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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

2

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

3

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

4

Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

72 Federal Register 72 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 181 / Wednesday, September 18, 2013 / Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 10,128. Abstract: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities to securely exchange Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) assistance programs data electronically with the Department of Education processors. Organizations establish Destination Point Administrators (DPAs) to transmit, receive, view and update student financial aid records using telecommunication software. Eligible respondents include the following, but are not limited to, institutions of higher education that participate in Title IV, HEA assistance programs, third-party servicers of eligible institutions,

5

Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Domain wall of the totally asymmetric exclusion process without particle number conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this research, the totally asymmetric exclusion process without particle number conservation is discussed. Based on the mean field approximation and the Rankine-Hugoniot condition, the necessary and sufficient conditions of the existence of the domain wall have been obtained. Moreover, the properties of the domain wall, including the location and height, have been studied theoretically. All the theoretical results are demonstrated by the computer simulations.

Yunxin Zhang

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

7

What is the total Betti number of a random real hypersurface?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the total Betti number of a random real hypersurface? Damien Gayet, Jean-Yves Welschinger July 12, 2011 Abstract We bound from above the expected total Betti number of a high degree random real of Smith's theory in equivariant homology, that the total Betti number of the real locus of a smooth real

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

8

Total Number of Existing Underground Natural Gas Storage Fields  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 400 401 409 411 410 414 1989-2012 Alabama 2 2 2 2 2 2 1995-2012 Arkansas 2 2 2 2 2 2 1989-2012 California 12 12 13 13 13 14 1989-2012 Colorado 8 8 9 9 9 10 1989-2012 Illinois 29 28 28 28 28 28 1989-2012 Indiana 22 22 22 22 22 22 1989-2012 Iowa 4 4 4 4 4 4 1989-2012 Kansas 19 19 19 19 19 19 1989-2012 Kentucky 23 23 23 23 23 23 1989-2012 Louisiana 15 17 18 18 18 18 1989-2012 Maryland 1 1 1 1 1 1 1989-2012 Michigan 45 45 45 45 45 45 1989-2012 Minnesota 1 1 1 1 1 1 1989-2012

9

Table A54. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of General Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,," "," ",," "," ",," "," "," "," " ,,,,"Computer Control" ,," "," ","of Processes"," "," ",," "," ",," " ,," ","Computer Control","or Major",,,"One or More"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"of Building","Energy-Using","Waste Heat"," Adjustable-Speed","General Technologies","None","Row"

10

Table A56. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Industry-Specific Technologies for Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"RSE" "SIC",,,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",1 20,"FOOD and KINDRED PRODUCTS" ,"Industry-Specific Technologies" ,"One or More Industry-Specific Technologies Present",2353,9 ," Infrared Heating",607,13 ," Microwave Drying",127,21 ," Closed-Cycle Heat Pump System Used to Recover Heat",786,19

11

Bounds on the locating-total domination number of a tree  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs, introduced by Haynes et al. [T.W. Haynes, M.A. Henning, J. Howard, Locating and total dominating sets in trees, Discrete Applied Mathematics 154 (8) (2006) 1293–1300]. A total dominating set S in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a locating-total dominating set of G if, for every pair of distinct vertices u and v in V ? S , N G ( u ) ? S ? N G ( v ) ? S . The minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set is the locating-total domination number ? t L ( G ) . We show that, for a tree T of order n ? 3 with l leaves and s support vertices, n + l + 1 2 ? s ? ? t L ( T ) ? n + l 2 . Moreover, we constructively characterize the extremal trees achieving these bounds.

Xue-gang Chen; Moo Young Sohn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

OSTI Increases Total Number of Documents Available to the Public | OSTI, US  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Total Number of Documents Available to the Public Total Number of Documents Available to the Public June 2005 Oak Ridge, TN - OSTI is pleased to announce the addition of 1994 full-text records in digital form to the DOE Information Bridge, increasing by more than 15 percent the total number of documents available to the public through this Web product. Currently viewable are more than 108,000 DOE scientific and technical reports. Information Bridge provides the open source to full-text and bibliographic records of DOE R&D reports in physics, chemistry, materials, biology, environmental sciences, energy technologies, engineering, computer and information science, renewable energy, and other topics. The Information Bridge consists of full-text documents produced and made available by the DOE National Laboratories and grantees from 1994 forward.

13

Total number of slots consumed in long_excl.q (exclusive nodes) will be  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total number of slots consumed in long_excl.q Total number of slots consumed in long_excl.q (exclusive nodes) will be restricted to 320 slots on June 4, 2013 Total number of slots consumed in long_excl.q (exclusive nodes) will be restricted to 320 slots on June 4, 2013 May 28, 2013 (0 Comments) The long queue has had a per-user limit of 320 slots (or 40 8-core nodes) for several months. The long_excl.q has not had a similar limit. On June 4, a per-user 320 slot limit will be introduced on the exclusive nodes (or 20 16-core nodes). This will ensure that a single user cannot consume too many resources simultaneously in the long queues. For large calculations requiring a great deal of resources, the normal queues should be targeted (jobs < 12 hours), as there are no per-user slots limits on those queues.

14

Table B1. Summary Table: Totals and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Summary Table: Totals and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation, 1999" . Summary Table: Totals and Means of Floorspace, Number of Workers, and Hours of Operation, 1999" ,"All Buildings (thousand)","Total Floorspace (million square feet)","Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand)","Mean Square Feet per Building (thousand)","Mean Square Feet per Worker","Mean Hours per Week" "All Buildings ................",4657,67338,81852,14.5,823,60 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,6774,11125,2.9,609,57 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,8238,10968,7.4,751,53 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,11153,11378,15.7,980,65 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",257,9311,9243,36.2,1007,78

15

Table B2. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, Hours of Operation, and Age of Building, 1999" . Summary Table: Totals and Medians of Floorspace, Number of Workers, Hours of Operation, and Age of Building, 1999" ,"All Buildings (thousand)","Total Floorspace (million square feet)","Total Workers in All Buildings (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Building (thousand)","Median Square Feet per Worker","Median Hours per Week","Median Age of Buildings (years)" "All Buildings ................",4657,67338,81852,5,909,50,30.5 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,6774,11125,2.5,667,50,30.5 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,8238,10968,7,1000,50,34.5 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,11153,11378,15,1354,55,28.5

16

Table A55. Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Powe  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," Number of Establishments by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation," " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and" " Presence of Cogeneration Technologies, 1994: Part 2" ,,,"Steam Turbines",,,,"Steam Turbines" ,," ","Supplied by Either","Conventional",,,"Supplied by","One or More",," " " "," ",,"Conventional","Combustion ","Combined-Cycle","Internal Combustion","Heat Recovered from","Cogeneration",,"RSE" "SIC"," ",,"or Fluidized","Turbines with","Combustion","Engines with","High-Temperature","Technologies","None","Row"

17

Award Number: Federal Non-Federal Federal Non-Federal Total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Prescribed by OMB Circular A-102 Prescribed by OMB Circular A-102 Previous Edition Usable Total (5) f. Contractual g. Construction Section B - Budget Categories Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number Grant Program Function or Activity Estimated Unobligated Funds e. Supplies i. Total Direct Charges (sum of 6a-6h) Grant Program, Function or Activity Object Class Categories Authorized for Local Reproduction h. Other a. Personnel b. Fringe Benefits c. Travel d. Equipment 6. j. Indirect Charges k. Totals (sum of 6i-6j) Program Income Applicant Name: Budget Information - Non Construction Programs OMB Approval No. 0348-0044 New or Revised Budget Section A - Budget Summary

18

Award Number: Federal Non-Federal Federal Non-Federal Total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

j. Indirect Charges j. Indirect Charges k. Totals (sum of 6i-6j) Program Income Applicant Name: Budget Information - Non Construction Programs OMB Approval No. 0348-0044 New or Revised Budget Section A - Budget Summary i. Total Direct Charges (sum of 6a-6h) Grant Program, Function or Activity Object Class Categories Authorized for Local Reproduction h. Other a. Personnel b. Fringe Benefits c. Travel d. Equipment 6. Total (5) f. Contractual g. Construction Section B - Budget Categories Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number Grant Program Function or Activity Estimated Unobligated Funds e. Supplies Prescribed by OMB Circular A-102 Previous Edition Usable

19

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

20

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

22

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

23

Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal Resource Area, Idaho by the US Geological Survey Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; MAGNETIC SURVEYS; MAPS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; AERIAL SURVEYING; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; IDAHO; KGRA; FEDERAL REGION X; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; SURVEYS; USA Author(s): Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA) Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/1/1981 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/5456508 Source: View Original Report Aeromagnetic Survey At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Raft River Geothermal Area

24

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

25

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

26

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

27

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

28

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

29

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

30

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

31

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

32

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

33

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

34

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

35

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

36

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

37

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

38

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

39

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

40

Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

About Energy.gov » Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for About Energy.gov » Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site Offices Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site Offices Name Telephone Number U.S. Department of Energy Ames Site Office 111 TASF, Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011 515-294-9557 U.S. Department of Energy Argonne Site Office 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-2000 U.S. Department of Energy Berkeley Site Office Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 510-486-5784 U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 905 NE 11th Avenue Portland, OR 97232 Bonneville Power Administration General and Regional Offices 503-230-3000 U.S. Department of Energy Brookhaven Site Office Upton, NY 11973 631-344-5050

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Applicability of Total Acid Number Analysis to Heavy Oils and Bitumens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The standard method employed for TAN, ASTM D664, was not even developed for crude oils, let alone heavy oil and bitumens. ... Funding from the following CCQTA TAN II project members is acknowledged:? Alberta Research Council, Inc., BP, Baker Petrolite, ConocoPhillips Canada, Enbridge Pipelines, Inc., ENCANA Corp., GE Betz, Husky Energy, Japan Canada Oil Sands Ltd., Marathon Petroleum Co., Maxxam Analytics, Inc., Nalco Canada, Inc., National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Petro-Canada, Shell Pipelines US, Suncor Energy, Inc., Terasen Pipelines, and Total E&P Canada Ltd. ...

Bryan Fuhr; Branko Banjac; Tim Blackmore; Parviz Rahimi

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

42

Total cross-section for photon-axion conversions in external electromagnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reconsider the conversion of the photon into axion in the external electromagnetic fields, namely in the static fields and in a periodic field of the wave guide. The total cross-sections for the conversion are evaluated in detail. The result shows that with strong strength of external electromagnetic fields, the cross-sections are large enough to measure the axion production. In the wave guide there exists the resonant conversion at the low energies, in which the value of cross-sections is much enhanced

D. V. Soa; H. N. Long; T. D. Tham

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

43

Ranks of Elliptic Curves with Prescribed Torsion over Number Fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......31], and compute Four of the points are cusps. The other four correspond to the pairs...six rational cusps, four cusps with field of...elliptic curve, P 2 a point of order 2, and P 9...2. Clearly, i is a lift of w 2. We denote the......

Johan Bosman; Peter Bruin; Andrej Dujella; Filip Najman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The imaginary quadratic fields of class number two  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ leg x 10 e MWs. 'e?ver? Rehmer L9) 6 had a?ed Still a?S?ther Criteri?n t'? ~ thia b?umd C?read m ~ 5 X 1, 0 e 9 The starting P?int for this Chesis is the c?ncePC ?f class numbers and we develop t'hat part of the nun-analytic theory pertaining..., then 3 ~ A, Proof? A ~ B implies that there exist principal ideals (oi) and (f3 ) such that (ol )A ? (/3 )3 But then (p ) 3 = (o. )A and the result follows from definition 2, 1. Theorem 28 If A ~ 3 and B ~ C, theu A ~ C Proof, If A ~ 3 and B ~ C...

Merritt, Michael Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

HIGH RESOLUTION NMR IN INHOMOGENEOUS MAGNETIC FIELDS: APPLICATION OF TOTAL SPIN COHERENCE TRANSFER ECHOES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION OF TOTAL SPIN COHERENCE TRANSFER ECHOES D.P.by total spin coherence transfer echo spectroscopy. (a) Thesequence to use total spin coherence transfer echoes to

Weitekamp, D.P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The influence of a magnetic field on turbulent heat transfer of a high Prandtl number fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of a magnetic field on turbulent heat transfer of a high Prandtl number fluid H magnetic field on the local and average heat transfer of an electrically conducting, turbulent fluid flow with high Prandtl number was studied experimentally. The mechanism of heat transfer modification due

Abdou, Mohamed

47

Reversing the weak measurement of an arbitrary field with finite photon number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For an arbitrary field with finite photon number inside a leaky cavity, we show that the null-result measurement can be conditionally reversed, using either multiple atoms or a multilevel atom. Even with photons detected, a certain class of fields...

Sun, Qingqing; Al-Amri, M.; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Number  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' , /v-i 2 -i 3 -A, This dow'at consists ~f--~-_,_~~~p.~,::, Number -------of.-&--copies, 1 Series.,-a-,-. ! 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 1; r-.' L INTRAMURALCORRESPONDENCE i"ks' 3 2.. September 25, 1947 Memo.tor Dr. A. H, Dovdy . From: Dr. H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical F!orks, Mayvood, New Jersey one of 2 plants in the U.S.A. engaged in the production of thorium compounds. The purpose of the trip vas to: l 1. Learn the type of chemical processes employed in the thorium industry (thorium nitrate). 2. Survey conditions of eeosure of personnel associated vith these chemical processes. 3. Obtain samples of atmospheric contaminants in the plant, as

49

Field Evaluation of the SFE-lnfrared Method for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) Determinations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......No differences in operation (e.g., warm-up...several hours of operation. Contrary to our...frustrate future field operations were the lack of...that the restrictor heater supplied with the...at the expense of cold fin gers). Based...conducted in cold weather. Other extractor......

Steven B. Hawthorne; David J. Miller; Kristin M. Hegvik

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Modular symbols for reductive groups and p-adic Rankin-Selberg convolutions over number fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a construction of a wide class of modular symbols attached to reductive groups. As an application we construct a p-adic distribution interpolating the special values of the twisted Rankin-Selberg L-function attached to cuspidal automorphic representations of GL(n) and GL(n-1) over number fields. If the representations are ordinary at p, our distribution is bounded and gives rise to a p-adic L-function.

Januszewski, Fabian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:06 PM"

52

Total Carbon Measurement in Soils Using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Results from the Field and Implications for Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Carbon Measurement in Soils using Laser-Induced Breakdown Total Carbon Measurement in Soils using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy: Results from the Field and Implications for Carbon Sequestration Michael H. Ebinger (mhe@lanl.gov, 505-667-3147) Environmental Dynamics and Spatial Analysis Group (EES-10), MS J495 Earth and Environmental Sciences Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA. David A. Cremers (cremers_david@lanl.gov, 505-665-4180) Advanced Chemical Diagnostics and Instrumentation Group, MS J565 Chemistry Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 David D. Breshears (daveb@lanl.gov, 505-665-2803) Environmental Dynamics and Spatial Analysis Group (EES-10), MS J495 Earth and Environmental Sciences Division Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, USA.

53

PA_Format_WAP April Production Numbers and Total ARRA and Non-ARRA production to date_6 23 10.xlsx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

**Homes **Homes Weatherized in April 2010 (Recovery Act) Total Number of Homes Weatherized through April 2010 (Recovery Act) ***Total Number of Homes Weatherized Calendar Year 2009 - April 2010 (Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding) Alabama 263 1,493 2,168 Alaska 0 0 709 Arizona 136 1,360 2,545 Arkansas 258 1,509 2,639 California 1,825 4,233 6,201 Colorado 291 2,490 6,482 Connecticut 189 690 1,759 Delaware 253 940 1,110 District of Columbia 27 137 213 Florida 602 2,356 3,432 Georgia 430 2,002 2,694 Hawaii 368 Idaho 317 1,683 3,607 Illinois 1,941 5,698 12,636 Indiana 978 3,924 6,333 Iowa 401 1,570 2,873 Kansas 232 1,502 2,318 Kentucky 409 1,690 4,395 Louisiana 186 925 2,588 Maine 277 1,583 2,689 Maryland 278 992 1,817 Massachusetts 395 3,258 6,076 Michigan 987 3,563 8,704 Minnesota 918 4,349 7,793 Mississippi 124 2,584

54

Kubo number and magnetic field line diffusion coefficient for anisotropic magnetic turbulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic field line diffusion coefficients Dx and Dy are obtained by numerical simulations in the case that all the magnetic turbulence correlation lengths lx, ly, and lz are different. We find that the variety of numerical results can be organized in terms of the Kubo number, the definition of which is extended from R=(?B/B0)(l?/l?) to R=(?B/B0)(lz/lx), for lx>~ly. Here, l? (l?) is the correlation length along (perpendicular to) the average field B0=B0e^z. We have anomalous, non-Gaussian transport for R?0.1, in which case the mean square deviation scales nonlinearly with time. For R?1 we have several Gaussian regimes: an almost quasilinear regime for 0.1?R?1, an intermediate, transition regime for 1?R?10, and a percolative regime for R?10. An analytical form of the diffusion coefficient is proposed, Di=D(?Blz/B0lx)?(li/lx)?lx2/lz, which well describes the numerical simulation results in the quasilinear, intermediate, and percolative regimes.

P. Pommois; P. Veltri; G. Zimbardo

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

55

Correlation between number of ferroelectric variants and coercive field of lead ziconate titanate single crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the magnitude of coercive fields, the external electric field that results in zero net field is defined as the magnitude of an external electric field, which results in zero net polarization. Theoretically, the coercive field calculated from a phenomenological thermodynamic theory assuming a perfect

Chen, Long-Qing

56

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF TURBULENT HEAT TRANSFER OF HIGH PRANDTL NUMBER FLUID FLOW UNDER STRONG MAGNETIC FIELD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF TURBULENT HEAT TRANSFER OF HIGH PRANDTL NUMBER FLUID FLOW UNDER to the heat transfer characteristic: Flibe is a high Prandtl number fluid. For high Prandtl number fluid, there is a severe limitation of temperature window due to its high melting point. The turbulent heat transfer is

Abdou, Mohamed

57

On p-adic L-functions for ${\\rm GL}(n)\\times{\\rm GL}(n-1)$ over totally real fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We refine and extend previous constructions of p-adic L-functions for Rankin-Selberg convolutions on ${\\rm GL}(n)\\times{\\rm GL}(n-1)$ for regular algebraic representations over totally real fields. We also proof a functional equation for this p-adic L-function, which will be of interest in further study of its arithmetic properties.

Januszewski, Fabian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 87  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 30 research projects are summarized in this report. Title of the project, contract number, company or university, award amount, principal investigators, objectives, and summary of technical progress are given for each project. Enhanced oil recovery projects include chemical flooding, gas displacement, and thermal recovery. Most of the research projects though are related to geoscience technology and reservoir characterization.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

> FOR CONFERENCE-RELATED PAPERS, REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR SESSION NUMBER, E.G., AB-02 (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE) Magnetic Field in Internal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-CLICK HERE) Magnetic Field in Internal and External Rotor model for the computation of magnetic field distribution in any number of stator slots and rotor poles on subdomain model for predicting magnetic field in any FSM topology with defining in advance the number

Boyer, Edmond

60

Probing higher order correlations of the photon field with photon number resolving avalanche photodiodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate the use of two high speed avalanche photodiodes in exploring higher order photon correlations. By employing the photon number resolving capability of the photodiodes the response to higher order photon coincidences can be measured. As an example we show experimentally the sensitivity to higher order correlations for three types of photon sources with distinct photon statistics. This higher order correlation technique could be used as a low cost and compact tool for quantifying the degree of correlation of photon sources employed in quantum information science.

J. F. Dynes; Z. L. Yuan; A. W. Sharpe; O. Thomas; A. J. Shields

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Field Notes and Specimen Catalog, Numbers 56-877 (1933-1934)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A l l specimens l i s t e d h e r e i n , unless otherwise s t a t e d , are i n the c o l l e c t i o n 9 LIBRARY BINDING COMPANY P.O. BOX 7217 WACO. 1,K.\\AS 76710, ? ? - -Name of ]) e p-t. PWSf 'P AMU Library Ooile^e Station, 77843... ? Bind a| j$ h missing issues or missing pages ? BINDERY COPY LOT NO: CRM Write 6*i type tfffe, volume, months, page nos., year call nos., imprint in the exact order to be stamped on the spine. Fi e l d Notod and Catalog Davis Numbers 56...

Davis, William B.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

Effects of local microbial bioaugmentation and biostimulation on the bioremediation of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in crude oil contaminated soil based on laboratory and field observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigated factors enhancing the performance of the bioremediation of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPHs) in crude oil-contaminated soil in laboratory and field observations. The bioaugmentation process used local microbial consortia (MC1, MC2 and MC3) combined with the biostimulation processes of nutrient addition (mineral–salt medium, MSM and NPK) and enhanced air stimulation (air supply and Oxygen Releasing Compound (ORC™)). The microcosm tests were conducted in tank and soil column setups, whereas the field test was performed in test plots inside an oil and gas facility in Malaysia. In the microcosm tank experiment, the combination of bioaugmentation (10% inoculum size of MC3) and MSM biostimulation yielded the highest TPH degradation of 79% of the total. In the column experiments, the degradation of \\{TPHs\\} in the top soil was highest in columns combining bioaugmentation and nutrient addition, whereas in the bottom soil, the degradation of \\{TPHs\\} was highest in columns combining bioaugmentation with the addition of both nutrients and ORCs. In the field demonstration, 97% of the \\{TPHs\\} were degraded in the top soil (0–1 m) when bioaugmented with MC2. The kinetic analysis study of the microcosm tank showed that a combination of both biostimulation and bioaugmentation in the soil column achieved the fastest rate constant of 0.0390 day?1. The field test also demonstrated a comparable rate constant of 0.0339 day?1. The kinetic rate constants in both the laboratory and field indicated that the best treatment method for the contaminated site is a combination of MC3 bioaugmentation and nutrient biostimulation.

Fatihah Suja; Fazli Rahim; Mohd Raihan Taha; Nuraini Hambali; M. Rizal Razali; Alia Khalid; Ainon Hamzah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Services Support Contract Fee Information Contract Period: Cost Plus Award Fee 3,311,479,516 September 2014 May 2009 - May 2019 Mission Support Alliance, LLC DE-AC06-09RL14728...

64

VOLUME54, NUMBER9 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 4 MARCH1985 Conversion of Wave Energy to Magnetic Field Energy in a Plasma Torus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOLUME54, NUMBER9 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 4 MARCH1985 Conversion of Wave Energy to Magnetic Field into plasma heating so that the conversion efficiency of rf energy to po- loidal field energy, given. Evidently, P,JP- 1. This points to a regime for efficient energy conversion except for two further effects

Karney, Charles

65

The $^4$He total photo-absorption cross section with two- plus three-nucleon interactions from chiral effective field theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The total photo-absorption cross section of $^4$He is evaluated microscopically using two- (NN) and three-nucleon (NNN) interactions based upon chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT). The calculation is performed using the Lorentz integral transform method along with the {\\em ab initio} no-core shell model approach. An important feature of the present study is the consistency of the NN and NNN interactions and also, through the Siegert theorem, of the two- and three-body current operators. This is due to the application of the $\\chi$EFT framework. The inclusion of the NNN interaction produces a suppression of the low-energy peak and enhancement of the high-energy tail of the cross section. We compare to calculations obtained using other interactions and to representative experiments. The rather confused experimental situation in the giant resonance region prevents discrimination among different interaction models.

S. Quaglioni; P. Navratil

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

67

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

68

field  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

field field-type-text field-field-page-name">

69

Contracts for field projects and supporting research on enhanced oil recovery. Progress review number 86, quarter ending March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summaries are presented for 37 enhanced oil recovery contracts being supported by the Department of Energy. The projects are grouped into gas displacement methods, thermal recovery methods, geoscience technology, reservoir characterization, and field demonstrations in high-priority reservoir classes. Each summary includes the objectives of the project and a summary of the technical progress, as well as information on contract dates, size of award, principal investigator, and company or facility doing the research.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

71

Total Petroleum Systems and Assessment Units (AU)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Surface water Groundwater X X X X X X X X AU 00000003 Oil/ Gas X X X X X X X X Total X X X X X X X Total Petroleum Systems (TPS) and Assessment Units (AU) Field type Total undiscovered petroleum (MMBO or BCFG) Water per oil

Torgersen, Christian

72

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

73

NAME: STUDENT NUMBER (PID): CITY, STATE ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAME: STUDENT NUMBER (PID): ADDRESS: CITY, STATE ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: CELL PHONE NUMBER of financial institution. 14 Cell Phone Expenses 15 Other ordinary and necessary living expenses. 16 TOTAL (add

74

Locating-total domination in graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices in a graph G is a total dominating set in G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . We obtain new lower and upper bounds on the locating-total domination number of a graph. Interpolation results are established, and the locating-total domination number in special families of graphs, including cubic graphs and grid graphs, is investigated.

Michael A. Henning; Nader Jafari Rad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

76

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locating–dominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater [186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locating–total dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

78

VOLUME 87, NUMBER 4 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 23 JULY 2001 Phase-Field Model of Mode III Dynamic Fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mode III Dynamic Fracture Alain Karma,1 David A. Kessler,2 and Herbert Levine3 1 Department of Physics III dynamic fracture that is based on the phase-field methodology used extensively to model.1103/PhysRevLett.87.045501 PACS numbers: 62.20.Mk, 46.50.+a The nonequilibrium physics of dynamic fracture

Levine, Herbert

79

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

80

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

82

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

83

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

84

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

85

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

86

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

87

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

88

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

89

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

90

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

91

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

92

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

93

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

94

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

95

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

96

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

97

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

98

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

99

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

100

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

102

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

103

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 UNIT NUMBER UNIT NAME Rubble oile 41 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Butler Lake Dam, West end of Butler Lake top 20 ft wide, 10 ft APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long, base 30...

104

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

105

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

106

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

107

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

108

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

109

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

110

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

111

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

112

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

113

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

114

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

115

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

116

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

117

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

118

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

119

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

120

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ESTIMATION OF TOTAL RADIATIVE POWER FROM THE 6-GEV RING LS-24  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TOTAL RADIATIVE POWER TOTAL RADIATIVE POWER FROM THE 6-GEV RING LS-24 G. K. Shenoy APRIL 18,1985 Here we make an estimation of the total power radiated from a positron trajectory through the bending magnets, undulators and wigglers. Bending Magnets The power P B per each bending magnet in the ring is given by (1) where E = 6 GeV B = field average over the magnet length = 0.67 T I = stored current = 0.1 A L = trajectory in each dipole magnet = 2.95 m (Ref. LS-12) This gives P B = 6021 watts. Since there are 64 such dipoles in the ring, the total power radiated from dipoles is T P B (watts) = P B (watts) x 64 = 385 kwatts 2 Undulators The total power radiated from a sinosoidal undulator is either given by P u (watts) (2) or by (3) where N = number of undulator periods of length AO (em), K is the deflection

122

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

123

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

124

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

126

Case Number:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

127

JOB NUMBER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

. . . . . . . . . .: LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) JOB NUMBER N/-&*W- 9d - 3 DATE RECEIVED " -1s - 9 J - NOTIFICATION TOAGENCY , In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposition request. including amendments, is ap roved except , . l for items that may be marke,, ,"dis osition not approved" or "withdrawn in c o i m n 10. 4. NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5 TELEPHONE Jannie Kindred (202) 5&-333 5 - 2 -96 6 AGENCYCERTIFICATION -. ~ - I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records roposed for disposal are not now needed for the business of this agency or wiRnot be needed after t G t r & s s d ; and that written concurrence from

128

KPA Number  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Mapping of the DOE Information Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM-SW) level 3. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Number KPA Activity SEM Section SEM Work Product SQSE Web site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse ORGANIZATION PROCESS FOCUS OPF-1 The software process is assessed periodically, and action plans are developed to address the assessment findings. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement Action Plan * Methodologies ! DOE Methodologies ! SEM OPF-2 The organization develops and maintains a plan for its software process development and improvement activities. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement

129

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2001  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

01 01 $4,547,400 FY2002 $4,871,000 FY2003 $6,177,902 FY2004 $8,743,007 FY2005 $13,134,189 FY2006 $7,489,704 FY2007 $9,090,924 FY2008 $10,045,072 FY2009 $12,504,247 FY2010 $17,590,414 FY2011 $17,558,710 FY2012 $14,528,770 Cumulative Fee Paid $126,281,339 Cost Plus Award Fee DE-AC29-01AL66444 Washington TRU Solutions LLC Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: $8,743,007 Contract Period: $1,813,482,000 Fee Information Maximum Fee $131,691,744 Total Estimated Contract Cost: $4,547,400 $4,871,000 $6,177,902 October 2000 - September 2012 Minimum Fee $0 Fee Available EM Contractor Fee Site: Carlsbad Field Office - Carlsbad, NM Contract Name: Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Operations March 2013 $13,196,690 $9,262,042 $10,064,940 $14,828,770 $12,348,558 $12,204,247 $17,590,414 $17,856,774

131

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

132

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

133

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

134

Locating-total domination in claw-free cubic graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we continue the study of locating-total domination in graphs. A set S of vertices of a graph G is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of G is adjacent to a vertex in S . We consider total dominating sets S which have the additional property that distinct vertices in V ( G ) ? S are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set. Such a set S is called a locating-total dominating set in G , and the locating-total domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a locating-total dominating set in G . A claw-free graph is a graph that does not contain K 1 , 3 as an induced subgraph. We show that the locating-total domination number of a claw-free cubic graph is at most one-half its order and we characterize the graphs achieving this bound.

Michael A. Henning; Christian Löwenstein

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

136

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

137

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

138

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

139

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

140

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

142

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

143

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

144

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

145

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

146

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

147

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

148

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

149

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

150

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

151

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

152

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

153

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

154

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

155

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

156

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

157

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

158

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

159

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

160

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

162

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

163

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

164

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

165

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

166

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

167

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

168

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

169

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

170

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

171

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

172

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

173

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

174

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

175

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

176

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

177

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

178

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

180

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

182

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

183

A Low Mach Number Model for Moist Atmospheric Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a low Mach number model for moist atmospheric flows that accurately incorporates reversible moist processes in flows whose features of interest occur on advective rather than acoustic time scales. Total water is used as a prognostic variable, so that water vapor and liquid water are diagnostically recovered as needed from an exact Clausius--Clapeyron formula for moist thermodynamics. Unlike the pseudo--incompressible formulation, this model allows a general equation of state. Low Mach number models can be computationally more efficient than a fully compressible model, but the low Mach number formulation introduces additional mathematical and computational complexity because of the divergence constraint imposed on the velocity field. Here, latent heat release is accounted for in the source term of the constraint by estimating the rate of phase change based on the time variation of saturated water vapor subject to the thermodynamic equilibrium constraint. We numerically assess the validity of the l...

Duarte, Max; Bell, John B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Property:TotalValue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalValue TotalValue Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "TotalValue" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 44 Tech Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + A ALLETE Inc., d/b/a Minnesota Power Smart Grid Project + 3,088,007 + Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 10,000,000 + American Transmission Company LLC II Smart Grid Project + 22,888,360 + American Transmission Company LLC Smart Grid Project + 2,661,650 + Atlantic City Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 37,400,000 + Avista Utilities Smart Grid Project + 40,000,000 + B Baltimore Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project + 451,814,234 + Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Division Smart Grid Demonstration Project + 177,642,503 +

185

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

186

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

187

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

188

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

189

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

190

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

191

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

192

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

193

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

194

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

195

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

196

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

197

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

198

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

199

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

200

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

202

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

203

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

204

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

205

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

206

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

207

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

208

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

209

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

210

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

211

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

212

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

213

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

214

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

215

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

216

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

217

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

218

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

219

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

220

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

222

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

223

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

224

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

225

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

226

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

227

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

228

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

229

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

230

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

231

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

232

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

233

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

234

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

235

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

236

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

237

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

238

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

239

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

240

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

242

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

243

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

244

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

245

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

246

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analytical Services & Testing Contract June 2014 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Advanced Technologies & Labs International Inc. DE-AC27-10RV15051 Cost Plus Award Fee...

247

Total field aeromagnetic map of the Raft River known Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDAHO; KGRA; FEDERAL REGION X; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; SURVEYS; USA Authors Geological Survey, Denver and CO (USA) Published DOE Information Bridge, 11...

248

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

249

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Wastren-EnergX Mission Support LLC Contract Number: DE-CI0000004 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 128,879,762 Contract Period: December 2009 - July 2015 Fee Information...

251

Total Estimated Contract Cost:) Performance Period Total Fee...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Washington Closure LLC DE-AC06-05RL14655 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Cost Plus Incentive Fee 2,251,328,348 Fee Information 0 Maximum Fee 337,699,252...

252

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Energy Savers [EERE]

& Wilcox Conversion Services, LLC Contract Number: DE-AC30-11CC40015 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee EM Contractor Fee June, 2014 Site: Portsmouth Paducah Project Office...

253

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Number: Contract Type: Contract Period: 0 Minimum Fee Maximum Fee Washington River Protection Solutions LLC DE-AC27-08RV14800 Cost Plus Award Fee 5,553,789,617 Fee Information...

254

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

2011 - September 2015 June 2014 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Idaho Treatment Group LLC DE-EM0001467 Cost Plus Award Fee Fee Information 419,202,975 Contract Period:...

255

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 Fee Information Minimum Fee Maximum Fee June 2014 Contract Number: Cost Plus Incentive Fee Contractor: 3,245,814,927 Contract Period: EM Contractor Fee Site:...

256

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

0 Contractor: Bechtel National Inc. Contract Number: DE-AC27-01RV14136 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Maximum Fee* 595,123,540 Fee Available 102,622,325 10,714,819,974...

257

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

LLC (UCOR) DE-SC-0004645 April 29, 2011 - July 13, 2016 Contract Number: Maximum Fee Cost Plus Award Fee 16,098,142 EM Contractor Fee Site: Oak Ridge Office - Oak Ridge, TN...

258

Magnetic Helicity and the Relaxation of Fossil Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the absence of an active dynamo, purely poloidal magnetic field configurations are unstable to large-scale dynamical perturbations, and decay via reconnection on an Alfvenic timescale. Nevertheless, a number of classes of dynamo-free stars do exhibit significant, long-lived, surface magnetic fields. Numerical simulations suggest that the large-scale poloidal field in these systems is stabilized by a toroidal component of the field in the stellar interior. Using the principle of conservation of total helicity, we develop a variational principle for computing the structure of the magnetic field inside a conducting sphere surrounded by an insulating vacuum. We show that, for a fixed total helicity, the minimum energy state corresponds to a force-free configuration. We find a simple class of axisymmetric solutions, parametrized by angular and radial quantum numbers. However, these solutions have a discontinuity in the toroidal magnetic field at the stellar surface which will exert a toroidal stress on the surface of the star. We then describe two other classes of solutions, the standard spheromak solutions and ones with fixed surface magnetic fields, the latter being relevant for neutron stars with rigid crusts. We discuss the implications of our results for the structure of neutron star magnetic fields, the decay of fields, and the origin of variability and outbursts in magnetars.

Avery E. Broderick; Ramesh Narayan

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

Totally Unimodular Multistage Stochastic Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 23, 2014 ... be the workforce level with a cost of ck per worker. The number of ... to the variable of the previous workforce level y?(k). Remark 4. ... planning.

2014-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

260

Page (Total 3) Philadelphia University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of materials and equipment and expected cost of materials needed (purchasing material that are not available in the department will take long time and should be avoided when possible). 3. Conduct the research work (field

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Compare Activities by Number of Computers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Computers Number of Computers Compare Activities by ... Number of Computers Office buildings contained the most computers per square foot, followed by education and outpatient health care buildings. Education buildings were the only type with more than one computer per employee. Religious worship and food sales buildings had the fewest computers per square foot. Percent of All Computers by Building Type Figure showing percent of all computers by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Computer Data by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Computers (thousand) Computers per Million Square Feet Computers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657

262

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fee Paid 127,390,991 Contract Number: Fee Available Contract Period: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 4,104,318,749 28,500,000 31,597,837 0 39,171,018 32,871,600 EM...

263

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DE-AM09-05SR22405DE-AT30-07CC60011SL14 Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee 357,223 597,797 894,699 EM Contractor Fee Site: Stanford Linear...

264

Algorithms for Algebraic Number Theory II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We now leave the realm of quadratic fields where the main computational tasks of algebraic number theory mentioned at the end of Chapter 4 were relatively simple (although as we have seen many conjectures rema...

Henri Cohen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Elements of number theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dissertation argues for the necessity of a morphosemantic theory of number, that is, a theory of number serviceable both to semantics and morphology. The basis for this position, and the empirical core of the dissertation, ...

Harbour, Daniel, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

267

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

268

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

269

Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TotalProjectCost TotalProjectCost Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Geothermal/TotalProjectCost Property Type Number Description Total Project Cost Pages using the property "Geothermal/TotalProjectCost" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource at Soda Lake, Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A Geothermal District-Heating System and Alternative Energy Research Park on the NM Tech Campus Geothermal Project + 6,135,381 + A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development and management support Geothermal Project + 1,629,670 +

270

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

271

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

272

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

upwelling irradiance upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband total upwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, passes through a horizontal unit area in an upward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFR : Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments RAD-AIR : Airborne Radiometers

273

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance The rate at which radiant energy, in narrow bands of wavelengths shorter than approximately 4 {mu}m, passes through a horizontal unit area in a downward direction. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NFOV : Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer

274

LHC by the numbers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 88,000 tonnes = total weight of the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan. 361 megajoules = energy of the USS ... Reagan. 361 megajoules = energy of the USS Ronald Regan when cruising at 5.6 knots. ...

Geoff Brumfiel

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

$ 3,422,994.00 $ 3,422,994.00 FY2011 4,445,142.00 $ FY2012 $ 5,021,951.68 FY2013 $ 3,501,670.00 FY2014 $0 FY2015 $0 FY2016 $0 FY2017 $0 FY2018 $0 FY2019 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $16,391,758 Wackenhut Services, Inc. DE-AC30-10CC60025 Contractor: Cost Plus Award Fee $989,000,000 Contract Period: Contract Type: January 2010 - December 2019 Contract Number: EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office - Aiken, SC Contract Name: Comprehensive Security Services September 2013 Fee Information Maximum Fee $55,541,496 $5,204,095 $3,667,493 $5,041,415 Minimum Fee 0 Fee Available $5,428,947 $6,326,114

276

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Spherical non-linear absorption of cosmological scalar fields onto a black hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we track the non-linear spherical evolution of a massless scalar field onto a Schwarzschild black hole space-time as a first approximation to the accretion of cosmologically motivated classical scalar fields. We perform an analysis related to wave packets described by wave number and width. We study various values of the wave number k, and found that for k = 0 and width packets bigger than the Schwarzschild radius, the absorption is not total. In the cases we studied for k > 0, the black hole absorbs the total amount of energy density of the scalar field moving toward the horizon. Our results indicate that assuming spherical symmetry, in the non-linear regime, there are cases for which scalar fields are allowed to survive outside black holes and may eventually have life-times consistent with cosmological time scales.

F. S. Guzman; F. D. Lora-Clavijo

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

278

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Arun field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arun field is a giant gas-condensate field operated by Mobil and Pertamina with over 20,000 acres of closure at the top of the Arun reservoir. A middle-shelf patch reef complex of early to middle Miocene age is the producing facies at the Arun field. About 1,100 ft of porous limestones, encased in shales, create a stratigraphic trap for overpressure hydrocarbons. Three main carbonate lithologies were encountered during the examination of over 4,300 ft of core; (1) a reef facies consisting of vuggy, coral encrusting, red-algal boundstones, (2) a near-reef facies consisting of foraminiferal, mixed-skeletal packstones with gravel-size coral fragments, and (3) an interreef lagoonal facies consisting of benthonic-foram packstones. Twenty-two species of corals have been identified from Arun reef facies; major reef-forming coals, listed in order of decreasing abundance, are Porites cf P. Lutes, Cyphastrea microphthalma, Astreopora myriophthalma, Styloconiella gunetheri, Porites solida, and Acropora ssp. The Arun reef is comprised of limestones (with minor amounts of dolomite). No shale beds occur in the sequence, and all carbonate facies are in communication. A pervasive microporosity, occurring throughout the Arun Limestone, results from meteoric alteration of original carbonate mud to form a microrhombic porosity that accounts for about three-fourths of the field's total porosity.

Jordan, C.F. Jr.; Abdullah, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented for approximately 165 abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma that have produced 10,000 or more barrels of oil prior to abandonment. The following information is provided for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date of field; year of last production, if known; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Chism, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Quantifiers for randomness of chaotic pseudo-random number generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...randomness of chaotic pseudo-random number generators L. De Micco 1 H. A. Larrondo 1...connection with pseudo-random number generators (PRNGs). Workers in the field are...notion to generate pseudo-random number generators (PRNGs) because random numbers are...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Total Imports of Residual Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. Total 5,752 5,180 7,707 9,056 6,880 6,008 1936-2013 PAD District 1 1,677 1,689 2,008 3,074 2,135 2,814 1981-2013 Connecticut 1995-2009 Delaware 1995-2012 Florida 359 410 439 392 704 824 1995-2013 Georgia 324 354 434 364 298 391 1995-2013 Maine 65 1995-2013 Maryland 1995-2013 Massachusetts 1995-2012 New Hampshire 1995-2010 New Jersey 903 756 948 1,148 1,008 1,206 1995-2013 New York 21 15 14 771 8 180 1995-2013 North Carolina 1995-2011 Pennsylvania 1995-2013 Rhode Island 1995-2013 South Carolina 150 137 194 209 1995-2013 Vermont 5 4 4 5 4 4 1995-2013 Virginia 32 200 113 1995-2013 PAD District 2 217 183 235 207 247 179 1981-2013 Illinois 1995-2013

283

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Galvan Ranch, TX LNG Imports from Algeria LNG Imports from Australia LNG Imports from Brunei LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea LNG Imports from Indonesia LNG Imports from Malaysia LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX LNG Imports from Qatar Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Period: Monthly Annual

284

Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thousand Barrels) Thousand Barrels) Data Series: Natural Gas Processed Total Liquids Extracted NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 658,291 673,677 720,612 749,095 792,481 873,563 1983-2012 Alabama 13,381 11,753 11,667 13,065 1983-2010 Alaska 22,419 20,779 19,542 17,798 18,314 18,339 1983-2012 Arkansas 126 103 125 160 212 336 1983-2012 California 11,388 11,179 11,042 10,400 9,831 9,923 1983-2012 Colorado 27,447 37,804 47,705 57,924 1983-2010 Florida 103 16 1983-2008 Illinois 38 33 24 231 705 0 1983-2012

285

Oklahoma's Native Languages with Total Population c. 1993 and Estimated Numbers of Speakers c. 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,927) 0 0 5 1(?) 24 0 Tonkawan Tonkawa (186) 0 Iroquoian Cherokee (122,000) Keetoowah Band Cherokee (7,450) Wyandotte (3,617) Seneca-Cayuga# (2,460) 9,000 (w/Cherokee) 0 0 Uto-Aztecan Comanche (8,500) Uchean Euchee

Oklahoma, University of

286

Consequence of total lepton number violation in strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The influence of neutrinoless electron to positron conversion on cooling of strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs is studied. It is shown that they can be good candidates for soft gamma-ray repeaters and anomalous X-ray pulsars.

V. B. Belyaev; P. Ricci; F. Simkovic; J. Adam, Jr.; M. Tater; E. Truhlik

2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

Consequence of total lepton number violation in strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of a neutrinoless electron to positron conversion on a cooling of strongly magnetized iron white dwarfs is studied.

Belyaev, V. B. [Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Ricci, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze) (Italy); Šimkovic, F. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina F1, SK-842 15, Bratislava, Slovakia and Bogolyubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Adam, J. Jr.; Tater, M.; Truhlík, E. [Institute of Nuclear Physics ASCR, CZ-250 68 ?ež (Czech Republic)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Locating and total dominating sets in trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A set S of vertices in a graph G = ( V , E ) is a total dominating set of G if every vertex of V is adjacent to a vertex in S. We consider total dominating sets of minimum cardinality which have the additional property that distinct vertices of V are totally dominated by distinct subsets of the total dominating set.

Teresa W. Haynes; Michael A. Henning; Jamie Howard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Notices OMB Control Number: 1850-0803.  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

870 Federal Register 870 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 140 / Monday, July 22, 2013 / Notices OMB Control Number: 1850-0803. Type of Review: Extension without change of an existing collection of information. Respondents/Affected Public: Individuals or households. Total Estimated Number of Annual Responses: 135,000. Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 27,000. Abstract: This is a request for a 3-year renewal of the generic clearance to allow the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to continue to develop, test, and improve its survey and assessment instruments and methodologies. The procedures utilized to this effect include but are not limited to experiments with levels of incentives for various types of survey operations, focus groups, cognitive laboratory

290

U.S. Total Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT LNG Imports into Cameron, LA LNG Imports into Cove Point, MD LNG Imports into Elba Island, GA LNG Imports into Everett, MA LNG Imports into Freeport, TX LNG Imports into Golden Pass, TX LNG Imports into Gulf Gateway, LA LNG Imports into Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports into Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports into Neptune Deepwater Port LNG Imports into Northeast Gateway LNG Imports into Sabine Pass, LA U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Australia Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Brunei Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Canada Highgate Springs, VT LNG Imports from Egypt Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Equatorial Guinea Elba Island, GA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Indonesia Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Malaysia Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Nigeria Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Norway Cove Point, MD Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Oman Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Peru Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Qatar Cameron, LA Elba Island, GA Golden Pass, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Lake Charles, LA Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Trinidad/Tobago Cameron, LA Cove Point, MD Elba Island, GA Everett, MA Freeport, TX Gulf Gateway, LA Gulf LNG, MS Lake Charles, LA Neptune Deepwater Port Northeast Gateway Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from United Arab Emirates Lake Charles, LA LNG Imports from Yemen Everett, MA Freeport, TX Neptune Deepwater Port Sabine Pass, LA LNG Imports from Other Countries Lake Charles, LA Period: Monthly Annual

291

Intrinsic Magnetic Fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emission theory of electromagnetic fields.—(1) Intrinsic magnetic field. The intrinsic magnetic field of a point charge is defined as that portion of the field which cannot be annihilated by the Lorentz transformation. It is shown that the intrinsic field can be represented by lines of force carried by the same moving elements as carry the electric field, and a potential is given for it. (2) Frequency of emission of moving elements. A relation between the frequency of emission of moving elements and the number of lines of force to a tube is deduced on the assumption that the latter number is the same for the electric and magnetic fields and that each moving element marks the intersection of an electric and magnetic line of force.

Leigh Page

1923-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Intelligent field emission arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field emission arrays (FEAs) have been studied extensively as potential electron sources for a number of vacuum microelectronic device applications. For most applications, temporal current stability and spatial current ...

Hong, Ching-yin, 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

294

Winding number versus Chern--Pontryagin charge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the usual d dimensional SO(d) gauged Higgs models with $d$-component Higgs fields, the 'energies' of the topologically stable solitons are bounded from below by the Chern-Pontryagin charges. A new class of Higgs models is proposed here, whose 'energies' are stabilised instead by the winding number of the Higgs field itself, with no reference to the gauge group. Consequently, such Higgs models can be gauged by SO(N), with 2 \\le N \\le d.

Tigran Tchrakian

2002-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

295

ALARA notes, Number 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [eds.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

CHROMOSOME NUMBERS IN MAMMALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...variables for which the double inte-gral does not exist: R. L. JEFFERY. On the number of elements in a group which have a power in...society will meet at Columbia University, MA ay 2, 1925. W. BENJAMIN FITE Acting Secretary 424 SCIENCE

Theophilus S. Painter

1925-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

297

Baryon Number Violation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report, prepared for the Community Planning Study - Snowmass 2013 - summarizes the theoretical motivations and the experimental efforts to search for baryon number violation, focussing on nucleon decay and neutron-antineutron oscillations. Present and future nucleon decay search experiments using large underground detectors, as well as planned neutron-antineutron oscillation search experiments with free neutron beams are highlighted.

K. S. Babu; E. Kearns; U. Al-Binni; S. Banerjee; D. V. Baxter; Z. Berezhiani; M. Bergevin; S. Bhattacharya; S. Brice; R. Brock; T. W. Burgess; L. Castellanos; S. Chattopadhyay; M-C. Chen; E. Church; C. E. Coppola; D. F. Cowen; R. Cowsik; J. A. Crabtree; H. Davoudiasl; R. Dermisek; A. Dolgov; B. Dutta; G. Dvali; P. Ferguson; P. Fileviez Perez; T. Gabriel; A. Gal; F. Gallmeier; K. S. Ganezer; I. Gogoladze; E. S. Golubeva; V. B. Graves; G. Greene; T. Handler; B. Hartfiel; A. Hawari; L. Heilbronn; J. Hill; D. Jaffe; C. Johnson; C. K. Jung; Y. Kamyshkov; B. Kerbikov; B. Z. Kopeliovich; V. B. Kopeliovich; W. Korsch; T. Lachenmaier; P. Langacker; C-Y. Liu; W. J. Marciano; M. Mocko; R. N. Mohapatra; N. Mokhov; G. Muhrer; P. Mumm; P. Nath; Y. Obayashi; L. Okun; J. C. Pati; R. W. Pattie Jr.; D. G. Phillips II; C. Quigg; J. L. Raaf; S. Raby; E. Ramberg; A. Ray; A. Roy; A. Ruggles; U. Sarkar; A. Saunders; A. Serebrov; Q. Shafi; H. Shimizu; M. Shiozawa; R. Shrock; A. K. Sikdar; W. M. Snow; A. Soha; S. Spanier; G. C. Stavenga; S. Striganov; R. Svoboda; Z. Tang; Z. Tavartkiladze; L. Townsend; S. Tulin; A. Vainshtein; R. Van Kooten; C. E. M. Wagner; Z. Wang; B. Wehring; R. J. Wilson; M. Wise; M. Yokoyama; A. R. Young

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 Risk and Safety Manager 5535 Security 7058 #12;- 3 - FOREWORD This reference manual outlines the safe

Bolch, Tobias

299

State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U) State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total 2012 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (centskWh) (Data from...

300

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Team Total Points Beta Theta Pi 2271  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bubbles 40 Upset City 30 Team Success 30 #12;Team Total Points Sly Tye 16 Barringer 15 Fire Stinespring 15

Buehrer, R. Michael

302

UCGE Reports Number 20272  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000 (GV2000 Project). To guide policy and practice in complex situations, current research in the area of what are understood to be "best practices" in property valuation and taxation to an integrated, social towards relevant literature in allied fields, which played a critical part in the research design. My

303

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT Board of Directors Reply to: Ronald Rayner C. W. Adams James D. Downing, P.E. Chairman Billy Hickman 66768 Hwy 60 Brian Turner Marvin John P.O. Box 99 Vice-Chairman Jason Pierce Salome, AZ 85348 Denton Ross Jerry Rovey Secretary James N. Warkomski ED8@HARCUVARCO.COM John Utz Gary Wood PHONE:(928) 859-3647 Treasurer FAX: (928) 859-3145 Sent via e-mail Mr. Darrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region P. O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 moe@wapa.gov; dswpwrmrk@wapa.gov Re: ED5-Palo Verde Hub Project Dear Mr. Moe, In response to the request for comments issued at the October 6 Parker-Davis Project customer th meeting, and in conjunction with comments previously submitted by the Southwest Public Power

304

Preventive Action Number:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-018 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 09_0924 Worksheet modified to reflect External Audit recommendation for identification of "Cause for Potential Nonconformance". Minor editing changes. 11_0414 Added Preventive Action Number block to match Q-Pulse

305

Preventive Action Number:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-017 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 11_0414 Added problem statement to first block. F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 3 of 3 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Corrective Action Number: Source: Details/Problem Statement: Raised By: Raised Date: Target Date:

306

On the efficiency of field star capture by star clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An exciting recent finding regarding scaling relations among globular clusters is the so-called 'blue tilt': clusters of the blue sub-population follow a trend of redder colour with increasing luminosity. In this paper we evaluate to which extent field star capture over a Hubble time may explain the 'blue tilt'. We perform collisional N-body simulations to quantify the amount of field star capture occuring over a Hubble time to star clusters with 10^3 to 10^6 stars. In the simulations we follow the orbits of field stars passing through a star cluster and calculate the energy change that the field stars experience due to gravitational interaction with cluster stars during one passage through the cluster. The capture condition is that their total energy after the passage is smaller than the gravitational potential at the cluster's tidal radius. By folding this with the fly-by rates of field stars with an assumed space density as in the solar neighbourhood and a range of velocity dispersions, we derive estimates on the mass fraction of captured field stars as a function of environment. We find that integrated over a Hubble time, the ratio between captured field stars and total number of clusters stars is very low (capture is not a probable mechanism for creating the colour-magnitude trend of metal-poor globular clusters.

Steffen Mieske; Holger Baumgardt

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

307

Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/TotalFloorArea Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total floor area (BRA), m2 Pages using the property "Building/TotalFloorArea" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,855 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,310 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 +

308

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/Total | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Total Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/Total" Showing 15 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 13.95 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 26 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15.2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 28 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 16.55 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 30 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 18.15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 9 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 33 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 20.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 11.1 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 36 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 22.25 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 12.95 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 24 +

309

Pseudo winding numbers and the spherical ansatz  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The path-dependent surface/time integral contribution to the topological charge in an SO(3) Yang - Mills theory is studied for paths in field space that interpolate between a background gauge field in the remote past and a gauge transform of it in the remote future. The possibility of existence of such paths along which this integral vanishes for a given initial background gauge field is related to the action of the group of gauge transformations of real, pseudo winding numbers on the physical states of the theory in the background gauge field. The analysis takes a particularly transparent form for the spherically-symmetric fields of the spherical ansatz, leading to a simple interpretation of the results.

Ahmed Abouelsaood

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Compare All CBECS Activities: Total Energy Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Use Total Energy Use Compare Activities by ... Total Energy Use Total Major Fuel Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 5.7 quadrillion Btu of all major fuels (electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district steam or hot water) in 1999. Office buildings used the most total energy of all the building types, which was not a surprise since they were the most common commercial building type and had an above average energy intensity. Figure showing total major fuel consumption by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Major Fuel Consumption per Building by Building Type Because there were relatively few inpatient health care buildings and they tend to be large, energy intensive buildings, their energy consumption per building was far above that of any other building type.

311

TotalView Parallel Debugger at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Totalview Totalview Totalview Description TotalView from Rogue Wave Software is a parallel debugging tool that can be run with up to 512 processors. It provides both X Windows-based Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command line interface (CLI) environments for debugging. The performance of the GUI can be greatly improved if used in conjunction with free NX software. The TotalView documentation web page is a good resource for learning more about some of the advanced TotalView features. Accessing Totalview at NERSC To use TotalView at NERSC, first load the TotalView modulefile to set the correct environment settings with the following command: % module load totalview Compiling Code to Run with TotalView In order to use TotalView, code must be compiled with the -g option. We

312

Effects of environmental parameters to total, quantum and classical correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We quantify the total, quantum, and classical correlations with entropic measures, and quantitatively compare these correlations in a quantum system, as exemplified by a Heisenberg dimer which is subjected to the change of environmental parameters: temperature and nonuniform external field. Our results show that the quantum correlation may exceed the classical correlation at some nonzero temperatures, though the former is rather fragile than the later under thermal fluctuation. The effect of the external field to the classical correlation is quite different from the quantum correlation.

Wen-Ling Chan; Jun-Peng Cao; Dong Yang; Shi-Jian Gu

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

Does Dissipation in AGN Disks Couple to the Total Pressure?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent work on the transport of angular momentum in accretion disks suggests that the Velikhov-Chandrasekhar instability, in which a large scale magnetic field generates small scale eddys in a shearing environment, may be ultimately responsible for this process. Although there is considerable controversy about the origin and maintenance of this field in accretion disks, it turns out that it is possible to argue, quite generally, using scaling arguments, that this process is sensitive to the total pressure in an AGN disk, rather than the pressure contributed by gas alone. We conclude that the resolution of the conceptual difficulties implied by the presence of strong thermal and viscous instabilities in radiation pressure and electron scattering dominated does not lie in models that couple the total dissipation rate to the gas pressure alone, or to some weighted mean of the gas and radiation pressures.

E. T. Vishniac

1993-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

316

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

317

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

318

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

319

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

320

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Transport driven plasma flows in the scrape-off layer of ADITYA Tokamak in different orientations of magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parallel plasma flows in the scrape-off layer of ADITYA tokamak are measured in two orientations of total magnetic field. In each orientation, experiments are carried out by reversing the direction of the toroidal magnetic field and the plasma current. The transport-driven component is determined by averaging flow Mach numbers, measured in two directions of the toroidal magnetic field and the plasma current for the same orientation. It is observed that there is a significant transport-driven component in the measured flow and the component depends on the field orientation.

Sangwan, Deepak; Jha, Ratneshwar; Brotankova, Jana; Gopalkrishna, M. V. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Number of Existing Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

326 324 331 331 329 330 1999-2012 326 324 331 331 329 330 1999-2012 Alabama 1 1 1 1 1 1 1999-2012 Arkansas 2 2 2 2 2 2 1999-2012 California 12 12 13 13 13 14 1999-2012 Colorado 8 8 9 9 9 10 1999-2012 Illinois 11 10 10 11 11 11 1999-2012 Indiana 10 10 10 9 9 10 1999-2012 Kansas 18 18 18 18 18 18 1999-2012 Kentucky 20 20 20 20 20 20 1999-2012 Louisiana 8 8 8 8 8 7 1999-2012 Maryland 1 1 1 1 1 1 1999-2012 Michigan 43 43 43 43 43 43 1999-2012 Mississippi 5 5 6 6 6 6 1999-2012 Montana 5 5 5 5 5 5 1999-2012 Nebraska 1 1 1 1 1 1 1999-2012 New Mexico 2 2 2 2 2 2 1999-2012 New York 23 23 25 25 25 26 1999-2012 Ohio 24 24 24 24 24 24 1999-2012 Oklahoma 13 13 13 13 13 12 1999-2012 Oregon 7 7 7 7 7 7 1999-2012

323

Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA 94720 510-486-5784 U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration P.O. Box 3621 905 NE 11th Avenue Portland, OR 97232 Bonneville Power...

324

Field Notes and Specimen Catalog, Numbers 1-54 (1933)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' ' LIST OP BIRDS with DATES L, Eared Grebe 2-4. Pied-billed Grebe, 2-4. 5* Glaucous-winged Gull, 2-4. . California Gull, 2-4. . Mallard, 2-4, 4? 15. 3, American fidgeon, 2-4. U Pintail, 2-4. Canvas-back, 2-4. 5. Red Head, 2-4. 0.... Greater Scaup, 2-4. 1, Lesser Scaup, 2-4, 12. American Golden-eye, 2-4. 15. Buffle Head, 2-4. 14. Surf Scoter, 2-3. . 1,5. Ruddy Duck, 2-4. 15, Canada Goose, 2-4, 17* American Bittern, 2-10, 2-26. |a0 Calif. Blue Heron, 2-26. 19c Black...

Davis, William B.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

325

Sustainability of multi-field inflation and bound on string scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effects of the interaction terms between the inflaton fields on the inflationary dynamics in multi-field models. With power law type potential and interactions, the total number of e-folds may get considerably reduced and can lead to unacceptably short period of inflation. Also we point out that this can place a bound on the characteristic scale of the underlying theory such as string theory. Using a simple multi-field chaotic inflation model from string theory, the string scale is constrained to be larger than the scale of grand unified theory.

Jinn-Ouk Gong

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

326

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shadowband Spectroradiometer SPEC-TOTDN : Shortwave Total Downwelling Spectrometer UAV-EGRETT : UAV-Egrett Value-Added Products VISST : Minnis Cloud Products Using Visst...

327

,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","12312014"...

328

Total Supplemental Supply of Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Total Supplemental Supply Synthetic Propane-Air Refinery Gas Biomass Other Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources &...

329

Total Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to...

330

Practice Field Practice Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courts Soccer Field Swimming pool Bandeen Hall Mountain House # 3 # 2 Golf Course Security Patterson Hall.B. Scott Arena Library Centennial Theater Mc Greer Hall Pollack Hall New Johnson Science Building Dewhurst Dining Hall Champlain Regional College # 4 Mackinnon Hall Residence # 6 Memorial House Retired Faculty

331

Construction Project Number  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

North Execution - (2009 - 2011) North Execution - (2009 - 2011) Construction Project Number 2009 2010 2011 Project Description ANMLPL 0001C 76,675.32 - - Animas-Laplata circuit breaker and power rights CRGRFL 0001C - - 7,177.09 Craig Rifle Bay and transfer bay upgrade to 2000 amps; / Convert CRG RFL to 345 kV out of Bears Ear Sub FGE 0019C - - 39,207.86 Replace 69/25kV transformer KX2A at Flaming Gorge FGE 0020C - - 52,097.12 Flaming Gorge: Replace failed KW2A transformer HDN 0069C 16,638.52 208,893.46 3,704,578.33 Replace failed transformer with KZ1A 250 MVA 230/138kv

332

KPA Activity Number  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

supports CMM-SW Level 2 supports CMM-SW Level 2 Mapping of the DOE Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM- SW) level 2. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Activity Number KPA Activity SEM Section SME Work Product SQSE Web Site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT RM-1 The software engineering group reviews the allocated requirements before they are incorporated in the software project. Chapter 3.0 * Develop High-Level Project Requirements Chapter 4.0 * Establish Functional Baseline * Project Plan * Requirements Specification Document * Requirements Management awareness * Defining Project Requirements RM-2 The software engineering group uses the allocated requirements as the basis for

333

DOE/ID-Number  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers Ronald K. Farris Heather Medema September 2012 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trade mark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

334

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Synthesis of Irciniastatin A (Psymberin) Michael T. Crimmins,* Jason M. Stevens, and Gregory, North Carolina 27599 crimmins@email.unc.edu Received July 21, 2009 ABSTRACT The total synthesis of a hemiaminal and acid chloride to complete the synthesis. In 2004, Pettit and Crews independently reported

335

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

Skogestad, Sigurd

336

Table HC6.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4...

337

Table HC6.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Number of Household Members, 2005 Total... 111.1 30.0 34.8 18.4...

338

Table 10: Total natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, w  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Total natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011" : Total natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011" "billion cubic feet" ,,"Changes in reserves during 2011" ,"Published",,,,,,,,"New Reservoir" ,"Proved",,"Revision","Revision",,,,"New Field","Discoveries","Estimated","Proved" ,"Reserves","Adjustments","Increases","Decreases","Sales","Acquisitions","Extensions","Discoveries","in Old Fields","Production","Reserves" "State and subdivision",40543,"(+,-)","(+)","(-)","(-)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(-)",40908

339

On neutron numbers and atomic masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On neutron numbers and atomic masses ... Assigning neutron numbers, correct neutron numbers, and atomic masses and nucleon numbers. ...

R. Heyrovská

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from of work done by the field, W*= -W. Bring q1 from , W *= 0 since no electric F yet #12;Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from the work done by an external

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Contractor Fee Payments - Carlsbad Field Office | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carlsbad Field Office Contractor Fee Payments - Carlsbad Field Office See the amount of fees earned on EM's major contracts for each evaluated fee period and the total contract to...

342

The environmental protection agency's research program on total human exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) research program on total human exposure to environmental pollution seeks to develop a newly emerging concept in the environmental sciences. Instead of focusing purely on the sources of pollution or their transport and movement through the environment, this research focuses on human beings as the receptors of these pollutants. People and daily activities become the center of attention. The methodology measures and models the pollutant concentrations found at the physical boundaries of people, regardless of whether the pollutants arrive through the air, water, food, or skin. It seeks to characterize quantitatively the impact of pollution on people by determining if an environmental problem exists at the human interface and, if so, by determining the sources, nature, extent, and severity of this environmental problem. By exploiting an emerging new arsenal of miniaturized instruments and by developing statistically representative survey designs for sampling the population of cities, significant progress has been made in recent years in providing previously unavailable human exposure field data needed for making valid risk assessments. The U.S. EPA total human exposure research program includes: development of measurement methods and instruments, development of exposure models and statistical protocols, microenvironmental field studies, total human exposure studies, validation of human exposure models with empirical data, and dosage research investigations.

Wayne Ott; Lance Wallace; David Mage; Gerald Akland; Robert Lewis; Harold Sauls; Charles Rodes; David Kleffman; Donna Kuroda; Karen Morehouse

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Number of Retail Customers by State by Sector, 1990-2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Retail Customers by State by Sector, 1990-2012" Number of Retail Customers by State by Sector, 1990-2012" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2012,"AK","Total Electric Industry",275405,48790,1263,0,"NA",325458 2012,"AL","Total Electric Industry",2150977,357395,7168,0,"NA",2515540 2012,"AR","Total Electric Industry",1332154,181823,33926,2,"NA",1547905 2012,"AZ","Total Electric Industry",2585638,305250,7740,0,"NA",2898628 2012,"CA","Total Electric Industry",13101887,1834779,73805,12,"NA",15010483

344

Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaTotal FloorAreaTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,454 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 14,348 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,300 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,546 +

345

Texas Rice, Volume VII, Number 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas April 2007 Volume VII Number 2 Texas Rice Latest News on the Farm Bill continued on page 6 Agriculture Secretary, Mike Johanns, appears... News on the Farm Bill Welcome to the latest edition of Texas Rice. The 2007 crop season is starting off very slow. Unseasonably cool weather, combined with continuing damp conditions, has greatly delayed plantings. Many of the fields that were...

346

Total synthesis and study of myrmicarin alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Tricyclic Myrmicarin Alkaloids An enantioselective gram-scale synthesis of a key dihydroindolizine intermediate for the preparation of myrmicarin alkaloids is described. Key transformations ...

Ondrus, Alison Evelynn, 1981-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Total synthesis of cyclotryptamine and diketopiperazine alkaloids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Total Synthesis of the (+)-12,12'-Dideoxyverticillin A The fungal metabolite (+)-12,12'-dideoxyverticillin A, a cytotoxic alkaloid isolated from a marine Penicillium sp., belongs to a fascinating family of densely ...

Kim, Justin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,262 1,938 TGR 4-20 0-3 2,871 2,871 - % of time appointed Hours of Work/Week Units TAL Provides Total

Kay, Mark A.

349

Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (?)-Acylfulvene and (?)- Irofulven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report our full account of the enantioselective total synthesis of (?)-acylfulvene (1) and (?)-irofulven (2), which features metathesis reactions for the rapid assembly of the molecular framework of these antitumor ...

Movassaghi, Mohammad

350

A GENUINELY HIGH ORDER TOTAL VARIATION DIMINISHING ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(TVD) schemes solving one-dimensional scalar conservation laws degenerate to first order .... where the total variation is measured by the standard bounded variation ..... interval Ij and into the jump discontinuities at cell interfaces, see [12].

351

Abandoned oil fields in Kansas and Nebraska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data on approximately 400 abandoned oil fields in Kansas and 90 abandoned oil fields in Nebraska are presented. The following information is obtained on each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; API gravity; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (DMC)

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Single-wave-number representation of nonlinear energy spectrum in elastic-wave turbulence of the Föppl–von Kármán equation: Energy decomposition analysis and energy budget  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A single-wave-number representation of a nonlinear energy spectrum, i.e., a stretching-energy spectrum, is found in elastic-wave turbulence governed by the Föppl–von Kármán (FvK) equation. The representation enables energy decomposition analysis in the wave-number space and analytical expressions of detailed energy budgets in the nonlinear interactions. We numerically solved the FvK equation and observed the following facts. Kinetic energy and bending energy are comparable with each other at large wave numbers as the weak turbulence theory suggests. On the other hand, stretching energy is larger than the bending energy at small wave numbers, i.e., the nonlinearity is relatively strong. The strong correlation between a mode ak and its companion mode a?k is observed at the small wave numbers. The energy is input into the wave field through stretching-energy transfer at the small wave numbers, and dissipated through the quartic part of kinetic-energy transfer at the large wave numbers. Total-energy flux consistent with energy conservation is calculated directly by using the analytical expression of the total-energy transfer, and the forward energy cascade is observed clearly.

Naoto Yokoyama and Masanori Takaoka

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

353

| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory | Total Scattering at the Lujan Center Neutron Powder Diffractometer (NPDF) High-Intensity Powder. Shoemaker, et al., Reverse Monte Carlo neutron scattering study of disordered crystalline materials neutron| Los Alamos National Laboratory | Total Scattering Developments forTotal Scattering Developments

Magee, Joseph W.

354

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

355

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

356

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

357

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

358

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

359

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

360

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

362

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

363

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

364

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

365

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

366

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

367

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

368

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

369

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

370

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

371

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

372

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

373

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

374

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

375

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

376

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

377

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

378

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

379

Number Suppletion in North American Indian Languages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been elimina ted from consideration. A total of 32 languages from 13 distinct genetic groupings were found to have suppletive verbs marking ergative plurality, i.e. the suppletive verb form cross-references the number of the subject of an intransitive... cry, die carry, put, stand throw sit go, run handle, put down lie, sit, fall, run stand lie, sit, float/glide carry, give, stand run/fly, put swim, turn, walk/go be locat- .arrive , be little die ed, lie, return sit,stand lie, sit falloff big, long...

Booker, Karen M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

382

VIMOS total transmission profiles for broad-band filters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIMOS is a wide-field imager and spectrograph mounted on UT3 at the VLT, whose FOV consists of four 7'x8' quadrants. Here we present the measurements of total transmission profiles -- i.e. the throughput of telescope + instrument -- for the broad band filters U, B, V, R, I, and z for each of its four quadrants. Those measurements can also be downloaded from the public VIMOS web-page. The transmission profiles are compared with previous estimates from the VIMOS consortium.

S. Mieske; M. Rejkuba; S. Bagnulo; C. Izzo; G. Marconi

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers Atiyah's question Thomas Schick G¨ottingen OA Chennai 2010 Thomas Schick (G¨ottingen) Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers Atiyah's question OA Chennai 2010 1 / 24 #12 = ~M/) with fundamental domain F. L2-Betti numbers:= normalized dimension( space of L2-harmonic forms

Sunder, V S

384

Data Compression with Prime Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

Gordon Chalmers

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

385

Measurement of total ion current from vacuum arc plasmasources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total ion current generated by a vacuum arc plasma source was measured. The discharge system investigated allowed ion collection from the arc plasma streaming through a hemispherical mesh anode with geometric transparency of 72 percent. A range of different cathode materials was investigated, and the arc current was varied over the range 50-500 A. We find that the normalized ion current (Iion/Iarc) depends on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5 percent to 19 percent and generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The application of a strong axial magnetic field in the cathode and arc region leads to increased normalized ion current, but only by virtue of enhanced ion charge states formed in a strong magnetic field.

Oks, Efim M.; Savkin, Konstantin P.; Yushkov, Georgiu Yu.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.; Anders, A.; Brown, Ian G.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Energy Perspectives, Total Energy - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Energy Total Energy Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Monthly Annual Analysis & Projections this will be filled with a highchart PREVIOUSNEXT Energy Perspectives 1949-2011 September 2012 PDF | previous editions Release Date: September 27, 2012 Introduction Energy Perspectives is a graphical overview of energy history in the United States. The 42 graphs shown here reveal sweeping trends related to the Nation's production, consumption, and trade of energy from 1949 through 2011. Energy Flow, 2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Total Energy Flow diagram image For footnotes see here. Energy can be grouped into three broad categories. First, and by far the largest, is the fossil fuels-coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Fossil fuels have stored the sun's energy over millennia past, and it is primarily

387

ARM - Measurement - Net broadband total irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance govMeasurementsNet broadband total irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Net broadband total irradiance The difference between upwelling and downwelling, covering longwave and shortwave radiation. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

388

SolarTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SolarTotal SolarTotal Jump to: navigation, search Name SolarTotal Place Bemmel, Netherlands Zip 6681 LN Sector Solar Product The company sells and installs PV solar instalations Coordinates 51.894112°, 5.89881° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.894112,"lon":5.89881,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

389

Total Cross Sections for Neutron Scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of neutron total cross-sections are both extensive and extremely accurate. Although they place a strong constraint on theoretically constructed models, there are relatively few comparisons of predictions with experiment. The total cross-sections for neutron scattering from $^{16}$O and $^{40}$Ca are calculated as a function of energy from $50-700$~MeV laboratory energy with a microscopic first order optical potential derived within the framework of the Watson expansion. Although these results are already in qualitative agreement with the data, the inclusion of medium corrections to the propagator is essential to correctly predict the energy dependence given by the experiment.

C. R. Chinn; Ch. Elster; R. M. Thaler; S. P. Weppner

1994-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

Unsteady Aerodynamic Models for Agile Flight at Low Reynolds Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-time Lyapunov exponent fields, which highlight separated flows and wake structures. A new fast method of a two-dimensional flat plate airfoil in motion at low Reynolds number, Re = 100, and in a wind tunnel of computing these fields is presented. In addition, we generalize the immersed boundary projec- tion method

Rowley, Clarence W.

391

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Total Energy USA...

392

Probability Tables for Mendelian Ratios with Small Numbers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-called ex- Total ...-...-..-..-....-.--. .9999 pected may lead to error in interpretation rather than serving as a valuable aid as it does with large numbers. Examples with other small numbers could be given, but this should iIIustrate the points... is set off so as to show the point beyond which the total probability in that direction is .0050 or less. Mendelian Ratios Combi- 1 130 121 112 10 3 9 4 8 5 7 6 6 7 5 8 4 9 3 10 2 11 .On95 0028 .O002 .. -- I ---- - 1 12 .0016 .0004...

Warwick, B. L. (Bruce L.)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Leica TCRA1105 Reflectorless Total Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster provides an overview of SLAC's TCRA1105 reflectorless total station for the Alignment Engineering Group. This instrument has shown itself to be very useful for planning new construction and providing quick measurements to difficult to reach or inaccessible surfaces.

Gaudreault, F.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

394

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA SÃ?RENSEN in this paper provides a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback been built and the experiments verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation

Skogestad, Sigurd

395

Total Solar Irradiance Satellite Composites and their  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 12 Total Solar Irradiance Satellite Composites and their Phenomenological Effect on Climate. Phenomenological solar signature on climate 310 9. Conclusion 312 1. INTRODUCTION A contiguoustotal solar from each other, in particular about whether the TSI minimum during solar Cycles 22e23 (1995

Scafetta, Nicola

396

POLAR FIELD REVERSAL OBSERVATIONS WITH HINODE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have been monitoring yearly variation in the Sun's polar magnetic fields with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode to record their evolution and expected reversal near the solar maximum. All magnetic patches in the magnetic flux maps are automatically identified to obtain the number density and magnetic flux density as a function of the total magnetic flux per patch. The detected magnetic flux per patch ranges over four orders of magnitude (10{sup 15}-10{sup 20} Mx). The higher end of the magnetic flux in the polar regions is about one order of magnitude larger than that of the quiet Sun, and nearly that of pores. Almost all large patches ({>=}10{sup 18} Mx) have the same polarity, while smaller patches have a fair balance of both polarities. The polarity of the polar region as a whole is consequently determined only by the large magnetic concentrations. A clear decrease in the net flux of the polar region is detected in the slow rising phase of the current solar cycle. The decrease is more rapid in the north polar region than in the south. The decrease in the net flux is caused by a decrease in the number and size of the large flux concentrations as well as the appearance of patches with opposite polarity at lower latitudes. In contrast, we do not see temporal change in the magnetic flux associated with the smaller patches (<10{sup 18} Mx) and that of the horizontal magnetic fields during the years 2008-2012.

Shiota, D. [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN (Institute of Physics and Chemical Research), Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tsuneta, S.; Shimojo, M.; Orozco Suarez, D.; Ishikawa, R. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sako, N., E-mail: shiota@riken.jp [Department of Astronomical Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Number  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY STATUS REPORT on Implementation of NEP Recommendations January, 2005 1 NEP RECOMMENDATIONS: STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION Chapter 1 1. That the President issue an Executive Order to direct all federal agencies to include in any regulatory action that could significantly and adversely affect energy supplies, distribution, or use, a detailed statement of energy effects and alternatives in submissions to the Office of Management and Budget of proposed regulations covered and all notices of proposed regulations published in the Federal Register. STATUS: IMPLEMENTED. In May 2001, President Bush issued Executive Order 13211 requiring federal agencies to include, in any regulatory action that could significantly and

398

NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SWMU 161 C-743 Trainina Trailer Comolex- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: . REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southwest of C-743 building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 feet wide by 200 feet...

399

Golden Field Office Contacts | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

U.S. Department of Energy Golden Field Office 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 Main Number: 720-356-1800 Main Fax: 720-356-1750 Golden Field Office Key...

400

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

BLM Ukiah Field Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name: BLM Ukiah Field Office Address: 2550 North State Street Place: Ukiah, CA Zip: 95482 Phone Number: (707) 468-4000 Website: http:www.blm.govcastenfo...

402

A Note on Fuzzy Real and Complex Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the concept of fuzzy field, we have considered the fuzzy field of real and complex numbers and thereafter we have established a few standard results of real and complex numbers with respect to a membership function.

T. K. Samanta

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

403

Category:Field Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Techniques Field Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Field Techniques page? For detailed information on Field Techniques as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Field Techniques Add.png Add a new Field Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. D [×] Data Collection and Mapping‎ 5 pages F [+] Field Sampling‎ (2 categories) 4 pages Pages in category "Field Techniques" The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. D Data Collection and Mapping F Field Sampling H Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) P Portable X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Field_Techniques&oldid=689815"

404

ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Shortwave broadband total downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy that comes from some continuous range of directions, at wavelengths between 0.4 and 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component BSRN : Baseline Solar Radiation Network

405

Total Neutron Scattering in Vitreous Silica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of Corning superpure vitreous silica glass has been investigated with neutrons. A new method of analysis using variable neutron wavelengths and the measurement of total scattering cross sections from transmission experiments is developed and the results are compared with those from differential x-ray scattering. The total neutron scattering method permits a simple and direct structure analysis with resolution apparently superior to x-rays. The preliminary results compare well in a first approximation analysis with the basic structure model of Warren and others and in addition the neutron-determined atomic radial distribution curve exhibits some finer details than the x-ray results. Thermal inelastic scattering of neutrons was corrected for in an approximate way.

R. J. Breen; R. M. Delaney; P. J. Persiani; A. H. Weber

1957-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) Tropical Africa: Total Forest Biomass (By Country) image Brown, S., and G. Gaston. 1996. Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates For 1980. ORNL/CDIAC-92, NDP-055. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. More Maps Calculated Actual Aboveground Live Biomass in Forests (1980) Maximum Potential Biomass Density Land Use (1980) Area of Closed Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Closed Forests (By County) Area of Open Forests (By Country) Mean Biomass of Open Forests (By County) Percent Forest Cover (By Country) Population Density - 1990 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1980 (By Administrative Unit) Population Density - 1970 (By Administrative Unit)

407

Improved selection in totally monotone arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper's main result is an O(({radical}{bar m}lgm)(n lg n) + mlg n)-time algorithm for computing the kth smallest entry in each row of an m {times} n totally monotone array. (A two-dimensional A = a(i,j) is totally monotone if for all i{sub 1} < i{sub 2} and j{sub 1} < j{sup 2}, < a(i{sub 1},j{sub 2}) implies a(i{sub 2},j{sub 1})). For large values of k (in particular, for k=(n/2)), this algorithm is significantly faster than the O(k(m+n))-time algorithm for the same problem due to Kravets and Park. An immediate consequence of this result is an O(n{sup 3/2} lg{sup 2}n)-time algorithm for computing the kth nearest neighbor of each vertex of a convex n-gon. In addition to the main result, we also give an O(n lg m)-time algorithm for computing an approximate median in each row of an m {times} n totally monotone array; this approximate median is an entry whose rank in its row lies between (n/4) and (3n/4) {minus} 1. 20 refs., 3 figs.

Mansour, Y. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Aiken Computation Lab.); Park, J.K. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Schieber, B. (International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center); Sen, S. (AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

EQUUS Total Return Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EQUUS Total Return Inc EQUUS Total Return Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EQUUS Total Return Inc Place Houston, Texas Product A business development company and VC investor that trades as a closed-end fund. EQUUS is managed by MCC Global NV, a Frankfurt stock exchange listed management and merchant banking group. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

409

Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2008  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Type: Maximum Fee 3,129,570 175,160 377,516 1,439,287 Fee Available 175,160 80,871 Accelerated Remediation Company (aRc) DE-AT30-07CC60013 Contractor: Contract Number:...

410

Table B15. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999" 5. Number of Establishments in Building, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",67338,43343,10582,3574,3260,4811,1769 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5358,857,"Q","Q","Q",512 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,5952,1630,137,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,7812,1982,784,"Q","Q",296

411

On the Number of Views of Polyhedral Scenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is known that a scene consiing of k convex polyhedra of total complexity n has at most O(n4 k2) distinct orthographic views, and that the number of such views is ¿((nk2 + n2)2) ...

Boris Aronov; Hervé Brönnimann; Dan Halperin; Robert Schiffenbauer

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Total solar house description and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial attempt to apply the Total Solar concept to a residence in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, area is described. A very large storage capacity has made it possible to use only solar energy for meeting the heating, cooling and hot water needs for the entire year, with a parasitic power penalty of about 3500 kWh. Winter temperatures were maintained at 68/sup 0/F with 60/sup 0/F night setback, summer at 76/sup 0/F. Occupant intervention was negligible and passive overheat was minimized. The extra cost for the system, approximately $30,000 is readily amortized by the savings in purchased energy.

Starobin, L. (Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia); Starobin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Neutron Total Cross Sections at 20 Mev  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the T(d, n)He4 reaction as a monoenergetic source of neutrons of about 20 Mev, the total cross sections of 13 elements have been measured by a transmission experiment. These cross sections vary approximately as A23 as is to be expected from the continuum theory of nuclear reactions. The cross section for hydrogen at 19.93 Mev is 0.504±0.01 barn. This result, together with other results at lower energies, seems to require a Yukawa potential in both the singlet and triplet n-p states and a singlet effective range that is lower than that obtained from p-p scattering data.

Robert B. Day and Richard L. Henkel

1953-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

RNG: A Practitioner's Overview Random Number Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RNG: A Practitioner's Overview Random Number Generation A Practitioner's Overview Prof. Michael and Monte Carlo Methods Pseudorandom number generation Types of pseudorandom numbers Properties of these pseudorandom numbers Parallelization of pseudorandom number generators New directions for SPRNG Quasirandom

Mascagni, Michael

415

VOLUME 78, NUMBER 5 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 3 FEBRUARY 1997 Steady-State Confinement of Non-neutral Plasmas by Rotating Electric Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. This process is analogous to an in- duction motor, since the applied electric field both creates and couples-State Confinement of Non-neutral Plasmas by Rotating Electric Fields X.-P. Huang,* F. Anderegg, E. M. Hollmann, C. F "rotating wall" electric fields to spin up a non-neutral plasma in a Penning-Malmberg trap, resulting

California at San Diego, University of

416

Motion at low Reynolds number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The work described in this thesis centers on inertialess motion at low Reynolds numbers at the crossroad between biofluids and microfluids. Here we address questions regarding locomotion of micro-swimmers, transport of ...

Tam, Daniel See Wai, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

418

Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

419

Total Pollution Effect and Total Energy Cost per Output of Different Products for Polish Industrial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years a broad use has been made of the indices of total energy requirements in the whole large production system corresponding to unit output of particular goods (Boustead I., Hancock G.F., 1979). The...

Henryk W. Balandynowicz

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: End Use: Total Commercial Industrial Oil Company Electric Power Vessel Bunkering Military All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 10,706,479 8,341,552 6,908,028 7,233,765 6,358,120 6,022,115 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 5,527,235 4,043,975 2,972,575 2,994,245 2,397,932 2,019,294 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 614,965 435,262 281,895 218,926 150,462 101,957 1984-2012 Connecticut 88,053 33,494 31,508 41,686 6,534 5,540 1984-2012 Maine 152,082 110,648 129,181 92,567 83,603 49,235 1984-2012 Massachusetts 300,530 230,057 59,627 52,228 34,862 30,474 1984-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ........................... 1,870 1,276 322 138 133 43.0 29.4 7.4 3.2 3.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 243 151 34 40 18 78.7 48.9 11.1 13.0 5.7 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 202 139 31 29 Q 54.8 37.6 8.5 7.9 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 300 240 31 21 7 42.5 34.1 4.4 3.0 1.1 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 250 182 40 11 Q 41.5 30.2 6.6 1.9 Q 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 236 169 41 8 19 35.4 25.2 6.2 1.2 2.8 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 241 165 54 7 16 36.3 24.8 8.1 1.0 2.4 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 199 130 42 11 16 35.0 22.8 7.5 1.9 2.8 Over 500,000 ............................. 198

422

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ............................. 2,037 1,378 338 159 163 42.0 28.4 7.0 3.3 3.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 249 156 35 41 18 78.6 49.1 11.0 12.9 5.6 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 218 147 32 31 7 54.8 37.1 8.1 7.9 1.7 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 343 265 34 25 18 43.8 33.9 4.4 3.2 2.3 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 270 196 41 13 Q 40.9 29.7 6.3 2.0 2.9 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 269 186 45 13 24 35.8 24.8 6.0 1.8 3.2 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 267 182 56 10 19 35.4 24.1 7.4 1.3 2.6 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 204 134 43 11 17 34.7 22.7 7.3 1.8 2.9 Over 500,000 .............................

423

Total assessment audits (TAA) in Iowa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Traditionally, energy, waste reduction and productivity audits are performed for a manufacturing facility independent of one another. Auditors generally deliver recommendations for improvement based on their specialized expertise (energy, waste reduction, productivity, etc.) without regard to how those recommendations may impact other, sometimes less obvious, subsystems or processes within the facility. The audits are typically performed in isolation from the plant upper management and commonly without adequate knowledge of how inherent interrelated operational constraints may directly or indirectly influence the success of audit recommendations. The Total Assessment Audit (TAA) concept originated from the belief that a manufacturing facility is better served using a holistic approach to problem solving rather than the more conventional isolated approach. The total assessment audit methodology partners the upper management team of a company with a multi-disciplined team of industry-specific specialists to collectively ascertain the core opportunities for improvement in the company and then to formulate a company oriented continuous improvement plan. Productivity, waste reduction, and energy efficiency objectives are seamlessly integrated into a single service delivery with the TAA approach. Nontraditional audit objectives that influence profitability and competitiveness such as business management practices, employee training, human resource issues, etc. are also subject to evaluation in a TAA. The underlying premise of this approach is that the objectives are interrelated and that simultaneous evaluation will province synergistic results. Ultimately, it is believed that the TAA approach can motivate a manufacturer to implement improvements it might not otherwise pursue if it were focused only on singular objectives.

Haman, W.G.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,626 7,904,858 8,113,034 8,313,776 1990's 8,497,848 8,634,774 8,680,613 8,726,187 8,790,733 8,865,541 8,969,308 9,060,473 9,181,928 9,331,206 2000's 9,370,797 9,603,122 9,726,642 9,803,311 9,957,412 10,124,433 10,329,224 10,439,220 10,515,162 10,510,950 2010's 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Residential

425

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

426

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

427

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

428

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

429

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

430

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

431

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

432

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

433

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

434

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

435

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

436

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

437

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

438

Title, Location, Document Number Estimated Cost Description  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moody to Lev, SUBJECT: NEPA 2012 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: JAN 25 2012 Moody to Lev, SUBJECT: NEPA 2012 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: JAN 25 2012 Title, Location, Document Number Estimated Cost Description EA Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain EA Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $65,000 Annual NEPA Planning Summary NEPA Reviews of Proposals to Implement Enterprise SRS Initiatives unknown The Savannah River Site Strategic Plan for 2011 - 2015 describes 12 initiatives that Enterprise SRS will pursue by applying SRS's management core competencies in nuclear materials. Implementation of new missions resulting from this effort will likely require NEPA review. However, until firm proposals are developed

439

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

440

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................

442

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 241,776 224,560 224,112 194,121 212,276 From Oil Wells.................................................. 60,444 56,140 56,028 48,530 53,069 Total................................................................... 302,220 280,700 280,140 242,651 265,345 Repressuring ...................................................... 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 2,340 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 3,324 Wet After Lease Separation................................

443

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 81,545 81,723 88,259 87,608 94,259 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

444

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 98,551 97,272 97,154 87,993 85,018 From Oil Wells.................................................. 6,574 2,835 6,004 5,647 5,458 Total................................................................... 105,125 100,107 103,158 93,641 90,476 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 105,125 100,107 103,158

445

Property:WellFieldParasiticConsump | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name WellFieldParasiticConsump Property Type Number Description Well-Field Parasitic Consumption (MWh). Pages using the property "WellFieldParasiticConsump" Showing 2 pages using...

446

Conditional preparation of states containing a definite number of photons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A technique for conditionally creating single- or multimode photon-number states is analyzed using Bayesian theory. We consider the heralded N-photon states created from the photons produced by an unseeded optical parametric amplifier when the heralding detector is the time-multiplexed photon-number-resolving detector recently demonstrated by Fitch, et al. [Phys. Rev. A 68, 043814 (2003).] and simultaneously by Achilles, et al. [Opt. Lett. 28, 2387 (2003).]. We find that even with significant loss in the heralding detector, fields with sub-Poissonian photon-number distributions can be created. We also show that heralded multimode fields created using this technique are more robust against detector loss than are single-mode fields.

Malcolm N. O'Sullivan; Kam Wai Clifford Chan; Vasudevan Lakshminarayanan; Robert W. Boyd

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

447

Tidal Love Numbers of Neutron Stars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a variety of fully relativistic polytropic neutron star models we calculate the star's tidal Love number k{sub 2}. Most realistic equations of state for neutron stars can be approximated as a polytrope with an effective index n {approx} 0.5-1.0. The equilibrium stellar model is obtained by numerical integration of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkhov equations. We calculate the linear l = 2 static perturbations to the Schwarzschild spacetime following the method of Thorne and Campolattaro. Combining the perturbed Einstein equations into a single second-order differential equation for the perturbation to the metric coefficient g{sub tt} and matching the exterior solution to the asymptotic expansion of the metric in the star's local asymptotic rest frame gives the Love number. Our results agree well with the Newtonian results in the weak field limit. The fully relativistic values differ from the Newtonian values by up to {approx}24%. The Love number is potentially measurable in gravitational wave signals from inspiralling binary neutron stars.

Hinderer, Tanja [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: tph25@cornell.edu

2008-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

Total production of uranium concentrate in the United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States 2. Number of uranium mills and plants producing uranium concentrate in the United States Uranium Concentrate Processing Facilities End of 1996 End of 1997 End of 1998 End of 1999 End of 2000 End of 2001 End of 2002 End of 2003 End of 2004 End of 2005 End of 2006 End of 2007 End of 2008 End of 2009 End of 2010 End of 2011 End of 2012 End of 3rd Quarter 2013 Mills - conventional milling1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 Mills - other operators2 2 3 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 In-Situ-Leach Plants3 5 6 6 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 5 5 6 3 4 5 5 5 Byproduct Recovery Plants4 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total 9 11 9 7 6 4 3 2 3 4 6 6 7 4 5 6 6 6

449

Ca rlsbad Field Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

En ergy En ergy Ca rlsbad Field Office P. O . Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 AUG 2 9 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling , Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Class 1 Permit Modification to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF

450

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations, 1992--1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1995. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sum (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measured do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Total Blender Net Input of Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Input Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquid Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Oxygenates/Renewables Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

452

Provides Total Tuition Charge to Source Contribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contribution 10 4 * 1,914 1,550 364 15 6 3 2,871 2,326 545 20 8 4 3,828 3,101 727 25 10 5 4,785 3,876 909 30 12,752 1,818 TGR 4-20 0-3 2,871 2,871 - % of time appointed Hours of Work/Week Units TAL Provides Total,742 4,651 1,091 75 30 5 4,785 3,876 909 80 32 4 3,828 3,101 727 85 34 3 2,871 2,326 545 90 36 3 2,871 2

Kay, Mark A.

453

Serck standard packages for total energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the principle of combined heat and power generation is attractive, practical problems have hindered its application. In the U.K. the scope for ‘small scale’ combined heat and power (total energy) systems has been improved markedly by the introduction of new Electricity Board regulations which allow the operation of small a.c. generators in parallel with the mains low voltage supply. Following this change, Serck have developed a standard total energy unit, the CG100, based on the 2.25 1 Land Rover gas engine with full engine (coolant and exhaust gas) heat recovery. The unit incorporates an asynchronous generator, which utilising mains power for its magnetising current and speed control, offers a very simple means of generating electricity in parallel with the mains supply, without the need for expensive synchronising controls. Nominal output is 15 kW 47 kW heat; heat is available as hot water at temperatures up to 85°C, allowing the heat output to be utilised directly in low pressure hot water systems. The CG100 unit can be used in any application where an appropriate demand exists for heat and electricity, and the annual utilisation will give an acceptable return on capital cost; it produces base load heat and electricity, with LPHW boilers and the mains supply providing top-up/stand-by requirements. Applications include ‘residential’ use (hospitals, hotels, boarding schools, etc.), swimming pools and industrial process systems. The unit also operates on digester gas produced by anaerobic digestion of organic waste. A larger unit based on a six cylinder Ford engine (45 kWe output) is now available.

R. Kelcher

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Selected peer-reviewed publications (in chronological order). Total number of publications from 1988 to 2010 is 71.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1. S.L. Edwards, J.M. Mauro, L.A. Fishel, J. Wang, M.A. Miller, N.H. Xuong, J. Kraut. (1988). Where. J. Wang, J.M. Mauro, S.L. Edwards, S.T. Oatley, L.A. Fishel, V.A. Ashford, Ng.-H. Xuong, J. Kraut.M. Mauro, J. Wang, L.A. Fishel, J. Kraut, T.G. Spiro (1990). Single-crystal resonance Raman spectroscopy

455

Date/Time: Friday 16 Sept: to // Saturday 17 Sept: to Number of search hours (total): hours (Fri) // hours (Sat)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Common Reed Phragmites australis 30 Common Sowthistle Sonchus oleraceus 31 Curly Dock Rumex crispus 32

Columbia University

456

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 20.3 14.8 1.2 0.6 0.9 2.8 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 57.8 49.2 2.9 1.2 1.4 3.0 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 37.0 30.5 2.2 0.8 1.1 2.4 2.............................................................. 16.2 13.1 11.6 0.6 0.2 Q 0.4 3 or More................................................. 9.0 7.7 7.2 Q Q Q Q Number of Laptop PCs 1.............................................................. 22.5 17.0 14.7 1.0 0.4 0.4 0.5 2.............................................................. 4.0 3.3 3.0 Q Q Q Q 3 or More................................................. 0.7 0.5 0.5 Q N N Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor).......................

457

Million U.S. Housing Units Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ............... 35.5 15.3 3.0 1.9 3.1 6.4 0.8 Use a Personal Computer............................. 75.6 17.7 5.0 1.6 2.8 8.0 0.4 Number of Desktop PCs 1.............................................................. 50.3 13.3 3.4 0.9 2.2 6.5 0.3 2.............................................................. 16.2 3.1 1.1 0.3 0.5 1.2 Q 3 or More................................................. 9.0 1.3 0.5 0.3 Q 0.3 N Number of Laptop PCs 1.............................................................. 22.5 5.5 1.3 0.4 0.9 2.7 Q 2.............................................................. 4.0 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 N 3 or More................................................. 0.7 Q N Q Q Q N Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor).......................

458

Photon number density operator iE^?A^  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A photon number density operator proportional to the dot product of the electric field and the vector potential is introduced as an alternative to the Mandel operator. In the Lorentz gauge it is the time component of the four-vector obtained by contracting the electromagnetic field tensor with the vector potential. Its other components can be interpreted as a current-density vector, and these number and current-density operators satisfy a continuity equation. The photon density operators introduced here are all products of operators that satisfy Maxwell’s equations and whose Lorentz and gauge transformation properties are well known.

M. Hawton and T. Melde

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Category:Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Field Sampling page? For detailed information on Field Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Field Sampling Add.png Add a new Field Sampling Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G [×] Gas Sampling‎ 3 pages W [×] Water Sampling‎ 2 pages Pages in category "Field Sampling" The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. G Gas Sampling R Rock Sampling S Soil Sampling W Water Sampling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Field_Sampling&oldid=689818" Category: Field Techniques

460

Document ID Number: RL-721  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform an outdoor, terrestrial ecological research study to attempt to control and deter nesting birds at the 241-C Tank Farm. This will be a preventative study to test possible methods for controlling &/or minimizing the presence and impacts of nesting birds inside the tank farm. A nesting bird

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

On rings of structural numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structural numbers over the set X, and let B(X) have the operations defined above with equality also as before. Theorem I. l. If X is any set, then B(X) is a commutative ring with identity. Proof. The structural number 0 is the additive identity element... with identity g. Definition I. 7. If A, B e S(X) then A'B = (P U q ( p e A, q e B, p Il q = &f and p U q can be formed in an odd number of ways). ~E1 t. 4. L t A = (( . b), (bj. 7 )) 4 B = ((b, c), (b), (a)) be in S(X) for some X. Then AD B = {{b, a), {a...

Powell, Wayne Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Enantioselective total syntheses of acylfulvene, irofulven, and the agelastatins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (-)-Acylfulvene, and (-)-Irofulven We report the enantioselective total synthesis of (-)-acylfulvene and (-)-irofulven, which features metathesis reactions for the rapid assembly of ...

Siegel, Dustin S. (Dustin Scott), 1980-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Price of Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Lake Charles, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Total Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

464

Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

-- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

465

California Onshore Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted in California...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Liquids Extracted in California (Thousand Barrels) California Onshore Natural Gas Total Liquids Extracted in California (Thousand Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

466

Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity Depletion Coupled to SRM: Correlation with Clinical Immunoassay Tests. Analysis of Serum Total and Free PSA Using Immunoaffinity...

467

Exploring Total Power Saving from High Temperature of Server Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Temperature Total system power (%) Cooling power (%)Total system power (%) Cooling power (%) JunctionTo simulate the cooling power consumption at different

Lai, Liangzhen; Chang, Chia-Hao; Gupta, Puneet

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 National Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Overview: Total Energy USA 2012 Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the...

469

The Theory of Quantized Fields. VI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper treats the effect of a time-independent external electromagnetic field upon a Dirac field by constructing the transformation function in a representation adapted to the external field. In addition to the alteration of the Green's function, the structure of the transformation function differs from that of the zero field situation by a factor which describes the energy of the modified vacuum state. A formula for the vacuum energy is obtained and expressed in a form appropriate to a localized field, in terms of the energy eigenvalues of discrete modes, and of the phase shifts associated with continuum modes. Determinantal methods are then introduced, and the class of fields is established for which a certain frequency-dependent modified determinant is an integral function of the parameter measuring the strength of the field. The properties of the determinant are investigated in the two frequency regions |p0|m, with regard to the zeros of the real determinant in the former region, which are the frequencies of the discrete modes, and to the phase of the complex determinant in the latter region. In the second situation, a connection is established with a unitary matrix defined for modes of a given frequency, and the phase of the determinant is expressed in terms of the eigenphases of this matrix. Following a discussion of the asymptotic behavior of the determinant as a function of p0, the modified determinant is constructed in terms of the discrete mode energies and of the eigenphases. This yields a more precise version of the vacuum energy formula, in which a single divergent parameter is exhibited, for a suitable class of fields.The scattering description is introduced by an evaluation of the Green's function, for a sufficiently large time interval, in terms of the discrete modes, and of linear combinations of free particle modes expressed by a unitary matrix which is an extension of that referring to modes of a single frequency. Transition probabilities are derived and summarized in a generating function that serves to evaluate occupation number expectation values for the final state, upon which is based the definition of differential and total scattering cross sections. A discussion is presented of various symmetry operations and the resulting properties of cross sections. Then, a determinantal formula for the individual transition probabilities is used to examine the probability for the persistence of a state, in its dependence upon occupation numbers. An incidental result of this analysis is a qualitative upper limit to total cross sections in relation to the character of the angular distribution. A section is devoted to the properties of eigenphases, including the demonstration of equivalence between phase shifts and eigenphases, and the discussion of alternative procedures for their evaluation in terms of quantities exhibited as convergent power series in the potential. Finally, the determinantal asymptotic behavior is used to obtain a high-energy approximation to the eigenphases for an isotropic scalar potential. The resulting high energy, small angle, form of the scattering cross section is discussed in the extreme quantum and classical limits. An alternative derivation of the high-energy scattering formula is provided in terms of an approximate construction of the Green's function.

Julian Schwinger

1954-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Coherence of neutron fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glauber's definition of quantum coherence is used for neutron fields under the assumption that the complete occupation number space is a direct product of Fermi subspaces. As a result, completely coherent microfields are obtained which define a density operator in full analogy to Glauber's P representation of boson fields. For better physical significance, a transformation from the P representation to a momentum representation is performed. It is proved that the second-order coherence function in this representation is equivalent to Wolf's second-order coherence function of a classical Dirac field. Finally, the results of the theory are used to calculate explicitly the second-order coherence function and the coherence time of an ideally collimated neutron beam.

E. Ledinegg and E. Schachinger

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Broken gauge symmetry in a Bose gas with constant particle number  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of broken gauge symmetries in Bose-Einstein condensates is still controversially discussed in science, since it would not conserve the total number of particles. Here, it is shown for the first time that non-random condensate and non-condensate phase distributions may arise from local particle number breaking in a Bose gas with constant particle number, while the global U(1)-gauge symmetry of the system is preserved due to particle number conservation.

Alexej Schelle

2014-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

472

Response: Issue Numbers and Librarianship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...some time. Put back the issue number. ALISON BAKER Librawy Jackson Laboratot), Bar...passage in which he supposes some unusually wise ape-like animal to have first thought...the approving nods and kindly grunts ofmy wise and most respected chief. And now I feel...

DANIEL E. KOSHLAND; JR.

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

473

Benchmark quality total atomization energies of small polyatomic Jan M. L. Martin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benchmark quality total atomization energies of small polyatomic molecules Jan M. L. Martin Successive coupled-cluster CCSD T calculations in basis sets of spdf, spdfg, and spdfgh quality, combined with separate Schwartz-type extrapolations A B/(l 1/2) of the self-consistent field SCF and correlation energies

Martin, Jan M.L.

474

The structure of the real and complex numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Then there exists z such that z 5 [Z] and z f [YJ . Furthermore X F S implies z F [X] and hence t K [X"j implies z & t. Thus z Q [Y] which is contradictory. ~T~og~2. 8 The real numbers form a complete ordered field. 5 See Appendix 5 Garrett Birkhoff... cf both systems are exhibited. f'rom the viewpoint of abstract algebra. Order is defined for the real numbers and its properties developed therefrom. Theorem 3. 20 demonstrates that the complex numbers cannot be algebraically ordered. Theorem 2. 2...

Linnstaedter, Jerry Leroy

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

476

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians method to compute Betti numbers of sim- plicial complexes. This has a number of advantages over are the Betti numbers, the i-th Betti number, bi= bi(X), being the rank of Hi(X). The Betti numbers often have

Friedman, Joel

477

GyroLAG—fluxgate magnetic total field, vectors, and tensors mapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Endurance (hrs) 3.8 to 5 Fuel consumption (L/hr) 18 to 24 Aircraft...speed of 100 km/hr) Engine type 914 Rotax turbo...rotor system. The final engine-of-choice for the...dual-redundant ignition and fuel injection systems are...

L. Ameglio; G. Jacobs; J. von Ludwig; M. Munschy

478

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752 Rosslyn, VA 22209

479

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752

480

RL·721 Document ID Number:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: REV 3 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00045 . J.proj(;l~t Titl~: - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- --------- ------_. . _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - LIMITED FIREBREAK MAINTENANCE ON THE HANFORD SITE DURING CALENDAR YEAR 2012 II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to perform firebreak maintenance in selected areas of the Hanford Site during calendar year 2012 with limited use of physical, chemical, and prescribed burning methods. Prescribed burning will be performed by the Hanford Fire Department under approved burn plans and permits; and only in previously disturbed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fields total number" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Number-phase uncertainty relations: Verification by balanced homodyne measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that fundamental uncertainty relations between photon number and canonical phase of a single-mode optical field can be verified by means of a balanced homodyne measurement. All the relevant quantities can be sampled directly from the measured phase-dependent quadrature distribution.

T. Opatrný; M. Dakna; D.-G. Welsch

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Nuevos materiales en artroplastia total de cadera  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

La búsqueda de la longevidad de los implantes protésicos articulares es uno de los imperativos que más preocupan hoy día a los investigadores y a los cirujanos ortopédicos que trabajan en este campo. Efectivamente, cada día se afrontan pacientes de menor edad deseosos de seguir una actividad vital normal, incluso de participar regularmente en deportes con impactos o en tareas pesadas y de carga. En el caso de las artroplastias de cadera se ha conseguido un buen funcionamiento de las mismas, casi asegurado en los primeros 10 años tras su implantación; sin embargo, a partir de ese plazo la supervivencia decrece. El fracaso del implante suele sobrevenir por desgaste de sus componentes articulares o por pérdida de fijación al hueso huésped, estando ambas causas íntimamente relacionadas. En este artículo se revisan los materiales utilizados en superficies articulares y después se analizan los que entran a formar parte de la composición estructural del sustrato y de las superficies de fijación de la prótesis. The search for durable articular prosthetic implant materials is a concern to researchers and orthopedic surgeons working in this field. Patients are progressively younger and wish to continue their normal activities, including regular high-impact sports activities, as well as heavy tasks involving loading. In the case of hip replacements, their functionality is practically guaranteed in the first 10 years of service, but then their survival drops off. Implant failure usually occurs as a result of wear of the articular components or loss of fixation to the host bone, which are two intimately related causes. In the present review we examine the materials used on articular surfaces and then analyze those that form part of the structural composition of the substrate and the prosthesis-fixation surfaces.

M. Fernández-Fairén; F.J. Gil-Mur

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Receptor modeling assessment of particle total exposure assessment methodology data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from the 1991 Particle Total Exposure Assessment Methodology (PTEAM) study in Riverside, CA, were analyzed using a new receptor modeling method. In this study, ambient (outdoor), indoor, and personal particulate matter (PM) concentrations and elemental concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} were measured for a number of participants. These measurements made is possible to relate the pollution to which people were exposed throughout their daily activities with the outdoor air conditions. Personal daytime concentrations of the PM{sub 10} and majority of elements were significantly higher than outdoor or indoor concentrations, suggesting that a significant part of personal aerosol exposure is the result of personal daily activities. Possible sources of additional particulate mass include resuspension of particles that penetrate from the outdoors and formation of new particles during cooking, smoking, etc. Positive matrix factorization analysis was performed to describe the sources of personal exposure. To identify relative contribution of different sources, regression of the particulate matter mass against the factor contributions was performed. Major sources of PM{sub 2.5} were oil combustion, nonferrous metal operations, and motor vehicles. The mass contributions of particles from these sources were similar for outdoor air and personal exposure. Personal exposure to particles from these sources can be controlled by changing outdoor sources. The primary source of PM{sub 10} was soil.

Yakovleva, E.; Hopke, P.K.; Wallace, L.

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

484

Magnetic field control of the intraband optical absorption in two-dimensional quantum rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of the two-dimensional semiconductor ring in the perpendicular magnetic field B are calculated within independent electron approximation. Characteristic feature of the energy spectrum are crossings of the levels with adjacent nonpositive magnetic quantum numbers as the intensity B changes. It is shown that the absorption coefficient of the associated optical transition is drastically decreased at the fields corresponding to the crossing. Proposed model of the Volcano disc allows to get simple mathematical analytical results, which provide clear physical interpretation. An interplay between positive linear and intensity-dependent negative cubic absorption coefficients is discussed; in particular, critical light intensity at which additional resonances appear in the total absorption dependence on the light frequency is calculated as a function of the magnetic field and levels' broadening.

Olendski, O., E-mail: oolendski@ksu.edu.sa [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2454, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Barakat, T., E-mail: tbarakat@ksu.edu.sa [Department of Physics, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2454, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

485

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Joel Friedman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians Joel Friedman Department of Mathematics 1984 Abstract We use the Laplacian and power method to compute Betti numbers of sim­ plicial complexes. This has are the Betti numbers, the i­th Betti number, b i = b i (X), being the rank of H i (X). The Betti numbers often

Friedman, Joel

486

Total Solar Irradiance Variability and the Solar Activity Cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is suggested that the solar variability is due to the perturbed nature of the solar core and this variability is provided by the variability of the solar neutrino flux from the solar neutrino detectors i.e., Homestake, Superkamiokande, SAGE and GALLEX-GNO. The solar neutrino flux in the standard solar model (SSM) was calculated on the assumption of L_nu (neutrino luminosity) = L_gamma (optical luminosity) which implies that if there is a change in optical luminosity then solar neutrino flux data will also be changed. An internal dynamo due to the cyclic variation of nuclear energy generation inside the core of the sun is responsible for the solar activity cycle was suggested and thus the internal magnetic field is also variable. Again the changes in the nuclear energy generation induce structural changes that result in variations of the global solar parameters i.e., luminosity, radius and temperatures etc. From the analysis of total solar irradiance (TSI) data during the year from 1970 to 2003 we have found five phases within the solar activity cycle. The first phase (I) starts before two years from the sunspot minimum. The second phase (II) starts at the time of sunspot minimum and phase (III) starts before 2/3 years from sunspot maximum whereas phase (IV) starts at sunspot maximum and fifth phase (V) starts at after 2-3 years from sunspot maximum.

Probhas Raychaudhuri

2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

487

Complete Embedded Minimal Surfaces of Finite Total David Hoffman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complete Embedded Minimal Surfaces of Finite Total Curvature David Hoffman Department-5300 Bonn, Germany July 18, 1994 Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 Basic theory and the global Weierstrass representation 4 2.1 Finite total curvature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 2

488

Colorado Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

489

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

490

Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals Total Offshore (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

491

Connecticut Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Connecticut Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

492

Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Connecticut Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

493

Project Functions and Activities Definitions for Total Project Cost  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This chapter provides guidelines developed to define the obvious disparity of opinions and practices with regard to what exactly is included in total estimated cost (TEC) and total project cost (TPC).

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

494

High field gradient particle accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

495

High field gradient particle accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Nevada Field Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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497

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00075 I. Project Title: Project 1-718, Electrical Utili ties Transformer Management Support Facility II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions -e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): The proposed action includes design, procurement, and construction of a pre-engineered metal building for transformer management; including inspections, routine maintenance, testing, refurbishing, and disposition of excess transformers. The building will be constructed in the previously disturbed, gravel-covered electrical utilities lay-down yard west of the 2101-M Building in 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The building footprint

498

NON-CLOSED CURVES IN Rn WITH FINITE TOTAL FIRST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

], and Kondo and Tanaka [14] have examined the global properties of the total curvature of a curveNON-CLOSED CURVES IN Rn WITH FINITE TOTAL FIRST CURVATURE ARISING FROM THE SOLUTIONS OF AN ODE P finite total first curvature. If all the roots of the associated characteristic polynomial are simple, we

Gilkey, Peter B

499

Total Cost of Ownership Considerations in Global Sourcing Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total Cost of Ownership Considerations in Global Sourcing Processes Robert Alard, Philipp Bremen and microeconomic aspects which can also be largely used independently. Keywords: Global Supply Networks, Total Cost of Ownership, Global Total Cost of Ownership, Global Procurement, Outsourcing, Supplier Evaluation, Country

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

500

GLOBAL RIGIDITY FOR TOTALLY NONSYMPLECTIC ANOSOV BORIS KALININ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL RIGIDITY FOR TOTALLY NONSYMPLECTIC ANOSOV Zk ACTIONS BORIS KALININ AND VICTORIA SADOVSKAYA by NSF grant DMS-0140513. Supported in part by NSF grant DMS-0401014. 1 #12;GLOBAL RIGIDITY FOR TOTALLY Abstract. We consider a totally nonsymplectic (TNS) Anosov action of Zk which is either uniformly

Sadovskaya, Victoria