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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Save Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy on AddThis.com... April 1, 2012 Alternative Fuels Save Money in Indy " The improvements we are making to the city's fleet and the savings involved illustrate our commitment to creating a more sustainable, livable

2

Final Report on the Fuel Saving Effectiveness of Various Driver Feedback Approaches  

SciTech Connect

This final report quantifies the fuel-savings opportunities from specific driving behavior changes, identifies factors that influence drivers' receptiveness to adopting fuel-saving behaviors, and assesses various driver feedback approaches.

Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Fuel Saving Ideas for Metal and Ceramic Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An easy method is presented for analyzing sources of heat loss from industrial processing furnaces, kilns, and ovens; and thus for recognizing opportunities for fuel saving. This will relate to melting, heat treating and hot forming of metals such as steel, aluminum and copper; plus firing of glass and ceramic material such as structural clay products, sanitary wear, containers, porcelain and electronic ceramics. Fuel saving methods will be discussed as prescriptions for remedying the above-mentioned losses, including precise fuel/air ratio control, furnace pressure control, and heat recovery systems applicable to these high temperature furnaces. Special attention will be devoted to use of flue gases to generate steam and to preheat combustion air.

Reed, R. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Analyzing Vehicle Fuel Saving Opportunities through Intelligent Driver Feedback  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Driving style changes, e.g., improving driver efficiency and motivating driver behavior changes, could deliver significant petroleum savings. This project examines eliminating stop-and-go driving and unnecessary idling, and also adjusting acceleration rates and cruising speeds to ideal levels to quantify fuel savings. Such extreme adjustments can result in dramatic fuel savings of over 30%, but would in reality only be achievable through automated control of vehicles and traffic flow. In real-world driving, efficient driving behaviors could reduce fuel use by 20% on aggressively driven cycles and by 5-10% on more moderately driven trips. A literature survey was conducted of driver behavior influences, and pertinent factors from on-road experiments with different driving styles were observed. This effort highlighted important driver influences such as surrounding vehicle behavior, anxiety over trying to get somewhere quickly, and the power/torque available from the vehicle. Existing feedback approaches often deliver efficiency information and instruction. Three recommendations for maximizing fuel savings from potential drive cycle improvement are: (1) leveraging applications with enhanced incentives, (2) using an approach that is easy and widely deployable to motivate drivers, and (3) utilizing connected vehicle and automation technologies to achieve large and widespread efficiency improvements.

Gonder, J.; Earleywine, M.; Sparks, W.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Analyzing Vehicle Fuel Saving Opportunities through Intelligent Driver Feedback  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

NREL/CP-5400-53864.Posted with permission. NREL/CP-5400-53864.Posted with permission. Presented at the 2012 SAE World Congress, 24-26 April 2012, Detroit, Michigan 2012-01-0494 Analyzing Vehicle Fuel Saving Opportunities Published through Intelligent Driver Feedback 04/16/2012 Jeffrey Gonder, Matthew Earleywine and Witt Sparks National Renewable Energy Laboratory doi:10.4271/2012-01-0494 ABSTRACT While it is well known that "MPG will vary" based on how one drives, little independent research exists on the aggregate

6

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #330: July 26, 2004 Fuel Savings Required  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30: July 26, 2004 30: July 26, 2004 Fuel Savings Required to Purchase Fuel Efficient Vehicle to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #330: July 26, 2004 Fuel Savings Required to Purchase Fuel Efficient Vehicle on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #330: July 26, 2004 Fuel Savings Required to Purchase Fuel Efficient Vehicle on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #330: July 26, 2004 Fuel Savings Required to Purchase Fuel Efficient Vehicle on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #330: July 26, 2004 Fuel Savings Required to Purchase Fuel Efficient Vehicle on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #330: July 26, 2004 Fuel Savings Required to Purchase Fuel Efficient Vehicle on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #330:

7

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #776: April 22, 2013 Fuel Savings from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: April 22, 6: April 22, 2013 Fuel Savings from Attempts to Alleviate Traffic Congestion to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #776: April 22, 2013 Fuel Savings from Attempts to Alleviate Traffic Congestion on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #776: April 22, 2013 Fuel Savings from Attempts to Alleviate Traffic Congestion on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #776: April 22, 2013 Fuel Savings from Attempts to Alleviate Traffic Congestion on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #776: April 22, 2013 Fuel Savings from Attempts to Alleviate Traffic Congestion on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #776: April 22, 2013 Fuel Savings from Attempts to Alleviate Traffic Congestion on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #776:

8

Estimation of Fuel Savings by Recuperation of Furnace Exhausts to Preheat Combustion Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery of waste energy in furnace exhaust gases is gaining in importance as fuel costs continue to escalate. Installation of a recuperator in the furnace exhaust stream to preheat the combustion air can result in considerable savings in fuel usage. These savings are primarily the result of the sensible heat increase of the combustion air and, to some extent, improved combustion efficiency. The amount of fuel saved will depend on the exhaust gas temperature, amount of excess air used, the type of burner and the furnace control system. These fuel savings may be accurately measured by metering the energy consumption per unit of production before and after installation of the recuperator. In the design of a waste heat recuperation system, it is necessary to be able to estimate the fuel saved by use of such a system. Standard industrial practice refers to the method described in the North American Combustion Handbook with its curves and tables that directly predict the percentage fuel savings. This paper analyzes the standard estimation technique and suggests a more realistic approach to calculation of percent fuel savings. Mass and enthalpy balances are provided for both methods and a typical furnace recuperation example is detailed to illustrate the differences in the two methods of calculating the percent energy saved.

Rebello, W. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Phipps, H. R., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

54.5 MPG and Beyond: New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

54.5 MPG and Beyond: New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings 54.5 MPG and Beyond: New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings 54.5 MPG and Beyond: New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings December 12, 2012 - 10:30am Addthis This graphic shows how Goodyear's new Air Maintenance Technology -- also called the self-regulating tire -- works. | Graphic courtesy of Goodyear. This graphic shows how Goodyear's new Air Maintenance Technology -- also called the self-regulating tire -- works. | Graphic courtesy of Goodyear. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Keeping tires inflated to the recommended pressure can improve gas mileage by 3 percent or the equivalent of saving up to $0.10 per gallon of gasoline. Goodyear has invented a self-regulating tire, which automatically

10

54.5 MPG and Beyond: New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings 54.5 MPG and Beyond: New Tire Technology Pumps Up Fuel Savings December 12, 2012 - 10:30am Addthis This graphic shows how Goodyear's new Air Maintenance Technology -- also called the self-regulating tire -- works. | Graphic courtesy of Goodyear. This graphic shows how Goodyear's new Air Maintenance Technology -- also called the self-regulating tire -- works. | Graphic courtesy of Goodyear. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? Keeping tires inflated to the recommended pressure can improve gas mileage by 3 percent or the equivalent of saving up to $0.10 per gallon of gasoline. Goodyear has invented a self-regulating tire, which automatically

11

Bike to Work - or Anywhere - for Fuel Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bike to Work - or Anywhere - for Fuel Savings Bike to Work - or Anywhere - for Fuel Savings Bike to Work - or Anywhere - for Fuel Savings May 23, 2011 - 4:45pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL I realized over the weekend that I missed National Bike to Work Day on Friday (and Bike to Work Week all last week), so I didn't get a chance to remind all of you blog readers to bike to work if you can! Even if you missed the national event, do some searching to see if your city has its own Bike to Work Day coming up; a quick search revealed that San Francisco already had their day on May 12, while here in Denver it will be held on June 22, so the dates of the local events seem to vary around the country. But it's still National Bike Month, and of course, you don't need a formal event to hop on your bike for your commute. The weather is warming up, and

12

Bike to Work - or Anywhere - for Fuel Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bike to Work - or Anywhere - for Fuel Savings Bike to Work - or Anywhere - for Fuel Savings Bike to Work - or Anywhere - for Fuel Savings May 23, 2011 - 4:45pm Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL I realized over the weekend that I missed National Bike to Work Day on Friday (and Bike to Work Week all last week), so I didn't get a chance to remind all of you blog readers to bike to work if you can! Even if you missed the national event, do some searching to see if your city has its own Bike to Work Day coming up; a quick search revealed that San Francisco already had their day on May 12, while here in Denver it will be held on June 22, so the dates of the local events seem to vary around the country. But it's still National Bike Month, and of course, you don't need a formal event to hop on your bike for your commute. The weather is warming up, and

13

Fuel savings and emissions reductions from light duty fuel cell vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) operate efficiently, emit few pollutants, and run on nonpetroleum fuels. Because of these characteristics, the large-scale deployment of FCVs has the potential to lessen US dependence on foreign oil and improve air quality. This study characterizes the benefits of large-scale FCV deployment in the light duty vehicle market. Specifically, the study assesses the potential fuel savings and emissions reductions resulting from large-scale use of these FCVs and identifies the key parameters that affect the scope of the benefits from FCV use. The analysis scenario assumes that FCVs will compete with gasoline-powered light trucks and cars in the new vehicle market for replacement of retired vehicles and will compete for growth in the total market. Analysts concluded that the potential benefits from FCVs, measured in terms of consumer outlays for motor fuel and the value of reduced air emissions, are substantial.

Mark, J.; Ohi, J.M.; Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 19.4% of vehicle fuel consumption in India is devoted to air conditioning (A/C). Indian A/C fuel consumption is almost four times the fuel penalty in the United States and close to six times that in the European Union because India's temperature and humidity are higher and because road congestion forces vehicles to operate inefficiently. Car A/C efficiency in India is an issue worthy of national attention considering the rate of increase of A/C penetration into the new car market, India's hot climatic conditions and high fuel costs. Car A/C systems originally posed an ozone layer depletion concern. Now that industrialized and many developing countries have moved away from ozone-depleting substances per Montreal Protocol obligations, car A/C impact on climate has captured the attention of policy makers and corporate leaders. Car A/C systems have a climate impact from potent global warming potential gas emissions and from fuel used to power the car A/Cs. This paper focuses on car A/C fuel consumption in the context of the rapidly expanding Indian car market and how new technological improvements can result in significant fuel savings and consequently, emission reductions. A 19.4% fuel penalty is associated with A/C use in the typical Indian passenger car. Car A/C fuel use and associated tailpipe emissions are strong functions of vehicle design, vehicle use, and climate conditions. Several techniques: reducing thermal load, improving vehicle design, improving occupants thermal comfort design, improving equipment, educating consumers on impacts of driver behaviour on MAC fuel use, and others - can lead to reduced A/C fuel consumption.

Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Andersen, S.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Enbridge Consumers Gas "Steam Saver" Program ("As Found" Performance and Fuel Saving Projects from Audits of 30 Steam Plants)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Canada, medium and large sized steam plants consume approximately 442 Billion Cubic Feet (12.5 Billion Cubic Meters) of natural gas annually. This is 25% of all natural gas delivered to all customers. (Small steam plants and Hydronic heating boilers consume another 15%) Enbridge Consumers Gas, a local gas distribution company located in Toronto, has approximately 400 Industrial and Institutional customers who own medium or large sized steam plants. During the past three years, Enbridge has developed a comprehensive steam energy efficiency program called "Steam Saver". This program is aimed at these 400 customers. The heart of this program is the boiler plant audit and performance test. This paper describes the fuel saving results for more than 30 medium and large sized boiler plants where audits have been completed and projects have been implemented. The savings in cubic feet per year of natural gas are broken down according to project or technology type. The financial payback is indicated for each category. Eleven of the larger plants have been "benchmarked". Plant efficiency, fuel consumption, steam costs and other performance variables are tabulated for these plants.

Griffin, B.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

From here to efficiency : time lags between the introduction of new technology and the achievement of fuel savings.  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the energy savings of new technology offering significant improvements in fuel efficiency are tracked for over 20 years as vehicles incorporating that technology enter the fleet and replace conventional light-duty vehicles. Two separate analyses are discussed: a life-cycle analysis of aluminum-intensive vehicles and a fuel-cycle analysis of the energy and greenhouse gas emissions of double vs. triple fuel-economy vehicles. In both efforts, market-penetration modeling is used to simulate the rate at which new technology enters the new fleet, and stock-adjustment modeling is used to capture the inertia in turnover of new and existing current-technology vehicles. Together, these two effects--slowed market penetration and delayed vehicle replacement--increase the time lag between market introduction and the achievement of substantial energy savings. In both cases, 15-20 years elapse, before savings approach these levels.

Mintz, M.; Vyas, A.; Wang, M.; Stodolsky, F.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

Feasibility of Thermoelectrics for Waste Heat Recovery in Conventional Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric (TE) generators convert heat directly into electricity when a temperature gradient is applied across junctions of two dissimilar metals. The devices could increase the fuel economy of conventional vehicles by recapturing part of the waste heat from engine exhaust and generating electricity to power accessory loads. A simple vehicle and engine waste heat model showed that a Class 8 truck presents the least challenging requirements for TE system efficiency, mass, and cost; these trucks have a fairly high amount of exhaust waste heat, have low mass sensitivity, and travel many miles per year. These factors help maximize fuel savings and economic benefits. A driving/duty cycle analysis shows strong sensitivity of waste heat, and thus TE system electrical output, to vehicle speed and driving cycle. With a typical alternator, a TE system could allow electrification of 8%-15% of a Class 8 truck's accessories for 2%-3% fuel savings. More research should reduce system cost and improve economics.

Smith, K.; Thornton, M.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

HEADQUARTERS & CONVENTION CENTER FLOORPLANS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber Café. Moscone West Convention. Center. Lobby. General Poster Session. Moscone West Convention. Center. Exhibit Hall. Employment Referral. Center.

20

Fuel Savings from Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's study shows that hybrid electric vehicles can significantly reduce oil imports for use in light-duty vehicles, particularly if drivers switch to smaller, more fuel-efficient vehicles overall.

Bennion, K.; Thornton, M.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

22

Aging in American Convents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schuster. Snowdon, David 2001 Aging with Grace: What the Nunreligion, devotion, and aging. CSW JAN09 update tocAging in American Convents FIELDWORK REPORT by Anna I.

Corwin, Anna I.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the DOE Water Power Program's conventional hydropower research and development efforts.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Purpose GIS Naming Conventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document describes guidelines for naming of GIS-related folders, files, attribute tables, and fields for the North Coast and Cascades Network (NCCN) and helps to fulfill the requirements for GIS deliverables developed as part of Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program natural resource studies. The primary objective of this document is to improve GIS data quality and usability by establishing a consistent file naming convention for working and final shared, geo-referenced data sets within the NCCN. These guidelines propose clear filename creation methods in order to minimize confusion, errors, and unnecessary support when GIS data are exchanged among users. Two competing objectives need to be balanced: to make a dataset name easily understood and as short as possible for use in various software systems. Longer field names, sometimes resulting from long dataset names and sometimes created by users, are often truncated during data exchange or format conversion, which could unintentionally create non-unique field names. These guidelines will: • promote consistency in GIS layer and attribute (variable or field) naming • provide guidance to data stewards and data contributors • advance a clearer understanding of the information in the files, tables and fields via appropriate

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy conducts research on conventional hydropower technologies to increase generation and improve existing means of generating hydroelectricity.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Boise Inc. St. Helens Paper Mill Achieves Significant Fuel Savings  

SciTech Connect

This case study describes how the Boise Inc. paper mill in St. Helens, Oregon, achieved annual savings of approximately 154,000 MMBtu and more than $1 million after receiving a DOE Save Energy Now energy assessment and implementing recommendations to improve the efficiency of its steam system.

Not Available

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Magnesium Components Achieve Weight Reduction and Fuel Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cast mag- nesium can achieve consider- able weight reduction advantages over both steel and aluminum. Furthermore, this favorable weight reduction potential can enable...

28

Hydroelectric Conventional | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroelectric Conventional Hydroelectric Conventional Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

29

ISG X-Conventional Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WG-4 Conventional Facilities Home Conventional Facilities Conf. room (Bldg. 281) Corvin, Enomoto, Kuchler Tuesday, June 17 13:00 - 15:30 GM-Vibration WG1 & WG4 -TT Bldg 214 15:30 - 16:00 Break Orange Room 16:00 - 18:00 GM-Vibration WG1 & WG4 - FA, TM Bldg 214 18:00 Adjourn Wednesday, June 18 09:00 -12:00 Status - Japan, California, Illinois, HI CF Bldg 281 13:00 - 15:30 California Warm Mechanical Design CF Bldg 281 15:30 - 16:00 Break to Plenary Orange Room 18:00 Adjourn to BBQ Slac Cafeteria 18:30 BBQ Dinner Picnic Area Thursday, June 19 09:00 - 12:00 Drawing, Design & Cost Estimates CF Bldg 281 13:00 - 15:30 FY' 2004 Planning - Plans CF Bldg 281 15:30 - 16:00 Break to Plenary Orange Room 18:00 Adjourn

30

Implementing the chemical weapons convention  

SciTech Connect

In 1993, as the CWC ratification process was beginning, concerns arose that the complexity of integrating the CWC with national law could cause each nation to implement the Convention without regard to what other nations were doing, thereby causing inconsistencies among States as to how the CWC would be carried out. As a result, the author's colleagues and the author prepared the Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention and presented it to each national delegation at the December 1993 meeting of the Preparatory Commission in The Hague. During its preparation, the Committee of CWC Legal Experts, a group of distinguished international jurists, law professors, legally-trained diplomats, government officials, and Parliamentarians from every region of the world, including Central Europe, reviewed the Manual. In February 1998, they finished the second edition of the Manual in order to update it in light of developments since the CWC entered into force on 29 April 1997. The Manual tries to increase understanding of the Convention by identifying its obligations and suggesting methods of meeting them. Education about CWC obligations and available alternatives to comply with these requirements can facilitate national response that are consistent among States Parties. Thus, the Manual offers options that can strengthen international realization of the Convention's goals if States Parties act compatibly in implementing them. Equally important, it is intended to build confidence that the legal issues raised by the Convention are finite and addressable. They are now nearing competition of an internet version of this document so that interested persons can access it electronically and can view the full text of all of the national implementing legislation it cites. The internet address, or URL, for the internet version of the Manual is http: //www.cwc.ard.gov. This paper draws from the Manual. It comparatively addresses approximately thirty implementing issues, showing how various States Parties have enacted measures that are responsive to CWC obligations. It is intended to highlight the issues that States Parties must address and to identify trends among States Parties that might be useful to States that have not yet made crucial decisions as to how to resolve key matters. At various points in the text, country names are listed in parenthesis to identify pieces of national legislation that demonstrate the point in the text. It should not be inferred that nations not listed have not addressed the point or have taken a different position. In some cases, a nation's position is explained in somewhat more depth to give specific detail to an assertion in the text. Attached to this paper is a chart which illustrates how States Parties in the Central European region as well as the United States respond to the issues raised. Obviously, in preparing such a chart, many subtle provisions in national legislation must be simplified. The point of the chart is to portray, on a few pages, the major trends of legislation.

Kellman, B.; Tanzman, E. A.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Conventional Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Storage Water Heaters Conventional Storage Water Heaters July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On top of the...

32

NIST Exhibits at the BIO International Convention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The BIO International Convention is the largest global event for ... key networking and partnering opportunities, and provides insights and inspiration ...

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

33

AFN Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AFN Annual Convention AFN Annual Convention AFN Annual Convention October 23, 2014 8:00AM AKDT to October 25, 2014 5:00PM AKDT Anchorage, Alaska The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one representative per 25 Native residents in the area and delegate participation rates at the annual convention typically exceed 95%. Each year, the AFN Convention draws between 4,000-5,000 attendees. The proceedings are broadcast live via television, radio and webcast reaching a diverse audience from Barrow to Ketchikan, from the Aleutian Chain to the Canadian border. During the convention, the entire state of Alaska is blanketed with discussion on current events and issues. International

34

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian...

35

Energy Basics: Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

heater can range from 20 to hundreds of gallons. Conventional storage water heater fuel sources include natural gas, propane, fuel oil, and electricity. Natural gas and...

36

TUTORIALS: Introduction to Conventional Transmission Electron ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... The link provided accesses the web site for the text, Introduction to Conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy by Marc DeGraef. The site ...

37

Random testing of C calling conventions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a C compiler, function calls are difficult to implement correctly because they must respect a platform-specific calling convention. But they are governed by a simple invariant: parameters passed to a function must be received unaltered. A violation ... Keywords: C, calling convention, compiler, composition, consistency, random testing

Christian Lindig

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

NCAI Annual Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Convention Annual Convention NCAI Annual Convention October 21, 2012 8:00AM PDT to October 26, 2012 5:00PM PDT Sacramento, California The National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) and the California tribes will host the organization's 69th Annual Convention & Marketplace in Sacramento, California this October. The national meeting will serve as the beginning of a yearlong celebration of the organization's 70 years of work since it was founded in 1944. This year's Annual Convention will also host a Constitutional review. Over the course of six days, events and celebrations will focus on the rights and sovereignty of American Indian and Alaska Native tribes. Throughout the week NCAI will convene it's General Assembly, educational breakout sessions, and cultural celebrations, all with the purpose of

39

NREL: Energy Analysis: Impacts of Conventional Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts of Renewable Electricity Generation on Efficiency and Emissions of Conventional Generators With increasing penetration of wind and solar generation, conventional fossil-fired power plants may be required to adjust their output level, start up, or shut down more frequently to accommodate the variability and uncertainty of these technologies. These operational changes can negatively impact plant efficiency and emissions. NREL's analyses are focused on understanding and quantifying the emissions and costs associated with these operational changes. NREL's impacts of renewable electricity generation on conventional generators analyses show that: While the emissions impacts of generator cycling and part-loading can be significant (e.g., combined cycle generators), these impacts are

40

Alaska Federation of Natives Annual Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Social instruments for robust convention emergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the notion of Social Instruments as mechanisms that facilitate the emergence of conventions from repeated interactions between members of a society. Specifically, we focus on two social instruments: rewiring and observation. Our main goal ...

Daniel Villatoro; Jordi Sabater-Mir; Sandip Sen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

2013 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) Convention is the largest representative annual gathering in the United States of any Native peoples. Delegates are elected on a population formula of one...

43

Conventional Medical Screening Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Medical Screening Program Conventional Medical Screening Program Conventional Medical Screening Program Medical screening is a strategy used to identify diseases or conditions in a select population at an early stage, often before signs and symptoms develop, and to refer individuals with suspicious findings to their personal physician or a specialist for further testing, diagnosis, and treatment. The program is not intended to serve as a substitute for routine medical exams through an individual's personal physician. The medical screening exam offered by the FWP evaluates an employee's health as it relates to their potential occupational exposures to hazardous agents. The FWP uses a customized medical screening protocol that was developed by a team of independent physicians specializing in occupational

44

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On...

45

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on...

46

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent Cost Allocation Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent Cost Allocation DOE published a...

47

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent...

48

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #648: November 8, 2010 Conventional...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: November 8, 2010 Conventional and Alternative Fuel Prices to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 648: November 8, 2010 Conventional and Alternative Fuel...

49

The Simla Convention 1914: A Chinese Puzzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initials in Tibetan. But since initalling is not only difficult but also impolite in Tibetan usage, the Tibetan plenipotentiary Lonchen Shatra put his full signature, describing his lineage even. After the signature, the British delegate put a note... officials in India, particularly, Olaf Car'oe and Hugh Richardson, advised strongly for the inclusion of the Simla Convention in the forthcoming edition of Aitchison's Treaties. The relevant volume had, however, been printed off. The print was called...

Sinha, Nirmal Chandra

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were satisfactorily identified using this nomenclature. Conclusions: Use of standardized naming conventions is important to facilitate comparison of dosimetry across patient datasets. The guidelines presented here will facilitate international acceptance across a wide range of efforts, including groups organizing clinical trials, Radiation Oncology Institute, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise, Radiation Oncology domain (IHE-RO), and Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM).

Santanam, Lakshmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brame, Scott; Straube, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tripuraneni, Prabhakar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, LaJolla, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter, E-mail: wbosch@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Advanced Technology Consortium, Image-guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Chemical Weapons Convention -- Legal issues  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) offers a unique challenge to the US system of constitutional law. Its promise of eliminating what is the most purely genocidal type of weapon from the world`s arsenals as well as of destroying the facilities for producing these weapons, brings with it a set of novel legal issues. The reservations about the CWC expressed by US business people are rooted in concern about safeguarding confidential business information and protecting the constitutional right to privacy. The chief worry is that international verification inspectors will misuse their power to enter commercial property and that trade secrets or other private information will be compromised as a result. It has been charged that the Convention is probably unconstitutional. The author categorically disagrees with that view and is aware of no scholarly writing that supports it. The purpose of this presentation is to show that CWC verification activities can be implemented in the US consistently with the traditional constitutional regard for commercial and individual privacy. First, he very briefly reviews the types of verification inspections that the CWC permits, as well as some of its specific privacy protections. Second, he explains how the Fourth Amendment right to privacy works in the context of CWC verification inspections. Finally, he reviews how verification inspections can be integrated into these constitutional requirements in the SU through a federal implementing statute.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a simple thermal energy storage system that already exists in almost every structure - concrete. Thermal storage calculations simulate sub-cooling of a building's structure during unoccupied times. During occupied times, the sub-cooled concrete reduces peak cooling demand, thereby lowering demand and saving money. In addition, significant savings are possible in the first cost of chilled water equipment, and the smaller chillers run at peak capacity and efficiency during a greater portion of their run time. The building, controlled by an Energy Management and Control System (EMCS), "learns" from past experience how to run the building efficiently. The result is an optimized balance between energy cost and comfort.

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

54

The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non- Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set...

Méjean, Aurélie; Hope, Chris

55

Industrial Heat Pumps for Steam and Fuel Savings: A BestPractices Steam Technical Brief  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Steam Techcial Brief is to introduce heat-pump technology and its applicaiton in industrial processes.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Analysis of fuel savings associated with fuel computers in multifamily buildings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This research was undertaken to quantify the energy savings associated with the installation of a direct monitoring control system (DMC) on steam heating plants in multi-family buildings located in the New York City metropolitan area. The primary objective was to determine whether fuel consumption was lower in buildings employing a DMC relative to those using the more common indirect monitoring control system (IMC) and if so, to what extent. The analysis compares the fuel consumption of 442 buildings over 12 months. The type of control system installed in these buildings was either a Heat-Timer (identified as IMC equipment) or a computer-based unit (identified as DMC equipment). IMC provides control by running the boiler for longer or shorter periods depending on outdoor temperature. This system is termed indirect because there is no feedback from indoor (apartment) temperatures to the control. DMC provides control by sensing apartment temperatures. In a typical multifamily building, sensors are hard wired to between 5 and 10 apartments sensors. The annual savings and simple payback were computed for the DMC buildings by comparing annual fuel consumption among the building groupings. The comparison is based on mean BTUs per degree day consumed annually and normalized for building characteristics, such as, equipment maintenance and boiler steady state efficiency as well as weather conditions. The average annual energy consumption for the DMC buildings was 14.1 percent less than the annual energy consumption for the IMC buildings. This represents 3,826 gallons of No. 6 fuel oil or $2,295 at a price of $0.60 per gallon. A base DMC system costs from $8,400 to $10,000 installed depending on the number of sensors and complexity of the system. The standard IMC system costs from $2,000 to $3,000 installed. Based on this analysis the average simple payback is 2.9 or 4.0 years depending on either an upgrade from IMC to DMC (4.0 years) or a new installation (2.9) years.

McNamara, M.; Anderson, J.; Huggins, E. [EME Group, New York, NY (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Gobble Up Fuel Savings on Your Next Road Trip with My Trip Calculator...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

is My Trip Calculator? It is an interactive tool that helps you plan a route, pick a car and estimate a fuel costs for your next road trip. Enter your own miles per gallon...

58

NIST Exhibits at the 2013 BIO International Convention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The BIO International Convention is the largest global event for ... key networking and partnering opportunities, and provides insights and inspiration ...

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

59

U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Oxygenated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

60

Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd VNCPPL Jump to: navigation, search Name Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL) Place Krishna Dist, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 521 157 Sector Biomass Product AP-based, biomass project developers References Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL) is a company located in Krishna Dist, Andhra Pradesh, India . References ↑ "Veeraiah Non Conventional Power Projects Ltd. (VNCPPL)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Veeraiah_Non_Conventional_Power_Projects_Ltd_VNCPPL&oldid=352749"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ENERGY STAR Success Story San Diego Convention Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Success Story ENERGY STAR Success Story San Diego Convention Center Since opening 20 years ago, San Diego's bayside convention facility has been a green industry leader and continues to receive accolades for environmental stewardship. The San Diego Convention Center Corporation (SDCCC) joined the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ENERGY STAR program as a partner in 2008. Using the EPA's online energy management and tracking tool, Portfolio Manager, the SDCCC tracked its energy consumption and has improved the facility's overall performance. Since then, the San Diego Convention Center has become a model for other convention and meeting facilities demonstrating the value of benchmarking to improve efficiency and to save money. . The Convention Center is managed and marketed by the SDCCC, a non-profit public

62

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications CIGNLCommentsDOECSCRulemaking11-30-10.doc DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

63

Microstructures and Textures Comparison of Conventional and High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

D12: Effects of Heating Rate on the Phase Transformation Temperature of .... of Conventional and High Niobium API 5L X80 Line Pipe Steel Using EBSD.

64

Properties of Conventionally Alloyed and Powder Alloyed Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Properties of Conventionally Alloyed and Powder Alloyed Nano-Crystalline Titanium Consolidated Via Spark Plasma Sintering. Author(s) ...

65

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response...

66

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint...

67

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint...

68

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint...

69

Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Project Type Topic 1...

70

DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting with CIGNL DOE Notice of Inquiry on...

71

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional methods for removing sulfur and other contaminants from syngas typically rely on chemical or physical absorption processes operating at low temperatures. When cooled...

72

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country Conventional Energy Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country March 1, 2012 Las Vegas, Nevada Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino The Office of Indian Energy Tribal Leader Energy Forum on "Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development: Best Practices in Indian Country" was held March 1, 2012, in Las Vegas, Nevada. The forum focused on recent trends, existing successful partnerships, and perspectives on the future of conventional energy and how tribal business interests are evolving to meet the interests and needs of new tribal energy economies. The forucm provided an opportunity for tribal

73

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a comparison of vehicle purchase and energy costs, and fuel-saving benefits of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles relative to hybrid electric and conventional vehicles.

Simpson, A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public Comments Convention on Supplementary Compensation Notice of Inquiry and Public Comments In an effort to assist the Department of Energy in its development of regulations pursuant to section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), the DOE General Counsel's office issued a Notice of Inquiry (NOI) in July 2010. The Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) provides for a global nuclear liability regime assuring prompt and equitable compensation in the event of certain nuclear incidents, and features the creation of an international fund to supplement the amount of compensation available for nuclear damage resulting from such incidents. Section 934 of the EISA authorizes the Secretary of Energy to

75

2012 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Federation of Natives Convention Alaska Federation of Natives Convention 2012 Alaska Federation of Natives Convention October 18, 2012 - 12:49pm Addthis Anchorage, Alaska October 18 - 20, 2012 During the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention held October 18-20 in Anchorage, the DOE Office of Indian Energy and the EERE Tribal Energy Program presented a preconference workshop entitled "Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Alaska Native Community Development." The workshop was designed to help tribal leaders and staff understand the range of energy efficiency and renewable energy opportunities that exist in their remote communities, and also covered project development and financing for clean energy projects. Download the Alaska workshop presentations. Addthis Related Articles

76

Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Convention Center Solar Power Plant Convention Center Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Atlantic City Convention Center Solar Power Plant Facility Atlantic City Convention Center Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Pepco Energy Services Location Atlantic City, New Jersey Coordinates 39.3642834°, -74.4229266° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3642834,"lon":-74.4229266,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention Indian Gaming 2012 Tradeshow and Convention March 13, 2012 - 6:47pm Addthis The National Indian Gaming Association (NIGA) 2012 tradeshow and convention will take place April 1-4, 2012, in San Diego, California. The event features seminars and trainings and other activities. Be sure to visit the Office of Indian Energy booth! Learn more on the NIGA website. Addthis Related Articles Energy Savings Performance Contract Case Studies Pacific Region Combined Heat and Power Projects Byron Washom, Director of Strategic Energy Initiatives at the University of California at San Diego, poses with an electric vehicle and some of the solar panels that cover UCSD's campus.| Photo courtesy of UCSD Q&A With Byron Washom of the University of California at San Diego

78

Livermore team successfully leads important test of a conventional warhead  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

102813_dod 102813_dod 10/28/2013 Livermore team successfully leads important test of a conventional warhead for the DoD Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov LLNL served as technical lead and integrator on an important test to assess a new conventional warhead designed by the Lab. Dave Hare, Livermore's program manager of the test, called it an "unequivocal success." Below is the press release from the Department of Defense Defense Department successfully conducts warhead sled test The Defense Department announced recently the successful testing of an advanced conventional precision effects warhead, a critical part of a national effort to establish a conventional prompt strike capability. This capability will contribute to the country's ability to defend its interests

79

File:EIA-conventional-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

conventional-gas.pdf conventional-gas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Natural Gas Production in Conventional Fields, Lower 48 States Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 3.25 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Natural Gas Production in Conventional Fields, Lower 48 States Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2009-04-08 Extent National Countries United States UN Region Northern America File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:54, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 17:54, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (3.25 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

80

Passive solar potential of a conventional home. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A conventional home not designed for passive solar heating was found to use an average of 61% less natural gas for space heating when compared to four similarly used control homes of identical design during the 1979-1980 heating season in Fort Collins, Colorado. The significant savings are attributed to: (1) passive solar gain through conventional windows; (2) optimum orientation of the home placing windows and doors away from prevailing winds; (3) the use of low-cost insulating window shutters; (4) conventional winterization; and (5) energy-conscious life-styles of the occupants. The payback period for the minor investment made by the owners of the demonstration home was estimated to be approximately two years. The results demonstrate that passive solar has a much greater potential in a conventional home than is currently believed and suggest that all future homes be oriented and constructed for maximum solar exposure.

Waterman, E.L.

1981-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Comparison of Conventional Distributed Computing Environments and Computational Grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years novel distributed computing environments termed grids have emerged. Superficially, grids are considered successors to, and more sophisticated and powerful versions of, conventional distributed environments. This paper investigates the ...

Zsolt Németh; Vaidy S. Sunderam

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Actors, coalitions and the framework convention on climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the political processes through which the Framework Convention on Climate Change was negotiated and the initial efforts of the United States, the Netherlands, and Japan to adopt national policies and ...

Sewell, Granville C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A state estimator including conventional and synchronized phasor measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an effective weighted least square formulation for the solution of the state estimation problem, considering conventional as well as synchronized phasor measurements. The proposed algorithm is based on a reference-free formulation, ...

George N. Korres; Nikolaos M. Manousakis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The All Superconducting Substation: A Comparison with a Conventional Substation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional substations today are quite similar in appearance to those of 50 years ago. However, substation components, efficiency, and safety have improved considerably in that time. If the improvements are to continue, different technologies will be required in the future. Superconducting devices such as transformers and cables are under development at present and may provide more efficient and more reliable service than conventional components. This report describes the effects of substituting superc...

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Dynamic Phase Structures in the Evolution of Conventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an agent-based model of a finite group of agents in a single population who each choose which convention to advocate, and which convention to practice. Influences or dependencies in agents choice exists in the form of guru effects and what others practice. With payoffs being dependent on cumulative rewards or actual standings in society, we illustrate the evolutionary dynamics of the phase structure of each group in the population via simulations.

Azhar, A K M; Ruzlan, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Results from Case Studies of Conventional Hydroelectric Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed plant performance analyses for three conventional hydroelectric plants were conducted using unit and plant performance characteristics and 1-minute plant operational data from 2008, 2009, and 2010. This report describes results from detailed performance analyses that evaluated reductions in overall plant efficiencies under a variety of operation-related and market-related conditions for the plants. Results show that the non-market operation of the conventional plant exhibited more efficient ...

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

87

EPRG WORKING PAPER The Effect of CO2 Pricing on Conventional and Non-Conventional Oil Supply and Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What would be the effect of CO2 pricing on global oil supply and demand? This paper introduces a model describing the interaction between conventional and non-conventional oil supply in a Hotelling framework and under CO2 constraints. The model assumes that nonconventional crude oil enters the market when conventional oil supply alone is unable to meet demand, and the social cost of CO2 is included in the calculation of the oil rent at that time. The results reveal the effect of a CO2 tax set at the social cost of CO2 on oil price and demand and the uncertainty associated with the time when conventional oil production might become unable to meet demand. The results show that a tax on CO2 emissions associated with fuel use would reduce oil demand despite the effect of lower future rents, and would delay the time when conventional oil supply is unable to satisfy demand. More precisely, between 81 and 99 % of the CO2 tax is carried into the oil price despite the counter-balancing effect of the reduced rent. A CO2 tax on fuel use set at the social cost of CO2 would delay by 25 years the time when conventional oil production is unable to meet oil demand, from 2019 to 2044 (mean value). The results show that this date is very sensitive to the price elasticity of demand and the demand growth rate, which shows the great potential of demand-side measures to smooth the transition towards low-carbon liquid fuel alternatives. www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRG WORKING PAPER Keywords JEL Classification Oil supply and demand; Conventional and non-conventional oil; CO2 pricing; Social cost of CO2.

Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope; Aurélie Méjean; Chris Hope

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

ENERGY STAR Success Story: San Diego Convention Center | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

San Diego Convention Center San Diego Convention Center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

89

ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

90

Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as in situ leaching (ISL) mining operations, to provide a more complete picture of uranium production. While this report focuses on the impacts associated with conventional surface and underground uranium mines Radioactive Materials from Uranium Mining. Volume 1: Mining and Reclamation Background" by U.S. EPA (2006

91

The Numerical Simulation of Conventional Ground Coalbed Methane Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The migration, accumulation, and production of coalbed methane (CBM) are absolutely different from the conventional natural gas. The mechanism of the migration and production of CBM are researched and the geological model of CBM reservoir simulation ... Keywords: coalbed methane, numerical simulation, desportion-diffusion, two phase flow, fully implicit finite difference

Lin Xiaoying; Liu Guowei; Su Xianbo

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: Justin Pollard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Proliferation and the Deterrence of Conventional War: A Proposal Justin Pollard April 2009) Introduction It seems counterintuitive to think that the spread of nuclear weapons could make the world a safer of ubiquitous nuclear armament is a more dangerous and unstable one. Certainly, a weapon of the nuclear

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

93

ENERGY STAR Success Story VA Beach Convention Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Success Story: STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center Located in Virginia's most populous city, the Virginia Beach Convention Center (VBCC) comprises more than 516,000 square feet and typically hosts 400 events a year. Fully opened in 2007, the VBCC has served as the anchor for the successful revitalization of Virginia Beach's old beach district. With historical references and maritime themes integrated into the structure's modern design, the Center features many technological advances that make it a prime location for meetings, conferences, and trade shows. However, even with a newly constructed building, the VBCC has demonstrated an important energy management principle: all buildings, regardless of their age and building systems they employ, can reduce energy consumption, save money, and offset greenhouse gas

94

Conventional Positron Target for a Tesla Formatted Beam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 SLAC-TN-03-072 November 2003 Abstract This note documents a set of expressions used to explore the issue of whether or not it is reasonable to consider a conventional positron source for a Tesla formatted beam. The critical issue is that of energy deposition in the conversion target and the comparison of the induced stress with the ultimate tensile strength of the target material. Since the length of the incident beam pulse is large in comparison to the ratio of beam size to the speed of sound, the concurrent pressure pulse dissipates in a time short compared to the overall pulse duration and one is left with only the Conventional Positron Target for a Tesla Formatted Beam John C. Sheppard Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

95

Government of Canada Initiatives in Support of the Joint Convention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Government of Canada strongly supported international efforts to bring into force the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (the Joint Convention), and was the second country to ratify it. The Joint Convention places a number of obligations on Contracting Parties aimed at achieving and maintaining a high level of safety worldwide in spent fuel and radioactive waste management, ensuring that effective defenses against potential hazards are in place during all management stages, preventing accidents with radiological consequences and mitigating their consequences should they occur. In addition to establishing and maintaining a modem regulatory framework and an independent regulatory body through the 2000 Nuclear Safety and Control Act, the Government of Canada has implemented a number of initiatives that address its responsibilities and serve to further enhance Canada's compliance with the Joint Convention. For nuclear fuel waste, the Government of Canada brought into force the Nuclear Fuel Waste Act in 2002 to require waste owners to develop, fund, organize and implement a long-term solution for Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The Act clearly reserves for Government the decision on the solution to be implemented in the best interests of Canadians, as well as oversight to ensure that waste owners are fulfilling their responsibilities. In the case of low-level radioactive waste, long-term solutions are being developed to ensure the protection of health, safety, and the environment, both now and in the future. Regarding uranium mine and mill tailings, current operators have state-of-the-art waste management facilities in place. The Government of Canada works with provincial governments to ensure that any potential abandoned or legacy mines sites where no owner can be held responsible are safely decommissioned and managed over the long term. (authors)

Brown, P.A.; Metcalfe, D.E. [Natural Resources Canada, 580 Booth Street, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0E4 (Canada); Lojk, R. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, 280 Slater Street, P.O. Box 1046, Station B, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On top of the tank are two thin pipes; one pipe is the hot water outlet, and the other is the cold water inlet. A large pipe in the middle is called a vent pipe. A pressure/temperature relief valve is also on top of the tank and is connected to an open pipe that runs down the side of the tank. Another valve near the bottom of the outside of the tank is the thermostat and gas valve. A cutout shows the parts inside the tank, which include a large tube called a flue tube/heat exchanger. Inside this tube is a jagged insert called a flue baffle. Beside the flue tube/heat exchanger is a thin tube called the anode rod. At the bottom of the tank is a gas burner, and beneath the burner are combustion air openings.

97

Manual for national implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention  

SciTech Connect

The Convention on the Prohibition on the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction, opened for signature, January 13, 1993, in Paris, France (CWC), is an unprecedented multilateral effort to eradicate an entire category of weapons of mass destruction and assure their continued absence through international verification. The CWC has been signed by over 150 nations, and is expected to enter into force in 1995. With its far-reaching system to verify compliance, the CWC presages a new foundation for international security based neither on fear nor on trust, but on the rule of law. A central feature of the CWC is that it requires each State Party to take implementing measures to make the Convention operative. The CWC goes beyond all prior arms control treaties in this regard. For this approach to succeed, and to inspire the eradication of other categories of mass destruction weaponry, coordination and planning are vital to harmonize CWC national implementation among States Parties. This Manual for National Implementation of the Chemical Weapons Convention is designed to assist States Parties, duly taking into account the distinctive aspects of their legal systems, in maximizing CWC enforcement consistent with their national legal obligations.

Kellman, B. [DePaul Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Tanzman, E.A.; Gualtieri, D.S.; Grimes, S.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Quantifying the Uncertainty in Estimates of World Conventional Oil Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since Hubbert proposed the "peak oil" concept to forecast ultimate recovery of crude oil for the U.S. and the world, there have been countless debates over the timing of peak world conventional oil production rate and ultimate recovery. From review of the literature, forecasts were grouped into those that are like Hubbert's with an imminent peak, and those that do not predict an imminent peak. Both groups have bases for their positions. Viewpoints from the two groups are polarized and the rhetoric is pointed and sometimes personal. A big reason for the large divide between the two groups is the failure of both to acknowledge the significant uncertainty in their estimates. Although some authors attempt to quantify uncertainty, most use deterministic methods and present single values, with no ranges. This research proposes that those that do attempt to quantify uncertainty underestimate it significantly. The objective of this thesis is to rigorously quantify the uncertainty in estimates of ultimate world conventional oil production and time to peak rate. Two different methodologies are used. The first is a regression technique based on historical production data using Hubbert's model and the other methodology uses mathematical models. However, I conduct the analysis probabilistically, considering errors in both the data and the model, which results in likelihood probability distributions for world conventional oil production and time to peak rate. In the second method, I use a multiple-experts analysis to combine estimates from the multitude of papers presented in the literature, yielding an overall distribution of estimated world conventional oil production. Giving due consideration to uncertainty, Hubbert-type mathematical modeling results in large uncertainty ranges that encompass both groups of forecasts (imminent peak and no imminent peak). These ranges are consistent with those from the multiple-experts analysis. In short, the industry does not have enough information at this time to say with any reliability what the ultimate world conventional oil production will be. It could peak soon, somewhere in the distant future, or somewhere in between. It would be wise to consider all of these possible outcomes in planning and making decisions regarding capital investment and formulation of energy policy.

Tien, Chih-Ming

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Characterizing Structural Controls of EGS-Candidate and Conventional Geothermal Reservoirs in the Great Basin: Developing Successful Exploration Strategies in Extended Terranes Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Geophysical Exploration Technologies Project Description The project group proposes to systematically assess the structural controls of geothermal systems in the Great Basin and adjacent regions. Phase I (Year 1) involves a broad inventory of structural settings of geothermal systems in the Great Basin, Walker Lane, and southern Cascades, with the aim of developing conceptual structural models and a structural catalogue of the most favorable structural environments. The regional stress field will be used to evaluate slip tendency on faults in the various tectonic provinces and thus determine which faults are most likely to accommodate dilation and slip in each setting. This overview will permit selection of representative sites (5 or 6 total) for more detailed studies in Phases II and III (Years 2-3). Sites will be selected on the basis of quality of exposure, apparent potential for geothermal development, and general type of system, so that all major types of systems can be evaluated and compared in this project (e.g., magmatic vs. nonmagmatic). The detailed investigations will include geologic mapping, kinematic analysis, stress determinations, gravity surveys, integration of available geophysical data, slip tendency analysis, and 3D modeling. In Year 3, the detailed studies will be completed and data synthesized to a) compare structural controls in various tectonic settings, b) complete the structural catalogue, and c) apply knowledge to exploration strategies and selection of drilling sites.

100

Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Comparison of conventional and airless abrasive blasting techniques  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of conventional and airless abrasive blasting techniques used to prepare steel surfaces (e.g., North Sea oil facilities, offshore structures, e.g., storage tanks, and land-based oil terminals) for corrosion protection shows the advantages of the Autoblast automatic abrasive blasting machine over the conventional air-blasting machine. Autoblast is based on the principle of a paddle type wheel, revolving at high speed, being continuously fed with abrasive, which is propelled off the wheel onto the work surface by centrifugal force in such a manner and at such an angle that the abrasive is reclaimed, cleaned and returned to the wheel for reuse. All this is done within a totally enclosed, self-propelled, highly maneuverable vehicle. The machine also incorporates a separator to remove dust and refuse, which is passed through a dust collector to allow the machine to operate 98% free of pollution. The production rate of Autoblast machines varies from about 20 sq m/man-hour on offshore platforms with confined areas, to 80 sq m/man-hour on newly constructed storage tanks.

Tighe, J.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Residential space heating cost: geothermal vs conventional systems  

SciTech Connect

The operating characteristics and economies of several representative space heating systems are analyzed. The analysis techniques used may be applied to a larger variety of systems than considered herein, thereby making this document more useful to the residential developer, heating and ventilating contractor, or homeowner considering geothermal space heating. These analyses are based on the use of geothermal water at temperatures as low as 120/sup 0/F in forced air systems and 140/sup 0/F in baseboard convection and radiant floor panel systems. This investigation indicates the baseboard convection system is likely to be the most economical type of geothermal space heating system when geothermal water of at least 140/sup 0/F is available. Heat pumps utilizing water near 70/sup 0/F, with negligible water costs, are economically feasible and they are particularly attractive when space cooling is included in system designs. Generally, procurement and installation costs for similar geothermal and conventional space heating systems are about equal, so geothermal space heating is cost competitive when the unit cost of geothermal energy is less than or equal to the unit cost of conventional energy. Guides are provided for estimating the unit cost of geothermal energy for cases where a geothermal resource is known to exist but has not been developed for use in residential space heating.

Engen, I.A.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Generalized Error Analysis for Conventional and Remote Reference Magnetotellurics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An error analysis which applies to both conventional and remote reference magnetotelluric impedance and tipper estimates is developed based on the assumption that noise in the field measurements is governed by a complex normal distribution. Under the assumed model of noise it is shown that the theoretical expressions for the variances and covariances derived recently by Gamble et al (1979b) specifically for remote reference estimates apply to conventional estimates as well. However, calculations are biased if the impedance or tipper functions are biased. The impedance and tipper functions are calculated as ratios of two random functions of noisy field measurements. The expressions for the variances and covariances account for noise in both the numerator and denominator of the estimates. They are useful provided the probability that the magnitude of the random error in the denominator exceeds the magnitude of its expected value is small. Expressions for the bias errors of the impedance and tipper functions are obtained in order to assess the relative contributions of random and bias errors to the man squared error of the estimates. The relative magnitude of both random and bias errors depends on the noise level and on the values of the sample coherencies between various pairs of the field measurements used to compute a particular estimate.

Stodt, John A.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Master EM Project Definition Rating Index - Traditional (Conventional) Definitions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17 Master EM Project Definition Rating Index - Traditional (Conventional) Definitions The following definitions describe the criteria required to achieve a maximum rating or maturity value of 5. It should be assumed that maturity values of 1-5 represent a subjective assessment of the quality of definition and/or the degree to which the end-state or maximum criteria have been met, or the product has been completed in accordance with the definition of maturity values. Rating Element Criteria for Maximum Rating COST A1 Cost Estimate A cost estimate has been developed and formally approved by DOE and is the basis for the cost baselines. The cost estimate is a reasonable approximation of Total Project Costs, and covers all phases of the project. The estimate is prepared in

105

S&TR | Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staff Staff Article title: Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention; article blurb: A Livermore team has discovered plenty of surprises in the first samples captured from a comet. Graphic of artist's conception of Stardust spacecraft. Photo of John Bradley at the Johnson Space Center. An artist's conception shows the Stardust spacecraft approaching Comet Wild 2. The spacecraft's cometary particle collector, filled with lightweight aerogel glass foam, is shown extended. The spacecraft is flanked by two solar panels. (Image courtesy of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration [NASA].) In the lower right photo, John Bradley gives the thumbs-up sign after scientists opened the Stardust sample return capsule in the clean room facility at NASA's Johnson Space Center.

106

Pseudogap in a thin film of a conventional superconductor.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A superconducting state is characterized by the gap in the electronic density of states, which vanishes at the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c}. It was discovered that in high-temperature superconductors, a noticeable depression in the density of states, the pseudogap, still remains even at temperatures above T{sub c}. Here, we show that a pseudogap exists in a conventional superconductor, ultrathin titanium nitride films, over a wide range of temperatures above T{sub c}. Our study reveals that this pseudogap state is induced by superconducting fluctuations and favoured by two-dimensionality and by the proximity to the transition to the insulating state. A general character of the observed phenomenon provides a powerful tool to discriminate between fluctuations as the origin of the pseudogap state and other contributions in the layered high-temperature superconductor compounds.

Sacepe, B.; Chapelier, C.; Baturina, T. I.; Vinokur, V. M.; Baklanov, M. R.; Sanquer, M. (Materials Science Division); (CEA-INAC/UJF-Grenoble); (A.V. Rzhanov Inst. Semiconductor Physics); (IMEC)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

CBTL Design Case Summary Conventional Feedstock Supply System - Woody  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conventional woody feedstock design has been developed that represents supply system technologies, costs, and logistics that are achievable today for supplying woody biomass as a blendstock with coal for energy production. Efforts are made to identify bottlenecks and optimize the efficiency and capacities of this supply system, within the constraints and consideration of existing local feedstock supplies, equipment, and permitting requirements. The feedstock supply system logistics operations encompass all of the activities necessary to move woody biomass from the production location to the conversion reactor ready for blending and insertion. This supply system includes operations that are currently available such that costs and logistics are reasonable and reliable. The system modeled for this research project includes the use of the slash stream since it is a more conservative analysis and represents the material actually used in the experimental part of the project.

Christopher T. Wright; Erin M. Searcy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

CBTL Design Case Summary Conventional Feedstock Supply System - Herbaceous  

SciTech Connect

A conventional bale feedstock design has been established that represents supply system technologies, costs, and logistics that are achievable today for supplying herbaceous feedstocks as a blendstock with coal for energy production. Efforts are made to identify bottlenecks and optimize the efficiency and capacities of this supply system, within the constraints of existing local feedstock supplies, equipment, and permitting requirements. The feedstock supply system logistics operations encompass all of the activities necessary to move herbaceous biomass feedstock from the production location to the conversion reactor ready for blending and insertion. This supply system includes operations that are currently available such that costs and logistics are reasonable and reliable. The system modeled for this research project includes the uses of field-dried corn stover or switchgrass as a feedstock to annually supply an 800,000 DM ton conversion facility.

Christopher T. Wright; Erin M. Searcy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Pushing towards the ET sensitivity using 'conventional' technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, the design study `Einstein gravitational wave Telescope' (ET) has been funded within the European FP7 framework. The ambitious goal of this project is to provide a conceptual design of a detector with a hundred times better sensitivity than currently operating instruments. It is expected that this will require the development and implementation of new technologies, which go beyond the concepts employed for the first and second detector generations. However, it is a very interesting and educational exercise to imagine a Michelson interferometer in which conventional technologies have been pushed to - or maybe beyond - their limits to reach the envisaged sensitivity for the Einstein Telescope. In this document we present a first sketchy analysis of what modifications and improvements are necessary to go, step-by-step, from second generation gravitational wave detectors to the Einstein Telescope.

Stefan Hild; Simon Chelkowski; Andreas Freise

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

Assessing performance : an analytical framework for the San José McEnery Convention Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study first outlines three major factors that limit the assessments of convention centers: high uncertainty in the convention industry, complex institutional structures and operational priorities, and plethora of ...

Lee, Kai-yan, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Hybrid and conventional hydrogen engine vehicles that meet EZEV emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, a time-dependent engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. A The validated engine model is then used to calculate fuel economy and emissions for three hydrogen-fueled vehicles: a conventional, a parallel hybrid, and a series hybrid. All vehicles use liquid hydrogen as a fuel. The hybrid vehicles use a flywheel for energy storage. Comparable ultra capacitor or battery energy storage performance would give similar results. This paper analyzes the engine and flywheel sizing requirements for obtaining a desired level of performance. The results indicate that hydrogen lean-burn spark-ignited engines can provide a high fuel economy and Equivalent Zero Emission Vehicle (EZEV) levels in the three vehicle configurations being analyzed.

Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

112

NUCLEAR-CONVENTIONAL POWER PLANT COST STUDY CONVENTIONAL COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS, 25,000 KW TO 325,000 KW, FOR ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY, LEMONT, ILLINOIS  

SciTech Connect

In order to establish a basis for comparing the estimated cost of nuclear power plant designs, a set of general and detailed design considerations for conventional coal-fired power plants was established. Five preliminary designs of conventional coal-fired power plants ranging in size from 25to 325 mw were selected, and cost estimates were prepared. ( A.C.)

Chittenden, W.A.

1959-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This is the first National Report prepared under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Managementi hereafter referred to as the "Joint Convention". This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). National Report Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management - May 2003

114

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This second National Report updates the first National Report published on May 3, 2003, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel (SF) and radioactive waste management facilities within the United States of America (U.S.). Second National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel

115

Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain  

SciTech Connect

Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more than the other. It was also observed that P-wave and S-wave do not always reflect from the same stratal boundaries. The utilization of full-elastic seismic wavefield needs to be maximized in oil and gas explorations in order to optimize the search for hydrocarbons.

Innocent Aluka

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE THE COMPENSATION CONVENTION: PATH TO A GLOBAL REGIME FOR DEALING WITH LEGAL LIABILITY AND COMPENSATION FOR NUCLEAR DAMAGE The adoption of the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (Compensation Convention) opens a new chapter in international nuclear liability law. The Compensation Convention provides the world community with the opportunity to deal with legal liability and compensation for nuclear damage through a global regime that includes all countries that operate nuclear powerplants (nuclear power generating countries) and most countries that do not operate nuclear powerplants (nonnuclear power generating countries). Such a global regime can remove

117

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Fourth National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Fourth United States of America (U.S.) National Report updates the Third Report published in October 2008, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management (Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the U.S. through June 2011. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within the U.S.

118

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management Third National Report for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management This Third United States National Report updates the second National Report published in October 2005, under the terms of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management 1(Joint Convention). This report reflects developments in the United States through September 2008. This report satisfies the requirements of the Joint Convention for reporting on the status of safety at spent fuel and radioactive waste management facilities within

119

National American Indian Housing Council 38th Annual Convention and Trade Show  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC’s) most longstanding annual event, the Annual Convention & Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about Indian housing, attend training...

120

Gratification obtained from television shows on Internet TV and conventional TV.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Television shows once available only on conventional TV in homes at specific days and times are now available via Internet TV in nearly any location,… (more)

Li, Nai-Se

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Producing Gas-Oil Ratio Performance of Conventional and Unconventional Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This study presents a detailed analysis of producing gas-oil ratio performance characteristics from conventional reservoir to unconventional reservoir. Numerical simulations of various reservoir fluid… (more)

Lei, Guowen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ENERGYSOLUTIONS' Comment in Response to Notice of Inquiry, Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation -75 FR 43945

123

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934

124

Fossil energy use in conventional and low-external-input cropping systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of fossil fuels will crest within the next decade and with reliance of modern conventional agriculture on fossil fuel energy inputs, food production… (more)

Cruse, Michael James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC Systems 6-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC Systems 6-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 6 MECHANICAL ­ HVAC SYSTEMS 6.1 Design Criteria 6.1.1 Codes and Standards The latest edition of the codes, standards have adequate capacity and head, no chilled water pumps #12;Conventional Facilities Chapter 6: HVAC

Ohta, Shigemi

126

Reducing Energy Usage of NULL Convention Logic Circuits using NULL Cycle Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in approximately 25% overall lower energy usage. Keywords: asynchronous circuits; NULL Convention Logic (NCL); NULLReducing Energy Usage of NULL Convention Logic Circuits using NULL Cycle Reduction Combined with Supply Voltage Scaling Brett Sparkman and Scott C. Smith Department of Electrical Engineering, University

Smith, Scott C.

127

The Impact of Conventional Surface Data upon VAS Regression Retrievals in the Lower Troposphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface temperature and dewpoint reports are added to the infrared radiances from the VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) in order to improve the retrieval of temperature and moisture profiles in the lower troposphere. The conventional (airways) ...

Tay-How Lee; Dennis Chesters; Anthony Mostek

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Agency for Non conventional Energy and Rural Technology ANERT | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Non conventional Energy and Rural Technology ANERT Non conventional Energy and Rural Technology ANERT Jump to: navigation, search Name Agency for Non-conventional Energy and Rural Technology (ANERT) Place Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India Zip 695004 Product Kerala state's nodal agency responsible for identification, promotion and development of non-conventional energy sources. Coordinates 8.50838°, 76.94773° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":8.50838,"lon":76.94773,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

129

Errors in Fixed and Moving Frame of References: Applications for Conventional and Doppler Radar Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Procedures for the estimation and correction of advection effects with single and multiple conventional and Doppler radars are developed. In the case of scalars or Cartesian vectors, the essence of the method is finding a moving frame of ...

Tzvi Gal-Chen

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Spectral Approach to the Unification of Satellite and Conventional Temperature Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to combine temperature soundings derived from VAS radiance observations with conventional data is proposed. Unlike similar previous attempts, only a portion of the signal contained in the VAS temperature soundings was combined with ...

Kyung-Sup Shin; James R. Scoggins

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Comments by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation; Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

132

Exploratory Analysis of the Difference between Temperature Observations Recorded by ASOS and Conventional Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Automated Surface Observing System is currently replacing conventional observations at the National Weather Service, the Federal Aviation Administration, and other stations that report hourly observations. From a climatological viewpoint, it ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; C. Bruce Baker

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Conventions for the use of the Session Description Protocol (SDP) for ATM Bearer Connections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes conventions for using the Session Description Protocol (SDP) described in RFC 2327 for controlling ATM Bearer Connections, and any associated ATM Adaptation Layer (AAL). The AALs addressed are Type 1, Type 2 and Type 5. This ...

R. Kumar; M. Mostafa

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Modelling the costs of non-conventional oil: A case study of Canadian bitumen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in conventional deposits. The longer- term problem of climate change arises from the fuller and longer-term use of coal, and of unconventional deposits such as heavy oils, tar sands and oil shales.” (Grubb, 2001) As conventional oil becomes scarcer, the transport... , it is not mobile at reservoir conditions, (Cupcic, 2003): density Oil shale is a fine-grained sedimentary rock rich in organic matter, (USGS, 2005): oil shales contain kerogen, which is a solid, insoluble organic material...

Méjean, A; Hope, Chris

135

B3.6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- 6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations Introduction LAs defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, ·which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit \Vithin the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10

136

Cost comparison of solar detoxification with conventional alternatives for the destruction of trichloroethylene  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to compare the cost of solar waste detoxification processes with conventional alternatives for the treatment of trichloroethylene (TCE) in air. The solar processes that were evaluated are high flux photothermal oxidation (PHOTOX), high flux thermal catalytic reforming (SOLTOX), and low flux photocatalytic oxidation (PHOCAT). The high flux processes, PHOTOX and SOLTOX, were based on dish concentrator technology. The low flux photocatalytic process was based on parabolic trough concentrating technology. The conventional alternatives are thermal oxidation, thermal catalytic oxidation, off-site carbon regeneration, and on-site solvent recovery. Analysis of the seven processes showed PHOCAT to be the most economical treatment method. PHOTOX showed slightly better economics relative to SOLTOX. Both were competitive, with the best conventional destruction process, thermal oxidation. Off-site carbon regeneration was the most expensive treatment method. 9 refs., 7 figs.

Glatzmaier, G.C.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

,"U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0u_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_c_nus_epm0u_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

138

,"Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes",60,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0u_vtr_mgalpd_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_cons_refmg_a_epm0u_vtr_mgalpd_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration"

139

,"U.S. Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Conventional, Average Refiner Gasoline Prices",6,"Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1994" ,"Release Date:","12/2/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/2/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0u_dpgal_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pri_refmg2_c_nus_epm0u_dpgal_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov"

140

Residential wood burning: Energy modeling and conventional fuel displacement in a national sample  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the natural, built, and behavioral factors predictive of energy consumption for residential space heating with wood or conventional fuels. This study was a secondary analysis of survey data from a nationwide representative sample of 5,682 households collected DOE in the 1984-1985 REC survey. Included were: weather, census division and utility data, interviewer-supplied dwelling measurements and respondent-reported energy-related family behaviors. Linear-regression procedures were used to develop a model that identified key determinants accounting for the variability in wood consumption. A nonlinear-regression model was employed to estimate the amount of conventional fuels used for space heating. The model was also used to estimate the amount of conventional fuels being displaced by wood-heating systems. There was a significant (p {le} .05) linear relationship between the dependent variable, square root of cords burned, various independent variables.

Warsco, K.S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hypofractionated Versus Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Final Results of Phase III Randomized Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated (55 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks) vs. a conventionally fractionated (64 Gy in 32 fractions within 6.5 weeks) dose schedule for radiotherapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: A total of 217 patients were randomized to either the hypofractionated (n = 108) or the conventional (n = 109) dose schedule. Most patients (n = 156) underwent RT planning and RT using a two-dimensional computed tomography method. Efficacy using the clinical, radiologic, and prostate-specific antigen data in each patient was evaluated before RT and at predetermined intervals after RT until death. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using the modified Late Effect in Normal Tissue - Subjective Objective Management Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scales was also evaluated before and at intervals after RT to 60 months. Results: The whole group has now been followed for a median of 90 months (range, 3-138). Of the 217 patients, 85 developed biochemical relapse (nadir prostate-specific antigen level + 2 {mu}g/L), 36 in the hypofractionated and 49 in the conventional group. The biochemical relapse-free, but not overall, survival at 90 months was significantly better with the hypofractionated (53%) than with the conventional (34%) schedule. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity persisted 60 months after RT and did not differ between the two dose schedules. Multivariate analyses revealed that the conventional schedule was of independent prognostic significance, not only for biochemical failure, but also for an increased risk of worse genitourinary symptoms at 4 years. Conclusions: A therapeutic advantage of the hypofractionated compared with the conventional dose schedule for RT of prostate cancer was evident at 90 months in the present study.

Yeoh, Eric E., E-mail: eric.yeoh@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Botten, Rochelle J.; Butters, Julie; Di Matteo, Addolorata C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Holloway, Richard H. [Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Fowler, Jack [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Water Power Program supports the development of technologies that harness the nation's renewable hydropower resources to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diver- sion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. The program's conventional hydropower activities focus on increasing generating capacity and efficiency at existing hydroelectric facilities, adding hydroelectric generating capacity to exist- ing non-powered dams, adding new low impact hydropower, increasing advanced pumped-storage hydropower capacity, and reducing potential environmental impacts of conven- tional hydropower production. The program's research and

143

Residential heating costs: a comparison of geothermal, solar and conventional resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The costs of residential heating throughout the United States using conventional, solar, and geothermal energy were determined under current and projected conditions. These costs are very sensitive to location - being dependent on the local prices of conventional energy supplies, local solar insolation, cimate, and the proximity and temperature of potential geothermal resources. The sharp price increases in imported fuels during 1979 and the planned decontrol of domestic oil and natural gas prices have set the stage for geothermal and solar market penetration in the 1980's.

Bloomster, C.H.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Fassbender, L.L.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

NV Energy Solar Integration Study: Cycling and Movements of Conventional Generators for Balancing Services  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With an increasing penetration level of solar power in the southern Nevada system, the impact of solar on system operations needs to be carefully studied from various perspectives. Qualitatively, it is expected that the balancing requirements to compensate for solar power variability will be larger in magnitude; meanwhile, generators providing load following and regulation services will be moved up or down more frequently. One of the most important tasks is to quantitatively evaluate the cycling and movements of conventional generators with solar power at different penetration levels. This study is focused on developing effective methodologies for this goal and providing a basis for evaluating the wear and tear of the conventional generators

Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Lower-Energy Requirements for Power-Assist HEV Energy Storage Systems--Analysis and Rationale (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presented at the 27th International Battery Seminar and Exhibit, 15-18 March 2010, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. NREL conducted simulations and analysis of vehicle test data with research partners in response to a USABC request; results suggest that power-assist hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), like conventional HEVs, can achieve high fuel savings with lower energy requirements at potentially lower cost.

Gonder, J.; Pesaran, A.

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

147

Formation of N2O and NO2 Across Conventional DeNOx SCR Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project investigated the formation of N2O and NO2 across conventional DeNOx selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. N2O is a particularly strong greenhouse gas, and both N2O and NO2 may adversely impact downstream processes. Additional data related to their formation or reduction across SCR catalysts is desirable.

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Technological impact of Non-Conventional Renewable Energy in the Chilean Electricity System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technological impact of Non-Conventional Renewable Energy in the Chilean Electricity System Juan D of methodology and analysis of the energy sector, considering whether they are simulation models. Molina C. GSM Victor J. Martinez A. GSM Hugh Rudnick, Fellow Department of Electrical Engineering

Rudnick, Hugh

149

Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Bibliography. Volume 8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains all of the technical references found in Volumes 1-7 concerning the development of guidelines for the verification and validation of expert systems, knowledge-based systems, other AI systems, object-oriented systems, and conventional systems.

Miller, L.A.; Hayes, J.E.; Mirsky, S.M. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Abstract --Image segmentation plays an important role in medical image processing. The aim of conventional hard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of conventional hard segmentation methods is to assign a unique label to each voxel. However, due to the limited (PV) effect. Using the hard segmentation methods, the PV effect can substantially decrease evaluation. Results demonstrated that a hard segmentation method would loss a significant amount of details

151

Chemical Weapons Convention Requirements Part 745page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Weapons Convention Requirements Part 745­page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001 §745.1 ADVANCE NOTIFICATION AND ANNUAL REPORT OF ALL EXPORTS OF SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) not less than 30 days in advance of every export

Bernstein, Daniel

152

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES from motor vehicles because unlike emissions of CO2, which are relatively easy to estimate, emissions-related emissions. In the U.S., for example, emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the production and use of motor

Kammen, Daniel M.

153

Nuclear forward scattering vs. conventional Mossbauer studies of atomically tailored Eu-based materials.  

SciTech Connect

With the decrease in size of devices, rapid characterization of nano-devices is an inevitable necessity. It is shown that Moessbauer spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation from the advanced photon source provides such a tool of investigation. Results are presented and compared for conventional Moessbauer and Nuclear Forward Scattering for {sup 151}Eu-doped magnesium sulfide as an example, especially at low concentrations.

Konjhodzic, A.; Adamczyk, A.; Hasan, Z.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Carroll, J. J.; Vagizov, F.; Univ. of Philadelphia; Youngstown State Univ.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Powering America Fact Sheet Series 1 Wind energy is more expensive than conventional energy, the commission determined that wind energy provided the lowest cost of any new generation resource submitted a reduction in payments by electricity customers of $305 million in one year.2 2 Wind energy requires

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

155

Conventional BCS, Unconventional BCS, and Non-BCS Hidden Dineutron Phases in Neutron Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of pairing correlations in neutron matter is re-examined. Working within the conventional approximation in which the $nn$ pairing interaction is provided by a realistic bare $nn$ potential fitted to scattering data, it is demonstrated that the standard BCS theory fails in regions of neutron number density where the pairing constant $\\lambda$, depending crucially on density, has a non-BCS negative sign. We are led to propose a non-BCS scenario for pairing phenomena in neutron matter that involves the formation of a hidden dineutron state. In low-density neutron matter where the pairing constant has the standard BCS sign, two phases organized by pairing correlations are possible and compete energetically: a conventional BCS phase and a dineutron phase. In dense neutron matter, where $\\lambda$ changes sign, only the dineutron phase survives and exists until the critical density for termination of pairing correlations is reached at approximately twice the neutron density in heavy atomic nuclei.

V. A. Khodel; J. W. Clark; V. R. Shaginyan; M. V. Zverev

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cost of energy from some renewable and conventional technologies. Progress report, FY 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Up-to-date, consistent, and transparent estimates of the cost of delivered energy from a selected number of solar and renewable technologies were developed and these were compared with the costs of conventional alternatives meeting the energy needs in comparable applications. Technology characterizations and cost assessments of representative systems relating to 23 solar and renewable resource technology/application pairs were performed. For each pair, identical assessments were also made for representative conventional (e.g., fossil fuel) competing systems. Section 2 summarizes the standardized methodology developed to do the technology characterizations and cost assessments. Assessments of technology/application pairs relating to distributed applications are presented in Section 3. Central system assessments are presented in Section 4. (MCW)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Outline of an on-site inspection regime for conventional arms control in Europe  

SciTech Connect

The complexity of the negotiations on Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) was emphasized recently by General John R. Galvin, SACEUR, when he stated, {open_quotes}The difficulties of comparing the relative strengths of strategic or intermediate-range nuclear arsenals pale in comparison with the problems of assessing the relative capabilities of opposing conventional forces.{open_quotes} Throughout this process, intensive and rigorous verification measures must be developed and enforced to ensure an acceptable degree of reliability. The eventual agreement will require a complex verification monitoring process covering a vast geographical area. The long-term success of the agreement to a large extent will depend on the level of confidence achieved by the verification process and the effective deployment of technological means will be essential to that process.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation : the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and policy-making in Panama.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Framework Convention on Climate Change has yet to deal with tropical deforestation although it represents an important source of greenhouse gas emissions. In December… (more)

Guay, Bruno.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Combustion Turbine Guidelines: Conventional and Advanced Machines: Volume 5: Westinghouse Models W501A-D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more than a decade, EPRI has been developing gas turbine hot section component repair and coating guidelines to assist utilities in the refurbishment of these critical and expensive parts. Utilities and repair vendors have used these guidelines to perform repairs on buckets (blades), turbine nozzles (vanes), combustion liners, and combustor transitions. Guidelines now exist for a variety of conventional and advanced General Electric and Westinghouse heavy frame gas turbines.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

160

A Rosetta Stone Relating Conventions In Photo-Meson Partial Wave Analyses  

SciTech Connect

A new generation of complete experiments in pseudoscalar meson photo-production is being pursued at several laboratories. While new data are emerging, there is some confusion regarding definitions of asymmetries and the conventions used in partial wave analyses (PWA). We present expressions for constructing asymmetries as coordinate-system independent ratios of cross sections, along with the names used for these ratios by different PWA groups.

A.M. Sandorfi, B. Dey, A. Sarantsev, L. Tiator, R. Workman

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effects of Markets and Operations on the Suboptimization of Pumped Storage and Conventional Hydroelectric Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed plant performance analyses were conducted using unit performance data, market data, and plant operational data from 2008, 2009, and 2010 for five pumped storage plants and three conventional hydroelectric plants. These eight case studies encompass three markets (MISO, PJM, and NYISO) and two regions (Southeast area and Western area). Owners for the eight plants include three investor-owned utilities, two state power authorities, and one federal power corporation. This report expands on ...

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

162

Gasoline-fueled hybrid vs. conventional vehicle emissions and fuel economy.  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses the relative fuel economy and emissions behavior, both measured and modeled, of technically comparable, contemporary hybrid and conventional vehicles fueled by gasoline, in terms of different driving cycles. Criteria pollutants (hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides) are discussed, and the potential emissions benefits of designing hybrids for grid connection are briefly considered. In 1997, Toyota estimated that their grid-independent hybrid vehicle would obtain twice the fuel economy of a comparable conventional vehicle on the Japan 10/15 mode driving cycle. This initial result, as well as the fuel economy level (66 mpg), made its way into the U.S. press. Criteria emissions amounting to one-tenth of Japanese standards were cited, and some have interpreted these results to suggest that the grid-independent hybrid can reduce criteria emissions in the U.S. more sharply than can a conventional gasoline vehicle. This paper shows that the potential of contemporary grid-independent hybrid vehicle technology for reducing emissions and fuel consumption under U.S. driving conditions is less than some have inferred. The importance (and difficulty) of doing test and model assessments with comparable driving cycles, comparable emissions control technology, and comparable performance capabilities is emphasized. Compared with comparable-technology conventional vehicles, grid-independent hybrids appear to have no clear criteria pollutant benefits (or disbenefits). (Such benefits are clearly possible with grid-connectable hybrids operating in zero emissions mode.) However, significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions (i.e., fuel consumption) are possible with hybrid vehicles when they are used to best advantage.

Anderson, J.; Bharathan, D.; He, J.; Plotkin, S.; Santini, D.; Vyas, A.

1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

CAES (conventional compressed-air energy storage) plant with steam generation: Preliminary design and cost analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed to evaluate the performance and cost characteristics of two alternative CAES-plant concepts which utilize the low-pressure expander's exhaust-gas heat for the generation of steam in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). Both concepts result in increased net-power generation relative to a conventional CAES plant with a recuperator. The HRSG-generated steam produces additional power in either a separate steam-turbine bottoming cycle (CAESCC) or by direct injection into and expansion through the CAES-turboexpander train (CAESSI). The HRSG, which is a proven component of combined-cycle and cogeneration plants, replaces the recuperator of a conventional CAES plant, which has demonstrated the potential for engineering and operating related problems and higher costs than were originally estimated. To enhance the credibility of the results, the analyses performed were based on the performance, operational and cost data of the 110-MW CAES plant currently under construction for the Alabama Electric Cooperative (AEC). The results indicate that CAESCC- and CAESSI-plant concepts are attractive alternatives to the conventional CAES plant with recuperator, providing greater power generation, up to 44-MW relative to the AEC CAES plant, with competitive operating and capital costs. 5 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C.; Abitante, P.A. (Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Mountainside, NJ (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Survey and assessment of conventional software verification and validation methods. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

By means of a literature survey, a comprehensive set of methods was identified for the verification and validation of conventional software. The 153 methods so identified were classified according to their appropriateness for various phases of a developmental life-cycle -- requirements, design, and implementation; the last category was subdivided into two, static testing and dynamic testing methods. The methods were then characterized in terms of eight rating factors, four concerning ease-of-use of the methods and four concerning the methods` power to detect defects. Based on these factors, two measurements were developed to permit quantitative comparisons among methods, a Cost-Benefit metric and an Effectiveness Metric. The Effectiveness Metric was further refined to provide three different estimates for each method, depending on three classes of needed stringency of V&V (determined by ratings of a system`s complexity and required-integrity). Methods were then rank-ordered for each of the three classes by terms of their overall cost-benefits and effectiveness. The applicability was then assessed of each for the identified components of knowledge-based and expert systems, as well as the system as a whole.

Mirsky, S.M.; Groundwater, E.H.; Hayes, J.E.; Miller, L.A. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical Business Development Best Practices in Indian Country  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONVENTIONAL ENERGY (OIL, GAS & COAL) FORUM & CONVENTIONAL ENERGY (OIL, GAS & COAL) FORUM & ASSOCIATED VERTICAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BEST PRACTICES IN INDIAN COUNTRY March 1, 2012 MANDALAY BAY RESORT AND CASINO NORTH CONVENTION CENTER 3950 Las Vegas Blvd. South, Las Vegas, NV 89119 The dynamic world of conventional energy (focusing on oil, gas and coal energy) is a critical piece of the American energy portfolio. This strategic energy forum will focus on recent trends, existing successful partnerships, and perspectives on the future of conventional energy and how tribal business interests are evolving to meet the interests and needs of new tribal energy economies. The third of a series of planned DOE Office of Indian Energy-sponsored strategic energy development & investment forums, this forum will provide an opportunity for Tribal leaders, federal

166

Homosexuality and the European Court of Human Rights: Recent Judgments Against the United Kingdom and Their Impact on Other Signatories to the European Convention of Human Rights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

500 B. Poland . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1. The History of the Convention in Poland . . . . . . . .System in Poland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507 C.

Dalvi, Sameera

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Estimation of steady-state unbalanced system conditions combining conventional power flow and fault analysis software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In real three-phase power systems the voltages and currents are not fully symmetrical. A method has been developed to estimate the effects of slight unbalanced network conditions for steady-state operation. A conventional power flow is followed by a linear incremental calculation using a three-phase model of the network. The unbalanced condition is handled like a multiple unbalanced fault. The process is illustrated for the case of a transformer bank with non-identical single phase units. The results show the effects of different transformer reactances and different voltage ratios, respectively.

Reichelt, D.; Ecknauer, E. [Nordostschweizerische Kraftwerke AG, Baden (Switzerland); Glavitsch, H. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zurich (Switzerland)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Economic costs of conventional surface-water treatment: A case study of the Mcallen northwest facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional water treatment facilities are the norm for producing potable water for U.S. metropolitan areas. Rapidly-growing urban populations, competing demands for water, imperfect water markets, and uncertainty of future water supplies contribute to high interests in alternative sources of potable water for many U.S. municipalities. In situations where multiple supply alternatives exist, properly analyzing which alternative is the most-economically efficient over the course of its useful life requires a sound economic and financial analysis of each alternative using consistent methodology. This thesis discusses such methodology and provides an assessment of the life-cycle costs of conventional water treatment using actual data from an operating surface-water treatment facility located in McAllen, Texas: the McAllen Northwest facility. This facility has a maximum-designed operating capacity of 8.25 million gallons per day (mgd), but due to required shutdown time and other limitations, it is currently operating at 78% of the designed capacity (6.44 mgd). The economic and financial life-cycle costs associated with constructing and operating the McAllen Northwest facility are analyzed using a newly-developed Excel 2 spreadsheet model, CITY H O ECONOMICS . Although specific results are applicable only to the McAllen Northwest facility, the baseline results of $771.67/acre-foot (acft)/ yr {$2.37/1,000 gallons/yr} for this analysis provide insight regarding the life-cycle costs for conventional surface-water treatment. The baseline results are deterministic (i.e., noninclusive of risk/uncertainty about datainput values), but are expanded to include sensitivity analyses with respect to several critical factors including the facility’s useful life, water rights costs, initial construction costs, and annual operations and maintenance, chemical, and energy costs. For example, alternative costs for water rights associated with sourcing water for conventional treatment facilities are considered relative to the assumed baseline cost of $2,300/ac-ft, with results ranging from a low of $653.34/ac-ft/yr (when water rights are $2,000/ac-ft) to a high of $1,061.83/ac-ft/yr (when water rights are $2,600/ac-ft). Furthermore, modifications to key data-input parameters and results are included for a more consistent basis of comparison to enable comparisons across facilities and/or technologies. The modified results, which are considered appropriate to compare to other similarly calculated values, are $667.74/ac-ft/yr {2.05/1,000 gallons/yr}.

Rogers, Callie Sue

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Implementing the chemical weapons convention: The nuts and bolts of compliance  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a presentation prepared for the American Bar Association in which the author discusses the issue of rights to privacy in the United States in the face of implementing the Chemical Weapons Convention inspections. The author points out that there are no clear precedents in law which deal with all the issues which will result from international inspections for verification which are required by the treaty. In particular as inspections tread on the issue of personal rights or private property there is a fairly ill defined legal area which needs to be developed to allow such inspections in the face of constitutional guarantees.

Tanzman, E.A.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed real-world school bus drive cycle data and selected similar standard drive cycles for testing on a chassis dynamometer. NREL tested a first-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) school bus equipped with a 6.4L engine and an Enova PHEV drive system comprising a 25-kW/80 kW (continuous/peak) motor and a 370-volt lithium ion battery pack. A Bluebird 7.2L conventional school bus was also tested. Both vehicles were tested over three different drive cycles to capture a range of driving activity. PHEV fuel savings in charge-depleting (CD) mode ranged from slightly more than 30% to a little over 50%. However, the larger fuel savings lasted over a shorter driving distance, as the fully charged PHEV school bus would initially operate in CD mode for some distance, then in a transitional mode, and finally in a charge-sustaining (CS) mode for continued driving. The test results indicate that a PHEV school bus can achieve significant fuel savings during CD operation relative to a conventional bus. In CS mode, the tested bus showed small fuel savings and somewhat higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions than the baseline comparison bus.

Barnitt, R.; Gonder, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Energy Comparison Between Conventional and Chilled Water Thermal Storage Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the summer of previous years, Kuwait faced a series of power shortages emphasizing the need for urgent commissioning of power generation projects. It is estimated that the demand for electricity is growing at an average of 6.2% per year, encouraged by government subsidies and driven by the rapid and continual expansion in building construction, urban development, and the heavy reliance on Air Conditioning (AC) systems for the cooling of buildings. The Chilled Water Thermal Storage (CWTS) system is one of the available techniques that can be utilized to reduce peak electricity demand of buildings when national electricity consumption is at its highest level. This paper demonstrates that the use of CWTS system reduces the peak power demand and energy consumption of AC systems for design day conditions by 36.7% - 87.5% and 5.4% - 7.2%, respectively. This reduction depends on selected operating strategies as compared with conventional AC system. Furthermore, results show that the annual energy consumption of CWTS systems decreases by between 4.5% and 6.9% compared with conventional systems, where chillers and pumps significantly contribute to this reduction.

Sebzali, M.; Hussain, H. J.; Ameer, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses a method of accounting for realistic levels of driver aggression to higher-level vehicle studies, including the impact of variation in real-world driving characteristics (acceleration and speed) on vehicle energy consumption and different powertrains (e.g., conventionally powered vehicles versus electrified drive vehicles [xEVs]). Aggression variation between drivers can increase fuel consumption by more than 50% or decrease it by more than 20% from average. The normalized fuel consumption deviation from average as a function of population percentile was found to be largely insensitive to powertrain. However, the traits of ideal driving behavior are a function of powertrain. In conventional vehicles, kinetic losses dominate rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses. In xEVs with regenerative braking, rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses dominate. The relation of fuel consumption predicted from real-world drive data to that predicted by the industry-standard HWFET, UDDS, LA92, and US06 drive cycles was not consistent across powertrains, and varied broadly from the mean, median, and mode of real-world driving. A drive cycle synthesized by NREL's DRIVE tool accurately and consistently reproduces average real-world for multiple powertrains within 1%, and can be used to calculate the fuel consumption effects of varying levels of driver aggression.

Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Implementing the Espoo Convention in transboundary EIA between Germany and Poland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poland and Germany have a long common border which leads to the necessity to cooperate and consult each other in the case of large-scale projects or infrastructure measures likely to cause negative transboundary effects on the environment. There are already binding provisions for transboundary EIA. In the area of the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE), transboundary EIA is intended to be legally binding for the Member States by the Espoo Convention which was ratified by Germany 8.8.2002 and by Poland 12.6.1997. Due to corresponding directives, the same is applicable in the context of the European Union. In German legislation, this issue is regulated by Art. 8 of the Federal EIA Act in regard to transboundary participation of administration and by Art. 9a in respect of transboundary public participation. However, these EIA regulations on transboundary participation do not surpass a certain detail level, as they have to be applied between Germany and all neighbouring states. Therefore both countries decided to agree on more detailed provisions in particular regarding procedural questions. During the 12th German-Polish Environmental Council, Germany and Poland reached an agreement on 11.4.2006 in Neuhardenberg/Brandenburg an agreement upon the implementation of the Espoo Convention, the so called Neuhardenberg Agreement. This article assesses the agreement under consideration of already existing law and discusses major improvements and problems.

Albrecht, Eike [Brandenburg University of Technology of Cottbus (BTU) Centre for Law and Administration, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 1, D - 03046 Cottbus (Germany)], E-mail: albrecht@tu-cottbus.de

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses a method of accounting for realistic levels of driver aggression to higher-level vehicle studies, including the impact of variation in real-world driving characteristics (acceleration and speed) on vehicle energy consumption and different powertrains (e.g., conventionally powered vehicles versus electrified drive vehicles [xEVs]). Aggression variation between drivers can increase fuel consumption by more than 50% or decrease it by more than 20% from average. The normalized fuel consumption deviation from average as a function of population percentile was found to be largely insensitive to powertrain. However, the traits of ideal driving behavior are a function of powertrain. In conventional vehicles, kinetic losses dominate rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses. In xEVs with regenerative braking, rolling resistance and aerodynamic losses dominate. The relation of fuel consumption predicted from real-world drive data to that predicted by the industry-standard HWFET, UDDS, LA92, and US06 drive cycles was not consistent across powertrains, and varied broadly from the mean, median, and mode of real-world driving. A drive cycle synthesized by NREL's DRIVE tool accurately and consistently reproduces average real-world for multiple powertrains within 1%, and can be used to calculate the fuel consumption effects of varying levels of driver aggression.

Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Routine inspection effort required for verification of a nuclear material production cutoff convention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 27 September 1993, President Clinton proposed {open_quotes}... a multilateral convention prohibiting the production of highly enriched uranium or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside of international safeguards.{close_quotes} The UN General Assembly subsequently adopted a resolution recommending negotiation of a non-discriminatory, multilateral, and internationally and effectively verifiable treaty (hereinafter referred to as {open_quotes}the Cutoff Convention{close_quotes}) banning the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons. The matter is now on the agenda of the Conference on Disarmament, although not yet under negotiation. This accord would, in effect, place all fissile material (defined as highly enriched uranium and plutonium) produced after entry into force (EIF) of the accord under international safeguards. {open_quotes}Production{close_quotes} would mean separation of the material in question from radioactive fission products, as in spent fuel reprocessing, or enrichment of uranium above the 20% level, which defines highly enriched uranium (HEU). Facilities where such production could occur would be safeguarded to verify that either such production is not occurring or that all material produced at these facilities is maintained under safeguards.

Dougherty, D.; Fainberg, A.; Sanborn, J.; Allentuck, J.; Sun, C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Comparison of operating and incremental costs of battery electric vehicles 1. Comparison of operating and incremental costs of battery electric vehicles and conventional gasoline vehicles Characteristics Hybrid electric vehicle (Prius) Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (Volt) Plug-in electric vehicle (Leaf) Fuel efficiency (mpg equivalent) 45 38 (charge-sustaining mode) 94 (charge-depleting mode) 99 (charge-depleting mode) Annual vehicle miles traveled 12,500 Percent vehicle miles traveled electric only 0 58 100 Fuel savings vs. conventional gasoline ICE vehicle (at $3.50 per gallon)a $1,169 $2,036 $3,314 Fuel savings vs. conventional gasoline ICE vehicle (at $6.00 per gallon)a $2,004 $4,340 $7,071 Incremental vehicle cost (2010 dollars) relative to cost of 35-mpg conventional gasoline ICE vehicleb $7,000 $20,000 $20,000

177

Bioenergy: What`s in it for the grower? The cost of producing dedicated energy crops. Comparisons with conventional crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dedicated energy crops must be at least as profitable as conventional crops that could be grown on a given site before farmers will produce energy crops on that site. This report concentrates on the cost of producing dedicated energy crops and compare those costs to the profitability of conventional crops. This comparison allows one to estimate a breakeven price, that is, a price for which the profitability of dedicated energy crops is equivalent to the profitability of conventional crops. Switchgrass and hybrid poplar have been chosen as representative herbaceous and woody crop species for the estimation.

Walsh, M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

Rachel Henderson

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

Implementation of B-splines in a Conventional Finite Element Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of B-spline interpolation functions in the finite element method (FEM) is not a new subject. B-splines have been utilized in finite elements for many reasons. One reason is the higher continuity of derivatives and smoothness of B-splines. Another reason is the possibility of reducing the required number of degrees of freedom compared to a conventional finite element analysis. Furthermore, if B-splines are utilized to represent the geometry of a finite element model, interfacing a finite element analysis program with existing computer aided design programs (which make extensive use of B-splines) is possible. While B-splines have been used in finite element analysis due to the aforementioned goals, it is difficult to find resources that describe the process of implementing B-splines into an existing finite element framework. Therefore, it is necessary to document this methodology. This implementation should conform to the structure of conventional finite elements and only require exceptions in methodology where absolutely necessary. One goal is to implement B-spline interpolation functions in a finite element framework such that it appears very similar to conventional finite elements and is easily understandable by those with a finite element background. The use of B-spline functions in finite element analysis has been studied for advantages and disadvantages. Two-dimensional B-spline and standard FEM have been compared. This comparison has addressed the accuracy as well as the computational efficiency of B-spline FEM. Results show that for a given number of degrees of freedom, B-spline FEM can produce solutions with lower error than standard FEM. Furthermore, for a given solution time and total analysis time B-spline FEM will typically produce solutions with lower error than standard FEM. However, due to a more coupled system of equations and larger elemental stiffness matrix, B-spline FEM will take longer per degree of freedom for solution and assembly times than standard FEM. Three-dimensional B-spline FEM has also been validated by the comparison of a three-dimensional model with plane-strain boundary conditions to an equivalent two-dimensional model using plane strain conditions.

Owens, Brian C.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Study of Eddy-induced Fluctuations of the Zonal-Mean Wind Using Conventional and Transformed Eulerian Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of eddy-induced fluctuations of the zonal-mean current in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is examined from the perspective of conventional and transformed Eulerian diagnostics using ECMWF FGGE IIIb data. Spatial correlations ...

Richard L. Pfeffer

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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181

Abstract--Compared to the conventional grid, the smart grid requires active participation of consumers to improve the quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

courses. His research interests include distribution automation, smart grid applications, electric1 Abstract-- Compared to the conventional grid, the smart grid requires active participation been visionary documents on smart grids that call for improved security [6], [7]. There are researchers

Namboodiri, Vinod

182

Nonlinear Dynamical Model of Regime Switching Between Conventions and Business Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce and study a non-equilibrium continuous-time dynamical model of the price of a single asset traded by a population of heterogeneous interacting agents in the presence of uncertainty and regulatory constraints. The model takes into account (i) the price formation delay between decision and investment by the second-order nature of the dynamical equations, (ii) the linear and nonlinear mean-reversal or their contrarian in the form of speculative price trading, (iii) market friction, (iv) uncertainty in the fundamental value which controls the amplitude of mispricing, (v) nonlinear speculative momentum effects and (vi) market regulations that may limit large mispricing drifts. We find markets with coexisting equilibrium, conventions and business cycles, which depend on (a) the relative strength of value-investing versus momentum-investing, (b) the level of uncertainty on the fundamental value and (c) the degree of market regulation. The stochastic dynamics is characterized by nonlinear geometric rando...

Yukalov, V I; Yukalova, E P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evaluation of new and conventional thermoluminescent phosphors for environmental monitoring using automated thermoluminescent dosimeter readers  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, there has been considerable interest in a new generation of super-sensitive thermoluminescent (TL) phosphors for potential use in routine personnel and environmental monitoring. Two of these phosphors, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and LiF:Mg,Cu,P, are evaluated in this paper for selected characteristics relevant to environmental monitoring, along with two conventional phosphors widely used in environmental monitoring, LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF{sub 2}:Dy. The characteristics evaluated are light-induced fading, light-induced background, linearity and variability at low dose, and the minimum measurable dose. These characteristics were determined using an automated commercial dosimetry system (Harshaw System 8800) and routine processing protocols. Annealing and readout protocols for each phosphor were optimized for use in a large-scale environmental monitoring program.

Rathbone, B.A.; Endres, A.W.; Antonio, E.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Computed and conventional arthrotomography of the glenohumeral joint: normal anatomy and clinical experience  

SciTech Connect

The glenohumeral joint was studied in 25 cadavers and 136 patients using computed arthrotomography (CAT) and conventional arthrotomography (AT) to assess shoulder instability. Cadaver shoulders were injected with air or latex, sectioned with a band saw, and normal articular anatomy outlined. CAT was performed in 81 patients and characterized the glenoid labrum as normal, abnormal, or detached. Hill-Sachs defects were seen in 20 out of 29 patients with anterior labral abnormalities, while bicipital tendon abnormalities were evident on CAT in 6. Of 55 patients who had AT, the status of the labrum was clarified in 13 of the 16 patients who had surgery or arthroscopy. Both methods can characterize the labrum; however, CAT is more comprehensive and appears ideal for both detection of Hill-Sachs defects and imaging the bicipital tendon. CAT requires less technical expertise and radiation than AT and is tolerated better by patients in pain.

Deutsch, A.L.; Resnick, D.; Mink, J.H.; Berman, J.L.; Cone, R.O. III; Resnik, C.S.; Danzig, L.; Guerra, J. Jr.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Use of seawater for air conditioning at Waikiki Convention Center. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

A large part of operating costs of a hotel in Hawaii is the cost of energy for air conditioning. Buildings can be constructed to use energy more efficiently by using many methods, however, some of these methods conflict with other concerns, aesthetics for example. Thus the process of designing and building an energy efficient hotel often involves trade-offs between energy efficiency and other objectives. The method proposed herein to reduce energy costs is to introduce seawater, pumped from the deep ocean at a temperature of approximately six degrees celsius, directly to heat exchangers which cool the chilled water circulating in the building air conditioning system. The energy required to run the system would be reduced to only the cost of the seawater pumps, the fans and controls. The savings would be in the operating costs of the seawater pumps versus the cost to the compressors of a conventional air conditioning system.

Williams, M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Routine inspection effort required for verification of a nuclear material production cutoff convention  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary estimates of the inspection effort to verify a Nuclear Material Cutoff Convention are presented. The estimates are based on (1) a database of about 650 facilities a total of eight states, i.e., the five nuclear-weapons states and three ``threshold`` states; (2) typical figures for inspection requirements for specific facility types derived from IAEA experience, where applicable; and (3) alternative estimates of inspection effort in cutoff options where full IAEA safeguards are not stipulated. Considerable uncertainty must be attached to the effort estimates. About 50--60% of the effort for each option is attributable to 16 large-scale reprocessing plants assumed to be in operation in the eight states; it is likely that some of these will be shut down by the time the convention enters into force. Another important question involving about one third of the overall effort is whether Euratom inspections in France and the U.K. could obviate the need for full-scale IAEA inspections at these facilities. Finally, the database does not yet contain many small-scale and military-related facilities. The results are therefore not presented as predictions but as the consequences of alternative assumptions. Despite the preliminary nature of the estimates, it is clear that a broad application of NPT-like safeguards to the eight states would require dramatic increases in the IAEA`s safeguards budget. It is also clear that the major component of the increased inspection effort would occur at large reprocessing plants (and associated plutonium facilities). Therefore, significantly bounding the increased effort requires a limitation on the inspection effort in these facility types.

Fishbone, L.G.; Sanborn, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

In-Use and Vehicle Dynamometer Evaluation and Comparison of Class 7 Hybrid Electric and Conventional Diesel Delivery Trucks  

SciTech Connect

This study compared fuel economy and emissions between heavy-duty hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) and equivalent conventional diesel vehicles. In-use field data were collected from daily fleet operations carried out at a FedEx facility in California on six HEV and six conventional 2010 Freightliner M2-106 straight box trucks. Field data collection primarily focused on route assessment and vehicle fuel consumption over a six-month period. Chassis dynamometer testing was also carried out on one conventional vehicle and one HEV to determine differences in fuel consumption and emissions. Route data from the field study was analyzed to determine the selection of dynamometer test cycles. From this analysis, the New York Composite (NYComp), Hybrid Truck Users Forum Class 6 (HTUF 6), and California Air Resource Board (CARB) Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) drive cycles were chosen. The HEV showed 31% better fuel economy on the NYComp cycle, 25% better on the HTUF 6 cycle and 4% worse on the CARB HHDDT cycle when compared to the conventional vehicle. The in-use field data indicates that the HEVs had around 16% better fuel economy than the conventional vehicles. Dynamometer testing also showed that the HEV generally emitted higher levels of nitric oxides than the conventional vehicle over the drive cycles, up to 77% higher on the NYComp cycle (though this may at least in part be attributed to the different engine certification levels in the vehicles tested). The conventional vehicle was found to accelerate up to freeway speeds over ten seconds faster than the HEV.

Burton, J.; Walkowicz, K.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Detailed thermal performance data on conventional and highly insulating window systems  

SciTech Connect

Data on window heat-transfer properties (U-value and shading coefficient (SC)) are usually presented only for a few window designs at specific environmental conditions. With the introduction of many new window glazing configurations (using low-emissivity coatings and gas fills) and the interest in their annual energy performance, it is important to understand the effects of window design parameters and environmental conditions on U and SC. This paper discusses the effects of outdoor temperature, wind speed, insolation, surface emittance, and gap width on the thermal performance of both conventional and highly insulating windows. Some of these data have been incorporated into the fenestration chapter of the ''ASHRAE Handbook - 1985 Fundamentals.'' The heat-transfer properties of multiglazed insulating window designs are also presented. These window systems include those having (1) one or more low-emittance coatings; (2) low-conductivity gas-fill or evacuated cavities; (3) a layer of transparent silica aerogel, a highly insulating microporous material; or (4) combinations of the above. Using the detailed building energy analysis program, DOE 2.1B, we show that these systems, which all maintain high solar transmittance, can add more useful thermal energy to a space than they lose, even in a northern climate. Thus, in terms of seasonal energy flows, these fenestration systems out-perform insulated walls or roofs.

Arasteh, D.; Selkowitz, S.; Hartmann, J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Challenges and Potential Solutions for Reducing Climate Control Loads in Conventional and Hybrid Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory, is collaborating with U.S. automotive manufacturers to develop innovative techniques to reduce national fuel consumption and vehicle tailpipe emissions by reducing vehicle climate control loads. A new U.S. emissions test, the Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (SFTP), will soon begin measuring tailpipe emissions with the air conditioning system operating. Modeled results show that emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) more than double during the air conditioning part of the SFTP. Reducing the transmittance of the glazing can have a greater impact on the cabin soak temperature than ventilating the vehicle during a hot soak. Reducing the amount of outside air can decrease cooling and heating loads but requires that the recirculated air be cleaned. We discuss a photocatalytic oxidation air-cleaning process for removing volatile organic compounds and bioareosols. We conclude with an example of modeling the thermal comfort of the occupants. An auxiliary load increase of only 400 Watts (W) results in a 0.4 km/L (1 mpg) decrease for a conventional 11.9-L/100-km (28-mpg) vehicle. If every vehicle in the United States were to save only 0.4 km/L (1 mpg), $4 billion (U.S. dollars) would be saved annually in gasoline and oil costs. Further information can be found at http://www.ctts.nrel.gov/auxload.html.

Farrington, R.B., Anderson, R., Blake, D.M., Burch, S.D.; Cuddy, M.R., Keyser, M.A., Rugh, J.P.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Braze Process Optimization Involving Conventional Metal/Ceramic Brazing with 50Au-50Cu Alloy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous process variables can influence the robustness of conventional metal/ceramic brazing processes. Experience with brazing of hermetic vacuum components has identified the following parameters as influencing the outcome of hydrogen furnace brazed Kovar{trademark} to metallized alumina braze joints: (a) Mo-Mn metallization thickness, sinter fire temperature and porosity (b) Nil plate purity, thickness, and sinter firing conditions (c) peak process temperature, time above liquidus and (d) braze alloy washer thickness. ASTM F19 tensile buttons are being used to investigate the above parameters. The F19 geometry permits determination of both joint hermeticity and tensile strength. This presentation will focus on important lessons learned from the tensile button study: (A) the position of the Kovar{trademark} interlayer can influence the joint tensile strength achieved--namely, off-center interlayers can lead to residual stress development in the ceramic and degrade tensile strength values. Finite element analysis has been used to demonstrate the expected magnitude in strength degradation as a function of misalignment. (B) Time above liquidus (TAL) and peak temperature can influence the strength and alloying level of the resulting braze joint. Excessive TAL or peak temperatures can lead to overbraze conditions where all of the Ni plate is dissolved. (C) Metallize sinter fire processes can influence the morphology and strength obtained from the braze joints.

MALIZIA JR.,LOUIS A.; MEREDITH,KEITH W.; APPEL,DANIEL B.; MONROE,SAUNDRA L.; BURCHETT,STEVEN N.; STEPHENS JR.,JOHN J.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

192

Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Devices to improve the performance of a conventional two-stroke spark ignition engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents research efforts made in three different phases with the objective of improving the fuel economy of and reducing exhaust emissions from conventional, carbureted, two-stroke spark ignition (SI) engines, which are widely employed in two-wheel transportation in India. A review concerning the existing two-stroke engine technology for this application is included. In the first phase, a new scavenging system was developed and tested to reduce the loss of fresh charge through the exhaust port. In die second phase, the following measures were carried out to improve the combustion process: (1) using an in-cylinder catalyst, such as copper, chromium, and nickel, in the form of coating; (2) providing moderate thermal insulation in the combustion chamber, either by depositing thin ceramic material or by metal inserts; (3) developing a high-energy ignition system; and (4) employing high-octane fuel, such as methanol, ethanol, eucalyptus oil, and orange oil, as a blending agent with gasoline. Based on the effectiveness of the above measures, an optimized design was developed in the final phase to achieve improved performance. Test results indicate that with an optimized two-stroke SI engine, the maximum percentage improvement in brake thermal efficiency is about 31%, together with a reduction of 3400 ppm in hydrocarbons (HC) and 3% by volume of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions over the normal engine (at 3 kW, 3000 rpm). Higher cylinder peak pressures (3-5 bar), lower ignition delay (2-4{degrees}CA){degrees} and shorter combustion duration (4-10 {degrees}CA) are obtained. The knock-limited power output is also enhanced by 12.7% at a high compression ratio (CR) of 9:1. The proposed modifications in the optimized design are simple, low-cost and easy to adopt for both production and existing engines.

Poola, R.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nagalingam, B.; Gopalakrishnan, K.V. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Comparison of conventional and solar-water-heating products and industries report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

President Carter established a goal that would require installation of at least one million solar water heaters by 1985 and 20 million water-heating systems by the year 2000. The goals established require that the solar industry be sufficiently mature to provide cost-effective, reliable designs in the immediate future. The objective of this study was to provide the Department of Energy with quantified data that can be used to assess and redirect, if necessary, the program plans to assure compliance with the President's goals. Results deal with the product, the industry, the market, and the consumer. All issues are examined in the framework of the conventional-hot-water industry. Based on the results of this solar hot water assessment study, there is documented proof that the solar industry is blessed with over 20 good solar hot water systems. A total of eight generic types are currently being produced, but a majority of the systems being sold are included in only five generic types. The good systems are well-packaged for quality, performance and installation ease. These leading systems are sized and designed to fit the requirements of the consumer in every respect. This delivery end also suffers from a lack of understanding of the best methods for selling the product. At the supplier end, there are problems also, including: some design deficiencies, improper materials selection and, occasionally, the improper selection of components and subsystems. These, in total, are not serious problems in the better systems and will be resolved as this industry matures.

Noreen, D; LeChevalier, R; Choi, M; Morehouse, J

1980-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

195

Cryoplasty Versus Conventional Angioplasty in Femoropopliteal Arterial Recanalization: 3-Year Analysis of Reintervention-Free Survival by Treatment Received  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare long-term efficacy of cryoplasty therapy versus conventional angioplasty in the treatment of peripheral arterial atherosclerotic stenosis on the basis of our 3-year clinical experience. Materials and Methods: From January 2006 to December 2008, a total of 155 patients with 192 lesions of the femoropopliteal sector were randomized to receive either cryoplasty or conventional balloon angioplasty. The primary study end point was lesion target patency. Follow-up with clinical evaluation of patient's symptoms, ankle-brachial index, and Doppler ultrasound was scheduled at 1, 6, 9, 12, 24, and 36 months. Results: For the cryoplasty group (n = 86), technical immediate success was achieved in 74.4% of lesions. Rate of significant dissection was 13.5% and rate of stent placement of 22%. In the long term, target lesion patency rate at 6 months was 59.4%, with rates of 55.9, 52.6, and 49.1% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. For the conventional angioplasty group (n = 69), the immediate technical success rate was 83.7%. Rate of significant dissection was 19%, and rate of stent placement was 72.9%. Patency rates at 6 months and at 1, 2, and 3 years were 71.5, 61.2, 60, and 56%, respectively. Conclusion: Compared with conventional angioplasty, cryoplasty showed good immediate success rates with lower stent placement rates. During the 3-year follow-up, patency rates tended to equalize between the two modalities.

Diaz, Maria Lourdes, E-mail: mldiaz@unav.es [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Servicio de Radiologia (Spain); Urtasun, Fermin, E-mail: Furtasun@telefonica.net; Barberena, Javier, E-mail: Jjb48@medena.es [Hospital de Navarra, Servicio de Radiologia (Spain); Aranzadi, Carlos, E-mail: Caranzadi@cfnavarra.es [Hospital de Navarra, Departamento de Cirugia Vascular (Spain); Guillen-Grima, Francisco, E-mail: Cfguillen@unav.es [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Departamento de Medicina Preventiva (Spain); Bilbao, Jose Ignacio, E-mail: jibilbao@unav.es [Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Servicio de Radiologia (Spain)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Abstract--This paper presents a comparative stability analysis of conventional synchronous generators and wind farms based on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generators and wind farms based on double feed induction generators (DFIG). Based on an appropriate DFIG wind on system stability of replacing conventional generation by DFIG-based wind generation on the IEEE 14-bus that the oscillatory behavior associated with the dominant mode of the synchronous generator is improved when the DFIG

Cañizares, Claudio A.

197

The possible influence of a non-conventional El Niño on the severe autumn drought of 2009 in Southwest China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A severe drought struck Southwest China during autumn 2009, which had a huge impact on productivity and the lives of the affected population. A non-conventional El Niño, the so-called warm pool (WP) El Niño, was supposed to be a principal factor ...

Wenjun Zhang; Fei-Fei Jin; Jing-Xia Zhao; Li Qi; Hong-Li Ren

198

Comparative Study for the Interpretation of Mineral Concentrations, Total Porosity, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and TOC in Hydrocarbon-Bearing Shale from Conventional Well Logs Haryanto Adiguna, SPE, Anadarko Petroleum, and mineral composition is an integral part of unconventional shale reservoir formation evaluation. Porosity requirement for economically viable flow of gas in very-low permeability shales. Brittle shales are favorable

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

199

Measurement of joint kinematics using a conventional clinical single-perspective flat-panel radiography system  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The ability to accurately measure joint kinematics is an important tool in studying both normal joint function and pathologies associated with injury and disease. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, accuracy, precision, and clinical safety of measuring 3D joint motion using a conventional flat-panel radiography system prior to its application in an in vivo study. Methods: An automated, image-based tracking algorithm was implemented to measure the three-dimensional pose of a sparse object from a two-dimensional radiographic projection. The algorithm was tested to determine its efficiency and failure rate, defined as the number of image frames where automated tracking failed, or required user intervention. The accuracy and precision of measuring three-dimensional motion were assessed using a robotic controlled, tibiofemoral knee phantom programmed to mimic a subject with a total knee replacement performing a stair ascent activity. Accuracy was assessed by comparing the measurements of the single-plane radiographic tracking technique to those of an optical tracking system, and quantified by the measurement discrepancy between the two systems using the Bland-Altman technique. Precision was assessed through a series of repeated measurements of the tibiofemoral kinematics, and was quantified using the across-trial deviations of the repeated kinematic measurements. The safety of the imaging procedure was assessed by measuring the effective dose of ionizing radiation associated with the x-ray exposures, and analyzing its relative risk to a human subject. Results: The automated tracking algorithm displayed a failure rate of 2% and achieved an average computational throughput of 8 image frames/s. Mean differences between the radiographic and optical measurements for translations and rotations were less than 0.08 mm and 0.07 Degree-Sign in-plane, and 0.24 mm and 0.6 Degree-Sign out-of-plane. The repeatability of kinematics measurements performed using the radiographic tracking technique was better than {+-}0.09 mm and 0.12 Degree-Sign in-plane, and {+-}0.70 mm and {+-}0.07 Degree-Sign out-of-plane. The effective dose associated with the imaging protocol used was 15 {mu}Sv for 10 s of radiographic cine acquisition. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the ability to accurately measure knee-joint kinematics using a single-plane radiographic measurement technique. The measurement technique can be easily implemented at most clinical centers equipped with a modern-day radiographic x-ray system. The dose of ionizing radiation associated with the image acquisition represents a minimal risk to any subjects undergoing the examination.

Seslija, Petar; Teeter, Matthew G.; Yuan Xunhua; Naudie, Douglas D. R.; Bourne, Robert B.; MacDonald, Steven J.; Peters, Terry M.; Holdsworth, David W. [Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada) and Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Western Ontario and London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Western Ontario and London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario N6A 4L6 (Canada); Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5C1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Compressive Creep Performance and High Temperature Dimensional Stability of Conventional Silica Refractories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Furnace designers and refractory engineers recognize that optimized furnace superstructure design and refractory selection are needed as glass production furnaces are continually striving toward greater output and efficiencies. Harsher operating conditions test refractories to the limit, while changing production technology (such as the conversion to oxy-fuel from traditional air-fuel firing) can alter the way the materials perform. Refractories for both oxy- and air-fuel fired furnace superstructures are subjected to high temperatures during service that may cause them to excessively creep or subside if the refractory material is not creep resistant, or if it is subjected to high stress, or both. Furnace designers can ensure that superstructure structural integrity is maintained if the creep behavior of the refractory material is well understood and well represented by appropriate engineering creep models. Several issues limit the abilities of furnace designers to (1) choose the optimum refractory for their applications, (2) optimize the engineering design, or (3) predict the service mechanical integrity of their furnace superstructures. Published engineering creep data are essentially non-existent for almost all commercially available refractories used for glass furnace superstructures. The limited data that do exist are supplied by the various refractory suppliers. Unfortunately, these suppliers generally have different ways of conducting their mechanical testing and they also interpret and report their data differently; this makes it hard for furnace designers to draw fair comparisons between competing grades of candidate refractories. Furthermore, the refractory supplier's data are often not available in a form that can be readily used for furnace design and for the prediction and design of long-term structural integrity of furnace superstructures. With the aim of providing such comparable data, the US DOE's Office of Industrial Technology and its Advanced Industrial Materials program is sponsoring work to conduct creep testing and analysis on refractories of interest to the glass industry. An earlier stage of the project involved identifying which refractories to test and this is described elsewhere. Conventional silica was one such identified refractory category, and the present report describes the creep behavior of this class of refractories. To portray a more complete understanding of how these refractories perform at service temperatures, their fundamental corrosion resistances, dimensional stabilities, and microstructure were characterized as well.

Karakus, M.; Kirkland, T.P.; Liu, K.C.; Moore, R.E.; Pint, B.A.; Wereszczak, A.A.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and emission reductions Title Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and...

202

Analysis of Coconut-Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines: Task 2 Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Analysis of Coconut-Derived Analysis of Coconut-Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines Task 2 Final Report T.L. Alleman and R.L. McCormick Milestone Report NREL/MP-540-38643 January 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Analysis of Coconut- Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines Task 2 Final Report T.L. Alleman and R.L. McCormick Prepared under Task Nos. WF3Y.1000 and FC02.0800 under an agreement between the U.S. Agency for International Development

203

EFFECTS OF CONVENTIONAL OR BMR CORN SILAGE FED AT TWO LEVELS ON INTAKE, MILK YIELD AND COMPOSITION, AND RUMEN FERMENTATION OF HOLSTEIN DAIRY COW.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of Brown Mid Rib (BMR) vs. conventional corn silage fed at two levels on production… (more)

Edwards, Travis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

2H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results - Interim Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results DE-FG36-05GO15032 Interim Report Nexant, Inc., Air Liquide, Argonne National Laboratory, Chevron Technology Venture, Gas Technology Institute, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and TIAX LLC May 2008 Contents Section Page Executive Summary ................................................................................................................... 1-9 Delivery Options ...................................................................................................................... 1-9 Evaluation of Options 2 and 3 ................................................................................................. 1-9

205

Impact of Cycling on the Operation and Maintenance Cost of Conventional and Combined-Cycle Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ongoing privatization of electricity generation across the world, competition and shareholder demand for higher profits, stricter regulations on environmental impacts, changes in fuel prices, and the increasing penetration of nondispatchable energy have resulted in an increasing need for larger energy generators to operate as non-baseload units. As a result, both conventional power plants and combined-cycle power plants are increasingly being subjected to load-following and cyclic operation. ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hypofractionation vs Conventional Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Matched-Cohort Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy given over 3 to 4 weeks. A 1:1 matched-cohort analysis with conventional radiation therapy was performed to assess response and survival. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven children, aged 3 to 14, were treated according to 1 of 2 hypofractionation regimens over 3 to 4 weeks (39/3 Gy, n=16 or 44.8/2.8 Gy, n=11). All patients had symptoms for {<=}3 months, {>=}2 signs of the neurologic triad (cranial nerve deficit, ataxia, long tract signs), and characteristic features of DIPG on magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-seven patients fulfilling the same diagnostic criteria and receiving at least 50/1.8 to 2.0 Gy were eligible for the matched-cohort analysis. Results: With hypofractionation radiation therapy, the overall survival at 6, 9, and 12 months was 74%, 44%, and 22%, respectively. Progression-free survival at 3, 6, and 9 months was 77%, 43%, and 12%, respectively. Temporary discontinuation of steroids was observed in 21 of 27 (78%) patients. No significant difference in median overall survival (9.0 vs 9.4 months; P=.84) and time to progression (5.0 vs 7.6 months; P=.24) was observed between hypofractionation vs conventional radiation therapy, respectively. Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed DIPG, a hypofractionation regimen, given over 3 to 4 weeks, offers equal overall survival with less treatment burden compared with a conventional regimen of 6 weeks.

Janssens, Geert O., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jansen, Marc H. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lauwers, Selmer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, Peter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Oldenburger, Foppe R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bouffet, Eric [Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Saran, Frank [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)] [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schieving, Jolanda H. [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Kaspers, Gertjan J. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hargrave, Darren [Department of Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom)] [Department of Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

An adaptive network based fuzzy inference system-genetic algorithm clustering ensemble algorithm for performance assessment and improvement of conventional power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance measurement and assessment are fundamental to management planning and control activities of complex systems such as conventional power plants. They have received considerable attention by both management practitioners and theorists. There ... Keywords: Adaptive network based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), Conventional power plants, Genetic algorithm clustering ensemble (GACE), Improvement, Performance assessment

A. Azadeh; M. Saberi; M. Anvari; A. Azaron; M. Mohammadi

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Technology assessment of solar energy systems. Socioeconomic impacts of solar deployment and conventional energy use. Volume III  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study presents an analysis of socio-economic impacts of conventional energy prices and solar technology use in the residential sector. Patterns of household energy use are explored as a function of income class. Impacts on household disposable income of use of conventional fuels and technologies as compared to solar alternatives are then assessed. This analysis is conducted for 1978 and 1990 by income class and region. Profiles of residential-solar-system purchases are presented and trends in the adoption of solar systems in this sector are discussed. Because income levels and certain demographic characteristics tend to be correlated, insights regarding the distribution of impacts among population groups can be obtained by examining the demographic composition of US households. Accordingly, socio-economic profiles of the US population are developed to help identify the demographic characteristics of households most severely affected by high energy prices, as well as of those households best able to reduce energy costs through the purchase of solar energy and conservation.

Gordon, J.J.; Tahami, J.E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study: Phase 1, Interim/final report: Volume 1, Technical and economic analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical and economic feasibility of using oxygen enriched combustion (OEC) and preheated oxygen enriched combustion (POEC) for industrial furnace applications was evaluated. The potential for fuel savings and productivity improvements with OEC/POEC systems was parametrically analyzed for a broad range of furnace conditions including those for steel heating, glass melting and aluminum melting. The changes in combustion characteristics with OEC were reviewed and their effects on furnace applications discussed. Relative advantages of different enrichment techniques, safety considerations and the effects of OEC on combustion-generated pollutants were also evaluated. The characteristics and economics of the state-of-the-art oxygen generation methods including PSA, membrane and cryogenic systems were evaluated to identify cost effective methods of supplying oxygen enriched air. The potential synergistic effects of combining preheating and oxygen enrichment were investigated by analyzing fuel savings and the capital and operating costs. The overall process economics of conventional heat recovery systems, and various OEC/POEC systems were compared.

Kobayashi, Hisashi

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Kinetic Model Development for the Combustion of Particulate Matter from Conventional and Soy Methyl Ester Diesel Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research has been to investigate how the oxidation characteristics of diesel particulate matter (PM) are affected by blending soy-based biodiesel fuel with conventional ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. PM produced in a light duty engine from different biodiesel-conventional fuel blends was subjected to a range of physical and chemical measurements in order to better understand the mechanisms by which fuel-related changes to oxidation reactivity are brought about. These observations were then incorporated into a kinetic model to predict PM oxidation. Nanostructure of the fixed carbon was investigated by HR-TEM and showed that particulates from biodiesel had a more open structure than particulates generated from conventional diesel fuel, which was confirmed by BET surface area measurements. Surface area evolution with extent of oxidation reaction was measured for PM from ULSD and biodiesel. Biodiesel particulate has a significantly larger surface area for the first 40% of conversion, at which point the samples become quite similar. Oxidation characteristics of nascent PM and the fixed carbon portion were measured by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and it was noted that increased biodiesel blending lowered the light-off temperature as well as the temperature where the peak rate of oxidation occurred. A shift in the oxidation profiles of all fuels was seen when the mobile carbon fraction was removed, leaving only the fixed carbon, however the trend in temperature advantage of the biofuel blending remained. The mobile carbon fraction was measured by temperature programmed desorption found to generally increase with increasing biodiesel blend level. The relative change in the light-off temperatures for the nascent and fixed carbon samples was found to be related to the fraction of mobile carbon. Effective Arrhenius parameters for fixed carbon oxidation were directly measured with isothermal, differential oxidation experiments. Normalizing the reaction rate to the total carbon surface area available for reaction allowed for the definition of a single reaction rate with constant activation energy (112.5 {+-} 5.8 kJ/mol) for the oxidation of PM, independent of its fuel source. A kinetic model incorporating the surface area dependence of fixed carbon oxidation rate and the impact of the mobile carbon fraction was constructed and validated against experimental data.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Legal and Economic Factors Determining Success and Failure in the Fight against Organized Crime: An Empirical Assessment of the Palermo Convention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transnational Organized Crime (Palermo Convention) athttp://www.unodc.org/pdf/crime/a_res_55/res5525e.pdf Watson,significant drops in organized crime levels as a result. At

Buscaglia, Edgardo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 1: technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume I contains the major results, a discussion of the conceptual framework of the study, and summaries of the vehicle, utility, fuel production, and manufacturing analyses. It also contains summaries of comments provided by external peer reviewers and brief responses to these comments.

Cuenca, R.; Formento, J.; Gaines, L.; Marr, B.; Santini, D.; Wang, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Adelman, S.; Kline, D.; Mark, J.; Ohi, J.; Rau, N. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Freeman, S.; Humphreys, K.; Placet, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Traditional (Conventional) Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Score Maturity Value Target Score Maturity Value Target Score Maturity Value Target Score A1 Cost Estimate H 7.5 1 7.5 2 15.0 5 37.5 5 37.5 A2 Cost Risk/Contingency Analysis P 3.0 1 3.0 1 3.0 5 15.0 5 15.0 A3 Funding Requirements/Profile H 7.5 1 7.5 2 15.0 4 30.0 5 37.5 A4 Independent Cost Estimate/Schedule Review P 3.0 N/A 0.0 N/A 0.0 5 15.0 5 15.0 A5 Life Cycle Cost P 3.0 1 3.0 1 3.0 4 12.0 5 15.0 A6 Forecast of Cost at Completion P 3.0 N/A 0.0 N/A 0.0 3 9.0 5 15.0 A7 Cost Estimate for Next Phase Work Scope P 3.0 5 15.0 5 15.0 5 15.0 5 15.0 Subtotal Cost 36.0 51.0 133.5 150.0 B1 Project Schedule H 7.5 1 7.5 2 15.0 5 37.5 5 37.5 B2 Major Milestones P 3.0 1 3.0 2 6.0 5 15.0 5 15.0 B3 Resource Loading P 3.0 1 3.0 1 3.0 4 12.0 5 15.0 B4 Critical Path Management H 7.5 1 7.5 1 7.5 4 30.0 5 37.5 B5 Schedule Risk/Contingency Analysis P 3.0 1 3.0 1 3.0 5 15.0 5 15.0 B6 Forecast of Schedule Completion P 3.0

214

Conventional Gasoline Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Finished motor gasoline ...

215

conventions.tex - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URLs should be complete, such as http://pi.nersc.gov and must be in tt font. If the URL occupies more than about one-half of a line, then it should appear on a ...

216

Beyond the conventional transistor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on approaches to continuing CMOS scaling by introducing new device structures and new materials. Starting from an analysis of the sources of improvements in device performance, we present technology options for achieving these performance ...

H.-S. P. Wong

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A comparison of the fracture properties of conventional and polymer-modified two-layer asphalt concrete overlay systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of reflection cracking through the conventional asphalt concrete overlays has increased the need to find new materials which could resist cracking or fracture more effectively. It is for this reason that polymers (Styrelo are added to the neat asphalt to improve the fracture resisting properties of asphalt concrete. In this study three different asphalt concrete mixtures with and without polymer (Styrelf) were used to study their fracture toughness. With four different binders and different combinations of mixtures, 18 different overlay systems were tested for their fracture toughness. Each overlay was made up of two different layers with asphalt rich sand anti-fracture (SAF) mixture as the bottom layer. Fracture mechanics concepts were used to compare the fracture properties of polymer (Styrelo modified asphalt concrete with the corresponding conventional neat asphalt concrete. Rate of crack growth is correlated with the energy line J*-integral. Crack growth rates were determined from laboratory experiments conducted on TTI overlay tester. Analysis of the experimental results showed that crack growth rate and J*-integral are correlated. In this study it was observed that the relation between the fracture material constants log(A) and (n) is not linear. A new fracture material constant (S) relating to crack speed was developed. The relationship between log(A) and (n) was found to be linear when combined with constant (S). Results showed that this new material constant (S) could lead to a better characterization of fracture toughness. Crack speed when calculated using (S) has shown better correlation with the observed experimental fatigue life. It is speculated that this new material constant (S) could be related to healing of the asphalt concrete or the plasticity effects due to unloading of the sample in overlay test.

Reddy, Praveena Gutha

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The enhanced value of combining conventional and 'omics' analyses in early assessment of drug-induced hepatobiliary injury  

SciTech Connect

The InnoMed PredTox consortium was formed to evaluate whether conventional preclinical safety assessment can be significantly enhanced by incorporation of molecular profiling ('omics') technologies. In short-term toxicological studies in rats, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics data were collected and analyzed in relation to routine clinical chemistry and histopathology. Four of the sixteen hepato- and/or nephrotoxicants given to rats for 1, 3, or 14 days at two dose levels induced similar histopathological effects. These were characterized by bile duct necrosis and hyperplasia and/or increased bilirubin and cholestasis, in addition to hepatocyte necrosis and regeneration, hepatocyte hypertrophy, and hepatic inflammation. Combined analysis of liver transcriptomics data from these studies revealed common gene expression changes which allowed the development of a potential sequence of events on a mechanistic level in accordance with classical endpoint observations. This included genes implicated in early stress responses, regenerative processes, inflammation with inflammatory cell immigration, fibrotic processes, and cholestasis encompassing deregulation of certain membrane transporters. Furthermore, a preliminary classification analysis using transcriptomics data suggested that prediction of cholestasis may be possible based on gene expression changes seen at earlier time-points. Targeted bile acid analysis, based on LC-MS metabonomics data demonstrating increased levels of conjugated or unconjugated bile acids in response to individual compounds, did not provide earlier detection of toxicity as compared to conventional parameters, but may allow distinction of different types of hepatobiliary toxicity. Overall, liver transcriptomics data delivered mechanistic and molecular details in addition to the classical endpoint observations which were further enhanced by targeted bile acid analysis using LC/MS metabonomics.

Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun, E-mail: heidrun.ellinger-ziegelbauer@bayerhealthcare.com [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Wuppertal (Germany); Adler, Melanie [University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Amberg, Alexander [Sanofi aventis R and D, Disposition, Safety and Animal Research, Frankfurt (Germany); Brandenburg, Arnd [Genedata AG, Basel (Switzerland); Callanan, John J. [UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science and School of Agriculture, Food Science and Veterinary Medicine, UCD Conway Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin (Ireland); Connor, Susan [MetaPro (United Kingdom); Fountoulakis, Michael [Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel (Switzerland); Gmuender, Hans [Genedata AG, Basel (Switzerland); Gruhler, Albrecht [Novo Nordisk A/S, Maaloev (Denmark); Hewitt, Philip [Merck KGaA Darmstadt (Germany); Hodson, Mark [MetaPro (United Kingdom); Matheis, Katja A. [Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Biberach (Germany); McCarthy, Diane [Bio-Rad, Laboratories, Hercules, CA (United States); Raschke, Marian; Riefke, Bjoern [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Schmitt, Christina S. [Merck KGaA Darmstadt (Germany); Sieber, Max [University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Sposny, Alexandra [Merck KGaA Darmstadt (Germany); Suter, Laura [Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sweatman, Brian [MetaPro (United Kingdom)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T <4 cm, N0, M0, or Mx). Severe (grade {>=}3) RP and potential predictive factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. A scoring system was established to predict the risk of RP. Results: At a median follow-up time of 16 months after SABR (range, 4-56 months), 15 patients had severe RP (14 [18.9%] grade 3 and 1 [1.4%] grade 5) and 1 patient (1.4%) had a local recurrence. In univariate analyses, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) before SABR, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and previous planning target volume (PTV) location were associated with the incidence of severe RP. The V{sub 10} and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V{sub 10}-V{sub 40} and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 {<=}65% before SABR (P=.012), V{sub 20} {>=}30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 {<=}65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V{sub 20} {>=}30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

Liu Hui; Zhang Xu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Indirect MR lymphangiography of the head and neck using conventional gadolinium contrast: A pilot study in humans  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate indirect magnetic resonance lymphangiography (MR-LAG) using interstitial injection of conventional gadolinium contrast (gadoteridol and gadopentetate dimeglumine) for delineating the primary lymphatic drainage of head-and-neck sites. Methods and Materials: We performed head-and-neck MR-LAG in 5 healthy volunteers, with injection of dermal and mucosal sites. We evaluated the safety of the procedure, the patterns of enhancement categorized by injection site and nodal level, the time course of enhancement, the optimal concentration and volume of contrast, and the optimal imaging sequence. Results: The worst side effects of interstitial contrast injection were brief, mild pain and swelling at the injected sites that were self-limited. MR-LAG resulted in consistent visualization of the primary lymphatic drainage pattern specific to each injected site, which was reproducible on repeated examinations. The best enhancement was obtained with injection of small volumes (0.3-0.5 mL) of either agent diluted, imaging within 5-15 min of injection, and a three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo sequence with magnetization transfer. Conclusions: We found head-and-neck MR-LAG to be a safe, convenient imaging method that provides functional information about the lymphatic drainage of injected sites. Applied to head-and-neck cancer, it has the potential to identify sites at highest risk of occult metastatic spread for radiotherapy or surgical planning, and possibly to visualize micrometastases.

Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)]. E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu; Draney, Mary T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Sivanandan, Ranjiv [Department of General Surgery, Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Ruehm, Stefan G. [Department of Radiology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Pawlicki, Todd [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Herfkens, Robert J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A comparison of diamond growth rate using in-liquid and conventional plasma chemical vapor deposition methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to make high-speed deposition of diamond effective, diamond growth rates for gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition and in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition are compared. A mixed gas of methane and hydrogen is used as the source gas for the gas-phase deposition, and a methanol solution of ethanol is used as the source liquid for the in-liquid deposition. The experimental system pressure is in the range of 60-150 kPa. While the growth rate of diamond increases as the pressure increases, the amount of input microwave energy per unit volume of diamond is 1 kW h/mm{sup 3} regardless of the method used. Since the in-liquid deposition method provides a superior cooling effect through the evaporation of the liquid itself, a higher electric input power can be applied to the electrodes under higher pressure environments. The growth rate of in-liquid microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process is found to be greater than conventional gas-phase microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process under the same pressure conditions.

Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Toyota, Hiromichi; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Inoue, Toru [Geodynamics Research Center, Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Large Cohort Dose-Volume Response Analysis of Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: Intensity-Modulated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare parotid gland dose-volume response relationships in a large cohort of patients treated with intensity-modulated (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and materials: A total of 221 patients (64 treated with IMRT, 157 with CRT) with various head-and-neck malignancies were prospectively evaluated. The distribution of tumor subsites in both groups was unbalanced. Stimulated parotid flow rates were measured before and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from computed tomography-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow ratio gland dose using Poisson regression modeling. Results: One year after radiotherapy, NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT were comparable with a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to a 50% complication probability) of 38 and 40 Gy, respectively. Until 6 months after RT, corrected for mean dose, different complication probabilities existed for IMRT vs. CRT. The relative risk of a complication for IMRT vs. CRT after 6 weeks was 1.42 (95% CI 1.21-1.67), after 6 months 1.41 (95% CI; 1.12-1.77), and at 1 year 1.21 (95% CI 0.87-1.68), after correcting for mean dose. Conclusions: One year after radiotherapy, no difference existed in the mean dose-based NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT. Early after radiotherapy (up to 6 months) mean dose based (Lyman) models failed to fully describe the effects of radiotherapy on the parotid glands.

Dijkema, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: T.Dijkema@umcutrecht.nl; Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gils, Carla H. van [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Moerland, Marinus A.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Technical evaluation of a solar heating system having conventional hydronic solar collectors and a radiant panel slab. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple innovative solar heating design (Solar Option One) using conventional hydronic solar collectors and a radiant panel slab was constructed. An objective of hybrid solar design is to combine the relative advantages of active and passive design approaches while minimizing their respective disadvantages. A test house using the Solar Option One heating system was experimentally monitored to determine its energy based performance during the 1982-83 heating season. The test residence is located in Lyndonville, Vermont, an area which has a characteristically cold and cloudy climate. The two story residence has a floor area of about 1400 square feet and is constructed on a 720 square foot 5.5 inch thick floor slab. A 24 inch packed gravel bed is located beneath the slab and the slab-gravel bed is insulated by two inches of polystyrene insulation. The test building is of frame construction and uses insulation levels which have become commonplace throughout the country. The structure would not fall into the superinsulated category but was tightly constructed so as to have a low infiltration level. The building is sun-tempered in that windows were concentrated somewhat on the South side and all but avoided on the North. A solar greenhouse on the South side of the building was closed off from the structure permanently throughout the testing so as to better observe the solar heating invention without confounding variables. The monitoring equipment generated an internal gain of about 17,000 BTUs per day, roughly the equivalent of occupancy by two persons. A full description of the experimental testing program is given. System efficiency and performance are reported.

Starr, R.J.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

An extended conventional fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect

The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and a thermal output of about 500 MW; it is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array. The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for a four-year cycle based on its presumed attractiveness to potential customers. This option is a once-through fuel cycle in which the entire core is discharged and replaced after four years. In addition, a conventional fuel utilization strategy, employing a periodic partial reload and shuffle, was developed as an alternative to the four-year once-through fuel cycle. This study, which was performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, is a typical multi-cycle projection analysis of the type performed by most fuel management organizations such as fuel vendors and utilities. In the industry, the results of such projections are used by the financial arms of these organizations to assist in making long-term decisions. In the case of the B and W mPower reactor, this analysis demonstrates flexibility for customers who consider the once-through fuel cycle unacceptable from a fuel utilization standpoint. As expected, when compared to the once-through concept, reloads of the B and W mPower reactor will achieve higher batch average discharge exposure, will have adequate shut-down margin, and will have a relatively flat hot excess reactivity trend at the expense of slightly increased peaking. (authors)

Scarangella, M. J. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Hydrogeochemical evaluation of conventional and hot dry rock geothermal resource potential in the Clear Lake region, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemistry, stable isotope, and tritium contents of thermal/mineral waters in the Clear Lake region were used to evaluate conventional and hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal potential for electrical generation. Thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region are broadly classified as thermal meteoric and connate types based on chemical and isotopic criteria. Ratios of conservative components such as B/Cl are extremely different among all thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region except for clusters of waters emerging from specific areas such as the Wilbur Springs district and the Agricultural Park area south of Mt. Konocti. In contrast ratios of conservative components in large, homogeneous geothermal reservoirs are constant. Stable isotope values of Clear Lake region waters show a mixing trend between thermal meteoric and connate (generic) end-members. The latter end-member has enriched {delta}D as well as enriched {delta}{sup 18}O, from typical high-temperature geothermal reservoir waters. Tritium data indicate most Clear Lake region waters are mixtures of old and young fluid components. Subsurface equilibration temperature of most thermal/mineral waters of the Clear Lake region is {le}150{degree}C based on chemical geothermometers but it is recognized that Clear Lake region waters are not typical geothermal fluids and that they violate rules of application of many geothermometers. The combined data indicate that no large geothermal reservoir underlies the Clear Lake region and that small localized reservoirs have equilibration temperatures {le}150{degree}C (except for Sulphur Bank mine). HDR technologies are probably the best way to commercially exploit the known high-temperatures existing beneath the Clear Lake region particularly within and near the main Clear Lake volcanic field.

Goff, F.; Adams, A.I.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mixing and flame structures inferred from OH-PLIF for conventional and low-temperature diesel engine combustion  

SciTech Connect

The structure of first- and second-stage combustion is investigated in a heavy-duty, single-cylinder optical engine using chemiluminescence imaging, Mie-scatter imaging of liquid-fuel, and OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (OH-PLIF) along with calculations of fluorescence quenching. Three different diesel combustion modes are studied: conventional non-diluted high-temperature combustion (HTC) with either (1) short or (2) long ignition delay, and (3) highly diluted low-temperature combustion (LTC) with early fuel injection. For the short ignition delay HTC condition, the OH fluorescence images show that second-stage combustion occurs mainly on the fuel jet periphery in a thickness of about 1 mm. For the long ignition delay HTC condition, the second-stage combustion zone on the jet periphery is thicker (5-6 mm). For the early-injection LTC condition, the second-stage combustion is even thicker (20-25 mm) and occurs only in the down-stream regions of the jet. The relationship between OH concentration and OH-PLIF intensity over a range of equivalence ratios is estimated from quenching calculations using collider species concentrations predicted by chemical kinetics simulations of combustion. The calculations show that both OH concentration and OH-PLIF intensity peak near stoichiometric mixtures and fall by an order of magnitude or more for equivalence ratios less than 0.2-0.4 and greater than 1.4-1.6. Using the OH fluorescence quenching predictions together with OH-PLIF images, quantitative boundaries for mixing are established for the three engine combustion modes. (author)

Singh, Satbir [General Motors Research and Development, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Musculus, Mark P.B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Reitz, Rolf D. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, California: Implications for conventional and hot dry rock geothermal development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of recent volcanism, high heat flow ({ge} HFU or 167 mW/m{sup 2}), and high conductive geothermal gradient (up to 120{degree} C/km) makes the Clear Lake region of northern California one of the best prospects for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development in the US. The lack of permeability in exploration wells and lack of evidence for widespread geothermal reservoirs north of the Collayomi fault zone are not reassuring indications for conventional geothermal development. This report summarizes results of thermal modeling of the Clear Lake magmatic system, and discusses implications for HDR site selection in the region. The thermal models incorporate a wide range of constraints including the distribution and nature of volcanism in time and space, water and gas geochemistry, well data, and geophysical surveys. The nature of upper crustal magma bodies at Clear Lake is inferred from studying sequences of related silicic lavas, which tell a story of multistage mixing of silicic and mafic magma in clusters of small upper crustal chambers. Thermobarometry on metamorphic xenoliths yield temperature and pressure estimates of {approximately}780--900 C and 4--6 kb respectively, indicating that at least a portion of the deep magma system resided at depths from 14 to 21 km (9 to 12 mi). The results of thermal modeling support previous assessments of the high HDR potential of the area, and suggest the possibility that granitic bodies similar to The Geysers felsite may underlie much of the Clear Lake region at depths as little as 3--6 km. This is significant because future HDR reservoirs could potentially be sited in relatively shallow granitoid plutons rather than in structurally complex Franciscan basement rocks.

Stimac, J.; Goff, F.; Wohletz, K.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A comparison of Nannochloropsis salina growth performance in two outdoor pond designs: conventional raceways versus the ARID pond with superior temperature management  

SciTech Connect

The present study examines how climatic conditions and pond design affect the growth performance of microalgae. From January to April of 2011, outdoor batch cultures of Nannochloropsis salina were grown in three replicate 780 L conventional raceways, as well as in an experimental 7500 L ARID (Algae Raceway Integrated Design) pond. The ARID culture system utilizes a series of 8 to 20 cm deep basins and a 1.5 m deep canal to enhance light exposure and mitigate temperature variations and extremes. The ARID culture reached the stationary phase 27 days earlier than the conventional raceways, which can be attributed to its superior temperature management and shallower basins. On a night when the air temperature dropped to -9 °C, the water temperature was 18 °C higher in the ARID pond than in the conventional raceways. Lipid and fatty acid content ranged from 16 - 25 % and 5 - 15 %, respectively, as a percentage of AFDW. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and eicosapentaenoic acid comprised the majority of fatty acids. While the ARID culture system achieved nearly double the volumetric productivity relative to the conventional raceways (0.023 vs 0.013 g L-1day-1), areal biomass productivities were of similar magnitude in both pond systems (3.34 vs. 3.47 g m-2day-1), suggesting that the ARID pond design has to be further optimized, most likely by increasing the culture depth or operating at higher cell densities while maintaining adequate mixing.

Crowe, Braden J.; Attalah, Said; Agrawal, Shweta; Waller, Peter; Ryan, Randy; Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Chavis, Aaron R.; Kyndt, John; Kacira, Murat; Ogden, Kimberly L.; Huesemann, Michael H.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Artifacts in Conventional Computed Tomography (CT) and Free Breathing Four-Dimensional CT Induce Uncertainty in Gross Tumor Volume Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study was to compare delineated gross tumor volume (GTV) sizes in 3DCT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans of patients with lung tumors. Methods and Materials: A total of 36 patients with 46 tumors referred for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors were included. All patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans. GTVs in all CT scans of individual patients were delineated during one session by a single physician to minimize systematic delineation uncertainty. The GTV size from the BHCT was considered the closest to true tumor volume and was chosen as the reference. The reference GTV size was compared to GTV sizes in 3DCT, at midventilation (MidV), at end-inspiration (Insp), and at end-expiration (Exp) bins from the 4DCT scan. Results: The median BHCT GTV size was 4.9 cm{sup 3} (0.1-53.3 cm{sup 3}). Median deviation between 3DCT and BHCT GTV size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-3.3 to 30.0 cm{sup 3}), between MidV and BHCT size was 0.2 cm{sup 3} (-5.7 to 19.7 cm{sup 3}), between Insp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.7 to 24.8 cm{sup 3}), and between Exp and BHCT size was 0.3 cm{sup 3} (-4.8 to 25.5 cm{sup 3}). The 3DCT, MidV, Insp, and Exp median GTV sizes were all significantly larger than the BHCT median GTV size. Conclusions: In the present study, the choice of CT method significantly influenced the delineated GTV size, on average, leading to an increase in GTV size compared to the reference BHCT. The uncertainty caused by artifacts is estimated to be in the same magnitude as delineation uncertainty and should be considered in the design of margins for radiotherapy.

Fredberg Persson, Gitte, E-mail: gitte.persson@rh.regionh.dk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Munch af Rosenschoeld, Per; Richter Vogelius, Ivan; Josipovic, Mirjana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Specht, Lena [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Korreman, Stine Sofia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Niels Bohr Institute, Faculty of Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO2 Sequestration … Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* NREL/TP-510-32575 * NREL/TP-510-32575 Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO 2 Sequestration - Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics Pamela L. Spath Margaret K. Mann National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 January 2004 * NREL/TP-510-32575 Biomass Power and Conventional Fossil Systems with and without CO 2 Sequestration - Comparing the Energy Balance, Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Economics Pamela L. Spath Margaret K. Mann Prepared under Task No. BB04.4010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393

232

Energy-related attitude/belief variables in conventional econometric equations: An empirical approach applied to residential energy consumption. Doctoral thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study analyzes a subsample of 523 households from the 1975 Lifestyles and Household Energy Use Survey conducted for the Washington Center for Metropolitan Studies. The study explores the empirical relationship between a set of four Energy-Related Attitude/Belief (ERAB) variables, household electricity and natural gas consumption, and three Energy-Related Discrete Choice (ERDC) variables. Using principal components factor analysis, the ERAB variables were constructed from a portion of the survey responses dealing with what households felt should be done to handle current or future energy shortages. A key finding of the study is that in the context of a conventional econometric specification of electricity and natural gas consumption, ERAB variables are statistically significant, although less significant than conventional explanatory variables for household energy consumption.

Wetzel, B.M.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Summerwood Associates, House M, Old Saybrook, Connecticut: Solar energy system performance evaluation, June 1980-May 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summerwood Associates, House M is a single-family rowhouse residence in Connecticut. The active solar energy system is designed to supply 78% of the space heating and 100% of the hot water loads. It is equipped with 378 square feet of flat plate collectors, a 600-gallon concrete storage tank, and for auxiliary heating, a heat pump and electrical resistance heater. The system and subsystem performance are measured, including the solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance. Also given are the system operating energy, energy savings, and weather conditions. (LEW)

Raymond, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 3: appendix E to technical report, comprehensive EVTECA results tables  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume III presents the results of the total energy cycle model runs, which are summarized in Volume I.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 4: peer review comments on technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline-powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume IV includes copies of all the external peer review comments on the report distributed for review in July 1997.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Offshore underbalanced drilling system could revive field developments. Part 2: Making this valuable reservoir drilling/completion technique work on a conventional offshore drilling platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part 1, presented in the July issue, discussed the emerging trend to move underbalanced drilling (UBD) operations into the offshore arena, following its successful application in many onshore areas. This concluding article delves into the details of applying UBD offshore. Starting with advantages the technique offers in many maturing or complex/marginal prospects, the UBD system for offshore platforms use is described. This involves conversion of the conventional rotary system, use of rotating diverters, design of the surface fluid separation system and the necessary gas (nitrogen or natural gas) injection system to lighten the fluid column. Commonly faced operational challenges for offshore UBD are listed along with recommended solutions.

Nessa, D.O.; Tangedahl, M.J.; Saponja, J.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Total energy cycle assessment of electric and conventional vehicles: an energy and environmental analysis. Volume 2: appendices A-D to technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report compares the energy use, oil use and emissions of electric vehicles (EVs) with those of conventional, gasoline- powered vehicles (CVs) over the total life cycle of the vehicles. The various stages included in the vehicles` life cycles include vehicle manufacture, fuel production, and vehicle operation. Disposal is not included. An inventory of the air emissions associated with each stage of the life cycle is estimated. Water pollutants and solid wastes are reported for individual processes, but no comprehensive inventory is developed. Volume II contains additional details on the vehicle, utility, and materials analyses and discusses several details of the methodology.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Guidelines for the verification and validation of expert system software and conventional software: Survey and documentation of expert system verification and validation methodologies. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third volume in the final report for the Expert System Verification and Validation (V&V) project which was jointly sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Electric Power Research Institute. The ultimate objective is the formulation of guidelines for the V&V of expert systems for use in nuclear power applications. The purpose of this activity was to survey and document techniques presently in use for expert system V&V. The survey effort included an extensive telephone interviewing program, site visits, and a thorough bibliographic search and compilation. The major finding was that V&V of expert systems is not nearly as established or prevalent as V&V of conventional software systems. When V&V was used for expert systems, it was almost always at the system validation stage after full implementation and integration usually employing the non-systematic dynamic method of {open_quotes}ad hoc testing.{close_quotes} There were few examples of employing V&V in the early phases of development and only weak sporadic mention of the possibilities in the literature. There is, however, a very active research area concerning the development of methods and tools to detect problems with, particularly, rule-based expert systems. Four such static-testing methods were identified which were not discovered in a comprehensive review of conventional V&V methods in an earlier task.

Groundwater, E.H.; Miller, L.A.; Mirsky, S.M. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #21: March 3, 1997 The Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 1997 The Fuel Savings Benefits of Increasing Fuel Economy to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 21: March 3, 1997 The Fuel Savings Benefits of Increasing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #684: July 18, 2011 Fuel Economy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2011 Fuel Economy versus Fuel Savings to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 684: July 18, 2011 Fuel Economy versus Fuel Savings on Facebook Tweet about...

242

" "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional or Fluidized Bed Boilers",,,"Conventional Combusion Turbines with Heat Recovery",,,"Combined-Cycle Combusion Turbines",,,"Internal Combusion Engines with Heat Recovery",,," Steam Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," " " "," " ," " "NAICS Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","Establishments with Any Cogeneration Technology in Use(c)","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know","In Use(d)","Not in Use","Don't Know"

243

Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect

n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for both primary reference fuels, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Additionally, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the aforementioned fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

244

Projects selected in todays announcement will focus on updating technologies and methods to improve the performance of conventional hydropower plants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in today's announcement will focus on updating technologies in today's announcement will focus on updating technologies and methods to improve the performance of conventional hydropower plants. The projects selected for negotiation of awards include: Dehlsen Associates, LLC (Carpinteria, CA) will further develop and validate the Aquantis Current Plane ocean current turbine technology. The project will validate analytical design tools and develop the technology's direct drive component. DOE share: up to $750,000; Duration: up to 2 years Dehlsen Associates, LLC (Carpinteria, CA) will first develop a bottom habitat survey methodology and siting study approach in accordance with all relevant regulatory agencies in the southeast Florida region; then they will determine the most suitable areas for mooring marine and hydrokinetic facilities based on the

245

Development and Demonstration of a High Efficiency, Rapid Heating, Low NOx Alternative to Conventional Heating of Round Steel Shapes, Steel Substrate (Strip) and Coil Box Transfer Bars  

SciTech Connect

Direct Flame Impingement involves the use of an array of very high-velocity flame jets impinging on a work piece to rapidly heat the work piece. The predominant mode of heat transfer is convection. Because of the locally high rate of heat transfer at the surface of the work piece, the refractory walls and exhaust gases of a DFI furnace are significantly cooler than in conventional radiant heating furnaces, resulting in high thermal efficiency and low NOx emissions. A DFI furnace is composed of a successive arrangement of heating modules through or by which the work piece is conveyed, and can be configured for square, round, flat, and curved metal shapes (e.g., billets, tubes, flat bars, and coiled bars) in single- or multi-stranded applications.

Kurek, Harry; Wagner, John

2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

246

Acoustic tomography and conventional meteorological ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depending on the incoming solar radiation and the local advection regional ... wind field as well as in the vertical sensible heat fluxes were observed.

247

? Online Convention Registration Available until  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cycles in the commodity markets are difficult to predict or sometimes understand. I came into the oil and gas industry on the upswing in prices resulting from the oil embargo. I survived the bottom falling out in the mid ‘80s to see the "dead sea " come back to life in the late ‘90s. The downturn in the economy in 2001 sank demand and natural gas prices that recovered to record levels in 2008, only to fall back to 2002 levels in 2010. Natural gas and crude oil prices used to have a price relationship of 1:6 based on energy equivalence. This changed after crude oil spiked in the middle of 2008 and Attending the Board of Directors dinner in New Orleans are (L to R) San Antonio Director Donna

You Still; To Register; Kenneth J. Huffman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Conventional Gasoline Imports from France  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

249

Product Supplied for Conventional Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Data may not add to ...

250

Architectural conventions and contextual cognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is offered herein are some tools of architectural criticism. The focus of these criticisms is concerned with the environmentally-public edge between individual buildings and their site-specific contexts. Within such ...

Shotola, Bradley Leonard

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Conventional Gasoline Imports from Belarus  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

252

Current Activated and Conventional Sintering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... This research was sponsored by the U.S. DOE, Office of EERE Industrial Technologies Program, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 with ...

253

OpenEI - Hydroelectric Conventional  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also...

254

Conventional Gasoline Imports from Russia  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indonesia withdrew from OPEC in January 2009, Angola joined OPEC in January 2007, Ecuador withdrew from OPEC in January 1993 and rejoined in November ...

255

BLENDING LOW ENRICHED URANIUM WITH DEPLETED URANIUM TO CREATE A SOURCE MATERIAL ORE THAT CAN BE PROCESSED FOR THE RECOVERY OF YELLOWCAKE AT A CONVENTIONAL URANIUM MILL  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex, there are a number of streams of low enriched uranium (LEU) that contain various trace contaminants. These surplus nuclear materials require processing in order to meet commercial fuel cycle specifications. To date, they have not been designated as waste for disposal at the DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS). Currently, with no commercial outlet available, the DOE is evaluating treatment and disposal as the ultimate disposition path for these materials. This paper will describe an innovative program that will provide a solution to DOE that will allow disposition of these materials at a cost that will be competitive with treatment and disposal at the NTS, while at the same time recycling the material to recover a valuable energy resource (yellowcake) for reintroduction into the commercial nuclear fuel cycle. International Uranium (USA) Corporation (IUSA) and Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) have entered into a commercial relationship to pursue the development of this program. The program involves the design of a process and construction of a plant at NFS' site in Erwin, Tennessee, for the blending of contaminated LEU with depleted uranium (DU) to produce a uranium source material ore (USM Ore{trademark}). The USM Ore{trademark} will then be further processed at IUC's White Mesa Mill, located near Blanding, Utah, to produce conventional yellowcake, which can be delivered to conversion facilities, in the same manner as yellowcake that is produced from natural ores or other alternate feed materials. The primary source of feed for the business will be the significant sources of trace contaminated materials within the DOE complex. NFS has developed a dry blending process (DRYSM Process) to blend the surplus LEU material with DU at its Part 70 licensed facility, to produce USM Ore{trademark} with a U235 content within the range of U235 concentrations for source material. By reducing the U235 content to source material levels in this manner, the material will be suitable for processing at a conventional uranium mill under its existing Part 40 license to remove contaminants and enable the product to re-enter the commercial fuel cycle. The tailings from processing the USM Ore{trademark} at the mill will be permanently disposed of in the mill's tailings impoundment as 11e.(2) byproduct material. Blending LEU with DU to make a uranium source material ore that can be returned to the nuclear fuel cycle for processing to produce yellowcake, has never been accomplished before. This program will allow DOE to disposition its surplus LEU and DU in a cost effective manner, and at the same time provide for the recovery of valuable energy resources that would be lost through processing and disposal of the materials. This paper will discuss the nature of the surplus LEU and DU materials, the manner in which the LEU will be blended with DU to form a uranium source material ore, and the legal means by which this blending can be accomplished at a facility licensed under 10 CFR Part 70 to produce ore that can be processed at a conventional uranium mill licensed under 10 CFR Part 40.

Schutt, Stephen M.; Hochstein, Ron F.; Frydenlund, David C.; Thompson, Anthony J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

256

Safety of high speed guided ground transportation systems: Comparison of magnetic and electric fields of conventional and advanced electrified transportation systems. Final report, September 1992-March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns exist regarding the potential safety, environmental and health effects on the public and on transportation workers due to electrification along new or existing rail corridors, and to proposed maglev and high speed rail operations. Therefore, the characterization of electric and magnetic fields (EMF) produced by both steady (dc) and alternating currents (ac) at power frequency (50 Hz in Europe and 60 Hz in the U.S.) and above, in the Extreme Low Frequency (ELF) range (3-3000 Hz) is of interest. The report summarizes and compares the results of a survey of EMF characteristics (spatial, temporal and frequency bands) for representative conventional railroad and transit and advanced high-speed systems including: the German TR-07 maglev system; the Amtrak Northeast Corridor (NEC) and North Jersey Transit (NJT) trains; the Washington, DC Metrorail (WMATA) and the Boston, MA (MBTA) transit systems; and the French TGV-A high speed rail system. This comprehensive comparative EMF survey produced both detailed data and statistical summaries of EMF profiles, and their variability in time and space. EMF ELF levels for WMATA are also compared to those produced by common environmental sources at home, work, and under power lines, but have specific frequency signatures.

Dietrich, F.M.; Feero, W.E.; Jacobs, W.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Measured Laboratory and In-Use Fuel Economy Observed over Targeted Drive Cycles for Comparable Hybrid and Conventional Package Delivery Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-use and laboratory-derived fuel economies were analyzed for a medium-duty hybrid electric drivetrain with 'engine off at idle' capability and a conventional drivetrain in a typical commercial package delivery application. Vehicles studied included eleven 2010 Freightliner P100H hybrids in service at a United Parcel Service facility in Minneapolis during the first half of 2010. The hybrids were evaluated for 18 months against eleven 2010 Freightliner P100D diesels at the same facility. Both vehicle groups use the same 2009 Cummins ISB 200-HP engine. In-use fuel economy was evaluated using UPS's fueling and mileage records, periodic ECM image downloads, and J1939 CAN bus recordings during the periods of duty cycle study. Analysis of the in-use fuel economy showed 13%-29% hybrid advantage depending on measurement method, and a delivery route assignment analysis showed 13%-26% hybrid advantage on the less kinetically intense original diesel route assignments and 20%-33% hybrid advantage on the more kinetically intense original hybrid route assignments. Three standardized laboratory drive cycles were selected that encompassed the range of real-world in-use data. The hybrid vehicle demonstrated improvements in ton-mi./gal fuel economy of 39%, 45%, and 21% on the NYC Comp, HTUF Class 4, and CARB HHDDT test cycles, respectively.

Lammert, M. P.; Walkowicz, K.; Duran, A.; Sindler, P.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Topical report on subsurface fracture mapping from geothermal wellbores. Phase I. Pulsed radar techniques. Phase II. Conventional logging methods. Phase III. Magnetic borehole ranging  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To advance the state-of-the-art in Hot Dry Rock technology, an evaluation is made of (i) the use of radar to map far-field fractures, (ii) the use of more than twenty different conventional well logging tools to map borehole-fracture intercepts, and (iii) the use of magnetic dipole ranging to determine the relative positions of the injection well and the production well within the fractured zone. It is found that according to calculations, VHF backscatter radar has the potential for mapping fractures within a distance of 50 +- 20 meters from the wellbore. A new technique for improving fracture identification is presented. Analyses of extant data indicate that when used synergistically the (1) caliper, (2) resistivity dipmeter, (3) televiewer, (4) television, (5) impression packer, and (6) acoustic transmission are useful for mapping borehole-fracture intercepts. Improvements in both data interpretation techniques and high temperature operation are required. The surveying of one borehole from another appears feasible at ranges of up to 200 to 500 meters by using a low frequency magnetic field generated by a moderately strong dipole source (a solenoid) located in one borehole, a sensitive B field detector that traverses part of the second borehole, narrow band filtering, and special data inversion techniques.

Hartenbaum, B.A.; Rawson, G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Simultaneous Integrated Boost Using Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Compared With Conventional Radiotherapy in Patients Treated With Concurrent Carboplatin and 5-Fluorouracil for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To compare, in a retrospective study, the toxicity and efficacy of simultaneous integrated boost using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) in patients treated with concomitant carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and December 2007, 249 patients were treated with definitive chemoradiation. One hundred patients had 70 Gy in 33 fractions using IMRT, and 149 received CRT at 70 Gy in 35 fractions. Overall survival, disease-free survival, and locoregional control were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median follow-up was 42 months. Three-year actuarial rates for locoregional control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 95.1% vs. 84.4% (p = 0.005), 85.3% vs. 69.3% (p = 0.001), and 92.1% vs. 75.2% (p < 0.001) for IMRT and CRT, respectively. The benefit of the radiotherapy regimen on outcomes was also observed with a Cox multivariate analysis. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was associated with less acute dermatitis and less xerostomia at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months. Conclusions: This study suggests that simultaneous integrated boost using IMRT is associated with favorable locoregional control and survival rates with less xerostomia and acute dermatitis than CRT when both are given concurrently with chemotherapy.

Clavel, Sebastien, E-mail: sebastien.clavel@umontreal.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen, David H.A.; Fortin, Bernard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Despres, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Khaouam, Nader [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada); Donath, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Soulieres, Denis [Department of Medical Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Guertin, Louis [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Centre Hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Nguyen-Tan, Phuc Felix [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hopital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, QC (Canada)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Effects of conventional or low bull to female ratio and utilization of reproductive tract scores in extensively-managed, natural mating breeding groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current study involved two experiments which were conducted at the Texas A&M Agricultural Research and Extension Center in Uvalde (semi-arid environment) from 2002 to 2004. In experiment one, Bonsmara bulls (n = 19; 20-24 mo of age) were joined with multiparous, crossbred females (n =586) for 90 d in 2003 and 2004. Bulls were allotted by selected physical traits, seminal traits, social rank, and serving capacity to one of two bull to female ratio (BFR) treatments: Conventional (1:21-1:29; n = 6 pastures) or Low (1:47-1:52; n = 2 pastures) BFR. Pregnancy rate (P = 0.33), calving rate (P = 0.26), and calving date (P = 0.22) did not differ between Conventional and Low BFR treatments. Post-breeding evaluation of bulls in 2002 (n = 16) indicated that social rank, but not seminal traits, was significantly correlated with pre-breeding values (P < 0.05). The current study demonstrates that Low BFR can be utilized in single- and multisire, 90-d breeding pastures of up to 2,090 ha without adversely affecting reproductive performance. In experiment two, yearling, one-half or three-quarter Bonsmara heifers (n = 106; 11-14 mo of age) were palpated per rectum and assigned a reproductive tract score (RTS) immediately prior to the beginning of the breeding season. Reproductive performance was measured in their two subsequent breeding years in order to estimate the value of the RTS system in extensively-managed, natural mating, 90-d breeding season programs. RTS was positively correlated (p < 0.01) with frame score (r = 0.25), age (r = 0.31), weaning weight (r = 0.47), and the weight of the heifer on the day of RTS exam (r = 0.56). The RTS means by dam parity also differed (P < 0.03). A lower (P < 0.01) percentage of females conceived during each of their first two breeding seasons for heifers of RTS 1 and 2 (65.2%) than for heifers of RTS 3, 4, and 5 (91.2%). Females with a RTS of 1 had a lower pregnancy rate over each of their first two breeding seasons, conceived later during their first breeding season, weaned lighter first calves, and remained lighter each year for fall body weight and body condition score than did heifers with RTS of 2 to 5 (P < 0.05). Collectively, the results of the current study indicate that heifers with a RTS of 1 immediately prior to a 90-d breeding season should be culled. Consideration should also be given to eliminating RTS 2 heifers, but further studies will be needed to confirm the potential economic advantage of this practice.

Rathmann, Ryan James

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A New Ventilation System Integrates Total Energy Recovery, Conventional Cooling and a Novel 'Passive' Dehumidification Wheel to Mitigate the Energy, Humidity Control and First Cost Concerns Often Raised when Designing for ASHRAE Standard 62-1999 Compliance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces a novel, ''passive" desiccant based outdoor air preconditioning system (PDH) that is shown to be significantly more energy-efficient than all known alternatives, and has the unique ability to dehumidify outdoor air streams to very low dewpoints unattainable with conventional cooling approaches. The system allows for precise control of the indoor space humidity while delivering high quantities of outdoor air, at both peak and part load conditions, and during both occupied and unoccupied modes. Low operating cost, reasonable first cost and a significant reduction in cooling plant capacity requirements provide a life cycle cost that is substantially less than that of more conventional system approaches.

Fischer, J. C.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

On-Board Imaging Validation of Optically Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery Positioning System for Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Paranasal Sinus and Skull Base Cancer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup. Results: The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 {+-} 1.1 mm and 3.9 {+-} 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner. Conclusion: Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Murphy, James D.; Chu, Karen P.M.; Hsu, Annie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu, E-mail: Qle@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: April 3, 2000 2: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on

264

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utahâ??s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utahâ??s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water â?? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquiferâ??s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utahâ??s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utahâ??s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

265

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Ligning-Derived Carbon Fiber as a Co-Product of Refining Cellulosic Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignin by-products from biorefineries has the potential to provide a low-cost alternative to petroleum-based precursors to manufacture carbon fiber, which can be combined with a binding matrix to produce a structural material with much greater specific strength and specific stiffness than conventional materials such as steel and aluminum. The market for carbon fiber is universally projected to grow exponentially to fill the needs of clean energy technologies such as wind turbines and to improve the fuel economies in vehicles through lightweighting. In addition to cellulosic biofuel production, lignin-based carbon fiber production coupled with biorefineries may provide $2,400 to $3,600 added value dry Mg-1 of biomass for vehicle applications. Compared to producing ethanol alone, the addition of lignin-derived carbon fiber could increase biorefinery gross revenue by 30% to 300%. Using lignin-derived carbon fiber in 15 million vehicles per year in the US could reduce fossil fuel consumption by 2-5 billion liters year-1, reduce CO2 emissions by about 6.7 million Mg year-1, and realize fuel savings through vehicle lightweighting of $700 to $1,600 per Mg biomass processed. The value of fuel savings from vehicle lightweighting becomes economical at carbon fiber price of $6.60 kg-1 under current fuel prices, or $13.20 kg-1 under fuel prices of about $1.16 l-1.

Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Baker, Fred S [ORNL; Compere, A L [ORNL; Griffith, William {Bill} L [ORNL; Boeman, Raymond G [ORNL; Keller, Martin [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Changes in salivary gland function after radiotherapy of head and neck tumors measured by quantitative pertechnetate scintigraphy: Comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and conventional radiation therapy with and without Amifostine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare changes in salivary gland function after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (RT), with or without Amifostine, for tumors of the head-and-neck region using quantitative salivary gland scintigraphy (QSGS). Methods and Materials: A total of 75 patients received pre- and post-therapeutic QSGS to quantify the salivary gland function. In all, 251 salivary glands were independently evaluated. Changes in the maximum uptake ({delta}U) and relative excretion rate ({delta}F) both pre- and post-RT were determined to characterize radiation-induced changes in the salivary gland function. In addition, dose-response curves were calculated. Results: In all groups, maximum uptake and relative excretion rate were reduced after RT ({delta}U {glands, the reduction was smaller for the IMRT-low than for the IMRT-high group. For the Amifostine-high and the conventional group the difference was significant only for one parameter ({delta}U, parotid and submandibular glands, p gland excretion rate of more than 50%,' the dose-response curves yielded D{sub 50}-values of 34.2 {+-} 12.2 Gy for the conventionally treated group and 36.8 {+-} 2.9 Gy for the IMRT group. For the Amifostine group, an increased D{sub 50}-values of 46.3 {+-} 2.3 Gy was obtained. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated RT can significantly reduce the loss of parotid gland function when respecting a certain dose threshold. Conventional RT plus Amifostine prevents reduced salivary gland function only in the patient group treated with <40.6 Gy.

Muenter, Marc W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany) and Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: m.muenter@dkfz.de; Hoffner, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Vincentius-Klinik Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Hof, Holger [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Herfarth, Klaus K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Rudat, Volker [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Josef-Hospital Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Huber, Peter [Clinical Cooperation Unit Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, Christian P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California  

SciTech Connect

A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region. In January 1997 the project entered its second and main phase with the purpose of demonstrating whether steamflood can be a more effective mode of production of the heavy, viscous oils from the Monarch Sand reservoir than the more conventional cyclic steaming. The objective is not just to produce the pilot site within the Pru Fee property south of Taft, but to test which production parameters optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

Steven Schamel

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

269

Technology Analysis - Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses Multi-Path Transportation Futures Study: Vehicle Characterization and Scenario Analyses The Multi-Path Study began by defining the basic physical characteristics of future advanced midsize cars and midsize SUVs with drivetrain technologies ranging from advanced SI and CI (diesel) engine-based conventional drivetrains through hybrid drivetrains (including plug-ins), to fuel cell hybrids and plug-in hybrids, through pure-electric drivetrains. The study evaluates these vehicles’ fuel economy using Argonne’s PSAT simulation model, estimates their costs, and does detailed analyses of their cost-effectiveness, balancing first costs against fuel savings. The study uses a version of the National Energy Modeling System (developed by the Energy Information Administration in the U.S. Department of Energy) to evaluate several scenarios assuming different vehicle costs (one set based on a literature review, one based on DOE goals) and availability of purchase subsidies.

270

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030-Graphic Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Graphic Data Figure 1. Total liquid fuels demand by sector Figure 1 Data Figure 2. Total natural gas supply by source Figure 2 Data Figure 3. New light-duty vehicle sales shares by type Figure 3 Data Figure 4. Proposed CAFE standards for passenger cars by vehicle footprint, model years 2011-2015 Figure 4 Data Figure 5. Proposed CAFE standards for light trucks by vehicle footprint, model years 2011-2015 Figure 5 Data Figure 6. Average fuel economy of new light-duty vehicles in the AEO2008 and AEO2009 projections, 1995-2030 Figure 6 Data Figure 7. Value of fuel saved by a PHEV compared with a conventional ICE vehicle over the life of the vehicles, by gasoline price and PHEV all-electric driving range

271

Green Your School | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Your School Green Your School Green Your School Illustration of a school bus. Schools around the country are finding ways to use energy as efficiently as possible, not only to set an example for their students and communities, but also to save on the bottom line. Given that energy costs are second only to salaries in terms of school budgets, many school leaders are investing in energy-efficiency technologies in their buildings and fuel-saving technologies in their buses. Check out a few facts about making your school green. Schools spend more on energy than any other expense except personnel. A high-performance school doesn't have to cost more to construct than a conventionally built school. High-performance schools can lower a school district's operating costs by up to 30%.

272

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California solar energy system performance evaluation, July 1980-June 1981  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory site is an office building in California with an active solar energy system designed to supply from 23 to 33% of the space heating load and part of the hot water load. The solar heating system is equipped with 1428 square feet of flat-plate collectors, a 2000-gallon water storage tank, and two gas-fired boilers to supply auxiliary heat for both space heating and domestic hot water. Poor performance is reported, with the solar fraction being only 4%. Also given are the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and the coefficient of performance. The performance data are given for the collector, storage, solar water heating and solar space heating subsystems as well as the total system. Typical system operation and solar energy utilization are briefly described. The system design, performance evaluation techniques, weather data, and sensor technology are presented. (LEW)

Wetzel, P.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Near term hybrid passenger vehicle development program. Phase I. Appendices A and B. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report vehicle use patterns or missions are defined and studied. The three most promising missions were found to be: all-purpose city driving which has the maximum potential market penetration; commuting which requires mainly a two-passenger car; and family and civic business driving which have minimal range requirements. The mission selection process was based principally on an analysis of the travel patterns found in the Nationwide Transportation Survey and on the Los Angeles and Washington, DC origin-destination studies data presented by General Research Corporation in Volume II of this report. Travel patterns in turn were converted to fuel requirements for 1985 conventional and hybrid cars. By this means the potential fuel savings for each mission were estimated, and preliminary design requirements for hybrid vehicles were derived.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solar energy system performance evaluation: Aratex Services, Fresno, California, December 1979-November 1980  

SciTech Connect

Solar preheated water is supplied to a commercial laundry plant by an active system consisting of 6528 square feet of single glazed flat-plate collectors, 12,500-gallon fiberglass storage tank, auxiliary steam boilers, and a 16,500-gallon water pump with tube-shell heat exchanger for feedwater preheat. The system is designed to provide 20% of the water heating load by solar energy. The solar fraction measured is 18%. Other measures of performance are given, including solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar coefficient of performance. The collector, storage, laundry hot water, and heat recovery subsystem performances are also discussed. The laundry's operating energy and weather data are given. (LEW)

Howard, B.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Baker Construction, Cincinnati, Ohio. Solar energy system performance evaluation, October 1980-May 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baker Construction site is a single family residence in Ohio with a passive solar heating system, which consists of 302 square feet of 62 degree sloped greenhouse glazing, a 35,500-pound concrete mass wall, 10,400-pound concrete slab floor, 20 phase change storage rods, six 1-kW electric baseboard heaters, and a wood stove. A solar fraction of 55% is reported. Also the solar savings ratio and conventional fuel savings are given. The performance of the greenhouse collector subsystem, the heat storage subsystem, and the space heating subsystem are summarized as well as total system performance. Energy savings and weather data are also included. The design of the system, performance evaluation techniques, and sensor technology are also presented. (LEW)

Spears, J.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fabrication and Materials Characterization I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, grant No. ... weight by almost half, resulting in remarkable fuel savings and gas emission reductions.

277

Tool and Calculator (Transit, Fuel) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This webside provide Tools & Calculators like Public Transit In Your Community, Fuel Saving Calculator, Carbon saving calculator, Transit Savings Report and transit benefits...

278

Real-time power management of parallel full hybrid electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lastly, the fuel saving capability of the HEV through intelligent driving was investigated. The intelligent vehicle velocity modification algorithm proposed by Manzie et al. is… (more)

Adhikari, Sunil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Retrofit regenerator package  

SciTech Connect

Potential fuel savings by retrofitting gas turbines with regeneration units are discussed. Thomassen U.S. is making the retrofit available.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

An Energy and Emissions Impact Evaluation of Intelligent Speed Adaptation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO: 85%; HC: 69%; NOx: 74% reduction) are possible with veryCO: 93%, HC: 90%, NOx: 86% reduction) and fuel savings (

Servin, Oscar; Boriboonsomsin, Kanok; Barth, Matthew

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Status of SiC Power Devices for Compact High Efficiency High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Si Circuits and, hence, 1- 3 % fuel savings for ... Distributed Systems in multiple locations for energy distribution and ... High temp/ density storage & ...

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

282

EERE News: Secretary Moniz Dedicates Clean Energy Research Center...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

a prototype CUBE system and validate its performance, reliability, and projected fuel savings through a fully integrated test at ESIF. "The research at ESIF will help refine...

283

Process Wrapped in Culture Leads PRO-TEC's Quest for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Product on Fleet Life-Cycle Fuel Savings (Technical ... Apply different annealing cycle based on ... Developed adaptive annealing cycles with chemistry ...

2012-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

284

A Distributed Framework for Coordinated Heavy-duty Vehicle ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to greenhouse gas emissions (road transport generates 16% of the CO2 pollution in Europe ..... fuel savings. Algorithm 1: Pseudocode for the savings calculation in

285

Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Frito-Lay  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fleet includes more than 600 hybrid electric sales cars and rapidly expanding use of propane and natural gas. Additional significant fuel savings are being realized through...

286

energy balance and comparison to conventional processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electricity-independent Generation of Si Based on the Use of Rice Husk: A Process Concept · Energy consumption of metal electrowinning: an optimization.

287

Improved Conventional Testing of Power Plant Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Factors such as mechanical stress, dust and pollution accumulation, moisture, and thermal aging can cause deterioration and ultimately failure of power, control, and instrumentation cables. This report documents physical, chemical, and electrical tests performed on thermally aged power plant cable, with emphasis on improvements in two major electrical diagnostic techniques: low-frequency insulation analysis to probe the bulk condition of cable insulation and partial discharge testing to detect cracks and...

1996-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

288

Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

208 3.165 3.198 3.264 3.261 3.267 1990-2014 208 3.165 3.198 3.264 3.261 3.267 1990-2014 East Coast (PADD1) 3.359 3.339 3.343 3.372 3.410 3.386 1992-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 3.501 3.501 3.511 3.555 3.552 3.535 1993-2014 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 3.509 3.514 3.523 3.570 3.618 3.594 1993-2014 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 3.303 3.274 3.276 3.298 3.335 3.311 1993-2014 Midwest (PADD 2) 3.124 3.058 3.140 3.251 3.203 3.239 1992-2014 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 3.102 3.053 3.051 3.109 3.115 3.106 1992-2014 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 3.077 3.055 3.055 3.100 3.120 3.148 1992-2014 West Coast (PADD 5) 3.343 3.335 3.333 3.351 3.371 3.367 1992-2014 West Coast less California 3.343 3.335 3.333 3.351 3.371 3.367 2000-2014 States Colorado 3.050 3.015 3.035 3.126 3.166 3.188 2000-2014

289

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18 2.749 1.864 2.289 - - 1994-2012 18 2.749 1.864 2.289 - - 1994-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 2.288 2.768 1.858 2.280 - - 1994-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 2.390 2.864 1.984 2.378 - - 1994-2012 Connecticut - - - - - - 1994-2012 Maine 2.384 2.848 1.984 2.360 - - 1994-2012 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1994-2012 New Hampshire 2.374 2.850 1.975 2.395 - - 1994-2012 Rhode Island - - - - - - 1994-2012 Vermont 2.420 2.925 1.989 2.422 - - 1994-2012 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.285 2.758 1.880 2.306 - - 1994-2012 Delaware - - - - - - 1994-2012 District of Columbia - - - - - - 1994-2012 Maryland 2.299 2.785 1.906 2.338 - - 1994-2012 New Jersey - - - - - - 1994-2012 New York 2.297 2.786 1.886 2.321 - - 1994-2012 Pennsylvania 2.275 2.738 1.873 2.295 - - 1994-2012

290

vi GNU make 14 Makefile Conventions ................... 111  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Implicit Rules ..................... 83 10.1 Using Implicit Rules................................... 83 10.2 Catalogue of Implicit Rules ............................ 84 10.3 Variables Used by Implicit Rules ....................... 87 10.4 Chains of Implicit Rules ............................... 89 10.5 Defining and Redefining Pattern Rules .................. 90 10.5.1 Introduction to Pattern Rules ................. 91 10.5.2 Pattern Rule Examples ....................... 91 10.5.3 Automatic Variables .......................... 92 10.5.4 How Patterns Match .......................... 94 10.5.5 Match-Anything Pattern Rules ................ 95 10.5.6 Canceling Implicit Rules ...................... 96 10.6 Defining Last-Resort Default Rules ..................... 96 10.7 Old-Fashioned Su#x Rules............................. 97 10.8 Implicit Rule Search Algorithm ........................ 98 11 Using make to Update Archive Files ...... 101 11.1 A

General Conventions For; Richard M. Stallman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

US-LHC MAGNET DATABASE AND CONVENTIONS.  

SciTech Connect

The US-LHC Magnet Database is designed for production-magnet quality assurance, field and alignment error impact analysis, cryostat assembly assistance, and ring installation assistance. The database consists of tables designed to store magnet field and alignment measurements data and quench data. This information will also be essential for future machine operations including local IR corrections.

WEI,J.; MCCHESNEY,D.; JAIN,A.; PEGGS,S.; PILAT,F.; BOTTURA,L.; SABBI,G.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

Conventional Gasoline Imports from Non OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

293

Conventional Gasoline Imports from Persian Gulf  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

294

October 10th Daejeon Convention Center, KOREA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center, KOREA Organized by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Hosted by Ministry of Education City Recognizing the prominent global role of nuclear energy, and based on the expectation that nuclear fusion will be able to provide an abundant source of energy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA

295

Probabilistic timing analysis on conventional cache designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Probabilistic timing analysis (PTA), a promising alternative to traditional worst-case execution time (WCET) analyses, enables pairing time bounds (named probabilistic WCET or pWCET) with an exceedance probability (e.g., 10-16), resulting ...

Leonidas Kosmidis, Charlie Curtsinger, Eduardo Quiñones, Jaume Abella, Emery Berger, Francisco J. Cazorla

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

NCAI 70th Annual Convention and Marketplace  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Experience six days of educational breakout sessions, discussions, events, and cultural celebrations, all organized with the purpose of engaging Indian Country in the National Congress of American...

297

SI Unit rules and style conventions checklist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3 , or kilogram per meter 3 . ... proper: m = 5 kg the current was 15 A improper: m = five kilograms m = five kg the current was 15 amperes ...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Blender Net Production of Conventional Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast: 1,533: 1,544: 1,519: 1,519: 1,551: 1,434: 2005-2013: Appalachian No. 1: 205: 189: 180: ... La. Gulf Coast: 88: 90: 89: 83: 86: 86: ...

299

Retail Prices for Premium Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 3.891: 3.771: 3.675: 3.758: 3.628: 3.514: 2003-2013: Denver: 3.811: 3.823: 3.811: 3.787: 3.732: 3.685: 2000-2013: Miami: 4.096: 4.078: 4.045: 4 ...

300

Retail Prices for Premium Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 2.972: 3.384: 2.540: 2.962: 3.705: 3.809: 2003-2012: Denver: 2.997: 3.388: 2.468: 2.885 : 2000-2010: Miami: 3.098: 3.626: 2.701: 3.106: 3.891: 4 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Retail Prices for Midgrade Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 3.547: 3.625: 3.496: 3.382: 3.455: 3.485: 2003-2013: Denver: 3.676: 3.652: 3.598: 3.547: 3.505: 3.469: 2000-2013: Miami: 3.883: 3.842: 3.805: 3 ...

302

Retail Prices for Midgrade Gasoline - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 2.864: 3.277: 2.432: 2.856: 3.595: 3.697: 2003-2012: Denver: 2.890: 3.278: 2.358: 2.773 : 2000-2010: Miami: 2.991: 3.519: 2.597: 3.006: 3.792: 3 ...

303

St. James Episcopal Church Fourth and Convention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, residential, and night spots. Always the place to "see and be seen," past and present. 23. B1-3 Beauregard Town Historic District In 1806 Elias Beauregard, a retired captain of the Louisiana Regiment, offered-lined boulevards, fountains, plazas, squares, and formal gardens. Beauregard envisioned a church on the central

Ullmer, Brygg

304

Current-Activated and Conventional Sintering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2011 ... Preliminary Investigations in Current-Activated Tip-Based Sintering (CATS): Modeling and Experiments: A. El-Desouky1; S.K. Kassegne1; K.S. ...

305

SI Unit rules and style conventions checklist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... proper: She exclaimed, "That dog weighs 10 kg!" t = 3 s, where t is time and s is second T = 22 K, where T is thermodynamic temperature, and K is ...

306

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 View History U.S. - - - - - - 1994-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) - - - - - - 1994-2013 New England (PADD 1A) - - - - - - 1994-2013 Connecticut...

307

Former Worker Program - Conventional Medical Screening Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

matter experts from HSS. The protocol is periodically updated, as necessary, based on new research findings within the scientificmedical community. The health conditions targeted...

308

Experiments at Demolition of Old Washington Convention ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST electrical engineers Chris Holloway and Galen ... signals and convert them to lower frequencies ... displayed in absolute units (electric field strength ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

309

Orbital debris : drafting, negotiating, implementing a convention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is time to recognize that while space may be infinite, Earth orbital space is a finite natural resource that must be managed properly. The problem we face with space pollution is complex and serious. The space treaties ...

Sénéchal, Thierry

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Measurement of the neutron leakage from a dedicated intraoperative radiation therapy electron linear accelerator and a conventional linear accelerator for 9, 12, 15(16), and 18(20) MeV electron energies  

SciTech Connect

The issue of neutron leakage has recently been raised in connection with dedicated electron-only linear accelerators used for intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). In particular, concern has been expressed about the degree of neutron production at energies of 10 MeV and higher due to the need for additional, perhaps permanent, shielding in the room in which the device is operated. In particular, three mobile linear accelerators available commercially offer electron energies at or above the neutron threshold, one at 9 MeV, one at 10 MeV, and the third at 12 MeV. To investigate this problem, neutron leakage has been measured around the head of two types of electron accelerators at a distance of 1 m from the target at azimuthal angles of 0 deg., 45 deg., 90 deg., 135 deg., and 180 deg. The first is a dedicated electron-only (nonmobile) machine with electron energies of 6 (not used here), 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV and the second a conventional machine with electron energies of 6 (also not used here), 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV. Measurements were made using neutron bubble detectors and track-etch detectors. For electron beams from a conventional accelerator, the neutron leakage in the forward direction in Sv/Gy is 2.1x10{sup -5} at 12 MeV, 1.3x10{sup -4} at 16 MeV, and 4.2x10{sup -4} at 20 MeV, assuming a quality factor (RBE) of 10. For azimuthal angles >0 deg., the leakage is almost angle independent [2x10{sup -6} at 12 MeV; (0.7-1.6)x10{sup -5} at 16 MeV, and (1.6-2.9)x10{sup -5} at 20 MeV]. For the electron-only machine, the neutron leakage was lower than for the conventional linac, but also independent of azimuthal angle for angles >0 deg. : ([0 deg. : 7.7x10{sup -6} at 12 MeV; 3.0x10{sup -5} at 15 MeV; 1.0x10{sup -4} at 18 MeV]; [other angles: (2.6-5.9)x10{sup -7} at 12 MeV; (1.4-2.2)x10{sup -6} at 15 MeV; (2.7-4.7)x10{sup -6} at 18 MeV]). Using the upper limit of 6x10{sup -7} Sv/Gy at 12 MeV for the IORT machine for azimuthal angles >0 deg. and assuming a workload of 200 Gy/wk and an inverse square factor of 10, the neutron dose equivalent is calculated to be 0.012 mSv/wk. For the primary beam at 12 MeV (0 deg. ), the 10x higher dose would be compensated by the attenuation of a primary beam stopper in a mobile linear accelerator. These neutron radiation levels are below regulatory values (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, 'Limitation of exposure to ionizing radiation', NCRP Report No. 116, NCRP Bethesda, MD, 1993)

Jaradat, Adnan K.; Biggs, Peter J. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, One University Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

In contrast to conventional inactivated influenza vaccines, 4xM2e.HSP70c fusion protein fully protected mice against lethal dose of H1, H3 and H9 influenza A isolates circulating in Iran  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ideal vaccines against influenza viruses should elicit not only a humoral response, but also a cellular response. Mycobacterium tuberculosis HSP70 (mHSP70) have been found to promote immunogenic APCs function, elicit a strong cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response, and prevent the induction of tolerance. Moreover, it showed linkage of antigens to the C-terminus of mHSP70 (mHSP70c) can represent them as vaccines resulted in more potent, protective antigen specific responses in the absence of adjuvants or complex formulations. Hence, recombinant fusion protein comprising C-terminus of mHSP70 genetically fused to four tandem repeats of the ectodomain of the conserved influenza matrix protein M2 (M2e) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified under denaturing condition, refolding, and then confirmed by SDS-PAGE, respectively. The recombinant fusion protein, 4xM2e.HSP70c, retained its immunogenicity and displayed the protective epitope of M2e by ELISA and FITC assays. A prime-boost administration of 4xM2e.HSP70c formulated in F105 buffer by intramuscular route in mice (Balb/C) provided full protection against lethal dose of mouse-adapted H1N1, H3N2, or H9N2 influenza A isolates from Iran compared to 0-33.34% survival rate of challenged unimmunized and immunized mice with the currently in use conventional vaccines designated as control groups. However, protection induced by immunization with 4xM2e.HSP70c failed to prevent weight loss in challenged mice; they experienced significantly lower weight loss, clinical symptoms and higher lung viral clearance in comparison with protective effects of conventional influenza vaccines in challenged mice. These data demonstrate that C-terminal domain of mHSP70 can be a superior candidate to deliver the adjuvant function in M2e-based influenza A vaccine in order to provide significant protection against multiple influenza A virus strains.

Ebrahimi, Seyyed Mahmoud, E-mail: smebrahimi@shirazu.ac.ir [Applied Biotechnology Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-3651,Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center of Virus and Vaccine, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Science, P.O.Box 14155-3651, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dabaghian, Mehran [Department of Pathobiology, University of Tehran, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 14155-6453, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Pathobiology, University of Tehran, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 14155-6453, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tebianian, Majid [Department of Biotechnology, Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute (RVSRI), P.O. Box 31975/148, Karaj, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Biotechnology, Razi Vaccine and Serum Research Institute (RVSRI), P.O. Box 31975/148, Karaj, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zabeh Jazi, Mohammad Hossein [Department of Pathobiology, University of Tehran, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 14155-6453, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Pathobiology, University of Tehran, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 14155-6453, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Activities implemented jointly: First report to the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Accomplishments and descriptions of projects accepted under the U.S. Initiative on Joint Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 150 countries are now Party to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which seeks, as its ultimate objective, to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases at a level that would prevent dangerous human interference with the climate system. As a step toward this goal, all Parties are to take measures to mitigate climate change and to promote and cooperate in the development and diffusion of technologies and practices that control or reduce emissions and enhance sinks of greenhouse gases. In the US view, efforts between countries or entities within them to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions undertaken cooperatively--called joint implementation (JI)--holds significant potential both for combating the threat of global warming and for promoting sustainable development. To develop and operationalize the JI concept, the US launched its Initiative on Joint Implementation (USIJI) in October 1993, and designed the program to attract private sector resources and to encourage the diffusion of innovative technologies to mitigate climate change. The USIJI provides a mechanism for investments by US entities in projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions worldwide and has developed a set of criteria for evaluating proposed projects for their potential to reduce net GHG emissions.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California, Class III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the initial phase of the project a multifaceted feasibility study was carried out to examine whether the pilot project could be justified technically and economically at this site. This study included: (1) Recompletion of 9 shut-in wells and drilling of a additional producer and a new temperature observation well. A core was taken from the reservoir interval in the new producer, Pru-101. The wells were produced by conventional cyclic steaming over a period of 15 months to establish a production baseline for the site, (2) Characterization of the stratigraphy and petrophysical properties of the Monarch Sand reservoir using existing well logs and analyses on samples in the core taken from Pru-101. The resulting data were used to develop a geostatistical model of the reservoir at the Pru Fee property and a specific reservoir simulator for the pilot test site on the property, and (3) Use of the reservoir simulator to test various steamflood and cyclic steaming production options leading to design of a production strategy for the pilot steamflood based on a four pattern, 9-spot array covering 8 ac near the center of the 40 ac Pru Fee property. The array chosen required drilling additional producers and injectors to supplement the existing wells recompleted in the initial phase of the project.

Schamel, Steven; Deo, Milind; Deets, Mike; Olsen, Keven

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

Hager, Robert C. (Hatchery Operations Consulting); Costello, Ronald J. (Mobrand Biometrics, Inc., Vashon Island, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

21st century locomotive technology: quarterly technical status report 26  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parasitic losses due to hybrid sodium battery thermal management do not significantly reduce the fuel saving benefits of the hybrid locomotive. Optimal thermal management trajectories were converted into realizable algorithms which were robust and gave excellent performance to limit thermal excusions and maintain fuel savings.

Lembit Salasoo; Ramu Chandra

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

316

The importance of vehicle costs, fuel prices, and fuel efficiency to HEV market success.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Toyota's introduction of a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) named ''Prius'' in Japan and Honda's proposed introduction of an HEV in the United States have generated considerable interest in the long-term viability of such fuel-efficient vehicles. A performance and cost projection model developed entirely at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is used here to estimate costs. ANL staff developed fuel economy estimates by extending conventional vehicle (CV) modeling done primarily under the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. Together, these estimates are employed to analyze dollar costs vs. benefits of two of many possible HEV technologies. We project incremental costs and fuel savings for a Prius-type low-performance hybrid (14.3 seconds zero to 60 mph acceleration, 260 time) and a higher-performance ''mild'' hybrid vehicle, or MHV (11 seconds 260 time). Each HEV is compared to a U.S. Toyota Corolla with automatic transmission (11 seconds 260 time). The base incremental retail price range, projected a decade hence, is $3,200-$3,750, before considering battery replacement cost. Historical data are analyzed to evaluate the effect of fuel price on consumer preferences for vehicle fuel economy, performance, and size. The relationship between fuel price, the level of change in fuel price, and consumer attitude toward higher fuel efficiency is also evaluated. A recent survey on the value of higher fuel efficiency is presented and U.S. commercial viability of the hybrids is evaluated using discount rates of 2090 and 870. Our analysis, with our current HEV cost estimates and current fuel savings estimates, implies that the U.S. market for such HEVS would be quite limited.

Santini, D. J.; Patterson, P. D.; Vyas, A. D.

1999-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #793: August 19, 2013 Improvements in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: August 19, 3: August 19, 2013 Improvements in Fuel Economy for Low-MPG Vehicles Yield the Greatest Fuel Savings to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #793: August 19, 2013 Improvements in Fuel Economy for Low-MPG Vehicles Yield the Greatest Fuel Savings on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #793: August 19, 2013 Improvements in Fuel Economy for Low-MPG Vehicles Yield the Greatest Fuel Savings on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #793: August 19, 2013 Improvements in Fuel Economy for Low-MPG Vehicles Yield the Greatest Fuel Savings on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #793: August 19, 2013 Improvements in Fuel Economy for Low-MPG Vehicles Yield the Greatest Fuel Savings on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #793: August 19, 2013

318

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #595: November 2, 2009 Plug-in Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: November 2, 5: November 2, 2009 Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Purchases May Depend on Fuel Savings and Incremental Cost to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #595: November 2, 2009 Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Purchases May Depend on Fuel Savings and Incremental Cost on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #595: November 2, 2009 Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Purchases May Depend on Fuel Savings and Incremental Cost on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #595: November 2, 2009 Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Purchases May Depend on Fuel Savings and Incremental Cost on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #595: November 2, 2009 Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Purchases May Depend on Fuel Savings and Incremental Cost on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #595: November 2, 2009

319

Conventional and Stuffed Bergman-Type Phases in the Na-Au-T (T=Ga, Ge, Sn) Systems: Synthesis, Structures, Coloring of Cluster Centers, and Fermi Sphere - Brillouin Zone Interactions  

SciTech Connect

Bergman-type phases in the Na?Au?T (T = Ga, Ge, and Sn) systems were synthesized by solid-state means and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Two structurally related (1/1) Bergman phases were found in the Na? Au?Ga system: (a) a conventional Bergman-type (CB) structure, Na26AuxGa54?x, which features empty innermost icosahedra, as refined with x = 18.1 (3), Im3?, a = 14.512(2) Å, and Z = 2; (b) a stuffed Bergman-type (SB) structure, Na26AuyGa55?y, which contains Gacentered innermost icosahedra, as refined with y = 36.0 (1), Im3?, a = 14.597(2) Å, and Z = 2. Although these two subtypes have considerable phase widths along with respective tie lines at Na ? 32.5 and 32.1 atom %, they do not merge into a continuous solid solution. Rather, a quasicrystalline phase close to the Au-poor CB phase and an orthorhombic derivative near the Au-rich SB phase lie between them. In contrast, only Au-rich SB phases exist in the Ge and Sn systems, in which the innermost icosahedra are centered by Au rather than Ge or Sn. These were refined for Na26Au40.93(5)Ge14.07(5) (Im3?, a = 14.581(2) Å, and Z = 2) and Na26Au39.83(6)Sn15.17(6) (Im3?, a = 15.009(2) Å, and Z = 2), respectively. Occupations of the centers of Bergman clusters are rare. Such centering and coloring correlate with the sizes of the neighboring icosahedra, the size ratios between electropositive and electronegative components, and the values of the average valence electron count per atom (e/a). Theoretical calculations revealed that all of these phases are Hume?Rothery phases, with evident pseudogaps in the density of states curves that arise from the interactions between Fermi surface and Brillouin zone boundaries corresponding to a strong diffraction intensity.

Lin, Qisheng; Smetana, Volodymur; Miller, Gordon J.; Corbett, John D

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

320

Industrial energy conservation technology: proceedings of the 1984 conference and exhibition. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Sixth Annual Industrial Energy Conservation Technology Conference and Exhibition was held at the Shamrock Hilton Hotel, Houston, Texas, April 15-18, 1984. Fifty-nine papers from Vol. I of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; one has been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

Williams, M.A. (ed.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Integrated Testing, Simulation and Analysis of Electric Drive Options for Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory verified diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reduction and cost implications of plug-in hybrid gasoline and diesel variants. These variants are run on a field-data-derived design matrix to analyze the effects of drive cycle, distance, battery replacements, battery capacity, and motor power on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. Two cost scenarios using fuel prices corresponding to forecasted highs for 2011 and 2030 and battery costs per kilowatt-hour representing current and long-term targets compare plug-in hybrid lifetime costs with diesel conventional lifetime costs. Under a future cost scenario of $100/kWh battery energy and $5/gal fuel, plug-in hybrids are cost effective. Assuming a current cost of $700/kWh and $3/gal fuel, they rarely recoup the additional motor and battery cost. The results highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle, daily driving distance, and kinetic intensity. For instances in the current-cost scenario where the additional plug-in hybrid cost is regained in fuel savings, the combination of kinetic intensity and daily distance travelled does not coincide with the usage patterns observed in the field data. If the usage patterns were adjusted, the hybrids could become cost effective.

Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

REQUEST BY CATERPILLAR INC. FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and demonstrate an electric turbo-compounding module on a laboratory on-highway truck diesel engine which has the potential fuel savings of five percent (5%). The work is...

323

Snapshots of the Year in Energy: 12 Awesome Photos from 2012...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What's your EnergyPledge? Day 12: Drive Your Way to Fuel Savings 12 Days of Energy Savings A New Energy-Efficient Home in the D.C. Community Solar Decathlon at Home in...

324

Air Force Achieves Fuel Efficiency through Industry Best Practices (Brochure), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

highest potential to save aviation fuel. highest potential to save aviation fuel. All MAF personnel are encouraged to propose fuel savings ideas. These ideas are then processed as initiatives, assigned a primary point of contact, and routed through an analysis process to prepare the initiative for presenta- tion to the Air Force's corporate structure. The corporate structure then evaluates and determines the initiatives with the highest potential fuel savings. Fuel-saving efforts focus on six major areas: policy, planning, execution, maintenance, science and technology, and fuel-efficient aircraft systems. The MAF also established a predetermined set of fuel-savings metrics and required reporting. In fiscal year 2011, implemented fuel initiatives saved the MAF more than 42 million gallons of aviation fuel in both

325

Roadmap and Technical White Papers for 21st Century Truck Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hours that are accumulated by type of heavy-duty vehicle. Analyze data from the EPA SmartWay Transport Partnership to measure fuel savings and emissions reductions associated...

326

Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities for petroleum refineries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MTC. Marano, J.J. , 2003. Refinery Technology Profiles:Deep Desulfurization of Oil Refinery Streams: A Review. FuelSavings for Flying J Refinery. Oil & Gas Journal, December 2

Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Route-Based Control of Hybrid Electric Vehicles: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today's hybrid electric vehicle controls cannot always provide maximum fuel savings over all drive cycles. Route-based controls could improve HEV fuel efficiency by 2%-4% and help save nearly 6.5 million gallons of fuel annually.

Gonder, J. D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

12 Days of Energy Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 of 12 Day 12: Drive Your Way to Fuel Savings Save money on fuel costs by emptying your car after all your shopping trips -- an extra 100 pounds in your vehicle could increase gas...

329

Evaluating and selecting options for oil refit programs  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Oil Refit Program provides technical support for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Oil Conservation Marketing Demonstration Program implemented in several states (designed to accelerate the use of fuel saving devices and systems by homeowners). BNL assisted with the planning and implementation of the marketing and grants option phases for the New York State Pilot Marketing Demonstration Program and is monitoring the results. Additionally BNL planned, and is implementing, the Oil Refit Option Qualification Program involving procedures for evaluating refit options for selection, field testing, and quantifying fuel savings for the purpose of qualifying additional options for use in the DOE state and other marketing programs. The BNL approach for the evaluation of options on a comparative basis is shown and the potential for optimizing fuel savings by combining available single-choice refit options is examined. Also shown are the estimated fuel savings for each option installed.

Hoppe, R.; Graves, W.; Salzano, F.J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fuel Economy Widgets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

widget and many other great free widgets at Widgetbox Not seeing a widget? (More info) Gas Mileage Tips Widget This widget displays a new fuel-saving tip each week and provides...

331

BCA Perspective on Fuel Cell APUs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Overall system at cruise) 0.6 litre Jet-A 40% less fuel used In-flight SFC* saving is 0.7% * Specific Fuel Consumption Fuel saving opportunity on the...

332

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Facts of the Week  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 793 Improvements in Fuel Economy for Low-MPG Vehicles Yield the Greatest Fuel Savings August 19, 2013 792 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy Source, 1982 and 2012...

333

Optimizing Dam Operations for Power and for Fish: an Overview of the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers ADvanced Turbine Development R&D. A Pre-Conference Workshop at HydroVision 2006, Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon July 31, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This booklet contains abstracts of presentations made at a preconference workshop on the US Department of Energy and US Army Corps of Engineers hydroturbine programs. The workshop was held in conjunction with Hydrovision 2006 July 31, 2006 at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland Oregon. The workshop was organized by the Corps of Engineers, PNNL, and the DOE Wind and Hydropower Program. Presenters gave overviews of the Corps' Turbine Survival Program and the history of the DOE Advanced Turbine Development Program. They also spoke on physical hydraulic models, biocriteria for safe fish passage, pressure investigations using the Sensor Fish Device, blade strike models, optimization of power plant operations, bioindex testing of turbine performance, approaches to measuring fish survival, a systems view of turbine performance, and the Turbine Survival Program design approach.

Dauble, Dennis D.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.2 7.2 66.8 59.8 52.5 48.2 53.6 75.7 75.1 65.4 57.1 W 60.9 February ............................. 67.0 66.6 60.6 53.5 49.6 54.8 75.4 74.9 66.1 58.1 NA 61.8 March .................................. 67.9 67.6 61.1 54.5 50.4 55.7 75.8 75.3 66.5 58.3 NA 62.2 April .................................... 73.1 72.8 66.9 62.3 56.4 62.6 80.8 80.4 72.4 66.7 W 69.3 May ..................................... 79.0 78.6 72.1 67.7 62.0 68.0 87.2 86.6 77.4 72.5 NA 74.8 June .................................... 79.2 78.6 70.3 62.4 58.5 63.9 87.6 86.8 75.9 66.8 NA 71.0 July ..................................... 75.6 75.0 66.0 56.4 52.9 58.5 83.8 83.0 71.4 60.2 NA 65.5 August ................................ 73.0 72.6 64.8 57.0 51.8 58.3 81.0 80.5 69.8 60.8 NA 64.9 September .......................... 72.0 71.8 64.8 57.7 52.3 58.7 79.8 79.5 69.6

335

Weekly U.S. Imports of Conventional Other Gasoline Blending ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

456 : 2011-Mar: 03/04 : 376 : 03/11 : 406 : 03/18 : 433 : 03/25 : 445 : 2011-Apr: 04/01 : 586 : 04/08 : 505 : 04/15 : 483 : 04/22 : 423 : 04/29 : 457 : 2011-May: 05/06 :

336

ENERGY STAR Success Story: The Virginia Beach Convention Center...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of their age and building systems they employ, can reduce energy consumption, save money, and offset greenhouse gas emissions by implementing low-cost, high-return energy...

337

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Type, PAD District, and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month Premium All Grades Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales...

338

Novel Sintering Processes and News in Conventional Sintering and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The symposium is dedicated to the state of the art in experiments and theory of Field Assisted ... Changes in the Grain Boundary Character and Mean Relative Energy Resulting form ... Spark Plasma Sintering: Processing of Nuclear Materials.

339

U.S. Exports of Conventional Motor Gasoline (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: 1994: 3,010: 2,151: 2,737: 2,183: 1,996: 2,628: 2,410 ...

340

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Values shown for the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

American Veterans 69th Annual National Convention | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

http:www.janugget.com Where AMVETS leaders and members will be given a chance to shape the future of our great organization. From electing new leaders to voting on...

342

Economic impact of integrating photovoltaics with conventional electric utility operation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the parameters which impact the value of photovoltaics (PV) to the electric utility. We have, therefore, chosen the high, medium and low load days in winter (January) and summer (July). The daily peak load has varied from 5838 MW to 9712 MW. These six days are studied for reference (no PV), high, medium, low and intermittent PV output cases. Results from these 30 case studies are summarized in this paper. In order to study the impact of operating photovoltaic (PV) systems on the electric utility production cost (fuel and variable O and M) we have chosen the load profile of a southeastern utility and the PV output data from solar test facilities in Virginia and North Carolina. In order to incorporate the short-term variations we have used 10-minute resolution data for both load and PV output.

Rahman, S. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

16,716.2 14,277.3 13,878.1 13,588.6 14,053.9 13,516.9 1994-2013 16,716.2 14,277.3 13,878.1 13,588.6 14,053.9 13,516.9 1994-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) W W W 3,727.8 W 3,676.1 1994-2013 New England (PADD 1A) - - - - - - 1994-2013 Connecticut - - - - - - 1994-2013 Maine - - - - - - 1994-2013 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1994-2013 New Hampshire - - - - - - 1994-2013 Rhode Island - - - - - - 1994-2013 Vermont - - - - - - 1994-2013 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) W W W W W W 1994-2013 Delaware - - - - - - 1994-2013 District of Columbia - - - - - - 1994-2013 Maryland - - - - - - 1994-2013 New Jersey - - - - - - 1994-2013 New York W W W W W W 1994-2013 Pennsylvania W W W W W W 1994-2013 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2,437.3 2,438.9 2,168.5 W 2,124.4 W 1994-2013

344

Conventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

34,966.5 33,853.0 31,513.3 29,499.2 25,064.8 17,695.8 1994-2012 34,966.5 33,853.0 31,513.3 29,499.2 25,064.8 17,695.8 1994-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 11,833.0 11,488.6 10,553.5 9,423.6 7,778.2 5,183.5 1994-2012 New England (PADD 1A) W W W W W W 1994-2012 Connecticut - - - - - - 1994-2012 Maine W W W W W W 1994-2012 Massachusetts - - - - - - 1994-2012 New Hampshire - - - - W W 1994-2012 Rhode Island - - - - - - 1994-2012 Vermont W W W W W W 1994-2012 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) W W W 2,592.4 2,527.8 2,297.8 1994-2012 Delaware - - - - - - 1994-2012 District of Columbia - - - - - - 1994-2012 Maryland W - - - - - 1994-2012 New Jersey - - - - - - 1994-2012 New York 1,592.0 1,497.3 1,529.5 1,448.1 1,447.5 W 1994-2012 Pennsylvania 1,497.8 W W 1,144.3 1,080.3 W 1994-2012

345

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

83.6 83.6 83.3 77.1 71.3 66.2 71.8 91.6 91.1 82.2 75.5 - 78.4 February ............................. 82.1 81.8 74.8 68.6 64.3 69.3 90.3 89.8 80.0 72.5 - 75.7 March .................................. 79.9 79.7 72.6 66.3 62.6 67.2 88.1 87.8 78.3 70.3 W 73.5 April .................................... 79.0 78.8 72.4 65.2 60.7 66.3 87.3 87.0 77.8 69.3 - 72.7 May ..................................... 79.6 79.5 73.0 67.5 61.8 67.9 87.5 87.2 78.4 70.7 - 73.8 June .................................... 78.9 78.7 70.9 63.9 59.0 65.0 86.8 86.5 76.6 67.2 - 71.0 July ..................................... 77.3 77.2 69.7 63.8 57.6 64.3 85.4 85.1 75.7 67.3 - 70.6 August ................................ 82.1 81.9 75.4 71.0 63.7 70.9 89.9 89.6 81.0 74.8 - 77.3 September .......................... 80.9 80.7 73.3 66.3 60.8 67.1 89.1 88.6 79.2 69.9 -

346

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51.0 51.0 50.8 45.0 38.1 33.0 39.1 59.9 59.7 51.9 42.3 - 46.1 February ............................. 49.4 49.3 43.4 36.3 32.8 37.6 58.6 58.4 50.4 40.4 - 44.3 March .................................. 57.2 57.1 52.4 46.9 39.7 47.1 65.7 65.5 58.6 50.5 - 53.7 April .................................... 68.1 68.0 64.2 56.7 47.2 56.2 76.5 76.2 69.8 60.5 - 63.9 May ..................................... 68.9 68.8 63.6 56.3 48.2 56.1 77.4 77.0 69.4 60.0 - 63.4 June .................................... 68.2 68.2 63.7 56.3 48.6 56.7 76.5 76.3 69.1 59.8 - 63.2 July ..................................... 73.6 73.6 69.8 63.6 55.3 63.8 81.8 81.6 75.0 67.2 - 70.0 August ................................ 78.7 78.7 74.6 68.4 62.5 69.0 87.5 87.2 79.9 72.0 - 74.9 September .......................... 82.1 81.9 77.5 71.5 64.7 71.9 90.9 90.5 83.1 75.3 -

347

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9.0 9.0 68.8 61.7 55.1 51.1 56.0 77.1 76.6 66.9 59.4 - 62.6 February ............................. 69.6 69.4 63.4 56.3 52.0 57.4 77.6 77.2 68.9 60.4 - 64.3 March .................................. 75.3 75.1 69.2 63.6 57.7 64.3 83.2 82.8 74.6 67.5 W 70.8 April .................................... 83.2 83.0 77.3 71.5 64.3 71.6 91.1 90.7 82.5 75.8 - 78.9 May ..................................... 86.2 85.9 79.2 71.7 65.6 72.6 94.1 93.6 84.2 75.8 - 79.5 June .................................... 83.7 83.4 75.2 66.6 59.9 67.4 91.6 90.9 80.2 69.5 - 74.2 July ..................................... 81.8 81.5 74.0 66.6 60.0 67.3 89.6 89.1 79.2 70.2 - 74.2 August ................................ 80.3 80.2 73.1 66.2 60.0 66.9 88.0 87.6 78.4 69.8 W 73.5 September .......................... 80.6 80.5 73.7 67.2 60.4 67.8 88.3 87.9 78.8 70.9 -

348

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales Type,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

66.1 66.1 65.8 58.4 51.1 49.2 52.4 74.6 74.2 64.6 55.6 - 59.1 February ............................. 63.3 63.2 56.3 50.1 47.4 51.0 72.0 71.6 62.1 54.1 - 57.3 March .................................. 61.3 61.2 54.2 47.9 45.4 48.9 69.9 69.5 60.0 51.9 - 55.0 April .................................... 62.6 62.5 56.3 51.1 47.1 51.5 71.0 70.7 61.8 55.1 - 57.7 May ..................................... 65.3 65.2 58.8 53.8 48.4 53.9 73.5 73.1 64.3 57.6 - 60.3 June .................................... 64.6 64.4 57.4 51.2 46.2 51.7 73.2 72.6 63.2 54.9 W 58.2 July ..................................... 63.4 63.2 56.0 49.8 45.1 50.5 72.2 71.7 62.2 53.4 - 56.9 August ................................ 60.5 60.3 52.9 45.0 41.0 46.3 69.6 69.2 59.2 48.8 - 53.0 September .......................... 59.2 59.1 52.8 45.8 40.8 46.7 68.2 67.9 58.8 49.7 -

349

An Improved Non-Conventional Method for Obtaining Nuclear Pure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... Uranium oxide (U3O8) is obtained from this precipitate by calcination for ... The latter is reduced by stannous chloride to obtain uranium trioxide ...

350

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Conventional Vertical Pump Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical pumps are used in several applications in power plants, such as condensate, heater drain, circulating water, and service water/river water applications.BackgroundThe Maintenance Issue Surveys of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Generation Maintenance Applications Center (GenMAC) indicate that members are experiencing difficulties with various maintenance issues associated with vertical pumps. Some of the problems identified a need for ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

351

Non-conventional Phase Transformation Paths: Part III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Program Organizers: Amy Clarke, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sudarsanam Suresh Babu, Ohio State Univ; Rajarshi Banerjee, Univ of ...

352

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fund in the event of certain nuclear incidents. Section 934 authorizes the Secretary of Energy (''Secretary'') to issue regulations establishing a retrospective risk pooling...

353

SNS 10800000-ST0003-R00 Conventional Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contractors, who are contracted to Knight/Jacobs, the Architect Engineer/Construction Manager (AE Associated Technology is the Architect Engineer partner of the Joint Venture and has provided the design

354

The United States Ratifies The Convention On Supplementary Compensatio...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean, safe, emissions-free nuclear power is an essential part of our national and global energy mix and its expansion is necessary for a secure energy future." Media contact(s):...

355

October 16-19, 2000 Baltimore Convention Center Baltimore ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Plenary Wednesday, October 18 7:00pm Conference Banquet Thursday, October 19 10:30am–12:00 noon Closing Plenary ...

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

356

U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Sales to End Users, Total 34,966.5 33,853.0 31,513.3 29,499.2 25,064.8 17,695.8 1994-2012 Through Retail Outlets 34,266.1 32,883.4...

357

Conventional Benchmarks as a Sample of the Performance Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most benchmarks are smaller than actual application programs. One reason is to improve benchmark universality by demanding resources every computer is likely to have. However, users dynamically increase the size of application programs to match the power ... Keywords: HINT, benchmarks, hierarchical memory, performance analysis

John L. Gustafson; Rajat Todi

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Overcoming the Limitations of Conventional Vector Processors Christos Kozyrakis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

file (VRF), the difficulty of im- plementing precise exceptions for vector instructions, and the high to support all-to-all communication between the functional units, as it is the case with the centralized VRF-processor, a multi-lane vector design with a centralized VRF. For the EEMBC benchmarks and assuming equal die area

Kozyrakis, Christos

359

The semantics of Chemical Markup Language (CML): dictionaries and conventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open patents’ paper, this issue. 29 Quixote project on QC databases. [http://quixote.wikispot.org/] Accessed 2011-05-25 30 Quixote paper, this issue. 31 Official Gaussian website. [http://www.gaussian.com/] Accessed 2011-05-25 32 GAMESS... , this issue. #2; Quixote project on QC databases. [http://quixote.wikispot.org/] Accessed 2011-05-25 #2; Quixote paper, this issue. #2; Official Gaussian website. [http://www.gaussian.com/] Accessed 2011-05-25 #2; GAMESS-UK software. [http...

Murray-Rust, Peter; Townsend, Joseph A; Adams, Sam; Phadungsukanan, Weerapong; Thomas, Jens

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

360

Development of a Conventional Fine Grain Casting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, all the liners cracked or spalled due to low thermal ... Failure analysis indicated that nonmetallic inclusions were the source of .... and neutron radiation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Guidelines for Chemical Cleaning of Conventional Fossil Plant Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the overall goals of EPRI's Fossil Plant Cycle Chemistry Target is to provide operating guidelines for the majority of fossil plants. Another goal is to extend the period between chemical cleans, and for units with all-ferrous feedwater systems, to eliminate the need to chemically clean altogether. These comprehensive, revised guidelines join the suite of 11 key EPRI documents that assist utilities in achieving these goals.

2001-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

362

United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

developing countries in adjusting to climate changes. 2008 - Poznan COP 14 in Poznan, Poland 2009 - Copenhagen Expert Group on Technology Transfer(EGTT) Terms of reference of the...

363

Conventional Gasoline Blended Bulk Terminal Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil stocks in the ...

364

Physics Basis for Advanced and Conventional Operating Modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of projected Power Plant designs · Only address technological issues required for successful device operation ­ Fueling, pumping, power handling, plasma control, neutronics, materials, remote handling, and safety.13 and growth time is 43

365

Nematode Communities in Organically and Conventionally Managed Agricultural Soils1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Scow KM. 1996. Nutrient limitation in a compost biofilter degrading hexane. J Air Waste Manage Assoc 46

Neher, Deborah A.

366

East Coast (PADD 1) Conventional Gasoline Blended Blended with ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Stock Type: Area: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History; Total Stocks: 3: 96: 55: 29: 23: 26: 2006-2012: Bulk Terminal: 3: 96: 55: 29: 23: 26: 2006-2012-= No ...

367

Blender Net Production of Conventional Gasoline Blended with ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

East Coast: 1,688: 1,693: 1,715: 1,697: 1,696: 1,742: 2005-2013: Appalachian No. 1: 215: 228: 213: 204: 213: 202: ... La. Gulf Coast: 107: 102: 103: ...

368

Retail Prices for Gasoline All Grades - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 3.682: 3.579: 3.480: 3.554: 3.409: 3.297: 2003-2013: Denver: 3.593: 3.601: 3.588: 3.565: 3.509: 3.456: 2000-2013: Miami: 3.811: 3.790: 3.755: 3 ...

369

Retail Prices for Gasoline All Grades - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 2.805: 3.217: 2.372: 2.793: 3.530: 3.632: 2003-2012: Denver: 2.815: 3.203: 2.282: 2.699 : 2000-2010: Miami: 2.927: 3.447: 2.521: 2.930: 3.696: 3 ...

370

Retail Prices for Gasoline All Grades - Conventional Areas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cities : Cleveland: 3.777: 3.806: 3.531: 3.567: 3.541: 3.340: 2003-2013: Denver : 2000-2001: Miami: 3.709: 3.751: 3.785: 3.789: 3.740: 3.574: 2003-2013: Seattle: 3 ...

371

ae.dvi - A Conventional Authenticated-Encryption Mode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Davis, California 95616, USA; and De partment of Computer Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200, Thailand. ...

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

,,,"with Any"," Steam Turbines Supplied by Either Conventional...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Turbines Supplied by Heat Recovered from High-Temperature Processes",,,," " ,,,"Cogeneration" "NAICS",,,"Technology" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Establishments(b)","in...

373

Metrics for Evaluating Conventional and Renewable Energy Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

With numerous options for the future of natural gas, how do we know we're going down the right path? How do we designate a metric to measure and demonstrate change and progress, and how does that metric incorporate all stakeholders and scenarios?

Mann, M. K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Contested areas of South China Sea likely have few conventional ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary › All Reports ... weather; gasoline; capacity; nuclear; exports; forecast; View All Tags ...

375

U.S. Conventional Gasoline Blending Components Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Spatly Islands : 2007-2007: Sweden: 110 : 142: 9 : 2004-2013: Syria : 2011-2011: Taiwan : 150 : 2004-2013: Thailand : 2006-2007: Togo : 2012-2012: Trinidad and Tobago

376

U.S. Conventional Gasoline Blending Components Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

377

Conventional And Analytical Electron Microscopy Study Of Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What Can we Learn from Atomic Scale Calculations of Grain Boundary Properties? What Can We Learn from Measurements of Li-ion Battery Single Particles?

378

Conventional Gasoline Imports from China - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

379

The Philadelphia Marriott: A convention center flagship hotel  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the state-of-the-art HVAC system at the Philadelphia Marriott Hotel. Thermal comfort and indoor air quality are emphasized. The system uses a hybrid gas absorption/electric centrifugal chilled water plant, variable flow pumping, water-side economizers to provide free cooling, central air handling units with air-side economizers and flow monitoring equipment.

Shulman, M.S. [Giovanetti-Shulman Associates, Drexel Hill, PA (United States); Mattocks, J. [Mechanical Design International, Inc., Ellicott City, MD (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Convention 78. [Honolulu, May 2-4, 1978  

SciTech Connect

Proceedings of the 1978 BCI meeting are reported. Business sessions are interspersed with more technical papers. A separate abstract was prepared for one of the presentations. (RWR)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

This is a low sintering temperature for conventional SOFC ...  

http://www.lbl.gov/Tech-Transfer/industry/index.html ... 441 stainless steel (MnCo) 3 O 4 coating Contact material (CCM) 0 250 500 750 1000 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 Pt ...

382

Monthly Evapotranspiration from Satellite and Conventional Meteorological Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly mean satellite measurements of surface heating rate, surface temperature, and normalized difference vegetation index were collected for seven locations in Kansas. These were combined with monthly average surface observations and used in a ...

J. D. Tarpley

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

ENERGY STAR Success Story: San Diego Convention Center | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

online energy management and tracking tool, Portfolio Manager, the SDCCC tracked its energy consumption and has improved the facility's overall performance. This two-page...

384

Stocks of Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Stocks include those ...

385

Structure and Properties of Detonation Sprayed Conventional and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Surface Restoration Effect Introduced by Advanced Lubricant Additive · Nanocomposite Thermal Spray Coatings. New Hardfacing Overlay Claddings ...

386

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

83.6 83.3 77.1 71.3 66.2 71.8 91.6 91.1 82.2 75.5 - 78.4 February ... 82.1 81.8 74.8 68.6 64.3 69.3 90.3 89.8 80.0 72.5 - 75.7 March ......

387

Table 32. Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade, Sales...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7.2 66.8 59.8 52.5 48.2 53.6 75.7 75.1 65.4 57.1 W 60.9 February ... 67.0 66.6 60.6 53.5 49.6 54.8 75.4 74.9 66.1 58.1 NA 61.8 March ......

388

A plan for producing a conventional Ada library  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a general consensus that Ada would benefit from having a library of tools available that would be standard across most or all implementations. This paper discusses how to get a "standard" l ibrary for Ada without impacting the ARM, increasing ...

Marin D. Condic

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Notice of extension of public comment period for reply comments. On July 27, 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) published in the Federal Register, a notice of inquiry (NOI) and request for...

390

Metrics for Evaluating Conventional and Renewable Energy Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

With numerous options for the future of natural gas, how do we know we're going down the right path? How do we designate a metric to measure and demonstrate change and progress, and how does that metric incorporate all stakeholders and scenarios?

Mann, M. K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Evaluation of greenhouse gas emissions from three dairy production systems in Iowa – conventional, grazing, and combination conventional/grazing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??International debate continues about the potential effects of global warming and agriculture's role in creating and mitigating it. Needed in this discussion are detailed analyses… (more)

Herringshaw, Andrew Lee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Control system design for a parallel hybrid electric vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the design of control systems for a parallel hybrid electric drive train which is an alternative to conventional passenger vehicles. The principle components of the drive train are a small internal combustion engine and an electric machine. In the parallel configuration, both devices can apply torque directly to the drive shaft for propelling the vehicle. A low order drive train model is developed which is used during the controller design and overall system simulations. The model is composed of sub-models for the engine, mechanical brake, electric machine, converter, battery, drive shaft with gears, and road load with wind resistance. The model yields results which are rough approximations of component performance and are appropriate for a top level drive train control study. In order to mimic the controls of a conventional car, the hybrid vehicle controller must insure that the torque command given by the user through the accelerator and brake pedal is tracked by the hybrid drive train without error. In this thesis two control systems are designed which enable the drive train to emulate conventional vehicle performance by meeting torque commands. The first control design maximizes the battery state-of-charge by minimizing the torque contribution of the electric machine. The second control design includes a cost parameter allowing the user to specify the appropriate tradeoff between a high state-of-charge and increased fuel savings. Simulation results verify that both controllers achieve the design objectives. Results also suggest that under proper control the parallel hybrid drive train can offer equal performance and range to a conventional passenger vehicle with improved fuel efficiency and reduced emissions.

Buntin, David Leighton

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Spearfish High School, Sparfish, South Dakota solar energy system performance evaluation, September 1980-June 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spearfish High School in South Dakota contains 43,000 square feet of conditioned space. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 57% of the space heating and 50% of the hot water demand. The system is equipped with 8034 square feet of flat plate collectors, 4017 cubic feet of rock bin sensible heat storage, and auxiliary equipment including 8 heat pumps, 6 of which are solar supplied and instrumented, air conditioning units, and natural-gas-fired boilers. Performance data are given for the system including the solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor and solar system coefficient of performance. Insolation, solar energy utilization and operation data are also given. The performance of the collector, storage, domestic hot water and space heating subsystems, the operating energy, energy savings, and weather conditions are also evaluated. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques and equations, site history, long-term weather data, sensor technology, and typical monthly data. (LEW)

Howard, B.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Should we have a new engine. An automobile power systems evaluation. Volume II. Technical reports  

SciTech Connect

Alternative automotive powerplants were examined for possible introduction during the 1980 to 1990 time period. Technical analyses were made of the stratified-charge Otto, diesel, Rankine (steam), Brayton (gas turbine), Stirling, electric, and hybrid powerplants as alternatives to the conventional Otto-cycle engine with its likely improvements. These alternatives were evaluated from a societal point of view in terms of energy consumption, urban air quality, cost to the consumer, materials availability, safety, and industry impact. The results show that goals for emission reduction and energy conservation for the automobile over the next 5 to 10 years can be met by improvements to the Otto-cycle engine and to the vehicle. This provides time for the necessary development work on the Brayton and Stirling engines, which offer the promise of eliminating the automobile as a significant source of urban air pollution, dramatically reducing fuel consumption, and being saleable at a price differential which can be recovered in fuel savings by the first owner. Specifically, the Brayton and Stirling engines require intensive component, system, and manufacturing process development at a funding level considerably higher than at present.

Stephenson, R.R.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Solar-energy-system performance evaluation, Cathedral Square, Burlington, Vermont, July-December 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cathedral Square solar site is a 10-story multiunit apartment building in Vermont. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 51% of the hot water load, and consists of 1798 square feet of flat plate collectors, 2699-gallon water tank in an enclosed mechanical room on the roof, and two auxiliary natural gas boilers to supply hot water to immersed heat exchanger in an auxiliary storage tank. The measured solar fraction was only 28%, not 51%, which, it is concluded, is an unreasonable expectation. Other performance data include the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance. Monthly performance data are given for the solar system overall, and for the collector, storage, and hot water subsystems. Also included are insolation data, typical storage fluid temperatures, domestic hot water consumption, and solar heat exchangers inlet/outlet temperatures, and typical domestic hot water subsystem temperatures. In addition, the system operating sequence and solar energy utilization are given. Appended are a system description, performance evaluation techniques, long-term weather data. (LEW)

Welch, K.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Potential impacts of Brayton- and Stirling-cycle engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two engine technologies (Brayton cycle and Stirling cycle) currently being pursued by the US Department of Energy were examined for their potential impacts if they achieved commercial viability. An economic analysis of the expected response of buyers to the attributes of the alternative engines was performed. Hedonic coefficients for vehicle fuel efficiency, performance and size were estimated for domestic cars based upon historical data. The marketplace value of the fuel efficiency enhancement provided by Brayton or Stirling engines was estimated. The effect upon various economic sectors of a large scale change-over from conventional to alternate engines was estimated using an economic input-output analysis. Primary effects were found in fuels refining, non-ferroalloy ores and ferroalloy smelting. Secondary effects were found in mining, transport, and capital financing. Under the assumption of 10 years for plant conversions and 1990 and 1995 as the introduction date for turine and Stirling engines respectively, the comparative fuel savings and present value of the future savings in fuel costs were estimated.

Heft, R.C.

1980-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Solar Energy system performance evaluation: El Toro, California, March 1981-November 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The El Toro Library is a public library facility in California with an active solar energy system designed to supply 97% of the heating load and 60% of the cooling load. The system is equipped with 1427 square feet of evacuated tube collectors, a 1500-gallon steel storage tank, and an auxiliary natural-gas-fired heating unit. During the period from March 1981 through November 1981 the system supplied only 16% of the space cooling load, far short of the 60% design value. Problems are reported related to control of a valve and of collection, low absorption chiller coefficient of performance during part of the period, and small collector area. Performance data are reported for the system, including solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, system coefficient of performance, solar energy utilization, and system operation. Subsystem performance data are also given for the collector, storage, and space cooling subsystems and absorption chiller. The system is briefly described along with performance evaluation techniques and sensors, and typical data are presented for one month. Some weather data are also included. (LEW)

Pakkala, P.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Solar-energy system performance evaluation. San Anselmo School, San Jose, California, July 1980-March 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The San Anselmo School is a one-story, brick elementary school building located in San Jose, California. The active solar energy system is designed to supply 70% of the heating load and 72% of the cooling load. It is equipped with 3.740 square feet of evacuated tube collectors, 2175-gallon tank for storage, four auxiliary gas-fired absorption chiller/heaters, and a solar-supplied absorption chiller. The measured heating and cooling solar fractions were 9% and 19%, respectively, for an overall solar fraction of 16%, the lowered performance being attributed to severe system control problems. Performance data include the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance. Performance data are presented for the overall system and for each subsystem. System operation and solar energy utilization data are included. Also included are a description of the system, performance evaluation techniques, sensor technology, and typical performance data for a month. Weather data are also tabulated. (LEW)

Pakkala, P.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Solar-energy-system performance evaluation. Scottsdale Courthouse, Scottsdale, Arizona. March, April, July, August, and October 1981 through February 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The site is the County Courts Building in Scottsdale, Arizona. Its active solar energy system is designed to supply 100% of the heating and 60% of the cooling load. The system consists of 2723 square feet of concentrating collectors, 5000 gallons of hot water storage, 25.5-ton absorption chiller, and backup electric resistance heating and a 25-ton electric reciprocating vapor-compressor chiller. The system performed far below design expectations due to the extremely poor performance of the collector array. Performance data given include the solar fraction, solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, and coefficient of performance. Monthly performance data are tabulated for the solar system and for each subsystem. Also given are monthly solar operating energy, energy savings, and weather conditions for each month. Typical system operation data are graphed and a typical operating sequence is given. Among the appendices are a brief system description, the performance evaluation techniques, typical monthly data, long-term weather data, and a brief discussion of sensor technology. (LEW)

Wetzel, P.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Solar-energy-system performance evaluation. San Anselmo School, San Jose, California, April 1981-March 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The San Anselmo School is a one-story brick elementary school building in San Jose, California. The active solar energy system is designed to supply 70% of the space heating and 72% of the cooling load. It is equipped with 3740 square feet of evacuated tube collectors, a 2175-gallon tank for heat storage, a solar-supplied absorption chiller, and four auxiliary gas-fired absorption chillers/heaters. The measured solar fraction of 19% is far below the expected values and is attributed to severe system control and HVAC problems. Other performance data given for the year include the solar savings ratio, conventional fuel savings, system performance factor, and solar system coefficient of performance. Also tabulated are monthly performance data for the overall solar energy system, collector subsystem, space heating and cooling subsystems. Typical hourly operation data for a day are tabulated, including hourly isolation, collector array temperatures (inlet and outlet), and storage fluid temperatures. The solar energy use and percentage of losses are also graphed. (LEW)

Pakkala, P.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Assessing the Battery Cost at Which Plug-In Hybrid Medium-Duty Parcel Delivery Vehicles Become Cost-Effective  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) validated diesel-conventional and diesel-hybrid medium-duty parcel delivery vehicle models to evaluate petroleum reductions and cost implications of hybrid and plug-in hybrid diesel variants. The hybrid and plug-in hybrid variants are run on a field data-derived design matrix to analyze the effect of drive cycle, distance, engine downsizing, battery replacements, and battery energy on fuel consumption and lifetime cost. For an array of diesel fuel costs, the battery cost per kilowatt-hour at which the hybridized configuration becomes cost-effective is calculated. This builds on a previous analysis that found the fuel savings from medium duty plug-in hybrids more than offset the vehicles' incremental price under future battery and fuel cost projections, but that they seldom did so under present day cost assumptions in the absence of purchase incentives. The results also highlight the importance of understanding the application's drive cycle specific daily distance and kinetic intensity.

Ramroth, L. A.; Gonder, J. D.; Brooker, A. D.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume IV, market penetration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume first describes the residential consumption of energy in each of the 11 STES regions by fuel type and end-use category. The current and projected costs and availability of fossil fuels and electricity for the STES regions are reported. Projections are made concerning residential building construction and the potential market for residential STES. The effects of STES ownership options, institutional constraints, and possible government actions on market penetration potential were considered. Capital costs for two types of STES were determined, those based on organic Rankine cycle (ORC) heat engines and those based on flat plate, water-cooled photovoltaic arrays. Both types of systems utilized parabolic trough collectors. The capital cost differential between conventional and STE systems was calculated on an incremental cost per dwelling unit for comparison with projected fuel savings in the market penetration analysis. The market penetration analysis was planned in two phases, a preliminary analysis of each of the geographical regions for each of the STE systems considered; and a final, more precise analysis of those regions and systems showing promise of significant market penetration. However, the preliminary analysis revealed no geographical regions in which any of the STES considered promised to be competitive with conventional energy systems using utility services at the prices projected for future energy supplies in the residential market. Because no promising situations were found, the analysis was directed toward an examination of the parameters involved in an effort to identify those factors which make a residential STES less attractive than similar systems in the commercial and industrial areas. Results are reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Statel-level Convention On AP's Power Crisis A state-level convention on the issue of the power crisis in Andhra Pradesh, at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5TH ANNUAL NAEE/IAEE INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND INFRASTRUCTURE FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SHERATON HOTEL, ABUJA, NIGERIA April 23-24, 2012 CALL FOR PAPERS CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES: After a decade of energy sector and economy-wide reforms, many African countries are confronted

Harinarayana, T.

404

Analysis and development of a solar energy regenerated desiccant crop drying facility: Phase I. Final report, July 1976--April 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study to verify the technical feasibility of the regenerated desiccant crop drying concept, characterize its performance, investigate design requirements, and define a pilot facility for further evaluating the operational and energy-conservative characteristics of the drying system are documented. The pilot facility defined in this study will be a use R and D tool of sufficient size to permit a meaningful evaluation of the system and to provide the necessary criteria for development of full-scale systems. The principal finding of the study is that the regenerated desiccant crop drying concept is technically feasible and has the capability to achieve a drying efficiency of approximately twice that of conventional crop drying systems. When using a fossil fuel energy source, energy savings will be approximately 40 to 50%. With solar energy input, the total fossil fuel savings could be 70 to 90%. The economic feasibility of the system appears promising. As with other new energy conserving systems that are presently capital-intensive, the economic viability of the system will be dependent on future capital cost reductions, on the future price of fossil fuels, and on the specific application of the system. Regarding system applications, it was concluded that the regenerated desiccant drying system, with or without the use of solar energy, will be economically best suited for a large central processing application, where it can receive a maximum amount of use and will benefit from economy-of-scale cost considerations. The basic study recommendations are: (1) additional R and D activities should be conducted to identify and evaluate means for achieving system cost reductions, and (2) the Mobile Pilot Facility program should be initiated.

Ko, S.M.; Merrifield, D.V.; Fletcher, J.W.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Industrial - Utility Cogeneration Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cogeneration may be described as an efficient method for the production of electric power in conjunction with process steam or heat which optimizes the energy supplied as fuel to maximize the energy produced for consumption. In a conventional electric utility power plant, considerable energy is wasted in the form of heat rejection to the atmosphere thru cooling towers, ponds or lakes, or to rivers. In a cogeneration system heat rejection can be minimized by systems which apply the otherwise wasted energy to process systems requiring energy in the form of steam or heat. Texas has a base load of some 75 million pounds per hour of process steam usage, of which a considerable portion could be generated through cogeneration methods. The objective of this paper is to describe the various aspects of cogeneration in a manner which will illustrate the energy saving potential available utilizing proven technology. This paper illustrates the technical and economical benefits of cogeneration in addition to demonstrating the fuel savings per unit of energy required. Specific examples show the feasibility and desirability of cogeneration systems for utility and industrial cases. Consideration of utility-industrial systems as well as industrial-industrial systems will be described in technical arrangement as well as including a discussion of financial approaches and ownership arrangements available to the parties involved. There is a considerable impetus developing for the utilization of coal as the energy source for the production of steam and electricity. In many cases, because of economics and site problems, the central cogeneration facility will be the best alternative for many users.

Harkins, H. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Truck Essential Power Systems Efficiency Improvements for Medium-Duty Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With a variety of hybrid vehicles available in the passenger car market, electric technologies and components of that scale are becoming readily available. Commercial vehicle segments have lagged behind passenger car markets, leaving opportunities for component and system development. Escalating fuel prices impact all markets and provide motivation for OEMs, suppliers, customers, and end-users to seek new techniques and technologies to deliver reduced fuel consumption. The research presented here specifically targets the medium-duty (MD), Class 4-7, truck market with technologies aimed at reducing fuel consumption. These technologies could facilitate not only idle, but also parasitic load reductions. The development efforts here build upon the success of the More Electric Truck (MET) demonstration program at Caterpillar Inc. Employing a variety of electric accessories, the MET demonstrated the improvement seen with such technologies on a Class 8 truck. The Truck Essential Power Systems Efficiency Improvements for Medium-Duty Trucks (TEPS) team scaled the concepts and successes of MET to a MD chassis. The team designed an integrated starter/generator (ISG) package and energy storage system (ESS), explored ways to replace belt and gear-driven accessory systems, and developed supervisory control algorithms to direct the usage of the generated electricity and system behavior on the vehicle. All of these systems needed to fit within the footprint of a MD vehicle and be compatible with the existing conventional systems to the largest extent possible. The overall goal of this effort was to demonstrate a reduction in fuel consumption across the drive cycle, including during idle periods, through truck electrification. Furthermore, the team sought to evaluate the benefits of charging the energy storage system during vehicle braking. The vehicle features an array of electric accessories facilitating on-demand, variable actuation. Removal of these accessories from the belt or geartrain of the engine yields efficiency improvements for the engine while freeing those accessories to perform at their individual peak efficiencies to meet instantaneous demand. The net result is a systems approach to fuel usage optimization. Unique control algorithms were specifically developed to capitalize on the flexibility afforded by the TEPS architecture. Moreover, the TEPS truck technology mixture exhibits a means to supplant current accessory power sources such as on-board or trailer-mounted gasoline-powered generators or air compressors. Such functionality further enhances the value of the electric systems beyond the fuel savings alone. To demonstrate the fuel economy improvement wrought via the TEPS components, vehicle fuel economy testing was performed on the nearly stock (baseline) truck and the TEPS truck. Table 1 illustrates the fuel economy gains produced by the TEPS truck electrification. While the fuel economy results shown in Table 1 do reflect specific test conditions, they show that electrification of accessory hardware can yield significant fuel savings. In this case, the savings equated to a 15 percent reduction in fuel consumption during controlled on-road testing. Truck electrification allows engine shutdown during idle conditions as well as independent on-demand actuation of accessory systems. In some cases, independent actuation may even include lack of operation, a feature not always present in mechanically driven components. This combination of attributes allows significant improvements in system efficiency and the fuel economy improvements demonstrated by the TEPS team.

Larry Slone; Jeffery Birkel

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost and the marginal fuel savings (assuming a base case of ten cents per kWhper kWh, which would bring it in line with the break-even costcost per mile: electricity vs. gasoline PRICE OF ELECTRICITY ($/kWh)

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

hf. J. Heat Mars Transfer. Vol. 40, No. 17.pp. 42W4218, 1997 f$ 1997Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights resmed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel cells, micro turbines and reciprocating engines (such as the Stirling engine). Fuel cells of the Stirling engine. Installed and O&M costs are cited in 2007 dollars. xii O&M costs vary according to fuel savings to increase with heating requirements. Micro-CHP systems with very high HPR (such as Stirling

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

409

Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Toksook Bay, Alaska (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Toksook Bay, Alaska. Data provided for this project include community load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, thermal load data, average net capacity factor, optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

Baring-Gould, I.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Kotzebue, Alaska (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Kotzebue, Alaska. Data provided for this project include wind turbine output, average wind speed, average net capacity factor, and optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

Baring-Gould, I.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Kasigluk, Alaska (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Kasigluk, Alaska. Data provided for this project include community load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, thermal load data, average net capacity factor, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

Baring-Gould, I.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

International Journal of Control Vol. 79, No. 5, May 2006, 479495  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, oil pump and power steering pump. Upper limits on what fuel saving that can be achieved auxiliaries are electrical generator, water pump, cooling fan, air compressor, air conditioning compressor are the electrical generator, the cooling fan and the water pump. The fan and the pump are supposed

Johansson, Karl Henrik

413

Application of a Tractive Energy Analysis to Quantify the Benefits of Advanced Efficiency Technologies Using Characteristic Drive Cycle Data  

SciTech Connect

Accurately predicting the fuel savings that can be achieved with the implementation of various technologies developed for fuel efficiency can be very challenging, particularly when considering combinations of technologies. Differences in the usage of highway vehicles can strongly influence the benefits realized with any given technology, which makes generalizations about fuel savings inappropriate for different vehicle applications. A model has been developed to estimate the potential for reducing fuel consumption when advanced efficiency technologies, or combinations of these technologies, are employed on highway vehicles, particularly medium- and heavy-duty trucks. The approach is based on a tractive energy analysis applied to drive cycles representative of the vehicle usage, and the analysis specifically accounts for individual energy loss factors that characterize the technologies of interest. This tractive energy evaluation is demonstrated by analyzing measured drive cycles from a long-haul trucking fleet and the results of an assessment of the fuel savings potential for combinations of technologies are presented. The results of this research will enable more reliable estimates of the fuel savings benefits that can be realized with particular technologies and technology combinations for individual trucking applications so that decision makers can make informed investment decisions for the implementation of advanced efficiency technologies.

LaClair, Tim J [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; St. Paul, Alaska (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in St. Paul, Alaska. Data provided for this project include load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, dump (controlling) load, average net capacity factor, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

Baring-Gould, I.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Vehicle Platooning Problem: Computational Complexity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 22, 2013 ... In this paper we attempt to maximize the amount of fuel saved by vehicles on a road ..... and each node rn represents an element in A. The white node ...... in the real world, HDVs travelling on the same path will likely take ad-.

416

Retrofits for Improved Heat Rate and Availability: Circulating Water Heat Recovery Retrofits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circulating water heat recovery is a means of directly increasing the thermal efficiency of a power plant. If only fuel savings are considered, the economic benefit is often only marginal. However, when increased megawatt output and heat-rate improvements are included in the economic analysis, such retrofits can be attractive, with break-even fuel costs sometimes approaching $1/million Btu.

1990-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ms. Jean Wolfe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/year reduction in harmful emissions (CO, HC, NOx, SOx) Vehicle Estimated Fuel Savings* Achieving Significantly current aircraft Emissions reduction: Local air quality: 75% less NOx (CAEP 6) Global climate: 40% less airspace resulted in 14 lawsuits. · Since 1980 FAA has invested over $5B in airport noise reduction

418

Use in combustion processes for a new type of gaseous fuel based on hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper approaches a very actual problem worldwide, concerning the replacing, in combustion processes, of classical fossil fuels by clean energy sources, in order to reduce the greenhouse effect gases, as well as for fossil fuels' saving. The experiments ... Keywords: burner, clean energy, energy saving, flame, greenhouse effect gases, hydrogen

Lucian Paunescu; Gheorghe Surugiu; Ion Melinte; Corneliu Dica; Paul Dan Stanescu; Gheorghe Iorga; Horia Necula

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Alternative Fuels Data Center (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Selawik, Alaska (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Selawik, Alaska. Data provided for this project include community load data, wind turbine output, diesel plant output, thermal load data, average wind speed, average net capacity factor, optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, average net wind penetration, and estimated fuel savings.

Baring-Gould, I.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 January ....................... - - - - - - - - - - - - February ..................... - - - - - - - - - - - - March .......................... - - - - - - - - - - - - April ............................ - - - - - - - - - - - - May ............................. - - - - - - - - - - - - June ............................ - - - - - - - - - - - - July ............................. - - - - - - - - - - - - August ........................ - - - - - - - - - - - - September .................. - - - - - - - - - - - - October ....................... 27.2 28.7 26.9 105.7 16.1 148.6 7.3 7.5 8.0 W W 21.2 November ................... 25.0 26.3 22.1 105.9 14.6 142.6 6.7 7.0 6.7 W W 20.0 December ................... 24.6 25.9 22.2 107.5 18.0 147.6 6.6 6.9 7.0 W W

422

Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1996 1996 ................................ 24.1 25.4 17.8 108.5 27.1 153.4 5.7 5.9 4.4 12.9 NA 17.3 1997 January ....................... 20.6 22.0 14.8 98.3 26.4 139.6 4.7 4.9 3.7 11.5 - 15.1 February ..................... 22.1 23.7 15.4 102.9 31.2 149.5 5.0 5.2 3.8 11.9 - 15.7 March .......................... 24.0 25.5 16.8 106.4 27.7 150.9 5.5 5.7 4.0 12.2 W 16.2 April ............................ 25.1 26.9 18.2 111.8 26.9 156.9 5.8 5.9 4.2 12.9 - 17.0 May ............................. 24.7 26.0 17.7 112.7 26.3 156.7 5.7 5.8 4.2 13.0 - 17.1 June ............................ 25.6 26.9 17.7 115.4 22.1 155.2 5.9 6.1 4.2 13.3 - 17.4 July ............................. 27.8 29.1 17.2 123.4 25.2 165.8 6.4 6.6 4.1 14.4 - 18.5 August ........................ 27.3 28.7 17.3 119.9 24.7 161.9 6.2 6.4 4.0 13.5 - 17.6 September ..................

423

CONVERT 15 WELLS TO BORS PUMPING UNITS AND TEST/COMPARE TO CONVENTIONAL UNITS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of fluid lifting equipment called Balanced Oil Recovery System (trade named BORS Lift{trademark}) was installed on several idle oil wells to demonstrate the operating efficiency of this innovative equipment technology. The BORS Lift system is designed to bring oil to the surface without the accompanying formation water. The BORS Lift system uses an innovative strap mechanism that takes oil from the top of the downhole oilwater column and lifts it to the surface, eliminating production of the formation water. Eliminating salt water production could potentially increase oil production, reduce operational costs, benefit the environment, and cut salt water disposal costs. Although the BORS Lift units did not function as intended, lessons learned during the course of the field demonstration project resulted in improvements in the technology and redesign of subsequent generation BORS Lift units which are reported to have significantly improved their performance characteristics. BORS Lift units were installed on 15 temporarily abandoned wells which had been shut down due to low oil production, high water production, and uneconomic operating conditions. The wells had been producing with artificial lift at a high watercut from a shallow (850-900 feet), pressure depleted oil sand reservoir prior to being shut down. The electrical motor driven BORS Lift units provided a possible approach for economically returning the shallow, low-volume oil wells to production. The BORS Lift units used in this field demonstration were designed to recover up to roughly 22 barrels of fluid per day from depths ranging to 1,700 feet, ideal for many marginal stripper well operations. The BORS units were first-production-model test units, operated under oil field conditions for the first time, and were naturally expected to experience some design problems. From the onset, the operator experienced mechanical, design, and operational problems with the BORS Lift units and was unable to maintain un-interrupted production operations. The inventor provided considerable on-site technical support in an ongoing effort to correct the problems with the units and the inventor worked extensively with the operator to make design and manufacturing changes to the units to try to improve their reliability and performance. The operational problems were mostly related to the durability of the various components under oil field operating conditions such as inadequate mechanical, electrical, and electronic design for rough service, extended operation, and severe weather conditions. During the course of the demonstration project, it further appeared that the producing formation lacked sufficient reservoir energy and/or favorable oil properties to mobilize and displace oil from the formation into the well bore in order to recharge the oil column in the well. The BORS Lift units were then moved to a second lease which appeared to have more favorable WTI quality oil properties. Eight of these units were reported to have been installed and placed in operation on the second lease, however, operational difficulties continued. It was determined that the units were inadequately designed and would need to be replace by improved second generation units. Due to the lack of success with the first generation units and the extra cost to replace them with the redesigned units, the operators decided not to continue with the project and the project was terminated at that point.

Walter B. North

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

Explosive performance measurements on large, multiple-hole arrays and large masses of conventional explosive  

SciTech Connect

The COntinuous Reflectometry for Radius vs. Time EXperiment (CORRTEX) system was developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory for determining the energy released in a nuclear explosion by measuring the position of its shock front as a function of time. The CORRTEX system, fielding techniques, and the methods and software for data reduction and analysis were developed over a 15 year period with hundreds of measurements made on nuclear tests and high explosive experiments. CORRTEX is a compact, portable, fast-sampling, microprocessor-controlled system, based on time domain reflectometry, requiring only a 24 volt power source and a sensing element. Only the sensing element (a length of 50 ohm coaxial cable) is expended during the detonation. In 1979, the CORRTEX system was shown to be ideally suited for chemical explosive performance measurements. Its utility for diagnosing chemical explosives was further demonstrated with successful measurements on large multiple-hole chemical shots in rock quarries and strip mines. Accurate timing of the detonation of sequenced or ripple fired arrays, as well as data characterizing the initiation, explosive performance and detonation anomalies are obtained. This information can serve as the basis for empirical or modeled improvements to blasting operations. A summary of the special CORRTEX features and well developed analysis techniques together with the experiment designs, data, and conclusions regarding the measurements and explosive performance from several array detonations and the Chemical Kiloton Experiment, 2.9 million pounds of an ammonium nitrate-fuel oil (ANFO) and emulsion blend conducted on the Nevada Test Site in 1993, are presented.

McKown, T.O. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Eilers, D.D. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Williams, P.E. [New Mexico Tech., Socorro, New Mexico (United States). Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Civil liability of rail carriers under CIM and SMGS international conventions: a comparative analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The subject of study covers the institute of carriers’ liability governed by two international legal acts, namely, SMGS and CIM. The work analyses the four… (more)

Nikitinas, Vilius

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Thermo economic comparison of conventional micro combined heat and power systems with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat and power systems (CHP) on this scale is called micro CHP (mCHP). First, the energy consumption-family household. The SOFC-mCHP system provides electricity as well as hot water for use and space heating heating located in larger cities. Secondly, there are CHP systems used in a decentralized form

Liso, Vincenzo

427

DAMAGE TO CONVENTIONAL AND SPECIAL TYPES OF RESIDENCES EXPOSED TO NUCLEAR EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

Ten residential structures of wood, brick, lightweight reinforced concrete block, and lightweight precast concrete slabs were exposed in pairs to the effects of a nuclear device of approximately 30 kt yield, detonated atop a 500-ft tower. The houses represented various structural types, and two houses of each type were tested. One house was located at an anticipated overpressure at which collapse or major damage might be expected and the other was located at an anticipated overpressure at which damage without collapse might be expected. The one-story reinforced lightweight concrete block house and the one-story precast lightweight concrete house suffered only minor structural damage. Photographs are included of the houses both before and after damage. Motion pictures were made during the event and were analyzed for information on thermal and blast effects. Recommendations are included for strengthening the structures within the limits of practical economy and so providing increased protection to dwelling structures. (C.H.)

Randall, P.A.

1961-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Table 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1996 January ....................... 68.4 67.8 61.8 54.9 51.4 55.0 77.5 76.9 68.0 59.1 - 61.2 February ..................... 68.5 67.9 63.4 56.2 52.1 56.4 77.9 77.3 69.7 60.2 - 62.9 March .......................... 74.7 74.1 69.1 63.5 57.8 63.5 83.7 83.2 75.4 67.3 W 69.7 April ............................ 82.9 82.2 77.5 71.5 64.0 70.8 92.0 91.4 83.8 75.7 - 77.9 May ............................. 86.2 85.7 82.1 71.8 65.3 71.9 95.5 95.0 87.7 75.8 - 78.8 June ............................ 83.6 83.0 79.0 66.6 60.0 66.6 92.6 92.0 84.8 69.3 - 73.2 July ............................. 81.2 80.7 76.4 66.6 60.1 66.5 90.3 89.8 82.3 70.1 - 73.1 August ........................ 79.3 78.8 74.3 66.1 60.0 66.1 88.4 87.9 80.6 69.6 W 72.2 September .................. 79.9 79.4 74.7 67.1 60.9 67.1 88.7 88.2 81.0 70.7 - 73.3 October .......................

429

Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(Million Gallons per Day) Year Month Regular Midgrade Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total Through Retail Outlets Total a DTW Rack Bulk Total 1994 ................................ 29.7 31.2 36.1 113.5 22.8 172.4 7.6 7.8 10.1 14.6 0.1 24.8 1995 January ....................... 18.5 19.6 13.2 88.3 22.4 123.8 4.9 5.1 3.8 W W 15.1 February ..................... 21.7 23.1 18.6 98.4 23.3 140.2 5.7 5.9 5.2 W W 18.0 March .......................... 23.5 24.8 21.2 103.4 25.1 149.7 6.2 6.5 5.4 W W 19.0 April ............................ 25.9 27.2 22.5 103.9 23.8 150.3 6.4 6.6 5.6 W W 19.1 May ............................. 27.0 28.3 23.1 111.4 25.0 159.5 6.4 6.6 5.8 W W 20.0 June ............................ 28.0 29.3 23.6 116.2 29.3 169.0 6.6 6.8 5.9 W W 20.6

430

Table 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January ....................... 59.4 58.8 54.2 46.0 41.8 46.6 69.8 69.2 60.4 49.8 NA 53.6 February ..................... 61.7 61.1 57.0 49.2 45.0 50.0 71.5 70.9 62.9 53.3 NA 56.9 March .......................... 62.2 61.7 57.4 49.9 46.2 51.3 72.0 71.4 63.3 54.0 NA 58.0 April ............................ 64.9 64.5 60.1 53.5 49.3 54.5 74.6 74.1 66.0 57.6 NA 61.2 May ............................. 66.6 66.2 62.0 54.7 50.3 56.0 76.4 75.9 67.7 58.4 NA 62.6 June ............................ 69.7 69.2 65.3 58.2 53.1 59.3 79.5 78.9 71.2 61.8 NA 65.9 July ............................. 72.6 72.2 68.0 61.0 56.0 62.2 82.3 81.8 73.8 63.9 NA 68.3 August ........................ 77.4 76.9 71.2 63.6 57.9 64.7 86.9 86.3 77.0 66.4 NA 71.0 September .................. 75.5 74.8 68.6 54.6 51.6 57.4 85.2 84.4 74.7 57.1 NA 64.6 October .......................

431

Table 9. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January ....................... 22.2 23.4 20.4 96.1 20.6 137.2 6.3 6.5 6.5 11.7 0.1 18.3 February ..................... 24.6 26.0 25.6 104.0 19.9 149.6 6.9 7.1 7.9 W W 21.2 March .......................... 31.6 33.2 42.2 113.4 20.6 176.2 7.9 8.2 11.6 W W 26.8 April ............................ 32.9 34.5 43.5 117.7 23.8 185.0 8.1 8.4 11.7 W W 27.0 May ............................. 34.2 35.8 47.6 119.7 24.3 191.6 8.5 8.8 W W 0.1 28.9 June ............................ 35.3 37.1 W W 24.5 197.4 W W W W 0.3 W July ............................. 34.7 36.2 W 122.7 W 191.9 W W W W 0.2 W August ........................ 35.6 37.2 48.6 W W 200.6 W 8.9 13.0 16.6 0.2 29.8 September .................. 34.1 35.6 44.7 123.2 25.0 193.0 8.2 8.5 12.0 W W 27.8 October ....................... 26.7 28.1 27.4 110.9 22.9 161.2 7.2 7.5

432

Table 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1995 January ....................... 65.7 65.0 59.5 52.3 48.2 52.4 75.7 74.9 66.3 56.8 W 59.2 February ..................... 65.7 65.1 60.6 53.4 49.6 53.7 75.4 74.7 67.4 57.9 W 60.6 March .......................... 66.8 66.2 61.0 54.3 50.7 54.6 76.1 75.4 67.4 58.1 W 60.7 April ............................ 72.2 71.7 66.3 62.2 57.0 62.0 81.2 80.7 72.8 66.6 W 68.4 May ............................. 78.8 78.3 72.5 67.6 62.1 67.4 88.0 87.4 79.2 72.4 W 74.3 June ............................ 79.2 78.6 72.5 62.3 58.5 63.1 88.3 87.6 79.5 66.7 W 70.3 July ............................. 74.9 74.2 68.4 56.3 52.8 57.4 84.0 83.3 74.7 60.0 W 64.2 August ........................ 71.9 71.3 65.5 56.8 52.1 57.2 80.8 80.2 71.1 60.6 NA 63.5 September .................. 71.1 70.6 65.1 57.6 52.5 57.7 79.8 79.3 70.5 61.2 W 63.9 October .......................

433

Table 8. U.S. Refiner Conventional Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1996 1996 ................................ 79.7 79.1 74.3 66.5 60.7 66.4 88.4 87.8 80.1 70.0 NA 72.6 1997 January ....................... 82.4 81.7 76.7 71.2 66.2 70.8 91.4 90.9 83.1 75.4 - 77.2 February ..................... 80.7 80.1 74.9 68.5 64.3 68.3 90.1 89.5 81.3 72.3 - 74.5 March .......................... 78.5 77.9 72.4 66.1 62.7 66.2 88.4 87.9 78.7 70.1 W 72.2 April ............................ 78.7 77.9 73.1 65.0 60.7 65.2 88.3 87.8 78.8 69.0 - 71.4 May ............................. 79.6 79.1 73.4 67.3 61.9 67.1 88.7 88.3 79.1 70.3 - 72.5 June ............................ 78.5 78.0 72.1 63.7 59.1 64.0 87.7 87.2 78.5 66.8 - 69.6 July ............................. 76.6 76.1 69.7 63.6 57.5 63.3 85.8 85.4 76.2 67.1 - 69.1 August ........................ 82.0 81.5 75.8 70.8 63.9 70.3 91.1 90.7 81.9 74.4 - 76.1 September ..................

434

Occluded Fronts and the Occlusion Process: A Fresh Look at Conventional Wisdom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, the formation of an occluded front during the occlusion process in extratropical cyclones has been viewed as the catch-up of a faster-moving cold front to a slower-moving warm front separating the warm-sector air from the low center, as ...

David M. Schultz; Geraint Vaughan

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

s a signatory to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For example, our Climate VISION (4), Climate Leaders (5), and SmartWay Transport Partnership (6) programs work

436

Field comparison of conventional HVAC systems with a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump  

SciTech Connect

Through its Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical and administrative support to federal agency programs directed at reducing energy consumption and cost in federal buildings and facilities. One such program is the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP). In this context, NTDP is a demonstration of a US energy-related technology at a federal site. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate new technologies. The partnership of these interests is secured through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The Fort Sam Houston (San Antonio, Texas) NTDP is a field evaluation of a 3-ton gas-engine-driven residential heat pump. Details of the technical approach used in the evaluation, including instrumentation and methodology, are presented. Dynamic performance maps, based on field data, are developed for the existing residential furnaces and air conditioners at Fort Sam Houston. These maps are the basis for comparisons between the candidate and current equipment. The approach offers advantages over pre/post-measure evaluations by decoupling the measured equipment performance from the effects of different envelope characteristics, occupant behavior, and weather.

Miller, J.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Planetary Wave Analysis Using the Acoustic and Conventional Arrays in the 1981 Ocean Tomography Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the maximum likelihood estimation method, quasi-geostrophic wave solutions are fitted to the observations of the 1981 Ocean Acoustic Tomography Experiment. The experiment occupied a 300 km square area centered at 26°N, 70°W over a duration ...

Ching-Sang Chiu; Yves Desaubies

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

March 3-7, 2013 • Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center San ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Advance Materials & Innovative Solutions for Oil and Gas I. WED. AM. Lone Star Salon A. 178. Materials Challanges in Hostile Environments.

439

March 3-7, 2013 • Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center San ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Corrosion of Mild Steel in Extreme Oil and Gas Environments: Srdjan. Nesic1 .... Refinery: Peter-Hans ter Weer1; 1TWS Services and Advice.

440

Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for fish populations to be negatively impacted by hydrokinetic turbines is a major issue associated with the development and licensing of this type of renewable energy source. Such impacts may include habitat alteration, disruptions in migrations and movements, and injury and mortality to fish that encounter turbines. In particular, there is considerable concern for fish and other aquatic organisms to interact with hydrokinetic turbines in a manner that could lead to alterations in normal b...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Particulate emissions from combustion of biomass in conventional combustion (air) and oxy-combustion conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oxy-fuel combustion is a viable technology for new and existing coal-fired power plants, as it facilitates carbon capture and thereby, can reduce carbon dioxide emissions.… (more)

Ruscio, Amanda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Control of residual aluminum from conventional treatment to improve reverse osmosis performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pa. ). A 1.5–2.5 mg/L free chlorine residual was maintainedsulfate addition (3:1 chlorine to ammonia w/w ratio).on Al:Cl molar ratio. As the chlorine content decreases, the

Gabelich, C J; Ishida, K P; Gerringer, F W; Evangelista, R; Kalyan, M; Suffet, I H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Effect of Hospital Staff Surge Capacity on Preparedness for a Conventional Mass Casualty Event  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a comprehensive disaster response. For example, staffcan severely disable disaster response. One survey predictedfirst response and patient transport during a disaster are

Welzel, Tyson B; Koenig, Kristi L; Bey, Tareg; Visser, Errol

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Evaluation of SI-HCCI-SI mode-switching using conventional actuation on a CNG engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) operation is desirable for its high thermal efficiency and low emissions of NOx and particulates. Difficulty with cold starting and… (more)

Boddez, Jason Bradley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Acoustic modeling problem for automatic speech recognition system: conventional methods (Part I)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In automatic speech recognition (ASR) systems, the speech signal is captured and parameterized at front end and evaluated at back end using the statistical framework of hidden Markov model (HMM). The performance of these systems depend critically on ... Keywords: ASR, Acoustic models, Back end, Front end, Gaussian mixtures, HMM

Rajesh Kumar Aggarwal; Mayank Dave

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Back to Exploration 2008 CSPG CSEG CWLS Convention 1 A Computational Model of Catalyzed Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and shipped back to the coal mine on the coal train's return trip. The synthesis of other commercially, and methane from coal are readily available at coal-fired electrical generating stations. Generation of thermogenic methane from coal begins in the higher ranks of the high-volatile bituminous coals, and at about

Spiteri, Raymond J.

447

Application of Adjustable-Speed Machines in Conventional and Pumped-Storage Hydro Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving turbine efficiency and operation over increased head range can be achieved by adjusting the speed of the turbine generator and motor. Until recently, adjustable-speed control for large-size generators and motors has not been practical for commercial application in hydroelectric plants. Current developments in power electronics, however, have made available robust and reliable high-ampacity thyristor devices along with necessary control systems. This report covers both the constraints of single-...

1996-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

SPE 159255-PP Rock Classification from Conventional Well Logs in Hydrocarbon-Bearing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

locations and deep water, and towards expensive unconventional sources such as oil shale and tar sands. Let

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

449

Measurement of biodiesel blend and conventional diesel spray structure using x-ray radiography.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The near-nozzle structure of several nonevaporating biodiesel-blend sprays has been studied using X-ray radiography. Radiography allows quantitative measurements of the fuel distribution in sprays to be made with high temporal and spatial resolution. Measurements have been made at different values of injection pressure, ambient density, and with two different nozzle geometries to understand the influences of these parameters on the spray structure of the biodiesel blend. These measurements have been compared with corresponding measurements of Viscor, a diesel calibration fluid, to demonstrate the fuel effects on the spray structure. Generally, the biodiesel-blend spray has a similar structure to the spray of Viscor. For the nonhydroground nozzle used in this study, the biodiesel-blend spray has a slightly slower penetration into the ambient gas than the Viscor spray. The cone angle of the biodiesel-blend spray is generally smaller than that of the Viscor spray, indicating that the biodiesel-blend spray is denser than the Viscor spray. For the hydroground nozzle, both fuels produce sprays with initially wide cone angles that transition to narrow sprays during the steady-state portion of the injection event. These variations in cone angle with time occur later for the biodiesel-blend spray than for the Viscor spray, indicating that the dynamics of the injector needle as it opens are somewhat different for the two fuels.

Kastengren, A. L.; Powell, C. F.; Wang, Y. J.; IM, K. S.; Wang, J.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A COURSE ON ENERGY Energy from the Earth: Renewable versus Conventional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ian Duggan: Research Interests Invasion Biology My research primarily involves the investigation.g., hydroelectricity dams, water supply reservoirs and retired quarries) are commonly preferentially invaded over

Pulfrey, David L.

451

EFFICACY AND BIODEGRADABILITY OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL IN CONVENTIONAL AND BIODIESEL AMENDED CARRIERS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is widely used as a wood preservative for wood products. It has been proposed that a modified PCP carrier system based on… (more)

Keshani Langroodi, Saeed

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

March 3-7, 2013 • Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center San ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... 8:30 AM AMREE Oil and Gas I - Introductory Comments and talk by Greg Kusinski ..... Cost Effective Developments for Fabrication of Titanium.

453

The Primary Reason for Women's Under-Representation? Reevaluating the Conventional Wisdom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bledsoe, Timothy and Mary Herring. 1990. "Victims of1998, but see Bledsoe and Herring 1990). Carroll's (1994)

Lawless, Jennifer L.; Pearson, Kathryn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Continuous-flow study and scale-up of conventionally difficult chemical processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidic systems provide valuable tools for exploring, studying, and optimizing organic syntheses. The small scales and fast transport rates allow for faster experiments and lower amounts of chemicals to be used, ...

Zaborenko, Nikolay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

US-IRANIAN COMPETITION: THE GULF MILITARY BALANCE- I The Conventional and Asymmetric Dimensions TENTH EDITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This analysis draws on the work of Dr. Abdullah Toukan and a series of reports on Iran by Adam Seitz, a Senior Research Associate

H. Cordesman; Er Wilner; Michael Gibbs; Scott Modell; Anthony H. Cordesman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

On-Board Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter Sensor for HCCI and Conventional Diesel Engines  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the research was to refine and complete development of an on-board particulate matter (PM) sensor for diesel, DISI, and HCCI engines, bringing it to a point where it could be commercialized and marketed.

Hall, Matt; Matthews, Ron

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

Annual Logging Symposium, June 22-26, 2013 JOINT STOCHASTIC INTERPRETATION OF CONVENTIONAL WELL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Verdín, The University of Texas at Austin Copyright 2013, held jointly by the Society of Petrophysicists and Well Log-bearing shale has become a major source of energy in recent years. Assessment of rock properties is extremely porosity, low permeability, and organic-rich shale has become a major source of energy in recent years due

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

458

Comparative analysis of the VRF system and conventional HVAC systems, focused on life-cycle cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As concern for the environment has been dramatically raised over the recent decade, all fields have increased their efforts to reduce impact on environment. The… (more)

Park, Jaesuk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Accounting for the Variation of Driver Aggression in the Simulation of Conventional and Advanced Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and battery electric vehicles offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gases, as well as to offer a financial benefit to the driver. However, assessing these potential benefits is complicated by several factors, including the driving habits of the operator. We focus on driver aggression, i.e., the level of acceleration and velocity characteristic of travel, to (1) assess its variation within large, real-world drive datasets, (2) quantify its effect on both vehicle efficiency and economics for multiple vehicle types, (3) compare these results to those of standard drive cycles commonly used in the industry, and (4) create a representative drive cycle for future analyses where standard drive cycles are lacking.

Neubauer, J.; Wood, E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fifty-nine conventional fuel-saving" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The potential for alcohols and related ethers to displace conventional gasoline components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is required by law to determine the feasibility of producing sufficient replacement fuels to replace 30 percent of the projected United States consumption of motor fuels by light duty vehicles in the year 2010. A replacement fuel is a non-petroleum portion of gasoline, including alcohols, natural gas and certain other components. A linear program has been used to study refinery impacts for production of ``low petroleum`` gasolines, which contain replacement fuels. The analysis suggests that high oxygenation is the key to meeting the replacement fuel target, and major contributors to cost increase can include investment in processes to produce olefins for etherification with alcohols. High oxygenation can increase the costs of control of vapor pressure, distillation properties, and pollutant emissions of gasolines. Year-round low petroleum gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum might be produced with cost increases of 23 to 37 cents per gallon, with substantial decreases in greenhouse gas emissions in some cases. Cost estimates are sensitive to assumptions about extrapolation of a national model for pollutant emissions, availability of raw materials and other issues. Reduction in crude oil use, a major objective of the low petroleum gasoline program, is 10 to 17 percent in the analysis.

Hadder, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); McNutt, B.D. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

An Interactive Barnes Objective Map Analysis Scheme for Use with Satellite and Conventional Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective analysis scheme based on the Barnes technique and designed for use on an interactive computer is described. In order to meet the specific needs of the research meteorologist, the interactive Barnes scheme allows real-time assessments ...

Steven E. Koch; Mary desJardins; Paul J. Kocin

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

BMC Infectious Diseases BioMed Central Research article Conventional and molecular epidemiology of Tuberculosis in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2003 Blackwood et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article: verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in all media for any purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL. Mycobacterium tuberculosisDNA fingerprintingclustering Background: To describe the demographic and geographic distribution of tuberculosis (TB) in Manitoba, thus determining risk factors associated with clustering and higher incidence rates in distinct subpopulations. Methods: Data from the Manitoba TB Registry was compiled to generate a database on 855 patients with tuberculosis and their contacts from 1992–1999. Recovered isolates of M. tuberculosis were typed by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors involved in clustering. Results: A trend to clustering was observed among the Canadian-born treaty Aboriginal subgroup in contrast to the foreign-born. The dominant type, designated fingerprint type 1, accounts for 25.8 % of total cases and 75.3 % of treaty Aboriginal cases. Among type 1 patients residing in urban areas, 98.9 % lived in Winnipeg. In rural areas, 92.8 % lived on Aboriginal reserves. Statistical models

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

March 3-7, 2013 • Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center San ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Matthew Kramer2; Jeffrey Shield1; 1University of Nebraska- Lincoln and ..... Program Organizers: Peter Liaw, The University of Tennessee;.

465

Proceedings of the 2nd International Convention on Rehabilitation Engineering & Assistive Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assistive and Rehabilitative Technologies (ART) are the systematic applications of scientific and engineering principles to improve the quality of life for people with disabilities. Though the providing of technology needed to accomplish tasks that were ...

Pairash Thajchayapong; Zen KOH; Wantanee PHANTACHAT; Wei Tech ANG

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Les micro-nanotechnologies pour les systèmes hyperfréquences: au-delà des conventions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??L'évolution de notre société est spectaculaire. Les nouvelles technologies apportent sans cesse des bouleversements dans nos vies, dont nous n'avons d'ailleurs pas toujours conscience tellement… (more)

Grenier, Katia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Conventional Facilities Chapter 10: Electrical Engineering 10-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Additional requirements for the Qualified Person are set forth in NFPA 70E Article 110.6 (D)(1). A person can and according to the applicable codes (OSHA, NFPA 70E, etc.). DEFINITIONS A Competent Person is an individual and NFPA, has received safety training on the hazards involved with electricity, and by virtue of training

Ohta, Shigemi

468

Establishing a Conventional Doppler Sodar cum Doppler Minisodar at the National Physical Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A personal computer–based three-axis Doppler sodar, capable of working in Doppler minisodar mode too, has been established at the National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi, India. The fast Fourier transform technique has been used to extract the ...

B. S. Gera; S. P. Singal; Neeraj Saxena

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) 83rd Annual LULAC National Convention & Exposition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LULAC  focuses on education, civil rights, and employment for Hispanics. Workshops will address Executive Core Qualifications and the Fundamental Competencies required by the Office of Personell...

470

NMR Nomenclature: nuclear spin properties and conventions for chemical shifts (IUPAC Recommendations 2001)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A unified scale is recommended for reporting the NMR chemical shifts of all nuclei relative to the 1H resonance of tetramethylsilane. The unified scale is designed to provide a precise ratio, ?, of the resonance frequency of a ... Keywords: IUPAC, NMR, chemical shift scales, notation, nuclear spin properties

Robin K. Harris; Edwin D. Becker; Sonia M. Cabral De Menezes; Robin Goodfellow; Pierre Granger

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Control of residual aluminum from conventional treatment to improve reverse osmosis performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Membrane Processes. Desalination 2. U.S. EnvironmentalMembrane Performance. Desalination 150(1), 15–30 7.IDA World Congress on Desalination and Water Reuse, Madrid,

Gabelich, C J; Ishida, K P; Gerringer, F W; Evangelista, R; Kalyan, M; Suffet, I H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Penetrator reliability investigation and design exploration : from conventional design processes to innovative uncertainty-capturing algorithms.  

SciTech Connect

This project focused on research and algorithmic development in optimization under uncertainty (OUU) problems driven by earth penetrator (EP) designs. While taking into account uncertainty, we addressed three challenges in current simulation-based engineering design and analysis processes. The first challenge required leveraging small local samples, already constructed by optimization algorithms, to build effective surrogate models. We used Gaussian Process (GP) models to construct these surrogates. We developed two OUU algorithms using 'local' GPs (OUU-LGP) and one OUU algorithm using 'global' GPs (OUU-GGP) that appear competitive or better than current methods. The second challenge was to develop a methodical design process based on multi-resolution, multi-fidelity models. We developed a Multi-Fidelity Bayesian Auto-regressive process (MF-BAP). The third challenge involved the development of tools that are computational feasible and accessible. We created MATLAB{reg_sign} and initial DAKOTA implementations of our algorithms.

Martinez-Canales, Monica L.; Heaphy, Robert (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Gramacy, Robert B. (University of Cambridge); Taddy, Matt (University of California, Santa Cruz, CA); Chiesa, Michael L.; Thomas, Stephen W. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Swiler, Laura Painton (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Hough, Patricia Diane; Lee, Herbert K. H. (University of California, Santa Cruz, CA); Trucano, Timothy Guy (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Gray, Genetha Anne

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Preliminary Design For Conventional and Compact Secondary Heat Exchanger in a Molten Salt Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The strategic goal of the Advance Reactors such as AHTR is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy in the United States by producing power to meet growing energy demands and demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not being served by light water reactors

Piyush Sabharwall; Mike Patterson; Ali Siahpush; Eung Soo Kim

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Conventional Facilities Chapter 7: Mechanical -Plumbing 7-1 NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water will be produced by a storage type electric water heater. The hot water will be stored at 140°F for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings American Water Works Association ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62 cold water Domestic hot water Sanitary sewer Tempered water (for emergency eye wash and shower) Storm

Ohta, Shigemi

475

Temporal analysis of clusters of supermarket customers: conventional versus interval set approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temporal data mining is the application of data mining techniques to data that takes the time dimension into account. This paper studies changes in cluster characteristics of supermarket customers over a 24 week period. Such an analysis can be useful ... Keywords: loyalty, modified kohonen SOM, rough set theory, temporal data mining

Pawan Lingras; Mofreh Hogo; Miroslav Snorek; Chad West

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

SURFACE LAYER ACCRETION IN TRANSITIONAL AND CONVENTIONAL DISKS: FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS TO PLANETS  

SciTech Connect

'Transitional' T Tauri disks have optically thin holes with radii {approx}>10 AU, yet accrete up to the median T Tauri rate. Multiple planets inside the hole can torque the gas to high radial speeds over large distances, reducing the local surface density while maintaining accretion. Thus multi-planet systems, together with reductions in disk opacity due to grain growth, can explain how holes can be simultaneously transparent and accreting. There remains the problem of how outer disk gas diffuses into the hole. Here it has been proposed that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) erodes disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays. In contrast to previous work, we find that the extent to which surface layers are MRI-active is limited not by ohmic dissipation but by ambipolar diffusion, the latter measured by Am: the number of times a neutral hydrogen molecule collides with ions in a dynamical time. Simulations by Hawley and Stone showed that Am {approx} 100 is necessary for ions to drive MRI turbulence in neutral gas. We calculate that in X-ray-irradiated surface layers, Am typically varies from {approx}10{sup -3} to 1, depending on the abundance of charge-adsorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whose properties we infer from Spitzer observations. We conclude that ionization of H{sub 2} by X-rays and cosmic rays can sustain, at most, only weak MRI turbulence in surface layers 1-10 g cm{sup -2} thick, and that accretion rates in such layers are too small compared to observed accretion rates for the majority of disks.

Perez-Becker, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: perez-becker@berkeley.edu [Departments of Astronomy and Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

477

SURFACE LAYER ACCRETION IN CONVENTIONAL AND TRANSITIONAL DISKS DRIVEN BY FAR-ULTRAVIOLET IONIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whether protoplanetary disks accrete at observationally significant rates by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) depends on how well ionized they are. Disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays are susceptible to charge neutralization by small condensates, ranging from {approx}0.01 {mu}m sized grains to angstrom-sized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Ion densities in X-ray-irradiated surfaces are so low that ambipolar diffusion weakens the MRI. Here we show that ionization by stellar far-ultraviolet (FUV) radiation enables full-blown MRI turbulence in disk surface layers. Far-UV ionization of atomic carbon and sulfur produces a plasma so dense that it is immune to ion recombination on grains and PAHs. The FUV-ionized layer, of thickness 0.01-0.1 g cm{sup -2}, behaves in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limit and can accrete at observationally significant rates at radii {approx}> 1-10 AU. Surface layer accretion driven by FUV ionization can reproduce the trend of increasing accretion rate with increasing hole size seen in transitional disks. At radii {approx}<1-10 AU, FUV-ionized surface layers cannot sustain the accretion rates generated at larger distance, and unless turbulent mixing of plasma can thicken the MRI-active layer, an additional means of transport is needed. In the case of transitional disks, it could be provided by planets.

Perez-Becker, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chiang, Eugene [Departments of Astronomy and Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Nov/Dec 2003 When Your Number Comes Up Selected CSBA Convention Highlights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vigorously ("roar") and move brood and stored food to some distance from the source. The only documented to a vertical hive wall and 2. as long as the wooden frames provided the proper "bee space" between #12

Hammock, Bruce D.

479

Nonlinear power flow control applications to conventional generator swing equations subject to variable generation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the swing equations for renewable generators are formulated as a natural Hamiltonian system with externally applied non-conservative forces. A two-step process referred to as Hamiltonian Surface Shaping and Power Flow Control (HSSPFC) is used to analyze and design feedback controllers for the renewable generator system. This formulation extends previous results on the analytical verification of the Potential Energy Boundary Surface (PEBS) method to nonlinear control analysis and design and justifies the decomposition of the system into conservative and non-conservative systems to enable a two-step, serial analysis and design procedure. In particular, this approach extends the work done by developing a formulation which applies to a larger set of Hamiltonian Systems that has Nearly Hamilto