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1

Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Statistics & Analysis" Independent Statistics & Analysis" ,"U.S. Energy Information Administration" ,"Short-Term Energy Outlook Figures, December 2013" ,"U.S. Prices" ,,"West Texas Intermediate (WTI) Crude Oil Price" ,,"U.S. Gasoline and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"U.S. Diesel Fuel and Crude Oil Prices" ,,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Price" ,,"U.S. Natural Gas Prices" ,"World Liquid Fuels" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Production and Consumption Balance" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Outages Among OPEC Producers" ,,"Estimated Unplanned Crude Oil Production Disruptions Among non-OPEC Producers" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption" ,,"World Liquid Fuels Consumption Growth"

2

Figure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 1E Roberts, Energy in US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluctuations and Global Events 14E Roberts, Energy in US DOE: 2011 Vehicle Technology Market Report #12;Figure 15: Effect of Oil Prices on US Economy 15E Roberts, Energy in US DOE: 2011 Vehicle Technology MarketFigure 1:Energy Consumption in USg gy p 2008 1E Roberts, Energy in US Source: www.eia.gov #12

Sutton, Michael

3

A1. Form EIA-176 Figure Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Form EIA-176 Form EIA-176 Figure Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1996 214 EIA-176, ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION, 19 PART IV: SUPPLY OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS RECEIVED WITHIN OR TRANSPORTED INTO REPORT STATE RESPONDENT COPY Page 2 PART III: TYPE OF COMPANY AND GAS ACTIVITIES OPERATED IN THE REPORT STATE 1.0 Type of Company (check one) 1.0 Control No. 2.0 Company Name 3.0 Report State 4.0 Resubmittal EIA Date: a b c d e Investor owned distributor Municipally owned distributor Interstate pipeline Intrastate pipeline Storage operator f g h i j SNG plant operator Integrated oil and gas Producer Gatherer Processor k Other (specify) 2.0 Gas Activities Operated On-system Within the Report State (check all that apply) a b c d e Produced Natural Gas

4

Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency September 28, 2010 - 10:20am Addthis Kevin Craft What are the key facts? Recovery Act funded energy efficiency lighting upgrades in Huntington, New York. Street lighting accounts for 40% of town's electric costs. Huntington estimates $151,000 in annual savings through lighting changes. Return-on-investment -- that is the phrase town officials in Huntington, New York, carefully considered before commissioning several projects to improve municipal energy efficiency. "Saving town residents money on energy bills is one way to help stimulate the local economy. So we looked for projects that would save our residents as much money as possible," said Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone.

5

Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency Finding Six-Figure ROI From Energy Efficiency September 28, 2010 - 10:20am Addthis Kevin Craft What are the key facts? Recovery Act funded energy efficiency lighting upgrades in Huntington, New York. Street lighting accounts for 40% of town's electric costs. Huntington estimates $151,000 in annual savings through lighting changes. Return-on-investment -- that is the phrase town officials in Huntington, New York, carefully considered before commissioning several projects to improve municipal energy efficiency. "Saving town residents money on energy bills is one way to help stimulate the local economy. So we looked for projects that would save our residents as much money as possible," said Huntington Supervisor Frank Petrone.

6

The effect of a multivalley energy band structure on the thermoelectric figure of merit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

value of the thermoelectric figure of merit Z than a similar material which has only a single valleyL-49 The effect of a multivalley energy band structure on the thermoelectric figure of merit D. M A comparison is drawn between the dimensionless thermoelectric figure of merit of a multivalleyed semiconductor

Boyer, Edmond

7

Figure 3. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions" " (million metric tons)" ,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021,2022,2023,2024,2025,2026,2027,2028,...

8

PHENIX (Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment): Data Tables and Figures from Published Papers  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The PHENIX Experiment is the largest of the four experiments currently taking data at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. PHENIX, the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment, is an exploratory experiment for the investigation of high energy collisions of heavy ions and protons. PHENIX is designed specifically to measure direct probes of the collisions such as electrons, muons, and photons. The primary goal of PHENIX is to discover and study a new state of matter called the Quark-Gluon Plasma. More than 60 published papers and preprints are listed here with links to the full text and separate links to the supporting PHENIX data in plain text tables and to EPS and GIF figures from the papers.

9

Figure legends supplemental figures Supplemental figure 1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Kruskal-Wallis-test). Supplemental figure 3. (a) Survival of GFAPcre+/VHL+f/+f /VEGF+f/+f mice (n=19

Kleinfeld, David

10

Figure of merit for dark energy constraints from current observational data  

SciTech Connect

In order to make useful comparisons of different dark energy experiments, it is important to choose the appropriate figure of merit (FoM) for dark energy constraints. Here we show that for a set of dark energy parameters (f{sub i}), it is most intuitive to define FoM=1/{radical}(detCov(f{sub 1},f{sub 2},f{sub 3},...)), where Cov(f{sub 1},f{sub 2},f{sub 3},...) is the covariance matrix of (f{sub i}). In order for this FoM to represent the dark energy constraints in an optimal manner, the dark energy parameters (f{sub i}) should have clear physical meaning and be minimally correlated. We demonstrate two useful choices of (f{sub i}) using 182 SNe Ia (from the HST/GOODS program, the first year Supernova Legacy Survey, and nearby SN Ia surveys), [R(z{sub *}),l{sub a}(z{sub *}),{omega}{sub b}h{sup 2}] from the five year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey measurement of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, assuming the Hubble Space Telescope prior of H{sub 0}=72{+-}8 (km/s) Mpc{sup -1}, and without assuming spatial flatness. We find that for a dark energy equation of state linear in the cosmic scale factor a, the correlation of (w{sub 0},w{sub 0.5}) [w{sub 0}=w{sub X}(z=0), w{sub 0.5}=w{sub X}(z=0.5), with w{sub X}(a)=3w{sub 0.5}-2w{sub 0}+3(w{sub 0}-w{sub 0.5})a] is significantly smaller than that of (w{sub 0},w{sub a}) [with w{sub X}(a)=w{sub 0}+(1-a)w{sub a}]. In order to obtain model-independent constraints on dark energy, we parametrize the dark energy density function X(z)={rho}{sub X}(z)/{rho}{sub X}(0) as a free function with X{sub 0.5}, X{sub 1.0}, and X{sub 1.5} [values of X(z) at z=0.5, 1.0, and 1.5] as free parameters estimated from data. If one assumes a linear dark energy equation of state, current observational data are consistent with a cosmological constant at 68% C.L. If one assumes X(z) to be a free function parametrized by (X{sub 0.5},X{sub 1.0},X{sub 1.5}), current data deviate from a cosmological constant at z=1 at 68% C.L., but are consistent with a cosmological constant at 95% C.L. Future dark energy experiments will allow us to dramatically increase the FoM of constraints on (w{sub 0},w{sub 0.5}), and of (X{sub 0.5},X{sub 1.0},X{sub 1.5}). This will significantly shrink the dark energy parameter space to either enable the discovery of dark energy evolution, or the conclusive evidence for a cosmological constant.

Wang Yun [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Figure of merit for dark energy constraints from current observational data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to make useful comparisons of different dark energy experiments, it is important to choose the appropriate figure of merit (FoM) for dark energy constraints. Here we show that for a set of dark energy parameters {fi}, it is most intuitive to define FoM=1/det?Cov(f1,f2,f3,…), where Cov(f1,f2,f3,…) is the covariance matrix of {fi}. In order for this FoM to represent the dark energy constraints in an optimal manner, the dark energy parameters {fi} should have clear physical meaning and be minimally correlated. We demonstrate two useful choices of {fi} using 182 SNe Ia (from the HST/GOODS program, the first year Supernova Legacy Survey, and nearby SN Ia surveys), [R(z*),la(z*),?bh2] from the five year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, and Sloan Digital Sky Survey measurement of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, assuming the Hubble Space Telescope prior of H0=72±8??(km/s)?Mpc-1, and without assuming spatial flatness. We find that for a dark energy equation of state linear in the cosmic scale factor a, the correlation of (w0,w0.5) [w0=wX(z=0), w0.5=wX(z=0.5), with wX(a)=3w0.5-2w0+3(w0-w0.5)a] is significantly smaller than that of (w0,wa) [with wX(a)=w0+(1-a)wa]. In order to obtain model-independent constraints on dark energy, we parametrize the dark energy density function X(z)=?X(z)/?X(0) as a free function with X0.5, X1.0, and X1.5 [values of X(z) at z=0.5, 1.0, and 1.5] as free parameters estimated from data. If one assumes a linear dark energy equation of state, current observational data are consistent with a cosmological constant at 68% C.L. If one assumes X(z) to be a free function parametrized by (X0.5,X1.0,X1.5), current data deviate from a cosmological constant at z=1 at 68% C.L., but are consistent with a cosmological constant at 95% C.L. Future dark energy experiments will allow us to dramatically increase the FoM of constraints on (w0,w0.5), and of (X0.5,X1.0,X1.5). This will significantly shrink the dark energy parameter space to either enable the discovery of dark energy evolution, or the conclusive evidence for a cosmological constant.

Yun Wang

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

Figure 1: Configuration of energy recovering system Modeling of an Electromechanical Energy Harvesting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the system are integrated permanent magnets (PM) with the magnetic fields in opposition. This arrangement induction, v is the displacement's speed of permanent magnet, d is the displacement, pe is the coil position Fig.1, shows the detailed configuration of the proposed energy recovering system. In the central shaft

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Figure S.1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2- Figures and Table 2.1 2- Figures and Table 2.1 Figure S.1 Figure 1.1 Figure 1.2 Figure 1.3 Figure 2.1 Figure 2.2 Figure 2.3 Figure 3.1 Figure 3.2 Figure 3.3 Figure 3.4 Figure 3.5 Figure 3.6 Figure 3.7 Figure 3.8 Figure 3.9 Figure 3.10 Figure 3.11 Figure 3.12 Figure 3.13 Figure 3.14 Figure 3.15 Figure 3.16 Figure 3.17 Figure 3.18 Figure 3.19 Figure 4.1 Figure 4.2 Figure 4.3 Figure 4.4 Figure 4.5 Figure 4.6 Figure 4.7 Figure 4.8 Figure 4.9 Figure 4.10 Figure 4.11 Figure 4.12 Figure 4.13 Figure 4.14 Figure 4.15 Figure 4.16 Figure 4.17 Figure 4.18 Figure 4.19 J.1 Lewiston Stage Contents Relationship (NOT AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORMAT) J.2 Keswick Stage Contents Relationship (NOT AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC FORMAT) J.3 Natoma Stage Contents Relationship (NOT AVAILABLE IN ELECTRONIC

14

MECS Fuel Oil Figures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Percentage of Total Purchased Fuels by Type of Fuel : Percentage of Total Purchased Fuels by Type of Fuel Figure 1. Percent of Total Purchased Fuel Sources: Energy Information Administration. Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS): Consumption of Energy; U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM): Statistics for Industry Groups and Industries: Statistical Abstract of the United States. Note: The years below the line on the "X" Axis are interpolated data--not directly from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey or the Annual Survey of Manufactures. Figure 2: Changes in the Ratios of Distillate Fuel Oil to Natural Gas Figure 2. Changes in the Ratios of Distillate Fuel Oil to Natural Gas Sources: Energy Information Administration. Office of

15

Figures of merit for testing standard models: application to dark energy experiments in cosmology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Kilo-Degree Survey (KIDS), Panoramic Survey Telescope Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS),1 Dark Energy Survey (DES),2 Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST),3 Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM)4 and Euclid.5......

A. Amara; T. D. Kitching

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

16

EECBG Success Story: Finding Six-Figure ROI from Energy Efficiency...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

EECBG Success Story: One Grant, Nine Energy Efficiency Programs for Illinois County Solar panels have been installed at a shelter facility near Ulster County Fairgrounds. |...

17

Microsoft Word - Figure_15_2014.docx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-191M, "Monthly Underground Gas Storage Report." U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual Figure 15....

18

Biaxial Interference Figures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biaxial interference figures are similar to uniaxial figures but show more variety in the shape and movement of isogyres. Biaxial figures often contain only a single isogyre, which is not always parallel to a ...

Richard E. Stoiber; Stearns A. Morse

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis (Revised)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southeast Regional Clean Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis Revised Joyce McLaren Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-49192 Revised April 2011 ERRATA SHEET NREL REPORT/PROJECT NUMBER: TP-6A20-49192 TITLE: Southeast Regional Clean Energy Policy Analysis AUTHOR(S): Joyce McLaren ORIGINAL PUBLICATION DATE: January 2011 DATE OF CORRECTIONS (MM/YYYY): 04/2011 The following figures and tables were replaced: Page vii, Figure ES-2 Page ix, Table ES-1 Page 12, Table 1 Page 20, Figure 10 Page 51, Table 11 Page 52, Figure 18 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401

20

A Spitzer Five-Band Analysis of the Jupiter-Sized Planet TrES-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With an equilibrium temperature of 1200 K, TrES-1 is one of the coolest hot Jupiters observed by {\\Spitzer}. It was also the first planet discovered by any transit survey and one of the first exoplanets from which thermal emission was directly observed. We analyzed all {\\Spitzer} eclipse and transit data for TrES-1 and obtained its eclipse depths and brightness temperatures in the 3.6 {\\micron} (0.083 % {\\pm} 0.024 %, 1270 {\\pm} 110 K), 4.5 {\\micron} (0.094 % {\\pm} 0.024 %, 1126 {\\pm} 90 K), 5.8 {\\micron} (0.162 % {\\pm} 0.042 %, 1205 {\\pm} 130 K), 8.0 {\\micron} (0.0213 % {\\pm} 0.042 %, 1190 {\\pm} 130 K), and 16 {\\micron} (0.33 % {\\pm} 0.12 %, 1270 {\\pm} 310 K) bands. The eclipse depths can be explained, within 1$\\sigma$ errors, by a standard atmospheric model with solar abundance composition in chemical equilibrium, with or without a thermal inversion. The combined analysis of the transit, eclipse, and radial-velocity ephemerides gives an eccentricity $e = 0.033^{+0.015}_{-0.031}$, consistent with a circular ...

Cubillos, Patricio; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Foster, Andrew S D; Lust, Nate B; Hardy, Ryan A; Bowman, M Oliver

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Calibration Model Assignments expressed as %U3O8, Summary Table ES-1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ES-1. Assignments for Logging Models ES-1. Assignments for Logging Models Model Location Primary Use a Enriched-Zone Grade % e U 3 O 8 b ppm e U b Enriched- Zone Thickness (ft) b Enriched- Zone Moisture (wt-%) c Dry Bulk Density (g/cc) c U1 U2 U3 WF N3 D U A1 A2 A3 Grand Junction, Colorado TC TC TC TC TC FN KUT FN FN FN 2.636 ± 0.082 1.229 ± 0.038 0.4516 ± 0.0091 0.3003 ± 0.0053 0.2310 ± 0.0041 0.0772 ± 0.0012 0.05569 ± 0.00097 0.03051 ± 0.00044 0.0794 ± 0.0012 0.1611 ± 0.0024 22355 ± 697 10424 ± 326 3830 ± 77 2547 ± 45 1959 ± 35 654.5 ± 9.8 472.3 ± 8.2 258.7 ± 3.7 673.5 ± 9.8 1366 ± 20 4.06 ± 0.01 4.01 ± 0.00 4.01 ± 0.00 4.02 ± 0.00 4.19 ± 0.00 5.80 ± 0.00 4.98 ± 0.00 6.01 ± 0.00 5.94 ± 0.00

22

Microsoft Word - figure_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

38 38 0 2 4 6 8 10 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Trillion Cubic Feet 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report." Figure 15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2002-2006 Cautionary Note: Number of Residential and Commercial Consumers The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that there may be some double counting in the number of residential and commercial customers reported for 2002 through 2006. EIA collects information on the number of residential and commercial consumers through a survey of companies that deliver gas

23

Microsoft Word - figure_18.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 440 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2001-2005 Note: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Form FERC-423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for

24

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2007 (Million Cubic Feet) Nigeria Algeria 37,483 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports.

25

Microsoft Word - figure_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Trillion Cubic Feet 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-920, "Combined Heat and Power Plant Report"; and Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report." Figure 15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2003-2007 Cautionary Note: Number of Residential and Commercial Consumers The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that there may be some double counting in the number of residential and commercial customers reported for 2003 through 2007.

26

Microsoft Word - figure_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

38 38 0 2 4 6 8 10 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 Trillion Cubic Feet 0 50 100 150 200 250 Billion Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Figure 15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2001-2005 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA -176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report." Cautionary Note: Number of Residential and Commercial Consumers The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that there may be some double counting in the number of residential and commercial customers reported for 2001 through 2005. EIA collects information on the number of residential and commercial consumers through a survey of companies that deliver gas

27

ProClim-Flash | No 57, June 201318 Figure 1: Swiss CH4 fluxes from (a) anthropogenic (agriculture, energy, waste) and (b) natural contributors (wetlands, lakes and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

April 2013 under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and under the Kyoto Protocol layers representing CH4 emissions from wastewater treatment and natural sources and sinks (Figure 1b by the CCES projects ENHANCE, www.cces.ethz.ch/ projects/sulu/ENHANCE, and BioChange, www.cces.ethz.ch/projects/clench/BioChange

28

Microsoft Word - figure_20.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 2005 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (2005 = 1.0) as published by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. dollars per thousand cubic feet base year Figure 21. Average price of natural gas delivered to residential consumers, 1980-2011 nominal dollars

29

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Expenditures > Executive Summary & Expenditures > Executive Summary 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Executive Summary Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 presents statistics about the amount of energy consumed in commercial buildings and the corresponding expenditures for that energy. These data are based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national energy survey of buildings in the commercial sector, conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy. Figure ES1. Energy Consumption is Commercial Buidings by Energy Source, 1992 Energy Consumption: In 1992, the 4.8 million commercial buildings in the United States consumed 5.5 quadrillion Btu of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat. Of those 5.5 quadrillion Btu, consumption of site electricity accounted for 2.6 quadrillion Btu, or 48.0 percent, and consumption of natural gas accounted for 2.2 quadrillion Btu, or 39.6 percent. Fuel oil consumption made up 0.3 quadrillion Btu, or 4.0 percent of the total, while consumption of district heat made up 0.4 quadrillion Btu, or 7.9 percent of energy consumption in that sector. When the energy losses that occur at the electricity generating plants are included, the overall energy consumed by commercial buildings increases to about 10.8 quadrillion Btu (Figure ES1).

30

Microsoft Word - figure_14.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 14. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2010 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway India Trinidad/ Tobago Egypt Yemen Japan Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 53,122 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Gulf of Mexico Canada Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates based on historical data. Energy Information

31

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,833 ,833 35 Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2009 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Trinidad/ Tobago Egypt Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 111,144 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates

32

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 13. Net Interstate Movements, Imports, and Exports of Natural Gas in the United States, 2008 (Million Cubic Feet) Norway Trinidad/ Tobago Interstate Movements Not Shown on Map From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 45,772 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports, and EIA estimates.

33

Microsoft Word - figure_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2010 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Nigeria Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 26.8 0.8 0.2 3.4 3.280 0.190 0.042 0.333 0.739 0.033 21.3 1.1 3.3 3.3 2.0 3.1 6.5 0.03 7.4 0.073 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to

34

Microsoft Word - figure_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2009 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Nigeria Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 26.0 0.7 0.2 3.5 3.271 0.236 0.013 0.338 0.701 0.031 20.6 1.0 3.4 3.0 1.9 3.1 6.2 0.03 6.9 0.160 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to

35

Microsoft Word - figure_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Algeria Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2007 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Nigeria Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 24.6 0.6 0.2 3.8 3.783 0.448 0.077 0.095 0.292 0.482 0.047 19.1 0.9 3.2 3.4 1.8 3.0 6.6 0.03 6.8 0.115 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895A, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to

36

Microsoft Word - figure_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Egypt Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 20088 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Nigeria Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 25.8 0.7 0.2 3.6 3.589 0.267 0.012 0.365 0.590 0.050 20.3 1.0 3.4 3.4 1.9 3.1 6.7 0.03 6.7 0.055 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to

37

Microsoft Word - figure_02.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Egypt Algeria Figure 2. Natural Gas Supply and Disposition in the United States, 2006 (Trillion Cubic Feet) Extraction Loss Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Nigeria Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 23.5 0.7 0.1 3.3 3.590 0.389 0.017 0.057 0.322 0.341 0.061 18.5 0.9 3.0 2.5 1.7 4.4 2.8 6.5 0.02 6.2 0.120 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895A, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids

38

Microsoft Word - Figure_14_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

44 0 2 4 6 8 10 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Constant Dollars Nominal Dollars Figure 14. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-2002 Figure 15. Average City Gate Price of Natural Gas in the United States, 2002 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 2002 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1996 = 1.0) as published by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis.

39

THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS35116 FIGURE 3-46  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lIb THE FIRST LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS3·5116 FIGURE 3-46 Energy cannot be created or destroyed; it can. The first law of thermodynamics, also known as the conservation of energy principle, provides a sound basis observa- tions, the first law of thermodynamics states that energy can be neither created nor destroyed

Kammen, Daniel M.

40

The synthesis of sound figures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss a novel technique to control the spatial distribution of sound level within a synthesized sound field. The problem is formulated by separating the sound field into regions with high acoustic level, so-called bright regions, and ... Keywords: Multichannel sound reproduction, Quiet zones, Sound field synthesis, Sound figures

Karim Helwani; Sascha Spors; Herbert Buchner

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIS-0268-Figures-1997.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOFJ'EIS-0268 DOFJ'EIS-0268 - PKw.2F Figure 4-L L-Lake and environs. 4-3 -- =----- 90 --m--- -m- EAST o (C.nti""ed O"figure 4.4b) AA 320 1 300 1 Fourmile Indian Grave Upland Pen Branch Brench Formation Branch 280 ~ 280 240 : E -220 ~ L 200 180 I 160 140 1 I I 1 2 3 4 5 Miles Legend: _ _ Inferredcontact Note:TO converito kilometersmultiply by 1.609 to convetito metersmultiply by0.304e Figure 4-4a. Generalized geologic cross section from Fourmile Branch to L DO~IS-0268 I t" 1 I I t 4-8 DOE/EIS-0268 I 4-60 I t t i I I DOE/EIS-0268 ,. ,. 4-61 DOE/EIS-0268 ,. ,,.':, .. ,.. , 4-62 I 1 I I I DOE/EIS-0268 4-63 DOEI'EIS-0268 ., . . 4-64 I I 1 B I I I m 1 I I I I 1 I I I m I DOE~IS-0268 4-65 DO~IS-0268 Radon in homes: 200 millirem per year Notes me major contributor to the annual average individual dose in the United StaIeS, [ncluti"g residents of the Central Savannah River Area, is naturally occuning radiation

42

Microsoft Word - figure_07-2014-update.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Figure 7. U.S. natural gas trade summary, 2009-2013 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 2009...

43

China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Exports Figure 7B.1. Net Energy Trade Figure 7B.2. GrossFigures Figure 7B.1. Net Energy Trade Figure 7B.2. GrossNet Trade [5] Net Energy Trade [5] [1] Exports are composed

Fridley, Ed., David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO Graphic Data AEO Graphic Data Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Figure 1. Energy Prices, 1980-2030 Figure 1 Data Figure 2. Delivered Energy Consumption by Sector Figure 2 Data Figure 3. Energy Consumption by Fuel, 1980-2030 Figure 3 Data Figure 4. Energy Use Per Capita and Per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product, 1980-2030 Figure 4 Data Figure 5. Electricity Generation by Fuel, 1980-2030 Figure 5 Data Figure 6. Total Energy Production and Consumption, 1980-2030 Figure 6 Data Figure 7. Energy Production by Fuel, 1980-2030 Figure 7 Data Figure 8. Projected U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Fuel, 1990-2030 Figure 8 Data Figure 9. Sulfur Dioxide Emissions in Selected States, 1980-2003 Figure 9 Data Figure 10. World Oil Prices in the AEO2005 and AEO 2006 Reference Cases Figure 10 Data

45

Microsoft Word - Figure_18_19.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK MD 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK Figure 18. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Onsystem Industrial Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Figure 19. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to U.S. Electric Power Consumers, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Note: States where the electric power price has been withheld (see Table 23) are included in the $0.00-$2.49 price category.

46

Microsoft Word - Figure_14_15.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 0.00-2.49 2.50-4.49 4.50-6.49 6.50-8.49 8.50-10.49 10.50+ WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK DE 0 2 4 6 8 10 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Constant Dollars Nominal Dollars Figure 14. Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-2004 Figure 15. Average City Gate Price of Natural Gas in the United States, 2004 (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 2004 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product

47

Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liters Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Refrigeratorby Efficiency Class Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) Figure 8by Fuel Figure 1 Primary Energy Consumption by End-use)

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

PHOBOS Experiment: Figures and Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

PHOBOS consists of many silicon detectors surrounding the interaction region. With these detectors physicists can count the total number of produced particles and study the angular distributions of all the products. Physicists know from other branches of physics that a characteristic of phase transitions are fluctuations in physical observables. With the PHOBOS array they look for unusual events or fluctuations in the number of particles and angular distribution. The articles that have appeared in refereed science journals are listed here with separate links to the supporting data plots, figures, and tables of numeric data.  See also supporting data for articles in technical journals at http://www.phobos.bnl.gov/Publications/Technical/phobos_technical_publications.htm and from conference proceedings at http://www.phobos.bnl.gov/Publications/Proceedings/phobos_proceedings_publications.htm

The PHOBOS Collaboration

49

BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" BILIWG: Consistent "Figures of Merit" A finite set of results reported in consistent units * To track progress of individual projects on a consistent basis * To enable comparing projects in a transparent manner Potential BILIWG Figures of Merit Key BILI Distributed Reforming Targets * Cost ($/kg of H2): H2A analysis - Distributed reforming station,1000 kg/day ave./daily dispensed, 5000/6250 psi (and 10,000/12,000 psi) dispensing, 500 units/yr. * nth unit vs. 500 units/yr ? * production unit only (with 300 psi outlet pressure) ? * Production unit efficiency: LHV H2 out/(LHV of feedstocks and all other energy in) GTG - WTG efficiency? - Feedstock conversion energy efficiency? * Production unit capital cost: Distributed reforming station,1000 kg/day ave./daily dispensed, 300 psi outlet pressure

50

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Regional maps Figure F3. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts 216 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Figure F3. Petroleum...

51

WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delivered Wind Energy Costs Have Declined Substantially BNEFTable ES-1. Potential Sources of Future Wind Energy Costvii Table 1. Potential Sources of Future Wind Energy Cost

Lantz, Eric

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Microsoft Word - figure_17.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 C ommercial All O ther States W isconsin Minnesota Pennsylvania Michigan O hio N ew Jersey Texas California N ew York Illinois 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion C ubic Feet Residential Indiana G eorgia N ew Jersey Pennsylvania Texas O hio Michigan Illinois California All O ther States N ew York 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion C ubic Feet Figure 17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2010 Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet E lectric P ower 7,387,184 34% Industrial 6,517,477 30% C om m ercial 3,101,675 14% R esidential 4,787,320 22% Industrial All O ther States Minnesota Iowa Pennsylvania O klahoma Illinois O hio Indiana Louisiana Texas California 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 E lectric Power All O ther States Arizona Mississippi Louisiana Alabama

53

Microsoft Word - figure_16.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Commercial All Other States Wisconsin Minnesota Pennsylvania Texas Ohio New Jersey Michigan California New York Illinois 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Wisconsin Indiana Texas New Jersey Pennsylvania Ohio Michigan Illinois California All Other States New York 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Figure 16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2008 Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Pow er 6,668,379 31% Industrial 6,650,276 31% Commercial 3,135,852 15% Residential 4,872,107 23% Industrial All Other States Georgia Iow a Oklahom a Pennsylvania Illinois Indiana Ohio Louisiana Texas California 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Electric Power All Other States Mississippi New Jersey Louisiana

54

Microsoft Word - figure_17.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Commercial All Other States Wisconsin M innesota Pennsylvania Ohio M ichigan Texas New Jersey California New York Illinois 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion C ubic Feet Residential Colorado Indiana Texas New Jersey Pennsylvania Ohio M ichigan Illinois California All Other States New York 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion C ubic Feet Figure 18. Natural gas delivered to consumers in the United States, 2011 Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Residential 4,713,695 21% Commercial 3,153,605 14% Industrial 6,904,843 31% Electric Power 7,573,863 34% Industrial All Other States M innesota Iowa Oklahoma Pennsylvania Ohio Illinois Indiana Louisiana Texas California 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Electric Power

55

Microsoft Word - figure_16.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Commercial All Other States Wisconsin Minnesota Pennsylvania Ohio Texas Michigan New Jersey California New York Illinois 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Wisconsin Indiana Texas New Jersey Pennsylvania Ohio Michigan Illinois California All Other States New York 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Figure 16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2007 Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Pow er 6,841,408 33% Industrial 6,624,846 31% Commercial 3,017,105 14% Residential 4,717,311 22% Industrial All Other States Georgia Oklahom a Michigan Pennsylvania Illinois Indiana Ohio Louisiana Texas California 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Power All Other States Alabam a

56

Microsoft Word - figure_16.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Commercial All Other States Wisconsin Minnesota Pennsylvania Ohio Michigan Texas New Jersey California New York Illinois 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Residential Minnesota Indiana Texas New Jersey Pennsylvania Ohio Michigan Illinois California All Other States New York 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Trillion Cubic Feet Figure 16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the United States, 2009 Volumes in Million Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Trillion Cubic Feet Electric Pow er 6,872,049 33% Industrial 6,167,193 29% Commercial 3,118,833 15% Residential 4,778,478 23% Industrial All Other States Georgia Iow a Pennsylvania Oklahom a Ohio Illinois Indiana Louisiana Texas California 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 Electric Power All Other States Nevada Pennsylvania Alabam a Arizona

57

Microsoft Word - Figure_3_4.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001-and over WA ID MT OR CA NV UT AZ NM CO WY ND SD MN WI NE IA KS MO TX IL IN OH MI OK AR TN WV VA KY MD PA WI NY VT NH MA CT ME RI NJ DE DC NC SC GA AL MS LA FL HI AK GOM 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 T e x a s G u l f o f M e x i c o N e w M e x i c o O k l a h o m a W y o m i n g L o u i s i a n a C o l o r a d o A l a s k a K a n s a s A l a b a m a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 Billion Cubic Meters 2002 2003 2002 Figure 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2002-2003 Figure 3. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in the United States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2003 (Million Cubic Feet) GOM = Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-895, "Monthly and Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Mineral Management

58

Policy Options for Encouraging Energy Efficiency Best Practices in Shandong Province's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 Figure 7 Total energy consumption and energy intensity ofonly data on total energy consumption or energy intensitytce) Figure 7 Total energy consumption and energy intensity

Price, Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Microsoft Word - Figure_3_4.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 T e x a s G u l f o f M e x i c o O k l a h o m a N e w M e x i c o W y o m i n g L o u i s i a n a C o l o r a d o A l a s k a K a n s a s C a l i f o r n i a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 Billion Cubic Meters 2003 2004 2003 Figure 4. Marketed Production of Natural Gas in Selected States and the Gulf of Mexico, 2003-2004 GOM = Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA -895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Mineral Management Service. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA -895, "Monthly Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Report," and the United States Mineral Management Service. None 1-15,000 15,001-100,000 100,001-200,000 200,001-500,000 500,001-and over

60

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Graphic Data Graphic Data International Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 Figure 1 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. World Delivered Energy Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2003-2030 Figure 2 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Use by Energy Type, 1980-2030 Figure 3 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 4. Fuel Shares of World Marketed Energy Use, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 4 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 5. World Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, 2003, 2015, and 2030 Figure 5 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9. Residential Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel, Reference15 Figure 10. Residential Primary Energy Consumption by End-20 Figure 17. Commercial Primary Energy Consumption by

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Toto the Robot Figure 1. Toto, front view. Figure 2. Toto, rear view.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toto the Robot Figure 1. Toto, front view. Figure 2. Toto, rear view. Toto the Robot was created so in the back to allow the tape- recorder to be held inside, and the figure was spray-painted. With his metallic a robot, helps account for his lack of verbal charm. Second, some younger children may recognize in Toto

Indiana University

63

Microsoft Word - figure_18.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 440 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel 0 2 4 6 8 1 0 1 2 1 4 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 Note: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants"; and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer Survey."

64

Figure2b.eps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coulomb-hole Coulomb-hole summations and energies for GW calculations with limited number of empty orbitals: a modified static remainder approach Jack Deslippe, 1 Georgy Samsonidze, 1 Manish Jain, 1 Marvin L. Cohen, 1 and Steven G. Louie 1 1 Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, California 94720 and Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (Dated: December 4, 2011) Abstract Ab initio GW calculations are a standard method for computing the spectroscopic properties of many materials. The most computationally expensive part in conventional implementations of the method is the generation and summation over the large number of empty orbitals required to converge the electron self energy. We propose a scheme to reduce the summation over empty states by the use of a modified static-remainder approximation, which

65

Microsoft Word - figure_19.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

63 63 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel Notes: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. Prices are in nominal dollars. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants"; Form EIA-423, "Monthly Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas Marketer

66

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 (Million Cubic Feet) Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 42,411 WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada i i N g e r a Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2006 253,214 690,780 634,185 658,523 134,764 63,063 526,726 121,049 34,531 492,655 101,101 23,154 40,113 1,496,283 68,601

67

Microsoft Word - figure_13.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 (Million Cubic Feet) 24,891 2,895 Nigeria WA M T I D OR W Y ND SD C A N V UT CO NE KS AZ NM OK TX MN WI MI IA I L IN OH MO AR MS AL GA TN KY FL SC NC WV MD DE VA PA NJ NY CT RI MA VT NH ME LA HI AK Mexico Algeria C a n a d a C a n a d a Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Algeria Canada Canada N i g e r i a O m a n Qatar Gulf of Mexico Gulf o f M e x i c o Gulf of Mexico Canada Gulf of Mexico Malaysia 2,986 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition," and the Office of Fossil Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 2005 Supplemental Data From Volume To From Volume To CT RI RI MA MA CT VA DC MD DC 335,380 634,982 664,318 612,297 125,202 33,223 531,868 103,624

68

Microsoft Word - Figure_03_04.doc  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Citygate dollars per thousand cubic feet Figure 3 and 4 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 NGPL Composite Spot Price NG Spot Price at Henry Hub dollars per thousand c ubic feet Note: Prices are in nominal dollars. Source: Table 3. Figure 3. Average citygate and consumer prices of natural gas in the United States, 2010-2013 Figure 4. Spot prices of natural gas and natural gas plant liquids in the United States, 2010-2013

69

Microsoft Word - figure_18.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 440 Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel 0 2 4 6 8 1 0 1 2 1 4 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 Notes: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. Prices are in nominal dollars. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants"; Form EIA-423, "Monthly Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas

70

Microsoft Word - figure_19.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 440 Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power V ehicle Fuel 0 2 4 6 8 1 0 1 2 1 4 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 Notes: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. Prices are in nominal dollars. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants"; Form EIA-423, "Monthly Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas

71

Microsoft Word - figure_18.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 440 Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Residential Commercial Industrial Electric Power Vehicle Fuel 0 2 4 6 8 1 0 1 2 1 4 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 Note: Coverage for prices varies by consumer sector. See Appendix A for further discussion on consumer prices. Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries to Consumers"; Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Form 423, "Monthly Report of Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants"; Form EIA-423, "Monthly Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; and Form EIA-910, "Monthly Natural Gas

72

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Publication  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Expenditures > Publication and Tables and Expenditures > Publication and Tables 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Publication and Tables Figure ES1. Energy Consumption in Commercial Buildings by Energy Sources, 1992 Separater Bar To View and/or Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader . If you experience any difficulties, visit our Technical Frequently Asked Questions. You have the option of downloading the entire report or selected sections of the report. Separater Bar Full Report - Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures, 1992 (file size 1.07 MB) pages: 214 Selected Sections Main Text - requires Adobe Acrobat Reader (file size 193,634 bytes) pages: 28, includes the following: Contacts Contents Executive Summary Introduction Background

73

RELEVANT SPECTROSCOPIC DATA Figure A.1: 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 25°C, 499.85 MHz) of 1iPr Figure A.12: 1 H NMR Spectrum (C6D6, 70°C, 499.85 MHz) of 1iPr Figure A.13: 13 C{1 H} NMR Spectrum (C6D6, 25°C, 125.70 MHz) of 1iPr #12;228 Figure A.14: 31 P{1 H} NMR Spectrum (C6D6, 25°C, 121.48 MHz) of 1iPr #12;229 Figure A.15: 1 H-13 C HSQC NMR Spectrum (C6D6, 25°C, 499

Winfree, Erik

74

EIS-0023-FEIS-Figures-1979.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NORTM NORTM CAROLINA 2 -- r /'- 3Charlo,te Gree,v:; I, o s. \ '~ ( % SOUTH CAROLINA ".4 o " .Alkenoco'"mb'a A1l.a,to \ August. ( SRP O Macon \ GEORGIA ? Charleston 50 MI ".* / 100 Ml 150 Mi 1 \ ATLANTIC OCEAN Sov.nn.h / FIGURE III-1. Location of SRP Relative to Surrounding Population Centers III-2 --- - FIGURE III-2. The Savannah River Plant III-3 FIGURE 'III-3. Profile of Geologic Formation Beneath the Savannah River Plant . III-5 ,-, -,.. . . . . . 5 .-- -612 CRYSTALLINE ROCK . II rfoce FIGURE III-4. Hydrostatic Head in Ground Water Near H Area III-8 ~'z 'Kw ) -.- ________ Alu EN F PLATEAU ";<--'-----% \ ~//i.s,t,,7 --- I '220--- Heed in Tuscaloosa ft H20 obove me.. $,0 level - 5 0 5 10 ,5 MILES FIGURE III-5. Flow in Tuscaloosa Aquifer (Ongoing hydrographic measurements indicate that this flow pattern has remained the same under the SRP site since the early 1950' s.) 111-10 . FIGURE

75

Microsoft Word - Figure_11.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

36 Electric Power 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a F l o r i d a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 Billion Cubic Meters Industrial 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 T e x a s C a l i f o r n i a L o u i s i a n a A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 Billion Cubic Meters Commercial 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 N e w Y o r k C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 Billion Cubic Meters Residential 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 C a l i f o r n i a I l l i n o i s N e w Y o r k A l l O t h e r S t a t e s Trillion Cubic Feet 0 30 60 90 120 150 Billion Cubic Meters Note: Vehicle fuel volume for 2004 was 20,514 million cubic feet. Source: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-886, "Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Service Vehicle Suppliers and Users";

76

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 ENERGY PRICES Figure 5-1 Major Coal Price Reforms (1980-117 Figure 5-2 Ex-Factory Coal Price Index (1980-Figure 6-14 Comparison of Coal Prices in China’s Domestic

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Alternative Energy Technology . 75Figure 25. Range in Alternative Energy EROEIs in Existingof Energy Output for Alternative Energy Development, 2010-

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

31 Figure 33 Primary Energy Consumption in Differentiv Figure 47 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by End-48 Residential Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel, CIS and

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 Figure 9 Retail Buildings Energy Intensity by End-12 Figure 10 Office Buildings Energy Intensity by End-Energy Intensity

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18 Figure 6 Primary Energy Consumption by End-Use in24 Figure 7 Primary Energy Consumption by Fuel in Commercialbased on total primary energy consumption (source energy),

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Economic Outlook and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 Figure 8 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 Figure 9 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 10 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 Figure 11 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 12. World Coal Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 Figure 12 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

82

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

80 Figure 3-6 Primary Energy Consumption (1980-3-8 Comparison of Primary Energy Consumption by SelectedFigure 3-9 Per Capita Primary Energy Consumption (1990-

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Figure legends Figure 1: Normalized radiance spectra of the different experimental color  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

treatment groups. The fluorescent (red) line represents the narrow rearing treatment. The 5500K (green) and 10000K (blue) lines represent the two bulb types used. #12;Figure S4: Behavioral predictive model performance for the broad-spectrum

Carleton, Karen L.

84

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Figure 91. World liquids consumption by end-use sector, 2007-2035 Figure 92. OECD and Non-OECD transportation sector liquids consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 93. OECD transportation energy use by region, 2007, 2025, and 2035 Figure 94. North America transportation energy use by country, 2007 and 2035 Figure 95. OECD Asia transportation energy use by country, 2007-2035 Figure 96. OECD Asia transportation energy use by country, 2007-2035 Figure 97. Non-OECD transportation energy use by region, 2007-2035 Figure 98. Non-OECD Asia transportation energy use by country, 2007-2035 Figure 99. Transportation energy use per capita in China and South Korea, 2007-2035

85

Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 - Graphic Data Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 - Graphic Data Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Graphic Data Figure 1. U.S. primary energy consumption, 1980-2035 Figure 1 Data Figure 2. U.S. liquid fuels supply, 1970-2035 Figure 2 Data Figure 3. U.S. natural gas supply, 1990-2035 Figure 3 Data Figure 4. U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2008 and 2035 Figure 4 Data Figure 5. Projected average fleet-wide fuel economy and CO2-equivalent emissions compliance levels for passenger cars, model year 2016 Figure 5 Data Figure 6. Projected average fleet-wide fuel economy and CO2-equivalent emissions compliance levels for light trucks, model year 2016 Figure 6 Data Figure 7. Total energy consumption in three cases, 2005-2035 Figure 7 Data

86

Figure 1. Nicaragua at night. The circled area is the Bluefields region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Instead, they advocate a focus on rural electrification for this region3 . blueEnergy blueEnergy%3 . The electrification rate in rural areas of Nicaragua, where 45% of the population lives, is a meager 25% 2 (Figure 1 are connected to an electric grid, rural areas outside of these cities are not. Due to geographic barriers

Kammen, Daniel M.

87

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook Figure 12. World marketed energy consumption, 1990-2035 Figure 13. World marketed energy consumption:OECD and Non-OECD, 1990-2035 Figure 14. Shares of world energy consumption in the United States, China, and India, 1990-2035 Figure 15. Marketed energy use in the Non-OECD economies by region, 1990-2035 Figure 16. World marketed energy use by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 17. Coal consumption in selected world regions, 1990-2035 Figure 18. World electricity generation by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 19. Renewable electricity generation in China by energy source, 2007-2035 Figure 20. World nuclear generating capacity by region, 2007 and 2035

88

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Graphic data - Highlights > Graphic data - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic data - Highlights Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 2. World marketed energy use by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 3. World liquids production, 1990-2035 Figure 4. Net change in world natural gas production by region, 2007-2035 Figure 5. World coal consumption by region, 1990-2035 Figure 6. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 7. World renewable electricity generation by energy source excluding world and hydropower, 2007-2035 Figure 8. World delivered energy consumption in the industrial sector, 2007-2035 Figure 9. World delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector, 2005-2035 Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2007-2035

89

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

values. Figure 7. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,Scenario Figure 8. Global Primary Energy by End-Use Sector,

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Sector Industrial Sector Energy Sector International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Industrial Sector Energy Sector Figure 82. Annual changes in world industrial and all other end-use energy consumption from previous year, 2006-2010 Figure 83. World delivered energy consumption in the industral and all other end-use sectors, 2005-2035 Figure 84. OECD and Non-OECD industrial sector energy consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 85. World industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 86. World industrial sector energy consumption by major energy-intensive industry shares, 2007 Figure 87. OECD and Non-OECD major steel producers, 2008 Figure 88. OECD industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 89. Non-OECD industrial sector energy consumption by fuel, 2007 and 2035

91

Fermilab E866 (NuSea) Figures and Data Plots  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The NuSea Experiment at Fermilab studied the internal structure of protons, in particular the difference between up quarks and down quarks. This experiment also addressed at least two other physics questions: nuclear effects on the production of charmonia states (bound states of charm and anti-charm quarks) and energy loss of quarks in nuclei from Drell-Yan measurements on nuclei. While much of the NuSea data are available only to the collaboration, figures, data plots, and tables are presented as stand-alone items for viewing or download. They are listed in conjunction with the published papers, theses, or presentations in which they first appeared. The date range is 1998 to 2008. To see these figures and plots, click on E866 publications or go directly to http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/papers.html. Theses are at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866theses/e866theses.html and the presentations are found at http://p25ext.lanl.gov/e866/papers/e866talks/e866talks.html. Many of the items are postscript files.

E866 NuSea Collaboration

92

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Demand and Economic Outlook Demand and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 Figure 9 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 Figure 10 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 11 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 12. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type,1990-2030 Figure 12 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 13. Coal Consumption in Selected World Regions,1980-2030 Figure 13 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

93

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Data International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 Figure 1 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. Average Annual Growth in Delivered Energy Consumption by Region and End-Use Sector, 2004-2030 Figure 2 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 3. Industrial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 Figure 3 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 4. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 Figure 4 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 5. World Liquids Production, 2004-2030 Figure 5 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

94

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2004 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 54 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2004 reference case forecast. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having Problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 3. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8600. Figure Data Figure 4. Comparison of 2003 and 2004 World Oil Price Projections, 1970-2025 (2002 Dollars per Barrel). Figure Data Figure 5. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025 (Quadrilliion Btu). Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-596-8600.

95

STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) Figures and Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The primary physics task of STAR is to study the formation and characteristics of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a state of matter believed to exist at sufficiently high energy densities. STAR consists of several types of detectors, each specializing in detecting certain types of particles or characterizing their motion. These detectors work together in an advanced data acquisition and subsequent physics analysis that allows final statements to be made about the collision. The STAR Publications page provides access to all published papers by the STAR Collaboration, and many of them have separate links to the figures and data found in or supporting the paper. See also the data-rich summaries of the research at http://www.star.bnl.gov/central/physics/results/. [See also DDE00230

The STAR Collaboration

96

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Energy Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 40. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 41. Primary energy use by fuel, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Levels Off Through 2030 Because energy use for housing, services, and travel in the United States is closely linked to population levels, energy use per capita is relatively stable (Figure 40). In addition, the economy is becoming less dependent on energy in general. Energy intensity (energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP) declines by an average

97

Energy Efficiency Services Sector: Workforce Education and Training Needs  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a baseline assessment of the current state of energy efficiency-related education and training programs and analyzes training and education needs to support expected growth in the energy efficiency services workforce. In the last year, there has been a significant increase in funding for 'green job' training and workforce development (including energy efficiency), through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Key segments of the energy efficiency services sector (EESS) have experienced significant growth during the past several years, and this growth is projected to continue and accelerate over the next decade. In a companion study (Goldman et al. 2009), our research team estimated that the EESS will increase two- to four-fold by 2020, to 220,000 person-years of employment (PYE) (low-growth scenario) or up to 380,000 PYE (high-growth scenario), which may represent as many as 1.3 million individuals. In assessing energy efficiency workforce education and training needs, we focus on energy-efficiency services-related jobs that are required to improve the efficiency of residential and nonresidential buildings. Figure ES-1 shows the market value chain for the EESS, sub-sectors included in this study, as well as the types of market players and specific occupations. Our assessment does not include the manufacturing, wholesale, and retail distribution subsectors, or energy efficiency-focused operations and maintenance performed by facility managers.

Goldman, Charles A.; Peters, Jane S.; Albers, Nathaniel; Stuart, Elizabeth; Fuller, Merrian C.

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

98

Microsoft Word - figure_06_07.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 16.4 13.0 11.7 10.8 8.0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Sources: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, "Natural Gas Imports and Exports." Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-920, "Combined Heat and Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-

99

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis....

100

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Transportation Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2008 Figure 66. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Liquids Consumption, 2005-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 67. Change in World Liquids Consumption for Transportation, 2005 to 2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 68. Average Annual Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Gros Domestic Product and Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Use, 2005-2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 69. Motor Vehicle Ownership in OECD Countries, 2005, 2015, and 2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

102

Figure 3-11 South Table Mountain Utilities Map  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

FTLB AMMO LEGEND Gas Existing Buildings Electrical Figure 3-11 South Table Mountain Utilities Map Sewer Communication Water Surface Drainage Storm Water WATER TANK FACILITIES...

103

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Highlights Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Graphic Data - Highlights Graphic Data - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 Figure 1 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. Average Annual Growth in Delivered Energy Consumption by Region and End-Use Sector, 2004-2030 Figure 2 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 3. Industrial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 Figure 3 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 4. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 Figure 4 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 5. World Liquids Production, 2004-2030 Figure 5 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

104

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in Three Cases, 1995-2035 Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2035 (2008 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1980-2035 Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1980-2035 Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

105

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Graphic Data Figure 1. Total liquid fuels demand by sector Figure 1 Data Figure 2. Total natural gas supply by source Figure 2 Data Figure 3. New light-duty vehicle sales shares by type Figure 3 Data Figure 4. Proposed CAFE standards for passenger cars by vehicle footprint, model years 2011-2015 Figure 4 Data Figure 5. Proposed CAFE standards for light trucks by vehicle footprint, model years 2011-2015 Figure 5 Data Figure 6. Average fuel economy of new light-duty vehicles in the AEO2008 and AEO2009 projections, 1995-2030 Figure 6 Data Figure 7. Value of fuel saved by a PHEV compared with a conventional ICE vehicle over the life of the vehicles, by gasoline price and PHEV all-electric driving range

106

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meanwhile, Chapter 2 Energy Production solar water heatersSolar Resources 8 Figure 1-7 China’s Wind Resources .. 9 CHAPTER 2 ENERGY PRODUCTIONsolar energy, geothermal, and ocean energy (for more details, please also see the energy production

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Microsoft Word - figure_06_07.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16.0 16.4 13.0 11.7 11.0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-920, "Combined Heat and Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; Form EIA-886, "Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Vehicles"; State agencies; and EIA estimates based

108

Microsoft Word - figure_06_07.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16.4 16.0 16.4 13.0 11.7 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-920, "Combined Heat and Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; Form EIA-886, "Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Vehicles"; State agencies; and EIA estimates based

109

Microsoft Word - figure_06_07.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14.7 15.2 16.4 16.0 16.4 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Percent Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production"; Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Natural Gas Imports and Exports; Form EIA-895A, "Annual Quantity and Value of Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-914, "Monthly Natural Gas Production Report"; Form EIA-906, "Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-920, "Combined Heat and Power Plant Report"; Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report"; Form EIA-886, "Annual Survey of Alternative Fueled Vehicle Suppliers and Users"; and EIA estimates.

110

Supplemental Figures: Figure S1. Analysis of endo-siRNA targets in different microarray datasets. The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supplemental Figures: Figure S1. Analysis of endo-siRNA targets in different microarray datasets. The percentage of each array dataset that were predicted endo-siRNA targets according to the Ambros dataset (Lee et al. 2006) was plotted [(number of endo-siRNA targets in microarray dataset / total genes

Bass, Brenda L.

111

International Energy Outlook - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2004 World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2004 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, including large increases for the developing economies of Asia. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2025. Figure 12. World Primary Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 Figure Data Figure 13. World Energy Consumption by Region, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 14. World Primary Energy Consumption by Energy Source, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data

112

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Emissions Figure 103. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2007-2035 Figure 104. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 105. U.S.energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel in IEO2009 and IEO2010, 2007, 2015, and 2035 Figure 106. Average annual growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in OECD economies, 2007-2035 Figure 107. Average annual growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the Non-OECD economies, 2007-2035 Figure 108. World carbon dioxide emissions from liquids combustion, 1990-2035 Figure 109. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas combustion, 1990-2035 Figure 110. World carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion, 1990-2035

113

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Electricity Figure 67. Growth in world electric power generation and total energy consumption, 1990-2035 Figure 68. World net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Figure 69. Non-OECD net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Figure 70. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2006-2035 Figure 71. World net electricity generation from nuclear power by region, 2007-2030 Figure 72. Net electricity generation in North America, 1990-2035 Figure 73. Net electricity generation in North America by Fuel, 2007 and 2035 Figure 74. Net electricity generation in OECD Europe by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 75. Net electricity generation in OECD Asia, 2007-2035 Figure 76. Net electricity generation in Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia, 2007-2035

114

Figure 1. Census Regions and Divisions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

US Federal Region Map US Federal Region Map US Federal Regions/> Energy Information Administration, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels.

115

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Highlights Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Graphic Data - Highlights Graphic Data - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2008 Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2005-2030 Figure 1 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. World Marketed Energy use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 Figure 2 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 3. World Oil Prices in Two Cases, 1980-2030 Figure 3 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 4. World Liquids Production, 2005-2030 Figure 4 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 5. World Natural Gas Production, 2005-2030 Figure 5 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

116

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy Consumption by End-Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by End Use Sector Energy Consumption by End Use Sector International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 25. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 25 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 26. OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 27. Growth in OECD and Non-OECD Residential Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2004 and 2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 28. OECD and Non-OECD Commercial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption, 2004-2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

117

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2008 - 2014 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2014 Table ES-1. U.S. Coal Summary...

118

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY ANALYSIS OF CEE HOUSEHOLD SURVEY NATIONAL AWARENESS OF ENERGY STAR Âź FOR 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements .................................................................................. ii Executive Summary ............................................................................ ES-1 Introduction ............................................................................................... 1 Methodology Overview ............................................................................. 2 Key Findings ............................................................................................. 5 Recognition .................................................................................................................. 5 Understanding ........................................................................................................... 12

119

Stuttering as Reflected in Adults’ Self-Figure Drawings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This pilot study aimed to detect indicators within self-figure drawings that reflect stuttering in adults. A sample of 20 adults who stutter from childhood were given a blank sheet...n...= 20). Indicators include...

Rachel Lev-Wiesel; Ayala Shabat; Ayala Tsur

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ES2 Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Consumer Price Index (CPI-U), and Real Average Retail Gasoline Price, 1978-2004, 1985100...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Ion beam figuring of small optical components Thomas W. Drueding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion beam figuring of small optical components Thomas W. Drueding Boston University College of Engineering Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department Boston, Massachusetts 02215 Steven C. Fawcett Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107 Thomas G. Bifano Boston University College of Engineering Aerospace

122

Correctness of depiction in planar diagrams of spatial figures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that it is possible to decide whether a given planar diagram correctly depicts the spatial figure consisting of a planar quadrangle together with its shadow in another plane.

P. L. Robinson

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

123

History of mirror casting, figuring, segmentation and active optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The accurate general figures for the mirrors with which one could achieve the optimum ... the beginning of the twentieth century by Karl Schwarzschild. A first design for a reflecting telescope ... dispersing len...

Lothar Noethe

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Supplementary Figure 1 SHAPE-MaP data analysis pipeline.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supplementary Figure 1 SHAPE-MaP data analysis pipeline. Outline of software pipeline that fully.1 GHz Intel Core i7 and 16 GB RAM). This strategy is implemented in the SHAPE-MaP Folding Pipeline

Cai, Long

125

Figure 7.1. Control of an alarm system. Figure 7.2. A simple memory element.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-digit BCD counter. Enable Q0 Q1 Q2 D0 D1 D2 Load Clock 1 0 0 0 Clock Q30 D3 Enable Q0 Q1 Q2 D0 D1 D2 Load Clock 0 0 0 Q30 D3 BCD0 BCD1 Clear Figure 7.30. Johnson counter. D Q Q Clock D Q Q D Q Q Q0 Q1 Qn 1 by CAD tools. Data Clock Latch #12;Figure 7.34. Timing simulation of storage elements. Figure 7.35. Code

Kalla, Priyank

126

A simple figure of merit for high temperature superconducting switches  

SciTech Connect

The discovery of the new high temperature superconductors has revived interest in many special applications, including superconducting switches. For comparison of switch types, a simple figure of merit based in switch performance is proposed, derived for superconducting switches, and then calculated for thyristors and vacuum switches. The figure of merit is then used to show what critical current density would be needed for superconducting switches to compete with more conventional switches. 46 refs., 1 fig.

Honig, E.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Muon Figures: 2001/04/19 Chris Waltham  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Muon Figures: 2001/04/19 Chris Waltham Hanging Wall 65 Looking o o ~25 S of W Fault Line r=2730 r) and replaced with back#12;ll. The grid is 1000' (#25;300m) square. p Muon Track Light from Muon Xf PSUP Impact Parameter at time Tf Muon leaves PSUP V h Cherenkov Cone Figure 3: Fitting Diagram 2 #12; ) (degrees) fit v

Learned, John

128

International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2004 Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate fuel markets in developing Asia. Figure 52. World Coal Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2001 and 2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 54. Coal Share of Regional Energy Consumption, 1970-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since

129

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy in China’s overall energy mix, in February 2005 thehalf of the nation’s energy mix (Figure 2-3). Figure 2-3energy conversion has only slightly increased since 1980 with an increase of only 2.6 Mt, after overall fuel mix

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projects of renewable energy in buildings Subsidy forpublic buildings Renewable energy in buildings Figure 9.Renewable Energy Application in Buildings ..

Levine, Mark D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected20 Figure 16. Office Buildings Energy Intensity by End-Projected Technology and Energy Intensity Trends in Cement

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Best Practice Indicates technical potential Actual energy efficiencyenergy efficiency over time. Building on past OECD experience and best practices,best practices. Figure 4. Plant Benchmarking Energy Efficiency

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Natural Gas Figure 36. World natural gas consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 37. Change in world natural gas production by region, 2007 and 2035 Figure 38. Natural gas consumption in North America by country, 2007-2035 Figure 39. Natural gas consumption in OECD Europe by end-use sector, 2007-2035 Figure 40. Natural gas consumption in OECD Asia by country and end-use sector, 2007-2035 Figure 41. Natural gas consumption in Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia, 2007-2035 Figure 42. Natural gas consumption in Non-OECD by Asia by country, 2007-2035 Figure 43. OECD natural gas production by country, 1990-2035 Figure 44. OECD Europe natural gas production, 1990-2035 Figure 45. Middle East natural gas production, 1990-2035

134

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Electricity Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Figure 52. Growth in World Electric Power Generation and Total Energy Consumption, 1990-2030 Figure 52 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 53. World Net Electric Power Generation, 1990-2030 Figure 53 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 54. World Electricity Generation by Fuel, 2005-2030 Figure 54 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 55. World Net Electricity Generation from Nuclear Power, 1980 and 2030 Figure 55 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 56. Net Electricity Generation in the United States and China, 1980-2030 Figure 56 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

135

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Electricity Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2007 Figure 60. World Electric Power Generation, 2004-2030 Figure 60 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 61. World Electric Power Generation by Region, 1980-2030 Figure 61 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 62. Average Annual Change in End-Use Sector Electricity Demand, 2004-2030 Figure 62 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 63. World Electricity Generation by Fuel, 2004 and 2030 Figure 63 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 64. Annual Growth in Electricity Generation by Region, 2004-2030 Figure 64 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

136

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Liquid Fuels Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid Fuels Liquid Fuels International Energy Outlook 2008 Figure 26. World Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1990-2030 Figure 26 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 27. World Production of Unconventional Liquid Fuels, 2005-2030 Figure 27 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 28. World Liquids Consumption by Sector, 2005-2030 Figure 28 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 29. World Liquids Consumption by Region and Country Group, 2005 and 2030 Figure 29 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 30. Nominal World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1980-2030 Figure 30 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

137

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Coal Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Figure 54. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 Figure 54 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 55. Coal share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2004, 2015, and 2030 Figure 55 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 56. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2004, 2015, and 2030 Figure 56 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 57. Non-OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2004, 2015, and 2030 Figure 57 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 58. Coal Consumption in China by Sector, 2004, 2015, and 2030 Figure 58 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

138

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Current World Energy Production Broken Down byUnited States and world energy production could be suppliedFigure 1.1: Current World Energy Production Broken Down by

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Correction/Update July 27th A stray "2010" was left in the middle of Figure 1. August 1st Figure title changes (PDF only): Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 2010-2040 (billion metric tons) This should actually be: Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2040 (billion metric tons) Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons carbon dioxide emitted per million 2010 dollars of gross domestic product) This should actually be: Figure 11. OECD and non-OECD carbon intensities, 1990-2040 (metric tons

140

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 81. Carbon diioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2007 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 82. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 83. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rate of Increase in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Slows in the Projections Even with rising energy prices, growth in energy use leads to increasing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

F-3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration,...

142

Summary of Information and Resources Related to Energy Use in Healthcare Facilities - Version 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 3. Estimated site energy intensity and floor space of4. Estimated source energy intensity of selected Californiasite energy and energy intensity (energy use per square foot

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Figure 1. Schematic drawing showing the components of a Li-ion battery cell and the information that can be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposals In Situ Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Advanced Li-ion BatteriesFigure 1. Schematic drawing showing the components of a Li-ion battery cell and the information (8300 28th Ct NE, Unit 200, Lacey, Washington 98516) Electrochemical energy storage devices (EES

144

Figure 2. Urban lawns have ~ 2x the microbial biomass of native and/or cultivated areas. Viable microbial biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 2. Urban lawns have ~ 2x the microbial biomass of native and/or cultivated areas. Viable and fertilized Corn: flood irrigated and fertilized Wheat-Fallow: a dryland winter wheat cropping system C and N mineralization rates (data not shown) than other ecosystems, suggesting that energy

Hall, Sharon J.

145

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Natural Gas Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Figure 35. World Natural Gas Consumption, 1980-2030 Figure 35 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 36. Natural Gas Consumption in North America by Country, 2005-2030 Figure 36 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 37. Natural Gas Consumption in OECD Europe, 2005-2030 Figure 37 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 38. Natural Gas Consumption in OECD Asia by Country, 2005-2030 Figure 38 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 39. Natural Gas Consumption in Non-OECD Europe and Eurasia, 2005-2030 Figure 39 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

146

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Natural Gas Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Figure 40. World Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2004-2030 Figure 40 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 41. World Natural Gas Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 Figure 41 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 42. World Natural Gas Reserves by Region, 1980-2007 Figure 42 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 43. World Natural Gas Reserves by Geographic Region as of January 1, 2007 Figure 43 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 44. World Natural Gas Resources by Geographic Region, 2006-2025 Figure 44 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

147

China Energy Databook -- User Guide and Documentation, Version 7.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial and Biomass Energy Table 4B.2. Actual PrimaryCommercial and Biomass Energy Figure 4B.2. Energy IntensityEnd Use, Commercial and Biomass Energy Figure 9B.10. Shares

Fridley, Ed., David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Figure 7.8 shows the cross-sections so recovered for the connection of the SHGC of Figure 6.8.b and the termination of the SHGC of Figure 6.8.d.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

30 Figure 7.8 shows the cross-sections so recovered for the connection of the SHGC of Figure 6.8.b and the termination of the SHGC of Figure 6.8.d. For discontinuous connections where there are no limb patches description (see top right SHGC in Figure 7.12.b and c for which discontinuity is caused by self occlusion

Southern California, University of

149

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - International Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1995-2030 (2006 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 3. OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Total Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1995-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data The International Energy Module (IEM) performs two tasks in all NEMS runs. First, the module reads exogenously global and U.S.A. petroleum liquids

150

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2009 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 12. Marketed Energy Use by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

151

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 1 - World Energy and Economic Outlook In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 9. World Marketed Energy Use; OECD and Non-OECD, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. Marketed Energy Use in the NON-OECD Economies by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

152

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy and Economic Outlook World Energy and Economic Outlook International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 1 - World Energy Demand and Economic Outlook In the IEO2008 projections, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD economies. Figure 9. World Marketed EnergyConsumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 10. World Marketed Energy Consumption: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 11. Marketed Energy Use in the Non-OECD Economies by Region, 1990-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

153

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Industrial Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Industrial Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 6 - Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Worldwide industrial energy consumption increases by an average of 1.4 percent per year from 2006 to 2030 in the IEO2009 reference case. Much of the growth is expected to occur in the developing non-OECD nations. Figure 63. OECD and Non-OECD Industrial Sector Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 64. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Fuel, 2006 and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 65. World Industrial Sector Energy Consumption by Major Energy-Intensive Industry Shares, 2005 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

154

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 Figure 75 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure 76 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 Figure 77 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 78. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioide Emissions in IEO2007 and IEO2008, 2005-2030 Figure 78 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 79. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the Non-OECD Economies, 2005-2030 Figure 79 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

155

World Energy Demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A reliable forecast of energy resources, energy consumption, and population in the future is a ... So, instead of absolute figures about future energy demand and sources worldwide, which would become...3.1 correl...

Giovanni Petrecca

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils  

SciTech Connect

For the first time, the lift, drag, and guidance forces acting on a permanent magnet are measured as the magnet passes over different arrays of figure-eight (null-flux) coils. The experimental results are in good agreement with the predictions of dynamic circuit theory, which is used to explain more optimal coil arrays.

Mulcahy, T.H.; He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rossing, T.D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Forces on a magnet moving past figure-eight coils  

SciTech Connect

For the first time, the lift, drag, and guidance forces acting on a permanent magnet are measured as the magnet passes over different arrays of figure-eight (null-flux) coils. The experimental results are in good agreement with the predictions of dynamic circuit theory, which is used to explain more optimal coil arrays.

Mulcahy, T.H.; He, Jianliang; Rote, D.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rossing, T.D. (Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Figures of the World Healthcare Organisation show that stroke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figures of the World Healthcare Organisation show that stroke is currently the leading cause disabilities following a stroke, the economic burden and shortage of rehabilitation therapists are also developed a robotic exoskeleton system that meets the requirements of effective post-stroke upper

159

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 Figure 77 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 78. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure 78 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 79. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2004-2030 Figure 79 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 80. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioide Emissions in the Non-OECD Economies, 2004-2030 Figure 80 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 81. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Liquids Combustion by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 81 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

160

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - International Energy Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Module International Energy Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook International Energy Module Figure 2. World Oil Prices in three Cases, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Figure 3. OPEC Oil Production in the Reference Case, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Figure 4. Non-OPEC Production in the Reference Case, 1970-2025. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure Data Table 4. Worldwide Oil Reserves as of January 1, 2002 (Billion Barrels) Printer Friendly Version Region Proved Oil Reserves Western Hemisphere 313.6 Western‘Europe 18.1 Asia-Pacific 38.7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2010 Coal In the IEO2010 Reference case, world coal consumption increases by 56 percent from 2007 to 2035, and coal's share of world energy consumption grows from 27 percent in 2007 to 28 percent in 2035. Figure 60. World coal consumption by country grouping, 1980-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Coal share of world energy consumption by sector, 2007, 2020, and 2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. OECD coal consumption by region, Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Non-OECD coal consumption by region, 1980,2007,2020, and 2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Coal consumption in China by sector, 2007, 2020, and 2035.

162

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)- Energy Production and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production and Imports Production and Imports Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Production and Imports Figure 5. Total energy production and consumption, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 6. Energy production by fuel, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Net imports of energy are expected to continue to meet a major share of total U.S. energy demand (Figure 5). In the AEO2008 reference case, the net import share of total U.S. energy consumption in 2030 is 29 percent, slightly less than the 30-percent share in 2006. Rising fuel prices over the projection period are expected to spur increases in domestic energy

163

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2005, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 7 percent. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 72 percent. Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

164

Potential Global Benefits of Improved Ceiling Fan Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011). ENERGY STAR Unit Shipment and Market Penetration2012c. ENERGY STAR Unit Shipment and Market Penetration7 and Figure 8 show ENERGY STAR market data for qualifying

Sathaye, Nakul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Rational Material Architecture Design for Better Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy and power storage systems, Renewable and Sustainable Energyeconomical and sustainable energy storage devices. Moreover,performance and sustainable energy storage systems. Figure.

Chen, Zheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10. Final and Primary Energy Consumption in the Industry35 Figure 16. Primary Energy Consumption byby end users while primary energy consumption includes final

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

[FIGURE] FIG 0.0 ELEPHANTS AND ETHICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[FIGURE] FIG 0.0 ELEPHANTS AND ETHICS 1.Wemmer,Elephants and Ethics 2/1/08 2:22 PM Page i #12;1.Wemmer,Elephants and Ethics 2/1/08 2:22 PM Page ii #12;Edited by CHRISTEN WEMMER AND CATHERINE A. CHRISTEN ELEPHANTS AND ETHICS TOWARD A MORALITY OF COEXISTENCE Foreword by John Seidensticker THE JOHNS

Hardin, Rebecca D.

168

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.1.1 Energy Production . . . . . . . . . 2.1.2 Spentof Figures Current World Energy Production Broken Down byCurrent US Energy Production Broken Down by

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EPA ENERGY STAR: Tackling Growth in Home Electronics and Small Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICF Consulting. 2003. Energy Star Market Penetration ReportConsulting. ———. 2004. Energy Star Market Penetration Reportmarket data. Figure 4. ENERGY STAR Market Penetration ENERGY

Sanchez, Marla Christine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Analysis of Energy-Efficiency Opportunities for the Pulp and Paper Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 Figure 8. Final energy mix in China's pulp and paperFigure 8 shows the final energy mix in China’s pulp andstatistics). Although the energy mix shows a trend toward

Kong, Lingbo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2010 Electricity World electricity generation increases by 87 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the IEO2010 Reference case. Non-OECD countries account for 61 percent of world electricity use in 2035. Figure 67. Growth in world electric power generation and total energy consumption, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 68. World net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 69. Non-OECD net electricity generation by region, 1990-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 70. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2006-2030. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 71. World net electricity generation from nuclear power by region, 2007-2030.

172

Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II  

SciTech Connect

Phase I Due to the growing interest in establishing a domestic hydrogen infrastructure, several hydrogen fueling stations already have been established around the country as demonstration units. While these stations help build familiarity with hydrogen fuel in their respective communities, hydrogen vehicles are still several years from mass production. This limited number of hydrogen vehicles translates to a limited demand for hydrogen fuel, a significant hurdle for the near-term establishment of commercially viable hydrogen fueling stations. By incorporating a fuel cell and cogeneration system with a hydrogen fueling station, the resulting energy station can compensate for low hydrogen demand by providing both hydrogen dispensing and combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The electrical power generated by the energy station can be fed back into the power grid or a nearby facility, which in turn helps offset station costs. Hydrogen production capacity not used by vehicles can be used to support building heat and power loads. In this way, an energy station can experience greater station utility while more rapidly recovering capital costs, providing an increased market potential relative to a hydrogen fueling station. At an energy station, hydrogen is generated on-site. Part of the hydrogen is used for vehicle refueling and part of the hydrogen is consumed by a fuel cell. As the fuel cell generates electricity and sends it to the power grid, excess heat is reclaimed through a cogeneration system for use in a nearby facility. Both the electrical generation and heat reclamation serve to offset the cost of purchasing the equivalent amount of energy for nearby facilities and the energy station itself. This two-phase project assessed the costs and feasibility of developing a hydrogen vehicle fueling station in conjunction with electricity and cogenerative heat generation for nearby Federal buildings. In order to determine which system configurations and operational patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

TIAX, LLC

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

173

Marine energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...have been considered in Argentina, Australia, Canada...benefit of carbon-free energy is to be realized...location power (MW) energy (TWh1) operational...Cape Keraudren 600 1.1 Argentina San Jose/Neuvo 600...prototype. Figure 14 Lunar Energy tidal stream device...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Figure 1. Microsupercapacitors developed with novel carbon nano-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to advanced energy technologies, including solar energy utilization, energy storage (batteries and capacitors) and heterogeneous catalysis for solar energy and solar fuels production. The FIRST Center will address three key

175

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compressor Compressed hydrogen storage Figure 2: High-compressor Compressed hydrogen storage Clean Energy Group lduction, and a hydrogen compression, storage, and Energy

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Figure 1: IPA symbols [wikipedia]. Unvoiced Consonants Voiced Consonants Vowels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1: IPA symbols [wikipedia]. Unvoiced Consonants Voiced Consonants Vowels Example Dbet IPA/at H Ă» Example Dbet IPA /th/is D D /b/ee b b /d/og d d /g/ab g g /j/udge J Ă? /l/ook l l /m/an m m /n/ap n n /r/eal r r plea/s/ure Z Z si/ng/ G N /v/ow v v /w/in w w /y/ou y j /z/oo z z Example Dbet IPA L

Allen, Jont

177

Investigation of Energy-Efficient Supermarket Display Cases  

SciTech Connect

Supermarkets represent one of the largest energy-intensive building groups in the commercial sector, consuming 2 to 3 million kWh/yr per store (ES-1). Over half of this energy use is for the refrigeration of food display cases and storage coolers. Display cases are used throughout a supermarket for the merchandising of perishable food products. The cases are maintained at air temperatures ranging from -10 to 35 F, depending upon the type of product stored. The operating characteristics and energy requirements of the refrigeration system are directly related to the refrigeration load. The sources of the display case refrigeration load consist of: (1) Moist and warm air infiltration through the open front of the case--air curtains are employed to inhibit this infiltration, but some ambient air is entrained, which adds a substantial portion to the refrigeration load. (2) Heat conduction through case panels and walls. (3) Thermal radiation from the ambient to the product and display case interior. (4) Internal thermal loads--the use of lights, evaporator fans, periodic defrosts, and antisweat heaters adds to the refrigeration load of the display case as well as directly consuming electric energy. The impact of each of these elements on the refrigeration load is very dependent upon case type (Figure ES-1). For example, air infiltration is the most significant portion of the refrigeration load for open, multi-deck cases, while radiation is the largest part of the load for tub-type cases. The door anti-sweat heaters represent a major share of the refrigeration load for frozen food door reach-in cases. Figure ES-2 shows the distribution of display cases in a typical supermarket (ES-2). Open, multi-deck, medium temperature display cases typically comprise about half of the refrigerated fixtures in a store (ES-3). In addition, medium temperature fixtures and storage coolers account for roughly 70 to 75 percent of the total store refrigeration load with open, multi-deck cases contributing about 3/4 of that fraction. Consequently, the focus of this investigation has tilted toward the open, vertical, multi-deck medium temperature case type. Various technologies and control methods are energy efficiency measures (EEMs) that could be applied to display cases and result in the reduction of the refrigeration load and of the energy consumption of the supermarket refrigeration system. An extensive evaluation of the EEMs was conducted in order to select those that met the following criteria: (1) Near-term implementation--All EEMs considered could be implemented with existing refrigeration hardware and technology. (2) Potential for energy-efficiency improvements--Energy savings and/or refrigeration load reduction must be obtained by the implementation of the EEM. (3) Enhancement of the ability to maintain target product temperature--Proper operation of the display case and maintenance of the stored product temperature could not be compromised by the use of the EEM. The energy impact of a number of viable display case EEMs was quantified by performing whole building hourly simulations. A special version of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE-2.3) program was used to develop a model of a supermarket. The model was then calibrated using available end-use monitored data to increase confidence in simulation results.

Walker, D.H.

2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

Energy Efficiency in Western Utility Resource Plans: Impacts on Regional Resources Assessment and Support for WGA Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goal.6 Figure 2-2. Accounting for Energy Efficiency2-3. Accounting for Energy Efficiency Resources in LoadFigure 3-1. Plan Energy Efficiency Program Effects: Annual

Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; Schlegal, Jeff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Figure 1. Rapidly wilting black walnut in the final stage of thousand cankers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Chihuahua, Mexico (Figure 3). This range appears to coincide largely with the distribution of Arizona walnut

180

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Notes & Figure Data Sources Reference Notes & Figure Data Sources Highlights Figure 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2040: History: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Statistics database (as of November 2012), www.eia.gov/ies. Projections: EIA, World Energy Projection System Plus (2013). Figure 2. World energy consumption by fuel type, 1990-2040: History: EIA, International Energy Statistics database (as of November 2012), www.eia.gov/ies. Projections: EIA, World Energy Projection System Plus (2013). Figure 3. World petroleum and other liquids production, 2010-2040: History: EIA, Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Biofuels Analysis. Projections EIA, Generate World Oil Balance application (2013). Figure 4. World increase in natural gas production by country grouping,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BRAHMS (Broad Range Hadron Magnetic Spectrometer) Figures and Data Archive  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The BRAHMS experiment was designed to measure charged hadrons over a wide range of rapidity and transverse momentum to study the reaction mechanisms of the relativistic heavy ion reactions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the properties of the highly excited nuclear matter formed in these reactions. The experiment took its first data during the RHIC 2000 year run and completed data taking in June 2006. The BRAHMS archive makes publications available and also makes data and figures from those publications available as separate items. See also the complete list of publications, multimedia presentations, and related papers at http://www4.rcf.bnl.gov/brahms/WWW/publications.html

182

Evaluation Framework and Tools for Distributed Energy Resources  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2002 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) forecast anticipates the need for 375 MW of new generating capacity (or about one new power plant) per week for the next 20 years, most of which is forecast to be fueled by natural gas. The Distributed Energy and Electric Reliability Program (DEER) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has set a national goal for DER to capture 20 percent of new electric generation capacity additions by 2020 (Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2000). Cumulatively, this amounts to about 40 GW of DER capacity additions from 2000-2020. Figure ES-1 below compares the EIA forecast and DEER's assumed goal for new DER by 2020 while applying the same definition of DER to both. This figure illustrates that the EIA forecast is consistent with the overall DEER DER goal. For the purposes of this study, Berkeley Lab needed a target level of small-scale DER penetration upon which to hinge consideration of benefits and costs. Because the AEO2002 forecasted only 3.1 GW of cumulative additions from small-scale DER in the residential and commercial sectors, another approach was needed to estimate the small-scale DER target. The focus here is on small-scale DER technologies under 500 kW. The technology size limit is somewhat arbitrary, but the key results of interest are marginal additional costs and benefits around an assumed level of penetration that existing programs might achieve. Berkeley Lab assumes that small-scale DER has the same growth potential as large scale DER in AEO2002, about 38 GW. This assumption makes the small-scale goal equivalent to 380,000 DER units of average size 100 kW. This report lays out a framework whereby the consequences of meeting this goal might be estimated and tallied up. The framework is built around a list of major benefits and a set of tools that might be applied to estimate them. This study lists some of the major effects of an emerging paradigm shift away from central station power and towards a more dispersed and heterogeneous power system. Seventeen societal effects of small-scale DER are briefly summarized. Each effect is rated as high, medium or low, on three different scales that will help determine the optimal social investment. The three scales are: the magnitude of the economic benefit; the likelihood that the benefit can be monetized in efficient markets, i.e. internalized; and how tractable it might be to quantify each benefit analytically. Some of the modeling tools that may be used to estimate these effects are described in the Appendix.

Gumerman, Etan Z.; Bharvirkar, Ranjit R.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Marnay , Chris

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Portugal Egypt Figure 2. Natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Portugal Egypt Figure 2. Natural gas supply and disposition in the United States, 2012 (trillion cubic feet) Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Gross Withdrawals From Gas and Oil Wells Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented/Flared Reservoir Repressuring Production Dry Gas Imports Canada Trinidad/Tobago Natural Gas Storage Facilities Exports Japan Canada Mexico Additions Withdrawals Gas Industry Use Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power 29.5 0.8 0.2 3.3 2.963 0.112 0.620 0.971 0.014 24.1 1.3 2.9 2.8 2.5 2.9 7.2 0.03 9.1 0.003 Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition"; Form EIA-895, "Annual Quantity and

184

Green queue : a framework for selecting energy optimal DVFS congurations in large scale MPI applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

settings . . . . . Green Queue Energy Savings with VariousApplication Figure 4.3: Green Queue Energy Savings withBlind Scaling Relative Energy Green Queue Relative Delay

Peraza, Joshua

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21 Figure 13: Primary Energy Consumption byEffects on Industry Primary Energy Consumption, 1995-share of total primary energy consumption surged even higher

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Advancing the Frontiers in Nanocatalysis, Biointerfaces, and Renewable Energy Conversion by Innovations of Surface Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 21. (a) Schemes of energy conversion from exothermicand Renewable Energy Conversion by Innovations of Surfacebiointerfaces, and renewable energy conversion chemistry. In

Somorjai, G.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - action potential energy Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the design of a practical energy ... Source: California Energy Commission Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization 3 FIGURE 12. To create a non-equilibrium a...

188

Adjoint-Based Implicit Uncertainty Analysis for Figures of Merit in a Laser Inertial Fusion Engine  

SciTech Connect

A primary purpose of computational models is to inform design decisions and, in order to make those decisions reliably, the confidence in the results of such models must be estimated. Monte Carlo neutron transport models are common tools for reactor designers. These types of models contain several sources of uncertainty that propagate onto the model predictions. Two uncertainties worthy of note are (1) experimental and evaluation uncertainties of nuclear data that inform all neutron transport models and (2) statistical counting precision, which all results of a Monte Carlo codes contain. Adjoint-based implicit uncertainty analyses allow for the consideration of any number of uncertain input quantities and their effects upon the confidence of figures of merit with only a handful of forward and adjoint transport calculations. When considering a rich set of uncertain inputs, adjoint-based methods remain hundreds of times more computationally efficient than Direct Monte-Carlo methods. The LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) engine is a concept being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Various options exist for the LIFE blanket, depending on the mission of the design. The depleted uranium hybrid LIFE blanket design strives to close the fission fuel cycle without enrichment or reprocessing, while simultaneously achieving high discharge burnups with reduced proliferation concerns. Neutron transport results that are central to the operation of the design are tritium production for fusion fuel, fission of fissile isotopes for energy multiplication, and production of fissile isotopes for sustained power. In previous work, explicit cross-sectional uncertainty analyses were performed for reaction rates related to the figures of merit for the depleted uranium hybrid LIFE blanket. Counting precision was also quantified for both the figures of merit themselves and the cross-sectional uncertainty estimates to gauge the validity of the analysis. All cross-sectional uncertainties were small (0.1-0.8%), bounded counting uncertainties, and were precise with regard to counting precision. Adjoint/importance distributions were generated for the same reaction rates. The current work leverages those adjoint distributions to transition from explicit sensitivities, in which the neutron flux is constrained, to implicit sensitivities, in which the neutron flux responds to input perturbations. This treatment vastly expands the set of data that contribute to uncertainties to produce larger, more physically accurate uncertainty estimates.

Seifried, J E; Fratoni, M; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Peterson, P F; Powers, J J; Taylor, J M

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

189

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and GDP Per Capita, with China 2050 Scenarios Carbon EmissionsEnergy and GDP Per Capita, with China 2050 Scenarios .. 37 Figure 39 Carbon Emissions

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate electricity and industrial sector fuel markets in emerging Asia. Figure 50. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1970-2025 (Billion Short Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 51. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2002, 2015, and 2025 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 52. World Recoverable Coal Reserves. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) reference case, world

191

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Energy and Economic Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1: World Energy and Economic Outlook 1: World Energy and Economic Outlook The IEO2006 projections indicate continued growth in world energy use, despite world oil prices that are 35 percent higher in 2025 than projected in last year’s outlook. Energy resources are thought to be adequate to support the growth expected through 2030. Figure 7. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 8. World Marketed Energy Use: OECD and Non-OECD, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Table 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Country Grouping, 2003-2030 (Quadrillion Btu) Printer friendly version Region 2003 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Average Annual Percent Change, 2003-2030

192

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2007 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. Average Annual Growth in Delivered Energy Consumption by Region and End-use Sector, 2004-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. Industrial Sector Delivered Energy Consumption by Region, 2004-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

193

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

63 Figure 59. Carbon Intensity of Power Generation,economic energy and carbon intensity by setting short andproduction) and carbon intensity (CO 2 emissions per unit of

Fridley, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2004, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide were greater than OECD emissions for the first time. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 57 percent. Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center on 202-585-8800. Figure Data Figure 78. World energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is the most abundant anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse

195

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2009 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 44 percent from 2006 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 73 percent, compared with an increase of 15 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2006-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. World Oil Prices in the IEO2009 and IEO2008 Reference Cases, 1980-2030 (2007 dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

196

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008 - Highlights Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2008 Highlights World marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 50 percent from 2005 to 2030.Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 85 percent,compared with an increase of 19 percent in the OECD countries. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption, 2005-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 2. World Marketed Energy Use by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 3. World Oil Prices in Two Cases, 1980-2030 (nominal dollars per barrel). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

197

figures for inverse problem paper in 3d - Department of Mathematics ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIGURES FOR INVERSE PROBLEM PAPER IN 3D. JUAN E. SANTOS. Departamento de Geof sica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias Astron omicas y Geof sicas,.

santos

1910-20-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2010 Natural Gas In the IEO2010 Reference case, natural gas consumption in non-OECD countries grows about three times as fast as in OECD countries. Non-OECD production increases account for 89 percent of the growth in world production from 2007 to 2035. Figure 36. World natural gas consumption 2007-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 37. Change in World natural gas production by region, 2007-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 38. Natural gas consumption in North America by country, 2007-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 39. Natural gas consumption in OECD Europe by end-use sector 2007-2035. Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo

199

Benefits and Costs of Aggressive Energy Efficiency Programs and the Impacts of Alternative Sources of Funding: Case Study of Massachusetts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 7. Effects of Alternative Energy Efficiency Businessand Benefits of Alternative Energy Efficiency Portfolios (and Benefits of Alternative Energy Efficiency Portfolios (

Cappers, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-World Energy Demand and Economic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid Fuels Liquid Fuels International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 2 - Liquid Fuels World liquids consumption in the IEO2009 reference case increases from 85 million barrels per day in 2006 to 107 million barrels per day in 2030. Unconventional liquids, at 13.4 million barrels per day, make up 12.6 percent of total liquids production in 2030. Figure 25. World Liquids Consumption by Region and Country Group, 2006 and 2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 26. World Liquids Supply in Three Cases, 2006 and 2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 27. World Production of Unconventional Liquid Fuels, 2006-2030 (million barrels per day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

International Energy Outlook - Electicity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2004 Electricity Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2004 projections. Developing nations in Asia are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Figure 60. World Net Electricity Consumptin, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 61. World Net Electricity Consumptin by Region, 2001-2025. Need help, call the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data World net electricity consumption is expected nearly double to over the next two decades, according to the International Energy Outlook 2004 (IEO2004) reference case forecast. Total demand for electricity is projected to increase on average by 2.3 percent per year, from 13,290

202

California's Energy Future - The View to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conversion to the needed energy mix. Figure 8 shows thefraction of the State’s energy mix. The use of fossil fuelleast 33% renewable energy in the mix. The renewables case

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 6: Electricity World electricity consumption doubles in the IEO2006 projections from 2003 to 2030. Non-OECD countries account for 71 percent of the projected growth, and OECD countries account for 29 percent. Figure 55. World Net Electricity Consumption, 2003-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 56. World Net Electricity Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 57. Net Electricity Consumption in OECD Countries by End-Use Sector, 2003, 2015, and 2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

204

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 97. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2006 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 98. Carbon dioxide emissions, 1990-2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rising Energy Consumption Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Without capture and sequestration, CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to the carbon content of the fuel. Coal has the highest carbon content and natural gas the lowest, with petroleum in between. In the AEO2008 reference case, the shares of these fuels change

205

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 7: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could affect patterns of energy use around the world and alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Figure 65. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 66. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the

206

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2005 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected to increase by nearly 70 percent between 2002 and 2025, with the most robust growth in demand expected among the emerging economies. Figure 34. World Natural Gas Consumption, 1980-2025 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center on 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 35. Natural Gas Consumption by Region, 1980-2025 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 36. Increase in Natural Gas Consumption by Region and Country, 2002-2025. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data

207

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 78. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 79. U.S. coal production in four cases, 2007, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 80. Average minemouth coal prices by regionCoal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Total Coal Production Increases at a Slower Rate Than in the Past In the AEO2009 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at both new and existing plants and the startup of several CTL

208

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Electricity Chapter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 6 - Electricity World electricity generation nearly doubles in the IEO2007 reference case from 2004 to 2030. In 2030, generation in the non-OECD countries is projected to exceed generation in the OECD countries by 30 percent. Figure Data Figure 61. World Electric Power Generation by Region, 1980-2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 62. Average Annual Change in End-Use Sector Electricity Demand, 2004-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 63. World Electricity Generation by Fuel, 2004 and 2030 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800.

209

Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 1 4 3 48 23 30 10 Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards Numbers represent active grants as at 1 October 2013 Figure 2. Technology Transfer award Transfer funding division. In the 2012/13 financial year Technology Transfer approved awards worth a total

Rambaut, Andrew

210

23 Figure 3.1: Color transition from purple/maroon argillites into bright red  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;23 Figure 3.1: Color transition from purple/maroon argillites into bright red argillites. This transition weathering, possibly sideritic layer in the lower part of the picture. The fine grained overlying red Island Section, lower maroon and purple part in red unit (level: 9 meter; Figure 3.3); south shore Gull

Kidd, William S. F.

211

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Energy Demand Figure 42. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1970-2025 (index, 1970 = 1). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Average Energy Use per Person Increases in the Forecast Energy intensity, as measured by energy use per 2000 dollar of GDP, is projected to decline at an average annual rate of 1.6 percent, with efficiency gains and structural shifts in the economy offsetting growth in demand for energy services (Figure 42). The projected rate of decline falls between the average rate of 2.3 percent from 1970 through 1986, when energy prices increased in real terms, and the 0.7-percent rate from 1986 through

212

Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy newsroomassetsimagesenergy-icon.png Energy Research into alternative forms of energy, and improving and securing the power grid, is a major national security...

213

Science Highlight January 2011 Figure 1: Architecture of an organic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Organic Solar Cells As worldwide energy consumption continues to increase, there is a pressing need processable organic solar photovoltaics (OPVs) shows promise as one route for providing inexpensive, flexible the molecular arrangement of the materials is critical for the design of more efficient solar cell devices

Wechsler, Risa H.

214

exp. Biol. (1976), 65, 483-506 With 14 figures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF SPIDER'S SILK AND THEIR ROLE IN THE DESIGN OF ORB-WEBS BY MARK DENNY* Department of Zoology, Duke physical properties of the viscid and frame silks of the orb-webs built by the spider Araneus sericatus (Cl; and allow the orb-web to function as an aerial filter with a minimum expen- diture of material and energy

Denny, Mark

215

Energy Demands and Efficiency Strategies in Data Center Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iv Chapter 5: National energy demand and potential energyAs Figure 1-2 shows, HVAC energy demand is comparable to thefor reducing this high energy demand reaches beyond

Shehabi, Arman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

ENERGY ANALYSIS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDIES Forecas Energy Demand for Hawaii H. Rudernan and P.summarized in Figure 1, The Hawaii Energy Demand ForecastingModel provided energy demand projections for each of the

Authors, Various

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2008 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 65 percent and international coal trade increases by 53 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2005 to 29 percent in 2030. Figure 46. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 47. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 48. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

218

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2009 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 49 percent from 2006 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2006 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 42. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 43. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 44. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

219

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 5 - Electricity World electricity generation nearly doubles in the IEO2008 reference case from 2005 to 2030. In 2030, generation in the non-OECD countries is projected to exceed generation in the OECD countries by 46 percent. Figure 52. Growth in World Electric Power Generation and Total Energy Consumption and Total Energy Consumption, 1990-2030 (Index, 1990 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 53. World Net Electric Power Generation, 1990-2030 (Trillion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 34. World Electricity Generation by Fuel, 2005-2030 (Trillion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

220

Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement fo the Designation of Energy Corridors in the 11 Western States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WWEC PEIS ES-1 October 2007 WWEC PEIS ES-1 October 2007 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ES.1 WHY ARE FEDERAL AGENCIES PROPOSING TO DESIGNATE ENERGYCORRIDORS IN THE WEST? On August 8, 2005, the President signed into law the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). In Subtitle F of EPAct, Congress set forth various provisions that would change the way certain federal agencies 1 (Agencies) coordinated to authorize the use of land for a variety of energy- related purposes. Section 368 of EPAct requires, among other things, the designation of energy corridors on federal lands in 11 western states 2 and the establishment of procedures to ensure that additional corridors are identified and designated as necessary and to expedite applications to construct or modify oil, gas, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Consumers Are Enjoying Low Oil Prices (Figure 1)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES MARCH 10, 1999 Summary of Jay Hakes Testimony on Exxon-Mobil Merger The major oil companies are very different companies today than they were at the time of the Arab Oil Embargo. Following the nationalization of crude-producing assets and the subsequent rise of state-owned oil companies to run and enhance those assets, major oil companies shrank. In 1972, had mergers occurred between BP and Amoco and Exxon and Mobil, the two resulting organizations would have controlled almost 28 percent of world production. Today the combined production of these four organizations accounts for less than 7 percent of production. Exxon and Mobil account for less than 4 percent. If Exxon and Mobil combine, EIA data show several regions of large overlap.

222

An analysis of maximum residential energy-efficiency in hot and humid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Day in Quick and Delayed Modes........................................................................................................73 Figure 12: Effect of Building Configuration on Energy Savings from (a) Roof Insulation, (b) Roof Absorptance..., and (c) Roof Emissivity....................................75 Figure 13: Effect of Roof Insulation on Energy Savings from (a) Building Configuration, (b) Roof Absorptance, and (c) Roof Emissivity..............................76 Figure 14: Effect...

Malhotra, Mini

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

223

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 9: Per Capita Carbon Emissions for Residential Energy9: Per Capita Carbon Emissions for Residential Energy Useenergy content for each fuel, the estimated per capita carbon emissions

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A U.S. and China Regional Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy usage intensity for residential and commercial buildingscommercial and residential prototype buildings [15]. Figures 10 and 11 show the energy usage

Feng, Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Multiple-Filled Skutterudites: High Thermoelectric Figure of Merit through Separately Optimizing Electrical and Thermal Transports  

SciTech Connect

Skutterudites CoSb{sub 3} with multiple cofillers Ba, La, and Yb were synthesized and very high thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = 1.7 at 850 K was realized. X-ray diffraction of the densified multiple-filled bulk samples reveals all samples are phase pure. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirm that multiple guest fillers occupy the nanoscale-cages in the skutterudites. The fillers are further shown to be uniformly distributed and the Co-Sb skutterudite framework is virtually unperturbed from atomic scale to a few micrometers. Our results firmly show that high power factors can be realized by adjusting the total filling fraction of fillers with different charge states to reach the optimum carrier density, at the same time, lattice thermal conductivity can also be significantly reduced, to values near the glass limit of these materials, through combining filler species of different rattling frequencies to achieve broad-frequency phonon scattering. Therefore, partially filled skutterudites with multiple fillers of different chemical nature render unique structural characteristics for optimizing electrical and thermal transports in a relatively independent way, leading to continually enhanced ZT values from single- to double-, and finally to multiple-filled skutterudites. The idea of combining multiple fillers with different charge states and rattling frequencies for performance optimization is also expected to be valid for other caged TE compounds.

Zhang, Weiqing [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yang, Jiong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Yang, Jihui [General Motors Corporation; Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Salvador, James R. [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Shi, Xun [General Motors Corporation-R& D; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Cho, Jung Y [GM R& D and Planning, Warren, Michigan; Bai, Shengqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic29 Figure 9. Sensitivity to Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy ­ Page 1 Argonne greenhouse gas emissions. In terms of key energy and environmental benefits, cornstarch ethanol comes out. This figure illustrates the energy inputs used to produce and deliver a million British Thermal Units (Btu

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

228

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 5 - Electricity World electricity generation increases by 77 percent from 2006 to 2030 in the IEO2009 reference case. The non-OECD countries are projected to account for 58 percent of world electricity use in 2030 Figure 48. Growth in World Electric Power Generation and Total Energy Consumption, 1990-2030 (Index, 1990 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 49. World Net Electric Power Generation, 1980-2030 (Trillion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 50. Non-OECD Net Electricity Generation by Region, 1980-2030 (Trillion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

229

Plasmonic Figures of Merit in a Doped Graphene Sheet | MIT-Harvard...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plasmonic Figures of Merit in a Doped Graphene Sheet May 15, 2014 at 2pm36-428 Marco Polini NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR and Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa MarcoPolini...

230

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 8 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2006, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 14 percent. In 2030, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 77 percent. Figure 80. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2006-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 81. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 82. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel in IEO2008 and IEO2009, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (billion metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

231

ASES Solar 2003 Americas Secure Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Many of these resources required electrical energy to preserve food, communicate, provide health care and improve human comfort. Figure 1: Temporary PV powered medical clinic in...

232

Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy ... “Scientific Challenges in Sustainable Energy Technology,” by Nathan S. Lewis of the California Institute of Technology, summarizes data on energy resources and analyses the implications for human society. ... ConfChem Conference on Educating the Next Generation: Green and Sustainable Chemistry—Solar Energy: A Chemistry Course on Sustainability for General Science Education and Quantitative Reasoning ...

John W. Moore

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A Framework for Comparative Assessments of Energy Efficiency Policy Measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2: Example of an energy costs trade-off chart (relative0.95 Gov 0.98 Figure 3: Energy costs trade-off chart (valuespublic sector energy-efficiency programs. A trade-off chart

Blum, Helcio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Energy Use in China: Sectoral Trends and Future Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Fuel (with biomass) Primary Energy Consumption (EJ) RuralEnd-use (without biomass) Commercial Energy Use by Fuel andfor 9% of primary energy excluding biomass fuels. Figure 10

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Data Network Equipment Energy Use and Savings Potential in Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Premises Equip. Total Energy Power (W) Port/Device Table 2.Premises Equip. Total Energy Power (W) Port/Device Figure 2:off individual ports and saving energy. Redesigning the

Lanzisera, Steven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 3 - Natural Gas In the IEO2009 reference case, natural gas consumption in the non-OECD countries grows more than twice as fast as in the OECD countries. Production increases in the non-OECD region account for more than 80 percent of the growth in world production from 2006 to 2030. Figure 33. World Natural Gas Consumption, 1980-2030 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 34. Natural Gas Consumption in North America by Country and Sector, 2006-2030 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 35. Natural Gas Consumption in OECD Asia by Country and Sector, 2006 and 2030 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

237

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Overview World net electricity generation increases by 93 percent in the IEO2013 Reference case, from 20.2 trillion kilowatthours in 2010 to 39.0 trillion kilowatthours in 2040 (Table 13). Electricity supplies an increasing share of the world's total energy demand and is the world's fastest-growing form of delivered energy (Figure 80). World electricity delivered to end users rises by 2.2 percent per year from 2010 to 2040, as compared with average growth of 1.4 percent per year for all delivered energy sources. Figure 80. Growth in world total electricity generation and total delivered energy consumption,1990-2040 figure data Figure 81. OECD and non-OECD net electricity generation, 1990-2040 figure data In general, projected growth in OECD countries, where electricity markets

238

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 3 - Natural Gas In the IEO2008 reference case, natural gas consumption in the non-OECD countries grows more than twice as fast as in the OECD countries. Production increases in the non-OECD region account for more than 90 percent of the growth in world production from 2005 to 2030. Figure 35. World Natural Gas Consumption, 1980-2030 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 36. Natural Gas Consumption in North America by Country, 2005-2030 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 37. Natural Gas Consumption in OECD Europe, 2005-2030 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

239

Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the level defined for a passive house in Germany (see FigureMinerge Germany Standard Passive House Definition Figure 15.low energy buildings or passive houses. Passive housing is

Levine, Mark D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Trexler Climate Energy Services TC ES | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trexler Climate Energy Services TC ES Trexler Climate Energy Services TC ES Jump to: navigation, search Name Trexler Climate + Energy Services (TC + ES) Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97214 Sector Services Product Trexler Climate + Energy Services was aquired by EcoSecurities in February 2007 and merged with their consulting division to form EcoSecurities Global Consulting Services. References Trexler Climate + Energy Services (TC + ES)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Trexler Climate + Energy Services (TC + ES) is a company located in Portland, Oregon . References ↑ "Trexler Climate + Energy Services (TC + ES)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Trexler_Climate_Energy_Services_TC_ES&oldid=352388

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Rhaglen Ynni Gwynt Wind Energy Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rhaglen Ynni Gwynt Wind Energy Programme Rhaglen Ynni Gwynt Wind Energy Programme Calculations supporting indicative figures used for the Wind Energy Programme Wind Energy (page) The energy to make,000,000 = 162.73 Therefore 4.5kWh/d/p = approximately 163 cups of tea per day per person Wind Energy Programme

242

Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 76. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic Table 3. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 4. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 5. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 6. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central Table 7. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central Table 8. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain Table 9. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Pacific Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity

243

Previewing the 2011 Renewable Energy Data Book | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Previewing the 2011 Renewable Energy Data Book Previewing the 2011 Renewable Energy Data Book Previewing the 2011 Renewable Energy Data Book November 29, 2012 - 3:45pm Addthis The 2011 Renewable Energy Data book contains facts and figures on the U.S. and global renewable energy industry. The 2011 Renewable Energy Data book contains facts and figures on the U.S. and global renewable energy industry. Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? NREL's annual Renewable Energy Data Book is now available for 2011. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) just released the 2011 edition of their annual report on the state of the renewable energy industry. The report -- which is produced for the Energy Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy -- is a

244

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While solar energy, and energy storage, technologies are Solar Power Cost Outlook . 23  Energy Storage solar  PV, they are favorable.     Figure 12: Percent of Initial Investment Recovered in 30 Years Energy Generation & Storage 

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT FROM THE SALTON TROUGH TO THE HIGH CASCADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1 of the LBL Geothermal Energy A simp1 i f i e dconducted by the LBL Geothermal Energy Group since (XBL 791-OF ENERGY DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY LAWRENCE BERKELEY

Goldstein, N.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

ON THE EQUILIBRIUM FIGURE OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS AND SATELLITES  

SciTech Connect

Many exoplanets have been observed close to their parent stars with orbital periods of a few days. As for the major satellites of the Jovian planets, the figure of these planets is expected to be strongly shaped by tidal forces. However, contrary to solar system satellites, exoplanets may present high values for the obliquity and eccentricity due to planetary perturbations, and may also be captured in spin-orbit resonances different from the synchronous one. Here we give a general formulation of the equilibrium figure of those bodies that makes no particular assumption on the spin and/or orbital configurations. The gravity field coefficients computed here are well suited for describing the figure evolution of a body whose spin and orbit undergo substantial variations in time.

Correia, Alexandre C. M. [Departamento de Fisica, I3N, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rodriguez, Adrian [Insituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, IAG-USP, Rua do Matao 1226, 05508-090 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

ENERGY EFFICIENT INTERNET INFRASTRUCTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. D R A F T October 27, 2010, 11:34pm D R A F T #12;2 ENERGY EFFICIENT INTERNET INFRASTRUCTURE FigureCHAPTER 1 ENERGY EFFICIENT INTERNET INFRASTRUCTURE Weirong Jiang, Ph.D.1 , and Viktor K. Prasanna]. In other words, an IP address may match multiple prefixes, but only the longest D R A F T October 27, 2010

Prasanna, Viktor K.

248

Graffiti (Figural)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004 Middle Egyptian Quarries Project: 2004 field season.flat space available. In quarries and in way-stops onwith further study is the quarry of Abdel Qurna just north

Cruz-Uribe, Eugene

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Energy Demand | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data Figure 55 From AEO2011 report . Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and

250

Energy Conservation at Westinghouse R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sumption of electricity (see Figure 2). The first OPEC oil embargo in 1973 caused Westing house to take a strong position to emphasize con servation of fossil fuels in all of its physical plant facilities including R&D. Figure 3 is a his tory of our... CONSERVATION - ENERGY AUDITS What criteria can we develop to measure achievements and establish goals? Figure 10 shows a range of en ergy requirements for schools in Northern United States of America in t~rms of M Btu/sq.ft./year. Figure 11 compares...

Norelli, P.; Roy, V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Federal, State, local, and foreign governments, EIA survey respondents, and the media. For further information, and for answers to questions on energy statistics, please...

252

Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Energy Express Licensing Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Of Spent Fuel Elements Express Licensing Acid-catalyzed dehydrogenation of amine-boranes Express Licensing Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Express Licensing Aligned Crystalline Semiconducting Film On A Glass Substrate And Method Of Making Express Licensing Anion-Conducting Polymer, Composition, And Membrane Express Licensing Apparatus for Producing Voltage and Current Pulses Express Licensing Biaxially oriented film on flexible polymeric substrate Express Licensing Corrosion Test Cell For Bipolar Plates Express Licensing Device for hydrogen separation and method Negotiable Licensing Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) Express Licensing Energy Efficient Synthesis Of Boranes Express Licensing

253

DOE/EIS-0342; Wanapa Energy Center Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interior Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs December 2004 Wanapa Energy Center Final Environmental Impact Statement Cooperating Agencies: DOE/EIS-0342 i CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.................................................................................................................ES-1 ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS.......................................................................................... AA-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................1-1 1.1 Project Background...........................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Purpose and Need..............................................................................................................1-3

254

2009 Renewable Energy Data Book, August 2010  

SciTech Connect

This Renewable Energy Data Book for 2009 provides facts and figures on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar energy, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, advanced water power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investments.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Rhaglen Ynni Gwynt Wind Energy Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rhaglen Ynni Gwynt Wind Energy Programme 1 WEP Internet Calculations Explained | 20/02/2013 Calculations supporting indicative figures used for the Wind Energy Programme Wind Energy (page) "The energy.2 Therefore 4.5kWh/d/p = approximately 160 cups of tea per day per person. Wind Energy Programme (page

256

Ris Energy Report 5 Photovoltaics 6.3.1 Photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to rise (Figure 16), high cost remains the principal barrier to PV as a large-scale energy producer 16. Efficiencies of research solar cells continue to rise, but cost is still an issue. figure 17 strategy in 2005 and Danish R&D and industry will certainly benefit from this fast-growing renewable energy

257

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity Intensity Figure DataThe energy intensity of the U.S. economy, measured as primary energy use (in Btu) per dollar of GDP (in 2005 dollars), declines by 40 percent from 2009 to 2035 in the AEO2011 Reference case as the result of a continued shift from energy-intensive manufacturing to services, rising energy prices, and the adoption of policies that promote energy efficiency (Figure 8). The Reference case reflects observed historical relationships between energy prices and energy conservation. To the extent that consumer preferences change over the projection, the improvement in energy intensity or energy consumption per capita could be greater or smaller. Figure DataSince 1992, the energy intensity of the U.S. economy has declined on average by 2 percent per year, in large part because the

258

Supplemental Figures Supplemental Figure1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) induced a gradual change in firing patterns, eventually leading to self-sustained tonic discharges (the

Fujisawa, Shigeyoshi

259

Figure 1. Schematic of initial air pump design Design of Air Pump System Using Bond Graph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, is presented in Figure 1. It is a vibratory pump in which an electromagnetic circuit drives a small permanent magnet attached to a pivoted lever that, in turn, drives a rubber bellows pump. The bellows pump has of the cascaded arrangement of three coupled subsystems: the electromagnetic actuator, the lever, and the air

Fernandez, Thomas

260

Figure 1: ATA 42 antenna array at Hat Creek ********ADAPTIVE REAL TIME IMAGING FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY*******  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1: ATA 42 antenna array at Hat Creek ********ADAPTIVE REAL TIME IMAGING FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY --------------------------­ · Astronomers primarily interested in astronomy. ­ Data reduction preoccupies radio astronomy specialists,f,p Bandpass( )f PolCal( )f,p Gains( )s,f,p S Beam Imager Astronomy Solver I2 ( ) )^(^, 2sVpfV - Ă„ Âčkj X Solver

Militzer, Burkhard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Figure 1: Multiplex logarithmic microfluidic perfusion array for probing shear stress effects on stem cells. (A)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1: Multiplex logarithmic microfluidic perfusion array for probing shear stress effects on stem cells. (A) Microfluidic perfusion systems exhibit more defined shear stress profiles and consume. (B) A 1x6 multiplex logarithmic microfluidic array for simultaneous application of shear stress

Voldman, Joel

262

Magnetic Levitation System The following figure shows the cross section of a magnetic levitation (MAGLEV) train.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetic Levitation System The following figure shows the cross section of a magnetic levitation in matched pairs. The magnetic attraction of the vertically paired magnets balances the force of gravity and levitates the vehicle above the guideway. d h z Train Track Magnets Fixed Reference Line Magnets

Hagan, Martin

263

High figure-of-merit nematic mixtures based on totally unsaturated isothiocyanate liquid crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1. Introduction The continuous demand for faster electro-optic response times is the driving force of figure-of-merit were observed at room temperature for the formulated nematic mixtures. Potential phased arrays (OPAs) for laser communications, require faster response times. In order to achieve a fast

Wu, Shin-Tson

264

* All figures are in color on the Coastal Sediments Proceedings DVD. NONUNIFORM SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODELING AT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1783 * All figures are in color on the Coastal Sediments Proceedings DVD. NONUNIFORM SEDIMENT@ncche.olemiss.edu. Abstract: A depth-averaged two-dimensionalnonuniform sediment transport model is applied to the beaches. The sediment transport, bed change and sorting equations are solved simultaneously and implicitly at the same

US Army Corps of Engineers

265

3-19 Urban Design Figure 3-9 Aerial View E Looking West  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

View F Looking North West #12;3-21 Urban Design Figure 3-11 Skyline and Massachusetts Avenue Gateway to careful site planning and transportation demand management. As the area has become more densely developed employed by TranSComm whose primary responsibilities include identifying and responding to transportation

Mohanty, Raj

266

Figure 1: Swimmer in swimming User Experiences with a Virtual Swimming Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accomplished the artistic endeavour by swimming in the pool of the ocean liner, Queen Elizabeth II, travelingFigure 1: Swimmer in swimming apparatus. User Experiences with a Virtual Swimming Interface Exhibit@ece.ubc.ca Abstract. We created an exhibit based on a new locomotion interface for swimming in a virtual reality ocean

British Columbia, University of

267

Enhancement of thermoelectric figure-of-merit by resonant states of aluminium doping in lead selenide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By adding aluminium (Al) into lead selenide (PbSe), we successfully prepared n-type PbSe thermoelectric materials with a figure-of-merit (ZT) of 1.3 at 850 K. Such a high ZT is achieved by a combination of high Seebeck ...

Zhang, Qinyong

268

Figure 1. Recurrent modular network architecture Recurrent modular network architecture for sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Classification of sea ice in MIZ is important for navigation in these regions and for accurate evaluation of heatFigure 1. Recurrent modular network architecture Recurrent modular network architecture for sea ice classification in the Marginal Ice Zone using ERS SAR images Andrey V. Bogdanov1a , Marc Toussaint1b , Stein

Toussaint, Marc

269

SPACESHUTTLEPROGRAMPETITIONFOR HCFC 141b Exemption Allowance Figure 3.2 Cornpleteil ET in Sliruy Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF HCFC 141b BLOWN FOAM Orbiter uses HCFC 141b blown foam to thermally insulate the Main Propulsion System location, necessitating the use of HCFC I-llb blown foam insulation Figures 3 4 and 3.5, respectively. illustrate the umbilical without and with foam insulation 17 #12;SPACESHUTTLEPROGRAMPETITION FOR HCFC 141b

Christian, Eric

270

IN PRINT (Feb. 2012): Am J Psych Word length: 3,983 Tables: 2, Figures: 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in individuals with autism as early as two years of age. Studies using head circumference suggest that brainIN PRINT (Feb. 2012): Am J Psych Word length: 3,983 Tables: 2, Figures: 4 Brain Volume Findings Neurological Institute, McGill University *IBIS Network: The IBIS (Infant Brain Imaging Study) Network

Utah, University of

271

Figure 1. Bipartite network showing how candidate SNPs co-occur across Colombian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1. Bipartite network showing how candidate SNPs co-occur across Colombian patients with one Study of Chronic Metabolic Diseases in Colombians Maria A. Caro MSc1,2 , Bryant Dang BS1 , Gabriel, are associated with key demographic and clinical variables in Colombians with metabolic disease. The results

Bhavnani, Suresh K.

272

NANOTECHNOLOGY 4 NOVEMBER 2004 Figure 1. A `quasi-optical' electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NANOTECHNOLOGY 4 NOVEMBER 2004 Figure 1. A `quasi-optical' electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer. EPR: Progress towards spin-based quantum computing Electron- and/or nuclear-spin-based quantum-dependent recombination (SDR)1-4 is an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique that is potentially useful in spin

Demirel, Melik C.

273

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012

274

Ris Energy Report 6 Energy efficiency policy 1 4 Energy efficiency policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RisĂž Energy Report 6 Energy efficiency policy 1 4 Energy efficiency policy JENs-PETER LYNOV, RIsĂž DTU; sVEND sVENDsEN, HENRIk M. TOMMERUP, bYg DTU; JĂžRN bORUP JENsEN, DANIsH ENERgY AssOCIATION 4.1 Introduction Figure 6 shows how energy efficiency improvements have reduced EU energy intensity during the past

275

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy Intensity Section  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity Intensity Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Intensity Figure 7. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Energy intensity, measured as energy use (in thousand Btu) per dollar of GDP (in 2000 dollars), is projected to decline at an average annual rate of 1.6 percent from 2006 to 2030 in the AEO2008 reference case (Figure 7). Although energy use generally increases as the economy grows, continuing improvement in the energy efficiency of the U.S. economy and a shift to less energy-intensive activities are projected to keep the rate of energy consumption growth lower than the rate of GDP growth. Since 1992, the energy intensity of the U.S. economy has declined on

276

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 5 - Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal’s share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 54. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 55. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2004, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to

277

International Energy Outlook 2006 - World Coal Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Markets Coal Markets International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 5: World Coal Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world coal consumption nearly doubles from 2003 to 2030, with the non-OECD countries accounting for 81 percent of the increase. Coal’s share of total world energy consumption increases from 24 percent in 2003 to 27 percent in 2030. Figure 48. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Billion Short Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 49. Coal Share of World energy Consumption by Sector 2003, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Table 10. World Recoverable Coal Reserves (Billion Short Tons) Printer friendly version

278

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Productions and Imports Productions and Imports figure dataNet imports of energy decline both in absolute terms and as a share of total U.S. energy consumption in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 9). The decline in energy imports reflects increased domestic petroleum and natural gas production, increased use of biofuels (much of which are produced domestically), and demand reductions resulting from rising energy prices and the adoption of new efficiency standards for vehicles. The net import share of total U.S. energy consumption is 9 percent in 2040, compared with 19 percent in 2011 (the share was 30 percent in 2005). Liquids figure dataU.S. production of crude oil in the AEO2013 Reference case increases from 5.7 million bpd in 2011 to 7.5 million bpd in 2019, 13 percent higher than in AEO2012 (Figure 10). Despite a decline after 2019,

279

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 4: Natural Gas Natural gas trails coal as the fastest growing primary energy source in IEO2006. The natural gas share of total world energy consumption increases from 24 percent in 2003 to 26 percent in 2030. Figure 34. World Natural Gas Consumption by Region, 1990-2030 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 35. World Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2003-2030 (Trillion Cubic Feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Consumption of natural gas worldwide increases from 95 trillion cubic feet in 2003 to 182 trillion cubic feet in 2030 in the IEO2006 reference case

280

Alternative Energy Development and China's Energy Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar PV Cell Production and Installed Capacity, 2000-2009 .. 11 Figure 5. Projected Solar PV Capacity by Technology .solar PV generation through 2030 as the embodied energy and material requirements differ significantly amongst the different PV cell technologies (solar PV technologies, including both crystal-silicon and thin-film PV cells,

Zheng, Nina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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281

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE).   12 Sep 2005.  "EERE Consumer's Guide: Sizing and Renewable Energy (EERE), which made the following generation costs.   Figure 16: EERE Forecasted Cost of PV 

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Eliminating Electricity Deficit through Energy Efficiency in India: An Evaluation of Aggregate Economic and Carbon Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Das, (2006) Reducing Electricity Deficit through EnergyLV supply. Figure 12: Electricity Productivity (Commercialan interesting result. The electricity productivity in both

Sathaye, Jayant

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Microsoft Word - NGNP_PCDR_Executive Summary_Rev_1_ser_6-22-2007...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF FIGURES Figure ES-1: Rendering of PBMR DPP - National Strategic Project in South Africa... 14 Figure ES-2: Cutaway of Main Power System for PBMR...

284

China's Energy and Carbon Emissions Outlook to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and analysis based on peak oil models. ” Energy Policy 36 (and analysis based on peak oil models”, Energy Policy, 2008Sharp Peak Figure 71 Coal Demand and Extraction Profiles Oil

Zhou, Nan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Energy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

..) ".. ..) ".. _,; ,' . ' , ,; Depar?.me.nt ,of.' Energy Washington; DC 20585 : . ' , - $$ o"\ ' ~' ,' DEC ?;$ ;y4,,, ~ ' .~ The Honorable John Kalwitz , 200 E. Wells Street Milwaukee, W~isconsin 53202, . . i :. Dear,Mayor 'Kalwitz: " . " Secretary of Energy Hazel' O'Leary has announceha new,approach 'to,openness in " the Department of Ene~rgy (DOE) and its communications with'the public. In -. support of~this initiative, we areipleased to forward the enclosed information related to the Milwaukee Ai.rport site in your jurisdiction that performed work, for DOE orits predecessor agencies. information; use, and retention. ., This information .is provided for your '/ ,' DOE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial:'Action~'Prog&is responsible for ,"'

286

Figure 2: The mercury jet target geometry. The proton beam and mercury jet cross at z=-37.5 cm.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 2: The mercury jet target geometry. The proton beam and mercury jet cross at z=-37.5 cm. Figure 3: The layout of multiple proton beam entry directions relative to mercury jet at z=-75 cm. A PION of a free liquid mercury jet with an intense proton beam. We study the variation of meson production

McDonald, Kirk

287

A novel optimization-based pole-figure inversion method: comparison with WIMV and maximum entropy methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An optimization-based pole-figure inversion method is presented that utilizes the orientation distribution function gradient for conditional control of the solution. The novel pole-figure inversion method, coined the hybrid -seminorm minimization, is empirically shown to be versatile, general and robust in the presence of simulated experimental errors.

Bernier, J.V.

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

288

Facts & figures 2010 The University of Gothenburg is, with its 37,000 students, one of the lar-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost 59 % Premises 13 % Other operating costs 24 % Capital costs 4 % Expenditure in percentages #12 funding and other sources Expenditure SEK 4,785 million of which: > SEK 2,817 million is spent > SEK 190 million is spent on capital costs Finances facts & figures 2010 facts & figures 2010 Personnel

Johannesson, Henrik

289

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 31, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2013 3181 Noise Figure in Near-Infrared Amorphous and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 31, NO. 19, OCTOBER 1, 2013 3181 Noise Figure in Near-Infrared, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--The noise figures (NF) of near-infrared (near-IR) amorphous silicon (a Amorphous and Mid-Infrared Crystalline Silicon Optical Parametric Amplifiers Jichi Ma and Sasan Fathpour

Fathpour, Sasan

290

Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Figure A1. Natural gas processing plant capacity in the United States, 2013 2012 Table A2. Natural gas processing plant capacity, by state, 2013 (million cubic feet per day) Alabama 1,403 Arkansas 24 California 926 Colorado 5,450 Florida 90 Illinois 2,100 Kansas 1,818 Kentucky 240 Louisiana 10,737 Michigan 479 Mississippi 1,123

291

Peak Oil and Fusion Energy Development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If industrial civilization does not figure out how to survive and thrive without cheap fossil energy, then technological civilization will be a short blip in the history of our species. A child born in 1990, if s...

Chang Shuk Kim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT FROM THE SALTON TROUGH TO THE HIGH CASCADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

o r compiling data on geothermal energy and develop- i n g aFigure 1 of the LBL Geothermal Energy A simp1 i f i e dconducted by the LBL Geothermal Energy Group since (XBL 791-

Goldstein, N.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Reconstructing the Energy Landscape of a Distribution from Monte Carlo Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the high energy portion of the tree, we need to generateconnects to lower energy nodes on the tree (Figure 5A) isestimate the tree and reconstruct the energy landscape from

Qing Zhou; Wing Hung Wong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Reconstructing the Energy Landscape of a Distribution from Monte Carlo Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the high energy portion of the tree, we need to generateconnects to lower energy nodes on the tree (Figure 5A) isestimate the tree and reconstruct the energy landscape from

Zhou, Qing; Wong, Wing Hung

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Evidence for energy savings from aerial running in the Svalbard rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nonsensical result. Energy savings during aerial...attributed to elastic storage mechanisms [4...horizontal kinetic energy of the COM. Figure-3...and (d) stride frequency = 1.499 + 1...C. Prefaut 1994 Energy expenditure and cardiorespiratory responses at the transition...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i n g s 2.1 Total Energy Consumption i n Japan's Residentialhouses. 2.1 Total Energy Consumption in Japan's Residentialorder to reduce total energy consumption. Figure 2 suggests

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Interoperable and Secure Communication for Cyber Physical Systems in the Energy Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

station   *  Solar  panel   Figure 3.2: Energy resources incapability Energy resource Specification solar panel 1 5KWh,new types of energy resources like a solar panel or a

Lee, Eun Kyu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.16 EJ in 2009. Primary energy consumption This article wasconsumption (EJ) Primary energy consumption Figure 2. China’that China’s total primary energy consumption will rise

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Policy Strategies and Paths to promote Sustainable Energy Systems - The dynamic Invert Simulation Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strongly dominating the energy mix for heating in Vienna.premium) on the energy carrier mix, CO 2 reductions anddevelopment of the energy carrier mix is presented in Figure

Stadler, Michael; Kranzl, Lukas; Huber, Claus; Haas, Reinhard; Tsioliaridou, Elena

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT FROM THE SALTON TROUGH TO THE HIGH CASCADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1 of the LBL Geothermal Energy A simp1 i f i e dconducted by the LBL Geothermal Energy Group since (XBL 791-Californta 94720 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT FROM The map

Goldstein, N.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT FROM THE SALTON TROUGH TO THE HIGH CASCADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1 of the LBL Geothermal Energy A simp1 i f i e dconducted by the LBL Geothermal Energy Group since (XBL 791-that its ux would not GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT FROM THE

Goldstein, N.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conversion to the needed energy mix. Figure 8 shows thefraction of the State’s energy mix. The use of fossil fuelleast 33% renewable energy in the mix. The renewables case

Yang, Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Trends in Economic Activity AEO2009 Presents Three Views of Economic Growth Figure 27. Average annual growth rates of real GDP, labor force, and productivity in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 28. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 29. Sectoral composition of industrial output growth rates in three cases, 2007-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

304

2013 Renewable Energy Data Book (Book)  

SciTech Connect

This Renewable Energy Data Book for 2013 provides facts and figures on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, global renewable energy development, wind power, solar power, geothermal power, biopower, hydropower, advanced water power, hydrogen, renewable fuels, and clean energy investment.

Esterly, S.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Lower Cost Energy Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ttle b1t about Abbott Laborator1es. Abbott 1s a world-w1de health care company w1th 27 manufactur1ng and research fac111t1es 1n the U.S. and Puerto R1co totall1ng more than 10,000,000 square feet of floor space. The company has also has manufactur1...ch ranks 96th 1n the Furtune 500. .uaan L.UOU.TO_IU OOMESTIC ENEllGY CONSEllVATION ~~ n ~~~ ~~ a M m M ~ ? " YEn F1gure 1: Energy Conservat10n U.S. & Puerto R1co The Abbott energy conservat10n program started 1n 1973 as d1d many compan1es. We...

Maze, M. E.

306

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights International Energy Outlook 2006 Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) reference case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a

307

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity Intensity figure dataPopulation is a key determinant of energy consumption through its influence on demand for travel, housing, consumer goods, and services. U.S. energy use per capita was fairly constant over the 1990 to 2007 period, but it began to fall after 2007. In the AEO2012 Reference case, energy use per capita continues to decline due to the impact of an extended economic recovery and improving energy efficiency. Total U.S. population increases by 25 percent from 2010 to 2035, but energy use grows by only 10 percent, and energy use per capita declines at an annual average rate of 0.5 percent per year from 2010 to 2035 (Figure 9). figure dataFrom 1990 to 2010, energy use per dollar of GDP declined on average by 1.7 percent per year, in large part because of shifts within the

308

Financial Analysis of Incentive Mechanisms to Promote Energy Efficiency: Case Study of a Prototypical Southwest Utility  

SciTech Connect

Many state regulatory commissions and policymakers want utilities to aggressively pursue energy efficiency as a strategy to mitigate demand and energy growth, diversify the resource mix, and provide an alternative to building new, costly generation. However, as the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE 2007) points out, many utilities continue to shy away from aggressively expanding their energy efficiency efforts when their shareholder's fundamental financial interests are placed at risk by doing so. Thus, there is increased interest in developing effective ratemaking and policy approaches that address utility disincentives to pursue energy efficiency or lack of incentives for more aggressive energy efficiency efforts. New regulatory initiatives to promote increased utility energy efficiency efforts also affect the interests of consumers. Ratepayers and their advocates are concerned with issues of fairness, impacts on rates, and total consumer costs. From the perspective of energy efficiency advocates, the quid pro quo for utility shareholder incentives is the obligation to acquire all, or nearly all, achievable cost-effective energy efficiency. A key issue for state regulators and policymakers is how to maximize the cost-effective energy efficiency savings attained while achieving an equitable sharing of benefits, costs and risks among the various stakeholders. In this study, we modeled a prototypical vertically-integrated electric investor-owned utility in the southwestern US that is considering implementing several energy efficiency portfolios. We analyze the impact of these energy efficiency portfolios on utility shareholders and ratepayers as well as the incremental effect on each party when lost fixed cost recovery and/or utility shareholder incentive mechanisms are implemented. A primary goal of our quantitative modeling is to provide regulators and policymakers with an analytic framework and tools that assess the financial impacts of alternative incentive approaches on utility shareholders and customers if energy efficiency is implemented under various utility operating, cost, and supply conditions.We used and adapted a spreadsheet-based financial model (the Benefits Calculator) which was developed originally as a tool to support the National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency (NAPEE). The major steps in our analysis are displayed graphically in Figure ES- 1. Two main inputs are required: (1) characterization of the utility which includes its initial financial and physical market position, a forecast of the utility?s future sales, peak demand, and resource strategy to meet projected growth; and (2) characterization of the Demand-Side Resource (DSR) portfolio ? projected electricity and demand savings, costs and economic lifetime of a portfolio of energy efficiency (and/or demand response) programs that the utility is planning or considering implementing during the analysis period. The Benefits Calculator also estimates total resource costs and benefits of the DSR portfolio using a forecast of avoided capacity and energy costs. The Benefits Calculator then uses inputs provided in the Utility Characterization to produce a ?business-as usual? base case as well as alternative scenarios that include energy efficiency resources, including the corresponding utility financial budgets required in each case. If a decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism are instituted, the Benefits Calculator model readjusts the utility?s revenue requirement and retail rates accordingly. Finally, for each scenario, the Benefits Calculator produces several metrics that provides insights on how energy efficiency resources, decoupling and/or a shareholder incentive mechanism impacts utility shareholders (e.g. overall earnings, return on equity), ratepayers (e.g., average customer bills and rates) and society (e.g. net resource benefits).

Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights Analyses> International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 - Highlights print version PDF Logo World marketed energy consumption increases by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035 in the Reference case. Total energy demand in non-OECD countries increases by 84 percent, compared with an increase of 14 percent in OECD countries. In the IEO2010 Reference case, which does not include prospective legislation or policies, world marketed energy consumption grows by 49 percent from 2007 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 495 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2007 to 590 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 739 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 (quadrillion Btu) Chart data

310

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Electricity consumption nearly doubles in the IEO2005 projection period. The emerging economies of Asia are expected to lead the increase in world electricity use. Figure 58. World Net Electricity Consumption, 2002-2025 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 59. World Net Electricity Consumption by Region, 2002-2025 (Billion Kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data The International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) reference case projects that world net electricity consumption will nearly double over the next two decades.10 Over the forecast period, world electricity demand is projected to grow at an average rate of 2.6 percent per year, from 14,275 billion

311

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 93. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 94. U.S. coal production, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Western Coal Production Continues To Increase Through 2030 In the AEO2008 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 0.3 percent per year from 2006 to 2015, when total production is 24.5 quadrillion Btu. In the absence of restrictions on CO2 emissions, the growth in coal production

312

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Demand Figure 60. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel, 2006 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Residential and Commercial Sectors Dominate Electricity Demand Growth Total electricity sales increase by 29 percent in the AEO2008 reference case, from 3,659 billion kilowatthours in 2006 to 4,705 billion in 2030, at an average rate of 1.1 percent per year. The relatively slow growth follows the historical trend, with the growth rate slowing in each succeeding

313

The significance of energy storage for renewable energy generation and the role of instrumentation and measurement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The significance of energy storage for renewable energy generation and the role of variable renewable energies such as wind and photovoltaic into the electricity grids. Figure 1 displays CEA INES 50, av. du Lac LĂ©man - BP 332 F-73375 Le Bourget-du-Lac Cedex France CEA: Atomic Energy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

Nuclear | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nuclear Nuclear Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 82. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 9. Electricy Generating Capacity Table 96. Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Table 97. Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, nuclear power capacity increases from 101.0 gigawatts in 2009 to 110.5 gigawatts in 2035 (Figure 82), including 3.8 gigawatts of expansion at existing plants and 6.3 gigawatts of new capacity. The new capacity includes completion of a second unit at the Watts Bar site, where construction on a partially completed plant has

315

About the Work of Art In the 1940s, Christian Petersen sculpted a plaster figure of George Washington Carver. He  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

About the Work of Art In the 1940s, Christian Petersen sculpted a plaster figure of George this sculpture in bronze as he originally intended, so he painted the work of art to resemble bronze. The plaster

Mayfield, John

316

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Overview Figure 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2035. figure data In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD nations),2 where demand is driven by strong long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD nations increases by 85 percent in the Reference case, as compared with an increase of 18 percent for the OECD economies.

317

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Overview Figure 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2035. figure data In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD nations),2 where demand is driven by strong long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD nations increases by 85 percent in the Reference case, as compared with an increase of 18 percent for the OECD economies.

318

International Energy Outlook 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Energy Outlook 2011 International Energy Outlook 2011 Release Date: September 19, 2011 | Next Scheduled Release Date: June 10, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2011) No International Energy Outlook will be released in 2012. The next edition of the report is scheduled for release in Spring 2013 Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. In the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not incorporate prospective legislation or policies that might affect energy markets, world marketed energy consumption grows by 53 percent from 2008 to 2035. Total world energy use rises from 505 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2008 to 619 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 770 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for

319

International Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Energy Outlook 2013 International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Highlights International Energy Outlook 2011 cover. The International Energy Outlook 2013 (IEO2013) projects that world energy consumption will grow by 56 percent between 2010 and 2040. Total world energy use rises from 524 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and to 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 1). Much of the growth in energy consumption occurs in countries outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD),2 known as non-OECD, where demand is driven by strong, long-term economic growth. Energy use in non-OECD countries increases by 90 percent; in OECD countries, the increase

320

Handbook on Energy-Aware and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook on Energy-Aware and Green Computing #12;2 #12;List of Figures 1.1 Sources of Energy energy to performance trade-off. . . . . . . . . . 17 1.8 Data center cooling system.11 Working scenario of a DVFS-enabled cluster scheduling 22 1.12 Power consumption curve of an Intel Core i7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market Trends-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Energy Demand Figure 33. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 34. Primary energy use by fuel, 2005-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Average Energy Use per Person Increases Through 2030 The future path of U.S. energy demand will depend on trends in population, economic growth, energy prices, and technology adoption. AEO2007 cases developed to illustrate the uncertainties associated with those factors include low and high economic growth cases, low and high price cases, and

322

Cost-Effecitive Energy Efficiency Measure for Above 2003 and 2009 IECC Code-Compliant Residential and Commercial Buildings in the City of Arlington  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

payback calculations. Figure 1 through Figure 4 present a description of the individual measures and combinations of these measures which achieve 15% savings above the 2003 and 2009 IECC code-compliant house. Annual energy savings, estimated costs..., simple payback, and NOx, SO2, and CO2 emissions reduction are provided. CoA Residential Project, p.iii July 2011 Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University Figure 1. Individual and Combined Energy Efficiency Measures for 2003 IECC Code-Compliant...

Kim, H.; Do, S.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.; Lewis, C.

323

Figure 1: Putatively optimal clusters of N spheres, for N = 4 \\Gamma 10 (figures (a)--(g)) and 13--20 (figures (h)--(o)). For greater clarity the spheres have been reduced in size, contacts between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geometrisches Modell des Atomkerns, Z. Physik 107 (1937), 332--346. [Wi87] L. T. Wille, Minimum­energy configurations of atomic clusters --- new results obtained by simulated annealing, Chem. Phys. Lett. 133 (1987), 169--200. [KN90] R. B. Kearfott and M. Novoa III, Algorithm 681: INTBIS, a portable interval Newton

Sloane, Neil J. A.

324

Well-To-Wheels Energy and Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ii This page intentionally left blank. iii CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ........................................................................................................ xi NOTATION .............................................................................................................................. xiii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................... 1 ES.1 CD Operation of Gasoline PHEVs and BEVs ......................................................... 2 ES.1.1 Petroleum Displacement ............................................................................. 2 ES.1.2 GHG Emissions .......................................................................................... 3

325

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Average Energy Use per Person Increases Through 2030 Figure 31. Energy use per capita and per dollar of gross domestic product, 1980-2030 (index, 1980 = 1). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Population growth is a key determinant of total energy consumption, closely linked to rising demand for housing, services, and travel. Energy consumption per capita, controlling for population growth, shows the combined effect of other factors, such as economic growth and technology improvement. In the AEO2006 reference case, energy consumption per capita grows faster than it has in recent history (Figure 31), as a result of continued growth in disposable income.

326

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Transportation Sector Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Transportation Sector Energy Consumption International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 7 - Transportation Sector Energy Consumption In the IEO2009 reference case, transportation energy use in the non-OECD countries increases by an average of 2.7 percent per year from 2006 to 2030, as compared with an average of 0.3 percent per year for the OECD countries. Figure 69. OECD and Non-OECD Transportation Sector Liquids Consumption, 2006-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure data Over the next 25 years, world demand for liquids fuels is projected to increase more rapidly in the transportation sector than in any other end-use sector. In the IEO2009 reference case, the transportation share of

327

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Overview Figure 72. Growth in world energy generation and total delivered energy consumption, 1990-2035. figure data In the IEO2011 Reference case, electricity supplies an increasing share of the world's total energy demand, and electricity use grows more rapidly than consumption of liquid fuels, natural gas, or coal in all end-use sectors except transportation. From 1990 to 2008, growth in net electricity generation outpaced the growth in delivered energy consumption (3.0 percent per year and 1.8 percent per year, respectively). World demand for electricity increases by 2.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035 and continues to outpace growth in total energy use throughout the projection period (Figure 72). World net electricity generation increases by 84 percent in the Reference

328

Thermoelectric figure of merit of Ag{sub 2}Se with Ag and Se excess  

SciTech Connect

In the temperature range of 100-300 K, the electric ({sigma}) and thermoelectric ({alpha}{sub 0}) properties of Ag{sub 2}Se with an excess of Ag as high as {approx}0.1 at. % and Se as high as {approx}1.0 at. %, respectively, are investigated. From the data on {sigma}, {alpha}{sub 0}, and {chi}{sub tot} (thermal conductivities), the thermoelectric power {alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}{sigma} and the figure of merit Z are calculated. It is found that {alpha}{sub 0}{sup 2}{sigma} and Z attain the peak values at room temperature and the electron concentration n {approx} 6.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}.

Aliev, F. F., E-mail: farzali@physics.ab.az; Jafarov, M. B.; Eminova, V. I. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

High figure-of-merit ultrathin metal transparent electrodes incorporating a conductive grid  

SciTech Connect

It is known that ultrathin (<10 nm) metal films (UTMFs) can achieve high level of optical transparency at the expense of the electrical sheet resistance. In this letter, we propose a design, the incorporation of an ad hoc conductive grid, which can significantly reduce the sheet resistance of UTMF based transparent electrodes, leaving practically unchanged their transparency. The calculated highest figure-of-merit corresponds to a filling factor and a grid spacing-to-linewidth ratio of 0.025 and 39, respectively. To demonstrate the capability of the proposed method the sheet resistance of a continuous 2 nm Ni film (>950 OMEGA/square) is reduced to approx6.5 OMEGA/square when a 100 nm thick Cu grid is deposited on it. The transparency is instead maintained at values exceeding 75%. These results, which can be further improved by making thicker grids, already demonstrate the potential in applications, such as photovoltaic cells, optical detectors and displays.

Ghosh, D. S.; Chen, T. L. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Castelldefels, Barcelona, 08860 Catalunya (Spain); Pruneri, V. [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Castelldefels, Barcelona, 08860 Catalunya (Spain); ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

330

Thermoelectric figure of merit of silicide two-dimensional quantum wells  

SciTech Connect

The calculation was made to estimate thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT, of quantum well structured films made of Transition Metal (TM) silicide, alloys of silicon and germanium, etc. 1-dimensional quantum confinement of charge carrier with quantum well structure were assumed in the calculation model. Transport properties parallel to the layer were estimated as a function of well width. Full account was made of Fermi statistics, and thermal conduction in the barrier layer was taken into account. Results of the calculation indicate that moderate increase in ZT is possible in modulated doping superlattice structure of TM silicides. But ZT decreases with decreasing well width in combinations of silicon and TM silicides. This is due to the larger thermal conductivity of silicon used as a barrier material.

Yamamoto, Z.; Ohta, T. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Consumption World Energy Consumption IEO98 projects that total annual world energy consumption could be 75 percent higher in 2020 than it was in 1995. Demand for all sources of energy except nuclear power is expected to grow over the projection period. Altenative Growth Cases Trends in Energy Intensity Emissions of Greenhouse Gases and the Kyoto Protocol Carbon Emissions Reference Case Trends in Primary Energy Consumption Forecast Comparisons By 2020 the world is projected to consume three times the amount of energy it used 25 years ago (Figure 11). Despite the recent economic crisis in Southeast Asia, which may reduce expected growth of energy consumption in the short term, EIA believes that almost half of the world’s projected energy increment will occur in developing Asia. Indeed, the IEO98 reference

332

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. energy consumption is projected to increase by 71 percent from 2003 to 2030. Fossil fuels continue to supply much of the energy used worldwide, and oil remains the dominant energy source. In the International Energy Outlook 2006 (IEO2006) ref- erence case, world marketed energy consumption increases on average by 2.0 percent per year from 2003 to 2030. Although world oil prices in the reference case, which remain between $47 and $59 per barrel (in real 2004 dollars), dampen the growth in demand for oil, total world energy use continues to increase as a result of robust economic growth. Worldwide, total energy use grows from 421 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2003 to 563 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and 722 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2003 to 2030 is projected for nations outside the Organization

333

Energy Use, Information, and Behavior in Small Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of analyzing and interpreting energy data They used ethnographic interviewing methods to evaluate energy feedback in the form of a Home Energy Report providing raw monthly billing data and weather-corrected annual energy consumption data to households. Like... and restaurants. Range shown is one standard deviation. l..ow energy business' is an average value for the lowest 10% of businesses in the sample. 20a Figure 4. Monthly energy consumption. CENTER FOR ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES Princeton University ENERGY...

Haberl, J. S.; Kempton, W.; Komor, P.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

334

Energy Exchange Process in Two-Longitudinal-Mode Optically Pumped Submillimeter Wave Laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the semi-classical density matrix equations and numerical iteration calculation, the gain coefficient of nine-energy-level NH3 molecular system was figured out. Energy exchange process in two-longitudina...

Xizhang Luo; Ping Zhang; Miaohua Lin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Natural Gas Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Demand Natural Gas Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Natural Gas Demand Figure 72. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 73. Total natural gas consumption, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Fastest Increase in Natural Gas Use Is Expected for the Buildings Sectors In the reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 21.7 trillion cubic feet in 2006 to a peak value of 23.8 trillion cubic feet in 2016, followed by a decline to 22.7 trillion cubic feet in 2030. The natural gas share of total energy consumption drops from 22 percent in 2006

336

Low complexity radio resource management for energy efficient wireless networks   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption has become a major research topic from both environmental and economical perspectives. The telecommunications industry is currently responsible for 0.7% of the total global carbon emissions, a figure ...

Vaca Ramirez, Rodrigo Alberto; Vaca, Rodrigo

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

merica's energy strength lies in merica's energy strength lies in the abundance and diversity of its energy resources, and in its technological leadership in de veloping and efficiently using these resources. Our nation has rich depos- its of coal, oil, and natural gas. The United Energy for a New Century Increasing Domestic Energy Supplies Figure 5-1 U.S. Energy Production: 1970-2000 Production of coal, the nation's most abundant fuel source, ex- ceeded 1 billion tons in 2000. Electricity generation accounted for about 90 percent of U.S. coal consumption last year. ________ Source: U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration. Coal Oil Nuclear 25 20 15 10 5 0 Non-hydro Renewables Hydropower 1970 80 90 00

338

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 It takes 8,900 kilowatt hours to provide electricity to one U.S. house for a year. With the energy saved annually through Infrastructure on Demand, LANL can power 216 homes. | Photo Courtesy of LANL Los Alamos' New Virtualized Data Center Saves Energy and Cash Data centers are responsible for nearly 2% of U.S. electricity consumption -- a price tag of $4.5 billion. Learn how Los Alamos is helping to reduce that price tag. March 4, 2011 An Attic black-figured amphora, currently in the British Museum, of the type that will be studied at SLAC. | Photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen, Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Geek-Up[3.4.2011]: 3,000+ MW and 2,500 Year-Old Greek Pottery Bonneville Power Administration celebrates big windy milestone and

339

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In the coming decades, responses to environmental issues could affect patterns of energy use around the world. Actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Figure 67. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2002-2025 (Gigawatts). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, and as a result world energy use has emerged at the center of the climate change debate. In the International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) reference case, world

340

Energy Perspectives - AER 2004, August 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 25 50 75 100 125 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2004, net imported energy accounted for 29 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 per Chained (2000) Dollar Thousand Btu Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent from 2001 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2003 reference case forecast. In the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case, world energy consumption is projected to increase by 58 percent over a 24-year forecast horizon, from 2001 to 2025. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 404 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2001 to 640 quadrillion Btu in 2025 (Figure 2). As in past editions of this report, the IEO2003 reference case outlook continues to show robust growth in energy consumption among the developing nations of the world (Figure 3). The strongest growth is projected for developing Asia, where demand for energy is expected to more than double over the forecast period. An average annual growth rate of 3 percent is projected for energy use in developing Asia, accounting for nearly 40 percent of the total projected increment in world energy consumption and 69 percent of the increment for the developing world alone.

342

Engineered Geothermal Systems Energy Return On Energy Investment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EGS EROI - 1 EGS EROI - 1 Engineered Geothermal Systems Energy Return On Energy Investment A.J. Mansure, Geothermal Consultant, ajm@q.com Albuquerque, NM 12/10/2012 Key Words: energy, EROI, EGS, efficiency, energy investment, energy return, input energy, energy payback, and net energy. Abstract Energy Return On Investment (EROI) is an important figure of merit for assessing the viability of energy alternatives. Too often comparisons of energy systems use "efficiency" when EROI would be more appropriate. For geothermal electric power generation, EROI is determined by the electricity delivered to the consumer compared to the energy consumed to construct, operate, and decommission the facility. Critical factors in determining the EROI of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS

343

Energy Conservation Through Demand-Side Management (DSM): A Methodology to Characterize Energy Use Among commercial Market Segments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 3% Other, 7% Lighting, 23% Figure 1. Distribution of U.S. commercial building use Figure 2. Distribution of U.S. commercial building by floor area. (EIA, 2006). energy use. (EIA, 2006). Commercial buildings consist of a variety...Wh/sf/yr (Figure 4). Energy use intensity in the southeast U.S. however, was roughly half the U.S. average for all markets (EIA, 2006). 1% 2% 2% 5% 5% 6% 6% 6% 7% 8% 8% 9% 13% 22% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% Vacant Government Religious All Other Service Food...

Grosskopf, K. R.; Oppenheim, P.; Barclay, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Oklahoma Industrial Energy Management Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In this introductory material, various definitions were given (BTU, Therm, etc.), along with the basic laws of thermodYnamics. Then, some conversion figures were given to compare var ious forms of energy. Finally, a brief tutorial on meter reading, demand charge...

Turner, W. C.; Estes, C. B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Risoe Energy Conference Copenhagen, Denmark  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zambia Ltd (CEEEZ) Private Bag E721, Lusaka ZAMBIA Tel/Fax: +260 - 1 - 240267 Email: yamba Cane Molasses/Juice Crop Residues (Bagasse) Sugar/Solids Raw Sugar Industrial Uses Steam & Electricity%) Biomass (0%) Other/Nuclear (1.9%) Figure: SAPP Installed Electricity Capacity for 2000 (Total Energy 45 GW

346

Phase transition enhanced thermoelectric figure-of-merit in copper chalcogenides  

SciTech Connect

While thermoelectric materials can be used for solid state cooling, waste heat recovery, and solar electricity generation, low values of the thermoelectric figure of merit, zT, have led to an efficiency too low for widespread use. Thermoelectric effects are characterized by the Seebeck coefficient or thermopower, which is related to the entropy associated with charge transport. For example, coupling spin entropy with the presence of charge carriers has enabled the enhancement of zT in cobalt oxides. We demonstrate that the coupling of a continuous phase transition to carrier transport in Cu{sub 2}Se over a broad (360–410 K) temperature range results in a dramatic peak in thermopower, an increase in phonon and electron scattering, and a corresponding doubling of zT (to 0.7 at 406 K), and a similar but larger increase over a wider temperature range in the zT of Cu{sub 1.97}Ag{sub .03}Se (almost 1.0 at 400 K). The use of structural entropy for enhanced thermopower could lead to new engineering approaches for thermoelectric materials with high zT and new green applications for thermoelectrics.

Brown, David R.; Day, Tristan; Snyder, G. Jeffrey, E-mail: jsnyder@caltech.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Borup, Kasper A.; Christensen, Sebastian; Iversen, Bo B. [Department of Chemistry and iNano, Aarhus University, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent marketed energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. Total energy demand in the non-OECD countries increases by 95 percent, compared with an increase of 24 percent in the OECD countries. In the IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-world marketed energy consumption is projected to grow by 57 percent over the 2004 to 2030 period. Total world energy use rises from 447 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 qua- drillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 1). Global energy demand grows despite the relatively high world oil and natural gas prices that are projected to persist into the mid-term outlook. The most rapid growth in energy demand from 2004 to 2030 is projected for nations outside

348

Residential Ventilation & Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Residential Ventilation & Energy Figure 1: Annual Average Ventilation Costs of the Current U.S. Single-Family Housing Stock ($/year/house). Infiltration and ventilation in dwellings is conventionally believed to account for one-third to one-half of space conditioning energy. Unfortunately, there is not a great deal of measurement data or analysis to substantiate this assumption. As energy conservation improvements to the thermal envelope continue, the fraction of energy consumed by the conditioning of air may increase. Air-tightening programs, while decreasing energy requirements, have the tendency to decrease ventilation and its associated energy penalty at the possible expense of adequate indoor air quality. Therefore, more energy may be spent on conditioning air.

349

Effects of Federal Residential Energy Conservation Programs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Table 5 i6 about $500 (3). This figure...the reduction in an-1. Increase jacket insulation...energy use is cut from 1.2 to 0.2 percent...consumers through tax rebates, there will be no...References and Notes 1. Quantities are given...ofprimary energy (11,500 Btu's per kilowatt-hour...

Eric Hirst; Janet Carney

1978-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

350

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity Intensity figure dataPopulation is a key determinant of energy consumption through its influence on demand for travel, housing, consumer goods, and services. U.S. energy use per capita was fairly constant from 1990 to 2007, but it began to fall after 2007. In the AEO2013 Reference case, energy use per capita continues to decline due to the impacts of improving energy efficiency (e.g., new appliance and CAFE standards) and changes in the ways energy is used in the U.S. economy. Total U.S. population increases by 29 percent from 2011 to 2040, but energy use grows by only 10 percent, with energy use per capita declining by 15 percent from 2011 to 2040 (Figure 8). From 1990 to 2011, energy use per dollar of GDP declined on average by 1.7 percent per year, in large part because of shifts within the economy from

351

Enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit in edge-disordered zigzag graphene nanoribbons H. Sevinli* and G. Cuniberti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

qualify zigzag graphene nanoribbons as a very promising material for thermoelectric applications. DOI: 10Enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit in edge-disordered zigzag graphene nanoribbons H. Sevinçli* and G. Cuniberti Institute for Materials Science and Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials, Dresden

Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

352

Figure 1. Photolithography techniques are used to create microfluidic flow cells where biofouling can be studied for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1. Photolithography techniques are used to create microfluidic flow cells where biofouling and construct microfluidic flow cells for real-time observation of bacterial attachment and biofouling. He microfluidic devices, and computer multiphysics simulation with COMSOL. The student will also learn to work

Shor, Leslie McCabe

353

Correct figures for Gertz, Stewart, and Khosla, ``An Iconic Programming Language for SensorBased Robots,'' SOAR 1992. interface X  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12; #12; #12; #12; #12; #12; #12; #12; Correct figures for Gertz, Stewart, and Khosla, ``An Iconic S job T actuator interface Z to actuator Z from sensor Y raw data in typed data in from sensor X iconic programming language iconic programs (jobs) graphical interfaces real­time tasks subroutine calls graphical

354

Figures and Data Plots from the Published Papers of the BELLE Experiment at the KEK - B Factory  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This resource provides more than 300 citations to preprints and papers with the figures from each one pulled out separately for easy access and downloading. These are physics publications. Be sure to also see the page of Technical Journal publications at http://belle.kek.jp/belle/bellenim/index.htm and the lists of conference presentations from 2000 through 2009. Belle is a high-energy physics (HEP) experiment that began in 1999 at the KEK B-factory in Japan under the direction of the international Belle Collaboration. The original Letter of Intent from the Collaboration stated their scientific goal as follows:

The laws of nature have a high degree of symmetry between matter and antimatter; violations of this symmetry, the so-called CP violations, are only seen as a small effect in the decays of neutral K mesons. Although experimental evidence for CP violation was first observed 30 years ago, we still do not understand how they occur. In 1973, Kobayashi and Maskawa (KM) noted that CP violation could be accommodated in the Standard Model only if there were at least six quark flavors, twice the number of quark flavors known at that time. The KM model for CP violation is now considered to be an essential part of the Standard Model. In 1980, Sanda and Carter pointed out that the KM model contained the possibility of rather sizable CP violating asymmetries in certain decay modes of the B meson. The subsequent observation of a long b quark lifetime and a large amount of mixing in the neutral B meson system indicated that it would be feasible to carry out decisive tests of the KM model by studying B meson decays. Our collaboration has been formed around the common interest of clarifying the long standing physics puzzle of CP violation. Our goal is to make a definitive test of the Standard ModelÆs predictions for CP violations in the decays of B mesons. [Copied, with editing, from Letter of Intent (KEK-Report94-2, April 1994); see http://belle.kek.jp/bdocs/old_publication.html and open the Letter of Intent file]

That original Belle experiment verified the KM theory, leading to a Nobel prize in 2008 for Kobayashi and Maskawa. Belle II Collaboration is now working on additional discoveries.

None

355

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Overview Figure 65. World coal consumption by region, 1980-2035 figure dataIn the IEO2011 Reference case, which does not include prospective greenhouse gas reduction policies, world coal consumption increases by 50 percent, from 139 quadrillion Btu in 2008 to 209 quadrillion Btu in 2035 (Figure 65). Although world coal consumption increases at an average rate of 1.5 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, the growth rates by region are uneven, with total coal consumption for OECD countries remaining near 2008 levels and coal consumption in non-OECD countries increasing at a pace of 2.1 percent per year. As a result, increased use of coal in non-OECD countries accounts for nearly all the growth in world coal consumption over the period. In 2008, coal accounted for 28 percent of world energy consumption (Figure

356

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Trends in Economic Activity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Trends in Economic Activity Trends in Economic Activity Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Trends in Economic Activity Figure 32. Average annual growth rates fo real GDP, labor force, and productivity, 2006-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 33. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates, 2006-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data AEO2008 Presents Three Views of Economic Growth AEO2008 presents three views of economic growth for the 2006-2030 projection period. Economic growth depends mainly on growth in the labor force and productivity. In the reference case, the labor force grows by an average of 0.7 percent per year; labor productivity in the nonfarm business

357

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Electricity Figure 53. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 54. Electricity generation by fuel, 2005 and 2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Continued Growth in Electricity Use Is Expected in All Sectors Total electricity sales increase by 41 percent in the AEO2007 reference case, from 3,660 billion kilowatthours in 2005 to 5,168 billion kilowatthours in 2030. The largest increase is in the commercial sector (Figure 53), as service industries continue to drive growth. Electricity

358

latch to fire. The tongue-retractor complex (see the figure) prevents the elongating ac-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can load the spring by global longitudinal tension but release its energy by local radial contraction and reduce efficiency. Second, the sliding spring re- leases its elastic energy gradually as con- secutive's law) and, therefore, are greatest at the moment of re- lease. Conventional engineering designs

Broccoli, Anthony J.

359

Studying Thermoelectric Oxides using High-Resolution Scanning Transmission Electron Figure 4: a) Atomic resolution Z-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the environmental impact, and deliver energy continuously, such as thermo-electric power generation, have often been as distinct peaks. The environmental impact of global climate change due to the combustion of fossil fuels is focused on either carbon-based fuels or wind and solar energy, approaches that are portable, minimize

Ben-Arie, Jezekiel

360

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Demand and Supply Natural Gas Demand and Supply Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Natural Gas Demand and Supply Figure 82. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2025 (trillion cubic feet). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Figure 83. Natural gas production by source, 1990-2025 (trillion cubic feet). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Projected Increases in Natural Gas Use Are Led by Electricity Generators In the AEO2005 reference case, total natural gas consumption increases from 22.0 trillion cubic feet in 2003 to 30.7 trillion cubic feet in 2025. In the electric power sector, natural gas consumption increases from 5.0 trillion cubic feet in 2003 to 9.4 trillion cubic feet in 2025 (Figure 82),

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Earth: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth: Energy Resources Earth: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Equivalent URI DBpedia Per Wikipedia, "Earth is the third planet from the Sun, and the largest of the terrestrial planets in the Solar System in terms of diameter, mass and density." Worldwide Alternative Energy Investments The following table summarizes worldwide alternative energy investments over time. All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Earth&oldid=72128" Categories: Stubs Places What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

362

Energy problems in Latin America  

SciTech Connect

Present energy consumption patterns, known reserves of conventional energy sources (oil, gas, coal, and hydroelectricity), and the impact of the oil crisis on the oil-importing countries of Latin America are discussed. New approaches to energy use, including improvements on end-use efficiency, fuel substitutions, nonconventional energy sources, and changes in consumption patterns, are important. Of particular significance are the alcohol program in Brazil and the possibilities for increased use of hydroelectricity. Investments needed to sustain a reasonable increase in production from conventional energy sources up to 1990 are presented. 14 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

Goldemberg, J.

1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

Development of Figure of Merits (FOMs) for Intermediate Coolant Characterization and Selection  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on characterization of several coolant performances in the IHTL. There are lots of choices available for the IHTL coolants; gases, liquid metals, molten salts, and etc. Traditionally, the selection of coolants is highly dependent on engineer's experience and decisions. In this decision, the following parameters are generally considered: melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. The followings are general thermal-hydraulic requirements for the coolant in the IHTL: (1) High heat transfer performance - The IHTL coolant should exhibit high heat transfer performance to achieve high efficiency and economics; (2) Low pumping power - The IHTL coolant requires low pumping power to improve economics through less stringent pump requirements; (3) Low amount of coolant volume - The IHTL coolant requires less coolant volume for better economics; (4) Low amount of structural materials - The IHTL coolant requires less structural material volume for better economics; (5) Low heat loss - The IHTL requires less heat loss for high efficiency; and (6) Low temperature drop - The IHTL should allow less temperature drop for high efficiency. Typically, heat transfer coolants are selected based on various fluid properties such as melting point, vapor pressure, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, viscosity, and coolant chemistry. However, the selection process & results are highly dependent on the engineer's personal experience and skills. In the coolant selection, if a certain coolant shows superior properties with respect to the others, the decision will be very straightforward. However, generally, each coolant material exhibits good characteristics for some properties but poor for the others. Therefore, it will be very useful to have some figures of merits (FOMs), which can represent and quantify various coolant thermal performances in the system of interest. The study summarized in this paper focuses on developing general FOMs for the IHTL coolant selection and shows some estimation results.

Eung Soo Kim; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan Anderson

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Liquid Fuels  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquid Fuels Liquid Fuels International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 2 - Liquid Fuels World liquids consumption increases from 84 million barrels per day in 2005 to 99 million barrels per day in 2030 in the IEO2008 high price case. In the reference case, which reflects a price path that departs significantly from prices prevailing in the first 8 months of 2008, liquids use rises to 113 million barrels per day in 2030. Figure 26. World Liquids Production in the Reference Case, 1990-2030 (Million Barrels Oil Equivalent per Day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 27. World Production of Unconventional Liquid Fuels, 2005-2030 (Million Barrels Oil Equivalent per Day). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

365

Figure 2 Known and speculative Eocene-Oligocene paleovalleys of northern California and western Nevada. Lower portions of channels from Lindgren (1911) and Lawler (1995). Some central Nevada calderas shown.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dayton Kings Beach Reno Sparks Sun Valley Yerington Dutch Hill Mine Bean Hill Spanish Peak TaylorsLake FIGURE 8 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 6 Taylorsville N 0 10 20 0 10 20 miles 30 kilometers CALIFORNIA NEVADA LassenCounty SierraCounty Plumas County Figure 4 Map of known and speculative Eocene-Oligocene paleovalleys

Tingley, Joseph V.

366

Engi 9614: Renewable Energy and Resource Conservation, Assignment #1, Oct. 4th 2013, "Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and compressed air energy systems would be potential systems because in Figure 2 it is shown that they are large of energy storage systems for storing electricity from renewable energy sources in Saudi Arabia" 1. 150 109 better storage systems to make better use of renewable energy options and we need to use renewable energy

Coles, Cynthia

367

Thermal Conductivity Reduction and Thermoelectric Figure of Merit Increase by Embedding Nanoparticles in Crystalline Semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 63.22.+m, 65.80.+n, 66.60.+a The performance of thermoelectric energy conversion devices depends to achieve high carrier mobility. The lowest thermal conduc- tivity in crystalline solids is generally

368

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights World energy consumption is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2002 to 2025. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use in the IEO2005 reference case forecast is expected in the countries with emerging economies. Figure 1. World Marketed Energy Consumptiion by Region, 1970-2025. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) reference case, world marketed energy consumption is projected to increase on average by 2.0 percent per year over the 23-year forecast horizon from 2002 to 2025—slightly lower than the 2.2-percent average annual growth rate from 1970 to 2002. Worldwide, total energy use is projected to grow from 412 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 2002 to 553 quadrillion Btu in

369

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Productions and Imports Productions and Imports Figure DataNet imports of energy meet a major, but declining, share of total U.S. energy demand in the AEO2011 Reference case (Figure 10). The projected growth in energy imports is moderated by increased use of biofuels (much of which are produced domestically), demand reductions resulting from the adoption of new efficiency standards, and rising energy prices. Rising fuel prices also spur domestic energy production across all fuels, particularly natural gas from plentiful shale gas resources, and temper the growth of energy imports. The net import share of total U.S. energy consumption in 2035 is 18 percent, compared with 24 percent in 2009. (The share was 29 percent in 2007, but it dropped considerably during the recession.) Liquids

370

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected In the IEO2007 reference case, total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase by 57 percent from 2004 to 2030. The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. The IEO2007 reference case-which reflects a scenario where current laws and policies remain unchanged throughout the projection period-projects strong growth for worldwide energy demand from 2004 to 2030. Total world consumption of marketed energy is projected to increase from 447 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 559 quadrillion Btu in 2015 and then to 702 quadrillion Btu in 2030-a 57-percent increase over the projection period (Table 1 and Figure 8). The largest projected increase in energy demand is for the non-OECD region. Generally, countries outside the OECD 3 have higher projected economic growth rates and more rapid population growth

371

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Highlights Highlights Growth in energy use is projected worldwide through 2020. The demand for electricity in homes, business, and industry is growing in all regions, as is the demand for petroleum-powered personal transportation. The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) reference case forecast indicates that by 2020, the world will consume three times the energy it consumed 28 years ago in 1970 (Figure 2). Much of the projected growth in energy consumption is attributed to expectations of rapid increases in energy use in the developing world—especially in Asia. Although the economic downturn in Asia that began in mid-1997 and continues into 1998 has lowered expectations for near-term growth in the region, the forecast still suggests that almost half the world’s projected increase in energy

372

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

373

Residential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends In the AEO2011 Reference case, residential energy use per capita declines by 17.0 percent from 2009 to 2035 (Figure 58). Delivered energy use stays relatively constant while population grows by 26.7 percent during the period. Growth in the number of homes and in average square footage leads to increased demand for energy services, which is offset in part by efficiency gains in space heating, water heating, and lighting equipment. Population shifts to warmer and drier climates also reduce energy demand for space heating.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6 quadrillion Btu of delivered energy, or 21 percent of total U.S. energy

374

Energy Flow: A Multimodal `Ready' Indication For Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Flow: A Multimodal `Ready' Indication For Electric Vehicles Abstract The lack of sound and vibration while starting the drive system of an electric vehicle (EV) is one of the major differences the energy level to the driver. With Energy Flow (see Figure 1), we test if there will be a benefit in terms

375

Dark energy model selection with current and future data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......distribution for the dark energy equation-of-state...for a cosmic shear survey with the Euclid probe...primary probes of dark energy, which are weak...using the goal survey parameters, we obtain a dark energy Figure of Merit......

Ivan Debono

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Methods for Detailed Energy Data Collection of Miscellaneous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primary energy consumption in the U.S., with 22% consumed by the residential sector and 18 and electronic loads (MELs) consume about 20% of the primary energy used in U.S. buildings, and this share% by the commercial sector. Figure 1 shows how the #12;4 primary energy use is broken down by end-use in the U

377

Managing R&D Risk in Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the development of solar energy sources was brought to aSource: Venture One Inc. Solar Wind Figure 1: Clean EnergyEnergy Hydrogen Fuel Cells Storage Solar Wind Geothermal n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a Source:

Rausser, Gordon C.; Papineau, Maya

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The energy required to produce materials: constraints on energy-intensity improvements, parameters of demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...data for embodied energy comes from Ashby-[10], for material prices for metals from the...10]. Plastic prices are for year 2011...2009. Figure 7. Energy intensity e versus...Natl Acad. Sci. USA 107, 20 905-20...an environmental history of the twentieth-century...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

11.5 MATLAB Laboratory Experiment on Circuits Consider the electrical circuit presented in Figure 11.18. Assume that all resistors in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11.5 MATLAB Laboratory Experiment on Circuits Consider the electrical circuit presented in Figure analysis, form the matrices j and k and the vector of initial conditions. Use MATLAB to find the currents via MATLAB, using the electrical circuit given in Figure 11.19 and the corresponding formulas

Gajic, Zoran

380

Colored figures Franke & Gaser (2012): Longitudinal changes in individual BrainAGE in healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colored figures Franke & Gaser (2012): Longitudinal changes in individual BrainAGE in healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease Figure 1: Depiction of the BrainAGE concept. A: The model of healthy brain aging is trained with the chronological age and preprocessed structural MRI data

Gaser, Christian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Figure 1. The dataset for the running example is excerpted at left, arranged in the typical manner for MVPA. The boxes at right introduce the dataset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1. The dataset for the running example is excerpted at left, arranged in the typical manner for MVPA. The boxes at right introduce the dataset representation used in later figures. In these boxes the "dataset-wise" scheme, the examples are relabeled prior to conducting the cross- validation, while

382

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand Energy Demand Index (click to jump links) Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Energy Demand in Alternative Technology Cases Annual Growth in Energy Use Is Projected To Continue Net energy delivered to consumers represents only a part of total primary energy consumption. Primary consumption includes energy losses associated with the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity, which are allocated to the end-use sectors (residential, commercial, and industrial) in proportion to each sector’s share of electricity use [103]. Figure 45. Primary and delivered energy consumption, excluding transportation use, 1970-2025 (quadrillion Btu). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

383

California | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 30, 2003 October 30, 2003 EIS-0365: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and to Conduct Public Scoping Meetings and Notice of Floodplain and Wetlands Involvement Baja California Power, Inc., and Sempra Energy Resources September 19, 2003 EIS-0323: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Sacramento Area Voltage Support Project, System Reliability and Voltage Support Improvements, Sierra Nevada Region, Alameda, Contra Costa, Placer, Sacramento, San Joaquin and Sutter Counties, CA September 1, 2003 EIS-0323: Environmental Impact Statement, Figures and Tables Sacramento Area Voltage Support March 31, 2003 EA-1345: Finding of No Significant Impact Cleanup and Closure of the Energy Technology Engineering Center, Oakland,

384

2012 Renewable Energy Data Book  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The 2012 Renewable Energy Data Book is 128 pages of data in tables, figures and charts, and text. It provides a look at resources and usage for wind, solar, geothermal, hydro, hydrogen, and biopower. Developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), it was produced by Rachel Gelman, edited by Mike Meshek, and designed by Stacy Buchanan and Erica Augustine and released in October, 2013. Report number for this data book is DOE/GO-102013-4291.

385

Coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Coal Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 101. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 15. Coal Supply, Disposition and Price Table 21. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - New England Table 22. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic Table 23. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 24. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 25. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 26. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central Table 27. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South

386

International Energy Outlook 1998  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas By 2020, the world’s annual consumption of natural gas is projected to be more than double the 1995 level. Much of the growth is expected to fuel electricity generation worldwide. Reserves Regional Activity Natural gas is expected to be the fastest-growing primary energy source in the world over the next 25 years. In the IEO98 reference case, gas consumption grows by 3.3 percent annually through 2020, as compared with 2.1-percent annual growth for oil and renewables and 2.2 percent for coal. By 2020, the world’s consumption of natural gas is projected to equal 172 trillion cubic feet, more than double the 1995 level (Figure 43). Much of the growth is expected to fuel electricity generation worldwide (Figure 44), but resource availability, cost, and environmental considerations will

387

Direct measurement of thin-film thermoelectric figure of merit Rajeev Singh,1,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conductivity of the thermoelectric material. Self-consistent finite-element simulations of the three. © 2009 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.3094880 Thermoelectric materials are playing application of thermoelectric materials is in direct thermal-to-electrical energy conversion. Because

Bowers, John

388

Reducing the Federal Energy Bill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Reducing the Federal Energy Bill Berkeley Lab's Work with the Federal Energy Management Program It costs billions of dollars and uses more energy than any other entity in the United States. What is it? Answer: the Federal government. In fiscal year 1995, the Federal government spent $8 billion on a net energy consumption of 1.15 quadrillion BTUs. While that may be a lot of energy in absolute terms, the numbers have been improving for years. Compared with fiscal year 1985, the 1995 energy-use figure is down by 22.5%, and the costs are down $2.5 billion. The decline is explained in part by the activities of FEMP (the Federal Energy Management Program) and the efforts of energy-efficiency experts at national laboratories, such as those at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy

389

China Energy Primer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

51 Figure 2-15 LNG Terminals inFigure 5-10 Natural Gas (LNG) Price in Selected Countries (2004-2008) . 131 Figure 5-11 LNG Import Price (2006-

Ni, Chun Chun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Transportation figure data Delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector remains relatively constant at about 27 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 6). Energy consumption by LDVs (including commercial light trucks) declines in the Reference case, from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, due to incorporation of the model year 2017 to 2025 GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs. Despite the projected increase in LDV miles traveled, energy consumption for LDVs further decreases after 2025, to 13.0 quadrillion Btu in 2035, as a result of fuel economy improvements achieved through stock turnover as older, less efficient vehicles are replaced by newer, more fuel-efficient vehicles. Beyond 2035, LDV energy demand begins to level off

391

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World energy demand and economic outlook World energy demand and economic outlook Overview In the IEO2013 Reference case, world energy consumption increases from 524 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 630 quadrillion Btu in 2020 and 820 quadrillion Btu in 2040, a 30-year increase of 56 percent (Figure 12 and Table 1). More than 85 percent of the increase in global energy demand from 2010 to 2040 occurs among the developing nations outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD), driven by strong economic growth and expanding populations. In contrast, OECD member countries are, for the most part, already more mature energy consumers, with slower anticipated economic growth and little or no anticipated population growth.7 Figure 12. World total energy consumption, 1990-2040.

392

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Overview Figure 110. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 1990-2035. figure data Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, energy consumption is at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2011 Reference case, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions increase from 30.2 billion metric tons in 2008 to 35.2 billion metric tons in 2020 and 43.2 billion metric tons in 2035. Much of the growth in emissions is attributed to developing, non-OECD nations that continue to rely heavily on fossil fuels to meet fast-paced growth in energy demand. Non-OECD emissions total 28.9 billion metric tons in 2035, or about 73 percent above the 2008 level. In comparison, OECD emissions

393

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Overview Figure 140. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 1990-2040 figure data Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions-those emissions produced through the combustion of liquid fuels, natural gas, and coal-account for much of the world's anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. As a result, energy consumption is an important component of the global climate change debate. In the IEO2013 Reference case, which does not assume new policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions47

394

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could affect patterns of energy use around the world and alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Anthropogenic (human- caused) emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, and as a result world energy use has emerged at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2006 reference case, world carbon dioxide emissions increase from 25,028 million metric tons in 2003 to 33,663 million metric tons in 2015 and 43,676 million metric tons in 2030 (Figure 65). 14 The Kyoto Protocol, which requires participating "Annex I" countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions collectively to an annual

395

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. energy demand U.S. energy demand In the United States, average energy use per person declines from 2010 to 2035 figure data Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use but also the mix of fuels consumed. Changes in the structure of the economy and in the efficiency of the equipment deployed throughout the economy also have an impact on energy use per capita. The shift in the industrial sector away from energy-intensive manufacturing toward services is one reason for the projected decline in industrial energy intensity (energy use per dollar of GDP), but its impact on energy consumption per capita is less direct (Figure 71). From 1990 to

396

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation sector energy demand Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy in 2040, the same as the level of energy demand in 2011 (Figure 70). The projection of no growth in transportation energy demand differs markedly from the historical trend, which saw 1.1-percent average annual growth from 1975 to 2011 [126]. No growth in transportation energy demand is the result of declining energy use for LDVs, which offsets increased energy use for heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs), aircraft, marine, rail, and pipelines. Energy demand for LDVs declines from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 13.0 quadrillion Btu in 2040, in contrast to 0.9-percent average annual growth

397

Estimate the fraction of the total transported energy (in the form of gasoline) in the Trans-Alaska Pipeline that is consumed in pumping.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimate the fraction of the total transported energy (in the form of gasoline) in the Trans m). So we can toss this out. Now estimate the energy content of gasoline: Many of you tried figuring

Nimmo, Francis

398

Predicting energy usage in a supermarket  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure Plan View of the Store Estimated Contribution of the Electrical Energy Using Systems in the Store. . ??. . 9 Schematic of a Typical Compressor and Refrigeration Case. . . . 13 10. Historical Energy Consumption (kWh) and Demand (k... institutional buildings using site and climate data, building system data and user variations such as occupancy and comfort level. He used the following regression equations to predict energy consumption: Consumption = Po+ Pt*(vl) + P&*(v2) + Pz*(v3) + (4*(v4...

Schrock, Derek Wayne

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Data and Analytics to Inform Energy Retrofit of High Performance Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the energy use intensity (EUI) of the CalSTRS Building inGenerally, the total electricity EUI during this time periodbuilding, annual breakdowns of EUI are shown in Figure 3,

Hong Ph.D., Tianzhen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

How Can China Lighten Up? Urbanization, Industrialization and Energy Demand Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intensity by Fuel MJ per US$ Diesel Coal Electricity Coke67 Figure 57: Coke Energy Intensity Trends, 2000 -enterprises tend to use coke-based blast furnaces more than

Aden, Nathaniel T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2010 213 Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions Pacific East South Central South Atlantic Middle Atlantic New England West South Central West North Central East North Central Mountain AK WA MT WY ID NV UT CO AZ NM TX OK IA KS MO IL IN KY TN MS AL FL GA SC NC WV PA NJ MD DE NY CT VT ME RI MA NH VA WI MI OH NE SD MN ND AR LA OR CA HI Middle Atlantic New England East North Central West North Central Pacific West South Central East South Central South Atlantic Mountain Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. Appendix F Regional Maps Figure F1. United States Census Divisions U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013

402

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Energy Efficiency 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tracking Progress Last updated 10/7/2013 Energy Efficiency 1 Energy Efficiency Figure 1 shows" standard for advanced levels of energy efficiency. The intent of the advanced, voluntary tiers is to provide the industry and marketplace with a framework for differentiating highly energy- efficient

403

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous 9 CBECS Survey Data 2003 | 1999 | 1995 | 1992 | Previous Building Characteristics Consumption & Expenditures Microdata Methodology Building Characteristics Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are presented in the Building Characteristics tables, which include number of buildings and total floorspace for various Building Characteristics, and Consumption and Expenditures tables, which include energy usage figures for major energy sources. Complete sets of RSE tables (What is an RSE?) are also available in PDF format 1999 Summary Tables for all principal building activities Summary Tables For All Principal Building Activities Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Square Feet per Building (thousand) Median Age of Building (years)

404

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. energy demand U.S. energy demand In the United States, average energy use per person declines from 2011 to 2040 figure data Population growth affects energy use through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and economic activity. The effects can be mitigated, however, as the structure and efficiency of the U.S. economy change. In the AEO2013 Reference case, U.S. population increases by 0.9 percent per year from 2011 to 2040; the economy, as measured by GDP, increases at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent; and total energy consumption increases by 0.3 percent per year. As a result, energy intensity, measured both as energy use per person and as energy use per dollar of GDP, declines through the projection period (Figure 52). The decline in energy use per capita is brought about largely by gains in

405

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. energy demand U.S. energy demand In the United States, average energy use per person declines from 2011 to 2040 figure data Population growth affects energy use through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and economic activity. The effects can be mitigated, however, as the structure and efficiency of the U.S. economy change. In the AEO2013 Reference case, U.S. population increases by 0.9 percent per year from 2011 to 2040; the economy, as measured by GDP, increases at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent; and total energy consumption increases by 0.3 percent per year. As a result, energy intensity, measured both as energy use per person and as energy use per dollar of GDP, declines through the projection period (Figure 52). The decline in energy use per capita is brought about largely by gains in

406

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Demand from Market Trends Energy Demand from Market Trends In the United States, average energy use per person declines from 2011 to 2040 figure data Population growth affects energy use through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and economic activity. The effects can be mitigated, however, as the structure and efficiency of the U.S. economy change. In the AEO2013 Reference case, U.S. population increases by 0.9 percent per year from 2011 to 2040; the economy, as measured by GDP, increases at an average annual rate of 2.5 percent; and total energy consumption increases by 0.3 percent per year. As a result, energy intensity, measured both as energy use per person and as energy use per dollar of GDP, declines through the projection period (Figure 52). The decline in energy use per capita is brought about largely by gains in

407

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Carbon Dioxide Emissions Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 110. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2003 and 2025 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Carbon dioxide emissions from energy use are projected to increase on average by 1.5 percent per year from 2003 to 2025, to 8,062 million metric tons (Figure 110). Emissions per capita are projected to grow by 0.7 percent per year. New carbon dioxide mitigation programs, more rapid improvements in technology, or more rapid adoption of voluntary programs could result in lower emissions levels than projected here.

408

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2004 with Projections to 2025 Market Trends - Carbon Dioxide Emissions Index (click to jump links) Carbon Dioxide Emissions Emissions from Electricity Generation Carbon Dioxide Emissions Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 115. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 1990-2025 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Carbon dioxide emissions from energy use are projected to increase on average by 1.5 percent per year from 2002 to 2025, to 8,142 million metric tons (Figure 115). Emissions per capita are projected to grow by 0.7 percent per year from 2002 to 2025. Carbon dioxide emissions in the residential sector, including emissions

409

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Sector Energy Consumption by Sector Transportation figure data Delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector grows from 27.6 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 28.8 quadrillion Btu in 2035 in the AEO2012 Reference case (Figure 7). Energy consumption by light-duty vehicles (LDVs) (including commercial light trucks) initially declines in the Reference case, from 16.5 quadrillion Btu in 2010 to 15.7 quadrillion Btu in 2025, due to projected increases in the fuel economy of highway vehicles. Projected energy consumption for LDVs increases after 2025, to 16.3 quadrillion Btu in 2035. The AEO2012 Reference case projections do not include proposed increases in LDV fuel economy standards-as outlined in the December 2011 EPA and NHTSA Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for 2017 and

410

PlotWatt | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PlotWatt PlotWatt Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: PlotWatt Agency/Company /Organization: PlotWatt Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Mobile Device Website: plotwatt.com/ Country: United States Web Application Link: plotwatt.com/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Green Button Apps Northern America Language: English PlotWatt Screenshot References: PlotWatt[1]PlotWatt FAQ[2] Logo: PlotWatt PlotWatt helps you to save money and energy, instead of getting hit with high energy bills every month. PlotWatt shows you exactly where to save. Overview PlotWatt's algorithms analyze home energy consumption to figure out spending at the appliance level and figure out how to cost effectively save

411

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy Consumption Total primary energy consumption in the AEO2008 reference case increases at an average rate of 0.9 percent per year, from 100.0 quadrillion Btu in 2006 to 123.8 quadrillion Btu in 2030—7.4 quadrillion Btu less than in the AEO2007 reference case. In 2030, the levels of consumption projected for liquid fuels, natural gas, and coal are all lower in the AEO2008 reference case than in the AEO2007 reference case. Among the most important factors resulting in lower total energy demand in the AEO2008 reference case are lower economic growth, higher energy prices, greater use of more efficient appliances, and slower growth in energy-intensive industries. Figure 2. Delivered energy consumption by sector, 1980-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

412

Efficient Energy Utilization in the Industrial Sector - Case Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

require. Recent figures for the distribution of energy indi cate that the industrial sector consumes about 44% of the total with about 2/3 of that for combustion and the remainder for raw materials. This repre sents about 24 quadrillion BTU's per year... 16 years to a possible 70 quqd rillion BTU's. The total energy consumption wi~l continue to grow over the next 16 years as shown in Figure 2. Again, under moderate economic growth, energy gnowth will average about 3 percent per year. For exa...

Davis, S. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Figures of merit for focusing mega-electron-volt ion beams in biomedical imaging and proton beam writing  

SciTech Connect

A figure of merit (FOM) has been developed for focusing quadrupole multiplet lenses for ion micro- and nanobeam systems. The method which is based on measurement of the central peak of the two-dimensional autocorrelation function of an image provides separate FOM for the horizontal and vertical directions. The approach has been tested by comparison with the edge widths obtained by nonlinear fitting the edge widths of a Ni grid and found to be reliable. The FOM has the important advantage for ion beam imaging of biomedical samples that the fluence needed is considerably lower than for edge fitting.

Ren Minqin; Whitlow, Harry J.; Ananda Sagari, A. R.; Kan, Jeroen A. van; Osipowicz, Thomas; Watt, Frank [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FIN-40014 (Finland); Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and Gas Supply Module Oil and Gas Supply Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 7. Oil and Gas Supply Model Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM) constitutes a comprehensive framework with which to analyze oil and gas supply on a regional basis (Figure 7). A detailed description of the OGSM is provided in the EIA publication, Model Documentation Report: The Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM), DOE/EIA-M063(2006), (Washington, DC, 2006). The OGSM provides crude oil and natural gas short-term supply parameters to both the Natural Gas Transmission and Distribution Module and the Petroleum Market Module. The OGSM simulates the activity of numerous firms that produce oil and natural

415

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Energy-Related Carbon  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 8. U.S. carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 1980-2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Absent the application of CCS technology (which is not expected to come into use without changes in current policies that are not included in the reference case), CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption and carbon content, with coal having the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and liquid fuels in between. In the AEO2008 reference case, the coal share of total energy use increases from 23 percent in 2006 to 26 percent in 2030, while the share of

416

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Natural gas is the fastest growing primary energy source in the IEO2003 forecast. Consumption of natural gas is projected to nearly double between 2001 and 2025, with the most robust growth in demand expected among the developing nations. Natural gas is expected to be the fastest growing component of world primary energy consumption in the International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case. Consumption of natural gas worldwide is projected to increase by an average of 2.8 percent annually from 2001 to 2025, compared with projected annual growth rates of 1.8 percent for oil consumption and 1.5 percent for coal. Natural gas consumption in 2025, at 176 trillion cubic feet, is projected to be nearly double the 2001 total of 90 trillion cubic feet (Figure 40). The natural gas share of total energy consumption is projected to increase from 23 percent in 2001 to 28 percent in 2025.

417

Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Energy Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Detailed Energy-Related Carbon Emissions All Industry Groups 1994 emissions Selected Industries Petroleum refining Chemicals Iron & Steel Paper Food Stone, clay and glass Methodological Details Estimation methods Glossary Return to: Energy and GHG Analysis Efficiency Page Energy Use in Manufacturing Energy-Related Carbon Emissions in Manufacturing Manufacturing, which accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy consumption, also accounts for about 80 percent of industrial energy-related carbon emissions. (Agriculture, mining, forestry, and fisheries account for the remaining 20 percent.) In 1994, three industries, petroleum, chemicals, and primary metals, emitted almost 60 percent of the energy-related carbon in manufacturing. The next three largest emitters (paper, food, and the stone, glass, and clay products industry) produced an additional 22 percent of the energy-related manufacturing emissions (Figure 1).

418

Energy conservation in chemotrophic anaerobic bacteria.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...serine have been insport system shown to be reduced to...Figure 6 is a high-power micrograph of a thin...species the membranous system may be involved in energy...A. Sober (ed.), Handbook of bio- chemistry...the electron transport system of Esche- richia coli...

R K Thauer; K Jungermann; K Decker

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

“Quantum Coaxial Cables” for Solar Energy Harvesting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

“Quantum Coaxial Cables” for Solar Energy Harvesting ... A conventional coaxial cable is a two-conductor cable consisting of a central wire conductor symmetrically surrounded by a braided conductor with an insulating spacer in between, as shown in Figure 1a. ...

Yong Zhang; Lin-Wang Wang; Angelo Mascarenhas

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

Supplemental Figures and Tables for Groundfish EFH Review Phase 1 Report "Federal and State Marine Protected Areas Type of Fishing Restriction"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Federal and State Marine Protected Areas ­ Type of Fishing Restriction" Author and state MPAs depicted in map figures, categorized by level of fishing restriction Fishing Restriction BEFORE AFTER Commercial and Recreational Fishing Prohibited

Goldfinger, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modular Exponentiation Algorithm Analysis for Energy Consumption and Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modular Exponentiation Algorithm Analysis for Energy Consumption and Performance Lin Zhong lzhong of their complexity, parallelism and latency. Insights are found for tradeoff between energy consumption of a tree structure. For example, Figure 1.3 shows to add 5 k-bit integers together in a tree sequence. It

Zhong, Lin

422

2011 Renewable Energy Data Book Author: Rachel Gelman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facts and figures on energy in general, renewable electricity in the United States, and global renewable in U.S. Power Plants: Electricity's Thirst for a Precious Resource Authors: Kristen Averyt, Jeremy of information available to help public- and private-sector decision-makers make water-smart energy choices. http

423

MODELING OF HYDRO-PNEUMATIC ENERGY STORAGE USING PUMP TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of delivered power and energy capacities. Hydraulic storage or compressed air energy storage (CAES) can be used-turbine to displace a virtual liquid piston for air compression (Figure 1). A dynamic model of the storage system. It is based upon air compression storage using a hydraulic drive, which allows relatively high conversion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

424

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Petroleum  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Petroleum Market Module Figure 17. Petroleum Market Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 18. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Petroleum Market Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Petroleum Products Modeled in PMM. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Crude Oil Categories in PMM Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Refinery Processing Units Modeled in PMM. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

425

Compact magnetic energy storage module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

Prueitt, M.L.

1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Electrical Energy and the Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sources as mentioned above, in addition to those based on coal or uranium. The carbon production per unit of energy for different electric systems are given in the attached Figure (I). POWER GENERA TlON: COAL AS A FUEL SOURCE Coal and Uranium..., depending on overburden geology and regional tectonics. The subsidence damaging effect can be controlled, when monitored by combinations of mining techniques. Another terrestrial impact from mining is the disposal of the mine refuse and the necessary...

Parate, N. S.

427

A variable parameter thermionic energy converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A VARIABLE PARAMETER THERMIONIC ENERGY CONVERTER A Thesis By Bobby Joe Bragg Submitted to the Graduate School of the Texas A 8c M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1967 Major... LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1. SIMPLE SCHEMATIC OF A THERMIONIC CONVERTER PAGE 2. POWER VS SPACING WITH A MINIMUM POWER POINT 3. POWER VS SPACING WITH NO MINIMUM POWER POINT 4. CONVERTER MOTIVE DIAGRAM~ O'E = 5. CONVERTER MOTIVE DIAGRAM~ 6. CONVERTER...

Bragg, Bobby Joe

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Energy Conservation Through Industrial Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Typical Axial Turbine SATURN 800 kW CENTAUR 2700 kW MARS 7400 kW Figure 3. Solar Gas Turbine Generator Sets 23 ESL-IE-79-04-03 Proceedings from the First Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 22-25, 1979 Exhaust Heat Utilization... temperatures below the dew point) 612,500 = $383/kW 1600 ? Net fuel rate (from Figure 4) = 6524 Btu/kWh ? Maintenance cost = $0.0018/kWh ? Cost of Electricity Generated 6 = (6524) (2.85 -;"-10 ) + 0.0018 0.20/kWh ? Saving/Kilowatt Hour: 0...

Solt, J. C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oil and natural Gas Oil and natural Gas Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Oil and Natural Gas Figure 67. Natural gas consumption by sector, 1990-2030 (trillion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 67. Total natural gas consumption, 1990-2030 (trilliion cubic feet). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Projected Natural Gas Use for Electricity Generation Peaks in 2020 Total natural gas consumption in the United States is projected to increase from 22.0 trillion cubic feet in 2005 to 26.1 trillion cubic feet in 2030 in the AEO2007 reference case. Much of the growth is expected before 2020, with demand for natural gas in the electric power sector growing from 5.8

430

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Drivers Market Drivers Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Trends in Economic Activity Figure 24. Average annual growth rates of real GDP, labor force, and productivity, 2005-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 25. Average annual inflation, interest, and unemployment rates, 2005-2030 (percent per year). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Strong Economic Growth Is Expected To Continue Through 2030 AEO2007 presents three views of economic growth for the projection period from 2005 through 2030. In the reference case, the Nation’s economic growth, measured in terms of real GDP, is projected to average 2.9 percent

431

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2007 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 85. Cellulose ethanol production, 2005-2030 (billion gallons per year). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 86. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energyi Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Lower Costs, Greater Demand Could Spur Cellulose Ethanol Production For AEO2007, two alternative ethanol cases examine the potential impact on ethanol demand of lower costs for cellulosic ethanol production, in combination with policies that increase sales of FFVs [170]. The reference case projects that 10.5 percent of new light-duty vehicles will be capable

432

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Productions and Imports Productions and Imports figure dataNet imports of energy decline both in absolute terms and as a share of total U.S. energy consumption in the AEO2014 Reference case (Figure 10). The decline in energy imports reflects increased domestic production of petroleum and natural gas, along with demand reductions resulting from rising energy prices and gradual improvement in vehicle efficiency. At the same time, natural gas exports increase (as domestic supplies increase and it becomes attractive to liquefy the natural gas for export), along with exports of motor gasoline (as demand declines and refiners are left with more than they can sell domestically) and exports of crude oil (as lighter domestic crude oil is swapped for the heavier crudes more commonly run in modern refineries). The net import share of total U.S.

433

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Demand Module Industrial Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Industrial Demand Module estimates energy consumption by energy source (fuels and feedstocks) for 12 manufacturing and 6 nonmanufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are further subdivided into the energy-intensive manufacturing industries and nonenergy-intensive manufacturing industries. The manufacturing industries are modeled through the use of a detailed process flow or end use accounting procedure, whereas the nonmanufacturing industries are modeled with substantially less detail (Table 17). The Industrial Demand Module forecasts energy consumption at the four Census region level (see Figure 5); energy consumption at the Census Division level is estimated by allocating the Census region forecast using the SEDS27 data.

434

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 Figure 5. United States Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Residential Demand Module forecasts future residential sector energy requirements based on projections of the number of households and the stock, efficiency, and intensity of use of energy-consuming equipment. The Residential Demand Module projections begin with a base year estimate of the housing stock, the types and numbers of energy-consuming appliances servicing the stock, and the “unit energy consumption” by appliance (or UEC—in million Btu per household per year). The projection process adds new housing units to the stock, determines the equipment

435

Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Trends Consumption Trends Data centers can consume up to 100 times more energy than a standard office building. Often, less than 15% of original source energy is used for the information technology equipment within a data center. Figure 1 outlines typical data center energy consumption ratios. An illustration that features a graphic of a coal container representing 100 units of coal. This enters a graphic of a power plant, where those 100 units of coal are turned into 35 units of energy. The 35 units of energy are distributed by power lines, represented by a graphic of power lines, where 33 units are delivered to a pie chart representing data typical data center energy end use. The data center pie chart features 48% representing server load and computing operation consumption; 43% representing cooling equipment consumption; and 9% representing power conversion and distribution consumption.

436

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

229 229 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Analysis. 12 11 10 19 22 21 20 15 14 9 13 7 5 6 1 2 3 4 16 17 8 18 1. ERCT ERCOT All 2. FRCC FRCC All 3. MROE MRO East 4. MROW MRO West 5. NEWE NPCC New England 6. NYCW NPCC NYC/Westchester 7. NYLI NPCC Long Island 8. NYUP NPCC Upstate NY 9. RFCE RFC East 10. RFCM RFC Michigan 11. RFCW RFC West 12. SRDA SERC Delta 13. SRGW SERC Gateway 14. SRSE SERC Southeastern 15. SRCE SERC Central 16. SRVC SERC VACAR 17. SPNO SPP North 18. SPSO SPP South 19. AZNM WECC Southwest 20. CAMX WECC California 21. NWPP WECC Northwest 22. RMPA WECC Rockies U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011

437

NREL: Energy Analysis - Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Ocean Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for ocean power technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of wave and tidal range technologies. Credit: Lewis, A., S. Estefen, J. Huckerby, W. Musial, T. Pontes, J. Torres-Martinez, 2011: Ocean Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 6.11 Enlarge image

438

EIA - AEO2010 - Energy intensity trends in AEO2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

intensity trends in AEO2010 intensity trends in AEO2010 Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Figure 17. Trends in U.S. oil prices, energy consumption, and economic output, 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Energy intensity trends in AEO2010 Energy intensity—energy consumption per dollar of real GDP—indicates how much energy a country uses to produce its goods and services. From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, U.S. total primary energy consumption and real GDP increased at nearly the same annual rate (Figure 17). During that period, real oil prices remained virtually flat. In contrast, from the mid-1970s to 2008, the relationship between energy consumption and real GDP growth changed, with primary energy consumption growing at less than one-third the previous average rate and real GDP growth continuing to grow at its historical rate. The decoupling of real GDP growth from energy consumption growth led to a decline in energy intensity that averaged 2.8 percent per year from 1973 to 2008. In the AEO2010 Reference case, energy intensity continues to decline, at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent from 2008 to 2035.

439

Testimonials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testimonials Testimonials Testimonials Read what some employees of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) are saying about their work. Photo of EERE employee Kristina of the Education and Workforce Development office. "It is largely believed that creating a clean energy economy relies on three main components: 1) The right technologies; 2) the right policies; and 3) the right politics. However, a critical ingredient is missing from this equation-the right people. "The U.S. is confronted by a serious shortage of scientists and engineers. In fact, DOW CEO Andrew Liveris recently stated that there are 'one million science, technology, engineering, and math jobs available in [the U.S.] and only 200,000 graduates qualified to fill them.' This figure challenges the

440

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential sector energy demand Residential sector energy demand Residential energy intensity continues to decline across a range of technology assumptions figure data In the AEO2013 Reference case, the energy intensity of residential demand, defined as annual energy use per household, declines from 97.2 million Btu in 2011 to 75.5 million Btu in 2040 (Figure 55). The projected 22-percent decrease in intensity occurs along with a 32-percent increase in the number of homes. Residential energy intensity is affected by various factors-for example, population shifts to warmer and drier climates, improvements in the efficiency of building construction and equipment stock, and the attitudes and behavior of residents toward energy savings. Three alternative cases show the effects of different technology

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential sector energy demand Residential sector energy demand Residential energy intensity continues to decline across a range of technology assumptions figure data In the AEO2013 Reference case, the energy intensity of residential demand, defined as annual energy use per household, declines from 97.2 million Btu in 2011 to 75.5 million Btu in 2040 (Figure 55). The projected 22-percent decrease in intensity occurs along with a 32-percent increase in the number of homes. Residential energy intensity is affected by various factors-for example, population shifts to warmer and drier climates, improvements in the efficiency of building construction and equipment stock, and the attitudes and behavior of residents toward energy savings. Three alternative cases show the effects of different technology

442

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Demand U.S. Energy Demand Mkt trends Market Trends Growth in energy use is linked to population growth through increases in housing, commercial floorspace, transportation, and goods and services. These changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009, the lowest level since 1967. In the AEO2011 Reference case, energy use per capita increases slightly through 2013, as the economy recovers from the 2008-2009 economic downturn. After 2013, energy use per capita declines by 0.3 percent per year on average, to 293 million Btu in 2035, as higher efficiency standards for vehicles and appliances take effect (Figure 55). See more figure data Reference Case Tables

443

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International energy International energy On This Page Non-OECD nations account... U.S. reliance on imported... Oil price cases depict... Liquids demand in developing... Unconventional liquids gain... Non-OECD nations account for 84 percent of growth in world energy use EIA's International Energy Outlook shows world marketed energy consumption increasing strongly over the projection period, rising by nearly 50 percent from 2009 through 2035 (Figure 50). Most of the growth occurs in emerging economies outside the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), especially in non-OECD Asia. Total non-OECD energy use increases by 84 percent in the Reference case, compared with a 14-percent increase in the developed OECD nations. figure data Energy use in non-OECD Asia, led by China and India, shows the most robust

444

ENERGY STAR Snapshot Spring 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spring 2012 Spring 2012 Snapshot data runs through December 31, 2011. The ENERGY STAR Snapshot provides an at-a-glance summary of the latest national ENERGY STAR metrics to help you, our partners, see the impact of your efforts. The ENERGY STAR Snapshot is distributed twice a year and provides: * Trends in energy benchmarking of commercial and industrial buildings. * State-by-state activity along with activity for the top Designated Market Areas. * Industrial sector participation in ENERGY STAR. * Trends in ENERGY STAR certified commercial and industrial facilities. Summary By the end of calendar year 2011, commercial and industrial organizations exceeded figures for benchmarking and certification that were achieved in 2010. Since June, 2011:

445

Robust constraints on dark energy and gravity from galaxy clustering data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......about the Stage IV survey, which is at z 0.7. Figure 3 Dark energy FoM for Stage...results on probing dark energy and testing gravity from such a survey. 4SUMMARY AND...galaxy redshift survey can probe dark energy and constrain......

Yun Wang

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

446

Journal of Power Sources 156 (2006) 677684 Thermodynamic analysis of electrokinetic energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is carried out for electrokinetic energy conversion. We demonstrate that the efficiencies depend solely Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Electrokinetic energy conversion; Generator; Pump; Figure) are generated between the ends of the capillary, indicating a conversion of mechan- ical energy into electrical

Xuan, Xiangchun "Schwann"

447

The Riesz energy of the Nth roots of unity: an asymptotic expansion for large N  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Chebyshev constant and energy on locally compact...figures (Macmillan, New York, 1964). 8. M. G otz, `On the Riesz energy of measures', J...theory (Springer, New York, 1972). 14. A...minimal discrete Riesz energy on curves in Rd......

J. S. Brauchart; D. P. Hardin; E. B. Saff

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

StepGreen.org: Increasing energy saving behaviors via social networks Jennifer Mankoff1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

StepGreen.org: Increasing energy saving behaviors via social networks Jennifer Mankoff1 , Susan R and evaluation of StepGreen.org, a site intended to promote energy-saving behaviors. We present the results of StepGreen.org (Figure 1), a site intended to motivate people to make energy-reducing changes

Mankoff, Jennifer

449

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 Regional maps Figure F6. Coal supply regions Figure F6. Coal Supply Regions WA ID OR CA NV UT TX OK AR MO LA MS AL GA FL TN SC NC KY VA WV WY CO SD ND MI MN WI IL IN OH MD PA NJ DE CT MA NH VT NY ME RI MT NE IA KS MI AZ NM 500 0 SCALE IN MILES APPALACHIA Northern Appalachia Central Appalachia Southern Appalachia INTERIOR NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS Eastern Interior Western Interior Gulf Lignite Dakota Lignite Western Montana Wyoming, Northern Powder River Basin Wyoming, Southern Powder River Basin Western Wyoming OTHER WEST Rocky Mountain Southwest Northwest KY AK 1000 0 SCALE IN MILES Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Office

450

2009 U.S. State Clean Energy Data Book: NREL's Clean Energy Policy Analyses Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The 2009 U.S. State Clean Energy Data Book is 16 pages of data summarized in tables, figures and charts, and text. It provides a look at the states leading the U.S. in renewable energy capacities in 2009. Developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), it was produced by Rachel Gelman, Marissa Hummon, Joyce McLaren and Elizabeth Doris, edited by Michelle Kubik, and designed by Stacy Buchanan. Release date is October, 2010. Report number for this data book is DOE/GO-102010-3139.

451

Type Ia supernovae selection and forecast of cosmology constraints for the Dark Energy Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present the results of a study of selection criteria to identify Type Ia supernovae photometrically in a simulated mixed sample of Type Ia supernovae and core collapse supernovae. The simulated sample is a mockup of the expected results of the Dark Energy Survey. Fits to the \\{MLCS2k2\\} and SALT2 Type Ia supernova models are compared and used to help separate the Type Ia supernovae from the core collapse sample. The Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit (modified to include core collapse supernovae systematics) is used to discriminate among the various selection criteria. This study of varying selection cuts for Type Ia supernova candidates is the first to evaluate core collapse contamination using the Figure of Merit. Different factors that contribute to the Figure of Merit are detailed. With our analysis methods, both SALT2 and \\{MLCS2k2\\} Figures of Merit improve with tighter selection cuts and higher purities, peaking at 98% purity.

Eda Gjergo; Jefferson Duggan; John D. Cunningham; Steve Kuhlmann; Rahul Biswas; Eve Kovacs; Joseph P. Bernstein; Harold Spinka

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Energy Incentive Programs, Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rhode Island Rhode Island Energy Incentive Programs, Rhode Island October 29, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis Updated October 2012 What public-purpose-funded energy efficiency programs are available in my state? Rhode Island's restructuring law includes a system benefits charge of 2 mill/kWh for energy efficiency programs, and 0.3 mills/kWh for renewable energy programs, through 2012. Over $35 million was budgeted for energy efficiency across all program types (including low-income and residential) in 2010; figures for 2011 are not available. The programs are administered by the local utilities. Rebates are available state-wide through the Cool Choice program, which provides rebates for high-efficiency HVAC equipment, including split system and single packaged air conditions and heat pumps. Dual enthalpy economizer

453

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Coal Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Market Module Coal Market Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Coal Market Module Figure 19. Coal Market Module Demand Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 20. Coal Market Module Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 21. Coal Market Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Coal Market Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The coal market module (CMM) represents the mining, transportation, and pricing of coal, subject to end–use demand. Coal supplies are differentiated by heat and sulfur content. CMM also determines the minimum cost pattern of coal supply to meet exogenously defined U.S. coal

454

Natural Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Gas Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 86. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 13. Natural Gas Supply, Disposition, and Prices Table 14. Oil and Gas Supply Table 21. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - New England Table 22. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic Table 23. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 24. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 25. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 26. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central Table 27. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South

455

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: 4: Vol. 5, No. 3 Dampness and Mold Growth in Buildings: A National Academy Study EETD to Operate Demand Response Research Center for California Energy Commission Transition-Metal Switchable Mirrors Win a 2004 R&D 100 Award TRAMS: A New Tracer Gas Airflow Measurement System Better Measurements of Carbon Aerosol Help Study Climate Effects Sources and Credits PDF of EETD News Dampness and Mold Growth in Buildings: A National Academy Study Figure 1. Mold in lab cultures (Photo courtesy of Mike McNickle) Figure 1. Mold in lab cultures (Photo courtesy of Mike McNickle) Mold growth in buildings and its possible effects on human health have been in the news for several years while claims against insurance companies for mold and moisture-related problems in buildings have been on the rise, as

456

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Special Topics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Special Topics > Special Topics International Energy Outlook 2007 World GDP: Potential Impacts of High and Low Oil Prices Differences from Reference Case World Oil Price Projections in the High and Low World Oil Price Cases, 2006-2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Differences from Reference Case World Real GDP Projections in the High and Low World Oil Price Cases, 2006-2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Price paths in the IEO2007 high and low world oil price cases are not characterized by disruption but rather represent sustained movements relative to the reference case oil price path. The assumptions behind the oil price cases are that the price changes do not come as a shock and that

457

Renewable/Alternative | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable/Alternative Renewable/Alternative Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 83. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary Table 16. Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation Table 17. Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 21. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - New England Table 22. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic Table 23. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central Table 24. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central Table 25. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic Table 26. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South

458

Press Room - Events - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

October is Energy Action Month October is Energy Action Month October is Energy Action Month! How much energy do you use in an average day and where do those energy supplies come from? With the right knowledge and understanding of energy's impact on our daily lives, we can learn how to use energy more wisely. Test your energy smarts This page will serve as your portal to a wealth of energy facts, figures and activities that will add to your energy knowledge in fun ways for kids and adults. Which uses the most energy in American homes each year? What sector of the U.S. economy consumes most of the nation's petroleum? Which fuel provides the most energy in the United States? How much of the energy in burning coal reaches the consumer as electricity? Which renewable energy source provides the U.S. with the most

459

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 28690 of 31,917 results. 81 - 28690 of 31,917 results. Article Solar, Wind, Hydropower: Home Renewable Energy Installations A guide to figuring out if solar, wind or other small renewable energy system is right for you. http://energy.gov/articles/solar-wind-hydropower-home-renewable-energy-installations Download CX-009904: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A1028 - Towards Scale Solar Conversion of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor to Hydrocarbon Fuels CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B3.8 Date: 12/15/2009 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-009904-categorical-exclusion-determination Article Energy Department and the NSTA Launch America's Home Energy Education Challenge 2013-2014 Program Registration Now Open For Student Energy Conservation Competition; Program

460

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "figure es1 energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Electricity Market Module Figure 9. Electricity Market Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 10. Electricity Market Module Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Electricity Market Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Central-Station Generating Technologies. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. 2002 Overnight Capital Costs (including Contingencies), 2002 Heat Rates, and Online Year by Technology for the AEO2003 Reference Case Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

462

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial sector energy demand Commercial sector energy demand For commercial buildings, pace of decline in energy intensity depends on technology figure data Average delivered energy consumption per square foot of commercial floorspace declines at an annual rate of 0.4 percent from 2011 to 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 59), while commercial floorspace grows by 1.0 percent per year. Natural gas consumption increases at about one-half the rate of delivered electricity consumption, which grows by 0.8 percent per year in the Reference case. With ongoing improvements in equipment efficiency and building shells, the growth of energy consumption declines more rapidly than commercial floorspace increases, and the average energy intensity of commercial buildings is reduced. Three alternative technology cases show the effects of efficiency

463

International Energy Outlook 2001 - Highlights  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To Forecasting Home Page EIA Homepage Highlights picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) World energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent from 1999 to 2020. Much of the growth in worldwide energy use is expected in the developing world in the IEO2001 reference case forecast. In the reference case projections for the International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001), world energy consumption is projected to increase by 59 percent over a 21-year forecast horizon, from 1999 to 2020. Worldwide energy use grows from 382 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1999 to 607 quadrillion Btu in 2020 (Figure 2 and Table 1). Many developments in 2000 influenced this year’s outlook, including persistently high world oil prices, stronger than anticipated economic recovery in southeast Asia, and

464

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Overview of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview of NEMS Overview of NEMS The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Overview of NEMS NEMS represents domestic energy markets by explicitly representing the economic decision making involved in the production, conversion, and consumption of energy products. Where possible, NEMS includes explicit representation of energy technologies and their characteristics. Summary of NEMS Detail Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version Figure 1. Census Divisions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 2. National Energy Modeling System. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Since energy costs and availability and energy-consuming characteristics

465

Prospects to Reduce the Use of Energy by 50% in Existing Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on input, i.e. building and ESL-IC-08-10-21 Proceedings of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 system data, present energy use, etc., gathered by the local consultants... of the Eighth International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Berlin, Germany, October 20-22, 2008 Figure 1. Pennf?ktaren with offices and restaurants in the centre of Stockholm. Figure 2. Prismahuset with lecture halls, laboratories...

Dalenback, J.; Abel, E.

466

Engineered Geothermal Systems Energy Return On Energy Investment  

SciTech Connect

Energy Return On Investment (EROI) is an important figure of merit for assessing the viability of energy alternatives. Too often comparisons of energy systems use â??efficiencyâ? when EROI would be more appropriate. For geothermal electric power generation, EROI is determined by the electricity delivered to the consumer compared to the energy consumed to construct, operate, and decommission the facility. Critical factors in determining the EROI of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) are examined in this work. These include the input energy embodied into the system. Embodied energy includes the energy contained in the materials, as well as, that consumed in each stage of manufacturing from mining the raw materials to assembling the finished system. Also critical are the system boundaries and value of the energy â?? heat is not as valuable as electrical energy. The EROI of an EGS depends upon a number of factors that are currently unknown, for example what will be typical EGS well productivity, as well as, reservoir depth, temperature, and temperature decline rate. Thus the approach developed is to consider these factors as parameters determining EROI as a function of number of wells needed. Since the energy needed to construct a geothermal well is a function of depth, results are provided as a function of well depth. Parametric determination of EGS EROI is calculated using existing information on EGS and US Department of Energy (DOE) targets and is compared to the â??minimumâ? EROI an energy production system should have to be an asset rather than a liability.

Mansure, A J

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Figures xiii Preface xix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? 2 What Software Testing Is--and Isn't 3 What Is Different about Testing Object-Oriented Software? 5 Overview of Our Testing Approach 6 Test Early 7 Test Often 7 Test Enough 8 The Testing Perspective 8 #12;vi Contents Chapter 2 The Testing Perspective 15 Testing Perspective 15 Object-Oriented Concepts

McGregor, John D.

468

Figure 1. Top: Theoretical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

only electrodes and catalysts, but also interfaces for chemical separations, water desalination, materials synthesis and characterization, geologic and biological processes. Thus...

469

Cancer Facts & Figures - 2010  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

heal, a lump or thickening, ear pain, a neck mass, coughing up blood, or a red or white patch that persists. Difficulties in chewing, swallowing, or moving the tongue or jaws are...

470

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Drivers Market Drivers Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Market Drivers Strong Economic Growth Is Expected To Continue Figure 35. Average annual growth rates of real GDP and economic factors, 1995-2025 (percent). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data The output of the Nation’s economy, measured by GDP, is projected to grow by 3.1 percent per year between 2003 and 2025 (with GDP based on 2000 chain-weighted dollars) (Figure 35). The labor force is projected to increase by 0.9 percent per year between 2003 and 2025. Labor productivity growth in the nonfarm business sector is projected at 2.2 percent per year. Compared with the second half of the 1990s, the rates of growth in GDP and nonfarm employment were lower from 2000 through 2002. Economic growth has

471

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Market Trends- Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand and Supply Electricity Demand and Supply Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Market Trends - Electricity Demand and Supply Continued Growth in Electricity Use Is Expected in All Sectors Figure 66. Annual electricity sales by sector, 1970-2025 (billion kilowatthours). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Total electricity sales are projected to increase at an average annual rate of 1.9 percent in the AEO2005 reference case, from 3,481 billion kilowatthours in 2003 to 5,220 billion kilowatthours in 2025 (Figure 66). From 2003 to 2025, annual growth in electricity sales is projected to average 1.6 percent in the residential sector, 2.5 percent in the commercial sector, and 1.3 percent in the industrial sector.

472

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Drivers Market Drivers Annual Energy Outlook 2004 with Projections to 2025 Market Trends - Market Drivers Index (click to jump links) Trends in Economic Activity International Oil Markets Figure 38. Average annual growth rates of real GDP and economic factors, 1995-2025 (percent). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data Trends in Economic Activity Strong Economic Growth Is Expected To Continue The output of the Nation's economy, measured by gross domestic product (GDP), is projected to grow by 3.0 percent per year between 2002 and 2025 (with GDP based on 1996 chain-weighted dollars) (Figure 38). The projected growth rate is slightly lower than the 3.1-percent rate projected in AEO2003. The labor force is projected to increase by 0.9 percent per year

473

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Market Trends -  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Market Trends - Market Drivers Market Trends - Market Drivers Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Strong Economic Growth Is Expected To Continue Through 2030 Figure 24. Average annual growth rates of real GDP, labor frce, and productivity in three cases, 2004-2030 (percent per year). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data AEO2006 presents three views of economic growth for the forecast period from 2004 through 2030. Although probabilities are not assigned, the reference case reflects the most likely view of how the economy will unfold over the period. In the reference case, the Nation’s economic growth, measured in terms of real GDP based on 2000 chain-weighted dollars, is projected to average 3.0 percent per year (Figure 24). The labor force is

474

International Energy Outlook 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coal's share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to 199.0 quadrillion Btu in 2030 (Figure 54). Coal consumption increases by 2.6 per- cent per year on average from 2004 to 2015, then slows to an average increase of 1.8 percent annually from 2015 to 2030. World GDP and primary energy consumption also grow more rapidly in the first half than in the second half of the projections, reflecting a gradual slowdown of economic growth in non-OECD Asia. Regionally, increased use of coal in non-OECD

475

International Energy Outlook 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Coal Markets World Coal Markets In the IEO2006 reference case, world coal consumption nearly doubles from 2003 to 2030, with the non-OECD countries accounting for 81 percent of the increase. Coal's share of total world energy consumption increases from 24 percent in 2003 to 27 percent in 2030. In the IEO2006 reference case, world coal consumption nearly doubles, from 5.4 billion short tons 7 in 2003 to 10.6 billion tons in 2030 (Figure 48). Coal consumption increases by 3.0 percent per year on average from 2003 to 2015, then slows to an average annual increase of 2.0 per- cent annually from 2015 to 2030. World GDP and pri- mary energy consumption also grow more rapidly in the first half than in the second half of the projections, reflecting a gradual slowdown of economic growth in non-OECD Asia. Regionally, increased use of coal in non-OECD countries accounts

476

International Energy Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2025. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. World coal consumption has been in a period of generally slow growth since the late 1980s, a trend that is projected to continue. Although total world consumption of coal in 2001, at 5.26 billion short tons,12 was more than 27 percent higher than the total in 1980, it was 1 percent below the 1989 peak of 5.31 billion short tons (Figure 56). The International Energy Outlook 2003 (IEO2003) reference case projects some growth in coal use between 2001 and 2025, at an average annual rate of 1.5 percent (on a tonnage basis), but with considerable variation among regions.

477

Commercial | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Commercial Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends The AEO2011 Reference case shows minimal change in commercial energy use per capita between 2009 and 2035 (Figure 62). While growth in commercial floorspace (1.2 percent per year) is faster than growth in population (0.9 percent per year), energy use per capita remains relatively steady due to efficiency improvements in equipment and building shells. Efficiency standards and the addition of more efficient technologies account for a large share of the improvement in the efficiency of end-use services, notably in space cooling, refrigeration, and lighting.[1] Issues in Focus In 2009, the residential and commercial buildings sectors used 19.6

478

An Activity-Based Assessment of the Potential Impacts of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Energy and Emissions Using One-Day Travel Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the automobile market, Plug- In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (electric vehicles. Because of these factors, the automobileELECTRIC ONLY Figure 5.5c Temporal Trip Distribution Source Energy Profiles Conclusions and Future Research Commercial PHEV release in the automobile

Recker, W. W.; Kang, J. E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2013 (See release cycle changes) | 16, 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Correction/Update May 13th & May 15th Revised data in the Issues in Focus chapter and the Market Trends chapters for Figures 38, 107, 198 & 111. One number on page 88 (first column) of the Market Trends Chapter text was corrected as indicated by the following bold value: Third paragraph, first sentence should read -"From 2011 to 2040,

480

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full 2013 (See release cycle changes) | correction | full report Overview Data Reference Case Side Cases Interactive Table Viewer Topics Source Oil/Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewable/Alternative Nuclear Sector Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Energy Demand Other Emissions Prices Macroeconomic International Efficiency Publication Chapter Market Trends Issues in Focus Legislation & Regulations Comparison Appendices Correction/Update May 13th & May 15th Revised data in the Issues in Focus chapter and the Market Trends chapters for Figures 38, 107, 198 & 111. One number on page 88 (first column) of the Market Trends Chapter text was corrected as indicated by the following bold value: Third paragraph, first sentence should read -"From 2011 to 2040,

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481

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Buildings sector energy consumption Buildings sector energy consumption Overview The buildings sector represents energy use in places where people reside, work, and buy goods and services. The sector excludes industrial facilities used for producing, processing, or assembling goods. In 2010, the buildings sector accounted for more than one-fifth of total worldwide consumption of delivered energy. While energy consumption increases in all end-use demand sectors, energy use in the buildings sector grows fastest throughout the projection. This growth, along with unprecedented changes in the underlying living standards and economic conditions, will make developments within the buildings sector important in understanding future world energy markets. Figure 97. World buildings sector delivered energy consumption, 2010-2040

482

1-6 Figure 1.3. View of the field area, looking south-southwest. Left side of the picture shows the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mountain massif. The Vermont Valley and the Tinmouth Valley are separated by a ridge along a fault (Pine of the Taconic Allochthon, with Dorset Mountains truncating the Valley. The base of Dorset Mountain contains. It is a gray weathering, medium bedded dolomite. (looking west) #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;2-27 Figure 2

Kidd, William S. F.

483

Supplementary Figure 1: Bayesian 50% majority-rule consensus trees for the combined dataset of mitochondrial genes (left) and nuclear genes (right). Color coding distinguishes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Supplementary Figure 1: Bayesian 50% majority-rule consensus trees for the combined dataset of mitochondrial genes (left) and nuclear genes (right). Color coding distinguishes groups supported by PP 99 for individual nuclear genes: Rag-1, Rag-2 and C-mos. Color coding distinguishes groups supported by PP 99

484

Figure 1. Ankle behavior can be approximated by a linear torsional spring in the progression stage of the stance phase of normal gait.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 1. Ankle behavior can be approximated by a linear torsional spring in the progression stage of the stance phase of normal gait. Abstract--In this paper we explore the mechanical behavior of the ankle in the progression stage of stance during normal walking. We show that the torque/angle behavior of the ankle during

Dollar, Aaron M.

485

Physics 305 Problem set 1 Due: Fri, Jan. 27, 2012 1) (a) Consider a thin slab of resistive material, as in the first figure, with resistivity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics 305 Problem set 1 Due: Fri, Jan. 27, 2012 1) (a) Consider a thin slab of resistive material, as in the first figure, with resistivity and thickness d. Find the resistance of a square piece, with edge length covers each of the two faces. Show that it is independent of L. (This is the two-dimensional "resistivity

Ross, Joseph

486

Figure 2 illustrates the proposed arrangement of the system value model for a given UAV design. The properties of the UAV system are split into five categories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 2 illustrates the proposed arrangement of the system value model for a given UAV design. The properties of the UAV system are split into five categories: performance, acquisition cost, supportability of mission success minus the life-cycle-cost of the UAV system. This simplified value model accounts

SĂłbester, AndrĂĄs

487

Development of A Cryogenic Drift Cell Spectrometer and Methods for Improving the Analytical Figures of Merit for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cryogenic (325-80 K) ion mobility-mass spectrometer was designed and constructed in order to improve the analytical figures-of-merit for the chemical analysis of small mass analytes using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. The instrument incorporates...

May, Jody C.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

488

Assignment Carbon Footprints Name__Lachniet__ 1) See Figure 1.1a at the back of the assignment (from IPCC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) How does the United States rank in terms of 'carbon intensity', the amount of emissions per capita, relative to other countries? The United States (and Canada) rank #1 in the highest 'carbon intensity' perAssignment Carbon Footprints Name__Lachniet__ 1) See Figure 1.1a at the back

Lachniet, Matthew S.

489

Supplementary Figure 1| Neutron diffraction data at 86 % relative humidity. a) Schematic representation of neutron diffraction geometry for -2 scans. Diffraction data are obtained  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distributions of lipid and protein under varying levels of hydration. Predicted neutron scattering profiles as number density profiles weighted by the neutron scattering lengths of individual atoms, then symmetrizedSupplementary Figure 1| Neutron diffraction data at 86 % relative humidity. a) Schematic

White, Stephen

490

Design and Simulation for Architectural Geometry Figure 1: Daytime and nighttime scenes of designed roof by using the developed computational tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

roof by using the developed computational tools 031.PDF Keywords: Architectural Geometry, Procedural an innovative computational design tool used to edit architectural geometry interactively and demonstratesDesign and Simulation for Architectural Geometry Figure 1: Daytime and nighttime scenes of designed

491

FIGURE 2. -Immunodiffusion comparison of Vibrio anguil-larum 775 and Vibrio sp. 1669. Wells I, 3, and 5 contain V. an-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 FIGURE 2. -Immunodiffusion comparison of Vibrio anguil- larum 775 and Vibrio sp. 1669. Wells I, 3, and 5 contain V. an- guillarum 775 sonicate and wells 2, 4, and 6 contain Vibrio sp. 1669 sonicate disease in young salmon. J. Compo Patho!' 77;419-423. RUCKER, R. R. 1959. Vibrio infections among marine

492

Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Assumptions to the Annual Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Demand Module Transportation Demand Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption isthe sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight and passenger aircraft, freight rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous transport such as mass transit. Light-duty vehicle fuel consumption is further subdivided into personal usage and commercial fleet consumption.

493

Indiana Energy Energy Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Indiana Energy Conference Energy Challenges And Opportunities November 5, 2013 ­ 9:00 a.m. ­ 5:00 p spectrum of business sectors including: Energy Community Manufacturing Policymakers Finance Engineering of Energy & Water: A Well of Opportunity Our water and energy systems are inextricably linked. Energy

Ginzel, Matthew

494

Matter & Energy Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

See Also: Matter & Energy Wind Energy Energy Technology Physics Nuclear Energy Petroleum 27, 2012) -- Energy flowing from large-scale to small-scale places may be prevented from flowing, indicating that there are energy flows from large to small scale in confined space. Indeed, under a specific

Shepelyansky, Dima

495

Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Energy Consumption U.S. Primary Energy Consumption by Source and Sector Share of Energy Consumed byEnergy Efficiency & Renewable Energy 2010 Fuel Cell Project Kick-off Dr. Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Fuel Cells Team Leader U.S. Department of Energy gy Fuel Cell Technologies Program September 28

496

Ris Energy Report 5 Solar thermal 41 by the end of 2004 about 110 million m2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RisĂž Energy Report 5 Solar thermal 41 6.3.2 by the end of 2004 about 110 million m2 of solar ther be within the competence of the existing solar thermal industry. Solar thermal PETER AHM, PA ENERgy LTD- mal collectors were installed worldwide. Figure 24 il- lustrates the energy contribution from

497

Macroscopic/microscopic simulation of nuclear reactions at intermediate energies. Denis Lacroix, Aymeric Van Lauwe and Dominique Durand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for reactions close to the fusion barrier (5-10 MeV/A) up to higher energy (100 MeV/A) and it gives access) -coalescence -test of fusion (FSI) -energy balance -classical propagation -in-flight emission Figure 1 to understand nuclear reactions at inter- mediate energies. These models provide gener- ally a rather good

Boyer, Edmond

498

What People Do with Consumption Feedback: A Long-Term Living Lab Study of a Home Energy Management System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Figure 10. Providing Energy Feedback on multiple...checked their current energy consumption before...commercial breaks. The integration of the HEMS into...important factor for sustainable use. To an extent...provides significant challenge to householders...monitoring of their energy usage in situations......

Tobias Schwartz; Gunnar Stevens; Timo Jakobi; Sebastian Denef; Leonardo Ramirez; Volker Wulf; Dave Randall

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

The lessons learned from the development of the wind energy industry that might be applied to marine industry renewables  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...capital grants for wind energy in late 1970s to early 1980s. still active in wind energy manufacture? still active in wind energy? USA Boeing no no GE yes...development. Figure 2. Early history of Bonus list price (adjusted for inflation...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Topics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Economic Activity AEO 2011 Trends in economic activity Economic Activity AEO 2011 Trends in economic activity Mkt trends Market Trends AEO2011 presents three views of economic growth (Figure 45). The rate of growth in real GDP depends on assumptions about labor force growth and productivity. In the Reference case, growth in real GDP averages 2.7 percent per year due to a 0.7 percent per year growth in the labor force and a 2.1 percent per year growth in labor productivity. See more figure data Reference Case Tables Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States XLS Table 2.1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England XLS Table 2.2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic XLS Table 2.3. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central XLS Table 2.4. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central XLS