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1

Moist caustic leaching of coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for reducing the sulfur and ash content of coal. Particulate coal is introduced into a closed heated reaction chamber having an inert atmosphere to which is added 50 mole percent NaOH and 50 mole percent KOH moist caustic having a water content in the range of from about 15% by weight to about 35% by weight and in a caustic to coal weight ratio of about 5 to 1. The coal and moist caustic are kept at a temperature of about 300.degree. C. Then, water is added to the coal and caustic mixture to form an aqueous slurry, which is washed with water to remove caustic from the coal and to produce an aqueous caustic solution. Water is evaporated from the aqueous caustic solution until the water is in the range of from about 15% by weight to about 35% by weight and is reintroduced to the closed reaction chamber. Sufficient acid is added to the washed coal slurry to neutralize any remaining caustic present on the coal, which is thereafter dried to produce desulfurized coal having not less than about 90% by weight of the sulfur present in the coal feed removed and having an ash content of less than about 2% by weight.

Nowak, Michael A. (Elizabeth, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasifiers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost-benefit outlook of black liquor gasification (BLG) could be greatly improved if the smelt causticization step could be achieved in situ during the gasification step. Or, at a minimum, the increase in causticizing load associated with BLG could be mitigated. A number of chemistries have been proven successful during black liquor combustion. In this project, three in situ causticizing processes (titanate, manganate, and borate) were evaluated under conditions suitable for high temperature entrained flow BLG, and low temperature steam reforming of black liquor. The evaluation included both thermodynamic modeling and lab experimentation. Titanate and manganate were tested for complete direct causticizing (to thus eliminate the lime cycle), and borates were evaluated for partial causticizing (to mitigate the load increase associated with BLG). Criteria included high carbonate conversion, corresponding hydroxide recovery upon hydrolysis, non process element (NPE) removal, and economics. Of the six cases (three chemistries at two BLG conditions), only two were found to be industrially viable: titanates for complete causticizing during high temperature BLG, and borates for partial causticizing during high temperature BLG. These two cases were evaluated for integration into a gasification-based recovery island. The Larsen [28] BLG cost-benefit study was used as a reference case for economic forecasting (i.e. a 1500 tpd pulp mill using BLG and upgrading the lime cycle). By comparison, using the titanate direct causticizing process yielded a net present value (NPV) of $25M over the NPV of BLG with conventional lime cycle. Using the existing lime cycle plus borate autocausticizing for extra capacity yielded a NPV of $16M.

Scott Sinquefeld; James Cantrell; Xiaoyan Zeng; Alan Ball; Jeff Empie

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

3

Role of interatomic bonding in the mechanical anisotropy and interlayer cohesion of CSH crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic scale properties of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH), the main binding phase of hardened Portland cement, are not well understood. Over a century of intense research has identified almost 50 different crystalline CSH minerals which are mainly categorized by their Ca/Si ratio. The electronic structure and interatomic bonding in four major CSH crystalline phases with structures close to those found in hardened cement are investigated via ab initio methods. Our result reveals the critical role of hydrogen bonding and importance of specifying precise locations for water molecules. Quantitative analysis of contributions from different bond types to the overall cohesion shows that while the Si-O covalent bonds dominate, the hydrogen bonding and Ca-O bonding are also very significant. Calculated results reveal the correlation between bond topology and interlayer cohesion. The overall bond order density (BOD) is found to be a more critical measure than the Ca/Si ratio in classifying different CSH crystals.

Dharmawardhana, C.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Misra, A. [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States)] [Department of Civil, Environmental, and Architectural Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Aryal, S.; Rulis, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Ching, W.Y., E-mail: ccdxz8@mail.umkc.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri—Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Effect of temperature on the microstructure of calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature affects the properties of concrete through its effect on the hydration of cement and its associated microstructural development. This paper focuses on the modifications to C-S-H induced by isothermal curing between 5 and 60 °C. The results show that as the temperature increases (within the range studied) the C/S ratio of C-S-H changes only slightly, with a higher degree of polymerisation of silicate chains, but there is a significant decrease in its bound water content and an increase of apparent density of 25%. This increase seems to come from a different packing of C-S-H at the nanoscale. As a consequence of these changes, the microstructure of the cement paste is much coarser and porous, which explains the lower final strengths obtained by curing at elevated temperatures. -- Highlights: •C-S-H structure studied at the atomic level •Multiple analytical techniques used •Studies conducted at temperatures above and below normal temperatures.

Gallucci, E., E-mail: gallucci.emmanuel@ch.sika.com; Zhang, X.; Scrivener, K.L.

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Characterization, Washing, Leaching, and Filtration of C-104 Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 1,400 g of wet Hanford Tank C-104 Sludge was evaluated by Battelle for the high-level waste (HLW) pretreatment processes of ultrafiltration, dilute caustic washing, and elevated-temperature caustic leaching. The filterability of diluted C-104 sludge was measured with a 0.1-{micro}m sintered metal Mott filter using a 24-inch-long, single-element, crossflow filtration system (cells unit filter [CUF]). While the filtrate was being recirculated prior to washing and leaching, a 6.9 wt% solids slurry was evaluated with a matrix of seven 1-hour conditions of varying trans-membrane pressure (30 to 70 psid) and axial velocity (9 to 15 ft/s). The filtrate flux and backpulse efficiency were determined for each condition. The slurry was concentrated to 23 wt% solids, a second matrix of six 1-hour conditions was performed, and data analogous to that recorded in the first matrix were obtained. The low-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.038 to 0.083 gpm/ft{sup 2}. The high-solids-concentration matrix produced filtrate flux rates that ranged from 0.0095 to 0.0172 gpm/ft{sup 2}. In both cases, the optimum filtrate flux was at the highest axial velocity (15 ft/s) and transmembrane pressure had little effect. Nearly all of the measured filtrate fluxes were more than an order of magnitude greater than the required plant flux for C-104 of 0.00126 gpm/ft{sup 2}. In both matrices, the filtrate flux appeared to be proportional to axial velocity, and the permeability appeared to be inversely proportional to the trans-membrane pressure. The first test condition was repeated as the last test condition for each matrix. In both cases, there was a significant decrease in filtrate flux, indicating some filter fouling during the test matrix that could not be removed by backpulsing alone, although the backpulse number and duration were not optimized. Following testing of these two matrices, the material was washed within the CUF by continuously adding approximately 5 L of 0.01-M NaOH and then removing it through the filter as permeate. The purpose of this washing step with 0.01-MNaOH was to remove water-soluble components that might inhibit dissolution of salts during caustic leaching, while avoiding peptization of the solids that occurs at a pH below 12. After washing the sludge with dilute caustic, it was combined with 3-M caustic, and the slurry was leached in a stainless steel vessel at 85 C for 8 hours. This leaching was followed by two 0.01-M caustic washes, each conducted in a stainless steel vessel to dilute remaining analytes from the interstitial liquids. Each rinse was performed at 85 C for 8 hours. Permeate from each of these process steps was removed using the crossflow filter system. Samples of the permeate from each slurry-washing activity and all intermediate process steps were taken and analyzed for chemical and radiochemical constituents. The fraction of each component removed was calculated. Key results are presented in Table S.1.

KP Brooks; PR Bredt; GR Golcar; SA Hartley; LK Jagoda; KG Rappe; MW Urie

2000-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

6

Rotary filtration system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary filtration apparatus for filtering a feed fluid into permeate is provided. The rotary filtration apparatus includes a container that has a feed fluid inlet. A shaft is at least partially disposed in the container and has a passageway for the transport of permeate. A disk stack made of a plurality of filtration disks is mounted onto the shaft so that rotation of the shaft causes rotation of the filtration disks. The filtration disks may be made of steel components and may be welded together. The shaft may penetrate a filtering section of the container at a single location. The rotary filtration apparatus may also incorporate a bellows seal to prevent leakage along the shaft, and an around the shaft union rotary joint to allow for removal of permeate. Various components of the rotary filtration apparatus may be removed as a single assembly.

Herman, David T. (Aiken, SC); Maxwell, David N. (Aiken, SC)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

Engineering the bonding scheme in C-S-H: The iono-covalent framework  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On the basis of recent molecular simulation and experimental studies, we discuss two possible strategies for tuning the mechanical properties of cementitious materials by modifying the bonding scheme in the hydrates at molecular level. We focus the discussion on the calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). A first strategy would be based on the strengthening of the network of cohesion forces acting between the individual C-S-H lamellae or between their crystallites. Atomic scale simulations by ab initio, molecular dynamics and energy minimization techniques show that the iono-covalent forces between individual C-S-H layers or C-S-H layer stacks, separated by strongly localized calcium ions and water molecules, are orders of magnitude larger than the ionic correlation forces acting between C-S-H surfaces separated by nm- or multi-nm-thick layers of mobile water molecules and ions. The elastic properties derived from this iono-covalent bonding scheme are in good agreement with experimental values obtained by ultrasonic or statistical ('grid') nanoindentation techniques. The concept picture for C-S-H which follows is that of a crystalline semi-continuum, with dense domains ('crystallites' or 'particles') iono-covalently bonded to each other, possibly entangled also, and embedded as long as the mesoscale porosity is water-saturated in a relatively weak attractive stress field due to fluctuating electrostatic forces. Depending on the size, the aspect ratio, and the turbostratic order of the crystallites, and also the composition of the interstitial solution, the relative importance of each contribution could be modified. This provides the basis for a better control of properties such as early age or long term strength development for instance. In this respect, the microstructure-properties relationships in clay minerals provide interesting leads, pointing to the importance of bonding continuity rather than bond strength. A second strategy to tune the mechanical properties of cement systems, akin to a biomimetic approach, is to hybridize the hydrates by grafting organic moieties on the mineral lamellae. This can be achieved by controlled hydrolysis of organo-silane precursor mixtures or by performing the hydration of the anhydrous silicates in silanized polymer solutions. The outcome may be materials with improved fracture energy and larger strain at failure.

Pellenq, R.J.-M. [Centre de Recherche en Matiere Condensee et Nanosciences, CNRS, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille cedex 09 (France); Lequeux, N. [Ecole Superieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles, Physico-Chimie des Polymeres et des Milieux Disperses, UMR 7615 CNRS-ESPCI-UPMC, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Damme, H. van [Ecole Superieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles, Physico-Chimie des Polymeres et des Milieux Disperses, UMR 7615 CNRS-ESPCI-UPMC, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75231 Paris cedex 05 (France)], E-mail: henri.vandamme@espci.fr

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Dark matter axions and caustic rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains discussions on the following topics: the strong CP problem; dark matter axions; the cavity detector of galactic halo axions; and caustic rings in the density distribution of cold dark matter halos.

Sikivie, P.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS SAMPLE ANALYSIS, CHEMICAL MODELING, AND FILTRATION EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Filtration within the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) currently limits the throughput in interim salt processing at the Savannah River Site. In this process, batches of salt solution with Monosodium Titanate (MST) sorbent are concentrated by crossflow filtration. The filtrate is subsequently processed to remove cesium in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) followed by disposal in saltstone grout. The concentrated MST slurry is washed and sent to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for vitrification. During recent ARP processing, there has been a degradation of filter performance manifested as the inability to maintain high filtrate flux throughout a multi-batch cycle. The objectives of this effort were to characterize the feed streams, to determine if solids (in addition to MST) are precipitating and causing the degraded performance of the filters, and to assess the particle size and rheological data to address potential filtration impacts. Equilibrium modelling with OLI Analyzer{sup TM} and OLI ESP{sup TM} was performed to determine chemical components at risk of precipitation and to simulate the ARP process. The performance of ARP filtration was evaluated to review potential causes of the observed filter behavior. Task activities for this study included extensive physical and chemical analysis of samples from the Late Wash Pump Tank (LWPT) and the Late Wash Hold Tank (LWHT) within ARP as well as samples of the tank farm feed from Tank 49H. The samples from the LWPT and LWHT were obtained from several stages of processing of Salt Batch 6D, Cycle 6, Batch 16.

Martino, C.; Herman, D.; Pike, J.; Peters, T.

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

10

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

11

Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Liquid filtration simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have a developed a computer code that simulates 3-D filtration of suspended particles in fluids in realistic filter structures. This code, being the most advanced filtration simulation package developed to date, provides LLNL and DOE with new capabilities to address problems in cleaning liquid wastes, medical fluid cleaning, and recycling liquids. The code is an integrated system of commercially available and LLNL-developed software; the most critical are the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver and the particle transport program. For the CFD solver, we used a commercial package based on Navier-Stokes equations and a LLNL-developed package based on Boltzman-lattice gas equations. For the particle transport program, we developed a cod based on the 3-D Langevin equation of motion and the DLVO theory of electrical interactions. A number of additional supporting packages were purchased or developed to integrate the simulation tasks and to provide visualization output.

Corey, I.; Bergman, W.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

CENTRIFUGAL MEMBRANE FILTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., the developer of a centrifugal membrane filtration technology, has engineered and developed a system for use within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. This is a crosscutting technology that falls under the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program, with potential application to tank wastes, contaminated groundwater, landfill leachate, and secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, including decontamination and decommissioning systems. SpinTek II High Shear Rotary Membrane Filtration System is a unique compact crossflow membrane system that has large, demonstrable advantages in performance and cost compared to currently available systems: (1) High fluid shear prevents membrane fouling even with very high solids content; hazardous and radioactive components can be concentrated to the consistency of a pasty slurry without fouling. (2) Induced turbulence and shear across the membrane increases membrane flux by a factor of ten over existing systems and allows operation on fluids not otherwise treatable. (3) Innovative ceramic membrane and mechanical sealing technology eliminates compatibility problems with aggressive DOE waste streams. (4) System design allows rapid, simple disassembly for inspection or complete decontamination. (5) Produces colloidal- and suspended-solids-free filtrate without the addition of chemicals. The first phase of this project (PRDA maturity stage 5) completed the physical scale-up of the SpinTek unit and verified successful scale-up with surrogate materials. Given successful scale-up and DOE concurrence, the second phase of this project (PRDA maturity stage 6) will provide for the installation and operation of the full-scale two-stage SpinTek unit for treatment of a DOE waste-stream at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technology has very broad application across the DOE system. Nineteen DOE technical needs areas (Appendix C) have been identified. Following successful full-scale demonstration for treatment of DOE wastes, this innovative technology will be rapidly deployed on a wide range of waste and process streams throughout the DOE system.

William A. Greene; Patricia A. Kirk; Richard Hayes; Joshua Riley

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

In Situ Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black liquor gasification offers a number of attractive incentives to replace Tomlinson boilers but it also leads to an increase in the causticizing load. Reasons for this have been described in previous reports (FY04 ERC, et.al.). The chemistries have also been covered but will be reviewed here briefly. Experimental results of the causticizing reactions with black liquor are presented here. Results of the modeling work were presented in detail in the Phase 1 report. They are included in Table 2 for comparison but will not be discussed in detail. The causticizing agents were added to black liquor in the ratios shown in Table 1, mixed, and then spray-dried. The mixture ratios (doping levels) reflect amount calculated from the stoichiometry above to achieve specified conversions shown in the table. The solids were sieved to 63-90 microns for use in the entrained flow reactors. The firing conditions are shown in Table 2. Pictures and descriptions of the reactors can be found in the Phase 1 annual report. Following gasification, the solids (char) was collected and analyzed by coulometric titration (for carbonate and total carbon), and by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP) for a wide array of metals.

Scott Alan Sinquefield

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

16

Synthesis and nano-mechanical characterization of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) made with 1.5 CaO/SiO{sub 2} mixture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is synthesized and characterized. C-S-H slurry was made with calcium oxide (CaO) to micro-silica (SiO{sub 2}) mixture ratio of 1.5 and enough deionized water. The slurry was continuously mixed for 7 days, then the excess water was removed. Two methods of drying were implemented: one method used the standard d-dry technique and the other was equilibrated to 11% relative humidity (RH). The dried powders were characterized using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRDA), and {sup 29}Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The stoichiometric formulas of synthetic C-S-H powders dried to d-dry and 11% RH in this study were approximated as C{sub 1.2}SH{sub 0.7} and C{sub 1.2}SH{sub 2.4} respectively. The powders were then compacted to create specimens with porosities similar to C-S-H in hydrated cement. The specimens underwent nanoindentation to mechanically characterize C-S-H. The experiments provide insight on the nanoscale mechanical characteristics of C-S-H.

Foley, Emmy M. [Arizona Public Service, Wintersburg, AZ 85354 (United States)] [Arizona Public Service, Wintersburg, AZ 85354 (United States); Kim, Jung J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Reda Taha, M.M., E-mail: mrtaha@unm.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, MSC01 1070, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Health Benefits of Particle Filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

Fisk, William J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Health Benefits of Particle Filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also, reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percent age improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, for example, 7percent to 25percent. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air.

Fisk, William J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Progress in caustic dezincing of galvanized scrap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to the worldwide increase in consumption of galvanized steel for automobiles in the last fifteen years, and the cost of environmental compliance associated with remelting larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, processes are being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. In the process discussed here, zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic and is recovered electrolytically as dendritic powder. The dezinced ferrous scrap is rinsed and used directly. The process is effective for zinc, lead, and aluminum removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. Pilot testing has been conducted in Hamilton, Ontario for batch treatment of 900 tonnes of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant in East Chicago, Indiana, now in its second generation, has dezinced in a continuous process mode about 1,800 tonnes of loose clips and shredded stamping plant scrap; this scrap typically has residual zinc below 0.05% and sodium dragout below 0.001%. This paper reviews caustic dezincing pilot plant performance and economics.

Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Morgan, W.A. [Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Preconceptual Design Description for Caustic Recycle Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify both high-level and low-activity waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. One aspect of the planning includes a need for a caustic recycle process to separate sodium hydroxide for recycle. Sodium is already a major limitation to the waste-oxide loading in the low-activity waste glass to be vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant, and additional sodium hydroxide will be added to remove aluminum and to control precipitation in the process equipment. Aluminum is being removed from the high level sludge to reduce the number of high level waste canisters produced. A sodium recycle process would reduce the volume of low-activity waste glass produced and minimize the need to purchase new sodium hydroxide, so there is a renewed interest in investigating sodium recycle. This document describes an electrochemical facility for recycling sodium for the WTP.

Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.

2008-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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21

Integrated pore blockage-cake filtration model for crossflow filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crossflow filtration is to be a key process in the treatment and disposal of approximately 60,000 metric tons of high-level radioactive waste stored at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is assessing filter performance with waste simulant materials that mimic the chemical and physical properties of Hanford tank waste. Prior simulant studies indicated that waste filtration performance may be limited by pore and cake fouling. To limit the shutdown of waste treatment operations, the pre-treatment facility plans to recover filter flux losses from cake formation and filter fouling by frequently backpulsing the filter elements. The objective of the current paper is to develop a simple model of flux decline resulting from cake and pore fouling and potential flux recovery through backpulsing of the filters for Hanford waste filtration operations. To this end, a model capable of characterizing the decline in waste-simulant filter flux as a function of both irreversible pore blockage and reversible cake formation is proposed. This model is used to characterize the filtration behavior of Hanford waste simulants in both continuous and backpulsed operations. The model is then used to infer the optimal backpulse frequency under specific operating conditions.

Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Russell, Renee L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Smith, Harry D.; Peterson, Reid A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Filtration Understanding: FY10 Testing Results and Filtration Model Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document completes the requirements of Milestone 2-4, Final Report of FY10 Testing, discussed in the scope of work outlined in the EM31 task plan WP-2.3.6-2010-1. The focus of task WP 2.3.6 is to improve the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) understanding of filtration operations for high-level waste (HLW) to improve filtration and cleaning efficiencies, thereby increasing process throughput and reducing the Na demand (through acid neutralization). Developing the cleaning/backpulsing requirements will produce much more efficient operations for both the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Savannah River Site (SRS), thereby significantly increasing throughput by limiting cleaning cycles. The scope of this work is to develop the understanding of filter fouling to allow developing this cleaning/backpulsing strategy.

Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Peterson, Reid A.; Russell, Renee L.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

23

Physics of Caustics and Protein Folding: Mathematical Parallels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy for protein folding arises from multiple sources and is not large in total. In spite of the many specific successes of energy landscape and other approaches, there still seems to be some missing guiding factor that explains how energy from diverse small sources can drive a complex molecule to a unique state. We explore the possibility that the missing factor is in the geometry. A comparison of folding with other physical phenomena, together with analytic modeling of a molecule, led us to analyze the physics of optical caustic formation and of folding behavior side-by-side. The physics of folding and caustics is ostensibly very different but there are several strong parallels. This comparison emphasizes the mathematical similarity and also identifies differences. Since the 1970's, the physics of optical caustics has been developed to a very high degree of mathematical sophistication using catastrophe theory. That kind of quantitative application of catastrophe theory has not previously been applied to folding nor have the points of similarity with optics been identified or exploited. A putative underlying physical link between caustics and folding is a torsion wave of non-constant wave speed, propagating on the dihedral angles and $\\Psi$ found in an analytical model of the molecule. Regardless of whether we have correctly identified an underlying link, the analogy between caustic formation and folding is strong and the parallels (and differences) in the physics are useful.

Walter Simmons; Joel L. Weiner

2011-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

24

Physics of Caustics and Protein Folding: Mathematical Parallels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy for protein folding arises from multiple sources and is not large in total. In spite of the many specific successes of energy landscape and other approaches, there still seems to be some missing guiding factor that explains how energy from diverse small sources can drive a complex molecule to a unique state. We explore the possibility that the missing factor is in the geometry. A comparison of folding with other physical phenomena, together with analytic modeling of a molecule, led us to analyze the physics of optical caustic formation and of folding behavior side-by-side. The physics of folding and caustics is ostensibly very different but there are several strong parallels. This comparison emphasizes the mathematical similarity and also identifies differences. Since the 1970's, the physics of optical caustics has been developed to a very high degree of mathematical sophistication using catastrophe theory. That kind of quantitative application of catastrophe theory has not previously been applied ...

Simmons, Walter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Inertial microfluidics for particle separation and filtration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Filtration and separation of particles has numerous industrial and research applications in biology and medicine. In this work, inertial microfluidics is used to develop devices… (more)

Bhagat, Ali Asgar Saleem

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines (ANLCorningHyundai CRADA) June 19, 2014 DOE Annual Merit Review & Peer Evaluation Meeting PI: Kyeong Lee Co-investigators: Seung Choi,...

27

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines (ANLCorningHyundai CRADA) May 15, 2013 DOE Annual Merit Review & Peer Evaluation Meeting PI: Kyeong Lee Postdocs: Seung Choi, Heeje...

28

Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Technology: Success stories...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Technology: Success stories at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Dr. Amit Shyam, ORNL Sponsored by U.S. Department...

29

Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Technology: Success stories...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Success stories at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Technology: Success stories at the High Temperature...

30

General calculations using graphics hardware, with application to interactive caustics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General calculations using graphics hardware, with application to interactive caustics Chris Trendall and A. James Stewart iMAGIS­GRAVIR/IMAG and University of Toronto Abstract. Graphics hardware has general computation. This paper shows that graphics hardware can perform general calculations, which

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

31

Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank S-110 Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Hanford Tank S-110 sludge caustic leaching test conducted in FY 2001 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The data presented here can be used to develop the baseline and alternative flowsheets for pretreating Hanford tank sludge. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the work through the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP; EM?50).

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carson, Katharine J.; Darnell, Lori P.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoopes, Francis V.; Sell, Richard L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, John J.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

32

Economic Feasibility of Electrochemical Caustic Recycling at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains a review of potential cost benefits of NaSICON Ceramic membranes for the separation of sodium from Hanford tank waste. The primary application is for caustic recycle to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreatment leaching operation. The report includes a description of the waste, the benefits and costs for a caustic-recycle facility, and Monte Carlo results obtained from a model of these costs and benefits. The use of existing cost information has been limited to publicly available sources. This study is intended to be an initial evaluation of the economic feasibility of a caustic recycle facility based on NaSICON technology. The current pretreatment flowsheet indicates that approximately 6,500 metric tons (MT) of Na will be added to the tank waste, primarily for removing Al from the high-level waste (HLW) sludge (Kirkbride et al. 2007). An assessment (Alexander et al. 2004) of the pretreatment flowsheet, equilibrium chemistry, and laboratory results indicates that the quantity of Na required for sludge leaching will increase by 6,000 to 12,000 MT in order to dissolve sufficient Al from the tank-waste sludge material to maintain the number of HLW canisters produced at 9,400 canisters as defined in the Office of River Protection (ORP) System Plan (Certa 2003). This additional Na will significantly increase the volume of LAW glass and extend the processing time of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Future estimates on sodium requirements for caustic leaching are expected to significantly exceed the 12,000-MT value and approach 40,000-MT of total sodium addition for leaching (Gilbert, 2007). The cost benefit for caustic recycling is assumed to consist of four major contributions: 1) the cost savings realized by not producing additional immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, 2) caustic recycle capital investment, 3) caustic recycle operating and maintenance costs, and 4) research and technology costs needed to deploy the technology. In estimating costs for each of these components, several parameters are used as inputs. Due to uncertainty in assuming a singular value for each of these parameters, a range of possible values is assumed. A Monte Carlo simulation is then performed where the range of these parameters is exercised, and the resulting range of cost benefits is determined.

Poloski, Adam P.; Kurath, Dean E.; Holton, Langdon K.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Fountain, Matthew S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Filters Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems (ANLCorningCaterpillar CRADA)...

34

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems (ANLCorningCaterpillar CRADA) Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems Development of...

35

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems (ANLCorningCaterpillar CRADA) Development of Advanced Particulate Filters...

36

CFD Analysis of Particle Deposition During DPF Filtration Processes...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Processes CFD Analysis of Particle Deposition During DPF Filtration Processes A 3-D DPF model is developed to predict thermo-physical properties during filtration processes and to...

37

Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency Studies Using Laboratory Generated Particles. Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency...

38

A mathematical and experimental study of caustic flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Dr. Ching Buang Wu A simple non-equilibrium chemical displacement model for continuous, linear, caustic flooding of crude oil is presented. The laboratory experiments were conducted to support the numerical simulation and to verify the results.... The unique feature of this mathematic study is that it includes the chemistry of the acid hydrolysis to produce surfactants and the chemical reaction rate under the non- equilibrium state. The in-situ generated surfactant was presumed to alter the oil...

Shen, Tsu-Cheng

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Linear Thermodynamics of Rodlike DNA Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Linear thermodynamics transportation theory is employed to study filtration of rodlike DNA molecules. Using the repeated nanoarray consisting of alternate deep and shallow regions, it is demonstrated that the complex ...

Li, Zirui

40

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) System Integration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report of the results obtained from the operation of an integrated test circuit for the Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) process for the desulfurization and demineralization of coal. The objectives of operational testing of the 20 pounds of coal per hour integrated MCL test circuit are: (1) to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS); (2) to determine the range of effective process operation; (3) to test process conditions aimed at significantly lower costs; and (4) to deliver product coal.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

VELOCITY ANISOTROPY AND SHAPE BIAS IN THE CAUSTIC TECHNIQUE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use the Millennium Simulation to quantify the statistical accuracy and precision of the escape-velocity technique for measuring cluster-sized halo masses at z {approx} 0.1. We show that in three dimensions one can measure nearly unbiased (<4%) halo masses (>1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun} h {sup -1}) with 10%-15% scatter. Line-of-sight projection effects increase the scatter to {approx}25%, where we include the known velocity anisotropies. The classical ''caustic'' technique incorporates a calibration factor that is determined from N-body simulations. We derive and test a new implementation that eliminates the need for calibration and utilizes only the observables: the galaxy velocities with respect to the cluster mean v, the projected positions r{sub p} , an estimate of the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) density concentration, and an estimate of the velocity anisotropies {beta}. We find that differences between the potential and density NFW concentrations induce a 10% bias in the caustic masses. We also find that large (100%) systematic errors in the observed ensemble average velocity anisotropies and concentrations translate to small (5%-10%) biases in the inferred masses.

Gifford, Daniel; Miller, Christopher J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

Plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a novel method for cleaning a filter surface using a plasma discharge self-cleaning filtration system. The method involves utilizing plasma discharges to induce short electric pulses of nanoseconds duration at high voltages. These electrical pulses generate strong Shockwaves that disintegrate and dislodge particulate matter located on the surface of the filter.

Cho, Young I.; Fridman, Alexander; Gutsol, Alexander F.; Yang, Yong

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

43

Thermophilic Biotrickling Filtration of Ethanol Vapors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermophilic Biotrickling Filtration of Ethanol Vapors H U U B H . J . C O X , T H O M A S S E X of ethanol vapors in biotrickling filters for air pollution control was investigated. Two reactors were adaptation phase, the removal of ethanol was similar in both reactors. At a bed contact time of 57 s

44

Caustic Crossing Microlensing Event by Binary MACHOs and Time Scale Bias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Caustic crossing microlensing events provide us a unique opportunity to measure the relative proper motion of the lens to the source, and so those caused by binary MACHOs are of great importance for understanding the structure of the Galactic halo and the nature of MACHOs. The microlensing event 98-SMC-01, occurred in June 1998, is the first event for which the proper motion is ever measured through the caustic crossing, and this event may be caused by binary MACHOs as we argue in this Letter. Motivated by the possible existence of binary MACHOs, we have performed the Monte Carlo simulations of caustic crossing events by binary MACHOs and investigated the properties and detectability of the events. Our calculation shows that typical caustic crossing events have the interval between two caustic crossings ($t_{\\rm cc}$) of about 5 days. We argue that with the current strategy of binary event search the proper motions of these typical events are not measurable because of the short time scale. Therefore the proper motion distribution measured from caustic crossing events suffers significantly from {`}time scale bias{'}, which is a bias toward finding long time scale events and hence slowly moving lenses. We predict there are two times more short time scale events ($t_{\\rm cc}\\le 10$ days) than long time scale events ($t_{\\rm cc}\\ge 10$ days), and propose an hourly monitoring observation instead of the nightly monitoring currently undertaken to detect caustic crossing events by binary MACHOs more efficiently.

Mareki Honma

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

On calculation of microlensing light curve by gravitational lens caustic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For an analysis of microlensing observational data in case of binary gravitational lenses as well as for an interpretation of observations of high magnification events in multiple images of a lensed quasar it is necessary to calculate for a given source the microlensing light curve by a fold caustic. This problem comes to the numerical calculation of a singular integral. We formulated the sufficient condition of a convergence of the integral sum for this singular integral. The strictly approach to the problem of a comparison of model results with the unequally sampled observational data consists in calculation of the model light curve in equidistant points of the canonical dissection of the integration segment and a following interpolation of its values at the moments of observations.

M. B. Bogdanov

2001-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

46

Interactive Caustics Using Local Precomputed Irradiance Chris Wyman Charles Hansen Peter Shirley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Computing, The University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah, USA Abstract Bright patterns of lightInteractive Caustics Using Local Precomputed Irradiance Chris Wyman Charles Hansen Peter Shirley

Wyman, Chris

47

Water filtration optimization by geometric programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Industrial Engineering WATER FILTRATION OPTIMIZATION BY GEOMETRIC PROGRAMMING A Thesis by DUANE JIMMY WRAY Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) M p, ~ (Member)' December 1970 ABSTRACT Water Fi 1 trati on Optimization... Mechanisms Empirical Studies Mi ltimedia Filters GEOMETRIC PROGRAMMING Posynomial Functions . Optimizing Posynomials Constrained Optima , Degrees of Difficulty Computer Algorithm . Page 12 13 17 20 20 24 25 FILTER COST MODEL Reducing...

Wray, Duane Jimmy

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Characterization of Filtration Scale-Up Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scale-up performance of sintered stainless steel crossflow filter elements planned for use at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) and at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were characterized in partial fulfillment (see Table S.1) of the requirements of Test Plan TP RPP WTP 509. This test report details the results of experimental activities related only to filter scale-up characterization. These tests were performed under the Simulant Testing Program supporting Phase 1 of the demonstration of the pretreatment leaching processes at PEP. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the tests discussed herein for Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to address the data needs of Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-07-004. Scale-up characterization tests employ high-level waste (HLW) simulants developed under the Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-469. The experimental activities outlined in TP-RPP-WTP-509 examined specific processes from two broad areas of simulant behavior: 1) leaching performance of the boehmite simulant as a function of suspending phase chemistry and 2) filtration performance of the blended simulant with respect to filter scale-up and fouling. With regard to leaching behavior, the effect of anions on the kinetics of boehmite leaching was examined. Two experiments were conducted: 1) one examined the effect of the aluminate anion on the rate of boehmite dissolution and 2) another determined the effect of secondary anions typical of Hanford tank wastes on the rate of boehmite dissolution. Both experiments provide insight into how compositional variations in the suspending phase impact the effectiveness of the leaching processes. In addition, the aluminate anion studies provide information on the consequences of gibbsite in waste. The latter derives from the expected fast dissolution of gibbsite relative to boehmite. This test report concerns only results of the filtration performance with respect to scale-up. Test results for boehmite dissolution kinetics and filter fouling are reported elsewhere (see Table S.1). The primary goal of scale-up testing was to examine how filter length influenced permeate flux rates. To accomplish this, the existing cells unit filter system, which employs a 2-ft-long, 0.5-in. (inner) diameter sintered stainless steel filter element, was redesigned to accommodate an 8-ft. sintered stainless steel filter element of the same diameter. Testing was then performed to evaluate the filtration performance of waste simulant slurries. Scale-up testing consisted of two separate series of filtration tests: 1) scale-up axial velocity (AV)/transmembrane pressure (TMP) matrix tests and 2) scale-up temperature tests. The AV/TMP matrix tests examined filtration performance of two different waste simulant slurries in the 8-ft. cells unit filter system. Waste simulant slurry formulations for the 8-ft. scale-up test was selected to match simulant slurries for which filtration performance had been characterized on the 2-ft CUF. For the scale-up temperature tests, the filtration performance at three test temperatures (i.e., 25°C, 40°C, and 60°C) was determined to evaluate if filter flux versus temperature correlations developed using the 2-ft filters were also valid for the 8-ft filters.

Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Luna, Maria L.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Jagoda, Lynette K.

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Demand Controlled Filtration in an Industrial Cleanroom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an industrial cleanroom, significant energy savings were realized by implementing two types of demand controlled filtration (DCF) strategies, one based on particle counts and one on occupancy. With each strategy the speed of the recirculation fan filter units was reduced to save energy. When the control was based on particle counts, the energy use was 60% of the baseline configuration of continuous fan operation. With simple occupancy sensors, the energy usage was 63% of the baseline configuration. During the testing of DCF, no complaints were registered by the operator of the cleanroom concerning processes and products being affected by the DCF implementation.

Faulkner, David; DiBartolomeo, Dennis; Wang, Duo

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A rigid porous filter and filtration method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention involves a porous rigid filter comprising a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulate from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulate. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area- to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas, Straub L.; Dennis, Richard A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Sandusky Water Filtration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey WindSamsungFarmsTreatment Jump to:Filtration

52

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Foster) - Honda Motor in Japan Complimentary Part Supply - Iljin Electric Co. (DPF heating systems for regeneration) 18 - - Summary Experimental setup for DPF filtration...

53

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(ANLCorningCaterpillar CRADA) Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems (ANLCorningCaterpillar CRADA) ace22lee.pdf More Documents & Publications...

54

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. ‘preliminary’) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

Peters, T. B.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) system integration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were to design, construct, shakedown and operate an integrated MCL test circuit to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), to test process conditions aimed at lower costs, and to deliver product coal. These objectives were met by the procurement, construction, and operation of the integrated test circuit. Shakedown and a 63-test process matrix resulted in the production of about 3,700 pounds of treated coal. Product MCL coal may be used to displace oil in some turbine and diesel engines and may be used in the retrofit of oil-fired boilers. Two high sulfur, high ash coals and one medium sulfur, high ash coal representative of the Eastern United States coal production were processed: Pittsburgh No. 8 (Powhatan No. 6 mine), Kentucky No. 9, and Pittsburgh No. 8 (Blacksville No. 2 mine). Although mild kiln operating conditions (325 to 415{degree}C and 1 to 2.3 hours residence time) and low caustic to coal ratios (1:1 to 3:1) were used, the combination of continuous operation and rigorous exclusion of air from the system allowed the production of MCL coal that had product sulfur content was well below NSPS standards, very low carbonate production, very little volatile losses, and low alkali retention by the product MCL coal. Optimization testing resulted in a product coal containing 0.2 to 0.4 percent sulfur (0.26 to 0.6 lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu) and 0.15 to 0.5 percent ash with more than 90 percent organic sulfur removal, {approximately}95 percent SO{sub 2} reduction from run-of-mine coal, {approximately}91 percent SO{sub 2} reduction from precleaned process feed coal, and with heat content of about 14,000 Btu per pound.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Changes in the pore network structure of Hanford sediment after reaction1 with caustic tank wastes2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Changes in the pore network structure of Hanford sediment after reaction1 with caustic tank wastes2@princeton.edu9 10 11 Abstract12 At the former nuclear weapons production site in Hanford, WA, caustic radioactive due to these geochemical reactions. The reacted Hanford sediment column had been18 imaged in 3D using

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

57

Hierarchical analysis of filtration. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original proposal for this work suggested two lines Of analysis that could be used to develop an hierarchical analysis of filtration. The first of these was semi-empirical and required the use of an angle-dependent rate coefficient to model the effect of particle inertia, while the second made use of a particle velocity decomposition that separated the velocity into an inertial part and a diffusive part. We have concluded that the semiempirical approach cannot lead to an efficient treatment of the filtration problem, and in this study we have dirrcted most of our effort toward the development of the velocity decomposition approach. Problems arise with the velocity decomposition method because the panicle tracking equation is hyperbolic in nature, and there are regions in the flow field where it is difficult to calculate the deterministic particle velocity. These problems can be avoided with an asymptotic analysis, and we have used this approach to determine single fiber efficiencies for small Stokes numbers. These efficiencies illustrate a minimum as a function of the particle diameter; however, the range of validity (in terms of the Stokes number) of the asymptotic method is uncertain. If the range of validity of the asymptotic expansion is suitable for the solution of practical problems, the current work on homogeneous filters should be expanded to included a broader range of values of the key parameters and then extended to include the case of heterogeneous filters. If the range of validity of the asymptotic method is not suitable for the solution of practical problems, the particle tracking problem must be resolved or we must move on to the use of Brownian dynamics. This approach is outlined, where we have indicated how Brownian dynamics may be incorporated into the method of volume averaging.

Quintard, M. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Arts et Metiers, 33 - Talence (France). Lab. Energetique et Phenomenes de Transfert; Whitaker, S. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-2939E Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment of California. #12;1 Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment economizers in data centers to save energy while controlling particle concentrations with high-quality air

59

Household scale slow sand filtration in the Dominican Republic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slow sand filtration is a method of water treatment that has been used for hundreds of years. In the past two decades, there has been resurgence in interest in slow sand filtration, particularly as a low-cost, household-scale ...

Donison, Kori S. (Kori Shay), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Christoph Beckermann Associate Beckermann, C., "Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration," in Proceedings of the 46th, 1992. #12;Abstract This paper presents an analysis of water modeling of steel pouring to study (1) air

Beckermann, Christoph

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K- Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filtration technologies Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Verification Statement TECHNOLOGY TYPE: BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS APPLICATION: CONTROL OF PM2... .5 EMISSIONS BY BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS TECHNOLOGY NAME: QG061...

63

Safety basis for the 241-AN-107 mixer pump installation and caustic addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety Basis was prepared to determine whether or not the proposed activities of installing a 76 HP jet mixer pump and the addition of approximately 50,000 gallons of 19 M (50:50 wt %) aqueous caustic are within the safety envelope as described by Tank Farms (chapter six of WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001, Rev. 0). The safety basis covers the components, structures and systems for the caustic addition and mixer pump installation. These include: installation of the mixer pump and monitoring equipment; operation of the mixer pump, process monitoring equipment and caustic addition; the pump stand, caustic addition skid, the electrical skid, the video camera system and the two densitometers. Also covered is the removal and decontamination of the mixer pump and process monitoring system. Authority for this safety basis is WHC-IP-0842 (Waste Tank Administration). Section 15.9, Rev. 2 (Unreviewed Safety Questions) of WHC-IP-0842 requires that an evaluation be performed for all physical modifications.

Van Vleet, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

64

An alternative parameterisation for binary-lens caustic-crossing events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microlensing events are being discovered and alerted by the two survey teams OGLE and MOA at an increasing rate. Around ten percent of these events involve binary lenses. Such events potentially contain much information on the physical properties of the observed binary systems, which can then be used for e.g. statistical studies on binary objects in the Galactic disk or bulge. However, such events are usually not straightforward to study, because the model equations are strongly non-linear and there are many local minima that can fool the search for the best solution if the parameter space is not inspected with great care. In this work an alternative parameterisation for the binary lens fitting problem is proposed, in which the parameters involved are defined to represent as closely as possible the caustic-crossing features observed in most binary lens light curves. Furthermore, we work out an extension of the method in order to make use of the straight line fold caustic approximation, when the latter applies for both the caustic entry and exit. We introduce an alternative parameterisation in order to confine the exploration of the parameter space to regions where the models only involve caustic crossing at the dates seen in the light curve. We find that the proposed parameterisation provides more robustness to the light curve fitting process, in particular in avoiding a code to get stuck in false minima.

A. Cassan

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE VOLUME1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1413 A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE with the quantities of chemical added and sludge produced. The pH and metals concentrations do not change linearlyH and the corresponding effluent composition and sludge volume can not be accurately determined without empirical

66

Structural evaluation of mixer pump installed in Tank 241-AN-107 for caustic addition project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the structural analysis and evaluation of a mixer pump and caustic addition system to be used in Tank 107-AN. This pump will be installed in the central pump pit of this double- shell tank for the purpose of bringing the hydroxide ion concentration into compliance with Tank Farm operating specifications.

Leshikar, G.A.

1995-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

Chemical cleaning of coal by molten caustic leaching after pretreatment by low-temperature devolatilization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Pretreatment of coal by devolatization at temperatures ranging from about 420.degree. C. to about 450.degree. C. for from about 10 minutes to about 30 minutes before leaching with molten caustic leads to a significant reduction in carbonate formation, greatly reducing the cost of cleaning coal on a per ton basis.

Chriswell, Colin D. (Slater, IA); Kaushik, Surender M. (Socorro, NM); Shah, Navin D. (Houston, TX); Markuszewski, Richard (Ames, IA)

1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

68

Simulation of filtration for suspension transport in porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the development and application of a novel method for analyzing the filtration of particles transported through a granular porous medium. The proposed analysis considers the deposition of particles ...

Kim, Yun Sung, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Improved filtration membranes through self-organizing amphiphilic comb copolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The operating cost of a membrane filtration system is generally determined by two major factors: the permeability of the membrane to water, and the lifetime of the membrane. Both of these are strongly affected by the ...

Asatekin Alexiou, Ayse

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Experiments concerning the dynamic filtration of drilling mud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENTS CONCERNING THE DYNAMIC FILTRATION OF DRILLING MUD A Thesis by JOHN GARY ELLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1989 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EXPERIMENTS CONCERNING THE DYNAMIC FILTRATION OF DRILLING MUD A Thesis by JOHN GARY ELLER Approved as to style and content by: Hans C. Ju am-Wold (Chair of Committee) tephen A. Holditch (Member) Ted...

Eller, John Gary

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Water Clarity Simulant for K East Basin Filtration Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a simulant formulation intended to mimic the behavior of the suspended solids in the K East (KE) Basin fuel storage pool. The simulant will be used to evaluate alternative filtration apparatus to improve Basin water clarity and to possibly replace the existing sandfilter. The simulant was formulated based on the simulant objectives, the key identified parameters important to filtration, the composition and character of the KE Basin suspended sludge particles, and consideration of properties of surrogate materials.

Schmidt, Andrew J.

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

Schwarz, T. and Wells, S. (1999) "Storm Water Particle Removal using Cross-Flow Filtration and Sedimentation," in Advances in Filtration and Separation Technology, Volume 12, ed. by W. Leung, American Filtrations and Separations Society, pp.219-226.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Sedimentation," in Advances in Filtration and Separation Technology, Volume 12, ed. by W. Leung, American Filtrations and Separations Society, pp.219-226. CONTINUOUS DEFLECTION SEPARATION OF STORMWATER PARTICULATES

Wells, Scott A.

73

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing Summary Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.” The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leaching process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP-1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP-2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic. The work described in this report addresses the kinetics of caustic leach under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed at the lab-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to caustic leach chemistry to support a scale-up factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. The scale-up factor will take the form of an adjustment factor for the rate constant in the boehmite leach kinetic equation in the G2 model.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

74

Direct Causticizing for Black Liquor Gasification in a Circulating Fluidized Bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification of black liquor (BLG) has distinct advantages over direct combustion in Tomlinson recovery boilers. In this project we seek to resolve causticizing issues in order to make pressurized BLG even more efficient and cost-effective. One advantage of BLG is that the inherent partial separation of sulfur and sodium during gasification lends itself to the use of proven high yield variants to conventional kraft pulping which require just such a separation. Processes such as polysulfide, split sulfidity, ASAQ, and MSSAQ can increase pulp yield from 1% to 10% over conventional kraft but require varying degrees of sulfur/sodium separation, which requires additional [and costly] processing in a conventional Tomlinson recovery process. However during gasification, the sulfur is partitioned between the gas and smelt phases, while the sodium all leaves in the smelt; thus creating the opportunity to produce sulfur-rich and sulfur-lean white liquors for specialty pulping processes. A second major incentive of BLG is the production of a combustible product gas, rich in H2 and CO. This product gas (a.k.a. “syngas”) can be used in gas turbines for combined cycle power generation (which is twice as efficient as the steam cycle alone), or it can be used as a precursor to form liquid fuels, such as dimethyl ether or Fischer Tropsh diesel. There is drawback to BLG, which has the potential to become a third major incentive if this work is successful. The causticizing load is greater for gasification of black liquor than for combustion in a Tomlinson boiler. So implementing BLG in an existing mill would require costly increases to the causticizing capacity. In situ causticizing [within the gasifier] would handle the entire causticizing load and therefore eliminate the lime cycle entirely. Previous work by the author and others has shown that titanate direct causticizing (i.e. in situ) works quite well for high-temperature BLG (950°C), but was limited to pressures below about 5 bar. It is desirable however to operate BLG at 20-30 bar for efficiency reasons related to either firing the syngas in a turbine, or catalytically forming liquid fuels. This work focused on achieving high direct causticizing yields at 20 bars pressure. The titanate direct causticizing reactions are inhibited by CO2. Previous work has shown that the partial pressure of CO2 should be kept below about 0.5 bar in order for the process to work. This translates to a total reactor pressure limit of about 5 bar for airblown BLG, and only 2 bar for O2-blown BLG. In this work a process was developed in which the CO2 partial pressure could be manipulated to a level under 0.5 bar with the total system pressure at 10 bar during O2-blown BLG. This fell short of our 20 bar goal but still represents a substantial increase in the pressure limit. A material and energy balance was performed, as well as first-pass economics based on capital and utilities costs. Compared to a reference case of using BLG with a conventional lime cycle [Larson, 2003], the IRR and NVP were estimated for further replacing the lime kiln with direct causticizing. The economics are strongly dependent on the price of lime kiln fuel. At $6/mmBTU the lime cycle is the clear choice. At $8/mmBTU the NPV is $10M with IRR of 17%. At $12/mmBTU the NPV is $45M with IRR of 36%. To further increase the total allowable pressure, the CO2 could be further decreased by further decreasing the temperature. Testing should be done at 750C. Also a small pilot should be built.

Scott Sinquefield; Xiaoyan Zeng, Alan Ball

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 6 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from comparable samples in Macrobatch 5. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous macrobatch. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST in ARP continues to occur. Both the CST and CWT samples indicate that the target Free OH value of 0.03 has been surpassed. While at this time there is no indication that this has caused an operational problem, the CST should be adjusted into specification. The {sup 137}Cs results from the SRNL as well as F/H lab data indicate a potential decline in cesium decontamination factor. Further samples will be carefully monitored to investigate this.

Peters, T. B.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, adionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria or turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During first quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in all six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells, while turbidity was elevated in one well. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Chase, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During third quarter 1994, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded other SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, groundwater from the six PAC monitoring wells at the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) flagging criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard during the quarter are discussed in this report. During second quarter 1995, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS. Aluminum exceeded its SRS Flag 2 criterion in four of the six PAC wells. Iron and manganese exceeded Flag 2 criteria in three wells (PAC 2, 5, and 6). Radium-228 exceeded Level 2 Flagging Criteria in one well (PAC 2); however this was an estimated value because quantitation in the sample did not meet specifications. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, samples from the KAC monitoring wells at the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, and other constituents. Monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard (50 NTU) are provided in this report. No constituents exceeded the final PDWS in the KAC wells. Aluminum and iron exceeded SRS flagging criteria in one or more of the downgradient wells. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the K-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Washing and Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge: Results of FY 1998 Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge washing and parametric caustic leaching tests were performed on sludge samples tiom five Hanford tanks: B-101, BX-1 10, BX-112, C-102, and S-101. These studies examined the effects of both dilute hydroxide washing and caustic leaching on the composition of the residual sludge solids. ` Dilute hydroxide washing removed from <1 to 25% of the Al, -20 to 45% of the Cr, -25 to 97% of the P, and 63 to 99% of the Na from the Hdord tank sludge samples examined. The partial removal of these elements was likely due to the presence of water-soluble sodium salts of aluminate, chromate, hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, and phosphate, either in the interstitial liquid or as dried salts.

GJ Lumetta; BM Rapko; J Liu; DJ Temer; RD Hunt

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludge: Results of FY 1997 studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The tank wastes will be partitioned into high-level and low-level fractions. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of immobilized high-level waste (IHLW). Caustic leaching (sometimes referred to as enhanced sludge washing or ESW) represents the baseline method for pretreating Hanford tank sludges. Caustic leaching is expected to remove a large fraction of the Al, which is present in large quantities in Hanford tank sludges. A significant portion of the P is also expected to be removed from the sludge by metathesis of water-insoluble metal phosphates to insoluble hydroxides and soluble Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Similar metathesis reactions can occur for insoluble sulfate salts, allowing the removal of sulfate from the HLW stream. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching tests performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 1996. The sludges used in this study were taken from Hanford tanks AN-104, BY-108, S-101, and S-111.

Lumetta, G.J.; Burgeson, I.E.; Wagner, M.J.; Liu, J.; Chen, Y.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. On this report, results are discussed for sonically assisted crossflow filtration of V-1067 resid, diluted with No. 2 fuel oil, and sonically assisted batch filtrations of solids concentrates from continuous cross-flow filtration experiments.

Slomka, B.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

C-018H LERF filtration test plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following outlines the plan to test the polymeric backwash filtration system at the LERF. These tests will determine if the ETF filter design is adequate. If the tests show that the design is adequate, the task will be complete. If the tests show that the technology is inadequate, it may be necessary to perform further tests to qualify other candidate filtration technologies (e.g., polymeric tubular ultrafiltration, centrifugal ultrafiltration). The criteria to determine the success or failure of the backwash filter will be based on the system`s ability to remove the bacteria and inorganic contaminants from the evaporator process condensate. The tests are designed to qualify the design basis of the filtration technology that will be used in the ETF.

Moberg, T.P.; King, C.V.

1994-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

84

Mill Integration-Pulping, Stream Reforming and Direct Causticization for Black Liquor Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MTCI/StoneChem developed a steam reforming, fluidized bed gasification technology for biomass. DOE supported the demonstration of this technology for gasification of spent wood pulping liquor (or 'black liquor') at Georgia-Pacific's Big Island, Virginia mill. The present pre-commercial R&D project addressed the opportunities as well as identified negative aspects when the MTCI/StoneChem gasification technology is integrated in a pulp mill production facility. The opportunities arise because black liquor gasification produces sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) and sodium (as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) in separate streams which may be used beneficially for improved pulp yield and properties. The negative aspect of kraft black liquor gasification is that the amount of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} which must be converted to NaOH (the so called causticizing requirement) is increased. This arises because sulfur is released as Na{sub 2}S during conventional kraft black liquor recovery, while during gasification the sodium associated Na{sub 2}S is partly or fully converted to Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. The causticizing requirement can be eliminated by including a TiO{sub 2} based cyclic process called direct causticization. In this process black liquor is gasified in the presence of (low sodium content) titanates which convert Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium content) titanates. NaOH is formed when contacting the latter titanates with water, thereby eliminating the causticizing requirement entirely. The leached and low sodium titanates are returned to the gasification process. The project team comprised the University of Maine (UM), North Carolina State University (NCSU) and MTCI/ThermoChem. NCSU and MTCI are subcontractors to UM. The principal organization for the contract is UM. NCSU investigated the techno-economics of using advanced pulping techniques which fully utilize the unique cooking liquors produced by steam reforming of black liquor (Task 1). UM studied the kinetics and agglomeration problems of the conversion of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to (high sodium) titanates during gasification of black liquor in the presence of (low sodium) titanates or TiO{sub 2} (Task 2). MTCI/ThermoChem tested the performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization in their Process Development Unit (PDU) (Task 3). The specific objectives were: (1) to investigate how split sulfidity and polysulfide (+ AQ) pulping can be used to increase pulp fiber yield and properties compared to conventional kraft pulping; (2) to determine the economics of black liquor gasification combined with these pulping technologies in comparison with conventional kraft pulping and black liquor recovery; (3) to determine the effect of operating conditions on the kinetics of the titanate-based direct causticization reaction during black liquor gasification at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); (4) to determine the mechanism of particle agglomeration during gasification of black liquor in the presence of titanates at relatively low temperatures ({le} 750 C); and (5) to verify performance and operability of the combined technology of steam reforming and direct causticization of black liquor in a pilot scale fluidized bed test facility.

Adriaan van Heiningen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

85

Water purification by shock electrodialysis: Deionization, filtration, separation, and disinfection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

purification is performed primarily by reverse osmosis (RO) plants and in some cases by electrodialysis (EDWater purification by shock electrodialysis: Deionization, filtration, separation, and disinfection H L I G H T S · Experiments demonstrate the multi- functionality of shock electrodialysis. · Besides

Bazant, Martin Z.

86

Filtration plant for drinking water James Tarchala [1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filtration plant for drinking water James Tarchala [1] Alexandre Selhorst [2] Cheny Thao [3] 1 2 3 Riley, Wang, Aaron Nolan (Not Pictured) 12/1/2014 #12;Reclaiming waste HEAT TO PRE- HEAT WATER IN a FACTORY HOT WATER SYSTEM Group 5: Joseph Von Arx(1) Aaron McKeown(2) Kyle Swanson(3) Ian Klecka(4) 1 2 3 4

Kostic, Milivoje M.

87

Colony filtration blot: a new screening method for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a small tag and can therefore, for most applications, go directly into scale-up. The process for analysis of soluble expression in small liquid cultures, in which filtration, centrifugation and/or affinity purification are combined with dot-blot or SDS-PAGE analysis4,6. The general usefulness

Cai, Long

88

Hot Gas Filtration of Fine and Ultra fine Particles with Liquid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hot Gas Filtration of Fine and Ultra fine Particles with Liquid Phase Sintered SiC Ceramic DPF Hot Gas Filtration of Fine and Ultra fine Particles with Liquid Phase Sintered SiC...

89

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) System Integration Project. Topical report for test circuit operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report of the results obtained from the operation of an integrated test circuit for the Molten-Caustic-Leaching (MCL or Gravimelt) process for the desulfurization and demineralization of coal. The objectives of operational testing of the 20 pounds of coal per hour integrated MCL test circuit are: (1) to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS); (2) to determine the range of effective process operation; (3) to test process conditions aimed at significantly lower costs; and (4) to deliver product coal.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Plastic-lined valves are virtually trouble-free in caustic, acid pipelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chevron renovated the naphthenic acid plant, part of the Pascagoula, Mississippi Refinery of Chevron U.S.A. Inc., in mid-1979. They installed plastic-lined valves in the caustic and acid water piping systems. The valves combine the excellent sealing characteristics of a plug valve with the minimal rotary contact surface and low pressure drop of a butterfly valve. The valve has a molded-in-place PTFE liner resistant to abrasives and corrosives at temperatures of 450/sup 0/F, and is rated for pressures from full vacuum to 150 psi.

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Energy conservation in electrostatic fabric filtration of industrial dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conservation in energy consumption in industrial fabric filtration systems has become very important due to the substantial increase in energy costs. Recently, an external electric field was utilized in the industrial dust control by fabric filters with very promising initial results. A substantial decrease in the pressure drop and an increase in collection efficiency were observed. The detailed outcome of the experimental research program in electrostatic fabric filtration was presented. The results show that pressure drop decreases substantially with the increased electrostatic field strength for all relevant parameters. Furthermore, the data of the experimental program was utilized to develop a semi-empirical model for the determination of the pressure drop and to establish an Energy-Optimized Design Criteria.

Ariman, T.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Modified approaches for high pressure filtration of fine clean coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of moisture from fine (minus 28 mesh) clean coal to 20% or lower level is difficult using the conventional vacuum dewatering technique. High pressure filtration technique provides an avenue for obtaining low moisture in fine clean coal. This paper describes a couple of novel approaches for dewatering of fine clean coal using pressure filtration which provides much lower moisture in fine clean coal than that obtained using conventional pressure filter. The approaches involve (a) split stream dewatering and (b) addition of paper pulp to the coal slurry. For Pittsburgh No. 8 coal slurry, split stream dewatering at 400 mesh provided filter cake containing 12.9% moisture compared to 24.9% obtained on the feed material. The addition of paper pulp to the slurry provided filter cake containing about 17% moisture.

Yang, J.; Groppo, J.G.; Parekh, B.K. [Center for Applied Energy Research, Lexington, KY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During first quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (first quarter 1995 is the third of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in wells FAC 3 and 11C. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During second quarter 1995, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were completed in the Barnwell/McBean aquifer and were sampled for the first time during third quarter 1994 (second quarter 1995 is the fourth of four quarters of data required to support the closure of the basin). Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria such as the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and radium-226 exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard (50 NTU) in well FAC 3. Groundwater flow direction in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin was to the west at a rate of 1300 feet per year. Groundwater flow in the Barnwell/McBean was to the northeast at a rate of 50 feet per year.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin groundwater monitoring report: Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During third quarter 1994, samples from the FAC monitoring wells at the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were collected and analyzed for herbicides/pesticides, indicator parameters, metals, nitrate, radionuclide indicators, volatile organic compounds, and other constituents. Piezometer FAC 5P and monitoring well FAC 6 were dry and could not be sampled. New monitoring wells FAC 9C, 10C, 11C, and 12C were sampled for the first time during third quarter. Analytical results that exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS), other Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria, or the SRS turbidity standard of 50 NTU during the quarter were as follows: gross alpha exceeded the final PDWS and aluminum, iron, manganese, and total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the FAC wells. Turbidity exceeded the SRS standard in wells FAC 3 and 10C. Groundwater flow direction and rate in the water table beneath the F-Area Acid/Caustic Basin were similar to past quarters.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mechanism of Phosphorus Removal from Hanford Tank Sludge by Caustic Leaching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two experiments were conducted to explore the mechanism by which phosphorus is removed from Hanford tank sludge by caustic leaching. In the first experiment, a series of phosphate salts were treated with 3 M NaOH under conditions prototypic of the actual leaching process to be performed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The phosphates used were aluminum phosphate, bismuth phosphate, chromium(III) phosphate, and ?-tri-calcium phosphate; all of these phases have previously been determined to exist in Hanford tank sludge. The leachate solution was sampled at selected time intervals and analyzed for the specific metal ion involved (Al, Bi, Ca, or Cr) and for P (total and as phosphate). The solids remaining after completion of the caustic leaching step were analyzed to determine the reaction product. In the second experiment, the dependence of P removal from bismuth phosphate was examined as a function of the hydroxide ion concentration. It was anticipated that a plot of log[phosphate] versus log[hydroxide] would provide insight into the phosphorus-removal mechanism. This report describes the test activities outlined in Section 6.3.2.1, Preliminary Investigation of Phosphate Dissolution, in Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, Rev.1. The objectives, success criteria, and test conditions of Section 6.3.2.1 are summarized here.

Lumetta, Gregg J.

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

97

GPS Data Filtration Method for Drive Cycle Analysis Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When employing GPS data acquisition systems to capture vehicle drive-cycle information, a number of errors often appear in the raw data samples, such as sudden signal loss, extraneous or outlying data points, speed drifting, and signal white noise, all of which limit the quality of field data for use in downstream applications. Unaddressed, these errors significantly impact the reliability of source data and limit the effectiveness of traditional drive-cycle analysis approaches and vehicle simulation software. Without reliable speed and time information, the validity of derived metrics for drive cycles, such as acceleration, power, and distance, become questionable. This study explores some of the common sources of error present in raw onboard GPS data and presents a detailed filtering process designed to correct for these issues. Test data from both light and medium/heavy duty applications are examined to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed filtration process across the range of vehicle vocations. Graphical comparisons of raw and filtered cycles are presented, and statistical analyses are performed to determine the effects of the proposed filtration process on raw data. Finally, an evaluation of the overall benefits of data filtration on raw GPS data and present potential areas for continued research is presented.

Duran, A.; Earleywine, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

CROSSFLOW FILTRATION: EM-31, WP-2.3.6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing crossflow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed some of those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Crossflow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate solutions. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Integrated Salt Disposition Process and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the crossflow filter feed flow rate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and crossflow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to evaluate methods to improve filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today. Experiments that use non-radioactive simulants for actual waste always carry the inherent risk of not eliciting prototypic results; however, they will assist in focusing the scope needed to minimize radioactive testing and thus maximize safety. To that end this investigation has determined: (1) Waste simulant SB6 was found to be more challenging to filtration than a SRS Tank 8F simulant; (2) Higher solids concentration presents a greater challenge to filtration; (3) Filter cake is something that should be properly developed in initial filter operation; (4) Backpulsing is not necessary to maintain a good filter flux with salt wastes; (5) Scouring a filter without cleaning will lead to improved filter performance; (6) The presence of a filter cake can improve the solids separation by an order of magnitude as determined by turbidity; (7) A well developed cake with periodic scouring may allow a good filter flux to be maintained for long periods of time; and (8) Filtrate flux decline is reversible when the concentration of the filtering slurry drops and the filter is scoured.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is a semicrystalline polymer with excellent engineering plastic properties and suitable processing temperatures. PPS can also be made containing branches (using a trifunctional monomer) and with crosslinked microstructure (when curing the monomer at high temperature in the presence of oxygen). PPS is made from the condensation reaction between para-dichlorobenzene and sodium sulfide with the assistance of a catalyst (to lower the activation barrier). The synthesis conditions for making PPS has evolved since its invention in the 1960's to the optimal conditions developed by the Philips Corporation in the 1970's. The resulting polymer consists of chemically stable molecular moieties such as benzene rings and ether like sulfur linkages between the aromatic rings. Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 3.3 E8 rad (330 Mrad), or the equivalent of 11 years of gamma irradiation (assuming a stripping solution concentration of 7.5 Ci/gal), and several months of exposures to 3M caustic solution and caustic salt simulant, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, demonstrates PPS is stable to the new solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Herman, D.; Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic-Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. The work described in this report addresses caustic leaching under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. Because gibbsite leaching kinetics are rapid (gibbsite is expected to be dissolved by the time the final leach temperature is reached), boehmite leach kinetics are the main focus of the caustic-leach tests. The tests were completed at the laboratory-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. Two laboratory-scale caustic-leach tests were performed for each of the PEP runs. For each PEP run, unleached slurry was taken from the PEP caustic-leach vessel for one batch and used as feed for both of the corresponding laboratory-scale tests.

Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Determination of glomerular filtration rate by external counting methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparing the DTPA to other accepted methods; the results were very favorable for the use of ggmTC-DTPA. Klopper et al. , sa1d mTc-DTPA ". . . rapidly prepared by a kit method, is a useful addition to the list of radiopharmaceuticals that can be used... points. First, the external counting method is suitable as a true means of determining the glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Second, the method is applicable to cats. To do this, five dogs were injected with ggmTc(Sn)-DTPA. Plasma samples were drawn...

Sartor, Tammy Lee

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Development of Model Filtration Media for Investigating Size-Dependent  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMP AMD 602 -EnergyFiltration

103

Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA- 731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

Evans, S.K.

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System - 1997 Notice of Violation Consent Order  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System is one of two documents that comprise the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the HWMA/RCRA closure certification of the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This plan, which provides information about the project description, project organization, and quality assurance and quality control procedures, is to be used in conjunction with the Field Sampling Plan for the HWMA/RCRA Closure Certification of the TRA-731 Caustic and Acid Storage Tank System. This Quality Assurance Project Plan specifies the procedures for obtaining the data of known quality required by the closure activities for the TRA-731 caustic and acid storage tank system.

Evans, Susan Kay; Orchard, B. J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

PEP Integrated Test D Run Report Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes" of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario (Test B and D) has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario (Test A) has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP and vessels UFP VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In Test D, 19M sodium hydroxide (NaOH, caustic) was added to the waste slurry in the UFP VSL T02 vessel after the solids were concentrated to ~20% undissolved solids. The NaOH was added to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by heating to 85°C using direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. The main difference of Test D compared to Test B is that the leach temperature is 85°C for 24 hrs as compared to 100°C for 12 hours. The other difference is the Test D simulant had Cr in the simulant from the start of processing and Test B had Cr added to adjust the simulant composition after aluminum leaching. Following the caustic leach, the UFP-VSL-T02A vessel contents are cooled using the vessel cooling jacket. The slurry was then concentrated to 17 wt% undissolved solids and washed with inhibited water to remove NaOH and other soluble salts. Next, the slurry was oxidatively leached using sodium permanganate to solubilize chrome. The slurry was then washed to remove the dissolved chrome and concentrated.

Sevigny, Gary J.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filtration-based intervention Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: air filtration-based intervention Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 About the Air Pollution and Respiratory Health Program The Air Pollution and Respiratory Health...

107

The effect of concentration on the structure and crystallinity of a cementitious waste form for caustic wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cement-based waste forms have long been considered economical technologies for disposal of various types of waste. A solidified cementitious waste form, Cast Stone, was developed to immobilize the radioactive secondary waste from vitrification processes. In this work, Cast Stone was considered for a Na-based caustic liquid waste, and its physical properties were analyzed as a function of liquid waste loading up to 2 M Na. Differences in crystallinity (phase composition), microstructure, mesostructure (pore size distribution, surface area), and macrostructure (density, compressive strength) were investigated using various analytical techniques, in order to assess the suitability of Cast Stone as a chemically durable waste. It was found that the concentration of secondary waste simulant (caustic waste) had little effect on the relevant engineering properties of Cast Stone, showing that Cast Stone could be an effective and tolerant waste form for a wide range of concentrations of high sodium waste.

Chung, Chul-Woo; Turo, Laura A.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Johnson, Bradley R.; McCloy, John S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON{trademark} fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors.

Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. Crossflow filtration is suitable for continuous flow operation and, when coupled with a sonic or ultrasonic field, may constitute a solution to operational problems of solids separation in coal liquefaction. However, for the efficient and trouble-free operation of crossflow filters the problems arising from dealing with highly viscous coal liquefaction resids need to be avoided. Either crossflow filters suitable for work at elevated temperatures at reduced resid viscosity should be used or the coal liquefaction process network should be modified to allow for dilution of resids using a distillate fraction, e.g., naphtha, diesel oil, etc., to reduce the viscosity of resids. As perhaps even a more practical alternative, field-assisted crossflow filtration of the reactor`s effluent stream prior to the distillation step should be considered. Such an approach will circumvent the more difficult separation of fine and ultrafine solids from highly viscous coal liquefaction resids.

Slomka, B.J. [Ames Laboratory, IA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Results from Alloy 600 And Alloy 690 Caustic SCC Model Boiler Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A versatile model boiler test methodology was developed and used to compare caustic stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of mill annealed Alloy 600 and thermally treated Alloy 690. The model boiler included simulated crevice devices that efficiently and consistently concentrated Na2CO3, resulting in volatilization of CO2 with the steam and concentration of NaOH at the tube surfaces. The test methodology also included variation in tube stress, either produced by the primary to secondary side pressure differential, or by a novel method that reproducibly yields a higher stress condition on the tube. The significant effect of residual stress on tube SCC was also considered. SCC of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 were evaluated as a function of temperature and stress. Analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) evaluations of the cracks and the grain boundaries ahead of the cracks were performed, providing insight into the SCC mechanism. This model boiler test methodology may be applicable to a range of bulkwater secondary chemistries that concentrate to produce aggressive crevice environments.

Miller, Frederick D.; Thomas, Larry E.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

111

Life Extension Program for the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit at Savannah River Site - 13179  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. Currently, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the CSSX process are deployed in the (ARP)/Modular CSSX Unit (MCU), to process salt waste for permanent disposition. The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. The original plant was permitted for a three year design life; however, given the successful operation of the plant, a life extension program was completed to continue operations. The program included detailed engineering analyses of the life-expectancy of passive and active components, resulting in component replacement and/or maintenance and monitoring program improvements. The program also included a review of the operations and resulted in a series of operational improvements. Since the improvements have been made, an accelerated processing rate has been demonstrated. In addition, plans for instituting a next-generation solvent are in place and will enhance the decontamination factors. (author)

Samadi, Azadeh [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Caustic Precipitation of Plutonium and Uranium with Gadolinium as a Neutron Poison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The caustic precipitation of plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) from Pu and U-containing waste solutions has been investigated to determine whether gadolinium (Gd) could be used as a neutron poison for precipitation with greater than a fissile mass containing both Pu and enriched U. Precipitation experiments were performed using both process solution samples and simulant solutions with a range of 2.6-5.16 g/L U and 0-4.3:1 U:Pu. Analyses were performed on solutions at intermediate pH to determine the partitioning of elements for accident scenarios. When both Pu and U were present in the solution, precipitation began at pH 4.5 and by pH 7, 99% of Pu and U had precipitated. When complete neutralization was achieved at pH > 14 with 1.2 M excess OH{sup -}, greater than 99% of Pu, U, and Gd had precipitated. At pH > 14, the particles sizes were larger and the distribution was a single mode. The ratio of hydrogen:fissile atoms in the precipitate was determined after both settling and centrifuging and indicates that sufficient water was associated with the precipitates to provide the needed neutron moderation for Gd to prevent a criticality in solutions containing up to 4.3:1 U:Pu and up to 5.16 g/L U.

VISSER, ANN E.; BRONIKOWSKI, MICHAEL G.; RUDISILL, TRACY S.

2005-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

Recommended Guanidine Suppressor for the Next-Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The guanidine recommended for the Next-Generation Caustic-Side is N,N ,N -tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). Systematic testing has shown that it is significantly more lipophilic than the previously recommended guanidine DCiTG, the active extractant in the commercial guanidine product LIX -79, while not otherwise changing the solvent performance. Previous testing indicated that the extent of partitioning of the DCiTG suppressor to the aqueous strip solution is significantly greater than expected, potentially leading to rapid depletion of the suppressor from the solvent and unwanted organic concentrations in process effluents. Five candidate guanidines were tested as potential replacements for DCiTG. The tests included batch extraction with simulated waste and flowsheet solutions, third-phase formation, emulsion formation, and partition ratios of the guanidine between the solvent and aqueous strip solution. Preliminary results of a thermal stability test of the TiDG solvent at one month duration indicated performance approximately equivalent to DCiTG. Two of the guanidines proved adequate in all respects, and the choice of TiDG was deemed slightly preferable vs the next best guanidine BiTABG.

Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL; Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL; Duncan, Nathan C [ORNL; Ensor, Dale [Tennessee Technological University; Hill, Talon G [ORNL; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Roach, Benjamin D [ORNL; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V [ORNL; Williams, Neil J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Role of Filtration in Maintaining Clean Heat Exchanger Coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of the study was to investigate the role of filtration in maintaining clean heat exchanger coils and overall performance. Combinations of 6 different levels of filtration (MERV 14, 11, 8, 6, 4, and no filter) and 4 different coils (an eight-row lanced-fin coil, HX8L), (an eight-row wavy-fin coil, HX8W), (a four-row lanced-fin coil, HX4L) and (a two-row lanced-fin coil, HX2L) were tested at 4 different air velocities (1.52, 2.03, 2.54,3.05 m/s (300, 400, 500, 600 ft/min)). The fouled conditions were obtained after injection of 600 grams of ASHRAE standard dust upstream of the filter/coil combination. This magnitude of dust is representative of a year of normal operation for an air conditioning system. The air-side pressure drops of the coils and filters and air-side heat transfer coefficients of the coils were determined from the measurements under the clean and fouled conditions. Depending upon the filter and coil test, the coil pressure drops increased in the range of 6%-30% for an air velocity at 2.54 m/s (500 ft/min). The impact was significantly greater for tests performed without a filter. The largest relative effect of fouling on pressure drop occurs for coils with fewer rows and having lanced fins. Coils with a greater number of rows can hold more dust so that a fixed amount of dust has a relatively smaller impact. The impact of fouling on air-side heat transfer coefficients was found to be relatively small. In some cases, heat transfer was actually enhanced due to additional turbulence caused by the presence of dust. The experimental results for pressure drops and heat transfer coefficients were correlated and the correlations were implemented within computer models of prototypical rooftop air conditioners and used to evaluate the impact of fouling on cooling capacity and EER. The equipment cooling capacity is reduced with fouling primarily because of a decrease in air flow due to the increase pressure drop rather than due to changes in h eat transfer coefficient. In most cases, the EER was reduced with fouling primarily due to increased fan power. However, the changes in EER were relatively small, in the range of 1%-9% (10%). For most cases, equipment having low efficiency filters had higher EER after fouling than equipment with high efficiency filters, because the high efficiency filter caused significantly higher pressure drops than the low efficiency filters. The extra filter pressure drop outweighed the reduced coil pressure drop after fouling. The impact of fan efficiency curves was also investigated in the study. The energy penalty associated with high efficiency filters was reduced considerably with higher efficiency fans. There is an energy penalty associated with the use of high efficiency filtration. However, the primary reason for selecting high efficiency filters for a particular application would be improved air quality. For HX8L, the quantity of dust passing through the coil with a MERV4 filter was approximately 30 times the dust passing the coil with a MERV14 filter. Without an upstream filter, the quantity of dust passing through the coil was approximately 60 times the value for a MERV14 filter.

Li Yang; James E. Braun; Eckhard A. Groll

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

116

Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration Technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technology evaluation was performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory on behalf of the Federal Energy Management Program. The objective was to quantify the benefits side stream filtration provides to a cooling tower system. The evaluation assessed the performance of an existing side stream filtration system at a cooling tower system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Spallation Neutron Source research facility. This location was selected because it offered the opportunity for a side-by-side comparison of a system featuring side stream filtration and an unfiltered system.

Boyd, Brian K.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Portable water filtration system for oil well fractionation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The invention comprises a portable, multi-stage filtration system utilized in filtering water for an oil and gas stimulation process commonly known as fracking. Three stages are used, the first being a straining operation reducing the size of particulate matter in the water to about three-eighths of an inch. The second stage is a centrifugal separator, reducing the particle size to about 50 microns. The final stage utilizes a cartridge-type filter giving a final particle size in the water of about 5 microns. In this manner, water which is injected into the well head during the fracking process and which is obtained from readily available sources such as ponds, streams and the like is relatively free of particulate matter which can foul the fracking process. The invention, by virtue of being mounted on a trailer, is portable and thus can be easily moved from site to site. Water flow rates obtained using the invention are between 250 and 300 gallons per minute, sufficient for processing a small to medium sized well.

Seibert, D. L.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

118

ALTERNATE HIGH EFFICIENCY PARTICULATE AIR (HEPA) FILTRATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Phase IIA of this project, CeraMem has further developed and scaled up ceramic HEPA filters that are appropriate for use on filtration of vent gas from HLW tanks at DOE sites around the country. This work included procuring recrystallized SiC monoliths, developing membrane and cement materials, and defining a manufacturing process for the production of prototype full sizes HEPA filters. CeraMem has demonstrated that prototype full size filters can be manufactured by producing 9 full size filters that passed DOP aerosol testing at the Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility. One of these filters was supplied to the Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) for process tests using simulated HLW tank waste. SRTC has reported that the filter was regenerable (with some increase in pressure drop) and that the filter retained its HEPA retention capability. CeraMem has also developed a Regenerable HEPA Filter System (RHFS) design and acceptance test plan that was reviewed by DOE personnel. The design and acceptance test plan form the basis of the system proposal for follow-on work in Phase IIB of this project.

Bruce Bishop; Robert Goldsmith; Karsten Nielsen; Phillip Paquette

2002-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

119

Membrane filtration studies of inversely soluble model metalworking fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model metalworking fluids, characterized by phase separation of functional components at elevated temperatures, were studied. Results of membrane filtration experiments with three oils of differing chemical nature confirm the feasibility of specific removal of finely dispersed contaminant oils without the simultaneous loss of active components from adequately formulated fluids. Prerequisites are that membrane materials and pore sizes be suitably chosen and that operating temperatures be kept below the cloud point of the least soluble component. The most suitable filter in the present study was a hydrophilic regenerated cellulose membrane with a NMWL of 100,000 dalton. Complete oil removal was attained if membrane pore sizes did not exceed 0.1 {micro}m. It was also found that intrinsically water-soluble boundary lubricants of the polyglycol ether type are retained by membranes in the presence of PPG-1800, which serves as a precipitation promoter above the cloud point. This is of considerable practical importance since it offers the possibility of designing water-soluble boundary lubrication and extreme pressure additives which are activated by the presence of an inversely soluble component above its cloud point. The latter compound also acts as the principal hydrodynamic lubricant of the present model formulations. The usefulness of a new analytical tool for the rapid acquisition and imaging of data pertinent to changes in molecular aggregation and phase conditions was demonstrated.

Misra, S.K.; Skoeld, R.O. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

Delmau, L.H.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Laboratory Tests on Post-Filtration Precipitation in the WTP Pretreatment Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed, and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, "Undemonstrated Leaching Processes," of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes et al. 2006). The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. A simplified flow diagram of the PEP system is shown in Figure 1.1. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP; and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF).

Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Crum, Jarrod V.

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

Form, function and flow in the plankton : jet propulsion and filtration by pelagic tunicates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trade-offs between filtration rate and swimming performance among several salp species with distinct morphologies and swimming styles were compared. Small-scale particle encounter at the salp filtering apparatus was also ...

Sutherland, Kelly Rakow

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Design of a small-scale continuous linear motion pharmaceutical filtration module  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new small-scale continuous linear motion pharmaceutical filtration prototype was designed, fabricated, and tested. The goal of this unit is to filter an Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) from a mixture of API ...

Wong, Katherine Wing-Shan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Vit Plant receives and sets key air filtration equipment for Low Activity Waste Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WTP lifted a nearly 100-ton carbon bed absorber into the Low-Activity Waste Facility. This key piece of air-filtration equipment will remove mercury and acidic gases before air is channeled through...

125

Evaluation of Collector Well Configurations to Model Hydrodynamics in Riverbank Filtration and Groundwater Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collector well designs are necessary to maximize groundwater uptake and riverbank filtration without negatively impacting an aquifer. Unfortunately, there is a lack of information and research regarding the implementation of collector well design...

De Leon, Tiffany Lucinda

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

Design and testing of an experiment to measure self-filtration in particulate suspensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment for measuring self-filtration in terms of change in volume fraction downstream of a constriction compared to volume fraction upstream of said constriction was designed and tested. The user has the ability to ...

Flander, Mattias S. (Mattias Simon)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Self-healing properties of water filtration membranes containing amphiphilic comb polymer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) and filtration experiments, as well as other characterization techniques. Surface analysis is accomplished via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Membrane samples are cleaned (in hydrogen peroxide or ...

Devereaux, Caitlin Albright, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

EFFICACY OF FILTRATION PROCESSES TO OBTAIN WATER CLARITY AT K EAST SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL (SNF) BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to provide water clarity to the K East Basin via filtration processes. Several activities are planned that will challenge not only the capacity of the existing ion exchange modules to perform as needed but also the current filtration system to maintain water clarity. Among the planned activities are containerization of sludge, removal of debris, and hydrolasing the basin walls to remove contamination.

DUNCAN JB

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Brief Review of Filtration Studies for Waste Treatment at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document completes the requirements of Milestone 1-2, PNNL Draft Literature Review, discussed in the scope of work outlined in the EM-31 Support Project task plan WP-2.3.6-2010-1. The focus of task WP 2.3.6 is to improve the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) understanding of filtration operations for high-level waste (HLW) to enhance filtration and cleaning efficiencies, thereby increasing process throughput and reducing the sodium demand (through acid neutralization). Developing the processes for fulfilling the cleaning/backpulsing requirements will result in more efficient operations for both the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Savannah River Site (SRS), thereby increasing throughput by limiting cleaning cycles. The purpose of this document is to summarize Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL’s) literature review of historical filtration testing at the laboratory and of testing found in peer-reviewed journals. Eventually, the contents of this document will be merged with a literature review by SRS to produce a summary report for DOE of the results of previous filtration testing at the laboratories and the types of testing that still need to be completed to address the questions about improved filtration performance at WTP and SRS. To this end, this report presents 1) a review of the current state of crossflow filtration knowledge available in the peer-reviewed literature, 2) a detailed review of PNNL-related filtration studies specific to the Hanford site, and 3) an overview of current waste filtration models developed by PNNL and suggested avenues for future model development.

Daniel, Richard C.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economizer use in data centers is an energy efficiency strategy that could significantly limit electricity demand in this rapidly growing economic sector. Widespread economizer implementation, however, has been hindered by potential equipment reliability concerns associated with exposing information technology equipment to particulate matter of outdoor origin. This study explores the feasibility of using economizers in data centers to save energy while controlling particle concentrations with high-quality air filtration. Physical and chemical properties of indoor and outdoor particles were analyzed at an operating northern California data center equipped with an economizer under varying levels of air filtration efficiency. Results show that when improved filtration is used in combination with an economizer, the indoor/outdoor concentration ratios for most measured particle types were similar to levels when using conventional filtration without economizers. An energy analysis of the data center reveals that, even during the summer months, chiller savings from economizer use greatly outweigh any increase in fan power associated with improved filtration. These findings indicate that economizer use combined with improved filtration could reduce data center energy demand while providing a level of protection from particles of outdoor origin similar to that observed with conventional design.

Shehabi, Arman; Ganguly, Srirupa; Gundel, Lara A.; Horvath, Arpad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Lunden, Melissa M.; Tschudi, William; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Nazaroff, William W

2009-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

CHARACTERIZATION AND EVALUATION OF CAUSTIC WASH TANK AND SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLES FROM MCU FROM AUGUST TO SEPTEMBER 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During processing of Salt Batches 3 and 4 in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), the decontamination efficiency for cesium declined from historical values and from expectations based on laboratory testing. This report documents efforts to analyze samples of solvent and process solutions from MCU in an attempt to understand the cause of the reduced performance and to recommend mitigations. CWT Solutions from MCU from the time period of variable decontamination factor (DF) performance which covers from April 2011 to September 2011 (during processing of Salt Batch 4) were examined for impurities using chromatography and spectroscopy. The results indicate that impurities were found to be of two types: aromatic containing impurities most likely from Modifier degradation and aliphatic type impurities most likely from Isopar{reg_sign} L and tri-n-octylamine (TOA) degradation. Caustic washing the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) solution with 1M NaOH improved its extraction ability as determined from {sup 22}Na uptake tests. Evidence from this work showed that pH variance in the aqueous solutions within the range of 1M nitric acid to 1.91M NaOH that contacted the solvent samples does not influence the analytical determination of the TOA concentration by GC-MS.

Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

RESULTS OF CAUSTIC DISSOLUTION OF ALUMINOSILICATE SCALE AND CHARACTERIZATION DATA FOR SAMPLES FROM THE EVAPORATOR POT AND GRAVITY DRAIN LINE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The build-up of sodium aluminosilicate scale in the 2H Evaporator system continues to cause operational difficulties. The use of a nitric acid cleaning operation proved successful in 2001. However, the operation required additional facilities to support spent cleaning solution neutralization and was quite costly. A proposed caustic cleaning flowsheet has many advantages over the acid flowsheet. Therefore, samples were retrieved from the evaporator system (gravity drain line and pot) for both chemical and radiological characterization and dissolution testing. The characterization of these scale samples showed the presence of nitrated cancrinite along with a dehydrated zeolite. Small amounts of depleted uranium were also found in these samples as expected and the amount of uranium ranged from 0.5 wt% to 2 wt%. Dissolution in sodium hydroxide solutions of various caustic concentrations showed that the scale slowly dissolves at elevated temperature (90 C). Data from similar testing indicate that the scale removed from the GDL in 2005 dissolves slower than that removed in 1997. Differences in the particle size of these samples of scale may well explain the measured dissolution rate differences.

Wilmarth, B; Rita Sullivan, R; Chris Martino, C

2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

133

Life extension program for the modular caustic side solvent extraction unit at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. At SRS, the CSSX process is deployed in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. Coalescers and decanters process the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) and Strip Effluent (SE) streams to allow recovery and reuse of the organic solvent and to limit the quantity of solvent transferred to the downstream facilities. MCU is operated in series with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) which removes strontium and actinides from salt waste utilizing monosodium titanate. ARP and MCU were developed and implemented as interim salt processing until future processing technology, the CSSX-based Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), is operational. SWPF is slated to come on-line in October 2014. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU process, however, was reached in April 2011. Nevertheless, most of the individual process components are capable of operating longer. An evaluation determined ARP/MCU can operate until 2015 before major equipment failure is expected. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU Life Extension (ARP/MCU LE) program will bridge the gap between current ARP/MCU operations and the start of SWPF operation. The ARP/MCU LE program introduces no new technologies. As a portion of this program, a Next Generation Solvent (NGS) and corresponding flowsheet are being developed to provide a major performance enhancement at MCU. This paper discusses all the modifications performed in the facility to support the ARP/MCU Life Extension. It will also discuss the next generation chemistry, including NGS and new stripping chemistry, which will increase cesium removal efficiency in MCU. Possible implementation of the NGS chemistry in MCU accomplishes two objectives. MCU serves as a demonstration facility for improved flowsheet deployment at SWPF; operating with NGS and boric acid validates improved cesium removal performance and increased throughput as well as confirms Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) ability to vitrify waste streams containing boron. NGS implementation at MCU also aids the ARP/MCU LE operation, mitigating the impacts of delays and sustaining operations until other technology is able to come on-line.

Samadi-Dezfouli, Azadeh

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

134

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (MCU) GAMMA MONITORS SYSTEM FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) selected Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) as the preferred technology for the removal of radioactive cesium from High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Before the full-scale Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) becomes operational, the Closure Business Unit (CBU) plans to process a portion of dissolved saltcake waste through a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). This work was derived from Technical Task Request SP-TTR-2004-00013, ''Gamma Monitor for MCU''. The deliverables for this task are the hardware and software for the gamma monitors and a report summarizing the testing and acceptance of this equipment for use in the MCU. Gamma-ray monitors are required to: (1) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the decontaminated salt solution before entering the DSS (Decontaminated Salt Solution) Hold Tank, (2) Measure the Cs-137 concentration in the strip effluent before entering the Strip Effluent Hold Tank, (3) Verify proper operation of the solvent extraction system by verifying material balance within the process (The DSS Hold Tank Cs-137 concentration will be very low and the Cs-137 concentration in the Strip Effluent Hold Tank will be fifteen times higher than the Cs-137 concentration in the Feed Tank.) Sodium iodide monitors are used to measure the Cs-137 concentration in the piping before the DSS Hold tank, while GM monitors are used for Cs-137 measurements before the Strip Effluent Hold Tank. Tungsten shields were designed using Monte Carlo calculations and fabricated to reduce the process background radiation at the detector positions. These monitors were calibrated with NIST traceable standards that were specially made to be the same as the piping being monitored. Since this gamma ray monitoring system is unique, specially designed software was written and acceptance tested by Savannah River National Laboratory personnel. The software is a LabView-based application that serves as a unified interface for controlling the monitor hardware and communicating with the host Distributed Control System (DCS). In order to provide user friendly software for the process personnel, the software was broken down into just a few software modules. These software modules are the Application Window, Detector Selection, Detector Configuration Settings, Background Counting, and Routine Data Acquisition. Instructions for using the software have been included in a user's manual that is appended to this report. The work presented in this report meets all of the requirements set forth in the project task plan to design and implement gamma ray monitors for the MCU. Additional setup and testing of the system will be required when it implemented in the process.

Casella, V

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Caustic-Side Solvent-Extraction Modeling for Hanford Interim Pretreatment System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to examine the applicability of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for the removal of cesium from Hanford tank-waste supernatant solutions in support of the Hanford Interim Pretreatment System (IPS). The Hanford waste types are more challenging than those at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in that they contain significantly higher levels of potassium, the chief competing ion in the extraction of cesium. It was confirmed by use of the CSSX model that the higher levels of potassium depress the cesium distribution ratio (DCs), as validated by measurement of DCs values for four of eight specified Hanford waste-simulant compositions. The model predictions were good to an apparent standard error of ±11%. It is concluded from batch distribution experiments, physical-property measurements, equilibrium modeling, flowsheet calculations, and contactor sizing that the CSSX process as currently employed for cesium removal from alkaline salt waste at the SRS is capable of treating similar Hanford tank feeds. For the most challenging waste composition, 41 stages would be required to provide a cesium decontamination factor (DF) of 5000 and a concentration factor (CF) of 5. Commercial contacting equipment with rotor diameters of 10 in. for extraction and 5 in. for stripping should have the capacity to meet throughput requirements, but testing will be required to confirm that the needed efficiency and hydraulic performance are actually obtainable. Markedly improved flowsheet performance was calculated for a new solvent formulation employing the more soluble cesium extractant BEHBCalixC6 used with alternative scrub and strip solutions, respectively 0.1 M NaOH and 10 mM boric acid. The improved system can meet minimum requirements (DF = 5000 and CF = 5) with 17 stages or more ambitious goals (DF = 40,000 and CF = 15) with 19 stages. Potential benefits of further research and development are identified that would lead to reduced costs, greater adaptability of the process to DOE alkaline salt wastes, and greater readiness for implementation. Such benefits accrue from optimal sizing of centrifugal contactors for application of the CSSX process for the IPS; more accurate modeling of cesium extraction with greater flexibility and applicability to a variety of feeds and flowsheet conditions; and further improving and optimizing the alternative CSSX solvent and scrub/strip system.

Moyer, B.A.; Birdwell, J.F.; Delmau, L. H.; McFarlane, J.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

138

FULL-SCALE TESTING OF A CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SYSTEM TO REMOVE CESIUM FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE RADIOACTIVE WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Site (SRS) personnel have completed construction and assembly of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility. Following assembly, they conducted testing to evaluate the ability of the process to remove non-radioactive cesium and to separate the aqueous and organic phases. They conducted tests at salt solution flow rates of 3.5, 6.0, and 8.5 gpm. During testing, the MCU Facility collected samples and submitted them to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel for analysis of cesium, Isopar{reg_sign} L, and Modifier [1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol]. SRNL personnel analyzed the aqueous samples for cesium by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) and the solvent samples for cesium using a Parr Bomb Digestion followed by ICP-MS. They analyzed aqueous samples for Isopar{reg_sign} L and Modifier by gas chromatography (GC).

Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Earl Brass, E; Stanley Brown, S; Mark Geeting, M; Lcurtis Johnson, L; Charles02 Coleman, C; S Crump, S; Mark Barnes, M; Samuel Fink, S

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

EFFECT ON 105KW NORTH WALL DUE TO ADDITION OF FILTRATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CHPRC D&D Projects is adding three filtration system on two 1-ft concrete pads adjacent to the north side of existing KW Basin building. This analysis is prepared to provide qualitative assessment based on the review of design information available for 105KW basin substructure. In the proposed heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) filtration pad designs a 2 ft gap will be maintained between the pads and the north end of the existing 1 05KW -Basin building. Filtration Skids No.2 and No.3 share one pad. It is conservative to evaluate the No.2 and No.3 skid pad for the wall assessment. Figure 1 shows the plan layout of the 105KW basin site and the location of the pads for the filtration system or HVAC skids. Figure 2 shows the cross-section elevation view of the pad. The concrete pad Drawing H-1-91482 directs the replacement of the existing 8-inch concrete pad with two new 1-ft think pads. The existing 8-inch pad is separated from the 105KW basin superstructure by an expansion joint of only half an inch. The concrete pad Drawing H-1-91482 shows the gap between the new proposed pads and the north wall and any overflow pits and sumps is 2-ft. Following analysis demonstrates that the newly added filtration units and their pads do not exceed the structural capacity of existing wall. The calculation shows that the total bending moment on the north wall due to newly added filtration units and pads including seismic load is 82.636 ft-kip/ft and is within the capacity of wall which is 139.0ft-kip/ft.

CHO CS

2010-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

DISSELKAMP RS

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Filtration of Cistern-collected Rainwater for the New SUB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;Filtration of Cistern-collected RainwaterUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Filtration of Cistern-collected Rainwater for the New SUB Junggil Park Moowon Choi Sungjin Woo University of British Columbia APSC 262 March

142

VOLUME 16, NUMBER 3 HVAC&R RESEARCH MAY 2010 The Effects of Filtration on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOLUME 16, NUMBER 3 HVAC&R RESEARCH MAY 2010 273 The Effects of Filtration on Pressure Drop and Energy Consumption in Residential HVAC Systems (RP-1299) Brent Stephens Atila Novoselac, PhD Jeffrey A of high-efficiency HVAC filters is a common strategy to control exposure to airborne particulate matter

Siegel, Jeffrey

143

Agglomeration and filtration of colloidal suspensions with DVLO interactions in simulation and experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. Eisfeld et al. propose a pseudo-continuous model for statistically described domain geometries, where 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Cake filtration is an energy efficient or membrane and build up a filter cake with increasing thick- ness. The high flow resistance of nanoporous

Harting, Jens

144

THE WEIGHT FILTRATION FOR REAL ALGEBRAIC VARIETIES CLINT MCCRORY AND ADAM PARUSINSKI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Using the work of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar we associate to each real algebraic variety a filtered by Totaro [37]. He used the work of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar [15] to show the existence, and more recent unpublished work on weight filtrations by Guill´en and Navarro Aznar [16]. Totaro's weight

Parusinski, Adam

145

Evaluation of a Combined Cyclone and Gas Filtration System for Particulate Removal in the Gasification Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wabash gasification facility, owned and operated by sgSolutions LLC, is one of the largest single train solid fuel gasification facilities in the world capable of transforming 2,000 tons per day of petroleum coke or 2,600 tons per day of bituminous coal into synthetic gas for electrical power generation. The Wabash plant utilizes Phillips66 proprietary E-Gas (TM) Gasification Process to convert solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal into synthetic gas that is fed to a combined cycle combustion turbine power generation facility. During plant startup in 1995, reliability issues were realized in the gas filtration portion of the gasification process. To address these issues, a slipstream test unit was constructed at the Wabash facility to test various filter designs, materials and process conditions for potential reliability improvement. The char filtration slipstream unit provided a way of testing new materials, maintenance procedures, and process changes without the risk of stopping commercial production in the facility. It also greatly reduced maintenance expenditures associated with full scale testing in the commercial plant. This char filtration slipstream unit was installed with assistance from the United States Department of Energy (built under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-97FT34158) and began initial testing in November of 1997. It has proven to be extremely beneficial in the advancement of the E-Gas (TM) char removal technology by accurately predicting filter behavior and potential failure mechanisms that would occur in the commercial process. After completing four (4) years of testing various filter types and configurations on numerous gasification feed stocks, a decision was made to investigate the economic and reliability effects of using a particulate removal gas cyclone upstream of the current gas filtration unit. A paper study had indicated that there was a real potential to lower both installed capital and operating costs by implementing a char cyclonefiltration hybrid unit in the E-Gas (TM) gasification process. These reductions would help to keep the E-Gas (TM) technology competitive among other coal-fired power generation technologies. The Wabash combined cyclone and gas filtration slipstream test program was developed to provide design information, equipment specification and process control parameters of a hybrid cyclone and candle filter particulate removal system in the E-Gas (TM) gasification process that would provide the optimum performance and reliability for future commercial use. The test program objectives were as follows: 1. Evaluate the use of various cyclone materials of construction; 2. Establish the optimal cyclone efficiency that provides stable long term gas filter operation; 3. Determine the particle size distribution of the char separated by both the cyclone and candle filters. This will provide insight into cyclone efficiency and potential future plant design; 4. Determine the optimum filter media size requirements for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit; 5. Determine the appropriate char transfer rates for both the cyclone and filtration portions of the hybrid unit; 6. Develop operating procedures for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit; and, 7. Compare the installed capital cost of a scaled-up commercial cyclone-filtration hybrid unit to the current gas filtration design without a cyclone unit, such as currently exists at the Wabash facility.

Rizzo, Jeffrey J. [Phillips66 Company, West Terre Haute, IN (United States)

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

DQE of wireless digital detectors: Comparative performance with differing filtration schemes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Wireless flat panel detectors are gaining increased usage in portable medical imaging. Two such detectors were evaluated and compared with a conventional flat-panel detector using the formalism of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 62220-1) for measuring modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) using two different filtration schemes.Methods: Raw images were acquired for three image receptors (DRX-1C and DRX-1, Carestream Health; Inc., Pixium 4600, Trixell) using a radiographic system with a well-characterized output (Philips Super80 CP, Philips Healthcare). Free in-air exposures were measured using a calibrated radiation meter (Unfors Mult-O-Meter Type 407, Unfors Instruments AB). Additional aluminum filtration and a new alternative combined copper-aluminum filtration were used to conform the x ray output to IEC-specified beam quality definitions RQA5 and RQA9. Using the IEC 62220-1 formalism, each detector was evaluated at X{sub N}/2, X{sub N}, and 2X{sub N}, where the normal exposure level to the detector surface (X{sub N}) was set to 8.73 ?Gy (1.0 mR). The prescribed edge test device was used to evaluate the MTF, while the NNPS was measured using uniform images. The DQE was then calculated from the MTF and NNPS and compared across detectors, exposures, and filtration schemes.Results: The three DR systems had largely comparable MTFs with DRX-1 demonstrating lower values above 1.0 cycles/mm. At each exposure, DRX-1C and Pixium detectors demonstrated better noise performance than that of DRX-1. Zero-frequency DQEs for DRX-1C, Pixium, and DRX-1 detectors were approximately 74%, 63%, and 38% for RQA5 and 50%, 42%, and 28% for RQA9, respectively.Conclusions: DRX-1C detector exhibited superior DQE performance compared to Pixium and DRX-1. In terms of filtration, the alternative filtration was found to provide comparable performance in terms of rank ordering of different detectors with the added convenience of being less bulky for in-the-field measurements.

Samei, Ehsan [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Departments of Radiology, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Murphy, Simon; Christianson, Olav [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)] [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effect of Oxalate on the Recycle of Neptunium Filtrate Solution by Anion Exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of laboratory column runs has been performed that demonstrates the recovery of neptunium (Np) containing up to 0.05 M oxalate. Np losses were generally less than one percent to the raffinate for feed solutions that contained 2 to 10 g Np/L. Up to 16 percent Np losses were observed with lower Np feed concentrations, but those losses were attributed to the shortened residence times rather than the higher oxalate to Np ratios. Losses in the plant are expected to be significantly less due to the lower cross-section flowrate possible with existing plant pumps. Elimination of the permanganate treatment of filtrates appears to be reasonable since the amount of Np in those filtrates does not appear to be practical to recover. Combination of untreated filtrates with other actinide rich solutions is not advisable as precipitation problems are likely. If untreated filtrates are kept segregated from other actinide rich streams, the recovery of the remaining Np is probably still possible, but could be limited due to the excessively high oxalate to Np ratio. The persistence of hydrazine/hydrazoic acid in filtrate solutions dictates that the nitrite treatment be retained to eliminate those species from the filtrates prior to transfer to the canyon. Elimination of the permanganate treatment of precipitator flushes and recovery by anion exchange does not appear to be limited by the oxalate effect on anion exchange. Np from solutions with higher oxalate to Np molar ratios than expected in precipitator flushes was recovered with low to modest losses. Solubility problems appear to be unlikely when the moles of oxalate involved are less than the total number of moles of Np due to complexation effects. The presence of significant concentrations of iron (Fe) in the solutions will further decrease the probability of Np oxalate precipitation due the formation of Fe oxalate complexes. Np oxalate solubility data in 8 M HNO{sub 3} with from one to six times as much oxalate as Np have been obtained. These data supplement literature data in the high HNO{sub 3} low oxalate region, but provide additional data for solutions with relatively large amounts of Np present. Enhanced solubility of Np oxalate over that reported in the literature was observed.

Kyser, E

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

148

Recycling of cleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane 2 stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols. From the data collected in this work, a preliminary process design and economic evaluations were performed for a model mill with 1,000-ton/day pulp production that uses a bleaching sequence based on chlorine dioxide. Assuming 3 m{sup 3} acidic effluents to be treated per ton of pulp produced, the electrodialysis process would require a membrane area of about 361 m{sup 2} for this model mill. The energy consumption of the electrodialytic stack for separation is estimated to be about $160/day, and the estimated capital cost of the electrodia

Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.; Energy Systems; Inst. of Paper Science and Tech.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The effect of various mud filtrates on the permeability of sandstone cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' or the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1954 MAJOR SUBJECT: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS MUD FILTRATES ON THE PERMEABILITY OF SANDSTONE CORES A Thesis By Robert A. Pfile Appr ved as to styIe and content by: (Chairman of mmittee... kind and amount of clay contained in the different cores. INTRODUCTION There is general agreement among members of the petroleum industry that the productive capacity of a well penetrating a clay- containing oil sand may be seriously impaired due...

Pfile, Robert Ambrose

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

On the splitting of the Bloch-Beilinson filtration Arnaud BEAUVILLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(X) , with CHp (X) = F0 CHp (X) . . . Fp+1 (X) = 0 and F1 CH(X) = Ker cX . We refer to [J] for a discussion graduation given by CHp (A) = s CHp s(A) , where CHp s(A) is the subspace of elements CHp (A) with k A = k2 not define the required filtration because the vanishing of the terms CHp s(A) for s

Beauville, Arnaud

151

MOBILIZATION, POISONING, AND FILTRATION OF F-CANYON TANK 804 SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) Deactivation and Decommissioning (SDD) Organization is evaluating options to disposition the F-Canyon 800 series underground tanks (including removal of the sludge heels from these tanks) and requested assistance from Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel to develop methods to effectively mobilize the sludge from these tanks (i.e., Tanks 804, 808, and 809). Because of the high plutonium content in Tank 804 (estimated to be as much as 1500 g), SDD needs to add a neutron poison to the sludge. They considered manganese and boron as potential poisons. Because of the large amount of manganese needed and the very slow filtration rate of the sludge/manganese slurry, SDD requested that SRNL investigate the impact of using boron rather than manganese as the poison. SRNL performed a series of experiments to help determine the disposal pathway of the material currently located in Tank 804. The objectives of this work are: (1) Determine the mobility of Tank 804 sludge when mixed with 10-15 parts sodium hydroxide as a function of pH between 10 and 14. (2) Determine the solubility of boron in sodium hydroxide solution with a free hydroxide concentration between 1 x 10{sup -4} and 2.0 M. (3) Recommend a filter pore size for SDD such that the filtrate contains no visible solids. (4) Determine whether a precipitate forms when the filtrate pH is adjusted to 12, 7, or 2 with nitric acid.

Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S

2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation to the Implementation of Rainwater Harvesting and Filtration System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by collecting, filtering and storing rainwater in cisterns for various uses, including irrigating rooftop garden.1 Rainwater Collection System ................................................................. 8 2 to the Implementation of Rainwater Harvesting and Filtration System in the New Student Union Building (SUB) at UBC Shuyi

154

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 474 Impacts of HVAC Filtration on Air-Conditioner Energy Consumption in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 474 Impacts of HVAC Filtration on Air efficiency filters (Points A, B, and C, respectively). #12;Proceedings of Healthy Buildings 2009 Paper 474

Siegel, Jeffrey

155

From Emergency to Fix: Point-of-Use Water Filtration Technology in Colonias Along the United States-Mexico Border  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

faculty and staff for making my graduate experience at Texas A&M University one for the books. vi NOMENCLATURE AWWA American Water Works Association BSF Biosand Filtration CDC United States Center for Disease Control CF Ceramic Filter EPA... FROM EMERGENCY TO FIX: POINT-OF-USE WATER FILTRATION TECHNOLOGY IN COLONIAS ALONG THE UNITED STATES-MEXICO BORDER A Thesis by EMILY LAUREN VANDEWALLE Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M...

Vandewalle, Emily Lauren

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Caustic stress corrosion cracking of E-Brite and Carpenter 7-MO stainless steels welded to Nickel 200 and Inconel 600  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAUSTIC STRESS CORROSION CRACKING OF E-BRITE AND CARPENTER 7 MO STAINLESS STEELS NELDED TO NIC~~ 200 AND INCONEL 600 A Thesis STEVEN MILES STOCKt1AN Approved as to style and content by: Dr R, R? Griffin (ME) (Chairman of the Committee) Dr...-Brite and Carpenter 7-MO Stainless Steels Welded to Nickel 200 and Znconel 600~ (December 1982) Steven Miles Stockman, B. S ~ , Texas AgM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr, R. B. Griffin Samples of E-Brite stainless steel and Carpenter 7-MO stainless...

Stockman, Steven Miles

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Measurement-Based Evaluation of Installed Filtration System Performance in Single-Family Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide discusses important study design issues to consider when conducting an on-site evaluation of filtration system performance. The two most important dichotomies to consider in developing a study protocol are (1) whether systems are being evaluated in occupied or unoccupied homes and (2) whether different systems are being compared in the same homes or if the comparison is between systems installed in different homes. This document provides perspective and recommendations about a suite of implementation issues including the choice of particle measurement devices, selection of sampling locations, ways to control and/or monitor factors and processes that can impact particle concentrations, and data analysis approaches.

Chan, Wanyu Rengie; Singer, Brett C.

2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

158

Multifunctional nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles formed via vacuum filtration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In one aspect, the present invention provides a method of forming a film of nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of (a) providing a first solution that contains a plurality of CNTs, (b) providing a second solution that contains a plurality of Pt nanoparticles, (c) combining the first solution and the second solution to form a third solution, and (d) filtering the third solution through a nanoporous membrane using vacuum filtration to obtain a film of nanocomposites of CNTs and Pt nanoparticles.

Hersam, Mark C; Ostojic, Gordana; Liang, Yu Teng

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

Use of tangential filtration unit for processing liquid waste from nuclear laundries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear facilities produce large quantities of weakly contaminated effluents charged with insoluble and soluble products. In collaboration with CEA, TECHNICATOME has developed an ultrafiltration process for liquid waste from nuclear facilities associated with prior insolubilization of radiochemical activity. This process, seeded ultrafiltration, is based on the use of a decloggable mineral filter media and combines very high separation efficiency with long membrane life. The efficiency of the tangential filtration unit which has been processing effluents from the Cadarache Nuclear Research Center (CEA-France) nuclear facility since mid-1988, has been confirmed on several sites.

Augustin, X.; Buzonniere, A. de [Technicatome, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Barnier, H. [CEA Cadarache, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Tributyl Phosphate (TBP, Group 7) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

.A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. The tributyl phosphate sludge (TBP, Group 7) is the subject of this report. The Group 7 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus as well as aluminum in the form of gibbsite. Both are believed to exist in sufficient quantities in the Group 7 waste to address leaching behavior. Thus, the focus of the Group 7 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Edwards, Matthew K.; Billing, Justin M.; Blanchard, David L.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIGUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive is used to improve stripping performance and to mitigate the effects of any surfactants present in the feed stream. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Pak, D.; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.; Caldwell, T.

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

162

Dust Filtration by Planet-Induced Gap Edges: Implications for Transitional Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By carrying out two-dimensional two-fluid global simulations, we have studied the response of dust to gap formation by a single planet in the gaseous component of a protoplanetary disk - the so-called "dust filtration" mechanism. We have found that a gap opened by a giant planet at 20 AU in a \\alpha=0.01, \\dot{M}=10^{-8} Msun/yr disk can effectively stop dust particles larger than 0.1 mm drifting inwards, leaving a sub-millimeter dust cavity/hole. However, smaller particles are difficult to filter by a planet-induced gap due to 1) dust diffusion, and 2) a high gas accretion velocity at the gap edge. An analytic model is also derived to understand what size particles can be filtered by the gap edge. Finally, with our updated understanding of dust filtration, we have computed Monte-Carlo radiative transfer models with variable dust size distributions to generate the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of disks with gaps. By comparing with transitional disk observations (e.g. GM Aur), we have found that dust fi...

Zhu, Zhaohuan; Dong, Ruobing; Espaillat, Catherine; Hartmann, Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Experimental study of unsteady state filtration of gas condensate system at the pressure above the dew point  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental study investigates the unsteady filtration of a gas condensate system at pressure above the dew point. It is assumed that the motion of a gas condensate mixture in a porous medium at a pressure 1.5--1.7 times higher than the dew point pressure does not comply with gas filtration rules. The results explain the process of forming microembryonics of the new phase, which can be used in project planning as well as during exploitation of gas condensate fields at reservoir pressure.

Babaev, R.D.; Suleymanov, A.A.; Shahiduzzaman, M. [Azerbaijan State Oil Academy, Baku (Azerbaijan). Dept. of Development and Production of Oil Fields

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Caustic Recovery Technology  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartment of4 Federal6CleanCaithnessSequestration|of Energy366,

166

Summary - Caustic Recovery Technology  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational EnergyCommittee onGASRainey STAR Center | DepartmentPaducah,

167

Effects of drilling fluid properties and shear rate on dynamic filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

86 88 90 92 TABLE D1: TABLE D2: TABLE D3: BASE MUD RUN WITH CORE 1A AT 389 SEC SHEAR RATE BASE MUD RUN WITH CORE 1B AT 194 SEC SHEAR RATE BASE MUD RUN WITH CORE 2A AT 142 SEC SHEAR RATE 113 114 TABLE D4: TABLE D5: TABLE D6: BASE MUD... 40 60 TIME, min. Fig 3-Cumulative Filtrate Volume As A Function Of Time At Various Shear Rates For Base Mud 0. 03 0. 028 0. 026 0. 024 0. 022 0. 02 0. 018 0. 016 0. 014 0. 012 0. 01 0. 008 CORE 2B 0 0 + CORE 1B 8 194 X CORE 3A g 218...

McCarty, Robert Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and with the exception of CPVC, no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied. The testing shows no major concerns for compatibility over the short duration of these tests but does indicate that longer duration exposure studies are warranted, especially for Tefzel. However, the physical changes experienced by Tefzel in the improved solvent were comparable to the physical changes obtained when Tefzel is placed in CSSX baseline solvent. Therefore, there is no effect of the improved solvent beyond those observed in CSSX baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Filtration of the Cistern-Collected Rainwater for the new UBC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into Filtration of the Cistern-Collected Rainwater for the new UBC Student Union Building Peter Yeung Teresa Chu of a project/report". #12;An Investigation into Filtration of the Cistern- Collected Rainwater for the new UBC, at the Vancouver campus of University of British Columbia will collect rainwater through the rooftop for non

170

Quantitative comparison of processes of oil-and water-based mud-filtrate invasion and corresponding effects on borehole resistivity measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for hydrocarbon exploration and production, drilling fluids sustain a pressure higher than that of formationQuantitative comparison of processes of oil- and water-based mud-filtrate invasion-filtrate invasion on borehole resistivity measurements. We simulate the process of mud-fil- trate invasion

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

171

Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene and gold nanoparticles by vacuum filtration and spontaneous reduction of gold ionsw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Layer-by-layer assembly of graphene and gold nanoparticles by vacuum filtration and spontaneous 2009 DOI: 10.1039/b821920f Layer-by-layer films comprised of alternating graphene and gold nanoparticle graphene oxide solution to fabricate the graphene thin film on the quartz substrate, followed by gold

Kim, Yong Jung

172

Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability of Vuggy and Fractured Carbonate Formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 121136 Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability to diagnose and estimate secondary porosity and absolute permeability of fractured and vuggy carbonate-connected) and fractured porosity, all embedded in a tight matrix. Rock-core data and wellbore resistivity images indicate

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

173

PEP Run Report for Integrated Test A, Caustic Leaching in UFP-VSL-T01A, Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.”(a) The PEP, located in the Process Engineering Laboratory-West (PDLW) located in Richland, Washington, is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Su, Yin-Fong; Geeting, John GH; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Smith, Dennese M.; Valdez, Patrick LJ; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Young, Joan K.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

174

Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Non-biodegradable landfill leachate treatment by combined process of agitation, coagulation, SBR and filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • A novel method of stripping (agitation) was investigated for NH{sub 3}-N removal. • PFS coagulation followed agitation process enhanced the leachate biodegradation. • Nitrification–denitrification achieved by changing operation process in SBR treatment. • A dual filter of carbon-sand is suitable as a polishing treatment of leachate. • Combined treatment success for the complete treatment of non-biodegradable leachate. - Abstract: This study describes the complete treatment of non-biodegradable landfill leachate by combined treatment processes. The processes consist of agitation as a novel stripping method used to overcome the ammonia toxicity regarding aerobic microorganisms. The NH{sub 3}-N removal ratio was 93.9% obtained at pH 11.5 and a gradient velocity (G) 150 s{sup ?1} within a five-hour agitation time. By poly ferric sulphate (PFS) coagulation followed the agitation process; chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biological oxygen demand (BOD{sub 5}) were removed at 70.6% and 49.4%, respectively at an optimum dose of 1200 mg L{sup ?1} at pH 5.0. The biodegradable ratio BOD{sub 5}/COD was improved from 0.18 to 0.31 during pretreatment step by agitation and PFS coagulation. Thereafter, the effluent was diluted with sewage at a different ratio before it was subjected to sequencing batch reactor (SBR) treatment. Up to 93.3% BOD{sub 5}, 95.5% COD and 98.1% NH{sub 3}-N removal were achieved by SBR operated under anoxic–aerobic–anoxic conditions. The filtration process was carried out using sand and carbon as a dual filter media as polishing process. The final effluent concentration of COD, BOD{sub 5}, suspended solid (SS), NH{sub 3}-N and total organic carbon (TOC) were 72.4 mg L{sup ?1}, 22.8 mg L{sup ?1}, 24.2 mg L{sup ?1}, 18.4 mg L{sup ?1} and 50.8 mg L{sup ?1} respectively, which met the discharge standard. The results indicated that a combined process of agitation-coagulation-SBR and filtration effectively eliminated pollutant loading from landfill leachate.

Abood, Alkhafaji R. [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Thi Qar University, Nasiriyah (Iraq); Bao, Jianguo, E-mail: bjianguo888@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Du, Jiangkun; Zheng, Dan; Luo, Ye [State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

DECONTAMINATION FACTORS AND FILTRATION FLUX IMPACT TO ARP AT REDUCED MST CONCENTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tank Farm and Closure Engineering is evaluating changes to the Actinide Removal Process facility operations to decrease the MST concentration from 0.4 g/L to 0.2 g/L and the contact time from 12 hours to between 6 and 8 hours. For this evaluation, SRNL reviewed previous datasets investigating the performance of MST at 0.2 g/L in salt solutions ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 M in sodium concentration. In general, reducing the MST concentration from 0.4 to 0.2 g/L and increasing the ionic strength from 4.5 to 7.5 M in sodium concentration will decrease the measured decontamination factors for plutonium, neptunium, uranium and strontium. The decontamination factors as well as single standard deviation values for each sorbate are reported. These values are applicable within the sorbate and sodium concentrations used in the experimental measurements. Decreasing the MST concentration in the ARP from 0.4 g/L to 0.2 g/L will produce an increase in the filter flux, and could lead to longer operating times between filter cleaning. The increase in flux is a function of a number of operating parameters, and is difficult to quantify. However, it is estimated that the reduction in MST could result in a reduction of filtration time of up to 20%.

Hobbs, D.

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

Selective Filtration of Gadolinium Trichloride for Use in Neutron Detection in Large Water Cherenkov Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water Cherenkov detectors have been used for many years as inexpensive, effective detectors for neutrino interactions and nucleon decay searches. While many important measurements have been made with these detectors a major drawback has been their inability to detect the absorption of thermal neutrons. We believe an inexpensive, effective technique could be developed to overcome this situation via the addition to water of a solute with a large neutron cross section and energetic gamma daughters which would make neutrons detectable. Gadolinium seems an excellent candidate especially since in recent years it has become very inexpensive, now less than $8 per kilogram in the form of commercially-available gadolinium trichloride, GdCl{sub 3}. This non-toxic, non-reactive substance is highly soluble in water. Neutron capture on gadolinium yields a gamma cascade which would be easily seen in detectors like Super-Kamiokande. We have been investigating the use of GdCl{sub 3} as a possible upgrade for the Super-Kamiokande detector with a view toward improving its performance as a detector for atmospheric neutrinos, supernova neutrinos, wrong-sign solar neutrinos, reactor neutrinos, proton decay, and also as a target for the coming T2K long-baseline neutrino experiment. This focused study of selective water filtration and GdCl{sub 3} extraction techniques, conducted at UC Irvine, followed up on highly promising benchtop-scale and kiloton-scale work previously carried out with the assistance of 2003 and 2005 Advanced Detector Research Program grants.

Vagins, Mark R.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

178

Dust filtration at gap edges: Implications for the spectral energy distributions of discs with embedded planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of some T Tauri stars display a deficit of near-IR flux that could be a consequence of an embedded Jupiter-mass planet partially clearing an inner hole in the circumstellar disc. Here, we use two-dimensional numerical simulations of the planet-disc interaction, in concert with simple models for the dust dynamics, to quantify how a planet influences the dust at different radii within the disc. We show that pressure gradients at the outer edge of the gap cleared by the planet act as a filter - letting particles smaller than a critical size through to the inner disc while holding back larger particles in the outer disc. The critical particle size depends upon the disc properties, but is typically of the order of 10 microns. This filtration process will lead to discontinuous grain populations across the planet's orbital radius, with small grains in the inner disc and an outer population of larger grains. We show that this type of dust population is qualitatively consistent with SED modelling of systems that have optically thin inner holes in their circumstellar discs. This process can also produce a very large gas-to-dust ratio in the inner disc, potentially explaining those systems with optically thin inner cavities that still have relatively high accretion rates.

W. K. M. Rice; Philip J. Armitage; Kenneth Wood; Giuseppe Lodato

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

179

A study of the effects of mud filtrate invasion on the response of standard resistivity logging tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the extremely small pore throats in the reservoir rock. These high capillary pressures, together with low relative permeabilities, are the reason for the high initial water saturations in many tight gas sands. Imbibition plays a large role in mud filtrate... of increased formation water saturation has a decreased resistivity. The annulus region has been generally assumed to form only in high permeability oil zones. The reason this type of resistivity profile is called an annulus is that if three resistivity...

Semmelbeck, Mark Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

180

The influence of zeta potential and yield stress on the filtration characteristics of a magnesium hydroxide simulant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the UK, irradiated fuels from Magnox reactors are often stored in water-filled ponds under alkaline conditions, so as to minimise corrosion of fuel cladding. This is important to prevent or reduce leakage of soluble fission products and actinides to the pond water. A variety of intermediate level wastes derived from Magnox materials are stored at power stations. Under these alkaline conditions, various species of magnesium are formed, of which magnesium hydroxide is the dominant material. The particle-fluid interactions are significant for the design and operation of facilities for hydraulic retrieval, filtration, dewatering and ion exchange treatment of fuel storage pond water and stored wet Magnox wastes. Here we describe a study of particulate properties and filtration characteristics of oxide particle simulants under laboratory conditions. Cake and medium resistance data were correlated across a range of pH conditions with electro-acoustic zeta potential and shear yield stress measurements, as a function of particle volume fractions. The influence of zeta potential on filtration properties arises directly from the interaction of particles within the sediment cake. (authors)

Biggs, Simon; Nabi, Rafiq; Poole, Colin [Leeds University/Nexia Solutions URA in Particle Science and Technology, Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Patel, Ashok [British Nuclear Group, Reactor Sites, Berkeley Centre, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, GL13 9PB (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The effects of selected environmental variables on filtration rate of Mytilopsis leucophaeata and evaluation of its potential role in the purification of mariculture effluent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laivlotte 2020 turbidity meter (Table I). Cuttlefish ink, colloidal carbon suspensions, microalgae cultures and mariculture eIHuent were used to provide measurable suspended particles which could be removed by the mussel filtration apparatus in order... concentration versus filtration rate, including Aquadag?, Sepia ink and cultured Nannoch/orops/s (microalgae). A specific amount of each colloid was suspended in filtered seawater Concentrations were estimated by relative turbidity measurements. Wang (1990...

Rice, Patrick Hays

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Hazardous Materials Verification and Limited Characterization Report on Sodium and Caustic Residuals in Materials and Fuel Complex Facilities MFC-799/799A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a companion to the Facilities Condition and Hazard Assessment for Materials and Fuel Complex Sodium Processing Facilities MFC-799/799A and Nuclear Calibration Laboratory MFC-770C (referred to as the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment). This report specifically responds to the requirement of Section 9.2, Item 6, of the Facilities Condition and Hazards Assessment to provide an updated assessment and verification of the residual hazardous materials remaining in the Sodium Processing Facilities processing system. The hazardous materials of concern are sodium and sodium hydroxide (caustic). The information supplied in this report supports the end-point objectives identified in the Transition Plan for Multiple Facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex, Advanced Test Reactor, Central Facilities Area, and Power Burst Facility, as well as the deactivation and decommissioning critical decision milestone 1, as specified in U.S. Department of Energy Guide 413.3-8, “Environmental Management Cleanup Projects.” Using a tailored approach and based on information obtained through a combination of process knowledge, emergency management hazardous assessment documentation, and visual inspection, this report provides sufficient detail regarding the quantity of hazardous materials for the purposes of facility transfer; it also provides that further characterization/verification of these materials is unnecessary.

Gary Mecham

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Final Report: Pilot-Scale X-Flow Filtration Test - Env C Plus Entrained Solids Plus Sr/TRU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This filtration technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. The plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

Duignan, M.R.

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

184

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

185

Low-Level Liquid Waste Processing Pilot Studies Using a Vibratory Shear Enhancing Process (VSEP) for Filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previous EPRI study evaluated potential treatment methods for the removal of iron from BWR waste streams. Of the methods investigated, high shear filtration using the vibratory shear-enhanced process (VSEP) showed the most promise to effectively and economically remove high iron concentrations from backwash receiving tank waste. A VSEP filter uses oscillatory vibration to create high shear at the surface of the filter membrane. This high shear force significantly improves the filter's resistance to fouling thereby enabling high throughputs with very little secondary waste generation. With a VSEP filter, the waste feed stream is split into two effluents- a permeate stream with little or no suspended solids and a concentrate stream with a suspended solids concentration much higher than that of the feed stream. To evaluate the feasibility of using a VSEP concept for processing typical high iron containing BWR radwaste, a surrogate feedstream containing up to 1,700 ppm iron oxide (as Fe2O3) was used. This surrogate waste simulates radioactive waste found at Exelon's Limerick and Peach Bottom (powdered resin condensate) plants, and in Hope Creek's (deep bed condensate) radwaste systems. Testing was done using a series L (laboratory scale) VSEP unit at the manufacturer's and contractor's laboratories. These tests successfully demonstrated the VSEP capability for producing highly concentrated waste streams with totally ''recyclable'' permeate (e.g., greater than 95% recovery).

Bushart, S.; Tran, P.; Asay, R.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: Hot-Gas Filtration; Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-333  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hypothesis that was tested in this task was that separation of char, with its associated mineral matter from pyrolysis vapors before condensation, will lead to improved oil quality and stability with respect to storage and transportation. The metric used to evaluate stability in this case was a 10-fold reduction in the rate of increase of viscosity as determined by ASTM D445 (the accelerated aging test). The primary unit operation that was investigated for this purpose was hot-gas filtration. A custom-built heated candle filter system was fabricated by the Pall Corporation and furnished to NREL for this test campaign. This system consisted of a candle filter element in a containment vessel surrounded by heating elements on the external surface of the vessel. The filter element and housing were interfaced to NREL?s existing 0.5 MTD pyrolysis Process Development Unit (PDU). For these tests the pyrolysis reactor of the PDU was operated in the entrained-flow mode. The HGF test stand was installed on a slipstream from the PDU so that both hot-gas filtered oil and bio-oil that was not hot-gas filtered could be collected for purposes of comparison. Two filter elements from Pall were tested: (1) porous stainless steel (PSS) sintered metal powder; (2) sintered ceramic powder. An extremely sophisticated bio-oil condensation and collection system was designed and fabricated at NREL and interfaced to the filter unit.

Baldwin, R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

DEMONSTRATION OF THE NEXT-GENERATION CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION SOLVENT WITH 2-CM CENTRIFUGAL CONTRACTORS USING TANK 49H WASTE AND WASTE SIMULANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers successfully demonstrated the chemistry and process equipment of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) flowsheet using MaxCalix for the decontamination of high level waste (HLW). The demonstration was completed using a 12-stage, 2-cm centrifugal contactor apparatus at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This represents the first CSSX process demonstration of the MaxCalix solvent system with Savannah River Site (SRS) HLW. Two tests lasting 24 and 27 hours processed non-radioactive simulated Tank 49H waste and actual Tank 49H HLW, respectively. Conclusions from this work include the following. The CSSX process is capable of reducing {sup 137}Cs in high level radioactive waste by a factor of more than 40,000 using five extraction, two scrub, and five strip stages. Tests demonstrated extraction and strip section stage efficiencies of greater than 93% for the Tank 49H waste test and greater than 88% for the simulant waste test. During a test with HLW, researchers processed 39 liters of Tank 49H solution and the waste raffinate had an average decontamination factor (DF) of 6.78E+04, with a maximum of 1.08E+05. A simulant waste solution ({approx}34.5 liters) with an initial Cs concentration of 83.1 mg/L was processed and had an average DF greater than 5.9E+03, with a maximum DF of greater than 6.6E+03. The difference may be attributable to differences in contactor stage efficiencies. Test results showed the solvent can be stripped of cesium and recycled for {approx}25 solvent turnovers without the occurrence of any measurable solvent degradation or negative effects from minor components. Based on the performance of the 12-stage 2-cm apparatus with the Tank 49H HLW, the projected DF for MCU with seven extraction, two scrub, and seven strip stages operating at a nominal efficiency of 90% is {approx}388,000. At 95% stage efficiency, the DF in MCU would be {approx}3.2 million. Carryover of organic solvent in aqueous streams (and aqueous in organic streams) was less than 0.1% when processing Tank 49H HLW. The entrained solvent concentration measured in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) was as much as {approx}140 mg/L, although that value may be overstated by as much as 50% due to modifier solubility in the DSS. The entrained solvent concentration was measured in the strip effluent (SE) and the results are pending. A steady-state concentration factor (CF) of 15.9 was achieved with Tank 49H HLW. Cesium distribution ratios [D(Cs)] were measured with non-radioactive Tank 49H waste simulant and actual Tank 49H waste. Below is a comparison of D(Cs) values of ESS and 2-cm tests. Batch Extraction-Strip-Scrub (ESS) tests yielded D(Cs) values for extraction of {approx}81-88 for tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant. The results from the 2-cm contactor tests were in agreement with values of 58-92 for the Tank 49H HLW test and 54-83 for the simulant waste test. These values are consistent with the reference D(Cs) for extraction of {approx}60. In tests with Tank 49H waste and waste simulant, batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the two scrub stages as {approx}3.5-5.0 for the first scrub stage and {approx}1.0-3.0 for the second scrub stage. In the Tank 49H test, the D(Cs) values for the 2-cm test were far from the ESS values. A D(Cs) value of 161 was measured for the first scrub stage and 10.8 for the second scrub stage. The data suggest that the scrub stage is not operating as effectively as intended. For the simulant test, a D(Cs) value of 1.9 was measured for the first scrub stage; the sample from the second scrub stage was compromised. Measurements of the pH of all stage samples for the Tank 49H test showed that the pH for extraction and scrub stages was 14 and the pH for the strip stages was {approx}7. It is expected that the pH of the second scrub stage would be {approx}12-13. Batch ESS tests measured D(Cs) values for the strip stages to be {approx}0.002-0.010. A high value in Strip No.3 of a test with simulant solution has been attributed to issues associated with the limits of detection for the

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.; Crowder, M.; Caldwell, T.; Pak, D; Fink, S.; Blessing, R.; Washington, A.

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Industrial Membrane Filtration and Short-bed Fractal Separation Systems for Separating Monomers from Heterogeneous Plant Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale displacement of petroleum will come from low-cost cellulosic feedstocks such as straw and corn stover crop residues. This project has taken a step toward making this projection a reality by reducing capital and energy costs, the two largest cost factors associated with converting cellulosic biomass to chemicals and fuels. The technology exists for using acid or enzyme hydrolysis processes to convert biomass feedstock (i.e., waste cellulose such as straw, corn stover, and wood) into their base monomeric sugar building blocks, which can, in turn, be processed into chemicals and fuels using a number of innovative fermentation technologies. However, while these processes are technically possible, practical and economic barriers make these processes only marginally feasible or not feasible at all. These barriers are due in part to the complexity and large fixed and recurring capital costs of unit operations including filtration, chromatographic separation, and ion exchange. This project was designed to help remove these barriers by developing and implementing new purification and separation technologies that will reduce the capital costs of the purification and chromatographic separation units by 50% to 70%. The technologies fundamental to these improvements are: (a) highly efficient clarification and purification systems that use screening and membrane filtration to eliminate suspended solids and colloidal material from feed streams and (b) fractal technology based chromatographic separation and ion exchange systems that can substitute for conventional systems but at much smaller size and cost. A non-hazardous ''raw sugar beet juice'' stream (75 to 100 gal/min) was used for prototype testing of these technologies. This raw beet juice stream from the Amalgamated Sugar LLC plant in Twin Falls, Idaho contained abrasive materials and membrane foulants. Its characteristics were representative of an industrial-scale heterogeneous plant extract/hydrolysis stream, and therefore was an ideal model system for developing new separation equipment. Subsequent testing used both synthetic acid hydrolysate and corn stover derived weak acid hydrolysate (NREL produced). A two-phased approach was used for the research and development described in this project. The first level of study involved testing the new concepts at the bench level. The bench-scale evaluations provided fundamental understanding of the processes, building and testing small prototype systems, and determining the efficiency of the novel processes. The second level of study, macro-level, required building larger systems that directly simulated industrial operations and provided validation of performance to minimize financial risk during commercialization. The project goals and scope included: (1) Development of low-capital alternatives to conventional crop-based purification/separation processes; and (2) Development of each process to the point that transition to commercial operation is low risk. The project reporting period was January 2001 to December 2004. This included a one year extension of the project (without additional funding).

Kearney, M; Kochergin, V; Hess, R; Foust, T; Herbst, R; Mann, N

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Emulsions for interfacial filtration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated a novel emulsion interfacial filter that is applicable for a wide range of materials, from nano-particles to cells and bacteria. This technology uses the interface between the two immiscible phases as the active surface area for adsorption of targeted materials. We showed that emulsion interfaces can effectively collect and trap materials from aqueous solution. We tested two aqueous systems, a bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and coal bed methane produced water (CBMPW). Using a pendant drop technique to monitor the interfacial tension, we demonstrated that materials in both samples were adsorbed to the liquid-liquid interface, and did not readily desorb. A prototype system was built to test the emulsion interfacial filter concept. For the BSA system, a protein assay showed a progressive decrease in the residual BSA concentration as the sample was processed. Based on the initial prototype operation, we propose an improved system design.

Grillet, Anne Mary; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Souza, Caroline Ann; Welk, Margaret Ellen; Hartenberger, Joel David; Brooks, Carlton, F.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Evaluation of the 183-D Water Filtration Facility for Bat Roosts and Development of a Mitigation Strategy, 100-D Area, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Filtration Facility is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington. It was used to provide filtered water for cooling the 105-D Reactor and supplying fire-protection and drinking water for all facilities in the 100-D Area. The facility has been inactive since the 1980s and is now scheduled for demolition. Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine if any part of the facility was being used as roosting habitat by bats.

Lindsey, C. T.; Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

191

Laplacian Growth II: Saffman - Taylor Problem Without Surface Tension in Filtration Combustion: Formation of One Finger with Half of the Channel Width  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filtration combustion is described by Laplacian growth without surface tension. These equations have elegant analytical solutions that replace the complex integro-differential motion equations by simple differential equations of pole motion in a complex plane. The main problem with such a solution is the existence of finite time singularities. To prevent such singularities, nonzero surface tension is usually used.However, nonzero surface tension does not exist in filtration combustion, and this destroys the analytical solutions. However, a more elegant approach exists for solving the problem. First, we can introduce a small amount of pole noise to the system. Second, for regularisation of the problem, we throw out all new poles that can produce a finite time singularity. It can be strictly proved that the asymptotic solution for such a system is a single finger. Moreover, the qualitative consideration demonstrates that a finger with 1/2 of the channel width is statistically stable. Therefore, all properties of such a solution are exactly the same as those of the solution with nonzero surface tension under numerical noise. The solution of the ST problem without surface tension is similar to the solution for the equation of cellular flames in the case of the combustion of gas mixtures.

Oleg Kupervasser

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

Control of the accumulation of non-process elements and organic compounds in pulp mills with bleach filtrate reuse. Quarterly report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A portion of each filtrate sample was freeze-dried and the resulting solids were analyzed for ash content. Adsorption experiments with calcium and barium were carried at 70{degrees}C in a temperature controlled incubator under continuous mixing in order to simulate the environment experienced by brownstock as it moves through the Q stage. In the calcium experiments, it was difficult to accurately determine the calcium adsorbed on the pulp by measuring the depletion of calcium in the aqueous phase. Consequently, the technique was modified. In the modified technique, the calcium-adsorbed pulp is acid washed again to release the calcium. The calcium concentration in the washings is measured, and the calcium adsorbed on the pulp is estimated by material balance. Measurement of calcium adsorption on the brownstock pulp fibers from the L-P/Samoa mill have been obtained.

Frederick, W.J.; Laver, M.L.; Rorrer, G.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Caustic Recovery Technology | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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194

A Ceramic membrane to Recycle Caustic  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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195

Water Filtration Using Plant Xylem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective point-of-use devices for providing safe drinking water are urgently needed to reduce the global burden of waterborne disease. Here we show that plant xylem from the sapwood of coniferous trees – a readily available, ...

Boutilier, Michael Stephen Ha

196

SLOW SAND FILTRATIONSLOW SAND FILTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control valve Effluent flow control structure #12;Characteristic Features of aCharacteristic Features effective size(dSmall effective size(d1010)) and largeand large uniformity coefficient (duniformity coefficient (d6060/d/d1010) of sand) of sand No filter media fluidizationNo filter media fluidization Relative

197

Water nano-filtration device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water filter includes a porous support characterized by a mean porosity in the range of 20 to 50% and a mean pore size of 2 to 5 .mu.m; and a carbon filter membrane disposed thereon which is characterized by a mean particle size of no more than 50 .mu.m and a mean pore size of no more than 7.2 .mu.m.

Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

198

Growth of sheets in 3D confinements - a model for the C-S-H meso 2 structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- and dicalcium silicate surfaces on particle aggre-41 gation [8]. Particle based models have also been used by the group of Ulm to successfully interpret nano42 indentation results [9]. Small-angle neutron scattering data of cement paste has been interpreted... -vectors, both curves show a q?4 dependence which corresponds to203 the experimental Porod regime. The simulated data is compared to experimental small-angle neutron204 scattering data for cement from Allen et al. (dashed) [30]. For large and intermediate...

Etzold, Merlin A.; McDonald, Peter J.; Routh, Alexander F.

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

199

Associations of blood lead, cadmium, and mercury with estimated glomerular filtration rate in the Korean general population: Analysis of 2008-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction: The objective of this study was to evaluate associations between blood lead, cadmium, and mercury levels with estimated glomerular filtration rate in a general population of South Korean adults. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study based on data obtained in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) (2008-2010). The final analytical sample consisted of 5924 participants. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated using the MDRD Study equation as an indicator of glomerular function. Results: In multiple linear regression analysis of log2-transformed blood lead as a continuous variable on eGFR, after adjusting for covariates including cadmium and mercury, the difference in eGFR levels associated with doubling of blood lead were -2.624 mL/min per 1.73 m Superscript-Two (95% CI: -3.803 to -1.445). In multiple linear regression analysis using quartiles of blood lead as the independent variable, the difference in eGFR levels comparing participants in the highest versus the lowest quartiles of blood lead was -3.835 mL/min per 1.73 m Superscript-Two (95% CI: -5.730 to -1.939). In a multiple linear regression analysis using blood cadmium and mercury, as continuous or categorical variables, as independent variables, neither metal was a significant predictor of eGFR. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CI values for reduced eGFR calculated for log2-transformed blood metals and quartiles of the three metals showed similar trends after adjustment for covariates. Discussion: In this large, representative sample of South Korean adults, elevated blood lead level was consistently associated with lower eGFR levels and with the prevalence of reduced eGFR even in blood lead levels below 10 {mu}g/dL. In conclusion, elevated blood lead level was associated with lower eGFR in a Korean general population, supporting the role of lead as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease.

Kim, Yangho [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung-Kook, E-mail: bklee@sch.ac.kr [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Soonchunhyang University 646 Eupnae-ri, Shinchang-myun, Asan-si, Choongnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of)] [Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Soonchunhyang University 646 Eupnae-ri, Shinchang-myun, Asan-si, Choongnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ray tracing for ICRF, including mode conversion and caustics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Slide 2 Heating with waves in the Joint European Torus (JET, Oxford). Electro-magnetic power · cyclotron.N. Kaufman3, A.Brizard4 1NADA, Royal Institute Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden; 2College of William resonance ions 50 MHz electrons 100 GHz · 32 MW power injected Where is it deposited? · core / edge

Jaun, André

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Ceramic membrane to Recycle Caustic | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014Department ofDepartment of56thA Barn RaisingAA

202

Experimental investigation of caustic steam injection for heavy oils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1 Overview Heavy oil is a part of the unconventional petroleum reserve. Heavy oil does not flow very easily and is classified as heavy because of its high specific gravity. With increasing demand for oil and with depleting... and success of the sodium carbonate and sodium silicate floods respectively. (5) Attainment of very low interfacial tension does not ensure improved oil recovery but a minimum value is necessary for a successful steam alkaline flood. Tiab, Okoye...

Madhavan, Rajiv

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

203

Physical process first law and caustic avoidance for Rindler horizon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the perturbation induced by a slowly rotating massive object as it passes through a Rindler horizon. It is shown that the passage of this object can be approximately modeled as Delta\\,function type tidal distortions hitting the horizon. Further, following the analysis presented by Amsel, Marolf and Virmani related to the issue of the validity of physical process first law, we establish a condition on the size of the object so that this law holds for the Rindler horizon.

Srijit Bhattacharjee; Sudipta Sarkar

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

204

Filtration for Metals Removal from Stormwater Runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste ­ Peat-Sand Mix ­ Kudzu ­ Peanut Hull Pellets MetalsMetals Copper,Cadmium, Chromium, Zinc, Lead CAPACITIES FOR COPPER #12;2 Capacity of Media for Zn 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 TP 207*Com post Kudzu-Sand M ix Cotton W aste Sand gZn/kgmedia 14 16 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Compost Kudzu PeanutHulls St

Clark, Shirley E.

205

CONDITIONING AND INITIAL ENLARGEMENT OF FILTRATION ON ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSDES ON A MANIFOLD. 2303. [14] FITZSIMMONS, P., PITMAN, J. W. and YOR, M. (1993). Markovian bridges, construction, Palm interpretation and splicing.

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

206

Local Martingales and Filtration Shrinkage Hans Follmer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction It is a classic result, known as Stricker's theorem, that if one considers a semimartingale, even in the classic case of having the local martingale still adapted, Stricker observed [31 the best known result in this direction is Stricker's Theorem: Theorem 1 (Stricker's Theorem). Let X

Föllmer, Hans

207

FILTRATION ASSOCIATED TO TORSION SEMI-STABLE ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extension of Qp and ?i : G ? GLd(OE) for i = 1, 2 two Galois representations such .... in Mr tor(?, N, Fil) such that. (1) if there exists a morphism of lifts ˆf : j.

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0 ACRF

209

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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210

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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211

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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212

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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213

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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214

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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215

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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216

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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217

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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218

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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219

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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220

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0725 ACRF

222

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0725

223

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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224

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A072578

225

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A0725789

226

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A07257896

227

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark A072578967

228

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark

229

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark8

230

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark81

231

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811 ACRF

232

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811 ACRF0 A

233

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811 ACRF0

234

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark811

235

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark8114 The

236

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1Vulture ChemistryBeller, Mark8114 The DR

237

Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartment of EnergyLight-Duty DieselReviewCalifornia |Side

238

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security919 Belowground

239

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security919 BelowgroundARM-0707

240

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security919 BelowgroundARM-07071

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security919 BelowgroundARM-070712

242

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security919

243

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science and

244

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science and2

245

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science and28

246

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science

247

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science2

248

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science23

249

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science234

250

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P.2.2Security9196 RACORO Science2345

251

Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

Collin, Clair

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Low Cost Ceramics:Low Cost Ceramics: Applications in Water FiltrationApplications in Water Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compared to price range ofprice range of commercial filterscommercial filters Drawbacks of parabolic mirrors (fires) and solarDrawbacks of parabolic mirrors (fires) and solar cookers Panel DiscussionIRC Princeton Alumnus Panel Discussion

Petta, Jason

253

Resonant character of laser-induced formation of particles in a Cs-H2 vapour J. L. Picqu, J. Vergs and R. Vetter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This resonant character confirms the feasibility, which was also pointed out in the case of UF6 mole- cules [4

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

254

EXAFS study of Nd(III) uptake by amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (CSH) P. Mandaliev a,b,*, R. Dhn a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXAFS study of Nd(III) uptake by amorphous calcium silicate hydrates (C­S­H) P. Mandaliev a,b,*, R Accepted 3 June 2009 Available online 7 June 2009 Keywords: Amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C Binding mechanisms Molecular level a b s t r a c t Calcium silicate hydrate (C­S­H) phases control

Wehrli, Bernhard

255

Hazard Analysis for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is designed to perform a demonstration on an engineering scale to confirm the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and filtration process equipment design and sludge treatment process. The system will use scaled prototypic equipment to demonstrate sludge water wash, caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, and filtration. Unit operations to be tested include pumping, solids washing, chemical reagent addition and blending, heating, cooling, leaching, filtration, and filter cleaning. In addition, the PEP will evaluate potential design changes to the ultrafiltration process system equipment to potentially enhance leaching and filtration performance as well as overall pretreatment throughput. The skid-mounted system will be installed and operated in the Processing Development Laboratory-West at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington.

Sullivan, Robin S.; Geeting, John GH; Lawrence, Wesley E.; Young, Jonathan

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

Structural Oil Pan With Integrated Oil Filtration And Cooling System  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oil pan for an internal combustion engine includes a body defining a reservoir for collecting engine coolant. The reservoir has a bottom and side walls extending upwardly from the bottom to present a flanged lip through which the oil pan may be mounted to the engine. An oil cooler assembly is housed within the body of the oil pan for cooling lubricant received from the engine. The body includes an oil inlet passage formed integrally therewith for receiving lubricant from the engine and delivering lubricant to the oil cooler. In addition, the body also includes an oil pick up passage formed integrally therewith for providing fluid communication between the reservoir and the engine through the flanged lip.

Freese, V, Charles Edwin (Westland, MI)

2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

257

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a real-time DPF controlmanagement system that can measure the instantaneous mass of soot deposits in a DPF, control DPF regeneration, and provide OBD signals for DPF operation. 3...

258

Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of wells or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of O-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ILJIN Electric Co., Korea IBIDEN, Japan Relevance and Objectives Existing DPF systems still need to improve filtrationregeneration efficiencies and pressure drops. ...

260

advanced membrane filtration: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

available reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes are based on the thin film composite (TFC) aromatic polyamide membranes. However, they have several disadvantages...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cost Analysis Procedures for Use in Promoting Fine Filtration Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this example empties into a 7" diameter duct, the required 1165 ACFM results in a velocity of 4363 FPM: V = Q ? A where: Q = 1165 CFM SYSTEM CALCULATION C ENGINEERING LETTER 1 The New York Blower Company a71 7660 Quincy Street, Willowbrook, Illinois... 60521-5596 Figure 1 - Typical System (3.5 in. radius) 2 x 3.1416 144 in. 2 /ft. 2 therefore: V = 1165 CFM ? .267 ft. 2 = 4363 FPM The velocity pressure (VP) at 4363 FPM is calculated by: VP = therefore: Acceleration Loss = = 1.19" W.G. The same...

Renfert, David A.

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

262

Development of Model Filtration Media for Investigating Size...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

control has been developed. Controlled pore sizes could be used to optimize high-capture efficiency with low backpressure. p-25strzelec.pdf More Documents & Publications...

263

Oxidation of sewage supernatant liquor by trickling filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

', '': . . 195~9 ":, ' '59 9- ", 19. , -: '; '; 15'F9-;: . :: 418 ?: 499'' ', , : P "-. 8'~5, . : ?. ;. 159 9 . -', ::". , $9-. -:. . . : P P$3I8. :;. "-, . -. , :s8138: '439, ": . ::"::14i:, 9', . ::-', , '-- 4N ' -", ';, '. , :" XL' ". . -:, ' 14..., -. ;;. , ';. ;. . . XiqnM, :or es. crest. sn4-;~ss od As jskNsi' ':5xo, nsg4j~s's1'nips ?', :; . , "::, ' ', : digssegos emik mme-, el@, -er&kling-;Blear srs -eaiu nnies=smpg+sk'in ehs bra semsne. ok' ehs 'soles~, shd erssemiame nf ehs 1@n$4, 'rsspsnei'vole A eriohlkng...

Styner, Pete

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Solvent Resistant Stirred Cells for Ultrafiltration and Filtration Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperatures and corrosion (See the section of this guide titled "Resistance to Chemical Agents.") s Wide for future transport). 2. Unscrew the three cross knobs from the support pillars and lift off the top plate assembly and the O- ring. 3. Remove the glass cylinder and O-ring from the base. Operating Guidelines s Use

Lebendiker, Mario

265

Energy Implications of In-Line Filtration in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name Occupant concern about indoor air quality (IAQ) issues has led to the increased use of more effective air

266

WEIGHT FILTRATIONS VIA COMMUTING AUTOMORPHISMS Daniel R. Grayson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject Classification. Primary 19E20. Supported by NSF grant DMS 90-02715. I thank Tom Goodwillie, Stephen Lichten* *baum, Friedhelm Waldhausen, Steven Landsburg, and Stephen Ullom for useful discussions

267

WEIGHT FILTRATIONS VIA COMMUTING AUTOMORPHISMS Daniel R. Grayson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Primary 19E20. Supported by NSF grant DMS 90­02715. I thank Tom Goodwillie, Stephen Lichtenbaum, Friedhelm Waldhausen, Steven Landsburg, and Stephen Ullom for useful discussions and ideas. 1 #12; 2 DANIEL R. GRAYSON

268

WEIGHT FILTRATIONS VIA COMMUTING AUTOMORPHISMS Daniel R. Grayson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

90-02715. I thank Tom Goodwillie, Stephen Lichtenbaum, Friedhelm Waldhausen, Steven Landsburg, and Stephen Ullom for useful discussions and ideas. 1 #12;2 DANIEL R. GRAYSON nonvanishing homotopy group

269

Engineering Optimisation of cryptosporidium filtration under simulated swimming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions / Tanya Leibrick. M.Res. 2012 Eng.D. The development of a lifing methodology for ceramic matrix composites / Danilo T. Di Salvo. Eng.D. 2012 Ph.D. Humic acid removal and fouling using tubular ceramic-scale modelling of ceramic composite layers and reinforced concrete slabs subjected to blast loading / Zainorizuan

Martin, Ralph R.

270

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

May 20, 2009 DOE Annual Merit Review & Peer Evaluation Meeting PI: Kyeong Lee (Postdoc: Seung Yang) Argonne National Laboratory DOE Project Managers: Kenneth Howden & Gurpreet...

271

Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydraulically operated pump for in-ground filtering and monitoring of ws or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of o-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

Hopkins, Charles D. (Augusta, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Toole, Jr., William R. (Aiken, SC)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of waters or other fluid sources, includes a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of o-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis. 5 figs.

Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

273

Air cooled turbine component having an internal filtration system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A centrifugal particle separator is provided for removing particles such as microscopic dirt or dust particles from the compressed cooling air prior to reaching and cooling the turbine blades or turbine vanes of a turbine engine. The centrifugal particle separator structure has a substantially cylindrical body with an inlet arranged on a periphery of the substantially cylindrical body. Cooling air enters centrifugal particle separator through the separator inlet port having a linear velocity. When the cooling air impinges the substantially cylindrical body, the linear velocity is transformed into a rotational velocity, separating microscopic particles from the cooling air. Microscopic dust particles exit the centrifugal particle separator through a conical outlet and returned to a working medium.

Beeck, Alexander R. (Orlando, FL)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Benefits of Better Ventilation and Filtration Practices in Schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environment Department of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory www.iaqscience.lbl.gov/sfrb.html Research Shows the Test Score Effects of Irritant Gases ESL-KT-13-12-17 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16... Findings Resource Bank (IAQ-SFRB), Indoor Environment Department of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory www.iaqscience.lbl.gov/sfrb.html Research Shows the Absenteeism Effects of Irritant Gases Desired level 1000 ppm > 7.10 l/s/p (15 cfm/p) 1 l...

Lamping, G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Analytical Modeling of Cake Filtration Scott A. Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of kaolin suspensions in distilled water. Constitutive properties were determined by experiments to the analytical model predictions assuming that porosity and pressure were functions only of fractional cake that whenever the distribution of porosity was only a function of fractional cake position, #12;2 z/L, where z

Wells, Scott A.

276

Application of CFCC technology to hot gas filtration applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discussion will feature high temperature filter development under the DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) Program. Within the CFCC Program there are four industry projects and a national laboratory technology support project. Atlantic Research, Babcock & Wilcox, DuPont Lanxide Composites, and Textron are developing processing methods to produce CFCC Components with various types of matrices and composites, along with the manufacturing methods to produce industrial components, including high temperature gas filters. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is leading a National Laboratory/University effort to increase knowledge of such generic and supportive technology areas as environmental degradation, measurement of mechanical properties, long-term performance, thermal shock and thermal cycling, creep and fatigue, and non-destructive characterization. Tasks include composite design, materials characterization, test methods, and performance-related phenomena, that will support the high temperature filter activities of industry and government.

Richlen, S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Instabilities of uniform filtration flows with phase transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New mechanisms of instability are described for vertical flows with phase transition through horizontally extended two-dimensional regions of a porous medium. A plane surface of phase transition becomes unstable at an infinitely large wavenumber and at zero wavenumber. In the latter case, the unstable flow undergoes reversible subcritical bifurcations leading to the development of secondary flows (which may not be horizontally uniform). The evolution of subcritical modes near the instability threshold is governed by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov equation. Two examples of flow through a porous medium are considered. One is the unstable flow across a water-bearing layer above a layer that carries a vapor-air mixture under isothermal conditions in the presence of capillary forces at the phase transition interface. The other is the vertical flow with phase transition in a high-temperature geothermal reservoir consisting of two high-permeability regions separated by a low-permeability stratum.

Il'ichev, A. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Steklov Institute of Mathematics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ilichev@mi.ras.ru; Tsypkin, G. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Mechanics (Russian Federation)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the Gridwise Global1WasteRecoveryAwardsFacilityEnergyAction | DepartmentSide

279

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesign &ReportOperation | Department ofCooling

280

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof EnergyAllianceDepartment of Energy SpiritIndoor airPLUS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems or GDI Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

282

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

We have these homes so well-air-sealed, we need to look at things like good source control products. Obviously, these homes are so efficient, they're zero energy ready, we have...

283

Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Technology: Success stories at the High  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMPRelatedEnergyEnergy

284

Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration Technology at Oak Ridge National  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -DepartmentNovember 1, 2010December 1,Goals Chapter| Department

285

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services AuditTransatlantic RelationsDepartment ofEfficiency |

286

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Companya new high capacityofTechnology |4Efficiency

287

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Companya new high capacityofTechnology

288

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Companya new high capacityofTechnologyDepartment

289

Indestructible Ultra-filtration: Ceramic HEPA Filters - Energy Innovation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching.348 270Energy InnovationDepartmentPortal Building

290

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned Small BusinessEMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION1 - In13 -

291

Magnetic Filtration Process, Magnetic Filtering Material, and Method of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . S .ofField Measurements

292

CFD Analysis of Particle Deposition During DPF Filtration Processes |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 <Ones | DepartmentCEEComponents |

293

CMI Unique Facility: Filtration Test Facility | Critical Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF2,

294

Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smart GridShiftMethodSimwYpes(tm) and47-000Single

295

THE WEIGHT FILTRATION FOR REAL ALGEBRAIC VARIETIES II: CLASSICAL HOMOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar ([6] Theorem (2.3.6)) to show that our filtered complex is independent to the foundational paper [6] of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar. In particular we have been influenced by the viewpoint of section 5 of that paper, on the theory of motives. Using Guill´en and Navarro Aznar's extension theorems

Parusinski, Adam

296

THE WEIGHT FILTRATION FOR REAL ALGEBRAIC VARIETIES II: CLASSICAL HOMOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a smooth center that has normal crossings with D. We apply a result of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar [6 with compact supports. Our work owes much to the foundational paper [6] of Guill´en and Navarro Aznar. Using Guill´en and Navarro Aznar's extension theorems, Totaro [13] observed that there is a functorial

Parusinski, Adam

297

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

A model for oxygen reduction in a gas-fed porous electrode in caustic electrolyte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Maxwell equations for multicomponent diffusion (11) m (X. N, ? X. N. ) VX, = P j=l CD t, j where m is set equal to two for oxygen and mtrogen (see appendix A for a treatment of the water vapor that is present). To simplify Eq. [1], it is assumed... that the diffusion of oxygen in the porous backing occurs only in the Z' direction, see Fig, 2. To further simplify Eq. [1], the variables X. and C are redefined in terms of partial pressures and the ideal gas i law respectively. phase diffusion The binary...

Wolfe, Don James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

Design and Economic Evaluation of Thermionic Cogeneration in a Chlorine-Caustic Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-callsti~ plant with therm ion ie Cl)gf~neration. Thermion i.e combustors replace the exi.sting hllrners of the boilers uSI!d to raise stp.am for th(~ evaporators, Rnd are capable of generating approximately 2.6 MW of de power. This satisfies about 5 percent... BURNER BOILER AUX I ..> BUS AND SWITCH GEAR THERMIONIC COMBUSTOR CELL f--- ROOM TO EVAPORATORS BOILER F==:> Figure 1. Block Diagram of Cogeneration System D STANDBY CELL ROOMS EVAPORATORS THEAMtOMC MODULES Figure 2. Schematic Layout...

Miskolezy, G.; Morgan, D.; Turner, R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The multiple quasar Q2237+0305 under a microlensing caustic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the high magnification event seen in the 1999 OGLE campaign light curve of image C of the quadruply imaged gravitational lens Q2237+0305 to study the structure of the quasar engine. We have obtained g'- and r'-band photometry at the Apache Point Observatory 3.5m telescope where we find that the event has a smaller amplitude in the r'-band than in the g'- and OGLE V-bands. By comparing the light curves with microlensing simulations we obtain constraints on the sizes of the quasar regions contributing to the g'- and r'-band flux. Assuming that most of the surface mass density in the central kiloparsec of the lensing galaxy is due to stars and by modeling the source with a Gaussian profile, we obtain for the Gaussian width 1.20 x 10^15 sqrt(M/0.1M_sun)cm 72 percent confidence.

T. Anguita; R. W. Schmidt; E. L. Turner; J. Wambsganss; R. L. Webster; K. A. Loomis; D. Long; R. McMillan

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Extraction of long-lived radionuclides from caustic Hanford tank waste supernatants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of polymer-based extraction systems, based on the use of polyethylene glycols (PEGs) or polypropylene glycols (PPGs), was demonstrated to be capable of selective extraction and recovery of long-lived radionuclides, such as {sup 99}Tc and {sup 129}I, from Hanford SY-101 tank waste, neutralized current acid waste, and single-shell tank waste simulants. During the extraction process, anionic species like TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and I{sup {minus}} are selectively transferred to the less dense PEG-rich aqueous phase. The partition coefficients for a wide range of inorganic cations and anions, such as sodium, potassium, aluminum, nitrate, nitrite, and carbonate, are all less than one. The partition coefficients for pertechnetate ranged from 12 to 50, depending on the choice of waste simulant and temperature. The partition coefficient for iodide was about 5, while that of iodate was about 0.25. Irradiation of the PEG phase with gamma-ray doses up to 20 Mrad had no detectable effect on the partition coefficients. The most selective extraction systems examined were those based on PPGs, which exhibited separation factors in excess of 3000 between TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 2}{sub {minus}}. An advantage of the PPG-based system is minimization of secondary waste production. These studies also highlighted the need for exercising great care in extrapolating the partitioning behavior with tank waste simulants to actual tank waste.

Chaiko, D.J.; Mertz, C.J.; Vojta, Y. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

SORPTION OF URANIUM, PLUTONIUM AND NEPTUNIUM ONTO SOLIDS PRESENT IN HIGH CAUSTIC NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solids such as granular activated carbon, hematite and sodium phosphates, if present as sludge components in nuclear waste storage tanks, have been found to be capable of precipitating/sorbing actinides like plutonium, neptunium and uranium from nuclear waste storage tank supernatant liqueur. Thus, the potential may exists for the accumulation of fissile materials in such nuclear waste storage tanks during lengthy nuclear waste storage and processing. To evaluate the nuclear criticality safety in a typical nuclear waste storage tank, a study was initiated to measure the affinity of granular activated carbon, hematite and anhydrous sodium phosphate to sorb plutonium, neptunium and uranium from alkaline salt solutions. Tests with simulated and actual nuclear waste solutions established the affinity of the solids for plutonium, neptunium and uranium upon contact of the solutions with each of the solids. The removal of plutonium and neptunium from the synthetic salt solution by nuclear waste storage tank solids may be due largely to the presence of the granular activated carbon and transition metal oxides in these storage tank solids or sludge. Granular activated carbon and hematite also showed measurable affinity for both plutonium and neptunium. Sodium phosphate, used here as a reference sorbent for uranium, as expected, exhibited high affinity for uranium and neptunium, but did not show any measurable affinity for plutonium.

Oji, L; Bill Wilmarth, B; David Hobbs, D

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

ORNL/TM-2008/073 CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT-EXTRACTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before

Pennycook, Steve

305

Point source in a phononic grating: stop bands give rise to phonon-focusing caustics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use locally-excited gigahertz surface phonon wavepackets in microscopic line structures of different pitches to reveal profound anisotropy in the radiation pattern of a point source in a grating. Time-domain data obtained ...

Maznev, Alex

306

Chemomechanics of calcium leaching of cement-based materials at different scales : the role of CH-dissolution and C-S-H degradation on strength and durability performance of materials and structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calcium leaching is a durability threat for cement-based materials employed in critical infrastructures, such as Nuclear Waste Storage Systems. This thesis presents a comprehensive study of the material and structural ...

Heukamp, Franz H. (Franz Hoyte), 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

SALTSTONE VAULT CLASSIFICATION SAMPLES MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT/ACTINIDE REMOVAL PROCESS WASTE STREAM APRIL 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was asked to prepare saltstone from samples of Tank 50H obtained by SRNL on April 5, 2011 (Tank 50H sampling occurred on April 4, 2011) during 2QCY11 to determine the non-hazardous nature of the grout and for additional vault classification analyses. The samples were cured and shipped to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Group-Radioisotope and Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (B&W TSG-RACL) to perform the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and subsequent extract analysis on saltstone samples for the analytes required for the quarterly analysis saltstone sample. In addition to the eight toxic metals - arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, mercury, lead, selenium and silver - analytes included the underlying hazardous constituents (UHC) antimony, beryllium, nickel, and thallium which could not be eliminated from analysis by process knowledge. Additional inorganic species determined by B&W TSG-RACL include aluminum, boron, chloride, cobalt, copper, fluoride, iron, lithium, manganese, molybdenum, nitrate/nitrite as Nitrogen, strontium, sulfate, uranium, and zinc and the following radionuclides: gross alpha, gross beta/gamma, 3H, 60Co, 90Sr, 99Tc, 106Ru, 106Rh, 125Sb, 137Cs, 137mBa, 154Eu, 238Pu, 239/240Pu, 241Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243/244Cm. B&W TSG-RACL provided subsamples to GEL Laboratories, LLC for analysis for the VOCs benzene, toluene, and 1-butanol. GEL also determines phenol (total) and the following radionuclides: 147Pm, 226Ra and 228Ra. Preparation of the 2QCY11 saltstone samples for the quarterly analysis and for vault classification purposes and the subsequent TCLP analyses of these samples showed that: (1) The saltstone waste form disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 was not characteristically hazardous for toxicity. (2) The concentrations of the eight RCRA metals and UHCs identified as possible in the saltstone waste form were present at levels below the UTS. (3) Most of the inorganic species measured in the leachate do not exceed the MCL, SMCL or TW limits. (4) The inorganic waste species that exceeded the MCL by more than a factor of 10 were nitrate, nitrite and the sum of nitrate and nitrite. (5) Analyses met all quality assurance specifications of US EPA SW-846. (6) The organic species (benzene, toluene, 1-butanol, phenol) were either not detected or were less than reportable for the vault classification samples. (7) The gross alpha and radium isotopes could not be determined to the MCL because of the elevated background which raised the detection limits. (8) Most of the beta/gamma activity was from 137Cs and its daughter 137mBa. (9) The concentration of 137Cs and 90Sr were present in the leachate at concentrations 1/40th and 1/8th respectively than in the 2003 vault classification samples. The saltstone waste form placed in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 met the SCHWMR R.61-79.261.24(b) RCRA metals requirements for a nonhazardous waste form. The TCLP leachate concentrations for nitrate, nitrite and the sum of nitrate and nitrite were greater than 10x the MCLs in SCDHEC Regulations R.61-107.19, Part I A, which confirms the Saltstone Disposal Facility classification as a Class 3 Landfill. The saltstone waste form placed in the Saltstone Disposal Facility in 2QCY11 met the R.61-79.268.48(a) non wastewater treatment standards.

Eibling, R.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

N,N'-DICYCLOHEXYL-N"-ISOTRIDECYLGUANIDINE AS SUPPRESSOR FOR THE NEXT GENERATION CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION (NG-CSSX) PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The purity, concentration, and source of the N,N'-dicyclohexyl-N"-isotridecylguanidine (DCiTG) suppressor (guanidine) used in the NG-CSSX process were found to influence solvent performance. As the starting isotridecanol used in the preparation of DCiTG is comprised of a mixture of branched-chain aliphatic alcohols, varying in composition with manufacturer, the resulting DCiTG itself is a mixture. Thus, it is necessary to address how the solvent performance will be affected by the different preparations of the DCiTG solvent component. In this study, four preparations of DCiTG from three sources were analyzed and evaluated for purity and performance, both in the absence and presence of an anionic surfactant impurity.

Duncan, Nathan C [ORNL; Roach, Benjamin D [ORNL; Williams, Neil J [ORNL; Bonnesen, Peter V [ORNL; Rajbanshi, Arbin [ORNL; Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

PULSED GAMMA RAYS FROM THE ORIGINAL MILLISECOND AND BLACK WIDOW PULSARS: A CASE FOR CAUSTIC RADIO EMISSION?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the detection of pulsed gamma-ray emission from the fast millisecond pulsars (MSPs) B1937+21 (also known as J1939+2134) and B1957+20 (J1959+2048) using 18 months of survey data recorded by the Fermi Large Area Telescope and timing solutions based on radio observations conducted at the Westerbork and Nancay radio telescopes. In addition, we analyzed archival Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and XMM-Newton X-ray data for the two MSPs, confirming the X-ray emission properties of PSR B1937+21 and finding evidence ({approx}4{sigma}) for pulsed emission from PSR B1957+20 for the first time. In both cases the gamma-ray emission profile is characterized by two peaks separated by half a rotation and are in close alignment with components observed in radio and X-rays. These two pulsars join PSRs J0034-0534 and J2214+3000 to form an emerging class of gamma-ray MSPs with phase-aligned peaks in different energy bands. The modeling of the radio and gamma-ray emission profiles suggests co-located emission regions in the outer magnetosphere.

Guillemot, L.; Kramer, M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Noutsos, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Venter, C. [Centre for Space Research, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, 2520 Potchefstroom (South Africa); Kerr, M.; Michelson, P. F. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Pancrazi, B. [CNRS, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Livingstone, M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, PQ H3A 2T8 (Canada); Janssen, G. H.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Espinoza, C. M. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Cognard, I. [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement, LPCE UMR 6115 CNRS, F-45071 Orleans Cedex 02 (France); Camilo, F. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Gargano, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, 70126 Bari (Italy); Grove, J. E. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Johnston, S., E-mail: guillemo@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de, E-mail: tyrel.j.johnson@gmail.com, E-mail: Christo.Venter@nwu.ac.za, E-mail: kerrm@stanford.edu [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); and others

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Active filtration of phosphorus in Ca-rich hydrated oil shale ash: precipitation mechanisms and recovery.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fosfor (P) on üks tähtsamaid biokeemilise tsükli toitaineid, mistõttu juba natuke kõrgenenud fosfori kontsentratsioonid võivad vallandada veekogude eutrofeerumise. Fosforiühendid on põllumajanduses väetistena intensiivses kasutuses. Fosforit… (more)

Liira, Martin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon filtration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surface, such that the targeted active layer contained 91 g... on cellulose-based carbon aerogel 1 LEPMI, UMR 5631 CNRSGrenoble-INPUJF, BP75, F-38402 St Martin d......

312

Magnetic filtration process, magnetic filtering material, and methods of forming magnetic filtering material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides magnetically responsive activated carbon, and a method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon. The method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon typically includes providing activated carbon in a solution containing ions of ferrite forming elements, wherein at least one of the ferrite forming elements has an oxidation state of +3 and at least a second of the ferrite forming elements has an oxidation state of +2, and increasing pH of the solution to precipitate particles of ferrite that bond to the activated carbon, wherein the activated carbon having the ferrite particles bonded thereto have a positive magnetic susceptibility. The present invention also provides a method of filtering waste water using magnetic activated carbon.

Taboada-Serrano, Patricia; Tsouris, Constantino; Contescu, Cristian I; McFarlane, Joanna

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

313

Pilot study of horizontal roughing filtration in northern Ghana as pretreatment for highly turbid dugout water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Northern Region Ghana (NRG), highly turbid rainwater runoff and intermittent streams are collected in earthen dams called dugouts. These dams serve as many communities' main source of drinking and domestic water despite ...

Losleben, Tamar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS and Zero Energy Ready Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

315

Drilling mud filtration and its effect on the electrical resistivity of porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a cementing material,, To obtain this reaction* a water-saturated sand was reduced to a low residual water content by flushing it with kerosene,, This was followed by a solu? tion containing five percent silicon tetrachloride in kerosene, until... the system was saturated with brine containing 10P000 ppma of NaCl0 The core was then flushed with kerosene at a pressure differential of 30 psio The resistivity of the core was measured during the flood and the produced water was collected in a 17...

Flock, Donald Louis

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Improvements of oil-in-water analysis for produced water using membrane filtration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The accuracy of oil-in-water analysis for produced water is increasingly crucial as the regulations for disposal of this water are getting more stringent world wide.… (more)

Khor, Ee Huey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filtration significantly Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Application Design Statement Summary: availability problems. The project includes rainwater collection, storage, treatment and re-use systems, air... cooled plant and water...

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional spectral filtration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Hironaka which permits, by a ... Source: Teh, Jyh-Haur - Department of Mathematics, National Tsing Hua University Collection: Mathematics 2 Journal of Pure and...

319

Aging and Gas Filtration Studies in the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is one of three particle tracking detectors of the ATLAS Inner Detector whose goal is to exploit the highly exciting new physics potential at CERN's next accelerator, the so-called Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The TRT consists of 370000 straw proportional tubes of 4 mm diameter with a 30 micron anode wire, which will be operated with a Xe/CO2/O2 gas mixture at a high voltage of approximately 1.5 kV. This detector enters a new area that requires it to operate at unprecedented high rates and integrated particle fluxes. Full functionality of the detector over the lifetime (10 years) of the experiment is demanded. Aging of gaseous detectors is a term for the degradation of detector performance during exposure to ionizing radiation. This phenomenon involves very complex physical and chemical processes that are induced by pollution originating from very small amounts of silicon-based substances in some components of the gas system. This work presents a review of previous aging...

Sprachmann, Gerald; Störi, Herbert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) selective filtration promoted toxic Microcystis blooms in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Saginaw Bay (Lake Huron) and Lake Erie Henry A. Vanderploeg, James R. Liebig, Wayne W. Carmichael, Megan A with other algae. Results were consistent with the hypothesis that zebra mussels promoted blooms of toxic M. aeruginosa in Saginaw Bay, western Lake Erie, and other lakes through selective rejection in pseudofeces

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

David B. Burnett

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

Measurement-Based Evaluation of Installed Filtration System Performance in Single-Family Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems LBNL-XXXX 8. Literature Cited AHAM (2006).ANSI/AHAM Standard AC-1-2006 Method for Measuring theHome Appliance Manufactures (AHAM), using Clean Air Delivery

Chan, Wanyu Rengie

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

BiotechnologyProfessional Development & Advancement Applied Principles and Techniques of NFF & TFF Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: 401-277-5097 Fax: 401-277-5060 (preferred) / Email:bruce_birch@mail.uri.edu The lectures will be held attend a lecture prior to attending the workshop. Total Registration Fee enclosed: Contact: Bruce Birch (check here ) or call Bruce Birch in the Special Programs Office (401-277-5050) at least three days

Rhode Island, University of

324

BiotechnologyProfessional Development & Advancement Applied Principles and Techniques of DFF & TFF Filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Contact: Bruce Birch: 401-277-5097 Fax: 401-277-5060 (preferred) / Email:bruce_birch@mail.uri.edu The lectures will be held at the URI Feinstein Providence Campus, 80 Washington Street, Providence, RI. Parking (check here ) or call Bruce Birch in the Special Programs Office (401-277-5050) at least three days

Rhode Island, University of

325

Impact of Feedwater Salinity on Energy Requirements of a Small-Scale Membrane Filtration System   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many remote communities in both developed and developing countries lack electricity and clean drinking water. One solution, for such communities that rely on brackish groundwater, is a photovoltaic (PV) powered hybrid ...

Richards, B.S.; Masson, L.; Schäfer, Andrea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies with Indoor airPLUS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indoor airPLUS qualification, a prerequisite for Zero Energy Ready Homes, offers an important platform to improve the indoor air quality (IAQ) in high-performance homes.  A critical aspect of...

327

Advection, dispersion, and filtration of fine particles within emergent vegetation of the Florida Everglades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., phosphorous) [Sansalone and Buchberger, 1997; Noe et al., 2007]. [3] Wetland vegetation influences flow

328

Next generation of electrospun textiles for chemical and biological protection and air filtration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) only in the presence of water, which serves as a medium promoting the nucleophilic action of the amidoximes in the fibers. Bactericidal fiber mats were produced from electrospinning of blends containing a biocide ...

Chen, Liang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about particulate...

330

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USA Abstract Economizer use in data centers is an energy efficiency strategy that could significantly limit electricity

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USA Abstract Economizer use in data centers is an energy efficiency strategy that could significantly limit electricity

Shehabi, Arman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Final Report: Pilot-scale Cross-flow Filtration Test - Envelope A + Entrained Solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company.This filter technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. This plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

Duignan, M.R.

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

333

Characterization and preservation techniques of plant xylem as low cost membrane filtration devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safe drinking water remains inaccessible for roughly 1.1 billion people in the world.³? As a result, 400 children under the age of 5 die every hour from biological contamination of drinking water.³? Studies have been done ...

Potash, Benjamin R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Comparison of soy protein concentrates produced by membrane filtration and acid precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, respectively. A series of operations including pH adjustment (8.0), agitation (250 rpm, 30 min), sonication (40 dB, 20 min), homogenization (3 min), and centrifugation (3,000 x g, 15 min) were followed. For the membrane processing, the ultrafiltration cartridge...

Kim, Hyun Jung

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Strong Macdonald Theory and the Brylinski Filtration for Affine Lie Algebras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

positive Chevalley generator e J is a linear combination ofa linear combination e = c i e i of the positive generators,

Slofstra, William Edward

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

David B. Burnett

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

337

Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration Technology at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof EnergyHouse11 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel| DepartmentMeet

338

Hot Gas Filtration of Fine and Ultra fine Particles with Liquid Phase  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground HawaiiWasteDepartmentHoney, Did YouSintered SiC

339

E-Print Network 3.0 - adsorption filtration photo-catalysis Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand Summary: Effects of Phosphate on Uranium(VI) Adsorption to Goethite-Coated Sand T A O C H E N G , M A R K O... natural and...

340

PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

PROJECT W-551 DETERMINATION DATA FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the detailed assessment forms and data for selection of the solids separation and cesium separation technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin. This data was used to prepare a cross-cutting technology summary, reported in RPP-RPT-37740.

TEDESCHI AR

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

Natural Abundance 43Ca NMR Spectroscopy of Tobermorite and Jennite...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

which has limited our ability to understand the structure of, for example, Ca–silicate hydrate (C–S–H). 43Ca nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has...

343

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank And Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 5 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the ''microbatches'' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (''Macrobatch'') 5 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 4 samples indicate generally consistent operations. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in the Actinide Removal process (ARP).

Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Contact Mechanics Based Mechanical Characterization of Portland Cement Paste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase of hydrated portland cement has different properties on the nanometric scale than on the micron scale. Packing density of C-S-H particles is proposed as an explanation for the disparity in the measured results...

Jones, Christopher

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

345

Deteriorated hardened cement paste structure analyzed by XPS and {sup 29}Si NMR techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and {sup 29}Si-MAS-NMR was used for the evaluation of deteriorated hardened cement pastes. The deterioration by ammonium nitrate solution was accompanied by changes in the pore structure as well as by structural changes in the C–S–H in the hardened cement paste. The CaO/SiO{sub 2} ratio of the C–S–H decreased with the progress of deterioration, there was also polymerization of the silicate in the C–S–H. It was confirmed that the degree of polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in hardened cement paste can be determined by XPS. It was also shown that the polymerization depends on the structure of the C–S–H. -- Highlights: •The polymerization of silicate of the C–S–H in the HCP can be observed by XPS. •The structure of C–S–H changed with the degree of calcium leaching. •The NMR result about silicate in C–S–H was in good agreement with the XPS result.

Kurumisawa, Kiyofumi, E-mail: kurumi@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Nawa, Toyoharu [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan)] [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Japan, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Owada, Hitoshi [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, 1-15-7 Tsukishima, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)] [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, 1-15-7 Tsukishima, Chuo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Shibata, Masahito [Taiheiyo Consultant Co., Ltd., 2-4-2, Ohsaku, Sakura-City, Chiba (Japan)] [Taiheiyo Consultant Co., Ltd., 2-4-2, Ohsaku, Sakura-City, Chiba (Japan)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Biologically active filtration for treatment of produced water and fracturing flowback wastewater in the O&G industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Sustainable development of unconventional oil and gas reserves, particularly tight oil, tight gas, and shale gas, requires prudent management of water resources used during drilling,… (more)

Freedman, Daniel E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Incorporating Latest Technologies in a Cost-Effective Design of Rainfall Catchment and Filtration Systems for Coastal Rhode Island Communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

months when groundwater levels are at their lowest. While the ancient practice of rainwater collection Williams University Abstract With this project, methods and materials for rainfall collection, storage to augment the current supply. #12;Catching, storing, and using rainwater at the household level can help

Rhode Island, University of

348

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An investigation into South Campus Storm water Catchment and Filtration Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, include an underground detention system for rainwater that was collected from parking lots, a system the possibility of capturing rainwater for use at the UBC Farm during the dry months of the year was conducted that used rooftops as a mean of catching rainwater then passed it through a chain of filters all the way

349

Adsorption/Membrane Filtration as a Contaminant Concentration and Separation Process for Mixed Wastes and Tank Wastes - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was conducted to evaluate novel approaches for removing radioactive strontium (Sr) and cesium (Cs) from the tank wastes. The bulk of the Sr removal research conducted as part of this project investigated adsorption of Sr onto a novel adsorbent known as iron-oxide-coated sand. The second major focus of the work was on the removal of cesium. Since the chemistries of strontium and cesium have little commonality, different materials (namely, cesium scavengers known as hexacyanoferrates, HCFs) were employed in these tests. This study bridged several scientific areas and yielded valuable knowledge for implementing new technological processes. The applicability of the results extends beyond the highly specialized application niches investigated experimentally to other issues of potential interest for EMSP programs (e.g., separation of chromium from a variety of wastes using IOCS, separation of Cs from neutral and acidic wastes with EC-controlled HCFs).

Benjamin, M.M.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The effects of cerium doping on the size, morphology, and optical properties of ?-hematite nanoparticles for ultraviolet filtration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Possible application of cerium-doped ?-hematite as ultraviolet filter. • Nanoparticles obtained through co-precipitation technique using various cerium doping levels followed by annealing. • Comprehensive materials characterisation utilizing XRD, DSC/TGA, STEM, UV–vis spectroscopy. • Increasing cerium content reduces particle sizing and alters morphology. • Solubility of cerium in hematite seen between 5 and 10% doping, 10% cerium doping greatly enhances attenuation in ultraviolet region and increases optical bandgap. - Abstract: Metal oxide nanoparticles have potential use in energy storage, electrode materials, as catalysts and in the emerging field of nanomedicine. Being able to accurately tailor the desirable properties of these nanoceramic materials, such as particle size, morphology and optical bandgap (E{sub g}) is integral in the feasibility of their use. In this study we investigate the altering of both the structure and physical properties through the doping of hematite (?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanocrystals with cerium at a range of concentrations, synthesised using a one-pot co-precipitation method. This extremely simple synthesis followed by thermal treatment results in stable Fe{sub 2?x}Ce{sub x}O{sub y} nanoceramics resulting from the burning of any unreacted precursors and transformation of goethite-cerium doped nanoparticle intermediate. The inclusion of Ce into the crystal lattice of these ?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles causes a significantly large reduction in mean crystalline size and alteration in particle morphology with increasing cerium content. Finally we report an increase optical semiconductor bandgap, along with a substantial increase in the ultraviolet attenuation found for a 10% Ce-doping concentration which shows the potential application of cerium-doped hematite nanocrystals to be used as a pigmented ultraviolet filter for cosmetic products.

Cardillo, Dean [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, AIIM Facility, University of Wollongong Innovation Campus, Squires Way, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Konstantinov, Konstantin, E-mail: konstan@uow.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, AIIM Facility, University of Wollongong Innovation Campus, Squires Way, North Wollongong, NSW 2500 (Australia); Devers, Thierry [Centre de Recherche sur la Matière Divisée, Institut de Physique, site de Chartres, Université d’Orléans (France)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Application of Pulse Spark Discharges for Scale Prevention and Continuous Filtration Methods in Coal-Fired Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the present work was to develop a new scale-prevention technology by continuously precipitating and removing dissolved mineral ions (such as calcium and magnesium) in cooling water while the COC could be doubled from the present standard value of 3.5. The hypothesis of the present study was that if we could successfully precipitate and remove the excess calcium ions in cooling water, we could prevent condenser-tube fouling and at the same time double the COC. The approach in the study was to utilize pulse spark discharges directly in water to precipitate dissolved mineral ions in recirculating cooling water into relatively large suspended particles, which could be removed by a self-cleaning filter. The present study began with a basic scientific research to better understand the mechanism of pulse spark discharges in water and conducted a series of validation experiments using hard water in a laboratory cooling tower. Task 1 of the present work was to demonstrate if the spark discharge could precipitate the mineral ions in water. Task 2 was to demonstrate if the selfcleaning filter could continuously remove these precipitated calcium particles such that the blowdown could be eliminated or significantly reduced. Task 3 was to demonstrate if the scale could be prevented or minimized at condenser tubes with a COC of 8 or (almost) zero blowdown. In Task 1, we successfully completed the validation study that confirmed the precipitation of dissolved calcium ions in cooling water with the supporting data of calcium hardness over time as measured by a calcium ion probe. In Task 2, we confirmed through experimental tests that the self-cleaning filter could continuously remove precipitated calcium particles in a simulated laboratory cooling tower such that the blowdown could be eliminated or significantly reduced. In addition, chemical water analysis data were obtained which were used to confirm the COC calculation. In Task 3, we conducted a series of heat transfer fouling tests using a condenser heat exchanger in the laboratory cooling tower, from which we confirmed that the plasma water treatment technology could prevent or significantly mitigate mineral foulings in condenser tubes when compared with the no-treatment case. With the completion of the present work, a cooling water treatment technology using pulse spark discharges is currently ready for field-validation tests. The plasma water treatment technology is a true mechanical water softener with almost no maintenance, which continuously converts hard water to soft water spending a relatively small amount of energy. Such a mechanical water softener could find wide-spread applications to solve hard water problems both in industry and at home.

Cho, Young; Fridman, Alexander

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R.J. : Effect of ventilation rate in a healthy building.IAQ '91: Healthy Buildings, American Society of Heating,

Thatcher, Tracy L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

We develop a procedure to simulate and detect the spatial distribution of mud-filtrate invasion in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of reservoirs. Accurate determination of in-situ formation resistivity as a direct measure of initial oil to a waterflood. Consequently, the invaded zone resistivity, xoR remains a direct indicator of residual oil

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

354

Numerical Simulation of Mud-Filtrate Invasion in Horizontal Wells and Sensitivity Analysis of Array Induction Tools1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assess- ment of reservoirs. Accurate determination of in-situ forma- tion resistivity as a direct measure be regarded as analogous to a waterflood. Consequently, the invaded zone resistivity, Rxo remains a direct

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

355

Mechanism of action of cysteamine in depleting prolactin immunoreactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thiol reagent cysteamine (CSH) depletes anterior pituitary cells of immunoreactive PRL both in vivo and in vitro. The authors examined the hypothesis that CSH affects either the solubility or immunoreactivity of PRL through a mechanism involving thiol-disulfide exchange. Adult female rats were treated with either CSH (300 mg/kg, sc) or an equimolar dose of ethanolamine as a control. Anterior pituitary glands were extracted in 0.1 M sodium borate buffer, pH 9.0. Treatment of pituitary extracts with beta-mercaptoethanol (BME) destroys the immunoreactivity of PRL. However, extraction in the presence of reduced glutathione or CSH of pituitaries of rats treated with CSH restores immunoreactive PRL to control levels. Extracts were also subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). On gels of pituitary extracts of CSH-treated rats, the band that comigrates with purified PRL is diminished compared to that in ethanolamine-treated controls. However, extraction of the pituitaries in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing buffer followed by chemical reduction with BME restores the PRL band. Therefore, CSH acts on PRL through a thiol-related mechanism to yield a product that is poorly soluble in aqueous buffer at pH 9 and is poorly immunoreactive. Dispersed anterior pituitary cells in tissue culture were incubated with L-(TVS)methionine to radiolabel newly synthesized peptides. PAGE followed by autoradiography confirmed the above results obtained in vivo.

Sagar, S.M.; Millard, W.J.; Martin, J.B.; Murchison, S.C.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Alloys (kt) Paper Pulp (kt) Caustic Soda (kt) Paper and Paperboard (Mt) Soda Ash (kt) Motor Vehicles and Chasis [

Fridley, Ed., David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous chemical growth Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WASTE DISPOSAL AUTHORIZATION Summary: Solvent (Halogenated) BasesCaustic Inorganic Solid Inorganic (Aqueous) Photo Processing Chemicals Paints... Risk & Safety Services...

358

Biological Conversion of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enzymes Acid + Caustic Wastewater Treatment Process Heat and Power Integration Biogas + Sludge Fuel Finishing (hydroprocessing, as needed) Electricity Hydrogen Hydrocarbon...

359

Multi-Scale Studies of Transport and Adsorption Phenomena of Cement-based Materials in Aqueous and Saline Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and (d) 7days, and (e) Cl XRF map with microscopic image,by X-ray fluorescence (XRF). NaCl-reacted C-S-H samples werean X-ray fluorescence (XRF) map. Using XRD, this chapter

Yoon, Se Yoon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Gas-phase ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations on transition metal carbonyls and nitrosyls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Hall molecular orbital calculations are reported for (n -CSH5)M(NO)&X where M=Cr, W and X=C1, Br, I and for [(n -CSH5) 5 5 M(CO)&]& where M=Cr, Mo, W. These compounds are derivatives of two related fragments, (n -CSH5)M(NO)2 and (q -CSH5)M(CO)B. The first 5 5... are assigned by comparison with the Fenske-Hall molecular orbital calculations on the chromium and molybdenum species. The difference in the (n -C H )-M-M angle between M=Cr and M=Mo is best explained 5 5 5 as steric crowding between C5H5 and CO...

Morris-Sherwood, Betty Jeanne

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these ...

Ulm, Franz-Josef

362

American Mineralogist, Volume 97, pages 10601069, 2012 0003-004X/12/00071060$05.00/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2138/am.2012.4058 1060  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-coordination with hydroxyl, VI Si-OH. Thaumasite and ettringite also form in the porous matrix of aging concrete, especially and of carbonation. Because C-S-H in concrete prov

Jacobsen, Steven D.

363

Computer News, Volume 29  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATH DEPT Computer News, Volume 29. How to update your login shell from csh to tcsh. If you, like me, have had an account on the Math network of SUNs ...

364

Arsenic Removal Using AgedArsenic Removal Using Aged Rapid Sand Filter MediaRapid Sand Filter Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exchangeIon exchange Coagulation / FiltrationCoagulation / Filtration Membrane filtration (Reverse Osmosis)Membrane filtration (Reverse Osmosis) Innovative adsorbents, e.g. metal oxidesInnovative adsorbents, e.g. metal oxides

365

Effects of cysteamine on pituitary, MTTW15 tumor, and serum prolactin levels measured by rat lymphoma cell bioassay and radioimmunoassay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cysteamine (CSH), a sulfhydryl compound, reduces both serum and anterior pituitary (AP) PRL measured by RIA. We have used the Nb2 lymphoma cell bioassay (BIO) for PRL to evaluate possible CSH-related changes in PRL levels in sera and tissues of male and MtTW15 mammosomatotropic tumor-bearing female rats. Experimental animals received a single sc injection of CSH (300 mg/kg), and samples were collected 0.5-24 h later. Since CSH and serum from CSH rats were toxic in BIO, samples were dialyzed before assay. All samples were evaluated for PRL and GH by RIA as well. A significant decrease (P less than 0.05) in BIO serum PRL was evident in male rats 0.5 h after CSH; levels remained low for 24 h. Serum PRL by RIA was significantly depressed at 4 h but not at 0.5 h or 24 h. PRL in AP extracts was decreased (60-90%) at all times by BIO and RIA. Significant decreases of BIO- and RIA-detectable PRL were recorded in serum and tissues (AP and tumors) at 4 h in tumor rats. Sequentially bled (0.5-4 h) CSH-treated tumor-bearing rats showed 50% and 80% reductions in serum PRL at 1 and 4 h by both BIO and RIA. CSH had no effect on GH levels in sera and tissues of any animal studied at any time interval. Our results substantiate earlier reports on CSH-induced decreases in RIA-detectable PRL. They show that such changes cannot be attributed to assay effects alone, as significant decreases in circulating and stored PRL (both AP and tumor) were evident by BIO. Results with tissue extracts were the most dramatic. They suggest an action of CSH or a metabolic intermediate with stored PRL which reduces both extractable PRL and hormone release. Such an effect of CSH on PRL extraction has been suggested by others. Whatever the mechanism, it appears to be relatively specific, since GH cells were not affected.

Parsons, J.A.; Peterson, E.K.; Hartfel, M.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Cysteamine-induced depletion of somatostatin and prolactin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cysteamine (2-aminoethanethiol (CSH), given in vivo or in vitro, rapidly but reversibly depletes immunoreactive somatostatin (irSS) in the central nervous system and gut as well as biological and immunological prolactin (PRL) activity in both the anterior pituitary and blood of the rat. This depletion of irSS and PRL is dose dependent and cannot be accounted for by release of either compound. Basal and potassium-stimulated SS release is reduced from hypothalamic tissue in vitro in CSH-treated animals. PRL secretion induced both pharmacologically and physiologically is abolished after CSH administration. Furthermore, CSH reduces cellular PRL content in a number of hyperprolactinemic states. The mechanism by which CSH reduces PRL levels is not clear, but it does not appear to act through the dopamine receptor nor does it alter the morphological structure of the lactotrope in normal animals. Most likely, CSH acts by interacting with the disulfide bonds of PRL, thus rendering the molecule both immunologically and biologically inactive.

Millard, W.J.; Sagar, S.M.; Martin, J.B.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Order and disorder in calcium–silicate–hydrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite advances in the characterization and modeling of cement hydrates, the atomic order in Calcium–Silicate–Hydrate (C–S–H), the binding phase of cement, remains an open question. Indeed, in contrast to the former crystalline model, recent molecular models suggest that the nanoscale structure of C–S–H is amorphous. To elucidate this issue, we analyzed the structure of a realistic simulated model of C–S–H, and compared the latter to crystalline tobermorite, a natural analogue of C–S–H, and to an artificial ideal glass. The results clearly indicate that C–S–H appears as amorphous, when averaged on all atoms. However, an analysis of the order around each atomic species reveals that its structure shows an intermediate degree of order, retaining some characteristics of the crystal while acquiring an overall glass-like disorder. Thanks to a detailed quantification of order and disorder, we show that, while C–S–H retains some signatures of a tobermorite-like layered structure, hydrated species are completely amorphous.

Bauchy, M., E-mail: bauchy@mit.edu [Concrete Sustainability Hub, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); MIT-CNRS Joint Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Qomi, M. J. Abdolhosseini; Ulm, F.-J. [Concrete Sustainability Hub, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Pellenq, R. J.-M. [Concrete Sustainability Hub, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); MIT-CNRS Joint Laboratory at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Centre Interdisciplinaire des Nanosciences de Marseille, CNRS and Aix-Marseille University, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

368

Recaustization of kraft black liquor via bipolar electrodialysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy in conjunction with HPD Inc. supported a research program to perform a laboratory feasibility study with various black liquor samples for the recaustization of these samples via bipolar electrodialysis. The research was conducted at the HPD pilot plant facility in Plainfield, Illinois, beginning in April 1989. This report is a summary of the work completed thru November 1989. The program was designed to operate the electrodialyzer in order to obtain performance and engineering data such as current efficiency, power consumption per gram of NaOH produced, and assess fouling and/or membrane durability. Prior to the electrodialysis laboratory runs, the black liquor samples were pretreated in order to remove as much lignin as possible. The black liquor samples were air oxidized, acidified to pH = 9.0 and pH = 2.0 and later filtered via a Buchner funnel under vacuum. The filtrate was then utilized to become the feed to the electrodialysis stack. Initial test runs were performed with synthetic solutions of either sodium sulfate or sodium bicarbonate in order to determine acceptable operating current, power, current efficiencies, and fouling behavior. A second set of test were conducted with a series of four Southern Kraft black liquor samples. Based on the results of this study, it was determined that the use of bipolar electrodialysis for producing a caustic stream and an acidified black liquor stream is feasible and was demonstrated. 9 refs., 27 figs., 32 tabs.

Koumoundouros, J.A.; Oshen, S.; Lynch, J.D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Effects on Occupants of Enhanced Particle Filtration in a non-problem office environment: A Double-Blind Crossover Intervention Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, Stateand Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State

Mendell, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Effects on Occupants of Enhanced Particle Filtration in a non-problem office environment: A Double-Blind Crossover Intervention Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental comfort, performance indicators, and symptom0.27 - 0.81). A l l performance indicators (confusion scale,itchy, or irritated Performance indicators (7-not at all, to

Mendell, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Novel Cleanup Agents Designed Exclusively for Oil Field Membrane Filtration Systems Low Cost Field Demonstrations of Cleanup Agents in Controlled Experimental Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of our project is to develop innovative processes and novel cleaning agents for water treatment facilities designed to remove fouling materials and restore micro-filter and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane performance. This project is part of Texas A&M University's comprehensive study of the treatment and reuse of oilfield brine for beneficial purposes. Before waste water can be used for any beneficial purpose, it must be processed to remove contaminants, including oily wastes such as residual petroleum hydrocarbons. An effective way of removing petroleum from brines is the use of membrane filters to separate oily waste from the brine. Texas A&M and its partners have developed highly efficient membrane treatment and RO desalination for waste water including oil field produced water. We have also developed novel and new cleaning agents for membrane filters utilizing environmentally friendly materials so that the water from the treatment process will meet U.S. EPA drinking water standards. Prototype micellar cleaning agents perform better and use less clean water than alternate systems. While not yet optimized, the new system restores essentially complete membrane flux and separation efficiency after cleaning. Significantly the amount of desalinated water that is required to clean the membranes is reduced by more than 75%.

David Burnett; Harold Vance

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Household ceramic water filter evaluation using three simple low-cost methods : membrane filtration, 3M Petrifilm and hydrogen sulfide bacteria in northern region, Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drinking water continues to be a major source of waterborne diseases and death in the world because many points of water collection remain unsafe. This thesis reports high level of fecal contamination found in rivers and ...

Mattelet, Claire (Claire Eliane H. Y.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Estimation of Dry-Rock Elastic Moduli Based on the Simulation of Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Borehole Acoustic Logs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Petroleum Engineers This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2007 SPE Annual Technical Conference(s). Contents of the paper, as presented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers position of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, its officers, or members. Papers presented at SPE meetings

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

374

Control of the accumulation of non-process elements and organic compounds in pulp mills with bleach filtrate reuse. Quarterly report 3, January--March, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress during this quarter is described on four tasks. The first task involves the recovery of organic matter from bleach effluents and black liquors, separation of carbohydrates and lignin degradation products, analysis of functional groups, and characterization of carbohydrate polymers. Progress in the second task was made in the selection of model compounds. Several subtasks are complete in Task 3, but the paper summarizes progress made in the determination of the residual hemicellulose content in the pulp samples. Finally, results are given for the measurement of metal adsorption isotherms on wood pulp. Goals for the next quarter are listed.

Frederick, W.J.; Laver, M.L.; Rorrer, G.L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

METC/Shell Cooperative Agreement CRADA 93-011 high temperature high pressure filtration and sorbent test program. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of activities of the particulate monitoring group in support of the METC/Shell CRADA 93-011. Online particulate monitoring began in August 1993 and ended in October 1994. The particulate monitoring group participated in six MGCR runs (No. 5 through No. 10). The instrument used in measuring the particle loadings (particle counts and size distribution) is the Particle Measuring Systems Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe High Temperature and High Pressure (PMS Model CSASP-100-HTHP). This PMS unit is rated to operate at temperatures up to 540{degree}C and gage pressures up to 2.07 MPa. Gas stream conditions, temperature at 540{degree}C, gage pressure at 2.93 MPa, and gas flowrate at 0.0157 SCM per second, precluded the direct measurement of particulate loadings in the gas stream with the PMS unit. A side stream was extracted from the gas stream after it came over to the MGCR, (Modular Gas Cleanup Rig), from the FBG, pressurized fluidized-bed gasifier, but before it entered the filter testing vessel. A sampling probe of 0.635 cm O.D. thin wall stainless steel tubing was used for extracting the sample gas isokinetically based on the expected flowrate. The sample gas stream was further split into two streams; one was directed to the PMS unit and the other to the alkali monitor unit.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Rate of Decline in Serum PFOA Concentrations after Granular Activated Carbon Filtration at Two Public Water Systems in Ohio and West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Court of Wood County, West Virginia, 10 April 2002. LittleSystems in Ohio and West Virginia Scott M. Bartell, 1,2plant in Washington, West Virginia, is owned and operated by

Bartell, Scott M; Calafat, Antonia M; Lyu, Christopher; Kato, Kayoko; Ryan, P. Barry; Steenland, Kyle

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Rate of decline in serum PFOA concentrations after granular activated carbon filtration at two public water systems in Ohio and West Virginia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Court of Wood County, West Virginia, 10 April 2002. LittleSystems in Ohio and West Virginia Scott M. Bartell, 1,2plant in Washington, West Virginia, is owned and operated by

Bartell, Scott M; Calafat, Antonia M; Lyu, Christopher; Kato, Kayoko; Ryan, P Barry; Steenland, Kyle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Method of producing a colloidal fuel from coal and a heavy petroleum fraction. [partial liquefaction of coal in slurry, filtration and gasification of residue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for combining coal as a colloidal suspension within a heavy petroleum fraction. The coal is broken to a medium particle size and is formed into a slurry with a heavy petroleum fraction such as a decanted oil having a boiling point of about 300 to 550/sup 0/C. The slurry is heated to a temperature of 400 to 500/sup 0/C for a limited time of only about 1 to 5 minutes before cooling to a temperature of less than 300/sup 0/C. During this limited contact time at elevated temperature the slurry can be contacted with hydrogen gas to promote conversion. The liquid phase containing dispersed coal solids is filtered from the residual solids and recovered for use as a fuel or feed stock for other processes. The residual solids containing some carbonaceous material are further processed to provide hydrogen gas and heat for use as required in this process.

Longanbach, J.R.

1981-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

379

CX-012069: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the deliberate operations at Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction require Savannah River National Laboratory to perform several tests in the near term, using radio-spiked...

380

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOENETL FE 0561 ORD 2010 Erik Saab 2010 NETL Morgantown GPDUSyngas Generator Decommissioning Prepatory work for the demolition of the GPDU and SGG Structures, Caustic Soda Tank...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Pastoral at the Boundaries: The Hybridization of Genre in the Fourteenth-Century Italian Eclogue Revival  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

world (or, in Samuel Johnson’s more caustic formulation,di Bretschneider. 69-82. Johnson, Samuel. 2006. The Lives of

Combs-Schilling, Jonathan David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

CX-008618: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for chemical and physical properties. Research will also include Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests utilizing similar sorbate solutions described above, and an organic caustic side...

383

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Extraction-scrub-strip (ESS) Testing for Modular Caustic-side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Support Savannah River Site AikenAikenSouth Carolina Recent events during the deliberate...

384

ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ammonia, and Terephthalic Acid, December 2007 ITP Chemicals: Final Report: Evaluation of Alternative Technologies for Ethylene, Caustic-Chlorine, Ethylene Oxide, Ammonia, and...

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - acids xxiv alkali Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Group 1-A Group 1-B Acetylene sludge Acid sludge Alkaline caustic liquids Acid and water Alkaline... ... Source: Prentiss, Mara - Department of Physics,...

386

Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fractionation Hydrogen Acid, Caustic, Enzymes Wastewater Treatment Insoluble solids Biogas + Sludge Process Heat and Power Integration Corn Stover Hydrocarbon Biofuels (i.e....

387

TESTING OF A ROTARY MICROFILTER TO SUPPORT HANFORD APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers are investigating and developing a rotary microfilter for solid-liquid separation applications at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the success of that work, the Hanford Site is evaluating the use of the rotary microfilter for its Supplemental Pretreatment process. The authors performed rotary filter testing with a full-scale, 25-disk unit with 0.5 {micro} filter media manufactured by Pall Corporation using a Hanford AN-105 simulant at solids loadings of 0.06, 0.29, and 1.29 wt%. The conclusions from this testing are: (1) The filter flux at 0.06 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.26 gpm/ft{sup 2} (6.25 gpm total). (2) The filter flux at 0.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.17 gpm/ft{sup 2} (4 gpm total). (3) The filter flux at 1.29 wt% solids reached a near constant value at an average of 0.10 gpm/ft{sup 2} (2.4 gpm total). (4) Because of differences in solids loadings, a direct comparison between crossflow filter flux and rotary filter flux is not possible. The data show the rotary filter produces a higher flux than the crossflow filter, but the improvement is not as large as seen in previous testing. (5) Filtrate turbidity measured < 4 NTU in all samples collected. (6) During production, the filter should be rinsed with filtrate or dilute caustic and drained prior to an extended shutdown to prevent the formation of a layer of settled solids on top of the filter disks. (7) Inspection of the seal faces after {approx} 140 hours of operation showed an expected amount of initial wear, no passing of process fluid through the seal faces, and very little change in the air channeling grooves on the stationary face. (8) Some polishing was observed at the bottom of the shaft bushing. The authors recommend improving the shaft bushing by holding it in place with a locking ring and incorporated grooves to provide additional cooling. (9) The authors recommend that CH2MHill Hanford test other pore size media to determine the optimum pore size for Hanford waste.

Poirier, M; David Herman, D; David Stefanko, D; Samuel Fink, S

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

388

SOLIDS PRECIPITATION EVENT IN MCU CAUSAL ANALYSIS AND RECOMMENDATIONS FROM SOLIDS RECOVERY TEAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process upset occurred in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) facility on April 6th, 2014. During recovery efforts, a significant amount of solids were found in the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT), Salt Solution Receipt Tanks (SSRTs), two extraction contactors, and scrub contactors. The solids were identified by Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) as primarily sodium oxalate and sodium alumina silicate (NAS) with the presence of some aluminum hydroxide. NAS solids have been present in the SSFT since simulant runs during cold chemical startup of MCU in 2007, and have not hindered operations since that time. During the process upset in April 2014, the oxalate solids partially blocked the aqueous outlet of the extraction contactors, causing salt solution to exit through the contactor organic outlet to the scrub contactors with the organic phase. This salt solution overwhelmed the scrub contactors and passed with the organic phase to the strip section of MCU. The partially reversed flow of salt solution resulted in a Strip Effluent (SE) stream that was high in Isopar™ L, pH and sodium. The primary cause of the excessive solids accumulation in the SSRTs and SSFT at MCU is attributed to an increase in the frequency of oxalic acid cleaning of the 512-S primary filter. Agitation in the SSRTs at MCU in response to cold weather likely provided the primary mechanism to transfer the solids to the contactors. Sources of the sodium oxalate solids are attributed to the oxalic acid cleaning solution used to clean the primary filter at the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) filtration at 512-S, as well as precipitation from the salt batch feed, which is at or near oxalate saturation. The Solids Recovery Team was formed to determine the cause of the solids formation and develop recommendations to prevent or mitigate this event in the future. A total of 53 recommendations were generated. These recommendations were organized into 4 focus areas: • Improve understanding of oxalate equilibrium and kinetics in salt solutions • Reduction/elimination of oxalic acid cleaning in 512-S • Flowsheet optimization • Improving diagnostic capability The recommendations implemented prior to resumption of MCU operations provide a risk mitigation or detection function through additional sampling and observation. The longer term recommendations provide a framework to increase the basic process knowledge of both oxalate chemistry and filtration behavior and then facilitate decisions that improve the salt flowsheet as a system.

Garrison, A.; Aponte, C.

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DPF Dielectric barrier discharge Copyright Accentus 2003 Improved Filtration Pellets 50-60% filtration Cordierite Monoliths Ceramic Fibres and Foams Meshes & Sintered...

390

MODELLING ANTICIPATIONS ON FINANCIAL MARKETS Contents ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Related to this is Stricker's theorem (see [44]): If a process is a semimartingale in an enlarged filtration, then it is a semimartingale in its own filtration.

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

391

194 PART 2 LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES AND PRECINCT PLANS View of McGowan looking northwest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GUTERMAN BIOCLIMATIC LAB PALMROAD POMOLOGY COLD STORAGE AND SALES WATER FILTRATION PLANT PLANTATIONS GUTERMAN BIOCLIMATIC LAB PALMROAD POMOLOGY COLD STORAGE AND SALES WATER FILTRATION PLANT PLANTATIONS

Chen, Tsuhan

392

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration Systems for GDI Engines Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Particulate Emissions Control by Advanced Filtration...

393

Extraction of naphthenic acid from kerosene using porous and nonporous polymeric membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic study of membrane-assisted extraction of naphthenic acids from hydrocarbon fractions by aqueous caustic soda using both porous and nonporous membranes is reported. The effects of hydrodynamic factors, concentration of naphthenic acids and caustic soda, and temperature on the transmembrane flux are discerned. The film model is used to determine the intrinsic mass transfer characteristics of the membranes.

Netke, S.A.; Pangarkar, V.G. [Univ. of Bombay, Matunga (India)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Big Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The late infall of cold dark matter onto an isolated galaxy, such as our own, produces streams and caustics in its halo. The outer caustics are topological spheres whereas the inner caustics are rings. The self-similar model of galactic halo formation predicts that the caustic ring radii $a_n$ follow the approximate law $a_n \\sim 1/n$. In a study of 32 extended and well-measured external galactic rotation curves evidence was found for this law. In the case of the Milky Way, the locations of eight sharp rises in the rotation curve fit the prediction of the self-similar model at the 3% level. Moreover, a triangular feature in the IRAS map of the galactic plane is consistent with the imprint of a ring caustic upon the baryonic matter. These observations imply that the dark matter in our neighborhood is dominated by a single flow. Estimates of that flow's density and velocity vector are given.

P. Sikivie

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

Synthesis and characterization of hafnium and molybdenum bifunctional initiators for the preparation of triblock copolymers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1. Three monofunctional mixed alkyl hafnium complexes containing the (MesNpy)2 ligand ([(MesitylNCH2)2CMe(2-CsH4N)]2) were synthesized. (MesNpy)Hf(Neo)R ((2b), R = Me; Neo = CH2CMe2Ph) and (MesNpy)Hf(CH2TMS)(R), ...

Gabert, Andrea Jennifer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Two-dimensional protonic diffusion in a hydrogen-bonded compound CsOH . H2O, studied by solid state NMR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

949 Two-dimensional protonic diffusion in a hydrogen-bonded compound CsOH . H2O, studied by solid césium hydroxide monohydrate CsH3O2 polycristallin révèle une diffusion protonique rapide dans ses phases hautes températures. Par mesure directe, la constante de diffusion est trouvée D = 1.2 10-5 exp(-1700/T

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

397

Performance of lime-treated silty soil under long-term hydraulic conditions B. Le Runigoa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to a significant decrease in shear strength. The results also indicated that the mechanical performance of soils calcium aluminates (C-S-H and C-A-H) can be formed. As a result, an improvement in the soil mechanical1 Performance of lime-treated silty soil under long-term hydraulic conditions B. Le Runigoa , V

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

398

Concrete is the most prevalent man-made substance on Earth. This strong, durable building material has been in use for at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-high-density concrete, a containment vessel for nuclear waste might last up to 16,000 years in- stead of 100. Changes that model to perform six tests that validated its accuracy. FINDINGS The team found that C-S-H isn't really

Entekhabi, Dara

399

Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

Deschner, Florian, E-mail: florian.deschner@gmail.com [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland)] [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Laboratory for Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Neubauer, Jürgen [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)] [GeoZentrum Nordbayern, Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

UC Irvine Profit Plus Planet Strategic Partnerships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and logistics Better Place, Fiskar Automotive, Mission Motors, Tesla Motors WATER Filtration, purification

Loudon, Catherine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems 424514 /2014 GAS/SOLID SEPARATIONS Cyclones, Electrostatic precipitators, (Hot) Gas filtration Ron

Zevenhoven, Ron

402

Comparison study of solid/liquid separation techniques for oilfield pit closures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vacuum filtration, belt-press filtration, screw-press filtration, and centrifuging techniques were evaluated in full-scale experiments for use in oilfield waste volume reduction. Centrifuging and belt-press filtration proved applicable to oilfield pit cleanups. Also, an effective chemical conditioning (coagulation and flocculation) was found for deliquoring seven types of oilfield waste slurries before separation.

Wojtanowicz, A.K.; Field, S.D.; Osterman, M.C.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Monitoring Based Commissioning: Benchmarking Analysis of 24 UC/CSU/IOU Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat transfer component, improper refrigerant charge, etc. )water treatment, correcting refrigerant charge Filtration

Mills, Evan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Control of the accumulation of non-process elements and organic compounds in pulp mills with bleach filtrate reuse. Milestones and progress, Quarter 9 (July 1--September 30, 1998)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two approach changes that were discussed and recommended in the Quarter 8 (April 1--June 30, 1998) progress report have been implemented in the current project plan. The OLI software has been used to develop a preliminary process model for predicting the distribution of NPE`s in a two stage brownstock washer, and the OLI database has been upgraded to include improved chemical equilibrium data for metal-organic interactions. This exercise served as a tool to evaluate the data and methods developed in this study, and to demonstrate its utility to industry. The Weyerhaeuser-NAELS software has also been applied to predicting inorganic solubility behavior. Task C-1.2, Estimation of unavailable thermodynamic parameters (scheduled completion date: 12/97), has been combined with Task D-2.1, Evaluation of the estimation procedure (scheduled completion date: 3/99) with a new scheduled completion date of 8/99. A model for the adsorption of metal ions on wood pulp fibers will include transport effects as well as adsorption equilibrium, and will be combined with a brownstock washer model to evaluate its predictive capability in comparison with mill data, and to demonstrate the applicability of the results obtained in this project. Three tasks are behind schedule: Task A-2.3, Measurement of stability constants for wood organics with metal ions (scheduled completion date: 6/98), Task B-2.1, Measure metal adsorption isotherms on wood pulp (scheduled completion date: 9/97), and Task B-2.3, Measure metal ion adsorption kinetics for strongly adsorbing metal species (scheduled completion date: 3/98). The reasons and expected completion dates are discussed in the Performance Variances and Open Items section. All other tasks are either completed, on, or ahead of schedule.

Frederick, W.J.; Laver, M.L.; Rorrer, G.L.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, W.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Control of the accumulation of non-process elements and organic compounds in pulp mills with bleach filtrate reuse. Milestones and progress, Quarter 8 (April 1--June 30, 1998)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overall, this project is on schedule and proceeding as planned. Two approach changes are recommended. One is to rely on commercially developed software, in particular that developed by OLI Systems, Inc., and now being expanded in a collaborative effort between OLI Systems, Inc. and IPST to provide a simulation package for the pulp and paper industry and to integrate it with existing process simulation tools used by that industry. The second is the development of a detailed brownstock/bleached fiber washer model as a tool to evaluate the data and methods developed in this study, and to demonstrate its utility to industry. Both of these are discussed in more detail in the Approach Changes section of this report. Two tasks are behind schedule. They are Task A-2.3, Measurement of stability constants for wood organics with metal ions (scheduled completion date: 6/98), and Task C-1.2, Estimation of unavailable thermodynamic parameters (scheduled completion date: 12/97). The reasons and expected completion dates for these tasks are discussed in the Performance Variances and Open Items section of this report. All other tasks are either completed, or on or ahead of schedule.

Frederick, W.J.; Laver, M.L.; Rorrer, G.L.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, W.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Control of the Accumulation of Non-Process Elements in Pulp Mills with Bleach Filtrate Reuse: A Chemical Equilibrium Approach to Predicting the Partitioning of Metals in Pulp Mill and Bleach Plant Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project was to develop fundamental, experimentally based methods for predicting the solubility or organic and inorganic matter and their interactions in recycled effluent from kraft pulp mills and bleach plants. This included: characterizing the capacity of wood pulp and dissolved organic matter to bind metal ions, developing a thermodynamic database of properties needed to describe the solubility of inorganic matter in pulp mill streams, incorporation of the database into equilibrium calculation software for predicting the solubility of the metals of interest, and evaluating its capability to predict the distribution of the metals between pulp fibers, inorganic precipitates, and solution.

Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, G.W.; Sinquefield, S.A.; Rorrer, G.L.; Laver, M.L.; Yantasee, W.; Ming, D.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Office of Enterprise Assessments Targeted Review of the Safety-Class Room Ventilation Systems and Associated Final Filtration Stages, and Review of Federal Assurance Capability at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, February 2015  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLC OrderEfficiencyOceanOctober Field ElementIdaho National

408

Monolith filter apparatus and membrane apparatus, and method using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A filtration apparatus that separates a liquid feedstock mixed with a gas into filtrate and retentate, the apparatus including at least one filtration device comprised of at least one monolith segment of porous material that defines a plurality of passageways extending longitudinally from a feed face of the structure to a retentate end face. The filtration device contains at least one filtrate conduit within it for carrying filtrate toward a filtrate collection zone, the filtrate conduit providing a path of lower flow resistance than that of alternative flow paths through the porous material of the device. The filtration device can also be utilized as a membrane support for a device for microfiltration, ultrafiltration, nanofiltration, reverse osmosis, or pervaporation. Also disclosed is a method for using such a filtration apparatus.

Goldsmith, Robert L. (Wayland, MA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

409

CHARACTERIZATION OF A PRECIPITATE REACTOR FEED TANK (PRFT) SAMPLE FROM THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sample of from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Precipitate Reactor Feed Tank (PRFT) was pulled and sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in June of 2013. The PRFT in DWPF receives Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/ Monosodium Titanate (MST) material from the 512-S Facility via the 511-S Facility. This 2.2 L sample was to be used in small-scale DWPF chemical process cell testing in the Shielded Cells Facility of SRNL. A 1L sub-sample portion was characterized to determine the physical properties such as weight percent solids, density, particle size distribution and crystalline phase identification. Further chemical analysis of the PRFT filtrate and dissolved slurry included metals and anions as well as carbon and base analysis. This technical report describes the characterization and analysis of the PRFT sample from DWPF. At SRNL, the 2.2 L PRFT sample was composited from eleven separate samples received from DWPF. The visible solids were observed to be relatively quick settling which allowed for the rinsing of the original shipping vials with PRFT supernate on the same day as compositing. Most analyses were performed in triplicate except for particle size distribution (PSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). PRFT slurry samples were dissolved using a mixed HNO3/HF acid for subsequent Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analyses performed by SRNL Analytical Development (AD). Per the task request for this work, analysis of the PRFT slurry and filtrate for metals, anions, carbon and base were primarily performed to support the planned chemical process cell testing and to provide additional component concentrations in addition to the limited data available from DWPF. Analysis of the insoluble solids portion of the PRFT slurry was aimed at detailed characterization of these solids (TGA, PSD, XRD and SEM) in support of the Salt IPT chemistry team. The overall conclusions from analyses performed in this study are that the PRFT slurry consists of 0.61 Wt.% insoluble MST solids suspended in a 0.77 M [Na+] caustic solution containing various anions such as nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, carbonate and oxalate. The corresponding measured sulfur level in the PRFT slurry, a critical element for determining how much of the PRFT slurry gets blended into the SRAT, is 0.437 Wt.% TS. The PRFT slurry does not contain insoluble oxalates nor significant quantities of high activity sludge solids. The lack of sludge solids has been alluded to by the Salt IPT chemistry team in citing that the mixing pump has been removed from Tank 49H, the feed tank to ARP-MCU, thus allowing the sludge solids to settle out. ? The PRFT aqueous slurry from DWPF was found to contain 5.96 Wt.% total dried solids. Of these total dried solids, relatively low levels of insoluble solids (0.61 Wt.%) were measured. The densities of both the filtrate and slurry were 1.05 g/mL. ? Particle size distribution of the PRFT solids in filtered caustic simulant and XRD analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids indicate that the PRFT slurry contains a bimodal distribution of particles in the range of 1 and 6 ?m and that the particles contain sodium titanium oxide hydroxide Na2Ti2O4(OH)2 crystalline material as determined by XRD. These data are in excellent agreement with similar data obtained from laboratory sampling of vendor supplied MST. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) combined with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of washed/dried PRFT solids shows the particles to be like previous MST analyses consisting of irregular shaped micron-sized solids consisting primarily of Na and Ti. ? Thermogravimetric analysis of the washed and unwashed PRFT solids shows that the washed solids are very similar to MST solids. The TGA mass loss signal for the unwashed solids shows similar features to TGA performed on cellulose nitrate filter paper indicating significant presence of the deteriorated filter

Crawford, C.; Bannochie, C.

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

410

CX-006630: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Improved Solvent TestingCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/02/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Savannah River Operations Office

411

CX-003634: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Improved Solvent TestingCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/09/2010Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Savannah River Operations Office

412

NANOSENSOR DETECTS MERCURY IN WATER J.-S. Lee, M. S. Han, C. A. Mirkin, "Colorimetric Detection of Mercuric Ion (Hg2+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NANOSENSOR DETECTS MERCURY IN WATER J.-S. Lee, M. S. Han, C. A. Mirkin, "Colorimetric Detection ­ 0647560 Mercuric ion (Hg2+ ) is one of the most stable inorganic forms of mercury. It is also a caustic

Shull, Kenneth R.

413

THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE NUCLEAR WASTE CLEANING PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 16 years of gamma irradiation and several months of exposures to caustic solution, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, PPS is remarkably stable to the new solvent.

Fondeur, F.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

MACHO Mass Determination Based on Space Telescope Observation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the possibility of lens mass determination for a caustic crossing microlensing event based on a space telescope observation. We demonstrate that the parallax due to the orbital motion of a space telescope causes a periodic fluctuation of the light curve, from which the lens distance can be derived. Since the proper motion of the lens relative to the source is also measurable for a caustic crossing event, one can find a full solution for microlensing properties of the event, including the lens mass. To determine the lens mass with sufficient accuracy, the light curve near the caustic crossing should be observed within uncertainty of $\\sim$ 1%. We argue that the Hubble Space Telescope observation of the caustic crossing supplied with ground-based observations of the full light curve will enable us to determine the mass of MACHOs, which is crucial for understanding the nature of MACHOs.

Mareki Honma

1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

415

CX-007078: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis of spent Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) SolventCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/18/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

416

--No Title--  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

This work (Module A) involves performing the fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) process on caustic DWPF Offgas Condensate Tank (OGCT) in SRNL HLC, A-block. The DWPF OGCT...

417

Canned Air in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Broadcast Transcript: Not that long ago, coal smoke made the air here in Beijing so caustic that your nasal passages were seared with each breath. Those were the good old days: Car ownership was limited to government ...

Hacker, Randi

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

418

Acid/Base Recovery From Sodium Sulfate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

escalating In price due to the Imbalance In market demand. Chlorine and caustic are produced together by the electrolysis 01 sodium chloride brine solutions. Every ECU (electrochemical unit) 01 chlorine resu~s In the production 01 one ECU 01 caustic soda... cell also produces an acid product that is contaminated with unreacted sullate. The voltage 01 a three compartment is higher, however, and the process system Is more complex. Process System Current density and efficiency determines the amount 01...

Niksa, M. J.

419

Status report on solid control in leachates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge pretreatment will involve some combination of washing and leaching with sodium hydroxide solutions to remove soluble salts and amphoteric material such as alumina. It is of paramount importance to prevent gelation and uncontrolled solid formation in tanks, transfer lines, and process equipment. An evaluation of results of washing and caustic leaching indicates that washing is more effective in dissolving sludge solids than subsequent sodium hydroxide treatment. Only aluminum and chromium were removed more effectively by caustic leaching than by water washing.

Beahm, E.C.; Weber, C.F.; Lee, D.D.; Dillow, T.A.; Hunt, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Keswa, C.M.; Osseo-Asare, K.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

PEP Support: Laboratory Scale Leaching and Permeate Stability Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents results from a variety of activities requested by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The activities related to caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, permeate precipitation behavior of waste as well as chromium (Cr) leaching are: • Model Input Boehmite Leaching Tests • Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Support Leaching Tests • PEP Parallel Leaching Tests • Precipitation Study Results • Cr Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Tests. Leaching test activities using the PEP simulant provided input to a boehmite dissolution model and determined the effect of temperature on mass loss during caustic leaching, the reaction rate constant for the boehmite dissolution, and the effect of aeration in enhancing the chromium dissolution during caustic leaching. Other tests were performed in parallel with the PEP tests to support the development of scaling factors for caustic and oxidative leaching. Another study determined if precipitate formed in the wash solution after the caustic leach in the PEP. Finally, the leaching characteristics of different chromium compounds under different conditions were examined to determine the best one to use in further testing.

Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

New insights into water bonding during early tricalcium silicate hydration with quasielastic neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New information on the water bonding during the first 36 h of hydration of tricalcium silicate was obtained using the high neutron flux at the sample position of the time-of-flight spectrometer (TOFTOF), FRM II in Garching, Germany, together with {sup 29}Si NMR and X-ray diffraction measurements. A rapid increase in the amount of constrained water was observed at the beginning of the induction period. This is attributed to the formation of an early C-S-H with a large specific surface area (around 800 m{sup 2}/g). During subsequent hydration, the amount of constrained water, as given by the total surface area of the hydration products, is controlled by (a) the formation of new metastable early C-S-H which increases total surface area and (b) polymerisation processes which reduce total surface area. The relative contribution of these processes varies during hydration.

Gutberlet, T., E-mail: gutberlet@cbm.bv.tum.de [Centre for Building Materials (CBM), Technische Universität München, Baumbachstraße 7, 81245 Munich (Germany); Hilbig, H.; Beddoe, R.E. [Centre for Building Materials (CBM), Technische Universität München, Baumbachstraße 7, 81245 Munich (Germany)] [Centre for Building Materials (CBM), Technische Universität München, Baumbachstraße 7, 81245 Munich (Germany); Lohstroh, W. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)] [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstraße 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Thermodynamics and cement science  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

Damidot, D., E-mail: damidot@ensm-douai.fr [Universite Lille Nord de France (France); EM Douai, LGCgE-MPE-GCE, Douai (France); Lothenbach, B. [Empa, Lab. Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Herfort, D. [Cementir Holding (Denmark); Glasser, F.P. [Chemistry Department, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Studies on the isolation and properties of the highly unsaturated fatty acids from natural sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

r-J (T < X GO 00 U. Filtrate Cduplex 6 +100 g. urea____________ ___________--------------------------------------- ! Filtrate Complex 7 +100 g. urea...

Abu-Nasr, Ahmed Mostafa

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

Pushing schedule derivation method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a Pushing Schedule Derivation Method has allowed the company to sustain the maximum production rate at CSH`s Coke Oven Battery, in spite of having single set oven machinery with a high failure index as well as a heat top tendency. The stated method provides for scheduled downtime of up to two hours for machinery maintenance purposes, periods of empty ovens for decarbonization and production loss recovery capability, while observing lower limits and uniformity of coking time.

Henriquez, B. [Compania Siderurgica Huachipato S.A., Talcahuano (Chile)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

A MANUAL FOR CATALOGING and INDEXING DOCUMENTS FOR DATABASE ACQUISITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FILTRATION· FLOW RATE·HYDRAULIC FRACTURING· INJECTION ~LLS·= FLOW RATE; DE.ll = HYDRAULIC FRACTURING; DE.12 = INJECTION

Schwartz, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Journal of Catalysis 255 (2008) 134137 www.elsevier.com/locate/jcat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and subsequent filtration, rinsing with deionized water, and treatment in flow- ing dry air (Praxair, extra dry

Iglesia, Enrique

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual water storage Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Partnerships Summary: and logistics Better Place, Fiskar Automotive, Mission Motors, Tesla Motors WATER Filtration, purification... , water conservation, irrigation and...

428

Results from tests of DuPont crossflow filter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crossflow filtration will be used to filter radioactive waste slurry as part of the Late Wash Process.

Steimke, J.L.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology and System Level Demonstration...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

On Program Participants - Collaborations Cummins Inc. - Cummins Fuel Systems - Cummins Turbo Technologies - Cummins Emissions Solutions - Cummins Electronics - Cummins Filtration...

430

Cummins SuperTruck Program - Technology Demonstration of Highly...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

On Program Participants - Collaborations Cummins Inc. - Cummins Fuel Systems - Cummins Turbo Technologies - Cummins Emissions Solutions - Cummins Electronics - Cummins Filtration...

431

Durability of Diesel Particulate Filters - Bench Studies on Cordierite...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design and Optimization Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration (DPF) Systems fundamental...

432

Use of CaO as an activator for producing a price-competitive non-cement structural binder using ground granulated blast furnace slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of calcium oxide (CaO) demonstrates a superior potential for the activation of ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), and it produces a higher mechanical strength than calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH){sub 2}]. The mechanical strength differences between CaO- and Ca(OH){sub 2}-activated GGBFS binders are explored using isothermal calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TGA and DTA) as well as compressive strength testing. Calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H), Ca(OH){sub 2} and a hydrotalcite-like phase are found as reaction products in all samples. The TGA and DTA results indicate that the use of CaO produces more C–S–H, although this is not likely to be the primary cause of higher strength development in the CaO-activated GGBFS. Rather, other factors such as porosity may govern the strength at a higher order of magnitude. Significant reduction of Ca(OH){sub 2} occurs only with the use of Ca(OH){sub 2}, followed by the formation of carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), indicating carbonation. -- Highlights: •CaO showed a better potential for the activation of GGBFS than Ca(OH){sub 2}. •Strength test, XRD, TGA/DTA and isothermal calorimetry are used. •C-S-H, Ca(OH){sub 2}, and a hydrotalcite-like phase are found in all samples. •The use of Ca(OH){sub 2} causes some degree of carbonation.

Kim, Min Sik; Jun, Yubin; Lee, Changha, E-mail: clee@unist.ac.kr; Oh, Jae Eun, E-mail: ohjaeeun@unist.ac.kr

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Dissolution and Characterization of Aluminum Clad Oxide Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory dissolution studies of aluminum clad mixed oxide fuel rods have been conducted using two different F-Canyon decladding and dissolving flowsheets. During the first phase of the experimental program, materials from three different color coded fuel rods were dissolved in caustic and nitric acid solutions. The final phase of the laboratory program involved the dissolution and characterization of materials from three cracked pellet fuel rods using a selected caustic/ nitric acid flowsheet.Laboratory results obtained from the initial dissolution studies identified several inconsistencies and potential problem issues with the behavior of materials from the color coded fuel rods. Based on these findings and influenced by the difficulties introduced by using the RCRA listed mercury during processing, the flowsheet selected for dissolving these aluminum clad fuel rods in F-Canyon dissolvers was the two- step caustic decladding/ nitric acid dissolution flowsheet.The final phase of the experimental program involved testing materials from three cracked pellet fuel rods using the selected flowsheet. Again all aluminum fuel rod components dissolved during the decladding step. However, some uranium and plutonium bearing solids remained with the caustic decladding solution which could be sent to waste. The quantities of uranium and plutonium expected to remain with the caustic solutions are small.Fluoride ions will need to be present in the nitric acid dissolver solution to dissolve all solids. At 0.05 molar fluoride concentration, no plutonium bearing solids remained in the product solutions.

Gray, J.H.

1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

434

Spectrophotometric Resolution of Stellar Atmospheres with Microlensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microlensing is a powerful tool for studying stellar atmospheres because as the source crosses regions of formally infinite magnification (caustics) the surfaceof the star is resolved, thereby allowing one to measure the radial intensity profile, both photometrically and spectroscopically. However, caustic crossing events are relatively rare, and monitoring them requires intensive application of telescope resources. It is therefore essential that the observational parameters needed to accurately measure the intensity profile are quantified. We calculate the expected errors in the recovered radial intensity profile as a function of the unlensed flux, source radius, spatial resolution the recovered intensity profile, and caustic crossing time for the two principle types of caustics: point-mass and binary lenses. We demonstrate that for both cases there exist simple scaling relations between these parameters and the resultant errors. We find that the error as a function of the spatial resolution of the recovered profile, parameterized by the number of radial bins, increases as $N_R^{3/2}$, considerably faster than the naive $N_R^{1/2}$ expectation. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages of binary caustic-crossing events and point-lens events. Binary events are more common, easier to plan for, and provide more homogeneous information about the stellar atmosphere. However, a sub-class of point-mass events with low impact parameters can provide dramatically more information provided that they can be recognized in time to initiate observations.

B. Scott Gaudi; Andrew Gould

1998-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

435

MEASURING THE MASS DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cluster mass profiles are tests of models of structure formation. Only two current observational methods of determining the mass profile, gravitational lensing, and the caustic technique are independent of the assumption of dynamical equilibrium. Both techniques enable the determination of the extended mass profile at radii beyond the virial radius. For 19 clusters, we compare the mass profile based on the caustic technique with weak lensing measurements taken from the literature. This comparison offers a test of systematic issues in both techniques. Around the virial radius, the two methods of mass estimation agree to within {approx}30%, consistent with the expected errors in the individual techniques. At small radii, the caustic technique overestimates the mass as expected from numerical simulations. The ratio between the lensing profile and the caustic mass profile at these radii suggests that the weak lensing profiles are a good representation of the true mass profile. At radii larger than the virial radius, the extrapolated Navarro, Frenk and White fit to the lensing mass profile exceeds the caustic mass profile. Contamination of the lensing profile by unrelated structures within the lensing kernel may be an issue in some cases; we highlight the clusters MS0906+11 and A750, superposed along the line of sight, to illustrate the potential seriousness of contamination of the weak lensing signal by these unrelated structures.

Geller, Margaret J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Diaferio, Antonaldo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Rines, Kenneth J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Serra, Ana Laura, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: diaferio@ph.unito.it, E-mail: kenneth.rines@wwu.edu, E-mail: serra@to.infn.it [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

HARRINGTON SJ

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

437

Survey of electrochemical production of inorganic compounds. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical generation of inorganic compounds, excluding chlorine/caustic, has been critically reviewed. About 60 x 10/sup 12/ Btu/y fossil fuel equivalent will be used in the year 2000 for the electrosynthesis of inorganic compounds. Significant energy savings in chlorate production can result from the development of suitable electrocatalysts for lowering the cathodic overpotential. Perchlorates, electrolytic hypochlorite, electrolytic manganese dioxide, fluorine and other miscellaneous compounds use relatively small amounts of electrical energy. Implementation of caustic scrubber technology for stack gas cleanup would result in appreciable amounts of sodium sulfate which could be electrolyzed to regenerate caustic. Hydrogen peroxide, now produced by the alkyl anthraquinone process, could be made electrolytically by a new process coupling anodic oxidation of sulfate with cathodic reduction of oxygen in alkaline solution. Ozone is currently manufactured using energy-inefficient silent discharge equipment. A novel energy-efficient approach which uses an oxygen-enhanced anodic reaction is examined.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Dezincing galvanized scrap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A caustic leach dezincing process is being developed for upgrading galvanized stamping plant scrap into clean scrap with recovery of the zinc. With further development the technology could also process galvanized scrap from obsolete automobiles. This paper will review: (1) the status of recent pilot plant operations in East Chicago, Indiana and plans for a commercial demonstration facility with a dezincing capacity of up to 250,000 tonnes/year, (2) the economics of caustic dezincing, and (3) benefits of decreased cost of environmental compliance, raw material savings, and improved operations with use of dezinced scrap.

Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Braun, C. [Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The genera of Mallophaga of North America north of Mexico with special reference to Texas species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of trisodium phosphate for one to six hours, the method of Van Cleave and Ross (194-7). Since all Mallophaga are sclerotized to varying degrees they must be bleached in a caustic solution prior to mounting. This permits the observation of certain taxonomic.... For most specimens this will require 24 to 4B hours. At some stage in the clearing process, after the body wall has become softened but before the caustic has had an opportunity to dissolve the stomach wall, the contents of the crop and intestine...

Wiseman, John Sumner

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

The effect of sodium chloride on the dissolution of calcium silicate hydrate gels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of cement based materials will be widespread in the long-term management of radioactive materials in the United Kingdom. One of the applications could be the Nirex reference vault backfill (NRVB) as an engineered barrier within a deep geological repository. NRVB confers alkaline conditions, which would provide a robust chemical barrier through the control of the solubility of some key radionuclides, enhanced sorption and minimised corrosion of steel containers. An understanding of the dissolution of C-S-H gels in cement under the appropriate conditions (e.g., saline groundwaters) is necessary to demonstrate the expected evolution of the chemistry over time and to provide sufficient cement to buffer the porewater conditions for the required time. A programme of experimental work has been undertaken to investigate C-S-H gel dissolution behaviour in sodium chloride solutions and the effect of calcium/silicon ratio (C/S), temperature and cation type on this behaviour. Reductions in calcium concentration and pH values were observed with samples equilibrated at 45 deg. C compared to those prepared at 25 deg. C. The effect of salt cation type on salt-concentration dependence of the dissolution of C-S-H gels was investigated by the addition of lithium or potassium chloride in place of sodium chloride for gels with a C/S of 1.0 and 1.8. With a C/S of 1.0, similar increases in dissolved calcium concentration with increasing ionic strength were recorded for the different salts. However, at a C/S of 1.8, anomalously high calcium concentrations were observed in the presence of lithium.

Hill, J. [UK Nirex Limited, Curie Avenue, Harwell, Didcot Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: joanne.hill@nirex.co.uk; Harris, A.W. [UK Nirex Limited, Curie Avenue, Harwell, Didcot Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom); Manning, M. [Formerly AEA Technology, Building 220, Harwell, Didcot Oxfordshire, OX11 0RA (United Kingdom); Chambers, A. [Serco Assurance, Building 150, Harwell International Business Centre, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RA (United Kingdom); Swanton, S.W. [Serco Assurance, Building 150, Harwell International Business Centre, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RA (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Improved evidence for the existence of an intermediate phase during hydration of tricalcium silicate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tricalcium silicate (Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}) with a very small particle size of approximately 50 nm has been prepared and hydrated for a very short time (5 min) by two different modes in a paste experiment, using a water/solid-ratio of 1.20, and by hydration as a suspension employing a water/solid-ratio of 4000. A phase containing uncondensed silicate monomers close to hydrogen atoms (either hydroxyl groups or water molecules) was formed in both experiments. This phase is distinct from anhydrous tricalcium silicate and from the calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) phase, commonly identified as the hydration product of tricalcium silicate. In the paste experiment, approximately 79% of silicon atoms were present in the hydrated phase containing silicate monomers as determined from {sup 29}Sileft brace{sup 1}Hright brace CP/MAS NMR. This result is used to show that the hydrated silicate monomers are part of a separate phase and that they cannot be attributed to a hydroxylated surface of tricalcium silicate after contact with water. The phase containing hydrated silicate monomers is metastable with respect to the C-S-H phase since it transforms into the latter in a half saturated calcium hydroxide solution. These data is used to emphasize that the hydration of tricalcium silicate proceeds in two consecutive steps. In the first reaction, an intermediate phase containing hydrated silicate monomers is formed which is subsequently transformed into C-S-H as the final hydration product in the second step. The introduction of an intermediate phase in calculations of the early hydration of tricalcium silicate can explain the presence of the induction period. It is shown that heterogeneous nucleation on appropriate crystal surfaces is able to reduce the length of the induction period and thus to accelerate the reaction of tricalcium silicate with water.

Bellmann, Frank, E-mail: frank.bellmann@uni-weimar.d [Institute for Building Materials Science, Bauhaus University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Damidot, Denis [Ecole des Mines de Douai, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, 941 rue Charles Bourseul, BP 10838, 59508 Doua cedexi (France); Moeser, Bernd [Institute for Building Materials Science, Bauhaus University Weimar, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Skibsted, Jorgen [Instrument Center for Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy and Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

442

The suitability of semi-continuous liquid chromatography for renal function replacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

employed here wi. l 1 be referred to as gel filtration chromatography, the special case where the solvent is water. There are a variety of names for this proce- dure including molecular sieve filtration, exclusion chromatography, and gel permeation... include middle molecule removal (NW 500-3000) ar. d hemodynamic stabilrty through solute rate removal control. Gel filtration chromatography (GFC) was the method employed to take advantage of these chemical and hemodynamic bene- fits. GFC has...

Blackwell, Gregory Allen

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

valves, in-core monitoring devices, facility air filtration systems, or substation transformers or capacitors; addition of structural bracing to meet earthquake standards andor...

444

RL-721 REV? I. Project Title: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM Document...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

valves, in-core monitoring devices, facility air filtration systems, or substation transformers or capacitors; addition of structural bracing to meet earthquake standards andor...

445

RL-721 REV4 I. Project Title: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM Document...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

valves, in-core monitoring devices, facility air filtration systems, or substation transformers or capacitors; addition of structural bracing to meet earthquake standards andor...

446

u.s. DEPARTlIlENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT M ANAGE MENT CEN T  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

valves, in-core monitoring devices. facility air filtration systems, or substation transformers or capacitors; addition of structural bracing to meet earthquake standards andor...

447

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the garage-to-house air leakage. Air Leakage and Air Transfer Between Garage and Living Space More Documents & Publications DOE ZERH Webinar: Ventilation and Filtration Strategies...

448

Department of Energy's Energy Savings Performance Contracts Stretch...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

unoccupied periods. Pool pump control. An adjustable speed drive was installed with a flow meter to control the pool filtration system and reduce flow during unoccupied...

449

E-Print Network 3.0 - automotive technologies annual Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and technology, fuels... and logistics Better Place, Fiskar Automotive, Mission Motors, Tesla Motors WATER Filtration, purification... STORAGE Grid-scale storage, batteries,...

450

University of Arizona Technology and Research Initiative Fund 2010/2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: cartridge membrane filtration; EDR: electrodialysis reversal; PLS: partial lime softening; GMF: granular: membrane microfiltration; CA: chemical addition; RO: reverse osmosis; PS: permeate stabilization; CF

Fay, Noah

451

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a flue gas condenser with a steam boiler. ? Improvedsteam dryers by gas ? Dryers and filtration equipment ? Applied CHP ? Purchased flue gas condensers ?

Price, Lynn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Control of size and charge selectivity in amphiphilic graft copolymer nanofiltration membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The throughput and efficiency of membrane separations make polymer filtration membranes an important resource for the pharmaceutical, food and wastewater treatment industries. Nanofiltration (NF) membranes fill an important ...

Lovell, Nathan Gary

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

estimated visually. Waters sampled for chemical analysis were stored in brimful polyethylene bottles with Polyseal caps following filtration from a large syringe attached to a...

454

Isotopic Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

estimated visually. Waters sampled for chemical analysis were stored in brimful polyethylene bottles with Polyseal caps following filtration from a large syringe attached to a...

455

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

estimated visually. Waters sampled for chemical analysis were stored in brimful polyethylene bottles with Polyseal caps following filtration from a large syringe attached to a...

456

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

estimated visually. Waters sampled for chemical analysis were stored in brimful polyethylene bottles with Polyseal caps following filtration from a large syringe attached to a...

457

Call for Papers 2008/2009 Special Issue for the IEEE Technology and Society Magazine entitled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drinking water filtration, waste treatment (low cost, effective yet without adverse environmental impact) o Electricity generation, wind and solar power, solar cooker, lighting (renewable energy sources, low

458

A New Active DPF System for "Stop and Go" Duty-Cycle Vehicles  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Trucks), based on: Variation of Volume of Filtration (valves and actuators) Global Thermal Management, using Heat Injection in the Exhaust (Catalytic Combustion,...

459

William Heinzer, Book in progress, preprints and talk slides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[ The Cohen-Macaulay and Gorenstein properties of rings associated to filtrations in .pdf format ]. [ Projectively full ideals in Noetherian rings talk in PostScript ...

460

Supertruck technologies for 55% thermal efficiency and 68% freight...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

On Program Partners Cummins Inc. - Cummins Fuel Systems - Cummins Electronics - Cummins Turbo Technologies - Cummins Emissions Solutions - Cummins Filtration - Modine - VanDyne...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Photocatalysis Currently, the research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, various surfaces are coated with thin transparent titanium dioxide layers which degrade adhering fatty is a major focus of this research area. Filtration, extraction, chromatography and membrane adsorption

Vollmer, Heribert

462

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Dairy Processing Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ultrafiltration, and reverse osmosis, each indicating asubjected to reverse osmosis filtration, microfiltration,processing industry are reverse osmosis systems and ultra-

Brush, Adrian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE OIL SHALE INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from ion exchange, reverse osmosis, filtration and otherStripping Ion Exchange Reverse Osmosis Chemical TreatmentElectrolytic Oxidation Reverse Osmosis tJl trafi 1 tration

Fox, J.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Fruit and Vegetable Processing Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processing industry are reverse osmosis systems and ultra-ultra-filtration and reverse osmosis has been used for applepassed through a reverse osmosis membrane and an ultra-

Masanet, Eric

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Innovation System Reverse Osmosis Small Businessclaims the largest reverse osmosis desalination plant in thetechniques such as reverse osmosis, and improving filtration

Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Retrofit Program of a Euro 1 andn EUro 2 Urban Bus Fleet in La...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High particulate matter filtration efficiency No secondary emissions like NO2, Furan, Dioxins, PAH The system proved to work perfectly well in all driving conditions during real...

467

Course 28123 Chemical/Biochemical Engineering Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and solid extraction, organic synthesis, fixed bed enzyme reactor, solids handling, combustion/ high, filtration, drying in a tunnel, spray drying, fluidization and fluidized bed drying, distillation, absorption

Simaan, Nabil

468

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge exposed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Civil... : A study of the filtration behaviour of contaminated wastewater treatment sludges was ... Source: Aydilek, Ahmet - Department of Civil and...

469

Mr. John E. Kieling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

underground facility, causing the ventilation exhaust to automatically shift to high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration mode. The ventilation system has been operating in...

470

Thesis - Department of Mathematics, Purdue University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 1, 2014 ... Doctor of Philosophy. December 2012 ...... At the risk of causing some confusion, is denoted by F the filtration generated by Lt completed with ...

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

471

Integrated Technology Air Cleaners (ITAC): Design and Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of particle air filtration technologies." Indoor Air 12(4):2011a). New air cleaning technologies for reduced commercialnumber 2 Integrated technology air cleaner High efficiency

Fisk, William J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control with ventilation, given current ventilation and filtration system practices, are the indoor-sourced gaseous pollutants with low octanal-air

Mendell, Mark J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Fast, Low Cost Method for Manufacturing Porous Structures for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Fast, Low Cost Method for Manufacturing Porous Structures for Fuel Cells, Catalysts and Filtration...

474

Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

characterization with single-cylinder test engines, guided by industry Barrier: Lack of cost-effective emission control Objective: Seek to shorten development time of filtration...

475

E-Print Network 3.0 - air force range Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Colorado State University Collection: Geosciences 70 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and...

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonia-loaded air filter Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Products Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 44 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: the air transport and detrainment. 13 12;II....

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - air filter media Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 42 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: the air transport and detrainment. 13 12;II....

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - air force institute Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University Collection: Materials Science ; Engineering 63 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and...

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - air force handbook Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry, University of Kansas Collection: Chemistry 18 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and...

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - air transport system Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Nebraska-Lincoln Collection: Engineering 67 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: , the use of a water system to model air...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "filtrate csh caustic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - air group constant Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 39 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: covered by a liquid oxide layer during air...

482

E-Print Network 3.0 - air stream diluted Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of California, Irvine Collection: Chemistry 77 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: to the diameter of the metal stream. It can be...

483

E-Print Network 3.0 - air velocity temperature Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 66 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: . In general, a certain minimum velocity has to be...

484

E-Print Network 3.0 - air concentrations arising Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology ; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 24 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: , and all scale effects are concentrated in the...

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - air transportation system Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Nebraska-Lincoln Collection: Engineering 67 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: , the use of a water system to model air...

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - air force experience Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Chemistry, University of Sydney Collection: Chemistry 70 Water Modeling of Steel Flow, Air Entrainment and Filtration Summary: air entrainment rate on Z. It is suggested to...

487

Tips for Living Green Conduct a home energy audit -hes.lbl.gov or fcgov.com/greenbuilding/home/existing_programs.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overnight and when not in use. Save energy and money by covering your pots while cooking and air dry your money and resources. Replace caustic cleaning products with environmentally-friendly alternatives like products. Give up the bleach: switch to organic cotton tampons or check out the Diva Cup - www

488

CX-006642: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Support TestingCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/18/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Savannah River Operations Office

489

CX-012578: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Actinide Removal and Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) Testing for Modular Caustic-side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Support (SB8) CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41850 Location(s): South CarolinaOffices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

490

Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project: FY2002 Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Plan describes the technology development program for alpha/strontium removal and Caustic Side Solvent Extraction cesium removal in FY2002. Crystalline Silicotitanate and Small Tank Tetratphenylborate Precipitation are discussed as possible backup technologies. Previous results are summarized in the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project Research and Development Summary Report

Harmon, Harry D.; Leugemors, Robert K.; Schlahta, Stephan N.; Fink, Samuel D.; Thompson, Major C.; Walker, Darrell D.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

491

Explosive growth of inhomogeneities in the distribution of droplets in a turbulent air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how the spatial distribution of inertial particles evolves with time in a random flow. We describe an explosive appearance of caustics and show how they influence an exponential growth of clusters due to smooth parts of the flow, leading in particular to an exponential growth of the average distance between particles.

S. A. Derevyanko; G. Falkovich; K. Turitsyn; S. Turitsyn

2006-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

492

ccsd-00003326,version2-9Dec2005 On geodesic envelopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd-00003326,version2-9Dec2005 On geodesic envelopes Gianmarco Capitanio December 9, 2005 Abstract We give a global description of envelopes of geodesic tangents of regular curves in (not necessarily inflectional geodesics and its tangential caustics (formed by the conjugate points to those of the initial

493

Testing and Disposal Strategy for Secondary Wastes from Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates.

Herbst, Alan K.

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

494

Testing and Disposal Strategy for Secondary Wastes from Vitrification of Sodium-Bearing Waste at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is considering vitrification to process liquid sodium-bearing waste. Preliminary studies were completed to evaluate the potential secondary wastes comprise acidic and caustic scrubber solutions, HEPA filters, activated carbon, and ion exchange media. Possible treatment methods, waste forms, and disposal sites are evaluated from radiological and mercury contamination estimates.

Herbst, Alan Keith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Approved September 8, 2007 by the Junior Academy Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

criteria for success. Just as scientific inquiry projects require (1) the identification of a problem) a design statement that identifies such limiting factors and criteria for success or meeting the design environment or conditions (temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, caustic conditions), ergonomics (human

Mountziaris, T. J.

496

Sending femtosecond pulses in circles: highly non-paraxial accelerating beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sending femtosecond pulses in circles: highly non-paraxial accelerating beams F. Courvoisier,* A Month X, XXXX; posted Month X, XXXX (Doc. ID XXXXX); published Month X, XXXX We use caustic beam shaping on 100 fs pulses to experimentally generate non-paraxial accelerating beams along a 60 degree circular

Boyer, Edmond

497

Non-Paraxial Wave Analysis of 3D Airy Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 3D Airy beam (AiB) is thoroughly explored from a wave-theory point of view. We utilize the exact spectral integral for the AiB to derive local ray-based solutions that do not suffer from the limitations of the conventional parabolic equation (PE) solution, and are valid far beyond the paraxial zone and for longer ranges. The ray topology near the main lobe of the AiB delineates a hyperbolic umilic diffraction catastrophe, consisting of a cusped double-layered caustic, but this caustic is deformed in the far range where the field loses its beam shape. The field in the vicinity of this caustic is described uniformly by a hyperbolic umilic canonical integral which is structured explicitly on the local geometry of the caustic as obtained from the initial field distribution. In order to accommodate the finite-energy AiB we also modify the canonical integral by adding a complex loss parameter. The canonical integral is calculated using a series expansion and the results are used to identify the validity zone of the conventional PE solution. The analysis is performed within the framework of the non-dispersive AiB where the aperture field is scaled with frequency such that the ray skeleton is frequency-independent. This scaling enables an extension of the theory to the ultra wide band (UWB) regime and ensures that the pulsed field propagates along the curved beam trajectory without dispersion, as will be demonstrated in a subsequent publication.

Y. Kaganovsky; E. Heyman

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

498

The 4th Symposium on Analysis & PDEs - Purdue University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

All talks are in MATH 175. Registration and coffee breaks are in Math Library Lounge (3rd floor in MATH building). TUESDAY ... Sub-Riemannian geometry in models of the visual cortex [Slides]. 3:00-4:00. Giorgio Talenti Università di Firenze. On complex-valued 2D eikonals: continuation past a caustic [Slides]. 4:

499

COPPER DEFICIENCY PROPHYLAXIS IN GRAZING SHEEP BY COPPER OXIDE INJECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPPER DEFICIENCY PROPHYLAXIS IN GRAZING SHEEP BY COPPER OXIDE INJECTION M. LAMAND Claudine LAB R of insoluble and non ionized form of injected copper has been shown in a previous paper (Lamand, 1978 it appeared that copper oxide was preferable to metallic copper, being slightly less caustic. Inflammation

Boyer, Edmond

500

Phase I Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (904-83G)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the completed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study (CMS/FS) for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (LAOCB)/L-Area Acid Caustic Basin (9LAACB) Solid Waste Management Unit/Operable Unit (SWMU/OU) at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z