA-2011-BLG-090 and OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. Determinations of the binary masses are possible by simultaneously measuring the Einstein radius and the lens parallax. The measured masses of the binary components are 0.43 M{sub Sun} and 0.39 M{sub Sun} for MOA-2011-BLG-090 and 0.57 M{sub Sun} and 0.17 M{sub Sun} for OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 and thus both lens components of MOA-2011-BLG-090 and one component of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 are M dwarfs, demonstrating the usefulness of microlensing in detecting binaries composed of low-mass components. From modeling of the light curves considering full Keplerian motion of the lens, we also measure the orbital parameters of the binaries. The blended light of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417 comes very likely from the lens itself, making it possible to check the microlensing orbital solution by follow-up radial-velocity observation. For both events, the caustic-crossing parts of the light curves, which are critical for determining the physical lens parameters, were resolved by high-cadence survey observations and thus it is expected that the number of microlensing binaries with measured physical parameters will increase in the future.

Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Choi, J.-Y. [Department of Physics, Institute for Astrophysics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763 (Korea, Republic of); Udalski, A.; Szymanski, M. K.; Kubiak, M.; Soszynski, I.; Pietrzynski, G.; Poleski, R.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozlowski, S.; Wyrzykowski, L. [Warsaw University Observatory, Al. Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa (Poland); Sumi, T. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Gould, A.; Skowron, J. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bozza, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'E.R. Caianiello', Universita degli Studi di Salerno, Via S. Allende, 84081 Baronissi (Italy); Dominik, M.; Horne, K. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Fouque, P. [IRAP, Universite de Toulouse, CNRS, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Collaboration: OGLE Collaboration; MOA Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; muFUN Collaboration; PLANET Collaboration; and others

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS Webinar (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below is the text version of the webinar, DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS, presented in August 2014.

136

EFFECT ON 105KW NORTH WALL DUE TO ADDITION OF FILTRATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CHPRC D&D Projects is adding three filtration system on two 1-ft concrete pads adjacent to the north side of existing KW Basin building. This analysis is prepared to provide qualitative assessment based on the review of design information available for 105KW basin substructure. In the proposed heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) filtration pad designs a 2 ft gap will be maintained between the pads and the north end of the existing 1 05KW -Basin building. Filtration Skids No.2 and No.3 share one pad. It is conservative to evaluate the No.2 and No.3 skid pad for the wall assessment. Figure 1 shows the plan layout of the 105KW basin site and the location of the pads for the filtration system or HVAC skids. Figure 2 shows the cross-section elevation view of the pad. The concrete pad Drawing H-1-91482 directs the replacement of the existing 8-inch concrete pad with two new 1-ft think pads. The existing 8-inch pad is separated from the 105KW basin superstructure by an expansion joint of only half an inch. The concrete pad Drawing H-1-91482 shows the gap between the new proposed pads and the north wall and any overflow pits and sumps is 2-ft. Following analysis demonstrates that the newly added filtration units and their pads do not exceed the structural capacity of existing wall. The calculation shows that the total bending moment on the north wall due to newly added filtration units and pads including seismic load is 82.636 ft-kip/ft and is within the capacity of wall which is 139.0ft-kip/ft.

CHO CS

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

138

Mechanisms of flow through compressible porous beds in sedimentation, filtration, centrifugation, deliquoring, and ceramic processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Houston research program is aimed at the specific area of solid/liquid separation including sedimentation, thickening, cake filtration, centrifugation, expression, washing, deep-bed filtration, screening, and membrane separation. Unification of the theoretical approaches to the various solid/liquid separation operations is the principle objective of the research. Exploring new aspects of basic separation mechanisms, verification of theory with experiment, development of laboratory procedures for obtaining data for design, optimizing operational methods, and transferring the results to industry are a part of the Houston program. New methodology developed in our program now permits an engineer or scientist to handle thickening, cake filtration, centrigual filtration, and expression in a unified manner. The same fundamental equations are simply adapted to the differing parameters and conditions related to the various modes of separation. As the system is flexible and adaptable to computational software, new developments can continually be added. Discussions of the various research projects in this report have been kept to a minimum and are principally qualitative. The length of the report would be excessive if each topic were covered in depth. Although the number of research topics may appear larger than one would expect, many are closely interconnected and reflect our philosophy of working in apparently diverse fields such as ceramics, mining, wastewater, food, chemical processing, and oil well operations.

Tiller, F.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

VOLUME 16, NUMBER 3 HVAC&R RESEARCH MAY 2010 The Effects of Filtration on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOLUME 16, NUMBER 3 HVAC&R RESEARCH MAY 2010 273 The Effects of Filtration on Pressure Drop and Energy Consumption in Residential HVAC Systems (RP-1299) Brent Stephens Atila Novoselac, PhD Jeffrey A of high-efficiency HVAC filters is a common strategy to control exposure to airborne particulate matter

Siegel, Jeffrey

140

THE WEIGHT FILTRATION FOR REAL ALGEBRAIC VARIETIES CLINT MCCRORY AND ADAM PARUSINSKI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Using the work of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar we associate to each real algebraic variety a filtered by Totaro [37]. He used the work of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar [15] to show the existence, and more recent unpublished work on weight filtrations by Guill´en and Navarro Aznar [16]. Totaro's weight

Parusinski, Adam

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of a Combined Cyclone and Gas Filtration System for Particulate Removal in the Gasification Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash gasification facility, owned and operated by sgSolutions LLC, is one of the largest single train solid fuel gasification facilities in the world capable of transforming 2,000 tons per day of petroleum coke or 2,600 tons per day of bituminous coal into synthetic gas for electrical power generation. The Wabash plant utilizes Phillips66 proprietary E-Gas (TM) Gasification Process to convert solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal into synthetic gas that is fed to a combined cycle combustion turbine power generation facility. During plant startup in 1995, reliability issues were realized in the gas filtration portion of the gasification process. To address these issues, a slipstream test unit was constructed at the Wabash facility to test various filter designs, materials and process conditions for potential reliability improvement. The char filtration slipstream unit provided a way of testing new materials, maintenance procedures, and process changes without the risk of stopping commercial production in the facility. It also greatly reduced maintenance expenditures associated with full scale testing in the commercial plant. This char filtration slipstream unit was installed with assistance from the United States Department of Energy (built under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-97FT34158) and began initial testing in November of 1997. It has proven to be extremely beneficial in the advancement of the E-Gas (TM) char removal technology by accurately predicting filter behavior and potential failure mechanisms that would occur in the commercial process. After completing four (4) years of testing various filter types and configurations on numerous gasification feed stocks, a decision was made to investigate the economic and reliability effects of using a particulate removal gas cyclone upstream of the current gas filtration unit. A paper study had indicated that there was a real potential to lower both installed capital and operating costs by implementing a char cyclonefiltration hybrid unit in the E-Gas (TM) gasification process. These reductions would help to keep the E-Gas (TM) technology competitive among other coal-fired power generation technologies. The Wabash combined cyclone and gas filtration slipstream test program was developed to provide design information, equipment specification and process control parameters of a hybrid cyclone and candle filter particulate removal system in the E-Gas (TM) gasification process that would provide the optimum performance and reliability for future commercial use. The test program objectives were as follows: 1. Evaluate the use of various cyclone materials of construction; 2. Establish the optimal cyclone efficiency that provides stable long term gas filter operation; 3. Determine the particle size distribution of the char separated by both the cyclone and candle filters. This will provide insight into cyclone efficiency and potential future plant design; 4. Determine the optimum filter media size requirements for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit; 5. Determine the appropriate char transfer rates for both the cyclone and filtration portions of the hybrid unit; 6. Develop operating procedures for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit; and, 7. Compare the installed capital cost of a scaled-up commercial cyclone-filtration hybrid unit to the current gas filtration design without a cyclone unit, such as currently exists at the Wabash facility.

Rizzo, Jeffrey J. [Phillips66 Company, West Terre Haute, IN (United States)

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

142

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and with the exception of CPVC, no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied. The testing shows no major concerns for compatibility over the short duration of these tests but does indicate that longer duration exposure studies are warranted, especially for Tefzel. However, the physical changes experienced by Tefzel in the improved solvent were comparable to the physical changes obtained when Tefzel is placed in CSSX baseline solvent. Therefore, there is no effect of the improved solvent beyond those observed in CSSX baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

143

Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

PEP Run Report for Integrated Test A, Caustic Leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A, Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.”(a) The PEP, located in the Process Engineering Laboratory-West (PDLW) located in Richland, Washington, is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Su, Yin-Fong; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, Dennese M.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Young, Joan K.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

145

DQE of wireless digital detectors: Comparative performance with differing filtration schemes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Wireless flat panel detectors are gaining increased usage in portable medical imaging. Two such detectors were evaluated and compared with a conventional flat-panel detector using the formalism of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62220-1) for measuring modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) using two different filtration schemes.Methods: Raw images were acquired for three image receptors (DRX-1C and DRX-1, Carestream Health; Inc., Pixium 4600, Trixell) using a radiographic system with a well-characterized output (Philips Super80 CP, Philips Healthcare). Free in-air exposures were measured using a calibrated radiation meter (Unfors Mult-O-Meter Type 407, Unfors Instruments AB). Additional aluminum filtration and a new alternative combined copper-aluminum filtration were used to conform the x ray output to IEC-specified beam quality definitions RQA5 and RQA9. Using the IEC 62220-1 formalism, each detector was evaluated at X{sub N}/2, X{sub N}, and 2X{sub N}, where the normal exposure level to the detector surface (X{sub N}) was set to 8.73 ?Gy (1.0 mR). The prescribed edge test device was used to evaluate the MTF, while the NNPS was measured using uniform images. The DQE was then calculated from the MTF and NNPS and compared across detectors, exposures, and filtration schemes.Results: The three DR systems had largely comparable MTFs with DRX-1 demonstrating lower values above 1.0 cycles/mm. At each exposure, DRX-1C and Pixium detectors demonstrated better noise performance than that of DRX-1. Zero-frequency DQEs for DRX-1C, Pixium, and DRX-1 detectors were approximately 74%, 63%, and 38% for RQA5 and 50%, 42%, and 28% for RQA9, respectively.Conclusions: DRX-1C detector exhibited superior DQE performance compared to Pixium and DRX-1. In terms of filtration, the alternative filtration was found to provide comparable performance in terms of rank ordering of different detectors with the added convenience of being less bulky for in-the-field measurements.

Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Murphy, Simon; Christianson, Olav [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Effect of Oxalate on the Recycle of Neptunium Filtrate Solution by Anion Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of laboratory column runs has been performed that demonstrates the recovery of neptunium (Np) containing up to 0.05 M oxalate. Np losses were generally less than one percent to the raffinate for feed solutions that contained 2 to 10 g Np/L. Up to 16 percent Np losses were observed with lower Np feed concentrations, but those losses were attributed to the shortened residence times rather than the higher oxalate to Np ratios. Losses in the plant are expected to be significantly less due to the lower cross-section flowrate possible with existing plant pumps. Elimination of the permanganate treatment of filtrates appears to be reasonable since the amount of Np in those filtrates does not appear to be practical to recover. Combination of untreated filtrates with other actinide rich solutions is not advisable as precipitation problems are likely. If untreated filtrates are kept segregated from other actinide rich streams, the recovery of the remaining Np is probably still possible, but could be limited due to the excessively high oxalate to Np ratio. The persistence of hydrazine/hydrazoic acid in filtrate solutions dictates that the nitrite treatment be retained to eliminate those species from the filtrates prior to transfer to the canyon. Elimination of the permanganate treatment of precipitator flushes and recovery by anion exchange does not appear to be limited by the oxalate effect on anion exchange. Np from solutions with higher oxalate to Np molar ratios than expected in precipitator flushes was recovered with low to modest losses. Solubility problems appear to be unlikely when the moles of oxalate involved are less than the total number of moles of Np due to complexation effects. The presence of significant concentrations of iron (Fe) in the solutions will further decrease the probability of Np oxalate precipitation due the formation of Fe oxalate complexes. Np oxalate solubility data in 8 M HNO{sub 3} with from one to six times as much oxalate as Np have been obtained. These data supplement literature data in the high HNO{sub 3} low oxalate region, but provide additional data for solutions with relatively large amounts of Np present. Enhanced solubility of Np oxalate over that reported in the literature was observed.

Kyser, E

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

147

Evaluation of Flocculation and Filtration Procedures Applied to WSRC Sludge: A Report from B. Yarar, Colorado School of Mines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report, addresses fundamentals of flocculation processes shedding light on why WSRC researchers have not been able to report the discovery of a successful flocculant and acceptable filtration rates. It also underscores the importance of applying an optimized flocculation-testing regime, which has not been adopted by these researchers. The final part of the report proposes a research scheme which should lead to a successful choice of flocculants, filtration aids (surfactants) and a filtration regime, as well recommendations for work that should be carried out to make up for the deficiencies of the limited WSRC work where a better performance should be the outcome.

Poirier, M.R.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

148

Recycling of cleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane 2 stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols. From the data collected in this work, a preliminary process design and economic evaluations were performed for a model mill with 1,000-ton/day pulp production that uses a bleaching sequence based on chlorine dioxide. Assuming 3 m{sup 3} acidic effluents to be treated per ton of pulp produced, the electrodialysis process would require a membrane area of about 361 m{sup 2} for this model mill. The energy consumption of the electrodialytic stack for separation is estimated to be about $160/day, and the estimated capital cost of the electrodia

Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.; Energy Systems; Inst. of Paper Science and Tech.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Recycling of bleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols.

Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.

2002-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

150

DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

Kyser, E.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

151

On the splitting of the Bloch-Beilinson filtration Arnaud BEAUVILLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(X) , with CHp (X) = F0 CHp (X) . . . Fp+1 (X) = 0 and F1 CH(X) = Ker cX . We refer to [J] for a discussion graduation given by CHp (A) = s CHp s(A) , where CHp s(A) is the subspace of elements CHp (A) with k A = k2 not define the required filtration because the vanishing of the terms CHp s(A) for s

Beauville, Arnaud

152

MOBILIZATION, POISONING, AND FILTRATION OF F-CANYON TANK 804 SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) Deactivation and Decommissioning (SDD) Organization is evaluating options to disposition the F-Canyon 800 series underground tanks (including removal of the sludge heels from these tanks) and requested assistance from Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel to develop methods to effectively mobilize the sludge from these tanks (i.e., Tanks 804, 808, and 809). Because of the high plutonium content in Tank 804 (estimated to be as much as 1500 g), SDD needs to add a neutron poison to the sludge. They considered manganese and boron as potential poisons. Because of the large amount of manganese needed and the very slow filtration rate of the sludge/manganese slurry, SDD requested that SRNL investigate the impact of using boron rather than manganese as the poison. SRNL performed a series of experiments to help determine the disposal pathway of the material currently located in Tank 804. The objectives of this work are: (1) Determine the mobility of Tank 804 sludge when mixed with 10-15 parts sodium hydroxide as a function of pH between 10 and 14. (2) Determine the solubility of boron in sodium hydroxide solution with a free hydroxide concentration between 1 x 10{sup -4} and 2.0 M. (3) Recommend a filter pore size for SDD such that the filtrate contains no visible solids. (4) Determine whether a precipitate forms when the filtrate pH is adjusted to 12, 7, or 2 with nitric acid.

Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

153

Syngas production from wood pellet using filtration combustion of lean natural gas–air mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A common method for the production of hydrogen and syngas is solid fuel gasification. This paper discusses the experimental results obtained from the combustion of lean natural gas–air mixtures in a porous medium composed of aleatory alumina spheres and wood pellets, called hybrid bed. Temperature, velocity, and chemical products (H2, CO, CO2, CH4) of the combustion waves were recorded experimentally in an inert bed (baseline) and hybrid bed (with a volume wood fraction of 50%), for equivalence ratios (?) from 0.3 to 1.0, and a constant filtration velocity of 15 cm/s. Upstream, downstream and standing combustion waves were observed for inert and hybrid bed. The maximum hydrogen conversion in hybrid filtration combustion is found to be ?99% at ? = 0.3. Results demonstrate that wood gasification process occurs with high temperature (1188 K) and oxygen available, and the lean hybrid filtration process can be used to reform solid fuels into hydrogen and syngas.

Karina Araus; Felipe Reyes; Mario Toledo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 474 Impacts of HVAC Filtration on Air-Conditioner Energy Consumption in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 474 Impacts of HVAC Filtration on Air efficiency filters (Points A, B, and C, respectively). #12;Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 474

Siegel, Jeffrey

155

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

.A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

156

Carbon Nanotube Film by Filtration as Cathode Catalyst Support for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Nanotube Film by Filtration as Cathode Catalyst Support for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell ... 1-10 Some early investigations found that by using the normal paste method and simply replacing carbon black particles with disordered multiwalled CNTs as the support for Pt catalyst nanoparticles higher PEMFC and DMFC performances were achieved. ... activity of the CNT cathode catalysts was measured in a direct methanol fuel cell by use of a Pt-Ru/C anode, and use of a Nafion-115 membrane. ...

Wenzhen Li; Xin Wang; Zhongwei Chen; Mahesh Waje; Yushan Yan

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

157

Removal and recovery of metal ions from process and waste streams using polymer filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymer Filtration (PF) is an innovative, selective metal removal technology. Chelating, water-soluble polymers are used to selectively bind the desired metal ions and ultrafiltration is used to concentrate the polymer-metal complex producing a permeate with low levels of the targeted metal ion. When applied to the treatment of industrial metal-bearing aqueous process streams, the permeate water can often be reused within the process and the metal ions reclaimed. This technology is applicable to many types of industrial aqueous streams with widely varying chemistries. Application of PF to aqueous streams from nuclear materials processing and electroplating operations will be described.

Jarvinen, G.D.; Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Kraus, K.M.; Thompson, J.A.

1999-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

158

Multifunctional nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles formed via vacuum filtration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In one aspect, the present invention provides a method of forming a film of nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of (a) providing a first solution that contains a plurality of CNTs, (b) providing a second solution that contains a plurality of Pt nanoparticles, (c) combining the first solution and the second solution to form a third solution, and (d) filtering the third solution through a nanoporous membrane using vacuum filtration to obtain a film of nanocomposites of CNTs and Pt nanoparticles.

Hersam, Mark C; Ostojic, Gordana; Liang, Yu Teng

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

Measurement-Based Evaluation of Installed Filtration System Performance in Single-Family Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide discusses important study design issues to consider when conducting an on-site evaluation of filtration system performance. The two most important dichotomies to consider in developing a study protocol are (1) whether systems are being evaluated in occupied or unoccupied homes and (2) whether different systems are being compared in the same homes or if the comparison is between systems installed in different homes. This document provides perspective and recommendations about a suite of implementation issues including the choice of particle measurement devices, selection of sampling locations, ways to control and/or monitor factors and processes that can impact particle concentrations, and data analysis approaches.

Chan, Wanyu Rengie; Singer, Brett C.

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

160

Feasibility of bioengineered two-stages sequential batch reactor and filtration–adsorption process for complex agrochemical effluent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present study, the feasibility of a bioengineered two-stages sequential batch reactor (BTSSBR) followed by filtration–adsorption process was investigated to treat the agrochemical effluent by overcoming factor affecting process stability such as microbial imbalance and substrate sensitivity. An air stripper stripped 90% of toxic ammonia, and combined with other streams for bio-oxidation and filtration–adsorption. The BTSSBR system achieved bio-oxidation at 6 days hydraulic retention time by fending off microbial imbalance and substrate sensitivity. The maximum reduction in COD and BOD by heterotrophic bacteria in the first reactor was 87% and 90%, respectively. Removal of toxic ammoniacal-nitrogen by autotrophic bacteria in a post-second stage bio-oxidation was 97%. The optimum filtration and adsorption of pollutants were achieved at a filtration rate of 10 and 9 m3 m?2 h?1, respectively. The treatment scheme comprising air stripper, BTSSBR and filtration–adsorption process showed a great promise for treating the agrochemical effluent.

Pravin Manekar; Rima Biswas; Chaitali Urewar; Sukdeb Pal; Tapas Nandy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency Studies Using Laboratory Generated Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diesel offers higher fuel efficiency, but produces higher exhaust particulate matter. Diesel particulate filters are presently the most efficient means to reduce these emissions. These filters typically trap particles in two basic modes: at the beginning of the exposure cycle the particles are captured in the filter holes, and at longer times the particles form a "cake" on which particles are trapped. Eventually the "cake" removed by oxidation and the cycle is repeated. We have investigated the properties and behavior of two commonly used filters: silicon carbide (SiC) and cordierite (DuraTrap® RC) by exposing them to nearly-spherical ammonium sulfate particles. We show that the transition from deep bed filtration to "cake" filtration can easily be identified by recording the change in pressure across the filters as a function of exposure. We investigated performance of these filters as a function of flow rate and particle size. The filters trap small and large particles more efficiently than particles that are ~80 to 200 nm in aerodynamic diameter. A comparison between the experimental data and a simulation using incompressible lattice-Boltzmann model shows very good qualitative agreement, but the model overpredicts the filter’s trapping efficiency.

Yang, Juan; Stewart, Marc; Maupin, Gary D.; Herling, Darrell R.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Estimates of HVAC filtration efficiency for fine and ultrafine particles of outdoor origin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work uses 194 outdoor particle size distributions (PSDs) from the literature to estimate single-pass heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) filter removal efficiencies for PM2.5 and ultrafine particles (UFPs: HVAC filters identified in the literature. Filters included those with a minimum efficiency reporting value (MERV) of 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16, as well as HEPA filters. We demonstrate that although the MERV metric defined in ASHRAE Standard 52.2 does not explicitly account for UFP or PM2.5 removal efficiency, estimates of filtration efficiency for both size fractions increased with increasing MERV. Our results also indicate that outdoor PSD characteristics and assumptions for particle density and typical size-resolved infiltration factors (in the absence of HVAC filtration) do not drastically impact estimates of HVAC filter removal efficiencies for PM2.5. The impact of these factors is greater for UFPs; however, they are also somewhat predictable. Despite these findings, our results also suggest that MERV alone cannot always be used to predict UFP or PM2.5 removal efficiency given the various size-resolved removal efficiencies of different makes and models, particularly for MERV 7 and MERV 12 filters. This information improves knowledge of how the MERV designation relates to PM2.5 and UFP removal efficiency for indoor particles of outdoor origin. Results can be used to simplify indoor air quality modeling efforts and inform standards and guidelines.

Parham Azimi; Dan Zhao; Brent Stephens

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

F/H Effluent Treatment Facility filtration upgrade alternative evaluations overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) was designed to treat process wastewater from the 200-F/H Production Facilities (routine wastewater) as well as intermittent flows from the F/H Retention Basins and F/H Cooling Water Basins (nonroutine wastewater). Since start-up of the ETF at SRS in 1988, the treatment process has experienced difficulties processing routine and nonroutine wastewater. Studies have identified high bacteria and bacterial decomposition products in the wastewater as the cause for excessive fouling of the filtration system. In order to meet Waste Management requirements for the treatment of processed wastewater, an upgrade of the ETF filtration system is being developed. This upgrade must be able to process the nonroutine wastewater at design capacity. As a result, a study of alternative filter technologies was conducted utilizing simulated wastewater. The simulated wastewater tests have been completed. Three filter technologies, centrifugal polymeric ultrafilters, tubular polymeric ultrafilters, and backwashable cartridge filters have been selected for further evaluation utilizing actual ETF wastewater.

Miles, W.C. Jr.; Poirier, M.R.; Brown, D.F.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Conversion of jet fuel and butanol to syngas by filtration combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Replacing batteries with fuel cells is a promising approach for powering portable devices; however, hydrogen fuel generation and storage are challenges to the acceptance of this technology. A potential solution to this problem is on-site fuel reforming, in which a rich fuel/air mixture is converted to a hydrogen-rich syngas. In this paper, we present experimental results of the conversion of jet fuel (Jet-A) and butanol to syngas by non-catalytic filtration combustion in a porous media reactor operating over a wide range of equivalence ratios and inlet velocities. Since the focus of this study is the production of syngas, our primary results are the hydrogen yield, the carbon monoxide yield, and the energy conversion efficiency. In addition, the production of soot that occurred during testing is discussed for both fuels. Finally, an analysis of the potential for these fuels and others to be converted to syngas based on the present experiments and data available in the literature is presented. This study is intended to increase the understanding of filtration combustion for syngas production and to illuminate the potential of these fuels for conversion to syngas by non-catalytic methods.

Colin H. Smith; Daniel I. Pineda; Casey D. Zak; Janet L. Ellzey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

HVAC filtration for controlling infectious airborne disease transmission in indoor environments: Predicting risk reductions and operational costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work describes and applies a methodology for estimating the impact of recirculating heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) particle filters on the control of size-resolved infectious aerosols in indoor environments using a modified version of the Wells-Riley model for predicting risks of infectious disease transmission. Estimates of risk reductions and associated operational costs of both HVAC filtration and equivalent outdoor air ventilation are modeled and compared using a case study of airborne transmission of influenza in a hypothetical office space. Overall, recirculating HVAC filtration was predicted to achieve risk reductions at lower costs of operation than equivalent levels of outdoor air ventilation, particularly for MERV 13–16 filters. Medium efficiency filtration products (MERV 7–11) are also inexpensive to operate but appear less effective in reducing infectious disease risks.

Parham Azimi; Brent Stephens

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Experimental study of unsteady state filtration of gas condensate system at the pressure above the dew point  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental study investigates the unsteady filtration of a gas condensate system at pressure above the dew point. It is assumed that the motion of a gas condensate mixture in a porous medium at a pressure 1.5--1.7 times higher than the dew point pressure does not comply with gas filtration rules. The results explain the process of forming microembryonics of the new phase, which can be used in project planning as well as during exploitation of gas condensate fields at reservoir pressure.

Babaev, R.D.; Suleymanov, A.A.; Shahiduzzaman, M. [Azerbaijan State Oil Academy, Baku (Azerbaijan). Dept. of Development and Production of Oil Fields

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Effects of drilling fluid properties and shear rate on dynamic filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

86 88 90 92 TABLE D1: TABLE D2: TABLE D3: BASE MUD RUN WITH CORE 1A AT 389 SEC SHEAR RATE BASE MUD RUN WITH CORE 1B AT 194 SEC SHEAR RATE BASE MUD RUN WITH CORE 2A AT 142 SEC SHEAR RATE 113 114 TABLE D4: TABLE D5: TABLE D6: BASE MUD... 40 60 TIME, min. Fig 3-Cumulative Filtrate Volume As A Function Of Time At Various Shear Rates For Base Mud 0. 03 0. 028 0. 026 0. 024 0. 022 0. 02 0. 018 0. 016 0. 014 0. 012 0. 01 0. 008 CORE 2B 0 0 + CORE 1B 8 194 X CORE 3A g 218...

McCarty, Robert Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

Simulated Waste for Leaching and Filtration Studies--Laboratory Preparation Procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the simulant preparation procedure for producing multi-component simulants for leaching and filtration studies, including development and comparison activities in accordance with the test plan( ) prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-06-006, Rev 0 (Smith 2006). A fundamental premise is that this approach would allow blending of the different components to simulate a wide variety of feeds to be treated in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). For example, a given feed from the planned feed vector could be selected, and the appropriate components would then be blended to achieve a representation of that particular feed. Using the blending of component simulants allows the representation of a much broader spectrum of potential feeds to the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP).

Smith, Harry D.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

Quantitative comparison of processes of oil-and water-based mud-filtrate invasion and corresponding effects on borehole resistivity measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for hydrocarbon exploration and production, drilling fluids sustain a pressure higher than that of formationQuantitative comparison of processes of oil- and water-based mud-filtrate invasion-filtrate invasion on borehole resistivity measurements. We simulate the process of mud-fil- trate invasion

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

171

A Backprojection-Filtration Algorithm for Nonstandard Spiral Cone-beam CT with an N-PI Window  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

triangulation. Then, they proposed a quasi-exact FBP reconstruction algorithm [9] using three sets of filter1 A Backprojection-Filtration Algorithm for Nonstandard Spiral Cone-beam CT with an N-PI Window in the nonstandard spiral scanning case. In this paper, we design an n-PI-window-based BPF algorithm, and report

Ye, Yangbo

172

In Situ Catalytic Ceramic Candle Filtration for Tar Reforming and Particulate Abatement in a Fluidized-Bed Biomass Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Situ Catalytic Ceramic Candle Filtration for Tar Reforming and Particulate Abatement in a Fluidized-Bed Biomass Gasifier ... In fact, the complications resulting from the requirement to obtain a tar-free product often contribute significantly to the overall investment and operating costs of small- to medium-scale gasification units. ...

Sergio Rapagnà; Katia Gallucci; Manuela Di Marcello; Pier Ugo Foscolo; Manfred Nacken; Steffen Heidenreich

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

Rapid Assay for In Situ Identification of Coagulase-Positive Staphylococci Recovered by Membrane Filtration from Swimming Pool Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contaminant of swimming pools and other recreational waters with a high...lack of a recovery system which...Examination of Water and Waste- water has...aureus in swimming pool water, these...filtration recovery of staphylococci in swimming pool water. Appl...enterotoxin, and heat-stable...

N. Arlene Klapes; Donald Vesley

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene and gold nanoparticles by vacuum filtration and spontaneous reduction of gold ionsw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene and gold nanoparticles by vacuum filtration and spontaneous 2009 DOI: 10.1039/b821920f Layer-by-layer films comprised of alternating graphene and gold nanoparticle graphene oxide solution to fabricate the graphene thin film on the quartz substrate, followed by gold

Kim, Yong Jung

175

Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • A novel method of stripping (agitation) was investigated for NH{sub 3}-N removal. • PFS coagulation followed agitation process enhanced the leachate biodegradation. • Nitrification–denitrification achieved by changing operation process in SBR treatment. • A dual filter of carbon-sand is suitable as a polishing treatment of leachate. • Combined treatment success for the complete treatment of non-biodegradable leachate. - Abstract: This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH{sub 3}-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s{sup ?1} within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L{sup ?1} at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD{sub 5}/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD{sub 5}, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH{sub 3}-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic–aerobic–anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD{sub 5}, suspended solid (SS), NH{sub 3}-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L{sup ?1}, 22.8 mg L{sup ?1}, 24.2 mg L{sup ?1}, 18.4 mg L{sup ?1} and 50.8 mg L{sup ?1} respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated pollutant loading from landfill leachate.

Abood, Alkhafaji R. [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Thi Qar University, Nasiriyah (Iraq); Bao, Jianguo, E-mail: bjianguo888@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Du, Jiangkun; Zheng, Dan; Luo, Ye [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Region-of-interest reconstruction of motion-contaminated data using a weighted backprojection filtration algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recently developed weighted backprojection filtration (WBPF) algorithm using data redundancy has capabilities that make this algorithm an attractive candidate for reconstructing images from motion-contaminated projection data. First, the WBPF algorithm is capable of reconstructing region-of-interest (ROI) images from reduced-scan fan-beam data, which have less data than the short-scan data required to reconstruct the entire field of view (FOV). Second, this algorithm can reconstruct ROI images from truncated data. Using phantom simulation studies, we demonstrate how these unique capabilities can be exploited to reduce the amount of motion-contaminated data used for reconstruction. In particular, we use examples from cardiac imaging to illustrate how off-center phantom positioning combined with phase-interval ROI reconstruction can result in the suppression of motion artifacts. In terms of temporal resolution, reduced-scan reconstruction with 45% of a full-scan dataset can be used to improve the temporal resolution of a short-scan reconstruction by 25.8% if ungated data are used. For data gated at 66 beats per minute, reduced-scan reconstruction with 45% of a full-scan dataset can be used to improve the temporal resolution of a short-scan reconstruction by 7.9%. As a result of our studies, we believe that the WBPF algorithm demonstrates the potential for reconstructing quality ROI images from motion-contaminated fan-beam data.

King, Martin; Pan Xiaochuan; Yu Lifeng; Giger, Maryellen [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Selective Filtration of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water Cherenkov Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have been investigating the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This focused study of selective water filtration and GdCl{sub 3} extraction techniques, conducted at UC Irvine, followed up on highly promising benchtop-scale and kiloton-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of 2003 and 2005 Advanced Detector Research Program grants.

Vagins, Mark R.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

A study of the effects of mud filtrate invasion on the response of standard resistivity logging tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the extremely small pore throats in the reservoir rock. These high capillary pressures, together with low relative permeabilities, are the reason for the high initial water saturations in many tight gas sands. Imbibition plays a large role in mud filtrate... of increased formation water saturation has a decreased resistivity. The annulus region has been generally assumed to form only in high permeability oil zones. The reason this type of resistivity profile is called an annulus is that if three resistivity...

Semmelbeck, Mark Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

179

Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is growing concern about potential terrorist attacks involving releases of chemical and/or biological (CB) agents, such as sarin or anthrax, in and around buildings. For an external release, the CB agent can enter the building through the air intakes of a building's mechanical ventilation system and by infiltration through the building envelope. For an interior release in a single room, the mechanical ventilation system, which often recirculates some fraction of the air within a building, may distribute the released CB agent throughout the building. For both cases, installing building systems that remove chemical and biological agents may be the most effective way to protect building occupants. Filtration systems installed in the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems of buildings can significantly reduce exposures of building occupants in the event of a release, whether the release is outdoors or indoors. Reduced exposures can reduce the number of deaths from a terrorist attack. The purpose of this report is to provide information and examples of the design of filtration systems to help building engineers retrofit HVAC systems. The report also provides background information on the physical nature of CB agents and brief overviews of the basic principles of particle and vapor filtration.

Thatcher, Tracy L.; Daisey, Joan M.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIFUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. Conclusions from this work include the following. The CSSX process is capable of reducing {sup 137}Cs in high level radioactive waste by a factor of more than 40,000 using five extraction, two scrub, and five strip stages. Tests demonstrated extraction and strip section stage efficiencies of greater than 93% for the Tank 49H waste test and greater than 88% for the simulant waste test. During a test with HLW, researchers processed 39 liters of Tank 49H solution and the waste raffinate had an average decontamination factor (DF) of 6.78E+04, with a maximum of 1.08E+05. A simulant waste solution ({approx}34.5 liters) with an initial Cs concentration of 83.1 mg/L was processed and had an average DF greater than 5.9E+03, with a maximum DF of greater than 6.6E+03. The difference may be attributable to differences in contactor stage efficiencies. Test results showed the solvent can be stripped of cesium and recycled for {approx}25 solvent turnovers without the occurrence of any measurable solvent degradation or negative effects from minor components. Based on the performance of the 12-stage 2-cm apparatus with the Tank 49H HLW, the projected DF for MCU with seven extraction, two scrub, and seven strip stages operating at a nominal efficiency of 90% is {approx}388,000. At 95% stage efficiency, the DF in MCU would be {approx}3.2 million. Carryover of organic solvent in aqueous streams (and aqueous in organic streams) was less than 0.1% when processing Tank 49H HLW. The entrained solvent concentration measured in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) was as much as {approx}140 mg/L, although that value may be overstated by as much as 50% due to modifier solubility in the DSS. The entrained solvent concentration was measured in the strip effluent (SE) and the results are pending. A steady-state concentration factor (CF) of 15.9 was achieved with Tank 49H HLW. Cesium distribution ratios [D(Cs)] were measured with non-radioactive Tank 49H waste simulant and actual Tank 49H waste. Below is a comparison of D(Cs) values of ESS and 2-cm tests. Batch Extraction-Strip-Scrub (ESS) tests yielded D(Cs) values for extraction of {approx}81-88 for tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant. The results from the 2-cm contactor tests were in agreement with values of 58-92 for the Tank 49H HLW test and 54-83 for the simulant waste test. These values are consistent with the reference D(Cs) for extraction of {approx}60. In tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant, batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the two scrub stages as {approx}3.5-5.0 for the first scrub stage and {approx}1.0-3.0 for the second scrub stage. In the Tank 49H test, the D(Cs) values for the 2-cm test were far from the ESS values. A D(Cs) value of 161 was measured for the first scrub stage and 10.8 for the second scrub stage. The data suggest that the scrub stage is not operating as effectively as intended. For the simulant test, a D(Cs) value of 1.9 was measured for the first scrub stage; the sample from the second scrub stage was compromised. Measurements of the pH of all stage samples for the Tank 49H test showed that the pH for extraction and scrub stages was 14 and the pH for the strip stages was {approx}7. It is expected that the pH of the second scrub stage would be {approx}12-13. Batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the strip stages to be {approx}0.002-0.010. A high value in Strip No.3 of a test with simulant solution has been attributed to issues associated with the limits of detection for the

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Caldwell, T.; Pak, D; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mechanisms of flow through compressible porous beds in sedimentation, filtration, centrifugation, deliquoring, and ceramic processing. [Annual report], February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of Houston research program is aimed at the specific area of solid/liquid separation including sedimentation, thickening, cake filtration, centrifugation, expression, washing, deep-bed filtration, screening, and membrane separation. Unification of the theoretical approaches to the various solid/liquid separation operations is the principle objective of the research. Exploring new aspects of basic separation mechanisms, verification of theory with experiment, development of laboratory procedures for obtaining data for design, optimizing operational methods, and transferring the results to industry are a part of the Houston program. New methodology developed in our program now permits an engineer or scientist to handle thickening, cake filtration, centrigual filtration, and expression in a unified manner. The same fundamental equations are simply adapted to the differing parameters and conditions related to the various modes of separation. As the system is flexible and adaptable to computational software, new developments can continually be added. Discussions of the various research projects in this report have been kept to a minimum and are principally qualitative. The length of the report would be excessive if each topic were covered in depth. Although the number of research topics may appear larger than one would expect, many are closely interconnected and reflect our philosophy of working in apparently diverse fields such as ceramics, mining, wastewater, food, chemical processing, and oil well operations.

Tiller, F.M.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

Low-Level Liquid Waste Processing Pilot Studies Using a Vibratory Shear Enhancing Process (VSEP) for Filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previous EPRI study evaluated potential treatment methods for the removal of iron from BWR waste streams. Of the methods investigated, high shear filtration using the vibratory shear-enhanced process (VSEP) showed the most promise to effectively and economically remove high iron concentrations from backwash receiving tank waste. A VSEP filter uses oscillatory vibration to create high shear at the surface of the filter membrane. This high shear force significantly improves the filter's resistance to fouling thereby enabling high throughputs with very little secondary waste generation. With a VSEP filter, the waste feed stream is split into two effluents- a permeate stream with little or no suspended solids and a concentrate stream with a suspended solids concentration much higher than that of the feed stream. To evaluate the feasibility of using a VSEP concept for processing typical high iron containing BWR radwaste, a surrogate feedstream containing up to 1,700 ppm iron oxide (as Fe2O3) was used. This surrogate waste simulates radioactive waste found at Exelon's Limerick and Peach Bottom (powdered resin condensate) plants, and in Hope Creek's (deep bed condensate) radwaste systems. Testing was done using a series L (laboratory scale) VSEP unit at the manufacturer's and contractor's laboratories. These tests successfully demonstrated the VSEP capability for producing highly concentrated waste streams with totally ''recyclable'' permeate (e.g., greater than 95% recovery).

Bushart, S.; Tran, P.; Asay, R.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

184

Evaluation of the 183-D Water Filtration Facility for Bat Roosts and Development of a Mitigation Strategy, 100-D Area, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Filtration Facility is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington. It was used to provide filtered water for cooling the 105-D Reactor and supplying fire-protection and drinking water for all facilities in the 100-D Area. The facility has been inactive since the 1980s and is now scheduled for demolition. Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine if any part of the facility was being used as roosting habitat by bats.

Lindsey, C. T.; Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

Application of pulse spark discharges for scale prevention and continuous filtration methods in coal-fired power plant Oct. 1, 2008 … Sept. 30, 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Drexel University Drexel University Y. Cho, A. Fridman, and A. Starikovskii Oct. 28, 2008 Application of pulse spark discharges for scale prevention and continuous filtration methods in coal-fired power plant U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Energy Technology Laboratory New Scale-Prevention Technology Use electrical pulse spark discharges in water to precipitate dissolved mineral ions. Remove them using a self-cleaning filter from cooling water. Specific objectives of the proposed work 1. Determine whether the spark discharge can promote the precipitation of mineral ions in cooling water. 2. Determine whether the proposed technology can increase the COC through a continuous precipitation of calcium ions

186

Laplacian Growth II: Saffman - Taylor Problem Without Surface Tension in Filtration Combustion: Formation of One Finger with Half of the Channel Width  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filtration combustion is described by Laplacian growth without surface tension. These equations have elegant analytical solutions that replace the complex integro-differential motion equations by simple differential equations of pole motion in a complex plane. The main problem with such a solution is the existence of finite time singularities. To prevent such singularities, nonzero surface tension is usually used.However, nonzero surface tension does not exist in filtration combustion, and this destroys the analytical solutions. However, a more elegant approach exists for solving the problem. First, we can introduce a small amount of pole noise to the system. Second, for regularisation of the problem, we throw out all new poles that can produce a finite time singularity. It can be strictly proved that the asymptotic solution for such a system is a single finger. Moreover, the qualitative consideration demonstrates that a finger with 1/2 of the channel width is statistically stable. Therefore, all properties of such a solution are exactly the same as those of the solution with nonzero surface tension under numerical noise. The solution of the ST problem without surface tension is similar to the solution for the equation of cellular flames in the case of the combustion of gas mixtures.

Oleg Kupervasser

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

187

Chloride anion exchange coprocessing for recovery of plutonium from pyrochemical residues and Cs sub 2 PuCl sub 6 filtrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuing studies of plutonium recovery from direct oxide reduction (DOR) and electrorefining (ER) pyrochemical process residues show that chloride anion exchange coprocessing is useful and effective. Coprocessing utilizes DOR residue salt as a reagent to supply the bulk of chloride ion needed for the chloride anion exchange process and to improve ER residue salt solubility. ER residue salt and ER scrapeout can be successfully treated, either alone or together, using coprocessing. In addition, chloride anion exchange at 2.0M acidity results in improved process performance by greatly reducing disproportionation of plutonium(IV), eliminating restrictions on oxidation time compared to operation at 1.0M acidity. Laboratory-scale experiments show that below-discard effluent plutonium losses are obtained. Resin capacity was 30 g Pu/{ell} or greater. Furthermore, it is feasible to perform chloride anion exchange recovery of plutonium from filtrate resulting from precipitation of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs{sub 2}PuCl{sub 6}, an oxidant salt to be used in the molten salt extraction process) and integration of its preparation with recovery of DOR salts. 10 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Killion, M.E.

1990-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

Fundamental studies of polymer filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were (1) to develop an enhanced fundamental understanding of the coordination chemistry of hazardous-metal-ion complexation with water-soluble metal-binding polymers, and (2) to exploit this knowledge to develop improved separations for analytical methods, metals processing, and waste treatment. We investigated features of water-soluble metal-binding polymers that affect their binding constants and selectivity for selected transition metal ions. We evaluated backbone polymers using light scattering and ultrafiltration techniques to determine the effect of pH and ionic strength on the molecular volume of the polymers. The backbone polymers were incrementally functionalized with a metal-binding ligand. A procedure and analytical method to determine the absolute level of functionalization was developed and the results correlated with the elemental analysis, viscosity, and molecular size.

Smith, B.F.; Lu, M.T.; Robison, T.W.; Rogers, Y.C.; Wilson, K.V.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Health Benefits of Particle Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with forced-air HVAC and conventional filters, and 0.1 forlow- efficiency filters in HVAC and homes with no forced airforced air HVAC and high efficiency filters Office buildings

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

SLOW SAND FILTRATIONSLOW SAND FILTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control valve Effluent flow control structure #12;Characteristic Features of aCharacteristic Features effective size(dSmall effective size(d1010)) and largeand large uniformity coefficient (duniformity coefficient (d6060/d/d1010) of sand) of sand No filter media fluidizationNo filter media fluidization Relative

191

Water nano-filtration device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water filter includes a porous support characterized by a mean porosity in the range of 20 to 50% and a mean pore size of 2 to 5 .mu.m; and a carbon filter membrane disposed thereon which is characterized by a mean particle size of no more than 50 .mu.m and a mean pore size of no more than 7.2 .mu.m.

Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

192

Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees – a readily available, ...

Boutilier, Michael Stephen Ha

193

Ray tracing for ICRF, including mode conversion and caustics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Slide 2 Heating with waves in the Joint European Torus (JET, Oxford). Electro-magnetic power · cyclotron.N. Kaufman3, A.Brizard4 1NADA, Royal Institute Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden; 2College of William resonance ions 50 MHz electrons 100 GHz · 32 MW power injected Where is it deposited? · core / edge

Jaun, André

194

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 RACORO Science and Operations Plan December 2008 Dr. Andrew M. Vogelmann, Principal Investigator* RACORO Steering Committee (RSC): Andrew Vogelmann - Brookhaven National Laboratory Greg McFarquhar - University of Illinois John Ogren and Graham Feingold - NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory Dave Turner - University of Wisconsin-Madison Jennifer Comstock and Chuck Long - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) Technical Operations Office Beat Schmid and Jason Tomlinson - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Haf Jonsson - Naval Postgraduate School *Brookhaven National Laboratory Bldg 490-D Upton, NY 11973 Tel: (631)-344-4421, Fax: (631) 344-2060

195

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

196

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6.1 6.1 Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations: AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description Revision 1 W.F. Feltz D.D. Turner H.B. Howell W.L. Smith R.O. Knuteson H.M. Woolf J. Comstock C. Sivaraman R. Mahon T.Halter April 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

197

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future December 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored b y the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their em ployees, makes any warranty, express or i mplied, or assu mes

198

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar P. Kollias, M. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Widener, R. Marchand, T. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory December 2005 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

199

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

200

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 ISDAC Flight Planning Document S.J. Ghan G. McFarquhar A. Korolev P. Liu W. Strapp H. Verlinde M. Wolde April 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 Evaluation of A New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with the NCAR Climate Atmospheric Model (CAM3) and ARM Observations Fourth Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report September 2007 Xiaohong Liu and Steven J. Ghan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Shaocheng Xie, James Boyle, and Stephen A. Klein Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research X. Liu et al., September 2007, DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-012 Summary Mixed-phase clouds are composed of a mixture of cloud droplets and ice crystals. The cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds can significantly impact cloud optical depth, cloud radiative forcing,

202

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

203

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008 November 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

204

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

205

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DR Cook, January 2011, DOE/SC-ARM/TR-052 iii Contents 1.0 General Overview ................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Contacts ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.1 Mentor .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.2 Instrument Developer ................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Deployment Locations and History ...................................................................................................... 2

206

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

207

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model First Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University December 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

208

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Third Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University C. Flynn/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

209

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Investigation of the Downwelling LW Differences Between the Niamey AMF Main and Supplementary Sites C.N. Long/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA P. Gotseff/National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO E.G. Dutton/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO April 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

210

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report ARM Translator Team J. Comstock C. Flynn M. Jensen C. Long S. McFarlane D. Turner S. Xie October 1, 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

211

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

84 84 UC-400 Annual Report 1999 Computing and Information Sciences R. A. Bair, Deputy Director and the Staff of the Computing and Information Sciences Directorate June 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

212

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Time Series of Aerosol Column Optical Depth at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Fourth Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report C. Flynn, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory A.S. Koontz, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory J.H. Mather, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory September 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

213

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report M. Jensen, Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Johnson, Brookhaven National Laboratory J.H. Mather, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

214

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November - December 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

215

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

216

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 8 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September - October 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

217

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARM-0707 ARM-0707 Report on the ARM Climate Research Facility EXPANSION WORKSHOP October 31 - November 1, 2007 Reston, Virginia Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE AC05 76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 DOE/SC-ARM-0707 iii Executive Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to provide the infrastructure needed to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere. Designated as a national user facility the ACRF

218

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research January 1 - March 31, 2008, DOE/SC-ARM/P-08-007 iii Contents 1. Data Availability ................................................................................................................................... 1 2. Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts ......................................... 2 3. Safety ....................................................................................................................................................

219

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Comparison of Meteorological Measurements from Sparse and Dense Surface Observation Networks in the U.S. Southern Great Plains February 2008 J.W. Monroe Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division/Argonne National Laboratory Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/University of Oklahoma M.T. Ritsche, M. Franklin Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division/Argonne National Laboratory, K.E. Kehoe Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/University of Oklahoma Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S.

220

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Second Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report M. Jensen/Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Johnson/Brookhaven National Laboratory J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University March 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hongbin Chen, Si-Chee Tsay, Wei-Chyung Wang, Chris Kumemerow, Graeme Stephens, Wesley Berg, Surabi. Menon, Yangang Liu, Mark Miller, Beat Schmid, Connor Flynn, Zhien Wang,...

222

Methods for microbial filtration of fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel methods for purifying contaminated subsurface groundwater are disclosed. The method is involves contacting the contaminated subsurface groundwater with methanotrophic or heterotrophic microorganisms which produce contaminant-degrading enzymes. The microorganisms are derived from surface cultures and are injected into the ground so as to act as a biofilter. The contaminants which may be treated include organic or metallic materials and radionuclides.

Carman, Margaret L. (San Ramon, CA); Jackson, Kenneth J. (San Leandro, CA); Knapp, Richard B. (Danville, CA); Knezovich, John P. (Stockton, CA); Shah, Nilesh N. (Livermore, CA); Taylor, Robert T. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

MCLACHLAN, ANTON. Water filtration by dissipative beaches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Input was mainly due to tidal effects as most wave energy was dis- sipated in the surf zone. During a very high-en- ergy cvcnt on a high tide, however, filtered vol ...

2000-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

224

FILTRATION ASSOCIATED TO TORSION SEMI-STABLE ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extension of Qp and ?i : G ? GLd(OE) for i = 1, 2 two Galois representations such .... in Mr tor(?, N, Fil) such that. (1) if there exists a morphism of lifts ˆf : j.

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

225

Molybdenum Coatings with Filtration of Plasma Flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deposition of molybdenum coatings in arc discharge with assistance of HF one is analyzed in this paper. To avoid substrate heating to high temperature and micro-arc formation during cleaning process, the surface cleaning was carried out with HF plasma only. For reduction of droplet fraction in plasma the 'freestanding' filter was utilized. As a filter a solenoid was used, which generated a curvilinear (with the angle of 90 deg.) transportation magnetic field. The effective crosssectional area of the plasma flow at which was observed the uniform distribution of the thickness of the applied coating, was equal to 113 sm{sup 2}. The coating on the base of arc discharge, filter and HF-biasing of substrate were deposited on different substrates, including glass and stainless steel.The optical (refractive index) properties of molybdenum films are presented. The reflective characteristics of the obtained molybdenum films in the range of wavelengths from 200 to 700 nm were measured.Molybdenum films were also investigated under the effect of the plasma emission, using an ECR discharge in a simple double-mirror magnetic trap. The time varying negative potential was supplied to sample holder what provided a wide energy distribution of ions bombarded the sample surface in range 30...1500V.

Gasilin, V. V.; Nezovibat'ko, Y. N.; Shvets, O. M.; Taran, V. S.; Tereshin, V. I.; Timoshenko, A. I.; Zavaleev, V. A. [National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

226

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 7 3. Results of a Decade-long Control Simulation Using Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model at a Resolution 250 km, Including a...

227

Filtration of submicrometer particles by pelagic tunicates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...too frequently for swimming to be effective...Particle encounter efficiency predicted for P...negligible sieving efficiency, yet...a longer-lived pool in deeper water...centuries. The efficiency with which salps...transfer carbon and energy from the submicron size...

Kelly R. Sutherland; Laurence P. Madin; Roman Stocker

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 The QCRad Value Added Product: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control Testing, Including Climatology Configurable Limits C.N. Long and Y. Shi September 2006 Work supported...

229

Local Martingales and Filtration Shrinkage Hans Follmer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction It is a classic result, known as Stricker's theorem, that if one considers a semimartingale, even in the classic case of having the local martingale still adapted, Stricker observed [31 the best known result in this direction is Stricker's Theorem: Theorem 1 (Stricker's Theorem). Let X

Föllmer, Hans

230

Paradoxical glomerular filtration of carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DOTATOC in rats: Influence of inhibitors of the organic ion transport and diuretics...N-acetylated low molecular weight chitosan . Mol Pharm 6 : 305 – 314...in 20.9 mL) of the OCT inhibitor cimetidine (Sigma-Aldrich...in 36.5 mL) of the OAT inhibitor probenecid (Sigma-Aldrich...

Alessandro Ruggiero; Carlos H. Villa; Evan Bander; Diego A. Rey; Magnus Bergkvist; Carl A. Batt; Katia Manova-Todorova; William M. Deen; David A. Scheinberg; Michael R. McDevitt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3. Segregated flow solver (2 nd order convection scheme, URF 0.5P, 0.2V) 4. Convective heat loss 5. No flow in axial(z) direction in wall regions 6. PM is homogeneously...

232

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

boundary condition data will be important for the success of future integrated Earth system models (e.g., for the coupling of atmospheric system components with vegetation and...

233

Magnetic Filtration Process, Magnetic Filtering Material, and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SummaryORNL researchers developed a new method for filtering materials and managing wastewater. This invention offers an integrated, intensified process to handle organic...

234

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 A Year of Radiation Measurements at the North Slope of Alaska Second Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report S.A. McFarlane/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Y. Shi/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory C.N. Long/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory April 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

235

Low Cost Ceramics:Low Cost Ceramics: Applications in Water FiltrationApplications in Water Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drawbacks of parabolic mirrors (fires) and solarDrawbacks of parabolic mirrors (fires) and solar cookers

Petta, Jason

236

The Production of Active Nitrogen in the Soil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

relation between the basicity of the soil and the effect of calcium carbonate. Basicity was determined by three methods: (1) Ten grams of soil were digested with 100 cc fifth normal nitric acid, for 12 hours and 10 cc. of the filtrate was titrated.... The basicity measured is due to carbonates and easily de- composed silicates of lime, magnesia, and the alkalies. (2) Fifty grams of soil were digested with 100 cc. tenth normal nitric acid, for one-half hour, and 20 cc. of the filtrate titrated with caustic...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hazard Analysis for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is designed to perform a demonstration on an engineering scale to confirm the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and filtration process equipment design and sludge treatment process. The system will use scaled prototypic equipment to demonstrate sludge water wash, caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, and filtration. Unit operations to be tested include pumping, solids washing, chemical reagent addition and blending, heating, cooling, leaching, filtration, and filter cleaning. In addition, the PEP will evaluate potential design changes to the ultrafiltration process system equipment to potentially enhance leaching and filtration performance as well as overall pretreatment throughput. The skid-mounted system will be installed and operated in the Processing Development Laboratory-West at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington.

Sullivan, Robin S.; Geeting, John GH; Lawrence, Wesley E.; Young, Jonathan

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Bayesian algorithm for model selection applied to caustic-crossing binary-lens microlensing events  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......full details on the data sets) to illustrate the capabilities...prior pi(s in, s out) covers a compact square, since...Moreover, it can be used to set detailed parameter constraints...over the full parameter set theta, the relevant prior...the integration limits cover the sub-box. The weighted......

N. Kains; P. Browne; K. Horne; M. Hundertmark; A. Cassan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Design and Economic Evaluation of Thermionic Cogeneration in a Chlorine-Caustic Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-callsti~ plant with therm ion ie Cl)gf~neration. Thermion i.e combustors replace the exi.sting hllrners of the boilers uSI!d to raise stp.am for th(~ evaporators, Rnd are capable of generating approximately 2.6 MW of de power. This satisfies about 5 percent... BURNER BOILER AUX I ..> BUS AND SWITCH GEAR THERMIONIC COMBUSTOR CELL f--- ROOM TO EVAPORATORS BOILER F==:> Figure 1. Block Diagram of Cogeneration System D STANDBY CELL ROOMS EVAPORATORS THEAMtOMC MODULES Figure 2. Schematic Layout...

Miskolezy, G.; Morgan, D.; Turner, R.

240

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

SORPTION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM AND NEPTUNIUM ONTO SOLIDS PRESENT IN HIGH CAUSTIC NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solids such as granular activated carbon, hematite and sodium phosphates, if present as sludge components in nuclear waste storage tanks, have been found to be capable of precipitating/sorbing actinides like plutonium, neptunium and uranium from nuclear waste storage tank supernatant liqueur. Thus, the potential may exists for the accumulation of fissile materials in such nuclear waste storage tanks during lengthy nuclear waste storage and processing. To evaluate the nuclear criticality safety in a typical nuclear waste storage tank, a study was initiated to measure the affinity of granular activated carbon, hematite and anhydrous sodium phosphate to sorb plutonium, neptunium and uranium from alkaline salt solutions. Tests with simulated and actual nuclear waste solutions established the affinity of the solids for plutonium, neptunium and uranium upon contact of the solutions with each of the solids. The removal of plutonium and neptunium from the synthetic salt solution by nuclear waste storage tank solids may be due largely to the presence of the granular activated carbon and transition metal oxides in these storage tank solids or sludge. Granular activated carbon and hematite also showed measurable affinity for both plutonium and neptunium. Sodium phosphate, used here as a reference sorbent for uranium, as expected, exhibited high affinity for uranium and neptunium, but did not show any measurable affinity for plutonium.

Oji, L; Bill Wilmarth, B; David Hobbs, D

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

From Pop-Up Cards to Coffee-Cup Caustics: The Knight's Visor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the circle, where it joins there in a valley crease. These valley creases are straight segments produces a bowing that is small for long strips and gradually increases for the shorter strips. The result the valley crease where a rib meets C follows the contour of C, and is a straight segment crease, that crease

O'Rourke, Joseph

244

Extraction of long-lived radionuclides from caustic Hanford tank waste supernatants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of polymer-based extraction systems, based on the use of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) or polypropylene glycols (PPGs), was demonstrated to be capable of selective extraction and recovery of long-lived radionuclides, such as {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I, from Hanford SY-101 tank waste, neutralized current acid waste, and single-shell tank waste simulants. During the extraction process, anionic species like TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and I{sup {minus}} are selectively transferred to the less dense PEG-rich aqueous phase. The partition coefficients for a wide range of inorganic cations and anions, such as sodium, potassium, aluminum, nitrate, nitrite, and carbonate, are all less than one. The partition coefficients for pertechnetate ranged from 12 to 50, depending on the choice of waste simulant and temperature. The partition coefficient for iodide was about 5, while that of iodate was about 0.25. Irradiation of the PEG phase with gamma-ray doses up to 20 Mrad had no detectable effect on the partition coefficients. The most selective extraction systems examined were those based on PPGs, which exhibited separation factors in excess of 3000 between TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 2}{sub {minus}}. An advantage of the PPG-based system is minimization of secondary waste production. These studies also highlighted the need for exercising great care in extrapolating the partitioning behavior with tank waste simulants to actual tank waste.

Chaiko, D.J.; Mertz, C.J.; Vojta, Y. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and electrochemistry of the iron and nickel base alloys in caustic environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical behavior of high purity (99.95% to 99.99%) iron in 0.6M NaCl and 1.0M Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ containing H/sub 2/S (50 ppM to 34,000 ppM) was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and slow scan rate polarization. Results have indicated that iron does undergo passivation in sulfate solutions containing H/sub 2/S. Iron dissolution depends on the presence of Cl/sup -/, the concentration of H/sub 2/S and solution pH. An equation is given that describes the anodic Tafel current densities. The slow strain rate test was used to evaluate the effect of electrode potential on the susceptibility of 2-1/4Cr, Mo steel to stress corrosion cracking in boiling 50% NaOH solution. Susceptibility decreased and general corrosion increased with increasing potentials. Failures contained a combination of ductile and brittle fracture. Time-to-failure was longest for controlled potentials of -700 and -600mV (Hg/HgO reference) in the -1100 to -400mV range used in this study.

Koehler, R.; Beck, F. H.; Agrawal, A. K.; Soendjasmono, B.; Staehle, R. W.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) * Scaling: Scaling is the precipitation of dissolved mineral components that have become saturated in solution, which can lower efficiency of the system. * Fouling: Fouling occurs when suspended particles or biologic growth forms an insulating film on heat transfer surfaces. Common foulants include organic matter, process oils, and silt, which can also lower system performance. * Microbiological Activity: Microbiological activity refers to microorganisms that live and grow in the cooling system that can contribute

247

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) * Scaling: Scaling is the precipitation of dissolved mineral components that have become saturated in solution, which can lower efficiency of the system. * Fouling: Fouling occurs when suspended particles or biologic growth forms an insulating film on heat transfer surfaces. Common foulants include organic matter, process oils, and silt, which can also lower system performance. * Microbiological Activity: Microbiological activity refers to microorganisms that live and grow in the cooling system that can contribute

248

Experiments concerning the dynamic filtration of drilling mud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and continued interest in the research. Dr. Phil Holbrook and other individuals at NL Baroid for the loan of much of the apparatus and valuable insights into the research. Marcus Allen and other individuals at Marathon Oil Company for their encouragement... and continued interest in the research. Dr. Phil Holbrook and other individuals at NL Baroid for the loan of much of the apparatus and valuable insights into the research. Marcus Allen and other individuals at Marathon Oil Company for their encouragement...

Eller, John Gary

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

249

Instabilities of uniform filtration flows with phase transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New mechanisms of instability are described for vertical flows with phase transition through horizontally extended two-dimensional regions of a porous medium. A plane surface of phase transition becomes unstable at an infinitely large wavenumber and at zero wavenumber. In the latter case, the unstable flow undergoes reversible subcritical bifurcations leading to the development of secondary flows (which may not be horizontally uniform). The evolution of subcritical modes near the instability threshold is governed by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov equation. Two examples of flow through a porous medium are considered. One is the unstable flow across a water-bearing layer above a layer that carries a vapor-air mixture under isothermal conditions in the presence of capillary forces at the phase transition interface. The other is the vertical flow with phase transition in a high-temperature geothermal reservoir consisting of two high-permeability regions separated by a low-permeability stratum.

Il'ichev, A. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Steklov Institute of Mathematics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ilichev@mi.ras.ru; Tsypkin, G. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Mechanics (Russian Federation)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- 1 i u : Flow velocity p : Pressure : Density : Kinematic viscosity : Laplace operator i : Standard index notation 21% porosity; 60 poreswall; 200...

251

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

We have these homes so well-air-sealed, we need to look at things like good source control products. Obviously, these homes are so efficient, they're zero energy ready, we have...

252

Solvent Resistant Stirred Cells for Ultrafiltration and Filtration Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures and corrosion (See the section of this guide titled "Resistance to Chemical Agents.") s Wide for future transport). 2. Unscrew the three cross knobs from the support pillars and lift off the top plate assembly and the O- ring. 3. Remove the glass cylinder and O-ring from the base. Operating Guidelines s Use

Lebendiker, Mario

253

An algebraic look at filtrations in modal logic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Cylindric Algebras, Part II. (1985) North-Holland. [7] Jonsson B. , Tarski...Rs will always satisfy (R) since all CAMAs satisfying satisfy (R). The relation...Tarski. Cylindric Algebras, Part II. North-Holland, 1985. [7] B. J onsson and......

Willem Conradie; Wilmari Morton; Clint J. van Alten

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Oxidation of sewage supernatant liquor by trickling filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tQ C?P?SSS SSQCS18 SPPXSQ'LSC9QQ XCC' ChS SSS1SCSQCS 4041 F4~ ISQSXVS6 KTCIIS 11QCQSSQ?S 8 S SQgX04I CQSECICSQ C94@X63SQ, gga4~g&SX Sod ~Cggaaieni Cages'S QS ISNESS'. 'Bg, t, Q?A, SC@ES1, . I Q' 5 I I glndgs digoseion tank snpsensennt ligose... tiie settled solids, & tbs-so~teston tank vithont pmdsoing- ssptio ( %is enisle. , contest of: chs. sledge, teen@id . ftoa-- chs sedisejcation, . tsnb 'dixeetlp, ass mfa cd tejsited scoiegs osiIeoicg; ef. ; icbj "s1ndge 'di " ' gsstioit' ~ ' Sie...

Styner, Pete

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

255

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

256

Development of Model Filtration Media for Investigating Size...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

control has been developed. Controlled pore sizes could be used to optimize high-capture efficiency with low backpressure. p-25strzelec.pdf More Documents & Publications...

257

DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

slides below The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in...

258

Reduction of cholera in Bangladeshi villages by simple filtration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...groups of villages were chosen, with consideration given to education, economic, and social background, and uniform distribution among the test...storing, and using surface water for domestic purposes. Posters containing illustrations of plankton and bacteria were distributed...

Rita R. Colwell; Anwar Huq; M. Sirajul Islam; K. M. A. Aziz; M. Yunus; N. Huda Khan; A. Mahmud; R. Bradley Sack; G. B. Nair; J. Chakraborty; David A. Sack; E. Russek-Cohen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Reduction of cholera in Bangladeshi villages by simple filtration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Department of Animal and Avian Sciences, University of Maryland...consideration given to education, economic, and social background...for domestic purposes. Posters containing illustrations...6 Colwell R R ( 1996 ) Science 274 : 2025 – 2031...

Rita R. Colwell; Anwar Huq; M. Sirajul Islam; K. M. A. Aziz; M. Yunus; N. Huda Khan; A. Mahmud; R. Bradley Sack; G. B. Nair; J. Chakraborty; David A. Sack; E. Russek-Cohen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Molecular filtration for recovery of waterborne viruses of fish.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was supported by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife under Anadromous Fish Act PL 89304 and by the Bonneville Power Administration under contract number DE-A179- 83 BP 11987, project number 83-312. G. R. Bouck served as the COTR...

R A Watanabe; J L Fryer; J S Rohovec

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cost Analysis Procedures for Use in Promoting Fine Filtration Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications. As can be seen in Figure 9, the axial flow fan is distinguished by a drooping BHP curve that has maximum horsepower at no flow or closed-off conditions. The axial fan SP curve exhibits an area of extreme instability to the left of the ?hump... procedures. This example also assumes that the fan inlet and outlet connections are aerodynamically designed. Fans are sensitive to abrupt changes in airflow directly adjacent to the fan inlet or outlet. The effects of abrupt changes and other ?system...

Renfert, David A.

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

262

Bio-oil Stabilization and Upgrading by Hot Gas Filtration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Removal of char and minerals from pyrolysis oil for the production of biomass-derived boiler and turbine fuels has been demonstrated at Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI)/National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using a ceramic cloth hot gas filter (HGF). ... Non-condensable gaseous products were vented through a 2 ?m filter for collection of any residual aerosol and then to a totalizing dry-gas meter for flow rate measurement. ... The composition of the feed and product vapors to and from the HGF test stand was monitored continuously with the molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS), and the composition of the product gases from the HGF test stand was monitored continuously by gas chromatography (GC). ...

Robert M. Baldwin; Calvin J. Feik

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

263

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ILJIN Electric Co., Korea IBIDEN, Japan Relevance and Objectives Existing DPF systems still need to improve filtrationregeneration efficiencies and pressure drops. ...

264

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

265

Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of wells or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of O-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

efficient regeneration strategies, which can control thermal run-away. Accurate measurement of heat release is needed. A real-time DPF controlmanagement system is...

267

Energy Implications of In-line filtration in California Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIELD TESTING OF FILTER IMPACTS IN HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCEThe effect of filter loading on total HVAC system energyof filters readily available for use in residential HVAC

Walker, Iain S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

The Benefits of Better Ventilation and Filtration Practices in Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment Department of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory www.iaqscience.lbl.gov/sfrb.html Research Shows the Test Score Effects of Irritant Gases ESL-KT-13-12-17 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16... Findings Resource Bank (IAQ-SFRB), Indoor Environment Department of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory www.iaqscience.lbl.gov/sfrb.html Research Shows the Absenteeism Effects of Irritant Gases Desired level 1000 ppm > 7.10 l/s/p (15 cfm/p) 1 l...

Lamping, G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy Implications of In-Line Filtration in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) used the values in theU-­?Factor   Maximum  SHGC   Maximum  Total  Area  (%)  

Walker, Iain S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Energy Implications of In-Line Filtration in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Heating and Cooling Fan Power Demand. Proc.Residential Heating and Cooling Fan Power Demand. Proc.return. Table 16: Cooling fan power and air flow Climate  

Walker, Iain S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Structural Oil Pan With Integrated Oil Filtration And Cooling System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil pan for an internal combustion engine includes a body defining a reservoir for collecting engine coolant. The reservoir has a bottom and side walls extending upwardly from the bottom to present a flanged lip through which the oil pan may be mounted to the engine. An oil cooler assembly is housed within the body of the oil pan for cooling lubricant received from the engine. The body includes an oil inlet passage formed integrally therewith for receiving lubricant from the engine and delivering lubricant to the oil cooler. In addition, the body also includes an oil pick up passage formed integrally therewith for providing fluid communication between the reservoir and the engine through the flanged lip.

Freese, V, Charles Edwin (Westland, MI)

2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

272

THE WEIGHT FILTRATION FOR REAL ALGEBRAIC VARIETIES II: CLASSICAL HOMOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar ([6] Theorem (2.3.6)) to show that our filtered complex is independent to the foundational paper [6] of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar. In particular we have been influenced by the viewpoint of section 5 of that paper, on the theory of motives. Using Guill´en and Navarro Aznar's extension theorems

Parusinski, Adam

273

THE WEIGHT FILTRATION FOR REAL ALGEBRAIC VARIETIES II: CLASSICAL HOMOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a smooth center that has normal crossings with D. We apply a result of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar [6 with compact supports. Our work owes much to the foundational paper [6] of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar. Using Guill´en and Navarro Aznar's extension theorems, Totaro [13] observed that there is a functorial

Parusinski, Adam

274

PULSED GAMMA RAYS FROM THE ORIGINAL MILLISECOND AND BLACK WIDOW PULSARS: A CASE FOR CAUSTIC RADIO EMISSION?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the fast millisecond pulsars (MSPs) B1937+21 (also known as J1939+2134) and B1957+20 (J1959+2048) using 18 months of survey data recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and timing solutions based on radio observations conducted at the Westerbork and Nancay radio telescopes. In addition, we analyzed archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and XMM-Newton X-ray data for the two MSPs, confirming the X-ray emission properties of PSR B1937+21 and finding evidence ({approx}4{sigma}) for pulsed emission from PSR B1957+20 for the first time. In both cases the gamma-ray emission profile is characterized by two peaks separated by half a rotation and are in close alignment with components observed in radio and X-rays. These two pulsars join PSRs J0034-0534 and J2214+3000 to form an emerging class of gamma-ray MSPs with phase-aligned peaks in different energy bands. The modeling of the radio and gamma-ray emission profiles suggests co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere.

Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Noutsos, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Venter, C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa); Kerr, M.; Michelson, P. F. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Pancrazi, B. [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Livingstone, M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ H3A 2T8 (Canada); Janssen, G. H.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Espinoza, C. M. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement, LPCE UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Gargano, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, 70126 Bari (Italy); Grove, J. E. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Johnston, S., E-mail: guillemo@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com, E-mail: Christo.Venter@nwu.ac.za, E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); and others

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Chemomechanics of calcium leaching of cement-based materials at different scales : the role of CH-dissolution and C-S-H degradation on strength and durability performance of materials and structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calcium leaching is a durability threat for cement-based materials employed in critical infrastructures, such as Nuclear Waste Storage Systems. This thesis presents a comprehensive study of the material and structural ...

Heukamp, Franz H. (Franz Hoyte), 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Chemicals for enhanced oil recovery. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies on the salinity range in which three liquid phases are observed for systems containing a tall oil ethoxylate or related nonionic surfactant, a cosurfactant, aqueous NaCl, and a hydrocarbon were extended. Increasing hydrophile-lipophile balance, HLB, causes an increase in the salinity needed to effect the transition of the surfactant from the lower to the upper phase. However, other factors besides HLB seem to be involved. Addition of the nonionic surfactant increases optimal salinity by an amount which depends on its hydrophilic character. Sodium-2-methyloleate,-2-butyloleate, -2-hexyloleate, -2,2-dimethyloleate, and -2,2-diethyloleate were synthesized and its phase behavior in aqueous/hydrocarbon systems studied. Adsorption of a commercial petroleum sulfonate from 0.1 M NaCl on the sodium form of montmorillonite was reduced a factor of ten by caustic extract from bleaching of wood pulp. In a comparison of several pulping wastes or byproducts as sacrificial agents, caustic extract and weak black liquor appeared most effective, and lignosulfonate only slightly less effective. Plugging tests of the filtrates obtained in the biomass-polymer separations indicated that polish filtration probably would be required. The microscreen is the most economical of the biomass separation methods. Small fermenter tests indicate that Sclerotium rolfsii cultures are able to tolerate salinity of 2 to 4% w/v NaCl in the fermentation broth makeup water; however, the organism was unable to grow in 6% w/v NaCl.

Johnson, J.S. Jr.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Uncertainty in the reactive transport model response to an alkaline perturbation in a clay formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSH_1.1 Gismondine Gyrolite Ettringite Katoite Straëtlingite2) monosulfoaluminate ? ettringite. In clay, the major paths

Burnol, A.; Blanc, P.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Gaucher, E.C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

279

Microsoft PowerPoint - 12-03 Peterson-Filtration.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Parameters Impacting Parameters Impacting Crossflow Filter Performance of Hanford Tank Waste Simulants Reid Peterson Justin Billings, Carolyn Burns, Richard Daniel, Phil Schonewill, Rick Shimskey November 2010 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1 Print Close High-temperature melters Underground waste tank Pretreatment Plant Low-activity radioactive waste High-level radioactive waste PRETREATMENT VITRIFICATION/ PROCESSING Hanford Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) 2 The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to process the approximately 55 million gallons of radioactive waste sludge generated by defense activities at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The planned waste treatment strategy is: 1.transfer the waste from the tank farms, where the waste is currently stored in 177 underground

280

Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Technology: Success stories at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Strong Macdonald Theory and the Brylinski Filtration for Affine Lie Algebras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

positive Chevalley generator e J is a linear combination ofa linear combination e = c i e i of the positive generators,

Slofstra, William Edward

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

SCR/Urea filter — A new filtration application for diesel vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order that the systems which in future will be necessary for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) in diesel-engined vehicles are protected against wear and ... for all the known SCR systems on the market. Mann+...

Jochen Reyinger; Gunnar-Marcel Klein; Michael Durst

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Evaluation of Collector Well Configurations to Model Hydrodynamics in Riverbank Filtration and Groundwater Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to better visualize and understand the findings generated by the model. The original model created in section 4.1 was designed by Dugat [2009]. Modifications to the original model are expanded upon in section 4.2. Figures 3-4 show the basic set-up... to better visualize and understand the findings generated by the model. The original model created in section 4.1 was designed by Dugat [2009]. Modifications to the original model are expanded upon in section 4.2. Figures 3-4 show the basic set-up...

De Leon, Tiffany Lucinda

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

284

Design Optimization of Vena Cava Filters: An application to dual filtration devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a significant medical problem that results in over 300,000 fatalities per year. A common preventative treatment for PE is the insertion of a metallic filter into the inferior vena cava that traps thrombi before they reach the lungs. The goal of this work is to use methods of mathematical modeling and design optimization to determine the configuration of trapped thrombi that minimizes the hemodynamic disruption. The resulting configuration has implications for constructing an optimally designed vena cava filter. Computational fluid dynamics is coupled with a nonlinear optimization algorithm to determine the optimal configuration of trapped model thrombus in the inferior vena cava. The location and shape of the thrombus are parameterized, and an objective function, based on wall shear stresses, determines the worthiness of a given configuration. The methods are fully automated and demonstrate the capabilities of a design optimization framework that is broadly applicable. Changes to thrombus location and shape alter the velocity contours and wall shear stress profiles significantly. For vena cava filters that trap two thrombi simultaneously, the undesirable flow dynamics past one thrombus can be mitigated by leveraging the flow past the other thrombus. Streamlining the shape of thrombus trapped along the cava wall reduces the disruption to the flow, but increases the area exposed to abnormal wall shear stress. Computer-based design optimization is a useful tool for developing vena cava filters. Characterizing and parameterizing the design requirements and constraints is essential for constructing devices that address clinical complications. In addition, formulating a well-defined objective function that quantifies clinical risks and benefits is needed for designing devices that are clinically viable.

Singer, M A; Wang, S L; Diachin, D P

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

285

DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes.  A critical aspect of...

286

Vapor-Particle Separation Using Microporous Metallic Membrane in Crossflow Filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous separation of vapor and particles in industrial processes could be a key step toward manufacturing of high-quality goods. The separation is critical for successful measurement of volatile or semi-volatile aerosol particles, which no reliable technique exists. We have developed a technique for separation of vapor and particles simultaneously using a specialty microporous metallic membrane. The separator allows the thermally denuded particles traverse straight through the membrane tube, while the vapor molecules permeate through the membrane, separate from the particles and are removed subsequently. The separation technique virtually eliminates the possibility of contamination by vapor re- condensation. We tested the prototype of the vapor-particle separator (VPS) using aerosols prepared from sodium chloride to represent non-volatile aerosols. Chemical like dioctyl phthalate was chosen to represent volatile particles. The test aerosol particles were generated by an atomizer followed by a tandem differential mobility analyser to produce a stream of monodisperse particles in the size range of 10 to 100 nm. In real world particles, we tested the VPS using diesel engine particles that is a mixture of complex chemical composition. Number concentration of the nonvolatile particles reduced as the temperature increased, but the mode diameter of the aerosol population remained unchanged. Number concentration of the volatile particles was also reduced as the temperature increased, but their mode diameters became smaller as particles shrunk in diameter. Differences in the thermal behaviour of the particles were attributed to its transition energy barrier and evaporation rate. Mass balance analysis suggests the separation of vapor and test particles was reasonably complete. Thus, we conclude the VPS could provide an effective means for quantitative characterization of aerosol volatility and separation of vapors from particles.

Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Measurement-Based Evaluation of Installed Filtration System Performance in Single-Family Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems LBNL-XXXX 8. Literature Cited AHAM (2006).ANSI/AHAM Standard AC-1-2006 Method for Measuring theHome Appliance Manufactures (AHAM), using Clean Air Delivery

Chan, Wanyu Rengie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

BiotechnologyProfessional Development & Advancement Applied Principles and Techniques of NFF & TFF Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: 401-277-5097 Fax: 401-277-5060 (preferred) / Email:bruce_birch@mail.uri.edu The lectures will be held attend a lecture prior to attending the workshop. Total Registration Fee enclosed: Contact: Bruce Birch (check here ) or call Bruce Birch in the Special Programs Office (401-277-5050) at least three days

Rhode Island, University of

289

BiotechnologyProfessional Development & Advancement Applied Principles and Techniques of DFF & TFF Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Contact: Bruce Birch: 401-277-5097 Fax: 401-277-5060 (preferred) / Email:bruce_birch@mail.uri.edu The lectures will be held at the URI Feinstein Providence Campus, 80 Washington Street, Providence, RI. Parking (check here ) or call Bruce Birch in the Special Programs Office (401-277-5050) at least three days

Rhode Island, University of

290

Active filtration of phosphorus in Ca-rich hydrated oil shale ash: precipitation mechanisms and recovery.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fosfor (P) on üks tähtsamaid biokeemilise tsükli toitaineid, mistõttu juba natuke kõrgenenud fosfori kontsentratsioonid võivad vallandada veekogude eutrofeerumise. Fosforiühendid on põllumajanduses väetistena intensiivses kasutuses. Fosforit… (more)

Liira, Martin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Cross flow filtration for mixed-culture algae harvesting for municipal wastewater lagoons.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The transesterification of lipids extracted from algae makes up the third generation of biodiesel production. The city of Logan, Utah proposes that the algae… (more)

Wilson, Misheka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems (ANL/Corning/Caterpillar CRADA)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

293

Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

Losleben, Tamar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Improvements of oil-in-water analysis for produced water using membrane filtration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The accuracy of oil-in-water analysis for produced water is increasingly crucial as the regulations for disposal of this water are getting more stringent world wide.… (more)

Khor, Ee Huey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Behaviour and kinematics of continuous ram filtration in bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...speed to maximize net energy gain. This implies...food uptake with energy consumption and oxygen assimilation...concentrations to save energy when food concentrations...densities than found on average, suggests that bowhead...KIIIN, Greenlandic Home Rule, P.T.M...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., phosphorous) [Sansalone and Buchberger, 1997; Noe et al., 2007]. [3] Wetland vegetation influences flow

297

Next generation of electrospun textiles for chemical and biological protection and air filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) only in the presence of water, which serves as a medium promoting the nucleophilic action of the amidoximes in the fibers. Bactericidal fiber mats were produced from electrospinning of blends containing a biocide ...

Chen, Liang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

particles, sorted by HVAC filter type and economizerand chloride, sorted by HVAC filter type and economizerand air-conditioning (HVAC) filters with three different

Shehabi, Arman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and air-conditioning (HVAC) filters with three differentmonitoring began, new HVAC filters with a rating of MERV 7loads for the three HVAC filter types and two ventilation

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about particulate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cross flow filtration for radwaste applications reverse osmosis demonstration case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s radwaste economic and regulatory scenarios signify the importance in the improvement of operational practices to reduce generator liabilities. This action is largely due to the rising cost dealing with burial sites and the imposed waste volume restriction. To control the economical burdens associated with waste burial and to comply with stricter environmental regulations, NPP`s are attempting to modify their radwaste system(s) design and operating philosophy by placing a major emphasis on waste volume reduction and processing techniques. The utilization of reverse osmosis technology as a means for treatment of process and wastewater streams in the nuclear power industry has been investigated for many years. This paper will outline reverse osmosis theory and highlight performance data for process and waste stream purification applications. Case studies performed at 5 nuclear plants have been outlined. The demonstrations were performed on a widely variety of process stream for both a PWR and BWR application. The data provided by the pilot systems, the equipment design, and the economical impact a reverse osmosis unit will have on producing treated (high purity) are as follows.

Malkmus, D. [VECTRA Technologies, Inc., Columbia, SC (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Conversion of wet ethanol to syngas via filtration combustion: An experimental and computational investigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethanol is often promoted as the biofuel of the future, yet its acceptance as a fuel for combustion devices is limited by the cost of production. Since most combustion engines cannot tolerate high concentrations of water, the ethanol must be distilled and dehydrated, requiring large amounts of energy. Ethanol also has great potential as a feedstock for syngas consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and other species. The conversion, called reforming, of ethanol to syngas does not necessarily require dehydration or distillation, thus eliminating or reducing the costs associated with those processes. In addition, there is potential for obtaining additional hydrogen from the water in the mixture. In this paper, we investigate the conversion of wet ethanol, or ethanol that has not been fully distilled or dehydrated, to syngas in an inert porous reactor. Experimental and computational results over a range of equivalence ratios, inlet velocities, and water fractions are presented. The results indicate that wet ethanol is a promising biological source for hydrogen.

Colin H. Smith; Daniel M. Leahey; Liane E. Miller; Janet L. Ellzey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Comparison of soy protein concentrates produced by membrane filtration and acid precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, respectively. A series of operations including pH adjustment (8.0), agitation (250 rpm, 30 min), sonication (40 dB, 20 min), homogenization (3 min), and centrifugation (3,000 x g, 15 min) were followed. For the membrane processing, the ultrafiltration cartridge...

Kim, Hyun Jung

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Evaluation of Five Membrane Filtration Methods for Recovery of Cryptosporidium and Giardia Isolates from Water Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...reducing the percent recovery of the organisms. The...accreditation from the National Association of Testing...Authorities in Australia is recovery of at least 10%. This...impact on foods: a review. J. Food Prot. 62...C. Parton. 1998. Recovery of Cryptosporidium oocysts...

T. Wohlsen; J. Bates; B. Gray; M. Katouli

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

High-extraction magnetic filtration: A new beneficiation process for industrial minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...6 9 - 1 0 9 . Oder, R. R., and Price, E. R., 1973, Brightness beneficiation of kaolin clays by magnetic treatment, TAPPI, v. 56, p. 7 5 - 7 8 . Patterson, S. H., and Murray, H. H., 1975, Clays, in Lefond, S. J., ed., Industrial...

306

E-Print Network 3.0 - adsorption filtration photo-catalysis Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand Summary: Effects of Phosphate on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand T A O C H E N G , M A R K O... natural and...

307

Drilling mud filtration and its effect on the electrical resistivity of porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4o Jfeterials and Equipment. 9 Conductivity .Apparatus ? ? * ? . 9 o * o * o * ? o * 0 o t ? 0 9 Resistivity Measurement and Flow .Apparatus a - e > o ? e ? o ? - o 9 Cores and Drilling Fluid Suspensions o t ' o o o o o o o o o 10 5... t > ? e o t f a a . . . 11 LI Core Chamber with Electrodes...

Flock, Donald Louis

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

308

doi:10.1016/j.gca.2005.04.004 Clay mineral weathering and contaminant dynamics in a caustic aqueous system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. including Hanford, WA; Savannah River, SC; Idaho Falls, ID; West Valley, NY and Oak Ridge, TN (DOE, 1995

Chorover, Jon

309

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank And Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 5 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 5 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 4 samples indicate generally consistent operations. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in the Actinide Removal process (ARP).

Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

2873EA123145678 #)"1 !""1"1""  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

léchelle des principaux hydrates (portlandite, ettringite, C-S-H, etc.) jusquà léchelle macroscopique du

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

311

Program burnset.c /* This software was developed at the National Institute of */  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) */ /* particles connected together by CSH, C3AH6, or ettringite */ /* Two matrices are used here: one to store clinker, slag, fly ash ettringite, C3AH6, or CSH pixel */ if((mic [px] [py] [pz]==C3S) || (mic [px] [py

Bentz, Dale P.

312

Scanning Electron Microscopy in Concrete Petrography Paul E. Stutzman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydroxide, needle-like habit of ettringite, and the sheet-like habit of calcium- silicate I C-S-H, platy-Type II C-S-H, and ettringite needles. Calcium Hydroxide Ettringite Calcium Hydroxide Ettringite Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate 15 µµm 10 µµm #12;#12;Calcium Hydroxide in Concrete 63 Figure 2

Bentz, Dale P.

313

Deteriorated hardened cement paste structure analyzed by XPS and {sup 29}Si NMR techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and {sup 29}Si-MAS-NMR was used for the evaluation of deteriorated hardened cement pastes. The deterioration by ammonium nitrate solution was accompanied by changes in the pore structure as well as by structural changes in the C–S–H in the hardened cement paste. The CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio of the C–S–H decreased with the progress of deterioration, there was also polymerization of the silicate in the C–S–H. It was confirmed that the degree of polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in hardened cement paste can be determined by XPS. It was also shown that the polymerization depends on the structure of the C–S–H. -- Highlights: •The polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in the HCP can be observed by XPS. •The structure of C–S–H changed with the degree of calcium leaching. •The NMR result about silicate in C–S–H was in good agreement with the XPS result.

Kurumisawa, Kiyofumi, E-mail: kurumi@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Nawa, Toyoharu [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Owada, Hitoshi [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, 1-15-7 Tsukishima, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)] [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, 1-15-7 Tsukishima, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Shibata, Masahito [Taiheiyo Consultant Co., Ltd., 2-4-2, Ohsaku, Sakura-City, Chiba (Japan)] [Taiheiyo Consultant Co., Ltd., 2-4-2, Ohsaku, Sakura-City, Chiba (Japan)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

PDSF Batch Job Example  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PDSF Batch Job Example PDSF Batch Job Example PDSF Batch Job Example On this page we show an example of how to run a simple batch job, monitor it, check its output, and look at the SGE accounting information about it. We start with a simple script named hello.csh, which just sleeps a bit and then writes some output: pdsf4 72% cat hello.csh #!/bin/csh sleep 600 echo "Hello, World" The simplest way to submit it is to just use qsub without any options: pdsf4 74% qsub hello.csh Your job 1787239 ("hello.csh") has been submitted We can check on its status with qstat. Use the -u option to get only your jobs: pdsf4 75% qstat -u hjort job-ID prior name user state submit/start at queue slots ja-task-ID -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

315

arXiv:0804.3651v2[math.AG]24Apr2008 MONODROMY FILTRATIONS AND THE TOPOLOGY OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a polyhedral complex. In [H], Hacking proved that if X is a subvariety of (C )n satisfying a certain genericity condition, then the link of the fan Trop(X) only has reduced rational homology in the top dimension. Hacking : Trop(C) that is affine-linear on edges. Our results can be seen as the analogue of Hacking's result

Helm, David

316

Effect of the drilling mud filtrate temperature on the resistivity of the stratum saturated by oil and gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model of the axisymmetric distribution of the phases in the zone of invasion of the water-based drilling mud into the productive stratum whose porous space can simultaneously contain three immiscib...

V. I. Pen’kovskii; N. K. Korsakova…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The effects of cerium doping on the size, morphology, and optical properties of ?-hematite nanoparticles for ultraviolet filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Possible application of cerium-doped ?-hematite as ultraviolet filter. • Nanoparticles obtained through co-precipitation technique using various cerium doping levels followed by annealing. • Comprehensive materials characterisation utilizing XRD, DSC/TGA, STEM, UV–vis spectroscopy. • Increasing cerium content reduces particle sizing and alters morphology. • Solubility of cerium in hematite seen between 5 and 10% doping, 10% cerium doping greatly enhances attenuation in ultraviolet region and increases optical bandgap. - Abstract: Metal oxide nanoparticles have potential use in energy storage, electrode materials, as catalysts and in the emerging field of nanomedicine. Being able to accurately tailor the desirable properties of these nanoceramic materials, such as particle size, morphology and optical bandgap (E{sub g}) is integral in the feasibility of their use. In this study we investigate the altering of both the structure and physical properties through the doping of hematite (?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanocrystals with cerium at a range of concentrations, synthesised using a one-pot co-precipitation method. This extremely simple synthesis followed by thermal treatment results in stable Fe{sub 2?x}Ce{sub x}O{sub y} nanoceramics resulting from the burning of any unreacted precursors and transformation of goethite-cerium doped nanoparticle intermediate. The inclusion of Ce into the crystal lattice of these ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles causes a significantly large reduction in mean crystalline size and alteration in particle morphology with increasing cerium content. Finally we report an increase optical semiconductor bandgap, along with a substantial increase in the ultraviolet attenuation found for a 10% Ce-doping concentration which shows the potential application of cerium-doped hematite nanocrystals to be used as a pigmented ultraviolet filter for cosmetic products.

Cardillo, Dean [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, AIIM Facility, University of Wollongong Innovation Campus, Squires Way, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Konstantinov, Konstantin, E-mail: konstan@uow.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, AIIM Facility, University of Wollongong Innovation Campus, Squires Way, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Devers, Thierry [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée, Institut de Physique, site de Chartres, Université d’Orléans (France)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability of Vuggy and Fractured Carbonate Formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to diagnose and estimate secondary porosity and absolute permeability of fractured and vuggy carbonate in the Barinas-Apure Basin in southwest Venezuela. The latter reservoir behaves as a triple-porosity-connected) and fractured porosity, all embedded in a tight matrix. Rock-core data and wellbore resistivity images indicate

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

319

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation to the Implementation of Rainwater Harvesting and Filtration System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum Certification, which is the highest green building rating in North America, the design and construction of the New SUB will serve as a model for future sustainable development around the world. LEED promotes five key areas of sustainable approach, including sustainable site development

320

Fate and removal of pharmaceuticals and illicit drugs in conventional and membrane bioreactor wastewater treatment plants and by riverbank filtration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...chemical contaminants in water and wastewater' compiled and edited by Michael...antibiotics in conventional and advanced wastewater treatment: implications for environmental discharge and wastewater recycling. Water Res. 41, 4164-4176...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Biologically active filtration for treatment of produced water and fracturing flowback wastewater in the O&G industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Sustainable development of unconventional oil and gas reserves, particularly tight oil, tight gas, and shale gas, requires prudent management of water resources used during drilling,… (more)

Freedman, Daniel E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R.J. : Effect of ventilation rate in a healthy building.IAQ '91: Healthy Buildings, American Society of Heating,

Thatcher, Tracy L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

From Emergency to Fix: Point-of-Use Water Filtration Technology in Colonias Along the United States-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sanitation, health care, electricity and paved roads (Korc and Ford 2013, pg. 80). In August 2011, the EPA supported and promoted POU devices in a regional conference (“BienESTAR”) attended by stakeholders and researchers at the University of Texas – El... of the millions of people across the globe without access to it. In September 2010, the UN Human Rights Council confirmed that it was legally binding upon states to respect, protect, and fulfill the human “right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation...

Vandewalle, Emily Lauren

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enzymes Acid + Caustic Wastewater Treatment Process Heat and Power Integration Biogas + Sludge Fuel Finishing (hydroprocessing, as needed) Electricity Hydrogen Hydrocarbon...

325

Studies of the refining of crude cottonseed oil and its solutions in commercial hexane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Different Concentrations of Caustic Soda................ 55 17. Refining of Diluted Cottonseed Oil-Hexane Fiscellas with 24? Re' Caustic Soda................................. 5^ Page LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) 18. Refining of FFOHR Cottonseed Oil.................................................... .65 21. Refining Cottonseed Oil Kiscellas with Ammonia Gas Followed by Caustic Re-refining......................... 67 22. Ammonium Hydroxide Refining of Cottonseed Oil-Hexane Kiscellas and Re-refining with 2.5$ of 20? Be' Caustic Soda...

Zeitoun, Mohamed Ali

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

326

Application of various membranes to remove NOM typically occurring in Korea with respect to DBP, AOC and transport parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bench- and pilot-scale membrane tests were performed to remove natural organic matter (NOM) originating from Paldang Lake in Korea. Membrane performance was demonstrated in terms of DOC, biodegradable organic carbon (BDOC), assimilable organic carbon (AOC), and transport parameters. Various membranes such as reverse osmosis (RO), nanofiltration (NF) and ultrafiltration (UF) were investigated for this study. Four different NF membranes were selected for pilot-scale filtration testing and investigated in terms of both flux decline and DOC removal. To demonstrate the effect of temperature on the source water seasonally, the flux of membranes was measured with pure water at different temperatures ranging from 25 to 7°C. Coagulation/sedimentation treated water was used as feed water without removing residual chlorine; related plants were located at the Suji water treatment plant of Yongin City. To investigate more rigorously the organic fouling for various NF membranes, mass transport behaviors of organic matter solutes were evaluated by an irreversible thermodynamic model. The pore sizes of the NF membranes tested in the pilot slightly increased due to the oxidation of the polymer structure of the membranes from residual chlorine during the 4-month tests. Periodic chemical cleaning with a caustic solution was made to prevent accumulation of foulants on the membrane surface. The NF membranes exhibited stable efficiencies in terms of DOC and AOC removal during the test for 4 months.

Noeon Park; Boksoon Kwon; Minjeong Sun; Hyowon Ahn; Chunghwan Kim; Changho Kwoak; Dongju Lee; Seonha Chae; Hoon Hyung; Jaeweon Cho

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Mercury-control technology-assessment study: D. F. Goldsmith Chemical and Metal Corporation, Evanston, Illinois. In-depth survey report for the site visit of May 4-6, 1982. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in-depth survey was conducted at the D. F. Goldsmith Chemical and Metal Corporation in Evanston, Illinois; emphasis was placed on the recirculating air unit for control of mercury vapor. Major products were prime virgin mercury, precious metals, and rare inorganic chemicals. Mercury was poured into an open vessel which was subsequently covered, and the mercury treated by agitation with an acidic or caustic solution. Mercury was then transferred to the still where it was batch-distilled. After distillation, mercury was bottled in 1 or 5 pound quantities and packed and shipped. The ventilation system included local exhaust, dilution, and recirculation steps. Local exhaust ventilation was particularly important at the bottle-filling station. Personal protective equipment included respirators, disposable lab coats, vinyl coated cloth gloves, plastic shoe coverings, and barrier creams. Work practices were controlled, and biological and air monitoring were in place. The recirculating unit removed 76% of the mercury vapor in the air stream. The authors recommend that a study be made of the advisability of using a charcoal filter in addition to the manganese oxide precoat bag filter with post filtration.

Telesca, D.R.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Computer News, Volume 29  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 29. How to update your login shell from csh to tcsh. If you, like me, have had an account on the Math network of SUNs ...

329

Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be similar to ettringite. Brucite and gypsum were assumed toof the reservoir precipitates as brucite (Mg(OH) 2 ). ThisDistance from reservoir (m) brucite, and CSH:1.7, with an

Moridis, George J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The mechanism of the formation and transformation of ettringite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The formation and transformation of ettringite were studied by measuring the ion concentration...3A, gypsum, lime and C?S?H gel on ettringite formation and transformation were also investigated. The ... compositi...

Peng Jiahui; Zhang Jianxin; Qu Jindong

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation behaviour of ettringite, mono- Page 787 of 901of portlandite and ettringite, relatively minor amounts ofCement V f Caprock V f Calcite Ettringite CSH:1.6 Katoite-Si

Finsterle, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Method of producing a colloidal fuel from coal and a heavy petroleum fraction. [partial liquefaction of coal in slurry, filtration and gasification of residue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for combining coal as a colloidal suspension within a heavy petroleum fraction. The coal is broken to a medium particle size and is formed into a slurry with a heavy petroleum fraction such as a decanted oil having a boiling point of about 300 to 550/sup 0/C. The slurry is heated to a temperature of 400 to 500/sup 0/C for a limited time of only about 1 to 5 minutes before cooling to a temperature of less than 300/sup 0/C. During this limited contact time at elevated temperature the slurry can be contacted with hydrogen gas to promote conversion. The liquid phase containing dispersed coal solids is filtered from the residual solids and recovered for use as a fuel or feed stock for other processes. The residual solids containing some carbonaceous material are further processed to provide hydrogen gas and heat for use as required in this process.

Longanbach, J.R.

1981-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 490494 On Involutions which Preserve Natural Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Institute of Mathematics of NAS of Ukraine 2002, Vol. 43, Part 2, 490 of Ukraine, 3 Tereshchenkivska Str., 01601 Kyiv-4, Ukraine E-mail: sav@imath.kiev.ua In this work we study

Popovych, Roman

334

Estimation of Dry-Rock Elastic Moduli Based on the Simulation of Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Borehole Acoustic Logs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects on Borehole Acoustic Logs Tobiloluwa Odumosu, SPE, Carlos Torres-Verdín, SPE, Jesús M Salazar, SPE. Jun Ma, Ben Voss, and Gong Li Wang, SPE, The University of Texas at Austin Copyright 2007, Society

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

335

Effects on Occupants of Enhanced Particle Filtration in a non-problem office environment: A Double-Blind Crossover Intervention Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of BuildingEnergy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building

Mendell, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The effect of temperature gradient on the transport phenomenon in roots of maize plants grown under salinity conditions. conductivity and filtration properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis of flows through primary root and first node root tissues of plants grown under conditions of salinity and nutrient deficiency induced by temperature gradients was carried out using. a mathematical mo...

J. Michalov

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Effects on Occupants of Enhanced Particle Filtration in a non-problem office environment: A Double-Blind Crossover Intervention Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, Stateand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State

Mendell, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Lutte contre les plantes envahissantes: effet du filtrat de culture de Phoma sabdariffae Sacc. sur l’activité photosynthétique de trois plantes aquatiques au Gabon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phoma sabdariffae Sacc. (Sphaerioidaceae) est le principal agent pathogène de la roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L. var. sabdariffa) au Gabon. Son action repose sur l’excrétion de...Phoma sabdariffa...

A. N. Lépengué; I. Mouaragadja; B. M’batchi; S. Ake

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

The effects of selected environmental variables on filtration rate of Mytilopsis leucophaeata and evaluation of its potential role in the purification of mariculture effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by turbidity reduction of suspensions over three hours. Sepia ink (0.15 + 0.034 []m) was the primary indicator for turbidity reduction. Mussels were exposed to four types of suspended particles (Sepia ink, colloidal carbon, Nannochloropsis and shrimp...

Rice, Patrick Hays

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Milky Way's dark matter distribution and consequences for axion detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Signals for both direct and indirect dark matter detection depend on the phase-space distribution of dark matter. The possibility of structures with high physical density, known as caustics, has provided an opportunity to increase the discovery potential of the Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX). I discuss the formation of dark matter caustics and consequences of the caustic ring model for ADMX.

Duffy, Leanne D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Extraction-scrub-strip (ESS) Testing for Modular Caustic-side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Support Savannah River Site AikenAikenSouth Carolina Recent events during the deliberate...

342

Microsoft Word - 13000  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

particulate air (HEPA) filter; a thermal catalytic oxidation unit (TCO); a NO x removal system (SCR); a caustic packed-bed scrubber (PBS); and a second HEME. CONCLUSIONS...

343

E. Required Information (MANDATORY) A. Information Category  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

particulate air (HEPA) filter; a thermal catalytic oxidation unit (TCO); a NO x removal system (SCR); a caustic packed-bed scrubber (PBS); and a second HEME. CONCLUSIONS...

344

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fractionation Hydrogen Acid, Caustic, Enzymes Wastewater Treatment Insoluble solids Biogas + Sludge Process Heat and Power Integration Corn Stover Hydrocarbon Biofuels (i.e....

345

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOENETL FE 0561 ORD 2010 Erik Saab 2010 NETL Morgantown GPDUSyngas Generator Decommissioning Prepatory work for the demolition of the GPDU and SGG Structures, Caustic Soda Tank...

346

InsideIllinoisMay 3, 2012 Vol. 31, No. 20  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in caustic open-air burn pits. "By finding ways to make these things useful again they can be di- verted away

Lewis, Jennifer

347

Revised DOE sku calculations | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Publications ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Ethylene, Caustic-Chlorine, Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007...

348

ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007 ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Ethylene, Caustic-Chlorine, Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and...

349

SOLIDS PRECIPITATION EVENT IN MCU CAUSAL ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM SOLIDS RECOVERY TEAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process upset occurred in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility on April 6th, 2014. During recovery efforts, a significant amount of solids were found in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Salt Solution Receipt Tanks (SSRTs), two extraction contactors, and scrub contactors. The solids were identified by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as primarily sodium oxalate and sodium alumina silicate (NAS) with the presence of some aluminum hydroxide. NAS solids have been present in the SSFT since simulant runs during cold chemical startup of MCU in 2007, and have not hindered operations since that time. During the process upset in April 2014, the oxalate solids partially blocked the aqueous outlet of the extraction contactors, causing salt solution to exit through the contactor organic outlet to the scrub contactors with the organic phase. This salt solution overwhelmed the scrub contactors and passed with the organic phase to the strip section of MCU. The partially reversed flow of salt solution resulted in a Strip Effluent (SE) stream that was high in Isopar™ L, pH and sodium. The primary cause of the excessive solids accumulation in the SSRTs and SSFT at MCU is attributed to an increase in the frequency of oxalic acid cleaning of the 512-S primary filter. Agitation in the SSRTs at MCU in response to cold weather likely provided the primary mechanism to transfer the solids to the contactors. Sources of the sodium oxalate solids are attributed to the oxalic acid cleaning solution used to clean the primary filter at the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) filtration at 512-S, as well as precipitation from the salt batch feed, which is at or near oxalate saturation. The Solids Recovery Team was formed to determine the cause of the solids formation and develop recommendations to prevent or mitigate this event in the future. A total of 53 recommendations were generated. These recommendations were organized into 4 focus areas: • Improve understanding of oxalate equilibrium and kinetics in salt solutions • Reduction/elimination of oxalic acid cleaning in 512-S • Flowsheet optimization • Improving diagnostic capability The recommendations implemented prior to resumption of MCU operations provide a risk mitigation or detection function through additional sampling and observation. The longer term recommendations provide a framework to increase the basic process knowledge of both oxalate chemistry and filtration behavior and then facilitate decisions that improve the salt flowsheet as a system.

Garrison, A.; Aponte, C.

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Extraction of naphthenic acid from kerosene using porous and nonporous polymeric membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic study of membrane-assisted extraction of naphthenic acids from hydrocarbon fractions by aqueous caustic soda using both porous and nonporous membranes is reported. The effects of hydrodynamic factors, concentration of naphthenic acids and caustic soda, and temperature on the transmembrane flux are discerned. The film model is used to determine the intrinsic mass transfer characteristics of the membranes.

Netke, S.A.; Pangarkar, V.G. [Univ. of Bombay, Matunga (India)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Nutritional versatility and growth kinetics of an Aeromonas hydrophila strain isolated from drinking water.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...tion about the behavior of these organisms...water by using rapid sand filtration, slow sand filtration, and...water after rapid sand filtration. The...exponential growth phase. Only those colony...mixture), 18 carbo- hydrates and (poly) alcohols...

D van der Kooij; W A Hijnen

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Enteric Protozoa in the Developed World: a Public Health Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as chlorination with safe storage, solar UV treatment, ceramic filtration, or...hazards (166). Slow sand filtration, solar technology, and membrane technology...filter design and safe filtrate storage. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge...

Stephanie M. Fletcher; Damien Stark; John Harkness; John Ellis

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

MODELLING ANTICIPATIONS ON FINANCIAL MARKETS Contents ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Related to this is Stricker's theorem (see [44]): If a process is a semimartingale in an enlarged filtration, then it is a semimartingale in its own filtration.

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

354

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration...

355

Monitoring Based Commissioning: Benchmarking Analysis of 24 UC/CSU/IOU Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat transfer component, improper refrigerant charge, etc. )water treatment, correcting refrigerant charge Filtration

Mills, Evan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Impact of microstructure on the effective diffusivity in random packings of hard spheres  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes like catalysis, filtration, oil recovery, ground water remediation, chromatography, trans- port

Torquato, Salvatore

357

J PHYSIV FRANCE 7 (1997) Colloque Cl, Supplt5mentau Journal dePhysiqueI11 demars 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been grown on Si substrates by plasma-assisted MO(ND using acetylacetonate iron complex as a gas source in a low pressure MOCVD reactor. Acetylacetonate iron complex Fe(CSH,02)3 was used asagas source, which of the source molecules may be decomposed into iron-oxide molecule and an intermediate by plasma applied

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

358

Nanogranular origin of concrete creep  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Gaussian curve in the PDF); HD C–S–H 48.2 Vol% (MHD = 36.1 ± 3.4 GPa, HHD = 1.01 ± 0.16 GPa and CHD = 179.2 ± 41.6 GPa); and...Determination of Young's modulus according to indentation diagram . Zavodskaya Laboratoria 41 : 1137 – 1140 . 22 Oliver WC Pharr...

Matthieu Vandamme; Franz-Josef Ulm

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nanogranular origin of concrete creep  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with water, sand, and aggregates...situ creep behavior of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S...complex creep behavior of concrete...and binding phase of hardened Portland...silicate–hydrate (C–S...with water, sand, and...situ creep behavior of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H...

Matthieu Vandamme; Franz-Josef Ulm

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Accelerated Biodegradation of Cement by Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria as a Bioassay for Evaluating Immobilization of Low-Level Radioactive Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Sand (19), for example...same apparatus, Sand and his coworkers...concrete cubes used by Sand et al. (21) in...that the Ca(OH)2 phase played a major role...calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), which...Furthermore, this leaching behavior was not affected...

Orli Aviam; Gabi Bar-Nes; Yehuda Zeiri; Alex Sivan

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Promoting Thiol Expression Increases the Durability of Antitumor T-cell Functions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...individual genes was done using Sso advance SYBR Green (Bio-Rad) and CFX96 Touch Real-Time...pathways may exist in tandem to meet the energy needs of a T cell (43). While this study...or CD8+CD44+CD62LloCXCR3hiCCR7lo (green) and analyzed for expression of c-SH...

Pravin Kesarwani; Amir A. Al-Khami; Gina Scurti; Krishnamurthy Thyagarajan; Navtej Kaur; Shahid Husain; Quan Fang; Osama S. Naga; Patricia Simms; Gyda Beeson; Christina Voelkel-Johnson; Elizabeth Garrett-Mayer; Craig C. Beeson; Michael I. Nishimura; and Shikhar Mehrotra

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Synthesis and characterization of hafnium and molybdenum bifunctional initiators for the preparation of triblock copolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Three monofunctional mixed alkyl hafnium complexes containing the (MesNpy)2 ligand ([(MesitylNCH2)2CMe(2-CsH4N)]2) were synthesized. (MesNpy)Hf(Neo)R ((2b), R = Me; Neo = CH2CMe2Ph) and (MesNpy)Hf(CH2TMS)(R), ...

Gabert, Andrea Jennifer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Spatial and Temporal Distribution of Latent Heating in the South Asian Monsoon Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Information from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) level 3 monthly 0.5° × 0.5° Convective and Stratiform Heating (CSH) product and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) 2A12 datasets is used to examine the four-dimensional latent heating (LH) ...

Manuel D. Zuluaga; Carlos D. Hoyos; Peter J. Webster

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Transcriptome Analysis of Aspergillus nidulans Exposed to Camptothecin-Induced DNA Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the mutS family DNA mismatch repair protein gene msh6), cshA...fluorescence automated sequencers. A pipeline was built to analyze and assemble...functional categories (DNA repair, DNA metabolism, proteasome...mshA) involved in mismatch repair, and AN6073.2, a prohibitin...

Iran Malavazi; Marcela Savoldi; Sônia Marli Zingaretti Di Mauro; Carlos Frederico Martins Menck; Steven D. Harris; Maria Helena de Souza Goldman; Gustavo Henrique Goldman

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Monolith filter apparatus and membrane apparatus, and method using same  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A filtration apparatus that separates a liquid feedstock mixed with a gas into filtrate and retentate, the apparatus including at least one filtration device comprised of at least one monolith segment of porous material that defines a plurality of passageways extending longitudinally from a feed face of the structure to a retentate end face. The filtration device contains at least one filtrate conduit within it for carrying filtrate toward a filtrate collection zone, the filtrate conduit providing a path of lower flow resistance than that of alternative flow paths through the porous material of the device. The filtration device can also be utilized as a membrane support for a device for microfiltration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, or pervaporation. Also disclosed is a method for using such a filtration apparatus.

Goldsmith, Robert L. (Wayland, MA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

366

Coupling of porous filtration and ion-exchange membranes in an electrodialysis stack and impact on cation selectivity: A novel approach for sea water demineralization and the production of physiological water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conventional electrodialysis (ED) and electrodialysis with ultrafiltration (EDUF) or nanofiltration (EDNF) membrane treatments were carried-out for partial desalination of sea water and to evaluate their potential for the production of physiological water. A demineralization rate of 10.6% was obtained with the EDNF and of 40.25% with EDUF and conventional ED processes. The nanofiltration membrane, due to its high electrical resistance, slowed down the migrations of ions. Moreover, the use of an ultrafiltration membrane had no significant effect on the demineralization rate of sea water and the electrodialytic parameters in comparison with the use of conventional ED membranes. A demineralization rate between 20.5 and 30.1% was obtained for each cation analyzed following EDNF treatments and between 43.3 and 64.4% when conventional ED or EDUF was used. Moreover, the decrease in the concentration of monovalent ions was slightly larger than for divalent ions in the case of ED and EDUF while for EDNF, the higher decrease was observed for calcium ion. This means that the replacement of a cation-exchange membrane by an ultrafiltration membrane would not change the selectivity of the process for ion separation but with a nanofiltration membrane a cation-selectivity appears.

Laurent Bazinet; Marianne Moalic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Members of the 30- to 32-Kilodalton Mycolyl Transferase Family (Ag85) from Culture Filtrate of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Are Immunodominant Th1-Type Antigens Recognized Early upon Infection in Mice and Cattle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Brussels, Belgium 2 Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Center, Groeselenberg 99...the immunogenicity and the antigenic composition of CF derived from M. avium subsp...Manca. 2001. Epitope focus, clonal composition and Th1 phenotype of the human CD4 response...

Valérie Rosseels; Sylvie Marché; Virginie Roupie; Marc Govaerts; Jacques Godfroid; Karl Walravens; Kris Huygen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

CHARACTERIZATION OF A PRECIPITATE REACTOR FEED TANK (PRFT) SAMPLE FROM THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sample of from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) was pulled and sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in June of 2013. The PRFT in DWPF receives Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/ Monosodium Titanate (MST) material from the 512-S Facility via the 511-S Facility. This 2.2 L sample was to be used in small-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing in the Shielded Cells Facility of SRNL. A 1L sub-sample portion was characterized to determine the physical properties such as weight percent solids, density, particle size distribution and crystalline phase identification. Further chemical analysis of the PRFT filtrate and dissolved slurry included metals and anions as well as carbon and base analysis. This technical report describes the characterization and analysis of the PRFT sample from DWPF. At SRNL, the 2.2 L PRFT sample was composited from eleven separate samples received from DWPF. The visible solids were observed to be relatively quick settling which allowed for the rinsing of the original shipping vials with PRFT supernate on the same day as compositing. Most analyses were performed in triplicate except for particle size distribution (PSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PRFT slurry samples were dissolved using a mixed HNO3/HF acid for subsequent Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analyses performed by SRNL Analytical Development (AD). Per the task request for this work, analysis of the PRFT slurry and filtrate for metals, anions, carbon and base were primarily performed to support the planned chemical process cell testing and to provide additional component concentrations in addition to the limited data available from DWPF. Analysis of the insoluble solids portion of the PRFT slurry was aimed at detailed characterization of these solids (TGA, PSD, XRD and SEM) in support of the Salt IPT chemistry team. The overall conclusions from analyses performed in this study are that the PRFT slurry consists of 0.61 Wt.% insoluble MST solids suspended in a 0.77 M [Na+] caustic solution containing various anions such as nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, carbonate and oxalate. The corresponding measured sulfur level in the PRFT slurry, a critical element for determining how much of the PRFT slurry gets blended into the SRAT, is 0.437 Wt.% TS. The PRFT slurry does not contain insoluble oxalates nor significant quantities of high activity sludge solids. The lack of sludge solids has been alluded to by the Salt IPT chemistry team in citing that the mixing pump has been removed from Tank 49H, the feed tank to ARP-MCU, thus allowing the sludge solids to settle out. ? The PRFT aqueous slurry from DWPF was found to contain 5.96 Wt.% total dried solids. Of these total dried solids, relatively low levels of insoluble solids (0.61 Wt.%) were measured. The densities of both the filtrate and slurry were 1.05 g/mL. ? Particle size distribution of the PRFT solids in filtered caustic simulant and XRD analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids indicate that the PRFT slurry contains a bimodal distribution of particles in the range of 1 and 6 ?m and that the particles contain sodium titanium oxide hydroxide Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 crystalline material as determined by XRD. These data are in excellent agreement with similar data obtained from laboratory sampling of vendor supplied MST. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) combined with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids shows the particles to be like previous MST analyses consisting of irregular shaped micron-sized solids consisting primarily of Na and Ti. ? Thermogravimetric analysis of the washed and unwashed PRFT solids shows that the washed solids are very similar to MST solids. The TGA mass loss signal for the unwashed solids shows similar features to TGA performed on cellulose nitrate filter paper indicating significant presence of the deteriorated filter

Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

PowerPoint Presentation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testing Objectives Testing Objectives * Qualitatively demonstrate leaching and ultrafiltration processes, equipment design and process control strategies * Obtain data to improve process model projections for leaching and ultrafiltration - Develop scaling factors to form link between laboratory-scale and engineering-scale test results Process Flowsheets * Baseline: caustic leaching in UF feed preparation vessels - Caustic added directly to as-received feed (3-8 wt% solids) * Alternative: caustic leaching in UF feed vessel - Caustic added after initial solids concentration to 20 wt% * All other process steps conducted in the UF feed vessels. PEP Flow Diagram Scaling Considerations * 1/4.5-scale facility: linear dimensions * PJM mixing - Newtonian slurry: power/volume - Non-newtonian: plant velocity

370

CX-007078: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis of spent Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) SolventCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/18/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

371

papr a celulza 63 (7-8) 2008218 retencn systm Preparation of biosilica-enriched filler and an example of its use in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the causticizing reaction.The chemical composition, and surface properties (surface charge) of newly designed. In comparison with wood, straw con- tains less cellulose. Xylans are the principal hemicelluloses of hardwoods

Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

372

Campus Cons and the New Mccarthyism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the 2005 College Republican National Convention, David Horowitz, arguably one of the most notorious and caustic pugilists of the culture wars, brought down the proverbial house by asserting that: “Universit...

Valerie Scatamburlo-D’ Annibale

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Appendix B - Chemical and Radiological Inventories for the CEMRC...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dibasic 500 g NA Calcium Phosphate Tribasic 1,000 g NA Carbon suspension 1,000 mL NA Carbon tetrachloride 200 mL NA Carbon, activated 500 g NA Caustic Spill Kit (Vermiculite)...

374

Slide 1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Caustic Caustic Caustic Caustic Cleaning Cleaning for Waste for Waste Heel Heel Removal Removal WB Barton Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange May 19, 2009 Tank Operations Contract 2 I would like to acknowledge the work of Dan Herting, Heinz Huber, and the staff at the 222-S Laboratory. Without their work, this process would just be a glimmer of an idea. Tank Operations Contract 3 Contents * Background * Chemistry * History * Observations * Process * Next Steps Tank Operations Contract 4 Background * Only 1 of 5 C farm tanks has met the TPA goal for waste retrieval when they reached the "limit of the technology." * On average about 10 % of the starting volume is not retrievable with current sluicing technology. * Waste heels have similar appearance, light tan sand and

375

Status report on solid control in leachates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge pretreatment will involve some combination of washing and leaching with sodium hydroxide solutions to remove soluble salts and amphoteric material such as alumina. It is of paramount importance to prevent gelation and uncontrolled solid formation in tanks, transfer lines, and process equipment. An evaluation of results of washing and caustic leaching indicates that washing is more effective in dissolving sludge solids than subsequent sodium hydroxide treatment. Only aluminum and chromium were removed more effectively by caustic leaching than by water washing.

Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Hunt, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Keswa, C.M.; Osseo-Asare, K.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Studies on the isolation and properties of the highly unsaturated fatty acids from natural sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

r-J (T < X GO 00 U. Filtrate Cduplex 6 +100 g. urea____________ ___________--------------------------------------- ! Filtrate Complex 7 +100 g. urea...

Abu-Nasr, Ahmed Mostafa

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

378

F – Goldschmidt Abstracts 2011  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in bank filtration settings, cause oscillations in the local water table, which can...The frequency and amplitude of the oscillations simulated those of a bank filtration...helium, argon, neon, krypton and xenon were measured using mass spectrometry...

379

CX-005530: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

530: Categorical Exclusion Determination 530: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005530: Categorical Exclusion Determination Detoxification of Uranium in Soils and Groundwater Using Recycled Concrete CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/27/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office Detoxification of Uranium in Soils and Groundwater Using Recycled Concrete. This effort seeks to demonstrate that U(VI) can be immobilized by inducing precipitation of U(VI) silicates by addition of powdered recycled concrete. Uranium silicates are stable over a wide range of pH and at the oxidizing conditions prevalent at most uranium waste sites. The predominant reactive component of cementitious material is the hydrated calcium silicate gel (C-S-H). If the reaction of C-S-H and U(VI) is sufficiently effective, then

380

NERSC User Environment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environment Environment NERSC User Environment Home Directories, Shells and Startup Files All NERSC systems (except PDSF) use global home directories, which are are pre-populated with startup files (also known as dot files) for all available shells. NERSC fully supports bash, csh, and tcsh as login shells. Other shells (ksh, sh, and zsh) are also available. The default shell at NERSC is csh. Changing Your Default Login Shell Use the NERSC Information management (NIM) portal if you want to to change your default login shell. To do this, select Change Shell from the NIM Actions pull-down menu. Managing Your Startup Files The "standard" dot-files are symbolic links to read-only files that NERSC controls. For each standard dot-file, there is a user-writable ".ext" file.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

 

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

"Summary: Detoxification of Uranium in Soils and Groundwater Using Recycled Concrete. Uranium (U) is the most frequently occurring radionuclide "Summary: Detoxification of Uranium in Soils and Groundwater Using Recycled Concrete. Uranium (U) is the most frequently occurring radionuclide contaminant in soil and groundwater of the DOE complex, but current treatment options are either reversible or apply to only a limited set of conditions. This LDRD effort seeks to demonstrate that U(VI) can be immobilized by inducing precipitation of U(VI) silicates by addition of powdered recycled concrete. Uranium silicates are stable over a wide range of pH and at the oxidizing conditions prevalent at most uranium waste sites. The predominant reactive component of cementitious material is the hydrated calcium silicate gel (C-S-H). If the reaction of C-S-H and U(VI) is sufficiently effective, then

382

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Doing Physics - User Software & Computing -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Setup : Software Setup Setup : Software Setup General CMS Software Environment Platform specific setup Application runtime environment Accessing CERN CVS server References General CMS Software Environment The CMS software environment for csh and tcsh users is set by sourcing the environment setup script. In tcsh, csh: source /uscmst1/prod/sw/cms/cshrc [option] In bash, sh: . /uscmst1/prod/sw/cms/shrc [option] This will set general CMS software environment variables, extend the user's $PATH to include CMS specific utilities and tools, and define aliases used in the CMS software projects. User can set one of the environments by choosing the corresponding argument to the environment setup script. NOTE: if environment is already set, sourcing a script will not change the environment. A warning will be

383

Sorption of Selenite and Selenate to Cement Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sorption of selenite and selenate to ettringite (3CaO·Al2O3·3CaSO4·32H2O), “monosulfate” (3CaO·Al2O3·CaSO4·12H2O), and calcium silicate hydrate (C?S?H) was investigated in order to understand Se immobilization by cement in hazardous wastes. ... Selenite is suggested to sorb by surface reactions, and for ettringite, a sorption maximum of 0.03 mol kg-1 was determined. ... Distribution ratios (Rd) for selenite were 0.18, 0.38, and 0.21 m3 kg-1 for ettringite, monosulfate, and C?S?H, respectively. ...

Isabel Baur; C. Annette Johnson

2003-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Pharmaceutical Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filtration in A Water Purification Plant. Special Issue onof steps necessary for water purification. This results in

Galitsky, Christina

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Phase distribution and intrapore salt exchange during drilling mud invasion of an oil- and gas-bearing formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As a result of drilling mud filtrate invasion of a formation saturated with oil, gas and natural water, the distribution...

N. K. Korsakova; V. I. Pen’kovskii

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A MANUAL FOR CATALOGING and INDEXING DOCUMENTS FOR DATABASE ACQUISITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FILTRATION· FLOW RATE·HYDRAULIC FRACTURING· INJECTION ~LLS·= FLOW RATE; DE.ll = HYDRAULIC FRACTURING; DE.12 = INJECTION

Schwartz, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Journal of Catalysis 255 (2008) 134137 www.elsevier.com/locate/jcat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and subsequent filtration, rinsing with deionized water, and treatment in flow- ing dry air (Praxair, extra dry

Iglesia, Enrique

388

Durability of Diesel Particulate Filters - Bench Studies on Cordierite...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design and Optimization Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems fundamental...

389

Advanced Workflows Jack Deslippe and Zhengji Zhao  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scripting for Scripting for Advanced Workflows Jack Deslippe and Zhengji Zhao Presentation URL: http://goo.gl/s6M8x Outline ● Scripting basics ● Shell scripting examples for launching multiple MPI jobs ● Chaining jobs ● Managing multiple serial jobs on Hopper and Carver Presentation URL: http://goo.gl/s6M8x Scripting Basics Scripting is a rich and deep topic and can refer to any of the following: SHELL (BASH, CSH ...)

390

High-Performance Solid Acid Fuel Cells Through  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orders of magnitude, reaching values as high as 10­2 ohm­1 cm­1 . Both the transition and the ion) Controversy over the superprotonic phase transition behavior in CsH2PO4 has recently been resolved (6 hydrogen- bonded oxyanions, often tetrahedral (such as SO4, SeO4, PO4, and AsO4), and metal cat- ions

391

EXAFS Study of Sn(IV) Immobilization by Hardened Cement Paste and Calcium Silicate Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An alternative structural model for Sn(IV) binding in HCP has been developed, assuming that ettringite is the uptake-controlling phase. ... Although there is no Al in C?S?H, Al is a possible second neighbor in HCP due to the presence of Al-containing phases, e.g., monosulfate, ettringite, and hydrogarnet. ... Preliminary experiments further support that ettringite could be a possible host phase for Sn(IV) (39). ...

Isabelle Bonhoure; Erich Wieland; André M. Scheidegger; Michael Ochs; Dominik Kunz

2003-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

PHOSPHATE MANAGEMENT: FY2010 RESULTS OF PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATION TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phosphate Management program seeks to develop treatment options for caustic phosphate solutions resulting from the caustic leaching of the bismuth phosphate sludge. The SRNL subtask investigated the precipitation of phosphate salts from caustic solutions through addition of fluoride and by crystallization. The scoping tests examined the: precipitation of phosphate by the addition of sodium fluoride to form the sodium fluorophosphate double salt, Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} {center_dot} 19H{sub 2}O, crystallization of phosphate by reducing the temperature of saturated phosphate solutions, and combinations of precipitation and crystallization. A simplified leachate simulant was used in the study produced by dissolving sodium phosphate in 1 M to 3.5 M sodium hydroxide solutions. The results show that all three processes; precipitation with sodium fluoride, crystallization, and combined precipitation/crystallization can be effective for removing large amounts of phosphate from solution. The combined process of precipitation/crystallization showed >90% removal of phosphate at all hydroxide concentrations when cooling a non-saturated phosphate solution from 65 C to 25 C. Based on the measured solubility of sodium phosphate, pH adjustment/caustic addition will also remove large amounts of phosphate from solution (>80%). For all three processes, the phosphate concentration in the caustic solution must be managed to keep the phosphate from becoming too concentrated and thereby potentially forming a solid mass of sodium phosphate after an effective phosphate removal process.

Hay, M.; King, W.

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

393

Spectrophotometric Resolution of Stellar Atmospheres with Microlensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microlensing is a powerful tool for studying stellar atmospheres because as the source crosses regions of formally infinite magnification (caustics) the surfaceof the star is resolved, thereby allowing one to measure the radial intensity profile, both photometrically and spectroscopically. However, caustic crossing events are relatively rare, and monitoring them requires intensive application of telescope resources. It is therefore essential that the observational parameters needed to accurately measure the intensity profile are quantified. We calculate the expected errors in the recovered radial intensity profile as a function of the unlensed flux, source radius, spatial resolution the recovered intensity profile, and caustic crossing time for the two principle types of caustics: point-mass and binary lenses. We demonstrate that for both cases there exist simple scaling relations between these parameters and the resultant errors. We find that the error as a function of the spatial resolution of the recovered profile, parameterized by the number of radial bins, increases as $N_R^{3/2}$, considerably faster than the naive $N_R^{1/2}$ expectation. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages of binary caustic-crossing events and point-lens events. Binary events are more common, easier to plan for, and provide more homogeneous information about the stellar atmosphere. However, a sub-class of point-mass events with low impact parameters can provide dramatically more information provided that they can be recognized in time to initiate observations.

B. Scott Gaudi; Andrew Gould

1998-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

394

MEASURING THE MASS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cluster mass profiles are tests of models of structure formation. Only two current observational methods of determining the mass profile, gravitational lensing, and the caustic technique are independent of the assumption of dynamical equilibrium. Both techniques enable the determination of the extended mass profile at radii beyond the virial radius. For 19 clusters, we compare the mass profile based on the caustic technique with weak lensing measurements taken from the literature. This comparison offers a test of systematic issues in both techniques. Around the virial radius, the two methods of mass estimation agree to within {approx}30%, consistent with the expected errors in the individual techniques. At small radii, the caustic technique overestimates the mass as expected from numerical simulations. The ratio between the lensing profile and the caustic mass profile at these radii suggests that the weak lensing profiles are a good representation of the true mass profile. At radii larger than the virial radius, the extrapolated Navarro, Frenk and White fit to the lensing mass profile exceeds the caustic mass profile. Contamination of the lensing profile by unrelated structures within the lensing kernel may be an issue in some cases; we highlight the clusters MS0906+11 and A750, superposed along the line of sight, to illustrate the potential seriousness of contamination of the weak lensing signal by these unrelated structures.

Geller, Margaret J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Rines, Kenneth J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Serra, Ana Laura, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu, E-mail: serra@to.infn.it [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

 

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Detoxification of Uranium in Soils and Groundwater Using Recycled Concrete. This LDRD effort seeks to demonstrate that U(VI) can be immobilized by Detoxification of Uranium in Soils and Groundwater Using Recycled Concrete. This LDRD effort seeks to demonstrate that U(VI) can be immobilized by inducing precipitation of U(VI) silicates by addition of powdered recycled concrete. Uranium silicates are stable over a wide range of pH and at the oxidizing conditions prevalent at most uranium waste sites. The predominant reactive component of cementitious material is the hydrated calcium silicate gel (C-S-H). If the reaction of C-S-H and U(VI) is sufficiently effective, then powdered clean concrete recycled from D&D operations could be used as the source of C-S-H, resulting in a very inexpensive amendment that would immobilize U in its oxidized form, insuring long-term treatment. The ability of Portland cement pastes to remove U(VI) from water solutions and to immobilize U(VI) in soils will be evaluated. If the first phase of

396

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit(MCU) Salt Batch Qualification Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit(MCU) Salt Batch Qualification Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina This EEC is written to cover future Salt Batch qualification efforts. Salt Batch qualification are anticipated to end in 2015. Feed material for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) must be carefully qualified before the material can be processed through those 2 units. As part of the qualification processes, SRNL is tasked with several items. First, the feed material (Tank 21H) must be extensively analyzed. Afterwards, portions of this material, combined with a previous sample of Tank 49H will undergo a MST strike test and an Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) test.

397

 

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

In support of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), SRNL will be investigating the properties of a new organic solvent blend. The In support of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), SRNL will be investigating the properties of a new organic solvent blend. The new blend will contain a new extractant (MAXCalix) which has physical properties very similar to the current extractant (BoBCalix). The new solvent may also require a new acid stripping agent, which is likely to be boric acid (as opposed to nitric acid). Finally, the suppressor may be changed from trioctlamine to a guanidine or similar species. In no case do the changes from the current solvent blend represent a knowledge gap or the introduction of dangerous new chemicals. As part of the testing, SRNL will be using caustic salt simulants, tank waste samples (identity to be determined), as well

398

 

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In support of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), SRNL will be investigating the properties of a new organic solvent blend. The In support of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), SRNL will be investigating the properties of a new organic solvent blend. The new blend will contain a new extractant (MAXCalix) which has physical properties very similar to the current extractant (BoBCalix). The new solvent may also require a new acid stripping agent, which is likely to be boric acid (as opposed to nitric acid). Finally, the suppressor may be changed from trioctlamine to a guanidine or similar species. In no case do the changes from the current solvent blend represent a knowledge gap or the introduction of dangerous new chemicals. As part of the testing, SRNL will be using caustic salt simulants, tank waste samples (identity to be determined), as well

399

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Salt Batch Qualification - Batch 6 Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Salt Batch Qualification - Batch 6 Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Salt Batch #6 samples shall be qualified and tested in support of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) treatment processes via a treatability study performed at SRNL. The ARP and MCU demonstrations are conducted to assess the efficiency of cesium mass transfer during the process steps and to look for any impacts from trace chemicals on process efficiency. The tests are used to provide confidence that the cesium, plutonium, and strontium removal will fall within expected ranges. B3.6 - Small-scale research and development, laboratory operations, and pilot projects

400

COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

HARRINGTON SJ

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Studies toward an Improved Process for N4,N4-Disubstituted-2-cyano-N1,N1-dimethyl-1H-imidazole-1,4-disulfonamides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reaction of N,N-dimethylsulfamoyl chloride (DMSC) with an aqueous solution of 5 was hampered by the fact that the excess caustic soda required to keep 5 in solution is able to react with DMSC or the product. ... This could be suppressed, however by operating in a two-phase system, so that treating a mixture of the aqueous caustic soda solution of 5 and an equal volume of ethyl benzene with DMSC (1.1 equiv) in the presence of catalytic benzyltriethylammonium chloride (BTEAC) afforded 92% conversion to 6, which dissolves in the organic layer with 8% starting material (5) crystallising at the interface. ... Although addition of fresh DMSC and caustic soda results in further conversion, significantly increased and, therefore, uneconomic quantities of DMSC are required to bring the reaction close to completion. ...

Gary P. Baker; Ian A. Bourne; Mark J. Ford; Richard W. G. Foster; Timothy H. Jackson; Robert W. Pannell; Martyn W. Whitmore

1999-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

Microsoft PowerPoint - 12-02 Balogapol shekarrev2.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAUSTIC RECYCLING CAUSTIC RECYCLING Shekar Balagopal Anthony Nickens November 18 th 2010 Print Close Outline * Insertion Opportunities at Site * Caustic Recycling Overview * Pilot Scale Demonstration Phase * Conclusions 2 Print Close Sodium Separation Technology Already Commercially Deployed! 3 Biodiesel Facility in Mexico, MO  NaSelect Ceramic Membrane Technology Deployed  Producing Sodium Methylate (SMO) for Archer Daniels Midland  Technology is Scalable 1500 lbs/day on a 100% basis of SMO  Equivalent to production of 71.2 kgs per hour of 10 M NaOH concentration from Actual Waste Modular revolutionary commercial technology applied to treat radioactive waste Print Close Principle of Operation: Electrolytic Ceramic Membrane Cell Electrode Reactions: Anode: 2H 2 O = O 2 + 4H

403

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Emissions Control - Advanced Diesel Particulate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that on-highway diesel vehicles have filtration systems to reduce tail-pipe soot emissions, known as particulate matter (PM). Diesel particulate filtration (DPF) systems are currently the most efficient at directly controlling PM. Argonne researchers, working with Corning, Inc., and Caterpillar, Inc., through a cooperative research and development agreement, are exploiting previously unavailable technology and research results on diesel PM filtration and regeneration processes, aiming to the technology transfer of advanced PM emission control to industry. Argonne's Research In operation of DPF systems, the filtration and regeneration of particulate emissions are the key processes to be controlled for high efficiency. Due to difficulties in accessing the micro-scaled structures of DPF membranes and monitoring particulate filtration and high-temperature thermal processes, however, research has been limited to macroscopic observation for the product.

404

Process for tertiary oil recovery using tall oil pitch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and compositions for enhancing the recovery of acid crudes are disclosed. The process involves injecting caustic solutions into the reservoir to maintain a pH of 11 to 13. The fluid contains an effective amount of multivalent cation for inhibiting alkaline silica dissolution with the reservoir. A tall oil pitch soap is added as a polymeric mobility control agent. (DMC)

Radke, C.J.

1983-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

405

A simple model for lensing by black holes in galactic nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......categorized thus: Cusp points on y 1-axis: There...gamma1gamma2. Cusp points on y 2-axis: Again...Therefore, gamma1gamma2 lifts the degeneracy of the caustic point at y =0 which was found...increases from two to four. If the point source......

M. C. Werner; N. W. Evans

2006-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

Calculation of the slowness vector from the ray vector in anisotropic media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...caustics in homogeneous weakly anisotropic media. Geophys. J. Int...rays near singularities in anisotropic media. Phys. Rev. B. 67...Liu1997Velocity anisotropy in shales: a petrological study. Geophysics...recovery of elastic constants of anisotropic elastic media: a direct and...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

ccsd-00003326,version2-9Dec2005 On geodesic envelopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd-00003326,version2-9Dec2005 On geodesic envelopes Gianmarco Capitanio December 9, 2005 Abstract We give a global description of envelopes of geodesic tangents of regular curves in (not necessarily inflectional geodesics and its tangential caustics (formed by the conjugate points to those of the initial

408

ALTERATION OF KAOLINITE TO CANCRINITE AND SODALITE BY SIMULATED HANFORD TANK WASTE AND ITS IMPACT ON CESIUM RETENTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALTERATION OF KAOLINITE TO CANCRINITE AND SODALITE BY SIMULATED HANFORD TANK WASTE AND ITS IMPACT University, Pullman, WA 99164, USA Abstract--Caustic nuclear wastes have leaked from tanks at the US of waste fluids to migrate into the underlying sediments. In this study, four simulant tank waste (STW

Flury, Markus

409

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with caustic soda in packed towers . Trans Inst Chem Eng 31 : 201...International , Warrendale, PA ) SAE Paper 2644 . 12 Spector...Stolaroff, 2008 (5) NaOH spray tower, proposal and protoype. Does...capture process. Proposed spray tower only: $53-127d Proposed...

Kurt Zenz House; Antonio C. Baclig; Manya Ranjan; Ernst A. van Nierop; Jennifer Wilcox; Howard J. Herzog

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Variants in the Structural Polysaccharides of Algal Cell Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... invariable presence in marine algae of a deposit of micro-crystalline material on the plant surfaces*. This deposit, which is often present in large amounts, especially in filamentous algae ... Roelofsen et al,12, correctly in our view, refer to the large amount of xylan present. We have found that treatment of Halicystis holocellulose with caustic potash solutions of ...

EVA FREI; R. D. PRESTON

1961-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

411

Tips for Living Green Conduct a home energy audit -hes.lbl.gov or fcgov.com/greenbuilding/home/existing_programs.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overnight and when not in use. Save energy and money by covering your pots while cooking and air dry your money and resources. Replace caustic cleaning products with environmentally-friendly alternatives like products. Give up the bleach: switch to organic cotton tampons or check out the Diva Cup - www

412

Phase I Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (904-83G)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the completed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study (CMS/FS) for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (LAOCB)/L-Area Acid Caustic Basin (9LAACB) Solid Waste Management Unit/Operable Unit (SWMU/OU) at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Approved September 8, 2007 by the Junior Academy Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

criteria for success. Just as scientific inquiry projects require (1) the identification of a problem) a design statement that identifies such limiting factors and criteria for success or meeting the design environment or conditions (temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, caustic conditions), ergonomics (human

Mountziaris, T. J.

414

Canned Air in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadcast Transcript: Not that long ago, coal smoke made the air here in Beijing so caustic that your nasal passages were seared with each breath. Those were the good old days: Car ownership was limited to government officials and the rest...

Hacker, Randi

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

415

Sending femtosecond pulses in circles: highly non-paraxial accelerating beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sending femtosecond pulses in circles: highly non-paraxial accelerating beams F. Courvoisier,* A Month X, XXXX; posted Month X, XXXX (Doc. ID XXXXX); published Month X, XXXX We use caustic beam shaping on 100 fs pulses to experimentally generate non-paraxial accelerating beams along a 60 degree circular

Boyer, Edmond

416

Non-Paraxial Wave Analysis of 3D Airy Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 3D Airy beam (AiB) is thoroughly explored from a wave-theory point of view. We utilize the exact spectral integral for the AiB to derive local ray-based solutions that do not suffer from the limitations of the conventional parabolic equation (PE) solution, and are valid far beyond the paraxial zone and for longer ranges. The ray topology near the main lobe of the AiB delineates a hyperbolic umilic diffraction catastrophe, consisting of a cusped double-layered caustic, but this caustic is deformed in the far range where the field loses its beam shape. The field in the vicinity of this caustic is described uniformly by a hyperbolic umilic canonical integral which is structured explicitly on the local geometry of the caustic as obtained from the initial field distribution. In order to accommodate the finite-energy AiB we also modify the canonical integral by adding a complex loss parameter. The canonical integral is calculated using a series expansion and the results are used to identify the validity zone of the conventional PE solution. The analysis is performed within the framework of the non-dispersive AiB where the aperture field is scaled with frequency such that the ray skeleton is frequency-independent. This scaling enables an extension of the theory to the ultra wide band (UWB) regime and ensures that the pulsed field propagates along the curved beam trajectory without dispersion, as will be demonstrated in a subsequent publication.

Y. Kaganovsky; E. Heyman

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

417

COPPER DEFICIENCY PROPHYLAXIS IN GRAZING SHEEP BY COPPER OXIDE INJECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPPER DEFICIENCY PROPHYLAXIS IN GRAZING SHEEP BY COPPER OXIDE INJECTION M. LAMAND Claudine LAB R of insoluble and non ionized form of injected copper has been shown in a previous paper (Lamand, 1978 it appeared that copper oxide was preferable to metallic copper, being slightly less caustic. Inflammation

Boyer, Edmond

418

Appendix F: NPDES Noncompliances Annual Site Environmental Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been relayed to cut off the lift station pumps. The failed LSF separator pump was replaced sheen flowed over the surface. ground a short distance to a storm drain and through Outfall 200 leak was tested and with caustic and acid with the passed. A surveillance schedule has resulting

Pennycook, Steve

419

Foundations and Trends R Computer Graphics and Vision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Berkeley, 627 Soda Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1776, USA, ravir@cs.berkeley.edu Abstract High quality image-based rendering. #12;1 Introduction High quality image synthesis is one of the oldest goals of computer graphics in sunlight, glossy reflections from a velvet cushion, and caustics from a wine- glass. Three decades

O'Brien, James F.

420

| London Mathematical Society Nonlinearity Nonlinearity 27 (2014) 10031028 doi:10.1088/0951-7715/27/5/1003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I, Universitat Polit`ecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona, Spain E-mail: Rafael.Ramirez@upc the caustic types, the winding numbers and the ellipsoids of such minimal periodic trajectories. We also trajectories, so their study is the first task. There exist two remarkable results concerning periodic billiard

Ramírez-Ros, Rafael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PEP Support Laboratory Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A and B, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic.

Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

422

EFRT M12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of PEP and Bench-Scale Oxidative Leaching Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to dissolve solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct steam injection to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before the addition of caustic. For wastes that have significantly high chromium content, the caustic leaching and slurry dewatering is followed by adding sodium permanganate to UFP-VSL-T02A, and the slurry is subjected to oxidative leaching at nominally ambient temperature. The purpose of the oxidative leaching is to selectively oxidize the poorly alkaline-soluble Cr(III) believed to be the insoluble form in Hanford tank sludge to the much more alkaline-soluble Cr(VI), e.g., chromate. The work described in this report provides the test results that are related to the efficiency of the oxidative leaching process to support process modeling based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed both at the lab-bench scale and in the PEP. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to oxidative leaching chemistry to support a scale factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. Owing to schedule constraints, the PEP test data to be included in this report are limited to those from Integrated Tests A (T01 A/B caustic leaching) and B (T02A caustic leaching).

Rapko, Brian M.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Hanson, Brady D.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

Homeland Security Issues for Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Equipment Condition Proper connection of all components Functionality Air filtration Types of filters in use Filter efficiencies Locations of filters Condition of filters Controls Types of controls Energy management system in use.... Filtration Filtration removes unwanted substances from the air. Different types of filters and levels of efficiency offer varying degrees of protection against everyday pollutants and CBR contaminants. Properly chosen, installed, and maintained air...

McClure, J. D.; Fisher, D.; Fenter, T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: Chemical flood predictive model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Flood Predictive Model (CFPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp for the US Department of Energy and was used in the National Petroleum Council's (NPC) 1984 survey of US enhanced oil recovery potential (NPC, 1984). The CFPM models micellar (surfactant)-polymer (MP) floods in reservoirs which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option is available in the model which allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic (alkaline) or caustic-polymer processes. This ''caustic'' option, added for the NPC survey, is not modeled as a separate process. Rather, the caustic and caustic-polymer oil recoveries are computed simply as 15% and 40%, respectively, of the MP oil recovery. In the CFPM, an oil rate versus time function for a single pattern is computed and the results are passed to the economic routines. To estimate multi-pattern project behavior, a pattern development schedule must be specified. After-tax cash flow is computed by combining revenues with capital costs for drilling, conversion and upgrading of wells, chemical handling costs, fixed and variable operating costs, injectant costs, depreciation, royalties, severance, state, federal, and windfall profit taxes, cost and price inflation rates, and the discount rate. A lumped parameter uncertainty routine is used to estimate risk, and allows for variation in computed project performance within an 80% confidence interval. The CFPM uses theory and the results of numerical simulation to predict MP oil recovery in five-spot patterns. Oil-bank and surfactant breakthrough and project life are determined from fractional flow theory. A Koval-type factor, based on the Dykstra-Parsons (1950) coefficient, is used to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on surfactant and oil bank velocities. 18 refs., 17 figs., 27 tabs.

Ray, R.M.; Munoz, J.D.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Download  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

S. Guarda prepared the media and maintained the cultures. .... the filtration tower, that excess media with traces of ...... L. Smith and M. H. Chanley [eds.], Culture ...

2000-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

426

Investigation of the Role of Surface Chemistry and Accessibility of Cadmium Adsorption Sites on Open-Surface Carbonaceous Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Then the suspensions were filtered using 0.45 µm membrane filters. ... The concentration of ions in the filtrates was immediately analyzed by AAS. ... carbon aerogel ...

Zhanming Gao; Teresa J. Bandosz; Zongbin Zhao; Mei Han; Changhai Liang; Jieshan Qiu

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

427

Gas Filter Testing Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas filtration of air in the cleanroom is carried out with HEPA (high- ... filter. The ambient air filters for the cleanroom are relatively fragile and require great care...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Mr. John E. Kieling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

underground facility, causing the ventilation exhaust to automatically shift to high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration mode. The ventilation system has been operating in...

429

Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts in Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pavlo. 2005. Do iodine water purification tablets provide an1997. Efficacy of iodine water purification tablets againstwater: 1) concentration and filtration, 2) elution and purification

Wainwright, Katlyn E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Integrated Technology Air Cleaners (ITAC): Design and Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of particle air filtration technologies." Indoor Air 12(4):2011a). New air cleaning technologies for reduced commercialnumber 2 Integrated technology air cleaner High efficiency

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control with ventilation, given current ventilation and filtration system practices, are the indoor-sourced gaseous pollutants with low octanal-air

Mendell, Mark J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Download  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

removed by filtration, and the disc was dried and ..... formation and removal. ... the plot is additive, so that the top bar of the histogram indicates total frequency.

433

35  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exponential-phase cellls were harvested by filtration for short-term uptake experi- ..... smoothing the [Fe'] measurements. tas in P. carterae-The specific growth ...

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

434

fundamental Modeling and Experimental Studies of Acicular Mullite...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Silicon Carbide ACM Particulate volume loaded nm 3 Pressure Drop kPa 8 Wall penetration data from salt particle filtration studies Sulfur EDX Silicon EDX Adjusted EDX...

435

DOEIEV.0005/35 ANL-OHS/HP-83403 FORMERLY UTILIZED MEDIAEC SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the overhead beams, and on the mixing vats , Kelly : filtration devices, and processing tanks. Contamination was found at 47 spots or localized areas and 11 larger, general areas...

436

Download  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jul 29, 1977 ... jar experiments similar to those of Hale. (1974). .... immediately after filtration by gas chro- matographic ... flange at the base) of Hale (1974) and.

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

437

Volterra Bridges and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tion which is greater than the filtration of the starting Volterra Gaussian process. Using ..... [4] F. Baudoin, M. Thieullen: Pinning Class of the Wiener Measure by a

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

B  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

high enough for its own proliferation and incidentally for the .... boiler flask with a minimum of nitric acid, digcstcd in a .... edly gave more efficient filtration than the.

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

439

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air particles Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of size-resolved particle removal using portable air cleaners relative to filtration in HVAC... to such agents. Stand alone (portable) ... Source: Texas at Austin, University of...

440

42  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

perature on filtration rate and energy cost of pumping. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. .... Energy release of seisms and ..... Fractal market analysis: Applying chaos theory.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

CX-007101: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Field testing - testing of equipment, heat pump and filtration device. Monitor heat transfer and energy efficiency parameters. CX-007101.pdf More Documents &...

442

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

estimated visually. Waters sampled for chemical analysis were stored in brimful polyethylene bottles with Polyseal caps following filtration from a large syringe attached to a...

443

Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

estimated visually. Waters sampled for chemical analysis were stored in brimful polyethylene bottles with Polyseal caps following filtration from a large syringe attached to a...

444

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

estimated visually. Waters sampled for chemical analysis were stored in brimful polyethylene bottles with Polyseal caps following filtration from a large syringe attached to a...

445

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

estimated visually. Waters sampled for chemical analysis were stored in brimful polyethylene bottles with Polyseal caps following filtration from a large syringe attached to a...

446

Control of size and charge selectivity in amphiphilic graft copolymer nanofiltration membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The throughput and efficiency of membrane separations make polymer filtration membranes an important resource for the pharmaceutical, food and wastewater treatment industries. Nanofiltration (NF) membranes fill an important ...

Lovell, Nathan Gary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Multiplex Templating Process in One-Dimensional Nanoscale: Controllable Synthesis, Macroscopic Assemblies, and Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

These exhibit enormous potential for attractive applications, such as liquid filtration and separation, continuous-flow catalysis, electrocatalysis, polymer-based nanocomposites, and superadsorbents, and elastomeric conductors. ...

Hai-Wei Liang; Jian-Wei Liu; Hai-Sheng Qian; Shu-Hong Yu

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

448

Porvair signs long term supply agreement with Honeywell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Microfiltrex Division of the Porvair Filtration Group has signed a long term agreement to supply components to a range of Honeywell programmes.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Research on Performance of Wastewater Purification Unit and Recycling of Wastewater and sludge Dewatering of In-Site in Feng Shan Wate Treatment Plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??During the water treatment process, each processing unit releases the sludge from the sedimentation process, and the wastewater from the rapid sand wash and filtration… (more)

Chen, Hsin-hung

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Detection of Bio-Aerosol Threats with a UV Scattering Trigger and Rapid DNA- and Antibody-Based Confirmation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An economical sensor for airborne pathogens consists of a continuous 'reagentless' UV scattering trigger followed by a confirmer that analyzes air filtrate for characteristic pathogen...

Stoughton, Roland

451

Rapid screening technique for detecting and assaying endopeptidase mutants of Aeromonas proteolytica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It was maintained by weekly serial sub- culture on Bacto-Tryptic Soy Agar made with distilled. water. R -" ~yt l t ~A. The gross endopeptidase activity of the reference culture filtrates and other test filtrates was deter- mined by the urea.... It was maintained by weekly serial sub- culture on Bacto-Tryptic Soy Agar made with distilled. water. R -" ~yt l t ~A. The gross endopeptidase activity of the reference culture filtrates and other test filtrates was deter- mined by the urea...

Soli, Teri Cullen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

452

SPARK! 2012 | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetic Filtration Process - Sherrill Advanced Credentialing For Trusted Networks - Sims Content Recommendation Solution - Tech Info Consumers - Morris Spark 2012 Request For...

453

William Heinzer, Book in progress, preprints and talk slides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[ The Cohen-Macaulay and Gorenstein properties of rings associated to filtrations in .pdf format ]. [ Projectively full ideals in Noetherian rings talk in PostScript ...

454

Effect of Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided  by  HVAC  system  filters,  it  was  assumed  filtration  from  the  HVAC  system  filters  brings  down  HVAC  system  air  leakage   and  ozone  deposition  on  HAVC  system  filters.      

Walker, Iain S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

DETERMINATION OF PARTICULATE ORGANIC NITROGEN  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy Commission Contract No. AT ( 1 l-l ) -34, ... ethanol. 8. 50% ethanol. Filtration of sample. Sample volumes generally range from. 100 ml for rich coastal ...

2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

456

E-Print Network 3.0 - activation decay heat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

h 1 in the dark... . Filtration reduced decay rates by various amounts, averaging 20%. Heat-labile, high... the loss of active degradative materials incurred by ... Source:...

457

Retrofit Program of a Euro 1 andn EUro 2 Urban Bus Fleet in La...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High particulate matter filtration efficiency No secondary emissions like NO2, Furan, Dioxins, PAH The system proved to work perfectly well in all driving conditions during real...

458

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis, each indicating asubjected to reverse osmosis filtration, microfiltration,processing industry are reverse osmosis systems and ultra-

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from ion exchange, reverse osmosis, filtration and otherStripping Ion Exchange Reverse Osmosis Chemical TreatmentElectrolytic Oxidation Reverse Osmosis tJl trafi 1 tration

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processing industry are reverse osmosis systems and ultra-ultra-filtration and reverse osmosis has been used for applepassed through a reverse osmosis membrane and an ultra-

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Use of bioassays to assess the water quality of wastewater treatment plants for the occurrence of estrogens and androgens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exposed to reconstituted reverse osmosis water (Control) andprocesses included reverse osmosis, filtration/chlorinationbeen treated with reverse osmosis. Our results also suggest

Schlenk, Daniel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Innovation System Reverse Osmosis Small Businessclaims the largest reverse osmosis desalination plant in thetechniques such as reverse osmosis, and improving filtration

Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry: An ENERGY STAR? Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis, each indicating asubjected to reverse osmosis filtration, microfiltration,processing industry are reverse osmosis systems and ultra-

Brush, Adrian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Download  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rainwater as a source of Fe(II)-stabilizing ligands to seawater. Joan D. Willey,1 .... glassware used for sampling, filtration, storage, extraction, and experiments ...

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

465

Speciation of trace metals in seawater by anodic stripping voltammetry: Critical analytical steps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The speciation of trace metals in seawater based on the voltammetric (DPASV) titration ... to sample contaminations during sampling, filtration and storage, displacement of complexing equilibria in freeze storage

G. Capodaglio; G. Scarponi; G. Toscano…

466

Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

characterization with single-cylinder test engines, guided by industry Barrier: Lack of cost-effective emission control Objective: Seek to shorten development time of filtration...

467

Verzeichnis von Veröffentlichungen über Gibberelline (1926–1960)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Das Verzeichnis enthält Veröffentlichungen über Gibberelline, die seit der Auffindung der Wirkung zellfreier Filtrate von Gibberella-Kulturen durch Kurosawa (1926) bis zum Jahr 1960 erschienen sind. Veröffentlich...

R. Knapp

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by the French Research National Agency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(% Vol) CSH_1.6 Ca1.6SiO3.6:2.58H2O 38.1% Portlandite Ca(OH)2 26.1% Ettringite Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12:26H2O.5H2O Ettringite Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12:26H2O Hydrotalcite Mg4Al2O7:10H2O C3FH6 Ca3Fe2(OH)12 Al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

469

Alternate stabilizers: solution towards reducing sulfate swell in expansive clay subgrades in Dallas district  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Research in this area, points to the reaction between alumna and Ca~ ions, in the presence of sulfates released by sulfate minerals and water, which leads to the formation of ettringite. The presence of excessive sulfates slows down the formation of CSH... due to a drop in pH and promotes the formation of ettringite (1). Ettirngite is stable in both wet and dry conditions and can expand to a volume equal to 227?o of the total volume of reactant solids (2). Ettringite can be transformed into thaumasite...

Rajendran, Deepa

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

470

Structural Studies of the Catalytic and Regulatory Mechanisms of Phenylalanine Hydroxylase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with phenylalanine activation. The isolated regulatory domain (PheH1-117) was expressed and purified using a QSepharose column followed by a gel filtration column. Analytical gel filtration shows that PheH1-117 exists as a dimer in solution. In the presence...

Li, Jun

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

471

Iron Chloride Precipitation of Viruses from Seawater Revision: 25 Mar 2014 Tucson Marine Phage Lab Page 1 of 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waters using iron- based flocculation and large-pore-size filtration, followed by resuspension of virus- containing precipitates in a pH 6 buffer. This Fe-based virus flocculation, filtration and resuspension in the resuspension buffer. Particles lose infectivity if resuspended with ascorbic acid in the buffer. PCR inhibition

Sullivan, Matthew B.

472

The properties of foams and lattices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...management, for thermal insulation, filtration and...material with a foam-like structure...becomes important in foams of low density intended for thermal insulation, which have a conductivity...management, for thermal insulation, filtration and...material with a foam-like structure...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

FIGURE I.-Research area, South Milwaukee, Wis. (after Cooper et a!. 1976). The solid triangle indicates the location of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intake for the tanks at the South Milwaukee Water Filtration Plant, 2) the Oak Creek stocking site, and 3) the Milwaukee Harbor stocking site. located 1.5 km offshore. Morpholine (C4 HsNO) was metered into one tank in separate tanks at the South Milwaukee Water Filtration Plant. Lake Michigan water was supplied to all three

474

Renal CO2 production from glutamine and lactate as a function of arterial perfusion pressure in dog  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...low filtration rate and low rate of energy expenditure for...and lactate as fuels of dog kidney under...transport and basal energy needs in acidosis...glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and para-aminohippurate...University of Florida College of Medicine...

S B Baruch; C K Eun; M MacLeod; R F Pitts

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Advanced particulate matter control apparatus and methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and methods for collection and removal of particulate matter, including fine particulate matter, from a gas stream, comprising a unique combination of high collection efficiency and ultralow pressure drop across the filter. The apparatus and method utilize simultaneous electrostatic precipitation and membrane filtration of a particular pore size, wherein electrostatic collection and filtration occur on the same surface.

Miller, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, ND); Zhuang, Ye (Grand Forks, ND); Almlie, Jay C. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

476

Microstructural and compositional change of NaOH-activated high calcium fly ash by incorporating Na-aluminate and co-existence of geopolymeric gel and C-S-H(I)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study explores the reaction products of alkali-activated Class C fly ash-based aluminosilicate samples by means of high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (HSXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and compressive strength tests to investigate how the readily available aluminum affects the reaction. Class C fly ash-based aluminosilicate raw materials were prepared by incorporating Na-aluminate into the original fly ashes, then alkali-activated by 10 M NaOH solution. Incorporating Na-aluminate reduced the compressive strength of samples, with the reduction magnitude relatively constant regardless of length of curing period. The HSXRD provides evidence of the co-existence of C-S-H with geopolymeric gels and strongly suggests that the C-S-H formed in the current system is C-S-H(I). The back-scattered electron images suggest that the C-S-H(I) phase exists as small grains in a finely intermixed form with geopolymeric gels. Despite providing extra source of aluminum, adding Na-aluminate to the mixes did not decrease the Si/Al ratio of the geopolymeric gel.

Oh, Jae Eun [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan Metropolitan City, 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Juhyuk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Oh, Sang-Gyun [Department of Architectural Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangro, Busanjin-Gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of); Clark, Simon M. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 20015 (United States); Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Hydration kinetics of cements by Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Application to Portland-cement-derived endodontic pastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Time-Domain Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (TD-NMR) of {sup 1}H nuclei is used to monitor the maturation up to 30 days of three different endodontic cement pastes. The 'Solid-liquid' separation of the NMR signals and quasi-continuous distributions of relaxation times allow one to follow the formation of chemical compounds and the build-up of the nano- and subnano-structured C-S-H gel. {sup 1}H populations, distinguished by their different mobilities, can be identified and assigned to water confined within the pores of the C-S-H gel, to crystallization water and Portlandite, and to hydroxyl groups. Changes of the TD-NMR parameters during hydration are in agreement with the expected effects of the different additives, which, as it is known, can substantially modify the rate of reactions and the properties of cementitious pastes. Endodontic cements are suitable systems to check the ability of this non-destructive technique to give insight into the complex hydration process of real cement pastes.

Bortolotti, Villiam, E-mail: villiam.bortolotti@unibo.it [Department DICAM, University of Bologna, Via Terracini 28, 40131, Bologna (Italy); Fantazzini, Paola [Department of Physics, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, 40127, Bologna (Italy); Mongiorgi, Romano [Centre of Biomineralogy, Crystallography and Biomaterials, Department of Earth and Geoenvironmental Sciences, University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta S. Donato, 40127, Bologna (Italy); Sauro, Salvatore [Department of Dental Biomaterials Science Kings College, London Dental Institute at Guy's, King's College and St Thomas' Hospitals, Floor 17 Guy's Tower, Guys Hospital, London Bridge, London SE1 9RT (United Kingdom); Dental Materials, School of Dentistry, University of Granada, Colegio Maximo, Campus de Cartuja, Granada (Spain); Zanna, Silvano [Centre of Biomineralogy, Crystallography and Biomaterials, Department of Earth and Geoenvironmental Sciences, University of Bologna, Piazza di Porta S. Donato, 40127, Bologna (Italy)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

Activity and Evolution of Vapor Deposited Pt-Pd Oxygen Reduction Catalysts for Solid Acid Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of hydrogen fuel cells based on the crystalline solid proton conductor CsH2PO4 is circumscribed by the mass activity of platinum oxygen reduction catalysts in the cathode. Here we report on the first application of an alloy catalyst in a solid acid fuel cell, and demonstrate an activity 4.5 times greater than Pt at 0.8 V. These activity enhancements were obtained with platinum-palladium alloys that were vapor-deposited directly on CsH2PO4 at 210 C. Catalyst mass activity peaks at a composition of 84 at% Pd, though smaller activity enhancements are observed for catalyst compositions exceeding 50 at% Pd. Prior to fuel cell testing, Pd-rich catalysts display lattice parameter expansions of up to 2% due to the presence of interstitial carbon. After fuel cell testing, a Pt-Pd solid solution absent of lattice dilatation and depleted in carbon is recovered. The structural evolution of the catalysts is correlated with catalyst de-activation.

Papandrew, Alexander B [ORNL; Chisholm, Calum R [ORNL; Zecevic, strahinja [LiOx, Inc., Pasadena, California 91106, United States; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Zawodzinski, Thomas A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

CX-007632: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

32: Categorical Exclusion Determination 32: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007632: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit Salt Batch Qualification CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 01/19/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Feed material for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) must be carefully qualified before the material can be processed through those 2 units. As part of the qualification processes, Savannah River National Laboratory is tasked with several items. First, the feed material (Tank 21H) must be extensively analyzed. Afterwards, portions of this material, combined with a previous sample of Tank 49H will undergo a MST strike test and an

480

CX-006630: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

30: Categorical Exclusion Determination 30: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006630: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Improved Solvent Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/02/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office In support of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) will be investigating the properties of a new organic solvent blend. The new blend will contain a new extractant (MAXCalix) which has physical properties very similar to the current extractant (BoBCalix) (see Evaluation Checklist, TC-A-2005-045). The new solvent may also require a new acid stripping agent, which is boric acid (as opposed to nitric acid). Finally, the suppressor is changed from

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481

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 - 6820 of 9,640 results. 11 - 6820 of 9,640 results. Download Proposed On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download http://energy.gov/em/downloads/proposed-site-disposal-facility-osdf-paducah-gaseous-diffusion-plant Download Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download http://energy.gov/em/downloads/operational-issues-environmental-restoration-disposal-facility Download Caustic Recovery Technology Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download http://energy.gov/em/downloads/caustic-recovery-technology Download Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations- Day 3, Session 1

482

Savannah River Site Contractor Achieves Tank Waste Milestone | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Contractor Achieves Tank Waste Milestone Contractor Achieves Tank Waste Milestone Savannah River Site Contractor Achieves Tank Waste Milestone February 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is a component of the Interim Salt Disposition Process — known as Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) — that helped Savannah River Remediation process more than 500,000 gallons of salt waste since October last year, a contract milestone. Pictured here is a component of the Interim Salt Disposition Process - known as Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) - that helped Savannah River Remediation process more than 500,000 gallons of salt waste since October last year, a contract milestone. AIKEN, S.C. - The Savannah River Site's liquid waste contractor recently achieved a contract milestone by processing 500,000 gallons of

483

CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

45: Categorical Exclusion Determination 45: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004445: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/25/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in Savannah River National Laboratory High Level Caves (HLC), A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 milliliters (mL) of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs.

484

CX-006642: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

42: Categorical Exclusion Determination 42: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006642: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Support Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/18/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River National Laboratory and Engineering Developmental Laboratory (EDL) in particular have been tasked to perform a set of small scale (Environmental Stress Screening and 2 centimeters) and full-scale V-5 (Strip Bank) and V-10 (Extraction Bank) contactor tests with new solvent being developed for the Extraction and Strip operations in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The Next Generation Solvent (NGS) is comprised of four components: 0.050

485

CX-003634: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

634: Categorical Exclusion Determination 634: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003634: Categorical Exclusion Determination Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Improved Solvent Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/09/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office In support of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), Savannah River National Laboratory will be investigating the properties of a new organic solvent blend. The new blend will contain a new extractant (MAXCalix) which has physical properties very similar to the current extractant (BoBCalix). The new solvent may also require a new acid stripping agent, which is likely to be boric acid (as opposed to nitric acid). Finally, the suppressor may be changed from trioctlamine to a

486

CX-003496: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003496: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Biofuels Using Ionic Transfer Membranes CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 08/19/2010 Location(s): Las Vegas, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Department of Energy is proposing to continue providing funding to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) to further their research on the development of a tubular NaSICON (Sodium Super Ionic Conductors) membrane process that produces high-purity sodium methoxide from low-cost aqueous sodium hydroxide. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003496.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000934: Categorical Exclusion Determination A Ceramic membrane to Recycle Caustic Caustic Recovery Technology

487

CX-006375: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

75: Categorical Exclusion Determination 75: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006375: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Transfer Lines with Spare Lines CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/14/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office The transfer lines between the Floor Drain Catch Tank (FDCT) in 221-S and Caustic Waste Neutralization Tanks (CWNT) in 980-S, KWW5 and KWW9, will be replaced using a spare line KWW15 for KWW5 portion and a like for like for the KWW9 portion. Caustic sump transfer lines in 422-S and 980-S to the CWNT will also be replaced. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006375.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003634: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006630: Categorical Exclusion Determination

488

Carbonation of metal silicates for long-term CO2 sequestration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a preferred embodiment, the invention relates to a process of sequestering carbon dioxide. The process comprises the steps of: (a) reacting a metal silicate with a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide to produce a hydroxide of the metal formerly contained in the silicate; (b) reacting carbon dioxide with at least one of a caustic alkali-metal hydroxide and an alkali-metal silicate to produce at least one of an alkali-metal carbonate and an alkali-metal bicarbonate; and (c) reacting the metal hydroxide product of step (a) with at least one of the alkali-metal carbonate and the alkali-metal bicarbonate produced in step (b) to produce a carbonate of the metal formerly contained in the metal silicate of step (a).

Blencoe, James G; Palmer, Donald A; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Beard, James S

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

489

CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004177: Categorical Exclusion Determination Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste Radioactive Bench-Scale Steam Reformer (Module A) CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/23/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in Savannah River National Laboratory High Level Caves, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 milliliters (mL) of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This

490

Gravitational Lensing Characteristics of the Transparent Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The transparent Sun is modeled as a spherically symmetric and centrally condensed gravitational lens using recent Standard Solar Model (SSM) data. The Sun's minimum focal length is computed to a refined accuracy of 23.5 +/- 0.1 AU, just beyond the orbit of Uranus. The Sun creates a single image of a distant point source visible to observers inside this minimum focal length and to observers sufficiently removed from the line connecting the source through the Sun's center. Regions of space are mapped where three images of a distant point source are created, along with their associated magnifications. Solar caustics, critical curves, and Einstein rings are computed and discussed. Extremely high gravitational lens magnifications exist for observers situated so that an angularly small, unlensed source appears near a three-image caustic. Types of radiations that might undergo significant solar lens magnifications as they can traverse the core of the Sun, including neutrinos and gravitational radiation, are discussed.

Bijunath Patla; Robert J. Nemiroff

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

491

Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

492

Kinetics of the hydrogen evolution reaction on mild steel and nickel cathodes in concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are reported at 288 to 358 K for both smooth and roughened electrode surfaces up to current densities of about 0.3 A/cm/sup 2/. Tafel plots for the nickel cathodes are linear over the whole current density range studied. The transfer coefficient, ..beta.., has an average value of 0.54 and is unaffected by varying either the caustic concentration, the temperature, or the surface roughness of the electrode. With the mild steel cathodes, the Tafel plots show two linear regions with the inflection point occurring at eta = 0.140 to -0.225 V. In the lower overpotential region, ..beta.. increases from about 0.5 to at least 1.4 with increasing caustic concentration and increasing temperature. This behavior is interpreted as being caused by a change in reaction mechanism and results from one of the reaction steps becoming reduced in rate. The ability of the caustic concentration or the temperature to affect the reaction mechanism is amplified by roughening the electrode surface. For the linear regions in the Tafel plots at high overpotentials, the slopes are almost invariant to changes in the caustic concentration, the temperature, or the surface roughness. The transition between the two Tafel regions appears to be caused by a change in the electrode surface resulting from the reduction of a surface oxide, possibly FeOH. The dependence of the inflection point potential on the experimental variables is analyzed in terms of this potential being equivalent to the equilibrium potential of the inferred surface redox reaction.

Brown, A.P.; Krumpelt, M.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

PRODUCTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABOUT AS CLOSE as a U. S. plant can be to rich Caribbean bauxite deposits, close to natural gas supplies, close to caustic soda supplies—these factors enable Reynolds Metals to cut transportation costs in its La Quinta-San Patricio aluminum processing facilities near Corpus Christi, Tex. ... The Corpus Christi faculties consist of two plants, La Quinta, which converts bauxite to aluminum oxide, and San Patricio, which reduces the alumina to metallic aluminum. ...

1954-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

494

Alternatives for sodium-potassium alloy treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) is currently treated at the Y-12 Plant by open burning. Due to uncertainties with future permits for this process alternative treatment methods were investigated, revealing that two treatment processes are feasible. One process reacts the NaK with water in a highly concentrated molten caustic solution (sodium and potassium hydroxide). The final waste is a caustic that may be used elsewhere in the plant. This process has two safety concerns: Hot corrosive materials used throughout the process present handling difficulties and the process must be carefully controlled (temperature and water content) to avoid explosive NaK reactions. To avoid these problems a second process was developed that dissolves NaK in a mixture of propylene glycol and water at room temperature. While this process is safer, it generates more waste than the caustic process. The waste may possibly be used as a carbon food source in biological waste treatment operations at the Y-12 Plant. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate both processes, and they showed that both processes are feasible alternatives for NaK treatment. Process flow sheets with mass balances were generated for both processes and compared. While the caustic process generates less waste, the propylene glycol process is safer in several ways (temperature, material handling, and reaction control). The authors recommend that the propylene glycol alternative be pursued further as an alternative for NaK treatment. To optimize this process for a larger scale several experiments should be conducted. The amount of NaK dissolved in propylene glycol and subsequent waste generated should be optimized. The offgas processes should be optimized. The viability of using this waste as a carbon food source at one of the Y-12 Plant treatment facilities should be investigated. If the state accepts this process as an alternative, design and construction of a pilot-scale treatment system should begin.

Takacs, T.J.; Johnson, M.E.

1993-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

495

 

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

In support of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), SRNL will be investigating the properties of a new organic solvent blend. The In support of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), SRNL will be investigating the properties of a new organic solvent blend. The new blend will contain a new extractant (MAXCalix) which has physical properties very similar to the current extractant (BoBCalix) (see EEC, TC- A-2005-045). The new solvent may also require a new acid stripping agent, which is boric acid (as opposed to nitric acid). Finally, the suppressor is changed from trioctlamine to a guanidine derivative. In no case do the changes from the current solvent blend represent a knowledge gap or the introduction of dangerous new chemicals. As part of the testing, SRNL will be using caustic salt simulants as well as organic (combustible, not flammable) liquids. An existing disposal path for each of these streams exists now, and no special requirements are needed for disposal. We estimate

496

 

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 mL of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This project will be conducted under a Hazardous Treatability Study. The process operates at ~ 700 degrees C and at -6 inwc pressure. The process will generate ~ 25 g of solid sodium-alumino-silicate mineralized product per run. This mineral product contains RCRA metals. The process also produces ~ 0.07 moles of gaseous NOx per run. Other constituents of the off-gas stream include CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2. Approximately 860 mL of steam

497

 

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT radioactive condensate is being used to mimic a proposed Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) stream. Approximately 700 mL of caustic, concentrated OGCT will be fed to the process over the course of 7 individual 100-mL runs. This project will be conducted under a Hazardous Waste Treatability Study. The process operates at ~ 700 degrees C and at -6 inwc pressure. The process will generate ~ 25 g of solid sodium-alumino-silicate mineralized, granular product per run. This mineral product contains RCRA metals. The process also produces ~ 0.07 moles of gaseous NOx per run. Other constituents of the off-gas stream include CO, CO2, H2, H2O and N2.

498

Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

499

DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOTYPE TITANATE ION EXCHANGE LOADED MEMBRANES FOR STRONTIUM, CESIUM AND ACTINIDE DECONTAMINATION FROM AQUEOUS MEDIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have successfully incorporated high surface area particles of titanate ion exchange materials (monosodium titanate and crystalline silicotitanate) with acceptable particle size distribution into porous and inert support membrane fibrils consisting of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon{reg_sign}), polyethylene and cellulose materials. The resulting membrane sheets, under laboratory conditions, were used to evaluate the removal of surrogate radioactive materials for cesium-137 and strontium-90 from high caustic nuclear waste simulants. These membrane supports met the nominal requirement for nonchemical interaction with the embedded ion exchange materials and were porous enough to allow sufficient liquid flow. Some of this 47-mm size stamped out prototype titanium impregnated ion exchange membrane discs was found to remove more than 96% of dissolved cesium-133 and strontium-88 from a caustic nuclear waste salt simulants. Since in traditional ion exchange based column technology monosodium titanate (MST) is known to have great affinity for the sorbing of other actinides like plutonium, neptunium and even uranium, we expect that the MST-based membranes developed here, although not directly evaluated for uptake of these three actinides because of costs associated with working with actinides which do not have 'true' experimental surrogates, would also show significant affinity for these actinides in aqueous media. It was also observed that crystalline silicotitanate impregnated polytetrafluoroethylene or polyethylene membranes became less selective and sorbed both cesium and strontium from the caustic aqueous salt simulants.

Oji, L; Keisha Martin, K; David Hobbs, D

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

500

Correlation method for chemical communication of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spite of many experimental studies of the chemical comminution of coal, there have been only a few reported attempts to correlate experimental data and mathematically model the process. This paper presents a strain energy model based on the thermodynamic analysis. The capillary-imbibition number is proposed as an important parameter for characterization of chemicals used in comminution. The authors discuss the development of a phenomenological model for chemical comminution to study the relative effects of the governing process. Sensitivity studies carried out with this model indicated that the mechanism of chemical transfer into bedding planes and comminution of coal is dominantly a capillary-imbibition-induced flow phenomenon and to a lesser extent a diffusion-controlled process. The authors also tested this hypothesis using experimental data. As reported, the maximum comminution rates for the middle Pennsylvania Cherokee C-bituminous coal with NaOH solutions were within the range of 6-8% caustic concentration. Hence, it is concluded that this contradicts the author's earlier work (1988), which reported that capillary-imbibition number (reciprocal of the surface-tension number) decreases with increasing caustic concentration. This conclusion is misleading because the authors simply present a set of data on capillary-imbibition number vs NaOH concentration, and it alone cannot determine the caustic concentration for the maximum comminution rate.

Civan, F.; Knapp, R.M. (School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (US))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z