Sample records for fields ks ne

  1. Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at 2:00 P.M.InnovationRADAGAST:Ne

  2. NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lake W ashington Ship Canal NE Pacific St. NE Pacific St. NE Boat St. 15th Ave NE 15thAveNE UniversityWayNE BrooklynAveNE NE Pacific St. MontlakeBlvdNE MontlakeBlvdNE Pacific Place NE University Burke-Gilman Trail METRO NW A CD D EF F GHI H J RR BB CC EE AA Rotunda Cafe Ocean Sciences Hitchcock

  3. 19Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-StateNovember 1997B β--Decay EvaluatedNe β+-Decay

  4. 19Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-StateNovember 1997B β--Decay EvaluatedNe β+-Decay

  5. 15Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-State Decay Evaluated Dataarge EC β--DecayFNp,Ne

  6. 16Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-State Decay Evaluated Dataarge EC15th1663ThermalNe

  7. Incompatible Statistics and Bell-KS Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ngel Rivas

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a possible loophole to the conclusion of the Bell-KS theorem that quantum mechanics is not compatible with any realistic and noncontextual or local theory. We emphasize that the models discarded by Bell-KS-like arguments possess a property not shared by quantum mechanics, i.e. the capability to make non-trivial statements about the joint statistics of quantum incompatible observables. By ruling out this possibility, apparently nothing seems to prevent from a realistic, noncontextual or local view of quantum mechanics.

  8. Multiphoton ionization and high-order harmonic generation of He, Ne, and Ar atoms in intense pulsed laser fields: Self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional theoretical approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Tong, Xiao-Min

    2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the multiphoton ionization and high-order harmonic generation (HHG) processes of rare-gas atoms (He, Ne, and Ar) in intense pulsed laser fields by means of a self-interaction-free time-dependent density...

  9. Reference Inside KS1992 Tray Inside Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Llope, William J.

    Reference Inside KS1992 0.2 Tray Inside Air 0.5 Tray Inside Air 0.8 Tray Inside Air 0.2 Tray Side Wall Inner 0.2 Tray Side Wall Inner Under TAMP near sensor pos4 Under TAMP near sensor pos4 Air Gap Below TDIG pos1 Air Gap Below TDIG pos4 Air Gap Below TDIG pos6 HPTDC1 Chip pos6 HPTDC4 Chip pos6 HPTDC2

  10. Quantum-fluid-dynamics approach for strong-field processes: Application to the study of multiphoton ionization and high-order harmonic generation of He and Ne atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I

    of the hydrodynamical density and wave function in space and time. The procedure is applied to the study of multiphoton for Ne, good agreement is achieved. Four different exchange-correlation energy functionals are used systems. Among these novel high-intensity phenomena, multiple high-order har- monic generation HHG

  11. Measurement of the KS->gg branching ratio using a pure KS beam with the KLOE detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The KLOE collaboration

    2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have searched for the decay KS->gg in a sample of 2x10^9 phi->KS KL decays collected at DAPHNE with an integrated luminosity of 1.9 fb^{-1}. KS are tagged by the KL interaction in the calorimeter. Two prompt photons must also be detected. Kinematic constraints reduce the initial 6x10^5 events to 2740 candidates, from which a signal of 711\\pm 35 events is extracted. By normalizing to the KS->2pi^0 decays counted in the same sample, we measure BR(KS->gg)= (2.26\\pm0.12_{stat}\\pm0.06_{syst})x10^{-6}, in agreement with O(p^4) Chiral Perturbation Theory predictions.

  12. BooNE: About BooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site MapSolar energy(cousin -in-lawHomeAbout BooNE

  13. Mass of Ne-16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodward, C. J.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tanner, D. M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . E. Tribble, J. D. Cossairt, D. P. May, and R. A. Kenefick, Phys. Rev. C 16, 1835 (1977). 4E. Kashy, W. Benenson, D. Mueller, R. G. H. Robert- son, and D. R. Goosman, Phys. Rev. C 11, 1959 (1975). 5For a review of the various calculations, see Ref...PHYSICAL REVIEWER C VOLUME 27, NUMBER 1 Mass of ' Ne JANUARY 1983 C. J. Woodward, * R. E. Tribble, and D. M. Tanner Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 23 August 1982) The mass of ' Ne has been...

  14. MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals fromprocess used in miningMicroBooNE MicroBooNE

  15. DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, April 6, 1992 Note: G-13 RF ENERGY LOSSES AND IMPEDANCE OF THE DA NE ACCUMULATOR RING VACUUM CHAMBER S. Bartalucci, L. Palumbo, M chamber. This field acts back on the beam and it is re- sponsible for energy losses and instabilities. We

  16. 19Ne.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-StateNovember 1997B β--Decay EvaluatedNe β+-Decay

  17. 19Ne_78.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-StateNovember 1997B β--Decay EvaluatedNe β+-Decay

  18. Investigation of the spatiotemporal characteristics of the electric field in the Ne-H{sub 2} plasma of a beam-type high-voltage pulsed discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demkin, V. P.; Mel'nichuk, S. V.; Borisov, A. V.; Bardin, S. S. [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)] [National Research Tomsk State University, 36, Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, the spatiotemporal dynamics of the electric field E(x, t) of plasma produced by a beam-type high-voltage pulsed discharge is investigated. The electric field strength E(x, t) in an accelerating gap and in a plasma flare was determined from the measured Stark splitting of the H{sub ?} hydrogen line. The obtained dependence E(x, t) was used to calculate the electron distribution function and the spectral line intensities in the accelerating gap and in the plasma flare by the method of statistical modeling. The calculated population of He atomic states excited by electron impact and their comparison with the measured spectral line intensities I(?, x, t) demonstrate that a reverse electric field retarding the electron motion and leading to electron beam degradation must be present in the plasma flare near the grid. Measurement of the field strength from the Stark splitting of the H{sub ?} line demonstrates that it can reach considerable values.

  19. Detection of Ks-excess stars in the 14Myr open cluster NGC4755

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonatto, C; Ortolani, S; Barbuy, B

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the structure, distribution of MS and PMS stars and dynamical state of the young open cluster NGC 4755. We explore the possibility that, at the cluster age, some MS and PMS stars still present infrared excesses related to dust envelopes and proto-planetary discs. The radial density profile follows King's law with a core radius $\\rm\\rc=0.7\\pm0.1 pc$ and a limiting radius $\\rm\\rl=6.9\\pm0.1 pc$; the cluster age is $\\rm14\\pm2 Myr$. Field-star decontamination reveals a low-MS limit at $\\rm\\approx1.4 \\ms$. The core MF ($\\chi=0.94\\pm0.16$) is flatter than the halo's ($\\chi=1.58\\pm0.11$). NGC 4755 contains $\\rm\\sim285$ candidate PMS stars of age $\\rm\\sim1 - 15 Myr$, and a few evolved stars. The mass locked up in PMS, MS and evolved stars amounts to $\\rm\\sim1150 \\ms$. Proper motions show that \\ks-excess MS and PMS stars are cluster members. \\ks-excess fractions in PMS and MS stars are $\\rm5.4\\pm2.1%$ and $\\rm3.9\\pm1.5%$ respectively, consistent with the cluster age. The core is deficient in PMS stars, as com...

  20. Ne pas confondre Absorption Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lige, Universit de

    Ne pas confondre Absorption Adsorption et Quand des molcules sont amenes en contact avec un'attachent simplement la surface du solide on parle d'adsorption. L'adsorption est donc le collage de molcules la surface d'un solide. Quand le charbon nettoie Principes physiques de l'adsorption Cdric Gommes

  1. Search for the CP symmetry violation in the decays of Ks mesons using the KLOE detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Silarski

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work was to determine the KS -> 3pi0 decay branching ratio and a modulus of the eta000 parameter, defined as the ratio of amplitudes for KS -> 3 pi0 to KL -> 3pi0 decays, which characterizes the CP symmetry violation in this decay. The measurement has been carried out with the KLOE detector operating at the phi-factory DAFNE in the Italian National Center for Nuclear Physics in Frascati. The KS mesons were identified with high efficiency via registration of these KL mesons which crossed the drift chamber without decaying and then interacted with the KLOE electromagnetic calorimeter. The KS four-momentum vector was then determined using the registered position of the KL meson and the known momentum of the phi meson. Next, the search for the KS -> 3pi0 -> 6gamma decay was carried out by the selection of events with six gamma quanta which momenta were reconstructed using time and energy measured by the electromagnetic calorimeter. To increase the signal over background ratio after identification of the KS meson and requiring six reconstructed photons a discriminant analysis is performed. It is based on kinematical fit, testing of the signal and background hypotheses and exploiting of the differences in kinematics of the KS decays into 2pi0 and 3pi0. Hence, we have obtained the upper limit on the KS -> 3pi0 branching ratio at the 90% confidence level BR(KS -> 3pi0)KS -> 3pi0 decay presented in this work failed to detect a signal of sufficient statistical significance. This upper limit can be translated into a limit on the modulus of the eta000 parameter amounting to: |eta000| < 0.009 at the 90% confidence level.

  2. NE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - Events - Fermilab atNovelNC

  3. Study of Penguin Pollution in the B^0 -> J/psi K_S Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Mishima

    2007-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the penguin pollution in the B^0 -> J/psi K_S decay up to leading power in 1/m_b and to next-to-leading order in \\alpha_s, m_b being the b quark mass and \\alpha_s the strong coupling constant. The deviation \\Delta S_{J/psi K_S} of the mixing-induced CP asymmetry from sin(2\\phi_1) and the direct CP asymmetry A_{J/psi K_S} are both found to be of O(10^{-3}) in a formalism that combines the QCD-improved factorization and perturbative QCD approaches.

  4. US NE MA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year69,023US Virgin120Mnt(N)NE MA

  5. Overview of NE Research Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of Bad CholesteroliManage Presentation3 DATE: March06-05-09 HSS/UnionNE

  6. NuSTAR DISCOVERY OF A CYCLOTRON LINE IN KS 1947+300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pottschmidt, Katja

    We present a spectral analysis of three simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopy Telescope Array and Swift/XRT observations of the transient Be-neutron star binary KS 1947+300 taken during its outburst in 2013/2014. These broadband ...

  7. Infrared features of KS fermion and Wilson fermion in Lattice Landau Gauge QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadataka Furui; Hideo Nakajima

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The running coupling and the Kugo-Ojima parameter of unquenched lattice Landau gauge are simulated and compared with the continuum theory. Presence of infrared fixed point of $\\alpha_0\\sim 2-2.5$ irrespective of the fermion actions (Wilson fermions and Kogut-Susskind(KS) fermions) in the continuum and in the chiral limit is suggested. Although there exists dependence on the polarization due to asymmetry of the lattice (time axis is longer than spacial axes), the Kugo-Ojima parameter $c$ is consistent with 1. Presence of $1+c_1/q^2$ correction factor in the running coupling depends on the lattice size and the sea quark mass. In the large lattice size and small sea quark mass, $c_1\\sim 2.8$GeV is confirmed. The MILC configuration of $a=0.09$fm suggests also presence of dimension 4 condensates with sign opposite to the dimension 2 condensates. The gluon propagator, the ghost propagator and the running coupling are compared with recent pQCD results including anomalous dimension of fields up to the 4-loop level.

  8. Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries in B0 -> Ks Pi0 gamma transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Abe; for the Belle Collaboration

    2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of CP-violation parameters in b -> s gamma transitions based on a sample of 386x10^6 BB pairs collected at the Y(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy-asymmetric e+e- collider. One neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in the B0 -> Ks Pi0 gamma decay channel irrespective to the Ks Pi0 intermediate state. The flavor of the accompanying B meson is identified from its decay products. CP-violation parameters are obtained from the asymmetries in the distributions of the proper-time intervals between the two B decays. We obtain the following results for the Ks Pi0 invariant mass covering the full range up to 1.8 GeV/c^2: S_{Ks Pi0 gamma} = +0.08 +-0.41(stat) +-0.10(syst), A_{Ks Pi0 gamma} = +0.12 +-0.27(stat) +-0.10(syst).

  9. Measurement of CP-Violating Asymmetries in the B0->K+K-Ks Dalitz Plot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a preliminary measurement of CP-violation parameters in the decay B0->K+K-Ks, using approximately 465 million BBbar events collected by the BABAR detector at SLAC. Reconstructing the neutral kaon as Ks->pi+pi- or Ks->pi0pi0, we analyze the Dalitz plot distribution and measure fractions to intermediate states. We extract CP parameters from the asymmetries in amplitudes and phases between B0 and B0bar decays across the Dalitz plot. From a fit to the whole Dalitz plot, we measure beta_eff = 0.44 +/- 0.07 +/- 0.02, A_CP = 0.03 +/- 0.07 +/- 0.02, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second ones are systematic. For decays to phiKs, we measure beta_eff = 0.13 +/- 0.13 +/- 0.02, A_CP = 0.14 +/- 0.19 +/- 0.02. For decays to f0Ks, we measure beta_eff = 0.15 +/- 0.13 +/- 0.03, A_CP = 0.01 +/- 0.26 +/- 0.07. From a fit to the region of the Dalitz plot with m_{K+K-}>1.1 GeV/c^2, we measure beta_eff = 0.52 +/- 0.08 +/- 0.03, A_CP = 0.05 +/- 0.09 +/- 0.04.

  10. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  11. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  12. The running coupling in lattice Landau gauge with unquenched Wilson fermion and KS fermion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadataka Furui; Hideo Nakajima

    2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The running coupling of the Wilson fermon(JLQCD/CP-PACS) and that of Kogut-Susskind(KS) fermion(MILC) are measured in the lattice Landau gauge QCD in $\\widetilde{MOM}$ scheme. The quark propagator of the KS fermion is also measured and we find that it is infrared suppressed. The renormalization factor of the running coupling and the tadpole renormalization define the scale of the quark wave function. Effects of the $A_\\mu^2$ condensates of a few GeV$^2$ are observed in the running coupling and also in the quark propagator.

  13. Dalitz analysis of D-0 -> K-S(0)pi(+)pi(-)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In e(+)e(-) collisions using the CLEO detector, we have studied the decay of the D-0 to the final state K(S)(0)pi(+)pi(-) with the initial flavor of the D-0 tagged by the decay D*+-->D(0)pi(+). We use the Dalitz technique to measure the resonant...

  14. Penguin pollution in the B^0 -> J/psi K_S decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiang-nan Li; Satoshi Mishima

    2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the most complete analysis of the penguin correction to the extraction of the standard-model parameter sin(2\\phi_1) from the B^0 -> J/psi K_S decay up to leading power in 1/m_b and to next-to-leading order in \\alpha_s, \\phi_1 being the weak phase, m_b the b quark mass, and \\alpha_s the strong coupling constant. The deviation \\Delta S_{J/psi K_S} of the mixing-induced CP asymmetry from sin(2\\phi_1) and the direct CP asymmetry A_{J/psi K_S} are both found to be of O(10^{-3}) in a formalism that combines the QCD-improved factorization and perturbative QCD approaches. The above results, different from those of O(10^{-4}) and of O(10^{-2}) obtained in the previous calculations, provide an important standard-model reference for verifying new physics from the B^0 -> J/psi K_S data.

  15. Observation of B -> K-S(0)pi(+)pi(-) and evidence for B -> K-*+/-pi(-/+)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for charmless hadronic B decays to the three-body final states K(S)(0)h(+)pi(-), K(+)h(-)pi(0), K(S)(0)h(+)pi(0) (h(+/-) denotes a charged pion or kaon), and their charge conjugates, using 13.5 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity...

  16. First observation and Dalitz analysis of the D-0 -> K-S(0)eta pi(0) decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 9.0 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in e(+)e(-) collisions near the Y(4S) mass collected with the CLEO II.V detector we report the first observation of the decay D-0-->K(S)(0)etapi(0). We measure the ratio of branching fractions, BR(D-0-->K(S...

  17. NE5534, NE5534A, SA5534. SA5534A LOW-NOISE OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    NE5534, NE5534A, SA5534. SA5534A LOW-NOISE OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS SLOS070C - JULY 1979 - REVISED5534. SA5534A LOW-NOISE OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS SLOS070C - JULY 1979 - REVISED SEPTEMBER 2004 3POST dc and ac characteristics. Some of the features include very low noise, high output-drive capability

  18. Morphology and structure of BzK-selected galaxies at z~2 in the CANDELS-COSMOS field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Guan-Wen; Chen, Yang; Kong, Xu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing a BzK-selected technique, we obtain 14550 star-forming galaxies (sBzKs) and 1763 passive galaxies (pBzKs) at z~2 from the K-selected (K<22.5) catalog in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field. The differential number counts of sBzKs and pBzKs are consistent with the results from the literature. Compared to the observed results, semi-analytic models of galaxy formation and evolution provide too few (many) galaxies at high (low)-mass end. Moreover, we find that the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass of sBzKs follow the relation of main sequence. Based on the HST/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) F160W imaging, we find a wide range of morphological diversities for sBzKs, from diffuse to early-type spiral structures, with relatively high M20, large size and low G, while pBzKs are elliptical-like compact morphologies with lower M20, smaller size and higher G, indicating the more concentrated and symmetric spatial extent of stellar population distribution in pBzKs than sBzKs. Furthermore, the sizes of pBzKs (sBz...

  19. New MiniBooNE Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelimir Djurcic

    2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab was designed to be a definitive test of the LSND evidence for neutrino oscillations and has recently reported first results of a search for electron-neutrino appearance in a muon-neutrino Booster beam. No significant excess of events was observed at higher energies, but a sizable excess of events was observed at lower energies. The lack of the excess at higher energies allowed MiniBooNE to rule out simple two-neutrino oscillations as an explanation of the LSND signal. However, the excess at lower energies is presently unexplained. A new data set of neutrinos from the NuMI beam line measured with the MiniBooNE detector at Fermilab has been analyzed. The measurement of NuMI neutrino interactions in MiniBooNE provide a clear proof-of-principle of the off-axis beam concept that is planned to be used by future neutrino experiments such as T2K and NOvA. Moreover, it complements the first oscillation results and will help to determine whether the lower-energy excess is due to background or to new physics. New results from the re-analysis of low energy excess from the Booster beam line and the results from measurements of neutrino interactions from NuMI beam line are discussed. MiniBooNE observes an unexplained excess of $128.8 \\pm 20.4 \\pm 38.3$ electron-like events in the energy region $200 < E_{\

  20. THSE DE DOCTORAT D'TAT ks SCIENCES PHYSIQUES A LA FACULT~DES SCtEtCES DE PARIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    TH?SE DE DOCTORAT D'?TAT ks SCIENCES PHYSIQUES présentée A LA FACULT~DES SCtEtüCES DE PARIS pour

  1. Quasielastic Scattering at MiniBooNE Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez-Ruso, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia (Spain); Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Fisica Computacional, Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal); Buss, O.; Leitner, T.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany)

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our description of neutrino induced charged current quasielastic scattering (CCQE) in nuclei at energies relevant for the MiniBooNE experiment. In our framework, the nucleons, with initial momentum distributions according to the Local Fermi Gas model, move in a density- and momentum-dependent mean field potential. The broadening of the outgoing nucleons due to nucleon-nucleon interactions is taken into account by spectral functions. Long range (RPA) correlations renormalizing the electroweak strength in the medium are also incorporated. The background from resonance excitation events that do not lead to pions in the final state is also predicted by propagating the outgoing hadrons with the Giessen semiclassical BUU model in coupled channels (GiBUU). We achieve a good description of the shape of the CCQE Q{sup 2} distribution extracted from data by MiniBooNE, thanks to the inclusion of RPA correlations, but underestimate the integrated cross section when the standard value of M{sub A} = 1 GeV is used. Possible reasons for this mismatch are discussed.

  2. Broad band X-ray spectrum of KS 1947+300 with BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Naik; P. J. Callanan; B. Paul; T. Dotani

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results obtained from three BeppoSAX observations of the accretion-powered transient X-ray pulsar KS 1947+300 carried out during the declining phase of its 2000 November -- 2001 June outburst. A detailed spectral study of KS 1947+300 across a wide X-ray band (0.1--100.0 keV) is attempted for the first time here. Timing analysis of the data clearly shows a 18.7 s pulsation in the X-ray light curves in the above energy band. The pulse profile of KS 1947+300 is characterized by a broad peak with sharp rise followed by a narrow dip. The dip in the pulse profile shows a very strong energy dependence. Broad-band pulse-phase-averaged spectroscopy obtained with three of the BeppoSAX instruments shows that the energy spectrum in the 0.1--100 keV energy band has three components, a Comptonized component, a ~0.6 keV blackbody component, and a narrow and weak iron emission line at 6.7 keV with a low column density of material in the line of sight. We place an upper limit on the equivalent width of the iron K_\\alpha line at 6.4 keV of ~13 eV (for a width of 100 eV). Assuming a spherical blackbody emitting region and the distance of the source to be 10 kpc, the radius of the emitting region is found to be in the range of 14--22 km, which rules out the inner accretion disk as the soft X-ray emitting region.

  3. Control of Well KS-8 in the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| OpenCongress,ConsolidatedContainedInformation KS-8

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Spencer Chemical Co - KS 0-01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -K Le BlondSantaWyomingSlickKS 0-01 FUSRAP

  5. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-KS.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdf Jump to:Originalfaq.pdfFinal.pdf JumpIN.pdf Jump to:KS.pdf

  6. MicroBooNE MicroBooNE Andrzej Szelc Yale University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatra EngineeringMicroBooNE MicroBooNE

  7. An Audiomagnetotelluric Survey Over The Chaves Geothermal Field (Ne

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan BlanchAmite County,Amrit BioElevatedEnergyPortugal)

  8. Re (epsilon'/epsilon_K) vs. B_d -> phi K_S CP asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ko; A. Masiero; Jae-hyeon Park

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a SUSY GUT seesaw scenario, the largeness of the atmospheric neutrino mixing can reflect itself into an enhanced flavor changing mixing of beauty and strange right-handed scalar quarks. If the CP violating phase in such down type squark RR insertion is the main source of CP asymmetry in B_d -> phi K_S and the gluino contributions to K0-K0 bar and B0-B0 bar mixing are negligible, there is a correlation between Re (epsilon'/epsilon_K) and B_d -> phi K_S CP asymmetry, in addition to that with the strange quark CEDM. The current data on Re (epsilon'/epsilon_K) = (16.7 +- 2.6) 10^-4 imply that S_{phi K} should be greater than \\sim 0.5 (0.25) for mu tan beta = 1 (5) TeV, assuming the RR dominance in b -> s transition and the minimal supergravity type boundary conditions for soft parameters.

  9. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints of Fasterdata IPv6theMicroBooNE

  10. MicroBooNE Proposal Addendum March

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatraMicroBooNE Proposal Addendum

  11. Prospects for Antineutrino Running at MiniBooNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. O. Wascko

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    MiniBooNE began running in antineutrino mode on 19 January, 2006. We describe the sensitivity of MiniBooNE to LSND-like nuebar oscillations and outline a program of antineutrino cross-section measurements necessary for the next generation of neutrino oscillation experiments. We describe three independent methods of constraining wrong-sign (neutrino) backgrounds in an antineutrino beam, and their application to the MiniBooNE antineutrino analyses.

  12. Optical observations of Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Kiziloglu; A. Baykal; N. Kiziloglu

    2006-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ROTSE-IIId observations of the Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300 obtained between September 2004 and December 2005 make it possible to study the correlation between optical and X-ray activity. The optical outburst of 0.1 mag was accompanied by an increase in X-ray flux in 2004 observations. Strong correlation between the optical and X-ray light curves suggests that neutron star directly accretes from the outflowing material of Be star. The nearly zero time lag between X-ray and optical light curves suggests a heating of the disk of Be star by X-rays. No optical brightening and X-ray enhancement was seen in 2005 observations. There is no indication of the orbital modulation in the optical light curve.

  13. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  14. DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, Sept. 2, 1991 Note: G-7 ENERGY LOSS DUE TO THE BROAD-BAND IMPEDANCE IN DA NE L. Palumbo, M. Serio 1. INTRODUCTION The Broad-Band (BB to simplify the evaluation of single-bunch instability thresholds and parasitic losses [1]. Lacking detailed

  15. Dates Days Activity Location Deadline Cost June 9 Sun. Kayaking Harpeth River, TN (KS to GT) 5/31 $33

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    Dates Days Activity Location Deadline Cost June 9 Sun. Kayaking Harpeth River, TN (KS to GT) 5/31 $33 15 Sat. Canoeing * Families welcome * Harpeth River, TN (The Narrows) 6/7 $22 16 Sun. Hike, TN 6/14 $22 21-23 Fri. - Sun. Backpacking Great Smoky Mountain National Park, TN 6/14 $97 30 Sun

  16. Neutrino-induced pion production at energies relevant for the MiniBooNE and K2K experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, T.; Buss, O.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, Heinrich-Buff-Ring 16, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Alvarez-Ruso, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, E-30100 Murcia (Spain)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate charged and neutral current neutrino induced incoherent pion production off nuclei at MiniBooNE and K2K energies within the GiBUU model. We assume impulse approximation and treat the nucleus as a local Fermi gas of nucleons bound in a mean-field potential. In-medium spectral functions are also taken into account. The outcome of the initial neutrino nucleon reaction undergoes complex hadronic final state interactions. We present results for neutral current {pi}{sup 0} and charged current {pi}{sup +} production and compare to MiniBooNE and K2K data.

  17. Recent results from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation ProtectionRaisingRecent PublicationsSciTechSciBooNE and

  18. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-CAMS) system is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Utah State University (USU), and other interested parties with the objective of developing and implementing a comprehensive and readily accessible data and information management system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) verification and validation (V&V) in support of nuclear energy systems design and safety analysis. The two key objectives of the NE-CAMS effort are to identify, collect, assess, store and maintain high resolution and high quality experimental data and related expert knowledge (metadata) for use in CFD V&V assessments specific to the nuclear energy field and to establish a working relationship with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to develop a CFD V&V database, including benchmark cases, that addresses and supports the associated NRC regulations and policies on the use of CFD analysis. In particular, the NE-CAMS system will support the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program, which aims to develop and deploy advanced modeling and simulation methods and computational tools for reliable numerical simulation of nuclear reactor systems for design and safety analysis. Primary NE-CAMS Elements There are four primary elements of the NE-CAMS knowledge base designed to support computer modeling and simulation in the nuclear energy arena as listed below. Element 1. The database will contain experimental data that can be used for CFD validation that is relevant to nuclear reactor and plant processes, particularly those important to the nuclear industry and the NRC. Element 2. Qualification standards for data evaluation and classification will be incorporated and applied such that validation data sets will result in well-defined, well-characterized data. Element 3. Standards will be established for the design and operation of experiments for the generation of new validation data sets that are to be submitted to NE-CAMS that addresses the completeness and characterization of the dataset. Element 4. Standards will be developed for performing verification and validation (V&V) to establish confidence levels in CFD analyses of nuclear reactor processes; such processes will be acceptable and recognized by both CFD experts and the NRC.

  19. Effects of finite volume on the KL-KS mass difference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christ, Norman H; Martinelli, Guido; Sachrajda, Christopher T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomena that involve two or more on-shell particles are particularly sensitive to the effects of finite volume and require special treatment when computed using lattice QCD. In this paper we generalize the results of Luescher, and Lellouch and Luescher, which determine the leading order effects of finite volume on the two-particle spectrum and two-particle decay amplitudes to determine the finite-volume effects in the second order mixing of the K0 and anti-K0 states. We extend the methods of Kim, Sachrajda and Sharpe to provide a direct, uniform treatment of these three, related, finite-volume corrections. In particular, the leading, finite-volume corrections to the KL-KS mass difference Delta M_K and the CP violating parameter epsilon_K are determined, including the potentially large effects which can arise from the near degeneracy of the kaon mass and the energy of a finite-volume, two-pion state.

  20. Effects of finite volume on the KL-KS mass difference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman H. Christ; Xu Feng; Guido Martinelli; Christopher T. Sachrajda

    2015-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Phenomena that involve two or more on-shell particles are particularly sensitive to the effects of finite volume and require special treatment when computed using lattice QCD. In this paper we generalize the results of Luescher, and Lellouch and Luescher, which determine the leading order effects of finite volume on the two-particle spectrum and two-particle decay amplitudes to determine the finite-volume effects in the second order mixing of the K0 and anti-K0 states. We extend the methods of Kim, Sachrajda and Sharpe to provide a direct, uniform treatment of these three, related, finite-volume corrections. In particular, the leading, finite-volume corrections to the KL-KS mass difference Delta M_K and the CP violating parameter epsilon_K are determined, including the potentially large effects which can arise from the near degeneracy of the kaon mass and the energy of a finite-volume, two-pion state.

  1. {alpha}-cluster states in N{ne}Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX (United States); Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States) and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing (United States)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of studies of {alpha}-Cluster structure in N{ne}Z light nuclei is discussed. Spin-parity assignments for the low-lying levels in {sup 10}C are suggested.

  2. Two-color CO{sub 2}/HeNe laser interferometer for C-2 experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornostaeva, O.; Deng, B. H.; Garate, E.; Gota, H.; Kinley, J.; Schroeder, J.; Tuszewski, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A six-channel two-color interferometer has been developed for plasma electron density measurements in the C-2 field reversed configuration experiment. A CO{sub 2} laser is utilized as the main probe beams, while copropagating visible HeNe laser beams are mainly sensitive to vibration. Density measurements in C-2 plasmas have shown that this is a reliable turn-key system. The maximum residual phase noise after vibration compensation is less than {+-}5 deg., corresponding to a line integral density of 3x10{sup 18} m{sup -2}. The time resolution for routine operation is 2 {mu}s.

  3. Triple photoionization of Ne and Ar near threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluett, J.B.; Wehlitz, R. [Synchrotron Radiation Center, UW-Madison, Stoughton, Wisconsin 53589 (United States); Lukic, D. [Institute of Physics, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The triple-photoionization cross section of neon and argon near threshold has been investigated by ion time-of-flight spectrometry. We applied the Wannier power law to our data and confirmed the theoretical Wannier exponent in the cases of Ne and Ar. Our data also agree with previous findings regarding the Wannier exponent and its range of validity for Ne. However, the Wannier power law exhibits a much smaller range of validity of 2 eV for Ar compared to 5 eV for Ne. Also, in contrast to a previous experiment, we do not find a 'second' power law but a gradual decrease of the exponent above the range of validity of the Wannier power law.

  4. Multiphoton Double Ionization of Ar and Ne Close to Threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yunquan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Ye Difa; Liu Jie [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, 100084 Beijing (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, 100088 Beijing (China); Rudenko, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Max-Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Tschuch, S.; Duerr, M.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Siegel, M.; Morgner, U. [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Welfengarten 1, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Gong Qihuang [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory for Mesoscopic Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In kinematically complete studies we explore double ionization (DI) of Ne and Ar in the threshold regime (I>3x10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}) for 800 nm, 45 fs pulses. The basic differences are found in the two-electron momentum distributions - 'correlation' (CO) for Ne and 'anticorrelation' (ACO) for Ar - that can be partially explained theoretically within a 3D classical model including tunneling. Transverse electron momentum spectra provide insight into 'Coulomb focusing' and point to correlated nonclassical dynamics. Finally, DI threshold intensities, CO as well as ACO regimes are predicted for both targets.

  5. Observation of a narrow structure in 1H(?,KS0)X via interference with phi-meson production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaryan, M J; Nepali, C; Polyakov, M V; Azimov, Ya; Briscoe, W J; Dodge, G E; Hyde, C E; Klein, F; Kuznetsov, V; Strakovsky, I

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report observation of a narrow peak structure at ?1.54 GeV with a Gaussian width ? = 6 MeV in the missing mass of KS in the reaction ? + p ? pKSKL. The observed structure may be due to the interference between a strange (or antistrange) baryon resonance in the pKL system and the ?(KSKL) photoproduction leading to the same final state. The statistical significance of the observed excess of events estimated as the log-likelihood ratio of the resonant signal + background hypothesis and the ?-production-based background-only hypothesis corresponds to 5.3?.

  6. Inclusive production of $\\Lambda$, $K^0_s$ and exotic narrow resonances for systems $K_s^0 p$, $K_s^0 \\Lambda$, $\\Lambda p$ from p+propane interactions at 10 GeV/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aslanyan, P Z

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data from the 2m propane bubble chamber for production of $\\Lambda$, $K^0_s$ have been used to search of exotic baryon states, in the $K_s^0 p$, $K_s^0 \\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda p$ decay mode for the reaction p+propane at 10 GeV/c. The estimation of experimental inclusive cross sections for $\\Lambda$ and $K^0_s$ production in the p$^{12}C$ collision is equal to $\\sigma_{\\Lambda}$= 13.3$\\pm$1.7 mb and $\\sigma_{K^0_s}$= 3.8$\\pm$0.6 mb, respectively. The measured $\\Lambda /\\pi^+$ ratio from pC reaction is equal to (5.3$\\pm0.8)*10^{-2}$. The experimental $\\Lambda /\\pi^+$ ratio from the pC reaction is approximately two times larger than the $\\Lambda /\\pi^+$ ratio simulated by FRITIOF model from the pC reaction. The invariant mass spectrum $\\Lambda K^0_s$ registered narrow peaks in regions of 1750 and 1795 MeV/$c^2$. The statistical significance of these peaks has been estimated as 5.6 and 3.3 S.D., respectively. These would be candidates for the $N^0$ or the $\\Xi^0$ pentaquark states. The $pK^0_s$ invaria...

  7. Djurcic_MiniBooNE_PANIC2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers SubfoldersU.S.PVDividendReport Zelimir

  8. SSRS Summary for SSRS NE Steering Group 8 September 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SSRS Summary for SSRS NE Steering Group 8 September 2011 1. Project Officer Hollie Walker left us modelling expert) to discuss the project monitoring and data analysis protocols that will be used to demonstrate the benefits of grey squirrel control under the Project. As a result of the discussions we revised

  9. High-frequency surface wave pumped He-Ne laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moutoulas, C.; Moisan, M.; Bertrand, L.; Hubert, J.; Lachambre, J.L.; Ricard, A.

    1985-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new electrodeless He-Ne laser using a plasma produced by an electromagnetic surface wave as the active medium is described. Gain measurements are reported as a function of the pump wave frequency from 200 to 915 MHz. The dependence of laser performance on the gas mixture and pressure is also presented.

  10. EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY FOR 2012 GRADUATES Lincoln, NE 68583

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    EMPLOYMENT SUMMARY FOR 2012 GRADUATES Lincoln, NE 68583 Website : http://law.unl.edu/ Phone : 402 Full Time 1 / 1 % Unemployed - Not Seeking 0 / 0 % Employment Status Unknown 1 / 1 % Unemployed - Seeking 10 / 8 % Total graduates 128 Employed - Bar Passage Required 84 1 3 0 88 / 69 % Employed

  11. Motor Vehicle Administration 6601 Ritchie Highway, N.E.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Motor Vehicle Administration 6601 Ritchie Highway, N.E. Glen Burnie, Maryland 21062 For more-Owner's Signature Vehicle Information Year Make Sticker No. Title No. Tag No. Vehicle Identification Number Car Multi-purpose vehicle Truck 1 ton or less Motorcycle Fees: Non Logo Organizational Tags: $15

  12. DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN -LNF, Accelerator Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

    K K DA NE TECHNICAL NOTE INFN - LNF, Accelerator Division Frascati, Sept. 2, 1991 Note: G-8 RF AND RESISTIVE ENERGY LOSS IN THE INTERACTION REGION VACUUM CHAMBER S. Bartalucci, L. Palumbo, M. Serio, B-section variation leads to sub- stantial energy losses localized in the IR vacuum chamber even if the steps in cross

  13. Plasma Diagnostics Through Analysis of Ne I Line Shape Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O.B. 368, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); School of Physics Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of the experimentally determined 26 prominent neutral neon (Ne I) line shapes (in the 3s-3p, 3s-3p', 3s'-3p', 3s'-3p and 3p-3d transitions) the basic plasma parameters i.e. electron temperature (T) and electron density (N) have been obtained using the line deconvolution procedure, in a plasma created in a linear, low-pressure, pulsed arc operated in pure neon. The mentioned plasma parameters have also been measured using independent experimental diagnostics techniques. Agreement has been found among the two sets of the obtained parameters. This recommends the deconvolution procedure for plasma diagnostical purposes. Self-confidence of the method has checked using Ne I spectral lines which originate from different energy levels. The advance used of the method has been done in the way to find energy level from which it does not existing any more assumption of LTE.This method may be of interest also in astrophysics where direct measurements of the main plasma parameters (T and N) are not possible. With the development of space born spectroscopy the good quality spectra will be enabling to use this method. The separate electron (We) and ion (Wi) contributions to the total Stark width (Wt), which have not been measured so far, have also been obtained for neon spectral lines. The measured and calculated We data are compared to available theoretical We values. It has found stronger influence of the ion contribution to the Ne I lines shape than the predicted ones calculated by the current theory. It has also tested the ion contribution to the Ne II lines shape. Small influence of the ion contribution to the some Ne II line shape has evidenced.

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - 1996 NARSTO Northeast Field Study (NARSTO-NE)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under5 Southern Oxidants6

  15. Dissociative-recombination product states and the dissociation energy D0 of Ne2+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, K. A.; Peterson, J. R.; Ramos, G.; Sheldon, J. W.

    1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Final product states of Ne2+ dissociative recombination were studied using time-of-flight spectroscopy to determine the kinetic energies released. The dissociative recombination occurred in a sustained discharge in the presence of a variable magnetic field and discharge voltage, at pressures of 5-15 mTorr. Under different conditions various excited states were observed ranging from the lowest 3s metastable states to higher Rydbcrg states within 0.000 54 eV of the dissociation limit. From their narrow widths, it is deduced that these higher states arose from Ne2+ ions with subthermal energies. From two of these narrow distributions, we obtain an improved value for the dissociation limit D0(Ne2+)= 1.260.02 eV.

  16. CDC-INV4104 Optimal Control of A ne Connection Control Systems: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    CDC-INV4104 Optimal Control of A ne Connection Control Systems: A Variational Approach J. Alexander we investigate the optimal control of a ne connection control systems. The formalism of the a ne-dimensional second-order system as a 2n-dimensional rst-order system and applying the machinery of optimal control

  17. Production rate of cosmogenic 21 Ne in quartz estimated from 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    Production rate of cosmogenic 21 Ne in quartz estimated from 10 Be, 26 Al, and 21 Ne concentrations Antarctica production rate calibration We estimated the production rate of 21 Ne in quartz using a set production rate. As the erosion rate can be determined from 10 Be and 26 Al concentrations, this allows

  18. Plate interaction in the NE Caribbean subduction zone from continuous GPS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Plate interaction in the NE Caribbean subduction zone from continuous GPS observations Uri S. ten sites on NE Caribbean islands to evaluate strain accumulation along the North American (NA) ­ Caribbean-Venegas (2012), Plate interaction in the NE Caribbean subduction zone from continuous GPS observations, Geophys

  19. CONGESTION IN THE ISO-NE ELECTRICITY MARKETS ANNA BARBARA IHRIG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    CONGESTION IN THE ISO-NE ELECTRICITY MARKETS BY ANNA BARBARA IHRIG THESIS Advisor: Prof. George in charge of operation and control, the ISO-NE. We describe how the ISO-NE administers the energy market in causing congestion is analyzed; no significant correlation was found. In addition, the impacts of the ISO

  20. Investigation of complete and incomplete fusion dynamics of {sup 20}Ne induced reactions at energies above the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, D., E-mail: dsinghiuac@gmail.com [Centre for Applied Physics, Central University of Jharkhand, Ranchi-835 205 (India); Ali, R. [Department of Physics, G.F.(P.G.), College, Shahjahanpur-242 001 (India); Kumar, Harish; Ansari, M. Afzal [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202 002 (India); Rashid, M. H.; Guin, R. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiment has been performed to explore the complete and incomplete fusion dynamics in heavy ion collisions using stacked foil activation technique. The measurement of excitation functions of the evaporation residues produced in the {sup 20}Ne+{sup 165}Ho system at projectile energies ranges ? 4-8 MeV/nucleon have been done. Measured cumulative and direct cross-sections have been compared with the theoretical model code PACE-2, which takes into account only the complete fusion process. The analysis indicates the presence of contributions from incomplete fusion processes in some ?-emission channels following the break-up of the projectile {sup 20}Ne in the nuclear field of the target nucleus {sup 165}Ho.

  1. Conference shapes direction of Doctrine 2015 -Fort Leavenworth, KS -The Fort Leavenworth Lamp http://www.ftleavenworthlamp.com/news/around_the_force/x27456959/Conference-shapes-direction-of-Doctrine-2015[8/18/2011 12:32:27 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Conference shapes direction of Doctrine 2015 - Fort Leavenworth, KS - The Fort Leavenworth Lamp and more accessible. The conference was led by the Combined Arms Doctrine Directorate, a subordinate

  2. Inclusive production of $?$, $K^0_s$ and exotic narrow resonances for systems $K_s^0 p$, $K_s^0 ?$, $?p$ from p+propane interactions at 10 GeV/c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Zh. Aslanyan

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data from the 2m propane bubble chamber for production of $\\Lambda$, $K^0_s$ have been used to search of exotic baryon states, in the $K_s^0 p$, $K_s^0 \\Lambda$ and $\\Lambda p$ decay mode for the reaction p+propane at 10 GeV/c. The estimation of experimental inclusive cross sections for $\\Lambda$ and $K^0_s$ production in the p$^{12}C$ collision is equal to $\\sigma_{\\Lambda}$= 13.3$\\pm$1.7 mb and $\\sigma_{K^0_s}$= 3.8$\\pm$0.6 mb, respectively. The measured $\\Lambda /\\pi^+$ ratio from pC reaction is equal to (5.3$\\pm0.8)*10^{-2}$. The experimental $\\Lambda /\\pi^+$ ratio from the pC reaction is approximately two times larger than the $\\Lambda /\\pi^+$ ratio simulated by FRITIOF model from the pC reaction. The invariant mass spectrum $\\Lambda K^0_s$ registered narrow peaks in regions of 1750 and 1795 MeV/$c^2$. The statistical significance of these peaks has been estimated as 5.6 and 3.3 S.D., respectively. These would be candidates for the $N^0$ or the $\\Xi^0$ pentaquark states. The $pK^0_s$ invariant mass spectrum shows resonant structures with $M_{K_s^0 p}$=1540, 1613, 1821 MeV/$c^2$. The statistical significance of these peaks have been estimated as 5.5,4.8 and 5.0 s.d., respectively. The invariant mass spectrum S=-1 $\\Lambda p$ observed a narrow peaks at 2100, 2175,2285 and 2353 MeV/$c^2$. Their excess above background by the second method is 6.9, 4.9, 3.8 and 2.9 S.D., respectively.

  3. Overview of DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning. The PTRA program supports DOE-NE's goal of using risk information to inform R&D program planning. The FY12 PTRA program is focused on terrorism risk. The program includes a mix of innovative methods that support the general practice of risk assessments, and selected applications.

  4. MiniBooNE "Windows on the Universe"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the last few decades has left neutrino physics with several vexing issues. Among them are the following questions: (1) Why are lepton mixing angles so different from those in the quark sector? (2) What is the most probable range of the reactor mixing angle? (3) Is the atmospheric mixing angle maximal? (4) What is the number of fermion generations? These are some of the issues that neutrino science hopes to study; this article will explore these questions as part of a more general scientific landscape, and will discuss the part MiniBooNE might play in this exploration. We discuss the current state of measurements taken by MiniBooNE, and emphasize the uniqueness of neutrino oscillations as an important probe into the 'Windows on the Universe.'

  5. [NeII] emission line profiles from photoevaporative disc winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. Alexander

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I model profiles of the [NeII] forbidden emission line at 12.81um, emitted by photoevaporative winds from discs around young, solar-mass stars. The predicted line luminosities (~ 1E-6 Lsun) are consistent with recent data, and the line profiles vary significantly with disc inclination. Edge-on discs show broad (30-40km/s) double-peaked profiles, due to the rotation of the disc, while in face-on discs the structure of the wind results in a narrower line (~10km/s) and a significant blue-shift (5-10km/s). These results suggest that observations of [NeII] line profiles can provide a direct test of models of protoplanetary disc photoevaporation.

  6. Neutrino and Antineutrino Cross sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan; /Alabama U.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH2). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  7. First measurement of ?? with a model-independent Dalitz plot analysis of B?DK, D?KS????? decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; et al

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first measurement of the angle ?? of the unitarity triangle using a model-independent Dalitz plot analysis of B?DK, D?KS????? decays. The method uses, as input, measurements of the strong phase of the D?K?S???? amplitude from the CLEO Collaboration. The result is based on the full data set of 772106 BB pairs collected by the Belle experiment at the ?(4S) resonance. We obtain ??=(77.3+15.114.94.14.3) and the suppressed amplitude ratio rB=0.1450.0300.0100.011. Here the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third is the error due to the precision of the strong-phase parameters obtainedmoreby CLEO.less

  8. Structure of Bright 2MASS Galaxies: 2D Fits to the Ks-band Surface Brightness Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel H. McIntosh; Ari H. Maller; Neal Katz; Martin D. Weinberg

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unprecedented sky coverage and photometric uniformity of the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) provides a rich resource for obtaining a detailed understanding of the galaxies populating our local (z<0.1) Universe. A full characterization of the physical structure of nearby galaxies is essential for theoretical and observational studies of galaxy evolution and structure formation. We have begun a quantified description of the internal structure and morphology of 10,000 bright (10<Ks<11) 2MASS galaxies through multi-component model fits to the 2D surface brightness profiles using GIM2D. From our initial Monte Carlo tests on 77 galaxies drawn at random from the RC3, we find that the model derived structural parameter errors due to sky uncertainies are typically less than 10%.

  9. First measurement of ?? with a model-independent Dalitz plot analysis of B?DK, D?KS????? decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Belous, K.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, M.-C.; Chang, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doleal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Koblitz, S.; Kody, P.; Korpar, S.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kronenbitter, B.; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z. Q.; Liventsev, D.; Louvot, R.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Muramatsu, N.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Prothmann, K.; Ritter, M.; Rhrken, M.; Rozanska, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Singh, J. B.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stani?, S.; Stari?, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first measurement of the angle ?? of the unitarity triangle using a model-independent Dalitz plot analysis of B?DK, D?KS????? decays. The method uses, as input, measurements of the strong phase of the D?K?S???? amplitude from the CLEO Collaboration. The result is based on the full data set of 772106 BB pairs collected by the Belle experiment at the ?(4S) resonance. We obtain ??=(77.3+15.114.94.14.3) and the suppressed amplitude ratio rB=0.1450.0300.0100.011. Here the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty, and the third is the error due to the precision of the strong-phase parameters obtained by CLEO.

  10. Time-Resolved Measurement of Interatomic Coulombic Decay in Ne_2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnorr, K; Kurka, M; Rudenko, A; Foucar, L; Schmid, G; Broska, A; Pfeifer, T; Meyer, K; Anielski, D; Boll, R; Rolles, D; Kbel, M; Kling, M F; Jiang, Y H; Mondal, S; Tachibana, T; Ueda, K; Marchenko, T; Simon, M; Brenner, G; Treusch, R; Scheit, S; Averbukh, V; Ullrich, J; Schrter, C D; Moshammer, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lifetime of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) [L. S. Cederbaum et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4778 (1997)] in Ne_2 is determined via an extreme ultraviolet pump-probe experiment at the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg. The pump pulse creates a 2s inner-shell vacancy in one of the two Ne atoms, whereupon the ionized dimer undergoes ICD resulting in a repulsive Ne^{+}(2p^{-1}) - Ne^{+}(2p^{-1}) state, which is probed with a second pulse, removing a further electron. The yield of coincident Ne^{+} - Ne^{2+} pairs is recorded as a function of the pump-probe delay, allowing us to deduce the ICD lifetime of the Ne_{2}^{+}(2s^{-1}) state to be (150 +/- 50) fs in agreement with quantum calculations.

  11. Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Business Career Services Center | 1300 Sunnyside Ave. Rm. 125 | Lawrence, KS 66045 | (785) 864-5591 | www.business.ku.edu - 1 - What Can I Do With A Major In INFORMATION SYSTEMS? This handout will provide education. You'll gain a solid foundation in the various business disciplines and gain an understanding

  12. 56 PM NETWORK june 2012 WWW.PMI.ORG by MIchEllE bOWlEs JacKsON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    56 PM NETWORK june 2012 WWW.PMI.ORG by MIchEllE bOWlEs JacKsON stepby #12;june 2012 PM NETWORK 57 by adopting an iterative 58 PM NETWORK june 2012 WWW.PMI.ORG waterfall approach. This introduced the idea

  13. {sup 18}Ne production for the Beta beams project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodk, Rastislav [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horsk 3/22a, CZ-12800 Prague (Czech Republic); Mendona, Tania M. [IFIMUP and IN - Institute of Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto, Portugal and CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Swaziland); Stora, Thierry [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense relativistic (anti)neutrino beams are an unique tool required to study fundamental properties of neutrinos such as neutrino oscillation parameters, as well as their Majorana or Dirac nature, the lepton number conservation hypothesis and the absolute neutrino mass scale. Such beams originate from acceleration of ?-decaying radioactive ions (Beta beams). A molten fluoride salt target has been developed for the production of the required rates of low-Q baseline isotope {sup 18}Ne for the Beta beams project. The prototyped unit has been tested on-line at ISOLDE-CERN. In this contribution an overview of the prototyping and on-line tests is presented.

  14. The MicroBooNE Experiment - At Work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints of Fasterdata IPv6theMicroBooNE at

  15. DOE NE Used Fuel Disposition FY2015 Working Group Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOST MANAGEMENT REPORT SRM/ATY 1DepartmentNE

  16. Municipal Energy Agency of NE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon LakeMountainMunicipal Energy Agency of NE Jump

  17. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,SpeedingWu,IntelligenceYou are hereNewsOurADMicroBooNE The

  18. MicroBooNE Project Critical Decision Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatra EngineeringMicroBooNE

  19. MicroBooNE TPC Wires Image Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatraMicroBooNE Proposal AddendumImage

  20. MicroBooNE TPC Wires Image Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your HomeOverview andSinatraMicroBooNE Proposal

  1. NE-23 List of California Sites Hattie Carwell. SAN/NSQA Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Andrew Wallo III, Designation and Certification Manager Division of Facilitv and Site Decommissioning Projects Dffice of Nuclear Energy bee: W. Murphie, NE-23 J. Wagoners,...

  2. A Case Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Ne German Basin- Integrated Interpretation Of Seismic Tomography, Litho-Stratigraphy, Salt Tectonics, And Thermal Structure Jump to:...

  3. Monte Carlo calculations for reference dosimetry of electron beams with the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, B. R., E-mail: bmuir@physics.carleton.ca; Rogers, D. W. O., E-mail: drogers@physics.carleton.ca [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Physics Department, Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate recommendations for reference dosimetry of electron beams and gradient effects for the NE2571 chamber and to provide beam quality conversion factors using Monte Carlo simulations of the PTW Roos and NE2571 ion chambers. Methods: The EGSnrc code system is used to calculate the absorbed dose-to-water and the dose to the gas in fully modeled ion chambers as a function of depth in water. Electron beams are modeled using realistic accelerator simulations as well as beams modeled as collimated point sources from realistic electron beam spectra or monoenergetic electrons. Beam quality conversion factors are calculated with ratios of the doses to water and to the air in the ion chamber in electron beams and a cobalt-60 reference field. The overall ion chamber correction factor is studied using calculations of water-to-air stopping power ratios. Results: The use of an effective point of measurement shift of 1.55 mm from the front face of the PTW Roos chamber, which places the point of measurement inside the chamber cavity, minimizes the difference betweenR{sub 50}, the beam quality specifier, calculated from chamber simulations compared to that obtained using depth-dose calculations in water. A similar shift minimizes the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth to the practical range and reduces the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors at the reference depth as a function of R{sub 50}. Similarly, an upstream shift of 0.34 r{sub cav} allows a more accurate determination of R{sub 50} from NE2571 chamber calculations and reduces the variation of the overall ion chamber correction factor with depth. The determination of the gradient correction using a shift of 0.22 r{sub cav} optimizes the root-mean-square deviation of a fit to calculated beam quality conversion factors if all beams investigated are considered. However, if only clinical beams are considered, a good fit to results for beam quality conversion factors is obtained without explicitly correcting for gradient effects. The inadequacy of R{sub 50} to uniquely specify beam quality for the accurate selection of k{sub Q} factors is discussed. Systematic uncertainties in beam quality conversion factors are analyzed for the NE2571 chamber and amount to between 0.4% and 1.2% depending on assumptions used. Conclusions: The calculated beam quality conversion factors for the PTW Roos chamber obtained here are in good agreement with literature data. These results characterize the use of an NE2571 ion chamber for reference dosimetry of electron beams even in low-energy beams.

  4. EROs in the EIS Fields. I: The AXAF (Chandra) Deep Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Scodeggio; D. Silva

    2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The publicly available EIS-DEEP optical-NIR data for the AXAF (Chandra) Deep Field have been used to construct samples of Extremely Red Objects (EROs) using various single-band and multi-band color criteria. In this work we define as EROs objects with colors consistent with passively evolving elliptical galaxies at z $\\geq$ 1. The EROs surface densities we derive are intermediate between previous published values, emphasizing again the need for larger survey areas to constrain the effects of possible large-scale structure. Although various single-color selected samples can be derived, the EROs sample selected using R-Ks > 5, I-Ks > 4, J-Ks > 1.8 jointly is likely to contain the highest fraction of passively evolving luminous field elliptical galaxies at z >= 1, or conversely, the lowest fraction of lower redshift interlopers. The surface density of this multi-band selected EROs sample is consistent with the conclusion that little or no field elliptical volume density evolution has occurred in the redshift range 0 > z > 1.5. However, extensive spectroscopic followup is necessary to confirm this conclusion.

  5. Print http://us.mg4.mail.yahoo.comfneo/launch?.rand=deOsgk04ks40i Subject: Re: [s-w-h] Solar verses wind efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Print http://us.mg4.mail.yahoo.comfneo/launch?.rand=deOsgk04ks40i Subject: Re: [s-w-h] Solar verses. A single nominal 100 watt solar panel for 4 sun hours/day would yield -4 kWh/day or 12 kWh/month. At $2 returns NO > QUESTIONS ASKED full refund if our customers feel SoWr > will not fit their needs But do you

  6. Neutrino Cross Section Measurements @ SciBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariani, C.; /Columbia U.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of cross sections of neutrinos of 0.7 GeV average energy scattering off a carbon target cross sections with by the SciBooNE experiment at Fermilab. These measurements are important inputs for current and future accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments in the interpretation of neutrino oscillation signals. The measurement of neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} is one of the most important goals in current neutrino experiments. For the current and next generation of long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K, NOvA and LBNE, the precise measurement of neutrino-nucleus cross sections in the few GeV energy range is an essential ingredient in the interpretation of neutrino oscillation signals.

  7. Effective versus ion thermal temperatures in the Weizmann Ne Z-pinch: Modeling and stagnation physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroupp, Eyal

    Effective versus ion thermal temperatures in the Weizmann Ne Z-pinch: Modeling and stagnation of Technology, Haifa, Israel 5 National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89144, USA (Received 23 thermal and effective temperatures is investigated through simulations of the Ne gas puff z-pinch reported

  8. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Application to Mobile Sensor Networks, Part II Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.princeton.edu/~naomi N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 2 Key References [1] Leonard, Paley, Lekien

  9. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Introduction Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton University and Electrical Systems and Automation University of Pisa naomi@princeton.edu, www.princeton.edu/~naomi N.E. Leonard ­ U

  10. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Cooperative Control, Part I, A-C Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton.princeton.edu/~naomi N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 2 Natural Groups Photo by Norbert Wu Exhibit

  11. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Cooperative Control, Part I, D-F Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton.princeton.edu/~naomi N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 2 Outline and Key References A. Artificial Potentials

  12. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Application to Mobile Sensor Networks, Part I Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.princeton.edu/~naomi N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 2 Outline 1. Introduction to cooperative control

  13. THE GENESIS SOLAR WIND CONCENTRATOR TARGET: MASS FRACTIONATION CHARACTERISED BY NE ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIENS, ROGER C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; OLINGER, C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HEBER, V.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; REISENFELD, D.B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BURNETT, D.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; ALLTON, J.H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BAUR, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; WIECHERT, U. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; WIELER, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentrator on Genesis provides samples of increased fluences of solar wind ions for precise determination of the oxygen isotopic composition of the solar wind. The concentration process caused mass fractionation as function of the radial target position. They measured the fractionation using Ne released by UV laser ablation along two arms of the gold cross from the concentrator target to compare measured Ne with modeled Ne. The latter is based on simulations using actual conditions of the solar wind during Genesis operation. Measured Ne abundances and isotopic composition of both arms agree within uncertainties indicating a radial symmetric concentration process. Ne data reveal a maximum concentration factor of {approx} 30% at the target center and a target-wide fractionation of Ne isotopes of 3.8%/amu with monotonously decreasing {sup 20}Ne/{sup 22}Ne ratios towards the center. The experimentally determined data, in particular the isotopic fractionation, differ from the modeled data. They discuss potential reasons and propose future attempts to overcome these disagreements.

  14. Optogalvanic isotope enrichment of Cu ions in Cu-Ne positive column discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    Optogalvanic isotope enrichment of Cu ions in Cu-Ne positive column discharges M. J. Kushner The isotopic enrichment of copper ions in a positive column Cu-Ne discharge using optogalvanic excitation the 63-amu isotope of copper is enriched relative to the neutral abundance. Enrichment as large as 10

  15. ccsd00000561 Proton Zemach radius from measurements of the hyper ne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd00000561 (version 1) : 25 Aug 2003 Proton Zemach radius from measurements of the hyper#12;ne and discuss the information about the electromagnetic structure of protons that could be extracted from theoretical results on the proton polarizability e#11;ects and the experimental hydrogen hyper#12;ne splitting

  16. Extractors for LowWeight A#ne Sources Institute for Advanced Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    to solve this problem. These are functions that are easy to invert given the en tire output, but very hardExtractors for LowWeight A#ne Sources Anup Rao # Institute for Advanced Study arao . An extractor for entropy k a#ne sources is a function A#Ext : F n # {0, 1} m such that for any such source X

  17. The Cretaceous/ Tertiary boundary: sedimentology and micropalaeontology at El Mulato section, NE Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    The Cretaceous/ Tertiary boundary: sedimentology and micropalaeontology at El Mulato section, NE and sedimentological analysis of this transition at the El Mulato section (NE Mexico), in order to infer the little Palaeogene Velasco Formation, there is a 2-m-thick Clastic Unit. Strati- graphical and sedimentological ana

  18. Liquid Argon scintillation light quenching due to Nitrogen impurities : measurements performed for the MicroBooNE vertical slice test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, Christie Shinglei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino experiment MicroBooNE is currently under construction. To expedite the physics output of MicroBooNE, a smaller version of its optical detection system has been implemented. To demonstrate full operability of ...

  19. Coupling between JET Pedestal ne-Te and Outer Target Plate Recycling: Consequences for JET ITER-Like-Wall Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupling between JET Pedestal ne-Te and Outer Target Plate Recycling: Consequences for JET ITER-Like-Wall Operation

  20. Two-chord interferometry using 3.39 {mu}m He-Ne laser on a flux-coil-generated FRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gota, H.; Deng, B. H.; Gupta, D.; Kiyashko, V.; Knapp, K.; Mendoza, R.; Morehouse, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Bolte, N.; Roche, T.; Wessel, F. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-chord {lambda}{sub IR}{approx}3.39 {mu}m He-Ne laser interferometer system was developed for a flux-coil-generated field-reversed configuration to estimate the electron density and the total temperature of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. This two-chord heterodyne interferometer system consists of a single {approx}2 mW infrared He-Ne laser, a visible ({lambda}{sub vis}{approx}632.8 nm) He-Ne laser for the alignment, a 40 MHz acousto-optic modulator, photodetectors, and quadrature phase detectors. Initial measurement was performed and the measured average electron densities were 2-10x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at two different radial positions in the midplane. A time shift in density was observed as the FRC expands radially. The time evolution of the line-averaged density agrees with the density estimated from the in situ internal magnetic probes, based on a rigid-rotor profile model.

  1. Mossbauer spectra of single-domain ne particle systems described using a multiple-level relaxation model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Dominic

    Mossbauer spectra of single-domain #12;ne particle systems described using a multiple describes the Mossbauer spectra of real #12;ne particle systems at all temperatures of interest, and yields temperatures, when all moments are blocked, Mossbauer spectra can be described with static hyper#12;ne #12

  2. Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title NE/J005398/2 Professor Christopher Perry University of Exeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title NE/J005398/2 Professor Christopher and resultant sediment records of the event. NE/J006122/1 Dr David Tappin NERC British Geological Survey Japan of severe wildfires on moorland carbon dynamics NE/J01141X/1 Dr Stephen G. Willis Durham University

  3. The MiniBooNE detector technical design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Stancu et al.

    2003-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment [1] is motivated by the LSND observation, [2] which has been interpreted as {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, and by the atmospheric neutrino deficit, [3,4,5] which may be ascribed to {nu}{sub {mu}} oscillations into another type of neutrino. MiniBooNE is a single-detector experiment designed to: obtain {approx} 1000 {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} events if the LSND signal is due to {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, establishing the oscillation signal at the > 5{sigma} level as shown in Fig. 1.1; extend the search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations significantly beyond what has been studied previously if no signal is observed; search for {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance to address the atmospheric neutrino deficit with a signal that is a suppression of the rate of {nu}{sub {mu}}C {yields} {mu}N events from the expected 600,000 per year; measure the oscillation parameters as shown in Fig. 1.2 if oscillations are observed; and test CP conservation in the lepton sector if oscillations are observed by running with separate {nu}{sub {mu}} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beams. The detector will consist of a spherical tank 6.1 m (20 feet) in radius, as shown in Fig. 1.3, that stands in a 45-foot diameter cylindrical vault. An inner tank structure at 5.75 m radius will support 1280 8-inch phototubes (10% coverage) pointed inward and optically isolated from the outer region of the tank. The tank will be filled with 807 t of mineral oil, resulting in a 445 t fiducial volume. The outer tank volume will serve as a veto shield for identifying particles both entering and leaving the detector with 240 phototubes mounted on the tank wall. Above the detector tank will be an electronics enclosure that houses the fast electronics and data acquisition system and a utilities enclosure that houses the plumbing, overflow tank, and calibration laser. The detector will be located {approx} 550 m from the Booster neutrino source. The neutrino beam, produced using 8 GeV protons from the Booster at FNAL, will consist of a target within a focusing system, followed by a {approx}50 m long pion decay volume. The low energy, high intensity and 1 {micro}s time-structure of a neutrino beam produced from the Booster beam are ideal for this experiment. We assume that the Booster can reliably deliver protons for a typical run which is two-thirds of a calendar year. The sensitivities discussed above assume the experiment receives 5 x 10{sup 20} protons per year. This Booster experiment is compatible with the Fermilab collider and MI programs. The Booster must run at 7.5 Hz to accommodate the MiniBooNE and collider programs simultaneously. The current schedule calls for data-taking to begin by the end of calendar year 2001.

  4. Few-Photon Multiple Ionization of Ne and Ar by Strong Free-Electron-Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moshammer, R.; Jiang, Y. H.; Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Schroeter, C. D.; Luedemann, S.; Zrost, K.; Dorn, A.; Ferger, T.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Foucar, L.; Titze, J.; Jahnke, T.; Schoeffler, M.; Doerner, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Fischer, D. [Atomic Physics, Stockholm University, Alba Nova University Centrum, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Weber, T. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, D 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Zouros, T. J. M. [Department of Physics, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, P.O. Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Duesterer, S. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] (and others)

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Few-photon multiple ionization of Ne and Ar atoms by strong vacuum ultraviolet laser pulses from the free-electron laser at Hamburg was investigated differentially with the Heidelberg reaction microscope. The light-intensity dependence of Ne{sup 2+} production reveals the dominance of nonsequential two-photon double ionization at intensities of I<6x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} and significant contributions of three-photon ionization as I increases. Ne{sup 2+} recoil-ion-momentum distributions suggest that two electrons absorbing ''instantaneously'' two photons are ejected most likely into opposite hemispheres with similar energies.

  5. 2007 Publications Abuzeineh, A.A., R.D. Owen, N.E. McIntyre, C.W. Dick, R. Strauss, and T.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Systems. N. Rooney, K.S. McCann, and D.L.G. Noakes, (eds.), Springer. Du, Z., K.H. Cheng, M.W. Vaughn, N

  6. Thomas-Ehrman effect in a three-body model: $^{16}$Ne case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Grigorenko; T. A. Golubkova; M. V. Zhukov

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic mechanism of the Thomas-Ehrman shift is studied in three-cluster systems by example of $^{16}$Ne and $^{16}$C isobaric mirror partners. We predict configuration mixings for $0^+$ and $2^+$ states in $^{16}$Ne and $^{16}$C. Large isospin symmetry breaking on the level of wave function component weights is demonstrated for these states and discussed as three-body mechanism of Thomas-Ehrman shift. It is shown that the description of the Coulomb displacement energies requires a consistency among three parameters: the $^{16}$Ne decay energy $E_T$, the $^{15}$F ground state energy $E_r$, and the configuration mixing parameters for the $^{16}$Ne/$^{16}$C $0^+$ and $2^+$ states. Basing on this analysis we infer the $^{15}$F $1/2^+$ ground state energy to be $E_r=1.39-1.42$ MeV.

  7. Tests of Lorentz and CPT violation with MiniBooNE neutrino oscillation excesses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teppei Katori

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Violation of Lorentz invariance and CPT symmetry is a predicted phenomenon of Planck-scale physics. Various types of data are analyzed to search for Lorentz violation under the Standard-Model Extension (SME) framework, including neutrino oscillation data. MiniBooNE is a short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment at Fermilab. The measured excesses from MiniBooNE cannot be reconciled within the neutrino Standard Model; thus it might be a signal of new physics, such as Lorentz violation. We have analyzed the sidereal time dependence of MiniBooNE data for signals of the possible breakdown of Lorentz invariance in neutrinos. In this brief review, we introduce Lorentz violation, the neutrino sector of the SME, and the analysis of short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We then present the results of the search for Lorentz violation in MiniBooNE data. This review is based on the published result (ArXiv:1109.3480).

  8. Application for Presidential Permit PP-400 TDI-NE - New England...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Comments of the Vermont Department of Public Service - August 6, 2014 Application for Presidential Permit PP-400 TDI-NE - New England Clean Power Link Project - Motion to...

  9. Geophysical imaging methods for analysis of the Krafla Geothermal Field, NE Iceland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Beatrice Smith

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint geophysical imaging techniques have the potential to be reliable methods for characterizing geothermal sites and reservoirs while reducing drilling and production risks. In this study, we applied a finite difference ...

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - 2001 Philadelphia NE-OPS Air Quality Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006 [FacilityMission Under5 SouthernPhiladelphia

  11. Neutrino induced pion production at MiniBooNE and K2K energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, T.; Buss, O.; Mosel, U. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen (Germany); Alvarez-Ruso, L. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Fisica Computacional, Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal)

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate charged and neutral current neutrino-induced incoherent pion production off nuclei within the GiBUU model at energies relevant for the MiniBooNE and K2K experiments. Special attention is paid to the entanglement between measured CCQE and CC1{pi}{sup +} cross sections. We further give predictions and compare to recent data measured at MiniBooNE.

  12. Charge-state-correlated cross sections for electron loss, capture, and ionization in C{sup 3+}-Ne collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchner, T. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, TU Clausthal, Leibnizstrasse 10, D-38678 Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Santos, A.C.F.; Sant'Anna, M.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Luna, H.; Sigaud, G.M.; Montenegro, E.C. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22452-970 (Brazil); Melo, W.S. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora 36036-330 (Brazil)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Charge-state-correlated total cross sections for projectile-electron loss, capture, and target ionization in C{sup 3+}-Ne collisions have been measured and calculated at absolute energies in the few MeV regime. The calculations are based on a recently proposed coupled mean-field approach which combines a set of nonperturbative single-particle calculations for the initial projectile electrons with another one for the initial target electrons. The basis generator method has been used to solve these equations. Very good overall agreement between experimental and theoretical data is found, which provides further evidence for the applicability of the approach to rather complex many-electron collision systems. One notable exception is the cross section for elastic projectile-electron loss associated with no change of the target charge state. In this case, the theoretical and experimental results differ qualitatively.

  13. [5] Suh JS, Jeong KS, Lee JS, Han IT. Study of the field-screening effect of highly ordered carbon nanotube arrays. Appl Phys Lett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    molecular weight polymer. The interfacial strength between carbon fillers and epoxy resin varies for improving and/or optimizing the manufacturing process of epoxymatrix composites. Epoxy resin filled with various carbons (carbon fiber, carbon nanofiber and carbon black) was studied. The epoxy resin system

  14. A First Comparison of the responses of a He4-based fast-neutron detector and a NE-213 liquid-scintillator reference detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jebali, R; Annand, J R M; Chandra, R; Davatz, G; Fissum, K G; Friederich, H; Gendotti, U; Hall-Wilton, R; Hkansson, E; Kanaki, K; Lundin, M; Murer, D; Nilsson, B; Rosborg, A; Svensson, H

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A first comparison has been made between the pulse-shape discrimination characteristics of a novel He4-based pressurized scintillation detector and a NE-213 liquid-scintillator reference detector using an Am/Be mixed-field neutron and gamma-ray source and a high-resolution scintillation-pulse digitizer. In particular, the capabilities of the two fast neutron detectors to discriminate between neutrons and gamma-rays were investigated. The NE-213 liquid-scintillator reference cell produced a wide range of scintillation-light yields in response to the gamma-ray field of the source. In stark contrast, the He4-based detector registered a maximum scintillation-light yield of 750 keVee to the same gamma-ray field. Pulse-shape discrimination for particles with scintillation-light yields of more than 750 keVee was excellent in the case of the He4-based detector, and above 750 keVee its signal was unambiguously neutron.

  15. A First Comparison of the responses of a He4-based fast-neutron detector and a NE-213 liquid-scintillator reference detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Jebali; J. Scherzinger; J. R. M. Annand; R. Chandra; G. Davatz; K. G. Fissum; H. Friederich; U. Gendotti; R. Hall-Wilton; E. Hkansson; K. Kanaki; M. Lundin; D. Murer; B. Nilsson; A. Rosborg; H. Svensson

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A first comparison has been made between the pulse-shape discrimination characteristics of a novel He4-based pressurized scintillation detector and a NE-213 liquid-scintillator reference detector using an Am/Be mixed-field neutron and gamma-ray source and a high-resolution scintillation-pulse digitizer. In particular, the capabilities of the two fast neutron detectors to discriminate between neutrons and gamma-rays were investigated. The NE-213 liquid-scintillator reference cell produced a wide range of scintillation-light yields in response to the gamma-ray field of the source. In stark contrast, the He4-based detector registered a maximum scintillation-light yield of 750 keVee to the same gamma-ray field. Pulse-shape discrimination for particles with scintillation-light yields of more than 750 keVee was excellent in the case of the He4-based detector, and above 750 keVee its signal was unambiguously neutron.

  16. Analysis of ISO NE Balancing Requirements: Uncertainty-based Secure Ranges for ISO New England Dynamic Inerchange Adjustments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Wu, Di; Hou, Zhangshuan; Sun, Yannan; Maslennikov, S.; Luo, X.; Zheng, T.; George, S.; Knowland, T.; Litvinov, E.; Weaver, S.; Sanchez, E.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The document describes detailed uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodology developed by PNNL to estimate secure ranges of potential dynamic intra-hour interchange adjustments in the ISO-NE system and provides description of the dynamic interchange adjustment (DINA) tool developed under the same contract. The overall system ramping up and down capability, spinning reserve requirements, interchange schedules, load variations and uncertainties from various sources that are relevant to the ISO-NE system are incorporated into the methodology and the tool. The DINA tool has been tested by PNNL and ISO-NE staff engineers using ISO-NE data.

  17. Postcollisional decay in Ne multiple ionization by H{sub 2}{sup +} ions in breakup collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sant'Anna, M.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Luna, H.; Cavalcanti, E.G.; Sigaud, G. M.; Montenegro, E. C. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro 22452-970 (Brazil); Santos, A.C.F. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, Missouri 65401 (United States); McGrath, C.; Shah, M.B. [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, The Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the Ne{sup q+} charge-state yield distribution for Ne atoms multiply ionized by 1-MeV/amu H{sub 2}{sup +}, in coincidence with the final state of the projectile, for both breakup and nonbreakup channels. Measurements with 1-MeV H{sup +} projectiles were also performed. While the H{sub 2}{sup +} nonbreakup channel produces results similar to equal-velocity proton or electron projectiles, the breakup channels lead to a charge-state yield distribution very close to the known Ne 2s{sup -1} postcollisional decay distribution, measured through photoionization [T. A. Carlson, W. E. Hunt, and M. O. Krause, Phys. Rev. 151, 41 (1966)]. This behavior suggests that, in the breakup channels, contributions to multiple ionization from mechanisms that are usually considered to be dominant in ion-atom collisions are less important than the postcollisional decay.

  18. MCViNE -- An object oriented Monte Carlo neutron ray tracing simulation package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiao Y Y; Granroth, Garrett E; Abernathy, Douglas L; Lumsden, Mark D; Winn, Barry; Aczel, Adam A; Aivazis, Michael; Fultz, Brent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MCViNE (Monte-Carlo VIrtual Neutron Experiment) is a versatile Monte Carlo (MC) neutron ray-tracing program that provides researchers with tools for performing computer modeling and simulations that mirror real neutron scattering experiments. By adopting modern software engineering practices such as using composite and visitor design patterns for representing and accessing neutron scatterers, and using recursive algorithms for multiple scattering, MCViNE is flexible enough to handle sophisticated neutron scattering problems including, for example, neutron detection by complex detector systems, and single and multiple scattering events in a variety of samples and sample environments. In addition, MCViNE can take advantage of simulation components in linear-chain-based MC ray tracing packages widely used in instrument design and optimization, as well as NumPy-based components that make prototypes useful and easy to develop. These developments have enabled us to carry out detailed simulations of neutron scatteri...

  19. WATER RESOURCES NE:BRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    -half. This would require changes in irrigation practices and installation of new types of irrigation systems supplies. Industries use energy to move water through processing systems and to heat and cool waters in the agricultural field is irrigation. During 1973 more than 5 million acres were irrigated in Nebraska with more

  20. Characterization of fragment emission in ^{20}Ne (7 - 10 MeV/nucleon) + ^{12}C reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aparajita Dey; C. Bhattacharya; S. Bhattacharya; S. Kundu; K. Banerjee; S. Mukhopadhyay; D. Gupta; T. Bhattacharjee; S. R. Banerjee; S. Bhattacharyya; T. K. Rana; S. K. Basu; R. Saha; K. Krishan; A. Mukherjee; D. Bandopadhyay; C. Beck

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The inclusive energy distributions of the complex fragments (3 $\\leq$ Z $\\leq$ 7) emitted from the bombardment of ^{12}C by ^{20}Ne beams with incident energies between 145 and 200 MeV have been measured in the angular range 10$^{o} \\leq \\theta_{lab} \\leq$ 50^{o}. Damped fragment yields in all the cases have been found to be the characteristic of emission from fully energy equilibrated composites. The binary fragment yields are compared with the standard statistical model predictions. Enhanced yields of entrance channel fragments (5 $\\leq$ Z $\\leq$ 7) indicate the survival of orbiting-like process in ^{20}Ne + ^{12}C system at these energies.

  1. Spectroscopy and intruder configurations of $^{33}$Mg and $^{31}$Ne studied with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kimura

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Excitation spectra and neutron single particle configurations of $^{33}$Mg and $^{31}$Ne are investigated by using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics combined with generator coordinate method. It is shown that both nuclei have strongly deformed $3/2^-$ ground state with a $3p2h$ configuration. The excitation spectra are qualitatively understood in terms of the Nilsson model and the calculation has shown the coexistence of different intruder configurations within small excitation energy. The calculated one neutron separation energy of $^{31}$Ne is rather small ($S_n=250$ keV) and implies a p-wave one neutron halo with a strongly deformed core.

  2. Proton-proton correlations observed in two-proton decay of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Mukha; L. Grigorenko; K. Summerer; L. Acosta; M. A. G. Alvarez; E. Casarejos; A. Chatillon; D. Cortina-Gil; J. Espino; A. Fomichev; J. E. Garcia-Ramos; H. Geissel; J. Gomez-Camacho; J. Hofmann; O. Kiselev; A. Korsheninnikov; N. Kurz; Yu. Litvinov; I. Martel; C. Nociforo; W. Ott; M. Pfutzner; C. Rodriguez-Tajes; E. Roeckl; M. Stanoiu; H. Weick; P. J. Woods

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-proton correlations were observed for the two-proton decays of the ground states of $^{19}$Mg and $^{16}$Ne. The trajectories of the respective decay products, $^{17}$Ne+p+p and $^{14}$O+p+p, were measured by using a tracking technique with microstrip detectors. These data were used to reconstruct the angular correlations of fragments projected on planes transverse to the precursor momenta. The measured three-particle correlations reflect a genuine three-body decay mechanism and allowed us to obtain spectroscopic information on the precursors with valence protons in the $sd$ shell.

  3. MiniBooNE as related to Windows on the Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of absolute neutrino and anti-neutrino cross-sections, the observation of a 'low energy anomaly' in the neutrino sector, the constraints placed on the LSND effect by a non-observation of neutrino oscillations, the search for neutrino and anti-neutrino appearance, and for the possible existence of new heavy particles makes MiniBooNE a major contributor to the current view of the Universe. This paper addresses specific model constraints set by the MiniBooNE data, and explores expectations for further remaining analysis of the data.

  4. Constraints on background torsion field from K physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhendra Mohanty; Utpal Sarkar

    1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We point out that a background torsion field will produce an effective potential to the $K$ and $\\bar{K}$ with opposite signs. This allows us to constrain the background torsion field from the $K_L$ and $K_S$ mass difference, CPT violating $K^\\circ$ and $\\bar{K^\\circ}$ mass difference and the CP violating quantities $\\epsilon$ and $\\eta_{+-}$. The most stringent bound on the cosmological background torsion $ < 10^{-25}$ GeV comes from the direct measurement of the CPT violation.

  5. Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13Evacuation2489

  6. Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13Evacuation2489Exclusive Neutrino Cross

  7. Exclusive Neutrino Cross Sections From MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1, 13Evacuation2489Exclusive Neutrino Cross

  8. Djurcic_MiniBooNE_NuFact2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers SubfoldersU.S.PVDividend

  9. Djurcic_MiniBooNE_NuFact2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers SubfoldersU.S.PVDividendReport Zelimir Djurcic

  10. MicroBooNE, A Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) Neutrino Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid Argon time projection chamber (LArTPC) is a promising detector technology for future neutrino experiments. MicroBooNE is a upcoming LArTPC neutrino experiment which will be located on-axis of Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) at Fermilab, USA. The R&D efforts on this detection method and related neutrino interaction measurements are discussed.

  11. N.E. Leonard U. Pisa 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    1 N.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 1 Cooperative Control and Mobile Sensor Networks Cooperative Control, Part II Naomi Ehrich Leonard Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Princeton University.E. Leonard ­ U. Pisa ­ 18-20 April 2007Slide 2 Collective Motion Stabilization Problem · Achieve synchrony

  12. Magnetostratigraphy and small mammals of the Late Oligocene Banovii basin in NE Bosnia and Herzegovina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Magnetostratigraphy and small mammals of the Late Oligocene Banovii basin in NE Bosnia Rudnici mrkog uglja Banovii d.d., Branilaca Banovia 36, 71290 Banovii, Bosnia and Herzegovina a b s t r in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Although the Dinarides occupy a crucial paleogeographic position bridging Central

  13. Living Longer on Less THe neW economic (in)securiTy of seniors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snider, Barry B.

    Living Longer on Less THe neW economic (in)securiTy of seniors INSTITUTE ON ASSETS & SOCIAL POLICY to measuring economic security applied in this report builds on previous work on middle class economic security for Social Policy and Manage- ment at Brandeis University, is dedicated to the economic well-being and social

  14. COLUMBIA RIVER INTER-TRIBAL FISH COMMISSION 700 NE Multnomah Street, Suite 1200

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLUMBIA RIVER INTER-TRIBAL FISH COMMISSION 700 NE Multnomah Street, Suite 1200 Portland, Oregon 97232 F (503) 235-4228 (503) 238-0667 F (503) 235-4228 www.critfc.org Putting fish back in the rivers and protecting the watersheds where fish live September 17, 2013 Bill Bradbury, Chairman Northwest Power

  15. Astronomical forcing of sedimentary cycles in the middle to late Miocene continental Calatayud Basin (NE Spain)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Basin (NE Spain) H. Abdul Aziz aY *, F. Hilgen a , W. Krijgsman b , E. Sanz c , J.P. Calvo d, Spain d Departemento de Petrologia y Geoqu|¨mica, Fac. CC. Geolo¨gicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid, Spain Received 16 August 1999; received in revised form 28 January 2000; accepted 29 January 2000

  16. Come to Norway Experience the World JuNE 20-July 31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tom Henning

    Come to Norway ­ Experience the World 2015 JuNE 20-July 31 #12;An Academic Experience The ISS of Bergen and the fjords of Western Norway. Studying and living with fellow students from all over the world School PO Box 1082 Blindern NO 0317 Oslo Norway uio.no/summerschool Tel: +47 22 85 63 85 iss

  17. Oil and Gas CDT Cenomanian-Turonian Palaeoenvironments of NE Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Cenomanian-Turonian Palaeoenvironments of NE Brazil Margin University of Birmingham, biostratigraphy, Brazil, Cretaceous Overview The Late Cretaceous stratigraphy of the Equatorial margin of North East Brazil holds a unique record of the final stages of the opening of the South Atlantic. During

  18. U ne rapide recension bibliographique sur la Tunisie et le Maroc laisse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    U ne rapide recension bibliographique sur la Tunisie et le Maroc laisse apparaître que tradition et. La France moderne serait là au secours d'une Tunisie et d'un Maroc traditionnels incapables de s) affirme par exemple qu'au Maroc, 1. Nombreux sont les auteurs qui convoquent l'une ou l'autre dans le

  19. The LSND puzzle in the light of MiniBooNE results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I give a brief overview over various attempts to reconcile the LSND evidence for oscillations with all other global neutrino data, including the results from MiniBooNE. I discuss the status of oscillation schemes with one or more sterile neutrinos and comment on various exotic proposals.

  20. Searches for new physics at MiniBooNE : sterile neutrinos and mixing freedom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S. (Georgia Stelios)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment was designed to perform a search for Vu --> Ve oscillations in a region of A[delta]sin 2 20very different from that allowed by standard, three neutrino oscillations, as determined by solar and ...

  1. Thermodynamics and equilibrium structure of Ne38 cluster: Quantum mechanics versus classical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelshtam, Vladimir A.

    . For example, although the heat capacity Cv T around the "solid-liquid" transition temperature T 10 K MC simulations are implemented in the parallel tempering framework. The classical heat capacity Cv do not play an essential role in the thermodynamics of Ne38, the quantum heat capacity

  2. Search for core-collapse supernovae using the MiniBooNE neutrino detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiorgi, Georgia Stelios

    We present a search for core-collapse supernovae in the Milky Way galaxy, using the MiniBooNE neutrino detector. No evidence is found for core-collapse supernovae occurring in our Galaxy in the period from December 14, ...

  3. 36 SEPTEMBER | 2012 WiNd TURbiNE CAPACiTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    36 SEPTEMBER | 2012 WiNd TURbiNE CAPACiTY FRONTiER FROM SCAdA ThE WORld hAS SEEN A significant contributor to this growth. The wind turbine generated energy depends on the wind potential and the turbine of wind turbines. Supervi- sory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems record wind turbine

  4. PI Research Organisation Project Title NE/J024678/1 Dr Christopher Davis University of Reading Driving space weather forecasts with real data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Southampton NE/J021075/1 Where did all the CO2 go? Insights from boron isotopes in deep University of Leeds NE/J02371X/1 Did the Southern Ocean drive deglacial atmospheric CO2 rise?Dr Raja of Leeds NE/J023310/1 Spectrally High resolution Infrared measurements for the characterisation of Volcanic

  5. Searches for New Physics at MiniBooNE: Sterile Neutrinos and Mixing Freedom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karagiorgi, Georgia S.; /MIT

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment was designed to perform a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations in a region of {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta} very different from that allowed by standard, three-neutrino oscillations, as determined by solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. This search was motivated by the LSND experimental observation of an excess of {bar {nu}}{sub e} events in a {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam which was found compatible with two-neutrino oscillations at {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta} < 1%. If confirmed, such oscillation signature could be attributed to the existence of a light, mostly-sterile neutrino, containing small admixtures of weak neutrino eigenstates. In addition to a search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations, MiniBooNE has also performed a search for {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillations, which provides a test of the LSND two-neutrino oscillation interpretation that is independent of CP or CPT violation assumptions. This dissertation presents the MiniBooNE {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} analyses and results, with emphasis on the latter. While the neutrino search excludes the two-neutrino oscillation interpretation of LSND at 98% C.L., the antineutrino search shows an excess of events which is in agreement with the two-neutrino {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} oscillation interpretation of LSND, and excludes the no oscillations hypothesis at 96% C.L. Even though the neutrino and antineutrino oscillation results from MiniBooNE disagree under the single sterile neutrino oscillation hypothesis, a simple extension to the model to include additional sterile neutrino states and the possibility of CP violation allows for differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillation signatures. In view of that, the viability of oscillation models with one or two sterile neutrinos is investigated in global fits to MiniBooNE and LSND data, with and without constraints from other oscillation experiments with similar sensitivities to those models. A general search for new physics scenarios which would lead to effective non-unitarity of the standard 3 x 3 neutrino mixing matrix, or mixing freedom, is also performed using neutrino and antineutrino data available from MiniBooNE.

  6. Neutral current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering beyond the Fermi gas model at MiniBooNE and BNL kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. V. Ivanov; A. N. Antonov; M. B. Barbaro; C. Giusti; A. Meucci; J. A. Caballero; R. Gonzalez-Jimenez; E. Moya de Guerra; J. M. Udias

    2015-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering cross sections on a $^{12}$C target are analyzed using a realistic spectral function $S(p,E)$ that gives a scaling function in accordance with the ($e,e'$) scattering data. The spectral function accounts for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations by using natural orbitals (NOs) from the Jastrow correlation method and has a realistic energy dependence. The standard value of the axial mass $M_A= 1.032$ GeV is used in all calculations. The role of the final-state interaction (FSI) on the spectral and scaling functions, as well as on the cross sections is accounted for. A comparison of the calculations with the empirical data of the MiniBooNE and BNL experiments is performed. Our results are analyzed in comparison with those when NN correlations are not included, and also with results from other theoretical approaches, such as the relativistic Fermi gas (RFG), the relativistic mean field (RMF), the relativistic Green's function (RGF), as well as with the SuperScaling Approach (SuSA) based on the analysis of quasielastic electron scattering.

  7. Survival of orbiting in $^{20}$Ne (7 - 10 MeV/nucleon) + $^{12}$C reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bhattacharya; A. Dey; S. Kundu; K. Banerjee; S. Bhattacharya; S. Mukhopadhyay; D. Gupta; T. Bhattacharjee; S. R. Banerjee; S. Bhattacharyya; T. Rana; S. K. Basu; R. Saha; S. Bhattacharjee; K. Krishan; A. Mukherjee; D. Bandopadhyay; C. Beck

    2005-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The inclusive energy distributions of fragments with Z $\\geq$ 3 emitted from the bombardment of $^{12}$C by $^{20}$Ne beams with incident energies between 145 and 200 MeV have been measured in the angular range $\\theta_{lab} \\sim$ 10$^\\circ$ - 50$^\\circ$. Damped fragment yields in all cases have been found to be characteristic of emission from fully energy equilibrated composites; for B, C fragments, average Q-values, $$, were independent of the centre of mass emission angle ($\\theta_{c.m}$), and the angular distributions followed $\\sim$1/sin$\\theta_{c.m}$ like variation, signifying long life times of the emitting di-nuclear systems. Total yields of these fragments have been found to be much larger compared to the standard statistical model predictions of the same. This may be indicative of the survival of orbiting like process in $^{12}$C + $^{20}$Ne system at these energies.

  8. Conical Emission from Shock Waves in Ne(1-20 AGeV)+U Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Rau; Jan Steinheimer; Barbara Betz; Hannah Petersen; Marcus Bleicher; Horst Stcker

    2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation and propagation of high-density compression waves, e.g. Mach shock waves, in cold nuclear matter is studied by simulating high-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions of Ne with U in the energy range from E_lab = 0.5 AGeV to 20 AGeV. In an ideal hydrodynamic approach, the high-density shock wave created by the small Ne nucleus passing through the heavy U nucleus is followed by a slower and more dilute Mach shock wave which causes conical emission of particles at the Mach cone angle. The conical emission originates from low-density regions with a small flow velocity comparable to the speed of sound. Moreover, it is shown that the angular distributions of emitted baryons clearly distinguish between a hydrodynamic approach and binary cascade processes used in the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) transport model.

  9. The thermonuclear rate for the 19F(a,p)22Ne reaction at stellar temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Ugalde; Richard Azuma; Aaron Couture; Joachim Grres; Hye-Young Lee; Edward Stech; Elizabeth Strandberg; Wanpeng Tan; Michael Wiescher

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{19}$F($\\alpha$,p)$^{22}$Ne reaction is considered to be one of the main sources of fluorine depletion in AGB and Wolf-Rayet stars. The reaction rate still retains large uncertainties due to the lack of experimental studies available. In this work the yields for both exit channels to the ground state and first excited state of $^{22}$Ne have been measured and several previously unobserved resonances have been found in the energy range E$_{lab}$=792-1993 keV. The level parameters have been determined through a detailed R-matrix analysis of the reaction data and a new reaction rate is provided on the basis of the available experimental information.

  10. Neutrino and Anti-neutrino Cross Sections at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dharmapalan, Ranjan [University of Alabama Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tuscaloosa, AL-35487 (United States)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment has reported a number of high statistics neutrino and anti-neutrino cross sections -among which are the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) and neutral current elastic (NCE) neutrino scattering on mineral oil (CH{sub 2}). Recently a study of the neutrino contamination of the anti-neutrino beam has concluded and the analysis of the anti-neutrino CCQE and NCE scattering is ongoing.

  11. A sterile neutrino at MiniBooNE and IceCube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masip, Manuel [CAFPE and Depto. Fsica Terica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada (Spain)

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibility that a sterile neutrino of mass around 50 MeV slightly mixed with the muon flavor may be the origin of the MiniBooNE anomaly. We show that its production in the atmosphere in a fraction of kaon decays would imply an excess of contained showers at IceCube from down-going and near-horizontal directions.

  12. The Photomultiplier Tube Calibration System of the MicroBooNE Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, J; Moss, Z; Strauss, T; Toups, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design and construction of an LED-based fiber calibration system for large liquid argon time projection detectors. This system was developed to calibrate the optical systems of the MicroBooNE experiment. As well as detailing the materials and installation procedure, we provide technical drawings and specifications so that the system may be easily replicated in future LArTPC detectors.

  13. Quasiparticle and Optical Excitations in Solid Ne and Ar: GW and BSE Approximations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Charles H.; Galamic-Mulaomerovic, S. [School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2007-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE) have been used to calculate quasiparticle and optical excitations in solid Ne and Ar. Absolute positions of quasiparticle and quasihole energies are found to be in very good agreement with experimental values. Binding energies of Frenkel excitons for these systems calculated using the BSE are also in good agreement with experiment. Splitting of excitons into longitudinal and transverse modes is calculated and found to be approximately twice the experimentally measured value.

  14. Print http://us.mg4.mail.yahoo.com/neo/launch?.rand=deOsgk04ks40i Subject: RE: [s-w-h] b Solar verses wind efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .yahoo.com/neo/launch?.rand=deOsgk04ks40i Subject: RE: [s-w-h] b Solar verses wind efficiency From: Michael Klemen (wind4energy, there is a link to IEC testing data. In this document: http://www.dyocore.com/materiaI/IEC_Standard_61400-Sol than doubled energy output. Instead, there's just a 36% improvement in output for a 117% increase

  15. Benthic biological and biogeochemical patterns and processes across an oxygen minimum zone (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Lisa

    (Pakistan margin, NE Arabian Sea) Gregory L. Cowie a,, Lisa A. Levin b a The Sir John Murray Laboratories), and organic matter (OM) availability on benthic communities and processes across the Pakistan Margin

  16. Strategic Plan for Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NE-KAMS knowledge base will assist computational analysts, physics model developers, experimentalists, nuclear reactor designers, and federal regulators by: (1) Establishing accepted standards, requirements and best practices for V&V and UQ of computational models and simulations, (2) Establishing accepted standards and procedures for qualifying and classifying experimental and numerical benchmark data, (3) Providing readily accessible databases for nuclear energy related experimental and numerical benchmark data that can be used in V&V assessments and computational methods development, (4) Providing a searchable knowledge base of information, documents and data on V&V and UQ, and (5) Providing web-enabled applications, tools and utilities for V&V and UQ activities, data assessment and processing, and information and data searches. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), the Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve computational modeling and simulation (M&S) of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs. In addition, from the outset, NE-KAMS will support the use of computational M&S in the nuclear industry by developing guidelines and recommended practices aimed at quantifying the uncertainty and assessing the applicability of existing analysis models and methods. The NE-KAMS effort will initially focus on supporting the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and thermal hydraulics (T/H) analysis for M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and will later expand to include materials, fuel system performance and other areas of M&S as time and funding allow.

  17. 20Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014Energy,F β--Decay EvaluatedMgNNa

  18. NE-23

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TACi+J-UN 2DCTt-tJOF

  19. NE-23,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TACi+J-UN>:-1.

  20. NE-23:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TACi+J-UN>:-1.1 , : -2

  1. NE-24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TACi+J-UN>:-1.1 , :

  2. 18Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-State Decay Evaluated Dataargeα, X)p, X)83BCFMgNNe

  3. 18Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-State Decay Evaluated Dataargeα, X)p, X)83BCFMgNNe

  4. NE-20

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 + PROJECT

  5. NE-24

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 + PROJECTpi/L +3 *3L 52.the

  6. 17Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-State Decay Evaluated Dataargeα, X) (CurrentBCFNNe

  7. Impact of the uncertainty in ?-captures on {sup 22}Ne on the weak s-process in massive stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, N. [Astrophysics group, EPSAM, Keele University, Keele, ST5 1BH, UK and NuGrid Project (United Kingdom); Hirschi, R. [Astrophysics group, EPSAM, Keele University, Keele, ST5 1BH, UK and Kavli IPMU (WPI), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Japan); Pignatari, M. [NuGrid Project and Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel, CH-4056 (Switzerland); Herwig, F. [NuGrid Project and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8P5C2 (Canada); Beard, M. [NuGrid Project and Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Imbriani, G. [Dipartiment di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy); Grres, J.; Boer, R. J. de; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive stars at solar metallicity contribute to the production of heavy elements with atomic masses between A = 60 and A = 90 via the so-called weak s-process (which takes place during core He and shell C burning phases). Furthermore, recent studies have shown that rotation boosts the s-process production in massive stars at low metallicities, with a production that may reach the barium neutron-magic peak. These results are very sensitive to neutron source and neutron poison reaction rates. For the weak s-process, the main neutron source is the reaction {sup 22}Ne(?,n){sup 25}Mg, which is in competition with {sup 22}Ne(?,?){sup 26}Mg. The uncertainty of both rates strongly affects the nucleosynthesis predictions from stellar model calculations. In this study, we investigate the impact of the uncertainty in ?-captures on {sup 22}Ne on the s-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars both at solar and at very low metallicity. For this purpose, we post-process, with the Nugrid mppnp code, non-rotating and rotating evolutionary models 25M{sub ?} stars at two different metallicities: Z = Z{sub ?} and Z = 10{sup ?5}Z{sub ?}, respectively. Our results show that uncertainty of {sup 22}Ne(?,n){sup 25}Mg and {sup 22}Ne(?,?){sup 26}Mg rates have a significant impact on the final elemental production especially for metal poor rotating models. Beside uncertainties in the neutron source reactions, for fast rotating massive stars at low metallicity we revisit the impact of the neutron poisoning effect by the reaction chain {sup 16}O(n,?){sup 17}O(?,?){sup 21}Ne, in competition with the {sup 17}O(?,n){sup 20}Ne, recycling the neutrons captured by {sup 16}O.

  8. The response of NE 102 to 2.6-28.0 MeV neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen Dobie

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    y(c), (b) the location of T, and (c) the location of a time channel T in the 0 n neutron continuum. 16 6. H vs. E spectrum for the first data run, Ed ? 12. 5 NeV. . . 20 n Proton recoil spectrum for tine channel 35 (E = 23. 5 MeV) from... Page calculated data points of Gocding and Pugh and with the measured data points of Evans and Eellamy, Nadey et al. , and Nadey and Waterman . 42 17. Zero extrapolated ~ given in table 7 fitted to the present data and to the data of refs. 5 and 6...

  9. DOE-NE Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment: FY12 Plans Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadasivan, Pratap [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides background information on FY12 plans for the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment program. Program plans, organization, and individual project elements are described. Research objectives are: (1) Develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors; (2) Develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy; (3) Develop Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Cycles; and (4) Understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism - Goal is to enable the use of risk information to inform NE R&D program planning.

  10. Horn Operational Experience in K2K, MiniBooNE, NuMI and CNGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardons, A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives an overview of the operation and experience gained in the running of magnetic horns in conventional neutrino beam lines (K2K, MiniBooNE, NuMI and CNGS) over the last decade. Increasing beam power puts higher demands on horn conductors but even more on their hydraulic and electrical systems, while the horn environment itself becomes more hostile due to radiation. Experience shows that designing horns for remote handling and testing them extensively without beam become prerequisites for successful future neutrino beam lines.

  11. Effectiveness of projectile screening in single and multiple ionization of Ne by B{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, W.; Luna, H.; Santos, A. C. F.; Montenegro, E. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, 21945-970 RJ (Brazil); DuBois, R. D. [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Montanari, C. C.; Miraglia, J. E. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, C1428EGA, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure multiple ionization cross sections of Ne by B{sup 2+} projectiles have been measured in the energy range of 0.75 to 4.0 MeV and calculated using the continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state approximation. The experiment and calculations show that the ionization cross sections by B{sup 2+}, principally for the production of highly charged recoils, is strongly enhanced when compared to the bare projectile with the same charge state, He{sup 2+}, at the same velocities.

  12. LSND versus MiniBooNE: Sterile neutrinos with energy dependent masses and mixing?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2008-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard active--sterile neutrino oscillations do not provide a satisfactory description of the LSND evidence for neutrino oscillations together with the constraints from MiniBooNE and other null-result short-baseline oscillation experiments. However, if the mass or the mixing of the sterile neutrino depends in an exotic way on its energy all data become consistent. I explore the phenomenological consequences of the assumption that either the mass or the mixing scales with the neutrino energy as $1/E_\

  13. MiniBooNE Neutrino Physics at the University of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancu, Ion

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities conducted by the UA group under the auspices of the DoE/EPSCoR grant number DE--FG02--04ER46112 since the date of the previous progress report, i.e., since November 2005. It also provides a final report of the accomplishments achieved during the entire period of this grant (February 2004 to January 2007). The grant has fully supported the work of Dr. Yong Liu (postdoctoral research assistant -- in residence at Fermilab) on the MiniBooNE reconstruction and particle identification (PID) algorithms.

  14. Thermonuclear reaction rate of $^{18}$Ne($?$,$p$)$^{21}$Na from Monte-Carlo calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Mohr; R. Longland; C. Iliadis

    2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction impacts the break-out from the hot CNO-cycles to the $rp$-process in type I X-ray bursts. We present a revised thermonuclear reaction rate, which is based on the latest experimental data. The new rate is derived from Monte-Carlo calculations, taking into account the uncertainties of all nuclear physics input quantities. In addition, we present the reaction rate uncertainty and probability density versus temperature. Our results are also consistent with estimates obtained using different indirect approaches.

  15. Thermonuclear reaction rate of $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na from Monte-Carlo calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, P; Iliadis, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction impacts the break-out from the hot CNO-cycles to the $rp$-process in type I X-ray bursts. We present a revised thermonuclear reaction rate, which is based on the latest experimental data. The new rate is derived from Monte-Carlo calculations, taking into account the uncertainties of all nuclear physics input quantities. In addition, we present the reaction rate uncertainty and probability density versus temperature. Our results are also consistent with estimates obtained using different indirect approaches.

  16. Skåne County, Sweden: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish, Washington: EnergySkåne County,

  17. 2015 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group Meeting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE)DepartmentVery5 Annual EM/NE/SC SQA Support Group

  18. Contacts for MicroBooNE plots and other data representations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution And Bylaws |Contact UsContacts for MicroBooNE plots

  19. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Nuclear Energy (NE) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHE U.S. DEPARTMENTTechnologies09 SPRofNuclear Energy (NE) 2010

  20. Introduction to MiniBooNE and Charged Current Quasi-Elastic (CCQE) Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn OtherEnergyBPA-Film-Collection Sign In About |MiniBooNE

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - TAUP_07_MiniBooNE.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPA / SPRA / USACE MarshallWeEarlWe28MinibooNE

  2. NE-23 Disposal of Offsite-Generated Defense Radioactive Waste, Ventron

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 + PROJECTpi/L +3 *3L 52. NE-23

  3. Lead Ref Project Title Institution NE/I001794/1 Dr C Wilson The structure and stability of transport and mixing barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    adjoints: how much do we really know about the source of the Indian Ocean Tsunami? NE/I001395/1 Dr R Hager of genome-environment interactions for host- parasite evolution NE/I001816/1 Dr J Biggs Active Development for the evolution of mid-ocean ridge basalt NE/I002030/1 Dr DM Scantlebury Energetics of a super

  4. $^{22}Ne$ a primary source of neutron for the s-process and a major neutron poison in CEMP AGB stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallino, R; Husti, L; Kppeler, F; Cristallo, S; Straniero, O

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $^{22}Ne$ a primary source of neutron for the s-process and a major neutron poison in CEMP AGB stars

  5. Light charged particle emission from hot $^{32}$S$^{*}$ formed in $^{20}$Ne + $^{12}$C reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aparajita Dey; S. Bhattacharya; C. Bhattacharya; K. Banerjee; T. K. Rana; S. Kundu; S. R. Banerjee; S. Mukhopadhyay; D. Gupta; R. Saha

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusive energy distributions for light charged particles ($p, d, t$ and $\\alpha$) have been measured in the $^{20}$Ne (158, 170, 180, 200 MeV) + $^{12}$C reactions in the angular range 10$^{o}$ -- 50$^{o}$. Exclusive light charged particle energy distribution measurements were also done for the same system at 158 MeV bombarding energy by in-plane light charged particle -- fragment coincidence. Pre-equilibrium components have been separated out from proton energy spectra using moving source model considering two sources. The data have been compared with the predictions of the statistical model code CASCADE. It has been observed that significant deformation effects were needed to be introduced in the compound nucleus in order to explain the shape of the evaporated $d, t$ energy spectra. For protons, evaporated energy spectra were rather insensitive to nuclear deformation, though angular distributions could not be explained without deformation. Decay sequence of the hot $^{32}$S nucleus has been investigated through exclusive light charged particle measurements using the $^{20}$Ne (158 MeV) + $^{12}$C reaction. Information on the sequential decay chain has been extracted through comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of the statistical model. It is observed from the present analysis that exclusive light charged particle data may be used as a powerful tool to probe the decay sequence of hot light compound systems.

  6. NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSSUMMER EDITION VOLUME 13 N0. 3 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    UPPort scientists neWs FroM tHe dc FieLd FaciLitY: QUantUM HaLL eFFect in graPHene at HigH Magnetic FieLds ed NEARING COMPLETION 14 NEWS FROM THE DC FIELD FACILITY QuantuM Hall effect In grapHene at HIgH MagnetIc f

  7. Wave packet and statistical quantum calculations for the He + NeH{sup +} ? HeH{sup +} + Ne reaction on the ground electronic state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koner, Debasish; Panda, Aditya N., E-mail: adi07@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Barrios, Lizandra; Gonzlez-Lezana, Toms, E-mail: t.gonzalez.lezana@csic.es [Instituto de Fsica Fundamental, C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A real wave packet based time-dependent method and a statistical quantum method have been used to study the He + NeH{sup +} (v, j) reaction with the reactant in various ro-vibrational states, on a recently calculated ab initio ground state potential energy surface. Both the wave packet and statistical quantum calculations were carried out within the centrifugal sudden approximation as well as using the exact Hamiltonian. Quantum reaction probabilities exhibit dense oscillatory pattern for smaller total angular momentum values, which is a signature of resonances in a complex forming mechanism for the title reaction. Significant differences, found between exact and approximate quantum reaction cross sections, highlight the importance of inclusion of Coriolis coupling in the calculations. Statistical results are in fairly good agreement with the exact quantum results, for ground ro-vibrational states of the reactant. Vibrational excitation greatly enhances the reaction cross sections, whereas rotational excitation has relatively small effect on the reaction. The nature of the reaction cross section curves is dependent on the initial vibrational state of the reactant and is typical of a late barrier type potential energy profile.

  8. Search for a Direct Large-Cluster-Transfer Process in the C-12,c-13(ne-20,a) Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murakami, T.; Takahashi, N.; Lui, YW; Takada, E.; Tanner, D. M.; Tribble, Robert E.; Ungricht, E.; Nagatani, K.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.0 1.5 I I x&Q I I I I I "c("Ne,n) K~=140.2 MeV (g 1.0 0.0 1.5 o 1.0 W 0. 8 /tg C I V=~ ~&~&+. x&Q c( Nen) K~=140.8 hf:eV HE=4' (c) ~ 0.0 b 1.5 1.0 I, I I I .Io "c("Ne,a) K~=1,19.6 hf:eV 8~b=8.75' the molecular...Si) =35.3-39.4 MeV] (Ref. 18) and 16O(I2C sBe) Ne(g s ) [E ( Si) =28.2-35.2 MeV] (Ref. 19) reactions using arbitrary units. Present address: Nuclear Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195. 'tPresent address: Sumitomo Heavy...

  9. LSND and MiniBooNE within (3+1) plus NSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhmedov, Evgeny; Schwetz, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, PO Box 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently observed event excess in MiniBooNE anti-neutrino data is in agreement with the LSND evidence for electron anti-neutrino appearance. We propose an explanation of these data in terms of a (3+1) scheme with a sterile neutrino including non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) at neutrino production and detection. The interference between oscillations and NSI provides a source for CP violation which we use to reconcile different results from neutrino and anti-neutrino data. Our best fit results imply NSI at the level of a few percent relative to the standard weak interaction, in agreement with current bounds. We compare the quality of the NSI fit to the one obtained within the (3+1) and (3+2) pure oscillation frameworks.

  10. An improved Neutrino Oscillations Analysis of the MiniBooNE Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, Alexis Armando; /Columbia U.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the exclusion region in the parameter space of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations of the LSND type using a combined fit to the reconstructed energy distributions of neutrino candidate samples from the MiniBooNE data obtained with two different particle identification methods. The two {nu}{sub e} candidate samples are included together with a high statistics sample of {nu}{sub {mu}} events in the definition of a {chi}{sup 2} statistic which includes the correlations between the energy intervals of all three samples and handles the event overlap between the {nu}{sub e} samples. The {nu}{sub {mu}} sample is introduced to constrain the effect of systematic uncertainties. This analysis increases the exclusion limit in the region {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx}< 1eV{sup 2} when compared with the result previously published by the collaboration, which used a different technique.

  11. Studies of the $?$ meson with WASA at COSY and KLOE-2 at DA$?$NE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Moskal

    2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the basic motivations of the KLOE-2 and WASA-at-COSY experiments is the test of fundamental symmetries and the search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model in the hadronic and leptonic decays of ground-state mesons and in particular in decays of the $\\eta$ meson. At COSY these mesons are produced in collisions of proton or deuteron beam with hydrogen or deuterium pellet target, and at DA$\\Phi$NE $\\eta$ mesons originate from radiative decays of $\\phi$ meson or from the fusion of virtual gamma quanta exchanged between colliding electrons and positrons. This contribution includes brief description of experimental techniques used by KLOE-2 and WASA-at-COSY as well as some of physics aspects motivating investigations of production and decays of $\\eta$ mesons.

  12. Deep sea tests of a prototype of the KM3NeT digital optical module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrin-Martnez, S; Aharonian, F; Aiello, S; Albert, A; Ameli, F; Anassontzis, E G; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; de Asmundis, R; Band, H; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F; Baret, B; Baron, S; Belias, A; Berbee, E; Berg, A M van den; Berkien, A; Bertin, V; Beurthey, S; van Beveren, V; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Bianucci, S; Billault, M; Birbas, A; Rookhuizen, H Boer; Bormuth, R; Bouche, V; Bouhadef, B; Bourlis, G; Bouwhuis, M; Bozza, C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Cacopardo, G; Caillat, L; Calamai, M; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Caruso, F; Cecchini, S; Ceres, A; Cereseto, R; Champion, C; Chateau, F; Chiarusi, T; Christopoulou, B; Circella, M; Classen, L; Cocimano, R; Colonges, S; Coniglione, R; Cosquer, A; Costa, M; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Rosa, G; Deniskina, N; Destelle, J -J; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti-Hasankiadeh, Q; Drakopoulou7, E; Drouhin, D; Drury, L; Durand, D; Eberl, T; Eleftheriadis, C; Elsaesser, D; Enzenhofer, A; Fermani, P; Fusco, L A; Gajana, D; Gal, T; Galata, S; Gallo, F; Garufi, F; Gebyehu, M; Giordano, V; Gizani, N; Ruiz, R Gracia; Graf, K; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Grmek, A; Habel, R; van Haren, H; Heid, T; Heijboer, A; Heine, E; Henry, S; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hevinga, M A; van der Hoek, M; Hofestadt, J; Hogenbirk, J; Hugon, C; Hosl, J; Imbesi, M; James, C; Jansweijer, P; Jochum, J; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Kappos, E; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Keller, P; Kieft, G; Koffeman, E; Kok, H; Kooijman, P; Koopstra, J; Korporaal, A; Kouchner, A; Koutsoukos, S; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Provost, H Le; Leisos, A; Lenis, D; Leonora, E; Clark, M Lindsey; Liolios, A; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Lohner, H; Presti, D Lo; Louis, F; Maccioni, E; Mannheim, K; Manolopoulos, K; Margiotta, A; Maris, O; Markou, C; Martinez-Mora, J A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Mos, S; Moudden, Y; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolaou, C; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papageorgiou, K; Papaikonomou, A; Papaleo, R; Pavalas, G E; Peek, H; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Petridou, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, Th; Priede, M; Puhlhofer, G; Pulvirenti, S; Racca, C; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Rapidis, P A; Razis, P; Real, D; Resvanis, L; Reubelt, J; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Royon, J; Saldana, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Santangelo, A; Sapienza, P; Savvidis, I; Schmelling, J; Schnabel, J; Sedita, M; Seitz, T; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Siotis, I; Sipala, V; Solazzo, M; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J; Stolarczyk, T; Stransky, D; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Tezier, D; Theraube, S; Thompson, L F; Timmer, P; Trapierakis, H I; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tsirigotis, A; Tzamarias, S; Tzamariudaki, E; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vermeulen, J; Vernin, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D; Werneke, P; Wiggers, L; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; van Wooning, R H L; Yatkin, K; Zachariadou, K; Zonca, E; Zornoza, J D; Ziga, J; Zwart, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first prototype of a photo-detection unit of the future KM3NeT neutrino telescope has been deployed in the deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea. This digital optical module has a novel design with a very large photocathode area segmented by the use of 31 three inch photomultiplier tubes. It has been integrated in the ANTARES detector for in-situ testing and validation. This paper reports on the first months of data taking and rate measurements. The analysis results highlight the capabilities of the new module design in terms of background suppression and signal recognition. The directionality of the optical module enables the recognition of multiple Cherenkov photons from the same $^{40}$K decay and the localization bioluminescent activity in the neighbourhood. The single unit can cleanly identify atmospheric muons and provide sensitivity to the muon arrival directions.

  13. BP Studentship* in the Department of Earth Sciences of the University of Oxford Tectonic evolution of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, NE Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Parnaiba cratonic basin, NE Brazil Supervisors: Prof. A. B. Watts and Dr. M. Daly (BP) * Subject to funding structure and petroleum play. The focus will be on the Parnaiba basin in NE Brazil, one of the world in Brazil and the UK, will involve the acquisition of seismic reflection and refraction profile data along

  14. Effective versus ion thermal temperatures in the Weizmann Ne Z-pinch: Modeling and stagnation physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giuliani, J. L.; Thornhill, J. W.; Dasgupta, A.; Velikovich, A. L.; Chong, Y. K.; Mehlhorn, T. A. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)] [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Kroupp, E.; Osin, D.; Maron, Y.; Starobinets, A.; Fisher, V.; Zarnitsky, Yu.; Bernshtam, V. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)] [Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Apruzese, J. P. [Consultant to NRL through Engility Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States)] [Consultant to NRL through Engility Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States); Fisher, A. [Falculty of Physics, Technion-Israeli Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)] [Falculty of Physics, Technion-Israeli Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel); Deeney, C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89144 (United States)] [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89144 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The difference between the ion thermal and effective temperatures is investigated through simulations of the Ne gas puff z-pinch reported by Kroupp et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 105001 (2011)]. Calculations are performed using a 2D, radiation-magnetohydrodynamic code with Tabular Collisional-Radiative Equilibrium, namely Mach2-TCRE [Thornhill et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 3480 (2001)]. The extensive data set of imaging and K-shell spectroscopy from the experiments provides a challenging validation test for z-pinch simulations. Synthetic visible images of the implosion phase match the observed large scale structure if the breakdown occurs at the density corresponding to the Paschen minimum. At the beginning of stagnation (?4?ns), computed plasma conditions change rapidly showing a rising electron density and a peak in the ion thermal temperature of ?1.8?keV. This is larger than the ion thermal temperature (<400?eV) inferred from the experiment. By the time of peak K-shell power (0?ns), the calculated electron density is similar to the data and the electron and ion thermal temperatures are equilibrated, as is observed. Effective ion temperatures are obtained from calculated emission line widths accounting for thermal broadening and Doppler velocity shifts. The observed, large effective ion temperatures (?4?keV) early in the stagnation of this Ne pinch can be explained solely as a combination of compressional ion heating and steep radial velocity gradients near the axis. Approximations in the modeling are discussed in regard to the higher ion thermal temperature and lower electron density early in the stagnation compared to the experimental results.

  15. Measurements of nuclear $?$-ray line emission in interactions of protons and $?$ particles with N, O, Ne and Si

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Benhabiles-Mezhoud; J. Kiener; J. -P. Thibaud; V. Tatischeff; I. Deloncle; A. Coc; J. Duprat; C. Hamadache; A. Lefebvre-Schuhl; J. -C. Dalouzy; F. De Grancey; F. De Oliveira; F. Dayras; N. De Srville; M. -G. Pellegriti; L. Lamia; S. Ouichaoui

    2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    $\\gamma$-ray production cross sections have been measured in proton irradiations of N, Ne and Si and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of N and Ne. In the same experiment we extracted also line shapes for strong $\\gamma$-ray lines of $^{16}$O produced in proton and $\\alpha$-particle irradiations of O. For the measurements gas targets were used for N, O and Ne and a thick foil was used for Si. All targets were of natural isotopic composition. Beams in the energy range up to 26 MeV for protons and 39 MeV for $\\alpha$-particles have been delivered by the IPN-Orsay tandem accelerator. The $\\gamma$ rays have been detected with four HP-Ge detectors in the angular range 30$^{\\circ}$ to 135$^{\\circ}$. We extracted 36 cross section excitation functions for proton reactions and 14 for $\\alpha$-particle reactions. For the majority of the excitation functions no other data exist to our knowledge. Where comparison with existing data was possible usually a very good agreement was found. It is shown that these data are very interesting for constraining nuclear reaction models. In particular the agreement of cross section calculations in the nuclear reaction code TALYS with the measured data could be improved by adjusting the coupling schemes of collective levels in the target nuclei $^{14}$N, $^{20,22}$Ne and $^{28}$Si. The importance of these results for the modeling of nuclear $\\gamma$-ray line emission in astrophysical sites is discussed.

  16. 6 JUNE 2014 VOL 344 ISSUE 6188 1095SCIENCE sciencemag.org ne reason for the use of biofuels is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    6 JUNE 2014 VOL 344 ISSUE 6188 1095SCIENCE sciencemag.org O ne reason for the use of biofuels good and bad outcomes, depending on the approach (1). Thus, comments about biofuels in recent reports of indirect land-use change on GHG emissions (5) identified the possibility that biofuels may endan- ger

  17. INELASTIC PROCESSES IN 0.11000 keV/u COLLISIONS OF Ne q+ (q=710) IONS WITH ATOMIC HYDROGEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4 INELASTIC PROCESSES IN 0.1­1000 keV/u COLLISIONS OF Ne q+ (q=7­10) IONS WITH ATOMIC HYDROGEN D to recycle hydrogen, and how to remove heat from the plasma. Cooling is required both to extract heat to run transfer, hydrogen and impurity radiation, ionization, and elastic collisions between the recycling gas

  18. The Neoproterozoic Keraf Suture in NE Sudan: Sinistral Transpression along the Eastern Margin of West Gondwana1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    The Neoproterozoic Keraf Suture in NE Sudan: Sinistral Transpression along the Eastern Margin Sudan remains poorly under-2 University of Houston Department of Geosciences, Hous- stood because of its Geological Research Authority of the Sudan, Regional Ge- ology Administration, Box 410, Khartoum, Sudan

  19. An Extragalactic Spectroscopic Survey of the SSA22 Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saez, C; Bauer, F E; Stern, D; Gonzales, A; Rreza, I; Alexander, D M; Matsuda, Y; Geach, J E; Harrison, F A; Havashino, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present VLT VIMOS, Keck DEIMOS and Keck LRIS multi-object spectra of 367 sources in the field of the z ~ 3.09 protocluster SSA22. Sources are spectroscopically classified via template matching, allowing new identifications for 206 extragalactic sources, including 36 z > 2 Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) and Lyman-a emitters (LAEs), 8 protocluster members, and 94 X-ray sources from the ~ 400 ks Chandra deep survey of SSA22. Additionally, in the area covered by our study, we have increased by ~ 4, 13, and 6 times the number of reliable redshifts of sources at 1.0 3.4, and with X-Ray emission, respectively. We compare our results with past spectroscopic surveys of SSA22 to investigate the completeness of the LBGs and the X-Ray properties of the new spectroscopically-classified sources in the SSA22 field.

  20. EVALUATING SYSTEMATIC DEPENDENCIES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE: THE INFLUENCE OF PROGENITOR {sup 22}Ne CONTENT ON DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsley, Dean M. [Department of Astronomy/Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Jackson, Aaron P.; Calder, Alan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York - Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Chamulak, David A.; Brown, Edward F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Timmes, F. X. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)], E-mail: townsley@as.arizona.edu

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical framework for formal study of systematic effects in supernovae Type Ia (SNe Ia) that utilizes two-dimensional simulations to implement a form of the deflagration-detonation transition (DDT) explosion scenario. The framework is developed from a randomized initial condition that leads to a sample of simulated SNe Ia whose {sup 56}Ni masses have a similar average and range to those observed, and have many other modestly realistic features such as the velocity extent of intermediate-mass elements. The intended purpose is to enable statistically well defined studies of both physical and theoretical parameters of the SNe Ia explosion simulation. We present here a thorough description of the outcome of the SNe Ia explosions produced by our current simulations. A first application of this framework is utilized to study the dependence of the SNe Ia on the {sup 22}Ne content, which is known to be directly influenced by the progenitor stellar population's metallicity. Our study is very specifically tailored to measure how the {sup 22}Ne content influences the competition between the rise of plumes of burned material and the expansion of the star before these plumes reach DDT conditions. This influence arises from the dependence of the energy release, progenitor structure, and laminar flame speed on {sup 22}Ne content. For this study, we explore these three effects for a fixed carbon content and DDT density. By setting the density at which nucleosynthesis takes place during the detonation phase of the explosion, the competition between plume rise and stellar expansion controls the amount of material in nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) and therefore {sup 56}Ni produced. Of particular interest is how this influence of {sup 22}Ne content compares to the direct modification of the {sup 56}Ni mass via the inherent neutron excess as discussed by Timmes et al. Although the outcome following from any particular ignition condition can change dramatically with {sup 22}Ne content, with a sample of 20 ignition conditions we find that the systematic change in the expansion of the star prior to detonation is not large enough to compete with the dependence discussed by Timmes et al. In fact, our results show no statistically significant dependence of the predetonation expansion on {sup 22}Ne content, pointing to the morphology of the ignition condition as being the dominant dynamical driver of the {sup 56}Ni yield of the explosion. However, variations in the DDT density, which were specifically excluded here, are also expected to be important and to depend systematically on {sup 22}Ne content.

  1. Evolution of massive fields around a black hole in Horava gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijo Varghese; V C Kuriakose

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution of massive scalar field in the spacetime geometry of Kehagias-Sfetsos(KS) black hole in deformed Horava-Lifshitz(HL) gravity by numerical analysis. We find that the signature of HL theory is encoded in the quasinormal mode(QNM) phase of the evolution of field. The QNM phase in the evolution process lasts for a longer time in HL theory. QNMs involved in the evolution of massive field are calculated and find that they have a higher oscillation frequency and a lower damping rate than the Schwarzschild spacetime case. We also study the relaxation of field in the intermediate and asymptotic range and verified that behaviors of field in these phases are independent of the HL parameter and is identical to the Schwarzschild case.

  2. Unidade Qtd Solicitao Valor Unidade Solic. Atendida N Empenho Valor Unitrio em R$Valor Total em R$ Vr Gasto Unidade Saldo 9 (nove) Computadores "Perfil 1"; OK 2008 NE911222 1.450,00 13.050,00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Rudolf Richard

    R$ Vr Gasto Unidade Saldo 9 (nove) Computadores "Perfil 1"; OK 2008 NE911222 1.450,00 13.050,00 17.964,00 3.928,00 4 (quatro) Computadores "Perfil 1"; OK 2008 NE911295 1.450,00 5.800,00 10 (dez) Nobreaks de 1000VA; OK 2008 NE911531 510,00 5.100,00 30 (trinta) Computadores "Perfil 1"; OK 2008 NE911296 1.450

  3. Vortfarado en Esperanto. Pao 2 (15.02.2013) uvaoj ne dancas ardaon en ikago. a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p r s t u v z1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pentus, Mati

    ekzistas verdaj steloj (Adaptita teksto) Liven Dek Li deliris: -- Mi ne timas la morton, ar mi plu vidos

  4. Lead Grant Reference Lead Grant RO Grant Holder Last Name, First Name Project Title NE/K000071/1 Newcastle University Mr R Gaulton Dual-wavelength laser scanning for forest health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newcastle University Mr R Gaulton Dual-wavelength laser scanning for forest health monitoring. NE/K000381/1Lead Grant Reference Lead Grant RO Grant Holder Last Name, First Name Project Title NE/K000071/1 and sensory mechanisms in bat navigation NE/K000403/1 University of Southampton Dr S Watt Emplacement dynamics

  5. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Frio sandstones, Nine Mile Point Field, Aransas County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Raina Rae

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1976 Ma) or Suh) ect: Geology DEPOSZTZONAL ENVIRCNMENT AND RESERVOIR MORPHOLOCY OF THE FRIO SANDSTONES ~ NINE MILE POI?f FIELD y ARANSAS CXIPIY ~ TEXAS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ttee) ead... of Department (M August 1976 Depositional Environment and Reservoir Norphology of the Frio Sandstones, N1ne Nile Point Field, Aransas County~ Texas (August 1975) ~ Rains Rae Powell~ B, S? ~ Stephen F Austin State University Ch~ of Advisory Caamitteee Dr...

  6. Data Reduction Processes Using FPGA for MicroBooNE Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jinyuan

    2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    MicroBooNE is a liquid Argon time projection chamber to be built at Fermilab for an accelerator-based neutrino physics experiment and as part of the R&D strategy for a large liquid argon detector at DUSEL. The waveforms of the {approx}9000 sense wires in the chamber are continuously digitized at 2 M samples/s - which results in a large volume of data coming off the TPC. We have developed a lossless data reduction scheme based on Huffman Coding and have tested the scheme on cosmic ray data taken from a small liquid Argon time projection chamber, the BO detector. For sense wire waveforms produced by cosmic ray tracks, the Huffman Coding scheme compresses the data by a factor of approximately 10. The compressed data can be fully recovered back to the original data since the compression is lossless. In addition to accelerator neutrino data, which comes with small duty cycle in sync with the accelerator beam spill, continuous digitized waveforms are to be temporarily stored in the MicroBooNE data-acquisition system for about an hour, long enough for an external alert from possible supernova events. Another scheme, Dynamic Decimation, has been developed to compress further the potential supernova data so that the storage can be implemented within a reasonable budget. In the Dynamic Decimation scheme, data are sampled at the full sampling rate in the regions-of-interest (ROI) containing waveforms of track-hits and are decimated down to lower sampling rate outside the ROI. Note that unlike in typical zerosuppression schemes, in Dynamic Decimation, the data in the pedestal region are not thrown away but kept at a lower sampling rate. An additional factor of 10 compression ratio is achieved using the Dynamic Decimation scheme on the BO detector data, making a total compression rate of approximate 100 when the Dynamic Decimation and the Huffman Coding functional blocks are cascaded. Both of the blocks are compiled in low-cost FPGA and their silicon resource usages are low.

  7. Demonstration Assessment of LED Roadway Lighting: NE Cully Boulevard Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Tuenge, Jason R.

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new roadway lighting demonstration project was initiated in late 2010, which was planned in conjunction with other upgrades to NE Cully Boulevard, a residential collector road in the northeast area of Portland, OR. With the NE Cully Boulevard project, the Portland Bureau of Transportation hoped to demonstrate different light source technologies and different luminaires side-by-side. This report documents the initial performance of six different newly installed luminaires, including three LED products, one induction product, one ceramic metal halide product, and one high-pressure sodium (HPS) product that represented the baseline solution. It includes reported, calculated, and measured performance; evaluates the economic feasibility of each of the alternative luminaires; and documents user feedback collected from a group of local Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) members that toured the site. This report does not contain any long-term performance evaluations or laboratory measurements of luminaire performance. Although not all of the installed products performed equally, the alternative luminaires generally offered higher efficacy, more appropriate luminous intensity distributions, and favorable color quality when compared to the baseline HPS luminaire. However, some products did not provide sufficient illumination to all areasvehicular drive lanes, bicycle lanes, and sidewalksor would likely fail to meet design criteria over the life of the installation due to expected depreciation in lumen output. While the overall performance of the alternative luminaires was generally better than the baseline HPS luminaire, cost remains a significant barrier to widespread adoption. Based on the cost of the small quantity of luminaires purchased for this demonstration, the shortest calculated payback period for one of the alternative luminaire types was 17.3 years. The luminaire prices were notably higher than typical prices for currently available luminaires purchased in larger quantities. At prices that are more typical, the payback would be less than 10 years. In addition to the demonstration luminaires, a networked control system was installed for additional evaluation and demonstration purposes. The capability of control system to measure luminaire input power was explored in this study. A more exhaustive demonstration and evaluation of the control system will be the subject of future GATEWAY report(s).

  8. Improved Search for ??????e Oscillations in the MiniBooNE Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Cheng, G.; Church, E. D.; Conrad, J. M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; et al

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab reports results from an analysis of ?e appearance data from 11.2710? protons on target in the antineutrino mode, an increase of approximately a factor of 2 over the previously reported results. An event excess of 78.428.5 events (2.8?) is observed in the energy range 200QE????e, the best oscillation fit to the excess has a probability of 66% while the background-only fit has a ? probability of 0.5% relative to the best fit. The data are consistent with antineutrino oscillations in the 0.01moresome overlap with the evidence for antineutrino oscillations from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector. All of the major backgrounds are constrained by in situ event measurements so nonoscillation explanations would need to invoke new anomalous background processes. The neutrino mode running also shows an excess at low energy of 162.047.8 events (3.4?) but the energy distribution of the excess is marginally compatible with a simple two neutrino oscillation formalism. Expanded models with several sterile neutrinos can reduce the incompatibility by allowing for CP violating effects between neutrino and antineutrino oscillations.less

  9. Particle decay branching ratios for states of astrophysical importance in 19Ne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. W. Visser; J. A. Caggiano; R. Lewis; W. B. Handler; A. Parikh; P. D. Parker

    2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured proton and alpha-particle branching ratios of excited states in 19Ne formed using the 19F(3He,t) reaction at a beam energy of 25 MeV. These ratios have a large impact on the astrophysical reaction rates of 15O(alpha,gamma), 18F(p,gamma) and 18F(p,alpha), which are of interest in understanding energy generation in x-ray bursts and in interpreting anticipated gamma-ray observations of novae. We detect decay protons and alpha-particles using a silicon detector array in coincidence with tritons measured in the focal plane detector of our Enge split-pole spectrograph. The silicon array consists of five strip detectors of the type used in the Louvain-Edinburgh Detector Array, subtending angles from 130 degrees to 165 degrees with approximately 14% lab efficiency. The correlation angular distributions give additional confidence in some prior spin-parity assignments that were based on gamma branchings. We measure Gamma_p/Gamma=0.387+-0.016 for the 665 keV proton resonance, which agrees well with the direct measurement of Bardayan et al.

  10. Color transparency after the NE18 and E665 experiments: Outllok and perspectives at CEBAF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Nemchik; N. N. Nikolaev; B. G. Zakharov

    1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    CEBAF is a high-luminocity factory of virtual photons with variable virtuality $Q^{2}$ and transverse size. This makes CEBAF, in particular after the energy upgrade to (8-12)GeV, an ideal facility for uncovering new phenomena, and opening new windows, at the interface of the perturbative and nonperturbative QCD. We discuss color transparency as the case for a broad program on electroproduction of vector mesons $\\rho^{0},\\,\\omega^{0},\\,\\phi^{0}$ and their radial excitations $\\rho',\\,\\omega',\\,\\phi'$ at CEBAF. We also comment on the second generation of experiments on color transparency in $^{4}He(e,e'p)$ scattering, which are also feasible at CEBAF. In 1994, we can make more reliable projections into future because our understanding of the onset of color transparency has greatly been augmented by two experiments completed in 1993:\\\\ i) no effect of CT was seen in the SLAC NE18 experiment on $A(e,e'p)$ scattering at virtualities of the exchanged photon $Q^{2} \\lsim 7$ GeV$^{2}$, \\\\ ii) strong signal of CT was observed in the FNAL E665 experiment on exclusive $\\rho^{0}$- meson production in deep inelastic scattering in the same range of $Q^{2}$. \\\\ We discuss the impact of these observations on the CEBAF experimental program. We argue they both are good news, both were anticipated theoretically, and both rule in the correct QCD mechanism of the onset of CT.

  11. Improved Search for ??????e Oscillations in the MiniBooNE Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Cheng, G.; Church, E. D.; Conrad, J. M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Garvey, G. T.; Grange, J.; Huelsnitz, W.; Ignarra, C.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R. A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Katori, T.; Kobilarcik, T.; Louis, W. C.; Mariani, C.; Marsh, W.; Mills, G. B.; Mirabal, J.; Moore, C. D.; Mousseau, J.; Nienaber, P.; Osmanov, B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C. C.; Ray, H.; Roe, B. P.; Russell, A. D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Tayloe, R.; Van de Water, R. G.; White, D. H.; Wickremasinghe, D. A.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab reports results from an analysis of ?e appearance data from 11.2710? protons on target in the antineutrino mode, an increase of approximately a factor of 2 over the previously reported results. An event excess of 78.428.5 events (2.8?) is observed in the energy range 200QE????e, the best oscillation fit to the excess has a probability of 66% while the background-only fit has a ? probability of 0.5% relative to the best fit. The data are consistent with antineutrino oscillations in the 0.01

  12. High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base that will provide technical services and resources for V&V and UQ of M&S in nuclear energy sciences and engineering. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the CASL, NEAMS, Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs.

  13. Comment on "15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne Breakout Reaction and Impact on X-Ray Bursts"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Davids

    2008-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently published letter reports a measurement of alpha decay from states in 19Ne at excitation energies below 4.5 MeV. The measured alpha decay branching ratios B_alpha are used to calculate the astrophysical rate of the 15O(alpha,gamma)19Ne reaction and to draw conclusions regarding the transition between steady state and unstable nuclear burning on accreting neutron stars. Here I show that the calculated astrophysical reaction rate is based on an unreliable value of B_alpha for the 4.03 MeV state and point out a serious internal inconsistency in the letter's treatment of low statistics alpha decay measurements.

  14. Detailed microscopic calculation of stellar electron and positron capture rates on $^{24}$Mg for O+Ne+Mg core simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jameel-Un Nabi

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Few white dwarfs, located in binary systems, may acquire sufficiently high mass accretion rates resulting in the burning of carbon and oxygen under nondegenerate conditions forming a O+Ne+Mg core. These O+Ne+Mg cores are gravitationally less bound than more massive progenitor stars and can release more energy due to the nuclear burning. They are also amongst the probable candidates for low entropy r-process sites. Recent observations of subluminous Type II-P supernovae (e.g., 2005cs, 2003gd, 1999br, 1997D) were able to rekindle the interest in 8 -- 10 M$_{\\odot}$ which develop O+Ne+Mg cores. Microscopic calculations of capture rates on $^{24}$Mg, which may contribute significantly to the collapse of O+Ne+Mg cores, using shell model and proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory, were performed earlier and comparisons made. Simulators, however, may require these capture rates on a fine scale. For the first time a detailed microscopic calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on $^{24}$Mg on an extensive temperature-density scale is presented here. This type of scale is more appropriate for interpolation purposes and of greater utility for simulation codes. The calculations are done using the pn-QRPA theory using a separable interaction. The deformation parameter, believed to be a key parameter in QRPA calculations, is adopted from experimental data to further increase the reliability of the QRPA results. The resulting calculated rates are up to a factor of 14 or more enhanced as compared to shell model rates and may lead to some interesting scenario for core collapse simulators.

  15. Using MiniBooNE NCEL and CCQE cross section results to constrain 3+1 sterile neutrino models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callum Wilkinson; Susan Cartwright; Lee Thompson

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE NCEL and CCQE cross-section measurements (neutrino running) are used to set limits in the $\\Delta m^{2}-\\sin^{2}\\vartheta_{\\mu s}$ plane for a 3+1 sterile neutrino model with a mass splitting $0.1 \\leq \\Delta m^{2} \\leq 10.0$ eV$^{2}$. GENIE is used, with a relativistic Fermi gas model, to relate $E_{\

  16. Experimental study of a Ne-H{sub 2} Penning Recombination Laser in a helical hollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pramatarov, P.M.; Stefanova, M.S.; Petrov, G.M. [Georgy Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Penning recombination lasers (PRL), as first proposed in, operate in non-equilibrium recombination plasma where the upper laser level (ULL) is populated by the recombination flux and the lower laser level (LLL) is depopulated by Penning reactions. The lack of chemical activity and degradation of the laser mixture, lasing in the visible spectral region and high output power obtained attract the attention to the Ne-H{sub 2} PRL operating on the NeI 585.3 nm line (the 2p{sub 1}-1s{sub 2} transition). Despite the most powerful PRL are pumped by electron beams of relativistic energies, it is of practical interest to realize PRL pumped in a hollow cathode discharge where beam of high energy primary electrons exists. In this study a detailed experimental investigation of a Ne-H{sub 2} PRL operating in a helical hollow cathode discharge is carried out. The obtained data are compared with the results of the theoretical model. The laser tube design is similar to that used in our previous work. The cathode is made of Mo band 10 mm wide, helically wound with a 15 mm pitch to form a cylindrical hollow. Five laser tubes with different cathode diameters (5.5-12 mm) and lengths (110-280 mm) are investigated.

  17. Are oxygen and neon enriched in PNe and is the current solar Ne/O abundance ratio underestimated?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Wang; X. -W. Liu

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough critical literature survey has been carried out for reliable measurements of oxygen and neon abundances of planetary nebulae (PNe) and HII regions. By contrasting the results of PNe and of HII regions, we aim to address the issues of the evolution of oxygen and neon in the interstellar medium (ISM) and in the late evolutionary phases of low- and intermediate-mass stars (LIMS), as well as the currently hotly disputed solar Ne/O abundance ratio. Through the comparisons, we find that neon abundance and Ne/O ratio increase with increasing oxygen abundance in both types of nebulae, with positive correlation coefficients larger than 0.75. The correlations suggest different enrichment mechanisms for oxygen and neon in the ISM, in the sense that the growth of neon is delayed compared to oxygen. The differences of abundances between PNe and HII regions, are mainly attributed to the results of nucleosynthesis and dredge-up processes that occurred in the progenitor stars of PNe. We find that both these alpha-elements are significantly enriched at low metallicity (initial oxygen abundance oxygen in intermediate mass stars (IMS) of low initial metallicities and in more massive stars, a conjecture that requires verification by further theoretical studies. This result also strongly suggests that both the solar neon abundance and the Ne/O ratio should be revised upwards by ~0.22 dex from the Asplund, Grevesse & Sauval values or by ~0.14 dex from the Grevesse & Sauval values.

  18. Investigation of thermonuclear $^{18}$Ne($?$,$p$)$^{21}$Na rate via resonant elastic scattering of $^{21}$Na+$p$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Y. Zhang; J. J. He; A. Parikh; S. W. Xu; H. Yamaguchi; D. Kahl; S. Kubono; P. Mohr; J. Hu; P. Ma; S. Z. Chen; Y. Wakabayashi; H. W. Wang; W. D. Tian; R. F. Chen; B. Guo; T. Hashimoto; Y. Togano; S. Hayakawa; T. Teranishi; N. Iwasa; T. Yamada; T. Komatsubara; Y. H. Zhang; X. H. Zhou

    2014-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction is thought to be one of the key breakout reactions from the hot CNO cycles to the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. In this work, the resonant properties of the compound nucleus $^{22}$Mg have been investigated by measuring the resonant elastic scattering of $^{21}$Na+$p$. An 89 MeV $^{21}$Na radioactive beam delivered from the CNS Radioactive Ion Beam Separator bombarded an 8.8 mg/cm$^2$ thick polyethylene (CH$_{2}$)$_{n}$ target. The $^{21}$Na beam intensity was about 2$\\times$10$^{5}$ pps, with a purity of about 70% on target. The recoiled protons were measured at the center-of-mass scattering angles of $\\theta_{c.m.}$$\\approx$175.2${^\\circ}$, 152.2${^\\circ}$, and 150.5${^\\circ}$ by three sets of $\\Delta E$-$E$ telescopes, respectively. The excitation function was obtained with the thick-target method over energies $E_x$($^{22}$Mg)=5.5--9.2 MeV. In total, 23 states above the proton-threshold in $^{22}$Mg were observed, and their resonant parameters were determined via an $R$-matrix analysis of the excitation functions. We have made several new $J^{\\pi}$ assignments and confirmed some tentative assignments made in previous work. The thermonuclear $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na rate has been recalculated based on our recommended spin-parity assignments. The astrophysical impact of our new rate has been investigated through one-zone postprocessing x-ray burst calculations. We find that the $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na rate significantly affects the peak nuclear energy generation rate, reaction fluxes, as well as the onset temperature of this breakout reaction in these astrophysical phenomena.

  19. Numerical analysis of similarity of barrier discharges in the 0.95 Ne/0.05 Xe mixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avtaeva, S. V.; Kulumbaev, E. B. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Established dynamic regimes of similar (with a scale factor of 10) barrier discharges in the 0.95 Ne/0.05 Xe mixture are simulated in a one-dimensional drift-diffusion model. The similarity is examined of barrier discharges excited in gaps of lengths 0.4 and 4 mm at gas pressures of 350 and 35 Torr and dielectric layer thicknesses of 0.2 and 2 mm, the frequencies of the 400-V ac voltage applied to the discharge electrodes being 100 and 10 kHz, respectively.

  20. Ks-band detection of thermal emission and color constraints to CoRoT-1b: A low-albedo planet with inefficient atmospheric energy redistribution and a temperature inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Justin C; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Sing, David K; Burrows, Adam

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection in Ks-band of the secondary eclipse of the hot Jupiter CoRoT-1b, from time series photometry with the ARC 3.5-m telescope at Apache Point Observatory. The eclipse shows a depth of 0.336+/-0.042 percent and is centered at phase 0.5022 (+0.0023,-0.0027), consistent with a zero eccentricity orbit ecos{\\omega} = 0.0035 (+0.0036,-0.0042). We perform the first optical to near-infrared multi-band photometric analysis of an exoplanet's atmosphere and constrain the reflected and thermal emissions by combining our result with the recent 0.6, 0.71, and 2.09 micron secondary eclipse detections by Snellen et al. (2009), Gillon et al. (2009), and Alonso et al. (2009a). Comparing the multi-wavelength detections to state-of-the-art radiative-convective chemical-equilibrium atmosphere models, we find the near-infrared fluxes difficult to reproduce. The closest blackbody-based and physical models provide the following atmosphere parameters: a temperature T = 2454 (+84,-170) K, a very low Bond albedo A_B...

  1. Electron density and temperature profile diagnostics for C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, B. H.; Kinley, J. S.; Schroeder, J. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 9-point Thomson scattering diagnostic system for the C-2 field reversed configuration plasmas is improved and the measured electron temperature profiles are consistent with theoretical expectations. Rayleigh scattering revealed a finite line width of the ruby laser emission, which complicates density calibration. Taking advantage of the plasma wobble motion, density profile reconstruction accuracy from the 6-chord two-color CO{sub 2}/HeNe interferometer data is improved.

  2. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of the Frio sandstones, Nine Mile Point Field, Aransas County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Raina Rae

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department (M August 1976 Depositional Environment and Reservoir Norphology of the Frio Sandstones, N1ne Nile Point Field, Aransas County~ Texas (August 1975) ~ Rains Rae Powell~ B, S? ~ Stephen F Austin State University Ch~ of Advisory Caamitteee Dr...), massive and laminated (AB) ~ and laminated only (B) divisions characterize the Frio, Bedsets are of'ten separated by middle-neritic, h1oturbated shales (E), and occasionally a rippled (C) and finely laminated (D) division are present A and AB bedsets...

  3. The Uncertainties in the 22Ne + alpha-capture Reaction Rates and the Production of the Heavy Magnesium Isotopes in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars of Intermediate Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Karakas; M. Lugaro; M. Wiescher; J. Goerres; C. Ugalde

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new rates for the 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg and 22Ne(alpha,gamma)26Mg reactions, with uncertainties that have been considerably reduced compared to previous estimates, and we study how these new rates affect the production of the heavy magnesium isotopes in models of intermediate mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars of different initial compositions. All the models have deep third dredge-up, hot bottom burning and mass loss. Calculations have been performed using the two most commonly used estimates of the 22Ne + alpha rates as well as the new recommended rates, and with combinations of their upper and lower limits. The main result of the present study is that with the new rates, uncertainties on the production of isotopes from Mg to P coming from the 22Ne + alpha-capture rates have been considerably reduced. We have therefore removed one of the important sources of uncertainty to effect models of AGB stars. We have studied the effects of varying the mass-loss rate on nucleosynthesis and discuss other uncertainties related to the physics employed in the computation of stellar structure, such as the modeling of convection, the inclusion of a partial mixing zone and the definition of convective borders. These uncertainties are found to be much larger than those coming from 22Ne + alpha-capture rates, when using our new estimates. Much effort is needed to improve the situation for AGB models.

  4. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13,Conservation BillingFieldField

  5. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  6. Forward fitting of experimental data from a NE213 neutron detector installed with the magnetic proton recoil upgraded spectrometer at JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binda, F., E-mail: federico.binda@physics.uu.se; Ericsson, G.; Eriksson, J.; Hellesen, C.; Conroy, S.; Sundn, E. Andersson [Department of Physics and Astronomy, EURATOM-VR Association, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Team

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present the results obtained from the data analysis of neutron spectra measured with a NE213 liquid scintillator at JET. We calculated the neutron response matrix of the instrument combining MCNPX simulations, a generic proton light output function measured with another detector and the fit of data from ohmic pulses. For the analysis, we selected a set of pulses with neutral beam injection heating (NBI) only and we applied a forward fitting procedure of modeled spectral components to extract the fraction of thermal neutron emission. The results showed the same trend of the ones obtained with the dedicated spectrometer TOFOR, even though the values from the NE213 analysis were systematically higher. This discrepancy is probably due to the different lines of sight of the two spectrometers (tangential for the NE213, vertical for TOFOR). The uncertainties on the thermal fraction estimates were from 4 to 7 times higher than the ones from the TOFOR analysis.

  7. 1771DECEMBER 2002AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | ne of the more stunning features of the images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; ILLINGWORTH AND O'CONNOR--Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, Berkshire, United Kingdom of the atmosphere. By tracking movements of individual cloud elements we can also determine the wind fields (e the energy budget of the planet. They tend to cool the earth by reflecting sunlight back to space while

  8. Magnetic fields of the W4 superbubble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, X Y; Reich, P; Han, J L; Kothes, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superbubbles and supershells are the channels for transferring mass and energy from the Galactic disk to the halo. Magnetic fields are believed to play a vital role in their evolution. We study the radio continuum and polarized emission properties of the W4 superbubble to determine its magnetic field strength. New sensitive radio continuum observations were made at 6 cm, 11 cm, and 21 cm. The total intensity measurements were used to derive the radio spectrum of the W4 superbubble. The linear polarization data were analysed to determine the magnetic field properties within the bubble shells. The observations show a multi-shell structure of the W4 superbubble. A flat radio continuum spectrum that stems from optically thin thermal emission is derived from 1.4 GHz to 4.8 GHz. By fitting a passive Faraday screen model and considering the filling factor fne , we obtain the thermal electron density ne = 1.0/\\sqrt{fne} (\\pm5%) cm^-3 and the strength of the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field B// = -5.0/\\sq...

  9. Measurement of Time-dependent CP-Violating Asymmetries in B0 --> KsKsKs Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present preliminary measurements of the CP asymmetry parameters in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays, reconstructing two of the K{sub S}{sup 0} into {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and one into {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. In a sample of 227 M B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC, they find the CP parameters to be S = -0.25{sub -0.61}{sup +0.68}(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst) and C = 0.56{sub -0.43}{sup +0.34}(stat) {+-} 004(syst). Combining this result with the previous BABAR measurement, obtained from events with three K{sub S}{sup 0} decaying into {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, they get S = -0.63{sub -0.28}{sup +0.32}(stat) {+-} 0.04(syst); C = -0.10 {+-} 0.25(stat) {+-} 0.05, (syst).

  10. Amplitude Analysis and Measurement of the Time-dependent CP Asymmetry of B0 to KsKsKs Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results on the Dalitz-plot structure and improved measurements of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters of the process B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} obtained using 468 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The Dalitz-plot structure is probed by a time-integrated amplitude analysis that does not distinguish between B{sup 0} and {bar B}{sup 0} decays. We measure the total inclusive branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = (6.19 {+-} 0.48 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third represents the Dalitz-plot signal model dependence. We also observe evidence for the intermediate resonant states f{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1710), and f{sub 2}(2010). Their respective product branching fractions are measured to be (2.70{sub -1.19}{sup +1.25} {+-} 0.36 {+-} 1.17) x 10{sup -6}, (0.50{sub -0.24}{sup +0.46} {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -6}, and (0.54{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21} {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.52) x 10{sup -6}. Additionally, we determine the mixing-induced CP-violation parameters to be S = -0.94{sub -0.21}{sup +0.24} {+-} 0.06 and C = -0.17 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. These values are in agreement with the standard model expectation.

  11. Discovery of the high--ionization emission line [Ne V] 3426 in the blue compact dwarf galaxy Tol 1214-277

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. I. Izotov; K. G. Noeske; N. G. Guseva; P. Papaderos; T. X. Thuan; K. J. Fricke

    2004-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the high-ionization [Ne V] 3426A emission line in the spectrum of the blue compact dwarf (BCD) galaxy Tol 1214-277 is reported. The detection of this line implies the presence of intense ionizing X-ray emission with a luminosity in the range 10^39-10^40 erg/s. Such a high X-ray luminosity cannot be reproduced by models of massive stellar populations. Other mechanisms, such as fast shocks or accretion of gas in high-mass X-ray binaries need to be invoked to account for the high intensity of the [Ne V] 3426A emission line.

  12. Towards secondary ion mass spectrometry on the helium ion microscope: An experimental and simulation based feasibility study with He{sup +} and Ne{sup +} bombardment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirtz, T.; Vanhove, N.; Pillatsch, L.; Dowsett, D. [Department of Science and Analysis of Materials (SAM), Centre de Recherche Public - Gabriel Lippmann, 41 rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Sijbrandij, S.; Notte, J. [Carl Zeiss NTS LLC, One Corporation Way, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States)

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of the high-brightness He{sup +}/Ne{sup +} atomic level ion source with secondary ion mass spectrometry detection capabilities opens up the prospect of obtaining chemical information with high lateral resolution and high sensitivity on the Zeiss ORION helium ion microscope. The analytical performance in terms of sputtering yield, useful yield, and detection limit is studied and subsequently optimized by oxygen and cesium flooding. Detection limits down to 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -5} can be obtained for silicon using Ne{sup +} and He{sup +}, respectively. A simulation based study reveals furthermore that a lateral resolution <10 nm can be obtained.

  13. Microsoft Word - Gage-KS.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE SWPAURTeC:8CO6 Figure Fuel3S FINAL

  14. Category:Goodland, KS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashton GreensVisualizations.in category

  15. Category:Wichita, KS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashtonGo BackLocationSmartTechniques page?

  16. Studies of the $\\eta$ meson with WASA at COSY and KLOE-2 at DA$\\Phi$NE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moskal, P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the basic motivations of the KLOE-2 and WASA-at-COSY experiments is the test of fundamental symmetries and the search for phenomena beyond the Standard Model in the hadronic and leptonic decays of ground-state mesons and in particular in decays of the $\\eta$ meson. At COSY these mesons are produced in collisions of proton or deuteron beam with hydrogen or deuterium pellet target, and at DA$\\Phi$NE $\\eta$ mesons originate from radiative decays of $\\phi$ meson or from the fusion of virtual gamma quanta exchanged between colliding electrons and positrons. This contribution includes brief description of experimental techniques used by KLOE-2 and WASA-at-COSY as well as some of physics aspects motivating investigations of production and decays of $\\eta$ mesons.

  17. Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title NE/I015299/1 Robert Upstill-Goddard Newcastle University Surfactant control of air-sea gas exchange in coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title NE/I015299/1 Robert Upstill NE/I015361/1 Timothy Heaton NERC British Geological Survey The oxygen isotope composition's University of Belfast 14C as a tool to trace terrestrial carbon in a complex lake: implications for food

  18. VOLUME 87, NUMBER 20 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 12 NOVEMBER 2001 Evidence Concerning Drying Behavior of Ne near a Cs Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Drying Behavior of Ne near a Cs Surface Francesco Ancilotto,1 Stefano Curtarolo,2 Flavio Toigo,1) Using density functional and Monte Carlo methods, we have studied the properties of Ne adsorbed on a Cs and grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations; we have im- proved somewhat upon techniques used in our

  19. Using the X-FEL to photo-pump X-ray laser transitions in He-like Ne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Rohringer, N

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearly four decades ago H-like and He-like resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes were proposed for producing X-ray lasers. However, demonstrating these schemes in the laboratory has proved to be elusive because of the difficulty of finding a strong resonant pump line. With the advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) we now have a tunable X-ray laser source that can be used to replace the pump line in previously proposed laser schemes and allow researchers to study the physics and feasibility of resonantly photo-pumped laser schemes. In this paper we use the X-FEL at 1174 eV to photo-pump the singly excited 1s2p state of He-like Ne to the doubly excited 2p3p state and model gain on the 2p3p-2p2s transition at 175 eV and the 2p3p-1s3p transition at 1017 eV. One motivation for studying this scheme is to explore possible quenching of the gain due to strong non-linear coupling effects from the intense X-FEL beam We compare this scheme with photo-pumping the He-like Ne ground state to the 1s3p singly excited state followed by lasing on the 3p-2s and 3d-2p transitions at 158 and 151 eV. Experiments are being planned at LCLS to study these laser processes and coherent quantum effects.

  20. Smooth Field Theories and Homotopy Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Alan Cameron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 . . . . . . . . 4 Categories of Field Theories 4.1 Functorto super symmetric field theories. CRM Proceedings and0-dimensional super symmetric field theories. preprint 2008.

  1. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | June 24, 2014: MicroBooNE Move

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New Mexico Feb. 13, 2013Focus GroupDown asbolsters

  2. Geoffrey Mills Los Alamos National Laboratory For the MiniBooNE Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGeneGenomeGeoffrey F. Chew, 1969 TheICHEP

  3. Geoffrey Mills Los Alamos National Laboratory For the MiniBooNE Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGeneGenomeGeoffrey F. Chew, 1969

  4. Geoffrey Mills Los Alamos National Laboratory For the MiniBooNE Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGeneGenomeGeoffrey F. Chew, 1969NeuTel2011

  5. Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Grant Reference Peter Bernath University of York Satellite Observations of Halogen-Containing Molecules NE/I022663/1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Grant Reference Peter Bernath University of York, Ice and Super-cooled Water Particles. NE/I023058/1 Gareth Chisham NERC British Antarctic Survey The University of Manchester Effects of a warming climate on the key organic carbon cycle processes

  6. Gear selectivity for catching catfish (Ictaluridae) throughout the Lower Platte River, NE Jeremy J. L. Hammen, Tony J. Barada, Aaron Blank, and Mark A. Pegg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Gear selectivity for catching catfish (Ictaluridae) throughout the Lower Platte River, NE Jeremy J anglers can total nearly 50% of the all anglers and much of this pressure is focused on the Lower Platte Platte River will offer vital information needed to provide appropriate management techniques for catfish

  7. de la cicatrice. La guri son tait complote 1 mois aprs le dbut du traitement. 1u 40, jour, on ne con-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    , on ne con- statait plus qu'une cicatrice fine et lisse dans toute son tendue. L'uranium, ou mieux le charge par l'intermdiaire d'une grande rsistance, l'autre ple tant la tcrre. Si Eo est la charge

  8. RE SONANT PHO NON -A 8 8 IS TE D 6E NE HA TION. . . not observed, presumably because either the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    , for example, A. Yariv, Quantum Electronics (Wiley, New York, 1967), Chap. 21; N. Bloembergen, Nonlinear OpticsRE SONANT PHO NON -A 8 8 IS TE D 6E NE HA TION. . . not observed, presumably because either cussions. *Present address: Hasler A. G. , Bern, Switzerland. ~P. A. Franken, A. E. Hill, C. %'. Peters

  9. Climatic variation in the Linxia basin, NE Tibetan Plateau, from 13.1 to 4.3 Ma: The stable isotope record

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garzione, Carmala N.

    (Lear et al., 2000; Zachos et al., 2001; Billups and Schrag, 2002). In East Asia, climate change sinceClimatic variation in the Linxia basin, NE Tibetan Plateau, from 13.1 to 4.3 Ma: The stable isotope record Majie Fan a,b,, David L. Dettman a , Chunhui Song b , Xiaomin Fang b,c , Carmala N. Garzione d

  10. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-86NE37969 1991 IEEE. Reprinted with permission, from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-86NE37969 1991 IEEE. Reprinted is updated continuously with range data sampled by on-board range sensors. The VFH method subsequently the robot's momentary location. Each sector in the polar histogramcontains a value representing the polar

  11. Spring 2009 PSY 362: Cognitive Neuroscience Quick Overview Classes: WED 4-6:40pm, NE-060 Prerequisites: Psy 101, 260

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    Spring 2009 PSY 362: Cognitive Neuroscience Quick Overview Classes: WED 4-6:40pm, NE-060. #225E Textbook: Gazzaniga, Ivry & Mangun: Cognitive Neuroscience. 3rd ed. Norton 2009. Tips and Details. 1 [optional] Feb 4 2 Cells and Neuroanatomy I Ch. 2: 18-25; Ch. 3: 50-77 Feb 11 3 Neuroanatomy II

  12. SciBooNE/MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementingnpitcheResearch Briefs TheSanketPlease contact the beamlineAugŽ.

  13. A 100ks XMM-Newton view of the Seyfert 1.8 ESO113-G010. I. Discovery of large X-ray variability and study of the FeKalpha line complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delphine Porquet; Phil Uttley; James N. Reeves; Alex Markowitz; Stefano Bianchi; Nicolas Grosso; Lance Miller; Sandrine Deluit; Ian M. George

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) We present here a long (100ks) XMM-Newton follow-up of the Seyfert 1.8 galaxy ESO113-G010 performed in November 2005, in order to study over a longer time-scale its main X-ray properties. The source was found in a higher/softer time-averaged flux state, and timing analysis of this source reveals strong, rapid variability. The Power Spectral Density (PSD) analysis indicates (at 95% c.l.) a break at 3.7 x 10^-4 Hz. This cut-off frequency is comparable to those measured in some other rapidly-variable Seyferts, such as MCG-6-30-15 and NGC4051. From the mass-luminosity-time-scale, we infer that M_BH ranges from 4 x 10^6 - 10^7 M_odot and the source is accreting at or close to the Eddington rate (or even higher). The existing data cannot distinguish between spectral pivoting of the continuum and a two-component origin for the spectral softening, primarily because the data do not span a broad enough flux range. In the case of the two-component model, the fractional offsets measured in the flux-flux plots increase significantly toward higher energies (similar to what is observed in MCG-6-30-15) as expected if there exists a constant reflection component. Contrary to May 2001, no significant highly redshifted emission line is observed (which might be related to the source flux level), while two narrow emission lines at about 6.5keV and 7keV are observed. The S/N is not high enough to establish if the lines are variable or constant. As already suggested by the 2001 observation, no significant constant narrow 6.4keV FeK line (EW~32eV) is observed, hence excluding any dominant emission from distant cold matter such as a torus in this Seyfert type 1.8 galaxy.

  14. Entomology 489 Field Entomology Field Project Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    with information, people, materials). Field Projects (your project should...) FEntomology 489 ­ Field Entomology Field Project Guide A small-group field project is required for ENTO 489 ­ Field Entomology. This guide provides general information about the field-project

  15. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Res Lawrence, Kansas Berexco, LLC - 2020 N. Bramblewood St., Wichita, KS and Trembley Oilfield, Reno County, KS FESCNGO John Terneus Field Demonstration of Chemical Flooding of...

  16. On Field Constraint Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wies, Thomas

    2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce field constraint analysis, a new technique for verifying data structure invariants. A field constraint for a field is a formula specifying a set of objects to which the field can point. Field constraints ...

  17. Investigation of thermonuclear $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na rate via resonant elastic scattering of $^{21}$Na+$p$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, L Y; Parikh, A; Xu, S W; Yamaguchi, H; Kahl, D; Kubono, S; Mohr, P; Hu, J; Ma, P; Chen, S Z; Wakabayashi, Y; Wang, H W; Tian, W D; Chen, R F; Guo, B; Hashimoto, T; Togano, Y; Hayakawa, S; Teranishi, T; Iwasa, N; Yamada, T; Komatsubara, T; Zhang, Y H; Zhou, X H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction is thought to be one of the key breakout reactions from the hot CNO cycles to the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. In this work, the resonant properties of the compound nucleus $^{22}$Mg have been investigated by measuring the resonant elastic scattering of $^{21}$Na+$p$. An 89 MeV $^{21}$Na radioactive beam delivered from the CNS Radioactive Ion Beam Separator bombarded an 8.8 mg/cm$^2$ thick polyethylene (CH$_{2}$)$_{n}$ target. The $^{21}$Na beam intensity was about 2$\\times$10$^{5}$ pps, with a purity of about 70% on target. The recoiled protons were measured at the center-of-mass scattering angles of $\\theta_{c.m.}$$\\approx$175.2${^\\circ}$, 152.2${^\\circ}$, and 150.5${^\\circ}$ by three sets of $\\Delta E$-$E$ telescopes, respectively. The excitation function was obtained with the thick-target method over energies $E_x$($^{22}$Mg)=5.5--9.2 MeV. In total, 23 states above the proton-threshold in $^{22}$Mg were observed, and their resonant parameters were determ...

  18. Improved Search for ??????e Oscillations in the MiniBooNE Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Brown, B. C.; Bugel, L.; Cheng, G.; Church, E. D.; Conrad, J. M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Garvey, G. T.; Grange, J.; Huelsnitz, W.; Ignarra, C.; Imlay, R.; Johnson, R. A.; Karagiorgi, G.; Katori, T.; Kobilarcik, T.; Louis, W. C.; Mariani, C.; Marsh, W.; Mills, G. B.; Mirabal, J.; Moore, C. D.; Mousseau, J.; Nienaber, P.; Osmanov, B.; Pavlovic, Z.; Perevalov, D.; Polly, C. C.; Ray, H.; Roe, B. P.; Russell, A. D.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Spitz, J.; Stancu, I.; Tayloe, R.; Van de Water, R. G.; White, D. H.; Wickremasinghe, D. A.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab reports results from an analysis of ?e appearance data from 11.2710? protons on target in the antineutrino mode, an increase of approximately a factor of 2 over the previously reported results. An event excess of 78.428.5 events (2.8?) is observed in the energy range 200QE?<1250 MeV. If interpreted in a two-neutrino oscillation model, ????e, the best oscillation fit to the excess has a probability of 66% while the background-only fit has a ? probability of 0.5% relative to the best fit. The data are consistent with antineutrino oscillations in the 0.01

  19. Smooth Field Theories and Homotopy Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilder, Alan Cameron

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHAPTER 3. FIELD THEORIES Definition 3.2.1. A smooth fielda top down definition of field theories. Taking as ourin the following. Definition A field theory is a symmetric

  20. NE]NL~GY r. ORNL/Sub/80-1 386/ &02 C)aS^" B ~Assessment of Internal Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NE]NL~GY r. ORNL/Sub/80-1 386/ &02 C)aS^" B ~Assessment of Internal Combustion LAnM~~l~Engines COMBUSTION ENGINES AS DRIVERS FOR HEAT PUMPS FINAL REPORT Date Published: January 1984 Report Prepared Government or any agency thereof. #12;ORNL/Sub/80-13836/1&02 Dist. Category UC-95d ASSESSMENT OF INTERNAL

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF UNCERTAINTIES IN THE {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne REACTION RATE ON MODELS OF TYPE I X-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davids, Barry [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Cyburt, Richard H. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Jose, Jordi [Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya and Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Mythili, Subramanian [Physics Department, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Monte Carlo calculation of the astrophysical rate of the {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction based on an evaluation of published experimental data. By considering the likelihood distributions of individual resonance parameters derived from measurements, estimates of upper and lower limits on the reaction rate at the 99.73% confidence level are derived in addition to the recommended, median value. These three reaction rates are used as input for three separate calculations of Type I X-ray bursts (XRBs) using spherically symmetric, hydrodynamic simulations of an accreting neutron star. In this way the influence of the {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction rate on the peak luminosity, recurrence time, and associated nucleosynthesis in models of Type I XRBs is studied. Contrary to previous findings, no substantial effect on any of these quantities is observed in a sequence of four bursts when varying the reaction rate between its lower and upper limits. Rather, the differences in these quantities are comparable to the burst-to-burst variations with a fixed reaction rate, indicating that uncertainties in the {sup 15}O({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 19}Ne reaction rate do not strongly affect the predictions of this Type I XRB model.

  2. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G; Mariani, C; Alcaraz-Aunion, J L; Brice, S J; Bugel, L; Catala-Perez, J; Conrad, J M; Djurcic, Z; Dore, U; Finley, D A; et al

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2?/dpd? = (5.34 0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared tomoreMonte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.less

  3. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Depalo, Rosanna; Ferraro, Federico; Slemer, Alessandra; Al-Abdullah, Tariq; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Anders, Michael; Bemmerer, Daniel; Elekes, Zoltn; Mattei, Giovanni; Reinicke, Stefan; Schmidt, Konrad; Scian, Carlo; Wagner, Louis

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominates the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with $^{22}$Ne. The strengths $\\omega\\gamma$ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479 and 1279 keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479 and 1279 keV resonances was determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which i...

  4. Strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV in the $^{22}$Ne(p,$?$)$^{23}$Na reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosanna Depalo; Francesca Cavanna; Federico Ferraro; Alessandra Slemer; Tariq Al-Abdullah; Shavkat Akhmadaliev; Michael Anders; Daniel Bemmerer; Zoltn Elekes; Giovanni Mattei; Stefan Reinicke; Konrad Schmidt; Carlo Scian; Louis Wagner

    2015-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na reaction is included in the neon-sodium cycle of hydrogen burning. A number of narrow resonances in the Gamow window dominates the thermonuclear reaction rate. Several resonance strengths are only poorly known. As a result, the $^{22}$Ne(p,$\\gamma$)$^{23}$Na thermonuclear reaction rate is the most uncertain rate of the cycle. Here, a new experimental study of the strengths of the resonances at 436, 479, 639, 661, and 1279 keV proton beam energy is reported. The data have been obtained using a tantalum target implanted with $^{22}$Ne. The strengths $\\omega\\gamma$ of the resonances at 436, 639, and 661 keV have been determined with a relative approach, using the 479 and 1279 keV resonances for normalization. Subsequently, the ratio of resonance strengths of the 479 and 1279 keV resonances was determined, improving the precision of these two standards. The new data are consistent with, but more precise than, the literature with the exception of the resonance at 661 keV, which is found to be less intense by one order of magnitude. In addition, improved branching ratios have been determined for the gamma decay of the resonances at 436, 479, and 639 keV.

  5. Measurement of K+ production cross section by 8 GeV protons using high energy neutrino interactions in the SciBooNE detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, G [Columbia U.; Mariani, C [Columbia U.; Alcaraz-Aunion, J L [Barcelona, IFAE; Brice, S J [Fermilab; Bugel, L [MIT; Catala-Perez, J [Valencia U.; Conrad, J M [MIT; Djurcic, Z [Columbia U.; Dore, U [Banca di Roma; INFN, Rome; Finley, D A [Fermilab; Franke, A J [Columbia U.; Banca di Roma; INFN, Rome

    2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports K+ production cross section and rate measurements using high energy daughter muon neutrino scattering data off the SciBar polystyrene (C8H8) target in the SciBooNE detector. The K+ mesons are produced by 8 GeV protons striking a beryllium target in Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam line (BNB). Using observed neutrino and antineutrino events in SciBooNE, we measure d2?/dpd? = (5.34 0.76) mb/(GeV/c x sr) for p + Be =K+ + X at mean K+ energy of 3.9 GeV and angle (with respect to the proton beam direction) of 3.7 degrees, corresponding to the selected K+ sample. Compared to Monte Carlo predictions using previous higher energy K+ production measurements, this measurement, which uses the NUANCE neutrino interaction generator, is consistent with a normalization factor of 0.85 0.12. This agreement is evidence that the extrapolation of the higher energy K+ measurements to an 8 GeV beam energy using Feynman scaling is valid. This measurement reduces the error on the K+ production cross section from 40% to 14%.

  6. Fields Institute Communications Volume 00, 0000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manhattan, KS 665062602, USA ramm@math.ksu.edu Abstract. A method for the identification of small to an iden tification of the positions of the small scatterers. These positions are found by a global materials, or the mine detection. The scattering theory for small scatterers originated in the classical

  7. Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

  8. Search for the decay B^+ \\to K_S^0 K_S^0 \\pi ^+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors search for charmless decays of charged B mesons to the three-body final state K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}. Using a data sample of 423.7 fb{sup -1} collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector, corresponding to (465.1 {+-} 5.1) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs, they find no significant signal and determine a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of 5.1 x 10{sup -7}.

  9. Description of $?$-cluster tail in $^{8}$Be and $^{20}$Ne: Delocalization of $?$ cluster because of quantum penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshiko Kanada-En'yo

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the $\\alpha$-cluster wave functions in cluster states of $^8$Be and $^{20}$Ne by comparing the exact relative wave function obtained by the generator coordinate method (GCM) with various types of trial functions. For the trial functions, we adopt the fixed range shifted Gaussian of the Brink-Bloch (BB) wave function, the spherical Gaussian with the adjustable range parameter of the spherical Thosaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-R\\"opke (sTHSR), the deformed Gaussian of the deformed THSR (dTHSR), and a function with the Yukawa tail (YT). The quality of the description of the exact wave function with a trial function is judged by the squared overlap between the trial function and the GCM wave function. The better result is obtained with the sTHSR wave function than the BB wave function, and further improvement can be done with the dTHSR wave function because these wave functions can describe the outer tail better. The YT wave function gives almost the equal quality to or even better quality than the dTHSR wave function indicating that the outer tail of $\\alpha$ cluster states is characterized by the Yukawa-like tail rather than the Gaussian tail. In the weakly bound $\\alpha$ cluster states with the small $\\alpha$ separation energy and the low centrifugal and Coulomb barriers, the outer tail part is the slowly damping function described well by the quantum penetration through the effective barrier. This outer tail characterizes the almost zero-energy free $\\alpha$ gas behavior, i.e., the delocalization of cluster.

  10. A survey of Existing V&V, UQ and M&S Data and Knowledge Bases in Support of the Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyung Lee; Rich Johnson, Ph.D.; Kimberlyn C. Moussesau

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Energy - Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Utah State University and others. The objective of this consortium is to establish a comprehensive knowledge base to provide Verification and Validation (V&V) and Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) and other resources for advanced modeling and simulation (M&S) in nuclear reactor design and analysis. NE-KAMS will become a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, the national laboratories, the U.S. NRC and the public to help ensure the safe operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. A survey and evaluation of the state-of-the-art of existing V&V and M&S databases, including the Department of Energy and commercial databases, has been performed to ensure that the NE-KAMS effort will not be duplicating existing resources and capabilities and to assess the scope of the effort required to develop and implement NE-KAMS. The survey and evaluation have indeed highlighted the unique set of value-added functionality and services that NE-KAMS will provide to its users. Additionally, the survey has helped develop a better understanding of the architecture and functionality of these data and knowledge bases that can be used to leverage the development of NE-KAMS.

  11. Search for B^{0} meson decays to pi^{0}K_{S}^{0}K_{S}^{0}, eta K_{S}^{0}K_{S}^{0}, and eta^{'}K_{S}^{0}K_{S}^{0}

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, R. K.

    We describe searches for B[superscript 0] meson decays to the charmless final states ?[superscript 0]K[subscript S][superscript 0]K[subscript S][superscript 0], ?K[subscript S][superscript 0]K[subscript S][superscript 0], ...

  12. MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    antielectron-neutrino candidate events in antineutrino mode that is quite consistent with neutrino oscillations at m2 1 eV2 and with the LSND oscillation signal 2. In...

  13. Interconnect Issues in NE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers interconnect issues in the Northeast and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Providence, Rhode Island.

  14. MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowCDevelopment33.0Minesν µ Charged

  15. MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625Data ShowCDevelopment33.0Minesν µ

  16. MiniBooNE:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625DataNeutrino mode fit in 200 MeV6 Months Later

  17. UPdate THE NE

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads into Fuel for U.S. Electricity3

  18. NE Blog Archive

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan - Technology ProjectEnergyNAICSblog-archive 1000

  19. NE Press Releases

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan - TechnologyJanuary 29, 2008 Mars Science

  20. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014Energy,F β--Decay EvaluatedMgNNap,

  1. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014Energy,F β--Decay

  2. 20Ne.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014Energy,F β--Decay

  3. 20Ne_78.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, 2014Energy,F β--Decay

  4. 625 Marion St. NE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isNFebruaryOctober 2, AlgeriaQ1 Q2 Q3 U . S . D E 25 Marion

  5. NE-23 W

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 August 2008 Office7-TACi+J-UN>:-1. ,-

  6. BooNE Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator|December 5, 2011

  7. BooNE Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator|December 5, 2011Experiment

  8. BooNE: Posters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticle Identification (PID)

  9. 18Ne.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-State Decay Evaluated Dataargeα, X)p, X)83BCFMgNNe

  10. 18Ne_78.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032) -Less isN Ground-State Decay Evaluated Dataargeα, X)p, X)83BCFMgNNe

  11. Alpha-Transfer Reaction O-16(c-12,be-8gs)ne-20 - Key Process in the C-12(o-16,alpha) Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murakami, T.; Ungricht, E.; Lui, YW; Mihara, Y.; Takada, E.; Tribble, Robert E.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 32, NUMBER 5 NOVEMBER 1985 Alpha transfer reaction '60(' C,SBes, )20Ne: Key process in the ' C('60,a) reaction T. Murakami, * E. Ungricht, Y.-Vf. Lui, Y. Mihara, ~ E. Takada, ~ and R. E. Tribble Cyclotron Institute.... ~T. Murakami, E. Ungricht, N. Takahashi, Y.-W. Lui, Y. Mihara, R. E. Neese, E. Takada, D. M. Tanner, R. E. Trib- ble, and K. Nagatani, Phys. Lett. 1208, 319 (1983); Phys. Rev. C 29, 847 (1984). K. Nagatani, T. Shimoda, D. Tanner, R. Tribble, and T...

  12. Quantum Field Theory & Gravity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664...

  13. Experimental measurements of the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 reaction rate and the stability of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob Lund Fisker; Wanpeng Tan; Joachim Goerres; Michael Wiescher; Randall L. Cooper

    2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the accretion rate of the fuel supply and its depletion rate by nuclear burning in the hot CNO cycle and the rp-process. For accretion rates close to stable burning the burst ignition therefore depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction, O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19, that regulates the flow between the hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19-reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we perform a parameter study of the uncertainty of this reaction rate and determine the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate. Our results corroborate earlier predictions and show that theoretically burning remains unstable up to accretion rates near the Eddington limit, in contrast to astronomical observations.

  14. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Bethesda, Maryland, June 8-12, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fusion - the process that powers the sun - offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITE R fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world's population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES ) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW's task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.) This Report presents a portfolio of research activities for US research in magnetic fusion for the next two decades. It is intended to provide a strategic framework for realizing practical fusion energy. The portfolio is the product of ten months of fusion-community study and discussion, culminating in a Workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland, from June 8 to June 12, 2009. The Workshop involved some 200 scientists from Universities, National Laboratories and private industry, including several scientists from outside the US. Largely following the Basic Research Needs model established by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES ), the Report presents a collection of discrete research activities, here called 'thrusts.' Each thrust is based on an explicitly identified question, or coherent set of questions, on the frontier of fusion science. It presents a strategy to find the needed answers, combining the necessary intellectual and hardware tools, experimental facilities, and computational resources into an integrated, focused program. The thrusts should be viewed as building blocks for a fusion program plan whose overall structure will be developed by OFES , using whatever additional community input it requests. Part I of the Report reviews the issues identified in previous fusion-community studies, which systematically identified the key research issues and described them in considerable detail. It then considers in some detail the scientific and technical means that can be used to address these is sues. It ends by showing how these various research requirements are organized into a set of eighteen thrusts. Part II presents a detailed and self-contained discussion of each thrust, including the goals, required facilities and tools for each. This Executive Summary focuses on a survey of the ReNeW thrusts. The following brief review of fusion science is intended to provide context for that survey. A more detailed discussion of fusion science can be found in an Appendix to this Summary, entitled 'A Fusion Primer.'

  15. Introduction Classical Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Christian

    Introduction Classical Field Theory Locally Covariant Quantum Field Theory Renormalization Time evolution Conclusions and outlook Locality and Algebraic Structures in Field Theory Klaus Fredenhagen II¨utsch and Pedro Lauridsen Ribeiro) Klaus Fredenhagen Locality and Algebraic Structures in Field Theory #12

  16. Dynamic screening x-ray energy shifts and collisional line broadening of 2p-1s transitions in 2 MeV/AMU H- and He-like Ne, Mg, and S ions traveling in solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Richard Jay

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for reflectivity) of the np-1s and 1snp-ls peaks vs quantum number for n 2 to 6. . . . ~ . . . . . 130 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The earliest report of Ku x-rays from few-electron heavy iona was found in the pioneering work of Edlen and Tyzen ~ Using a vacuum.... Hopkins et al. 2 also observed line broadening when they measured x-rays emitted from 4 ' 0 NeV Ne moving in solid targets. The line broadening is thought to arise because of the large cross-sections for ionization, excitation, and decay processes...

  17. A practical scheme for generating isolated elliptically polarized attosecond pulses using bi-chromatic counter rotating circularly polarized laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mediauskas, Lukas; van der Haart, Hugo; Ivanov, Misha Yu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra of circularly polarized harmonics is calculated by numerically solving the Time-Dependent Schr\\"{o}dinger Equation for a 2D model of Ne atom using circularly polarized fundamental with counter-rotating second harmonic laser fields. We demonstrate strong asymmetry between left- and right- circularly polarized harmonics when a ground state with p-type symmetry is used. It arises due to the circular polarization of individual attosecond pulses in the generated pulse train. Reducing the length of the counter-rotating drivers and introducing a small time-shift between them allows to generate a single elliptically polarized attosecond pulse.

  18. Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current...

  19. Recoil-Ion Momentum Distributions for Two-Photon Double Ionization of He and Ne by 44 eV Free-Electron Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, A.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck Advanced Study Group at CFEL, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Foucar, L.; Havermeier, T.; Smolarski, M.; Schoessler, S.; Cole, K.; Schoeffler, M.; Doerner, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Frankfurt, 60486 Frankfurt (Germany); Kurka, M.; Ergler, Th.; Kuehnel, K. U.; Jiang, Y. H.; Voitkiv, A.; Najjari, B.; Luedemann, S.; Schroeter, C. D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kheifets, A. [Research School of Physical Sciences, Australian University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Duesterer, S. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] (and others)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recoil-ion momentum distributions for two-photon double ionization of He and Ne (({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){omega}=44 eV) have been recorded with a reaction microscope at FLASH (the free-electron laser at Hamburg) at an intensity of {approx}1x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} exploring the dynamics of the two fundamental two-photon-two-electron reaction pathways, namely, sequential and direct (or nonsequential) absorption of the photons. We find strong differences in the recoil-ion momentum patterns for the two mechanisms pointing to the significantly different two-electron emission dynamics and thus provide serious constraints for theoretical models.

  20. Idaho National Laboratory Ten-year Site Plan (2012 through 2021) -- DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability -- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cal Ozaki

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet long-term objectives to transform the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), we are providing an integrated, long-term vision of infrastructure requirements that support research, development and demonstration (RD&D) goals outlined in the DOE strategic plans, including the NE Roadmap and reports such as Facilities for the Future of Nuclear Energy Research: A Twenty-year Outlook. The goal of the INL Ten-year Site Plan (TYSP) is to clearly link RD&D mission goals and INL core capabilities with infrastructure requirements (single and multi-program), establish the 10-year end-state vision for INL complexes, identify and prioritize infrastructure and capability gaps, as well as the most efficient and economic approaches to closing those gaps.

  1. Please cite this article in press as: Otero, I., et al., Loss of water availability and stream biodiversity under land abandonment and climate change in a Mediterranean catchment (Olzinelles, NE Spain). Land Use Policy (2010), doi:10.1016/j.landusepol.201

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gracia, Carlos

    biodiversity under land abandonment and climate change in a Mediterranean catchment (Olzinelles, NE Spain under land abandonment and climate change in a Mediterranean catchment (Olzinelles, NE Spain) Iago-cover change Warming Mediterranean catchment Water courses Aquatic fauna a b s t r a c t In the north rim

  2. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  3. When Fields Collide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, David I.

    Particle cosmology is among the hottest of hot topics in physics today. The field investigates the smallest units of matter and their role in determining the shape and fate of the entire universe. In recent years the field ...

  4. Double field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Chris

    The zero modes of closed strings on a torus the torus coordinates plus dual coordinates conjugate to winding number parameterize a doubled torus. In closed string field theory, the string field depends on all zero-modes ...

  5. String Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This elementary introduction to string field theory highlights the features and the limitations of this approach to quantum gravity as it is currently understood. String field theory is a formulation of string theory as a field theory in space-time with an infinite number of massive fields. Although existing constructions of string field theory require expanding around a fixed choice of space-time background, the theory is in principle background-independent, in the sense that different backgrounds can be realized as different field configurations in the theory. String field theory is the only string formalism developed so far which, in principle, has the potential to systematically address questions involving multiple asymptotically distinct string backgrounds. Thus, although it is not yet well defined as a quantum theory, string field theory may eventually be helpful for understanding questions related to cosmology in string theory.

  6. Covariant Noncommutative Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estrada-Jimenez, S. [Licenciaturas en Fisica y en Matematicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Chiapas Calle 4a Ote. Nte. 1428, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Garcia-Compean, H. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN P.O. Box 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F., Mexico and Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Monterrey Via del Conocimiento 201, Parque de Investigacion e Innovacion Tecnologica (PIIT) Autopista nueva al Aeropuerto km 9.5, Lote 1, Manzana 29, cp. 66600 Apodaca Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Obregon, O. [Instituto de Fisica de la Universidad de Guanajuato P.O. Box E-143, 37150 Leon Gto. (Mexico); Ramirez, C. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, P.O. Box 1364, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The covariant approach to noncommutative field and gauge theories is revisited. In the process the formalism is applied to field theories invariant under diffeomorphisms. Local differentiable forms are defined in this context. The lagrangian and hamiltonian formalism is consistently introduced.

  7. Properties of resonant states in 18Ne relevant to key 14O(alpha,p)17F breakout reaction in type I x-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Hu; J. J. He; A. Parikh; S. W. Xu; H. Yamaguchi; D. Kahl; P. Ma; J. Su; H. W. Wang; T. Nakao; Y. Wakabayashi; T. Teranishi; K. I. Hahn; J. Y. Moon; H. S. Sung; T. Hashimoto; A. A. Chen; D. Irvine; C. S. Lee; S. Kubono

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The $^{14}$O($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{17}$F reaction is one of the key reactions involved in the breakout from the hot-CNO cycle to the rp-process in type I x-ray bursts. The resonant properties in the compound nucleus $^{18}$Ne have been investigated through resonant elastic scattering of $^{17}$F+$p$. The radioactive $^{17}$F beam was separated by the CNS Radioactive Ion Beam separator (CRIB) and bombarded a thick H$_2$ gas target at 3.6 MeV/nucleon. The recoiling light particles were measured by using three ${\\Delta}$E-E silicon telescopes at laboratory angles of $\\theta$$_{lab}$$\\approx$3$^\\circ$, 10$^\\circ$ and 18$^\\circ$, respectively. Five resonances at $E_{x}$=6.15, 6.28, 6.35, 6.85, and 7.05 MeV were observed in the excitation functions. Based on an $R$-matrix analysis, $J^{\\pi}$=1$^-$ was firmly assigned to the 6.15-MeV state. This state dominates the thermonuclear $^{14}$O($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{17}$F rate below 1 GK. We have also confirmed the existence and spin-parities of three states between 6.1 and 6.4 MeV. As well, a possible new excited state in $^{18}$Ne was observed at $E_{x}$=6.85$\\pm$0.11 MeV and tentatively assigned as $J$=0. This state could be the analog state of the 6.880 MeV (0$^{-}$) level in the mirror nucleus $^{18}$O, or a bandhead state (0$^+$) of the six-particle four-hole (6$p$-4$h$) band. A new thermonuclear rate of the $^{14}$O($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{17}$F reaction has been determined, and its astrophysical impact has been examined within the framework of one-zone x-ray burst postprocessing calculations.

  8. Facilities Management Field Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Facilities Management Field Services FieldStationsAnnualReport2006 #12;Cover Photo by Dr Mark Jermy coast #12; Introduction A very wet Steve Weaver emerges from the river. Ah, field work! The Government broadband, at least there is now an alternative to the telephone line. Electrical power spikes (and outages

  9. Meeting Name Score Rank Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Call Panel A 10 1 NE/L011328/1 Christopher Davies University of Leeds A New Energy Budget for Earth's Core and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meeting Name Score Rank Grant Reference Grant Holder Research Organisation Project Title Call Panel Rethinking carbonate diagenesis: clues to past carbon cycling from an overlooked carbon sink IRF OCT13 Panel of Criegee Biradical Chemistry IRF OCT13 Panel B 8 3 NE/L011166/1 James Brearley NERC British Antarctic

  10. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-86NE379691 Reprint of Proceedings of the 1990 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-86NE379691 Page 572 Reprint uses a two-dimensional Cartesian Histogram Grid as a world model. This world model is updated that is constructed around the robot's momentary location. Each sector in the Polar Histogram holds the polar obstacle

  11. Extracting the asymptotic normalization coefficients in neutron transfer reactions to determine the reaction rates for 22Mg(p,gamma)23AL and 17F(p,gamma)18Ne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Abdullah, Tariq Abdalhamed

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    side of the scintillator (PMR) signal are shown in the left and middle pictures, respec- tively. At right, the two dimensional ?E-Er spectrum shows the quality of the particle identification obtained. The position of 23Ne is identified by the circle...

  12. Some conclusive considerations on the comparison of the ICARUS nu_mu to nu_e oscillation search with the MiniBooNE low-energy event excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Antonello; B. Baibussinov; P. Benetti; F. Boffelli; A. Bubak; E. Calligarich; S. Centro; A. Cesana; K. Cieslik; D. B. Cline; A. G. Cocco; A. Dabrowska; A. Dermenev; A. Falcone; C. Farnese; A. Fava; A. Ferrari; D. Gibin; S. Gninenko; A. Guglielmi; M. Haranczyk; J. Holeczek; M. Kirsanov; J. Kisiel; I. Kochanek; J. Lagoda; S. Mania; A. Menegolli; G. Meng; C. Montanari; S. Otwinowski; P. Picchi; F. Pietropaolo; P. Plonski; A. Rappoldi; G. L. Raselli; M. Rossella; C. Rubbia; P. Sala; A. Scaramelli; F. Sergiampietri; D. Stefan; R. Sulej; M. Szarska; M. Terrani; M. Torti; F. Varanini; S. Ventura; C. Vignoli; H. Wang; X. Yang; A. Zalewska; A. Zani; K. Zaremba

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive search for anomalous LSND-like nu_mu to nu_e oscillations has been performed by the ICARUS Collaboration exposing the T600 LAr-TPC to the CERN to Gran Sasso (CNGS) neutrino beam. The result is compatible with the absence of additional anomalous contributions giving a limit to oscillation probability of 3.4E-3 and 7.6E-3 at 90% and 99% confidence levels respectively showing a tension between these new limits and the low-energy event excess (200 < E_nu QE < 475 MeV) reported by MiniBooNE Collaboration. A more detailed comparison of the ICARUS data with the MiniBooNE low-energy excess has been performed, including the energy resolution as obtained from the official MiniBooNE data release. As a result the previously reported tension is confirmed at 90% C.L., suggesting an unexplained nature or an otherwise instrumental effect for the MiniBooNE low energy event excess

  13. Covariant Hamiltonian Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jrgen Struckmeier; Andreas Redelbach

    2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A consistent, local coordinate formulation of covariant Hamiltonian field theory is presented. Whereas the covariant canonical field equations are equivalent to the Euler-Lagrange field equations, the covariant canonical transformation theory offers more general means for defining mappings that preserve the form of the field equations than the usual Lagrangian description. It is proved that Poisson brackets, Lagrange brackets, and canonical 2-forms exist that are invariant under canonical transformations of the fields. The technique to derive transformation rules for the fields from generating functions is demonstrated by means of various examples. In particular, it is shown that the infinitesimal canonical transformation furnishes the most general form of Noether's theorem. We furthermore specify the generating function of an infinitesimal space-time step that conforms to the field equations.

  14. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in the interplanetary space between the sun and the earth.

  15. Status of the measurement of K S -> ?e? branching ratio and lepton charge asymmetry with the KLOE detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Kami?ska on behalf of the KLOE-2 collaboration

    2015-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the current status of the analysis of about 1.7 billion K_S K_L pair events collected at DA{\\Phi}NE with the KLOE detector to determine the branching ratio of K_S -> {\\pi}e{\

  16. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  17. Theory of electromagnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the theory of electromagnetic fields, with an emphasis on aspects relevant to radiofrequency systems in particle accelerators. We begin by reviewing Maxwell's equations and their physical significance. We show that in free space, there are solutions to Maxwell's equations representing the propagation of electromagnetic fields as waves. We introduce electromagnetic potentials, and show how they can be used to simplify the calculation of the fields in the presence of sources. We derive Poynting's theorem, which leads to expressions for the energy density and energy flux in an electromagnetic field. We discuss the properties of electromagnetic waves in cavities, waveguides and transmission lines.

  18. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  19. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  20. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  1. Constructive Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Gallavotti

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the renormalization group approach to the proof of non perturbative ultraviolet stability in scalar field theories in dimension d=2,3.

  2. Electromagnetic Lorenz Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Potter

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauge transformations are potential transformations that leave only specific Maxwell fields invariant. To reveal more, I develop Lorenz field equations with full Maxwell form for nongauge, sans gauge function, transformations yielding mixed, superposed retarded and outgoing, potentials. The form invariant Lorenz condition is then a charge conservation equivalent. This allows me to define three transformation classes that screen for Lorenz relevance. The nongauge Lorentz conditions add polarization fields which support emergent, light-like rays that convey energy on charge conserving phase points. These localized rays escape discovery in modern Maxwell fields where the polarizations are suppressed by gauge transformations.

  3. Evidence of blocking effects on 3-keV Ne{sup 7+} ions guided through nanocapillaries in polycarbonate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Hellhammer, R.; Sulik, B.; Juhasz, Z.; Bayer, V.; Trautmann, C.; Bodewits, E.; Hoekstra, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); GSI Helmholtz-Zentrum, Materialforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); KVI Atomic Physics, University of Groningen, NL-9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied the dynamic properties of ion guiding through nanocapillaries etched in insulating polycarbonate (PC). Capillaries with diameters of 95 and 165 nm and a length of 10 {mu}m were used. In a further sample, the capillaries had a diameter of 175 nm and a length of 30 {mu}m. A few additional measurements were made using capillaries in polyethylene terephthalate (PET). The temporal evolution of the intensity and the angular distribution of the transmitted ions were studied by measuring transmission profiles as a function of the charge deposited on the sample surface. The tilt angle of the capillary axis was varied from 0 deg. to 5 deg. The mean emission angle of the transmission profiles exhibit pronounced oscillations, similarly as in previous measurements using PET. However, for PC, nearly an order of magnitude more charge needs to be inserted into the capillaries to accomplish the oscillations. In contrast to PET, with PC, we observed a strong decrease of the profile intensities with irradiation time. This observation provides evidence of blocking effects on the ions, which are likely to be due to a repulsive field produced by significant charge deposition inside the PC capillaries.

  4. Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors.

  5. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory III (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schrodinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  6. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schrodinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  7. Negative-tension branes and tensionless (1/2) brane in boundary conformal field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishida, Akira; Kim, Yoonbai [Department of Physics and BK21 Physics Research Division, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chanju [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, O-Kab [School of Mathematics, Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of boundary conformal field theory we consider a flat unstable Dp-brane in the presence of a large constant electromagnetic field. Specifically, we study the case that the electromagnetic field satisfy the following three conditions: (i) a constant electric field is turned on along the x{sup 1} direction (E{sub 1}{ne}0); (ii) the determinant of the matrix ({eta}+F) is negative so that it lies in the physical region (-det({eta}+F)>0); (iii) the 11-component of its cofactor is positive to the large electromagnetic field. In this case, we identify exactly marginal deformations depending on the spatial coordinate x{sup 1}. They correspond to tachyon profiles of hyperbolic sine, exponential, and hyperbolic cosine types. Boundary states are constructed for these deformations by utilizing T-duality approach and also by directly solving the overlap conditions in BCFT. The exponential type deformation gives a tensionless half brane connecting the perturbative string vacuum and one of the true tachyon vacua, while the others have negative tensions. This is in agreement with the results obtained in other approaches.

  8. MiniBooNE Results and Neutrino Schemes with 2 sterile Neutrinos: Possible Mass Orderings and Observables related to Neutrino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srubabati Goswami; Werner Rodejohann

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The MiniBooNE and LSND experiments are compatible with each other when two sterile neutrinos are added to the three active ones. In this case there are eight possible mass orderings. In two of them both sterile neutrinos are heavier than the three active ones. In the next two scenarios both sterile neutrinos are lighter than the three active ones. The remaining four scenarios have one sterile neutrino heavier and another lighter than the three active ones. We analyze all scenarios with respect to their predictions for mass-related observables. These are the sum of neutrino masses as constrained by cosmological observations, the kinematic mass parameter as measurable in the KATRIN experiment, and the effective mass governing neutrinoless double beta decay. It is investigated how these non-oscillation probes can distinguish between the eight scenarios. Six of the eight possible mass orderings predict positive signals in the KATRIN and future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. We also remark on scenarios with three sterile neutrinos. In addition we make some comments on the possibility of using decays of high energy astrophysical neutrinos to discriminate between the mass orderings in presence of two sterile neutrinos.

  9. Production of cold beams of ND{sub 3} with variable rotational state distributions by electrostatic extraction of He and Ne buffer-gas-cooled beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twyman, Kathryn S.; Bell, Martin T.; Heazlewood, Brianna R.; Softley, Timothy P., E-mail: tim.softley@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TA (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the rotational state distribution of a velocity-selected, buffer-gas-cooled beam of ND{sub 3} is described. In an apparatus recently constructed to study cold ion-molecule collisions, the ND{sub 3} beam is extracted from a cryogenically cooled buffer-gas cell using a 2.15 m long electrostatic quadrupole guide with three 90 bends. (2+1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules exiting the guide show that beams of ND{sub 3} can be produced with rotational state populations corresponding to approximately T{sub rot} = 918 K, achieved through manipulation of the temperature of the buffer-gas cell (operated at 6 K or 17 K), the identity of the buffer gas (He or Ne), or the relative densities of the buffer gas and ND{sub 3}. The translational temperature of the guided ND{sub 3} is found to be similar in a 6 K helium and 17 K neon buffer-gas cell (peak kinetic energies of 6.92(0.13) K and 5.90(0.01) K, respectively). The characterization of this cold-molecule source provides an opportunity for the first experimental investigations into the rotational dependence of reaction cross sections in low temperature collisions.

  10. Speed limit of frozen pellets (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and Ne) through single-loop and multiloop tubes and implications for fusion plasma research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, S. K.; Griffith, A. E.; Foust, C. R.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frozen pellets (H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and Ne at 8 K) of nominal 2.7 mm diam were shot through a coiled tube (single loop of {approx}0.6 m diam and 8.5 mm bore), and the speed limit for survival was recorded for each pellet type. Intact H{sub 2} pellets were observed at speeds approaching 500 m/s; but neon pellets could not survive much more than 100 m/s. The speed limit for D{sub 2} pellets fell in the middle at {approx}300 m/s. Some D{sub 2} pellets were also shot through a 30 m coiled tube consisting of 11 loops (average loop diameter of {approx}0.8 m), and a speed limit of {approx}100 m/s was observed. Injection of frozen H{sub 2} or D{sub 2} pellets is commonly used for core fueling of magnetically confined plasmas, and frozen neon pellets are sometimes used for impurity transport studies in similar experiments. The results from these tests add to a pellet database for injection lines with single- and complex multiple-curved guide tubes. All of the information to date suggests that frozen pellets can be delivered reliably from a pellet source to any accessible plasma location on a fusion device via ''roller-coaster'' tubes as long as the pellet speed is maintained below a threshold limit.

  11. Configuration studies for a cubic-kilometre deep-sea neutrino telescope - KM3NeT - with NESSY, a fast and flexible approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Carr; D. Dornic; F. Jouvenot; G. Maurin; for the KM3NeT consortium

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical predictions for neutrino fluxes indicate that km$^{3}$ scale detectors are needed to detect certain astrophysical sources. The three Mediterranean experiments, ANTARES, NEMO and NESTOR are working together on a design study, KM3NeT, for a large deep-sea neutrino telescope. A detector placed in the Mediterranean Sea will survey a large part of the Galactic disc, including the Galactic Centre. It will complement the IceCube telescope currently under construction at the South Pole. Furthermore, the improved optical properties of sea water, compared to Antarctic ice, will allow a better angular resolution and hence better background rejection. The main work presented in this paper is to evaluate different km$^{3}$ scale detector geometries in order to optimize the muon neutrino sensitivity between 1 and 100 TeV. For this purpose, we have developed a detailed simulation based on the {\\it Mathematica} software - for the muon track production, the light transmission in water, the environmental background and the detector response. To compare different geometries, we have mainly used the effective neutrino area obtained after the full standard reconstruction chain.}

  12. TARGET FRAGMENT ENERGIES AND MOMENTA IN THE REACTION OF 4.8 GeV {sup 12}C AND 5.0 GeV {sup 20}Ne WITH {sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loveland, W.; Luo, Cheng; McGaughey, P. L.; Morrissey, D. J.; Seaborg, G. T.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Target fragment recoil properties were measured using the thick target-thick catcher technique for the interaction of 4.8 GeV {sup 12}C and 5.0 GeV {sup 20}Ne with {sup 238}U. The target fragment energies and momenta are very similar for the reaction of 4.8 GeV (400 MeV/A) {sup 12}C and 5.0 GeV (250 MeV/A) {sup 20}Ne with {sup 238}U. In the complex variation of fragment momenta with their N/Z ratio, one finds evidence suggesting the existence of several mechanisms leading to the formation of the target fragments. Comparison of these results with the predictions of the intranuclear cascade model of Yariv and Fraenkel and the firestreak model shows that both model predictions grossly overestimate the target fragment momenta.

  13. Radiation Field on Superspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

  14. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar [Advanced Design Consulting USA, 126 Ridge Road, P.O. Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States); Dunn, Jonathan Hunter [MAX-lab, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  15. Dose response of selected ion chambers in applied homogeneous transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, M. [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Departments of Oncology and Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Rathee, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The magnetic fields of an integrated MR-Linac system will alter the paths of electrons that produce ions in the ionization chambers. The dose response of selected ion chambers is evaluated in the presence of varying transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields. The investigation is useful in calibration of therapeutic x-ray beams associated with MR-Linac systems. Methods: The Monte Carlo code PENELOPE was used to model the irradiation of NE2571, and PR06C ionization chambers in the presence of a transverse and longitudinal (with respect to the photon beam) magnetic fields of varying magnitude. The long axis of each chamber was simulated both parallel and perpendicular to the incident photon beam for each magnetic field case. The dose deposited in each chamber for each case was compared to the case with zero magnetic field by means of a ratio. The PR06C chamber's response was measured in the presence of a transverse magnetic field with field strengths ranging from 0.0 to 0.2 T to compare to simulated results. Results: The simulations and measured data show that in the presence of a transverse magnetic field there is a considerable dose response (maximum of 11% near 1.0 T in the ion chambers investigated, which depends on the magnitude of magnetic field, and relative orientation of the magnetic field, radiation beam, and ion chamber. Measurements made with the PR06C chamber verify these results in the region of measurement. In contrast, a longitudinal magnetic field produces only a slight increase in dose response (2% at 1.5 T) that rises slowly with increasing magnetic field and is seemingly independent of chamber orientation. Response trends were similar for the two ion chambers and relative orientations considered, but slight variations are present from chamber to chamber. Conclusions: Care must be taken when making ion chamber measurements in a transverse magnetic field. Ion chamber responses vary not only with transverse field strength, but with chamber orientation and type, and can be considerable. Longitudinal magnetic fields influence ion chamber responses relatively little (2% at 1.5 T), and only at field strengths in excess of 1.0 T.

  16. Energy for the future with Ris from nuclear power to sustainable energy Ris NatioNal laboRatoRy foR sustaiNable eNeRgy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy for the future with Ris from nuclear power to sustainable energy Ris NatioNal laboRatoRy foR sustaiNable eNeRgy edited by MoRteN JastRup #12;Energy for the future #12;Energy for the future with Ris from nuclear power to sustainable energy Translated from 'Energi til fremtiden med Ris fra

  17. High-Beta, Improved Confinement Reversed-Field Pinch Plasmas at High Density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyman, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Chapman, B. E. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ahn, J. W. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Almagri, A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Anderson, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Bonomo, F. [Consorzio RFX, Italy; Brower, D. L. [University of California, Los Angeles; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Craig, D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Hartog, D. J. Den [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Deng, B. [University of California, Los Angeles; Ding, W. X. [University of California, Los Angeles; Ebrahimi, F. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ennis, D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Fiksel, G. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Foust, Charles R [ORNL; Franz, P. [EURATOM / ENEA, Italy; Gangadhara, S. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Goetz, J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; O'Connell, R, [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Oliva, S. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Prager, S. C. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reusch, J. A. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Sarff, J. S. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Stephens, H. D. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Yates, T. [University of California, Los Angeles

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Madison Symmetric Torus Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 1991 discharges where improved confinement is brought about by modification of the current profile, pellet injection has quadrupled the density, reaching ne=41019 m 3. Without pellet injection, the achievable density in improved confinement discharges had been limited by edge-resonant tearing instability. With pellet injection, the total beta has been increased to 26%, and the energy confinement time is comparable to that at low density. Pressure-driven local interchange and global tearing are predicted to be linearly unstable. Interchange has not yet been observed experimentally, but there is possible evidence of pressure-driven tearing, an instability usually driven by the current gradient in the reversed-field pinch.

  18. field_equipment.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIELD EQUIPMENT INVENTORY Trucks * Five vacpressure trucks, 60-90 bbl, up to 5 bpm at 5,000 lb. * Waterfi re truck, 110 bbl * Two dump trucks: 5-yard and 12-yard * Belly dump...

  19. Manager, Carlsbad Field Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM), Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is seeking a highly experienced and motivated executive-minded individual to fill its...

  20. Three Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    viii Contents. Three Field Theory. 8789. 9095. 9697. 98107. 108114. 115121. De?nition and examples of ?eld structure 67. Vector spaces, bases...

  1. HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlapentokh, Alexandra

    HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields Alexandra Shlapentokh East Carolina University AMS-ASL-MAA Panel on Hilberts Tenth Problem San Francisco January 14, 2010 #12;HTP over Function's known about HTP over Function Fields. Field Results for Characteristic 0 Field Results for Positive

  2. Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wornell, Gregory W.

    Quasi light fields: extending the light field to coherent radiation Anthony Accardi1,2 and Gregory light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of coherent image formation that strikes a balance between the utility of the light field

  3. On the Relation of KS Entropy and Permutation Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsten Keller; Anton M. Unakafov; Valentina A. Unakafova

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Since Bandt et al. have shown that the permutation entropy and the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy coincide for piecewise monotone interval maps, the relationship of both entropies for time-discrete dynamical systems is of a certain interest. The aim of this paper is a discussion of this relationship on the basis of an ordinal characterization of the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy recently given.

  4. 1 KS.Inglett_CV KANIKA SHARMA INGLETT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    ; bioremediation and biodegradation of environmental pollutants EDUCATION Ph.D., Soil and Water Science with minor technology. TEACHING Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Instructor, Bioremediation level, co instructor Dr KR Reddy) Spring 2010 (even years) Instructor, Bioremediation and Biodegradation

  5. Field error lottery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Quimby, D.C. (Spectra Technology, Inc., Bellevue, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of {plus minus}25{mu}m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration...

  7. A Geothermal Field Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Model Based On Geophysical And Thermal Prospectings In Nea Kessani (Ne Greece) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Geothermal...

  8. STATISTICAL MECHANICS AND FIELD THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuel, S.A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    York. K. Bardakci, Field Theory for Solitons, II, BerkeleyFart I Applications of Field Theory Methods to StatisticalStatistical Mechanics to Field Theory Chapter IV The Grand

  9. BooNE versus MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator|December 5,

  10. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  11. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  12. Anomalies for Galilean fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristan Jensen

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We initiate a systematic study of `t Hooft anomalies in Galilean field theories, focusing on two questions therein. In the first, we consider the non-relativistic theories obtained from a discrete light-cone quantization (DLCQ) of a relativistic theory with flavor or gravitational anomalies. We find that these anomalies survive the DLCQ, becoming mixed flavor/boost or gravitational/boost anomalies. We also classify the pure Weyl anomalies of Schr\\"odinger theories, which are Galilean conformal field theories (CFTs) with $z=2$. There are no pure Weyl anomalies in even spacetime dimension, and the lowest-derivative anomalies in odd dimension are in one-to-one correspondence with those of a relativistic CFT in one dimension higher. These results classify many of the anomalies that arise in the field theories dual to string theory on Schr\\"odinger spacetimes.

  13. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  14. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were performed enhanced oil recovery field pilot was performed in Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Studies were performed to determine a nutrient system to encourage growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria an inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient material were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor an additional production well in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicated the additional production well monitored during the field trial was also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels of tertiary oil was recovered. Microbial activity increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulphide concentration was experienced. These observations indicate that an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. The three production wells monitored in the pilot area demonstrated significant permeability reduction indicated by interwell pressure interference tests. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform (15 md maximum difference between post-treatment permeability values) indicating that preferential plugging had occurred.

  15. Chandra Survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Field. I. X-ray Data, Point-like Source Catalog, Sensitivity Maps, and Number Counts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumpe, M; Brunner, H; Hanami, H; Ishigaki, T; Takagi, T; Markowitz, A G; Goto, T; Malkan, M A; Matsuhara, H; Pearson, C; Ueda, Y; Wada, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data products from the 300 ks Chandra survey in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) deep field. This field has a unique set of 9-band infrared photometry covering 2-24 micron from the AKARI Infrared Camera, including mid-infrared (MIR) bands not covered by Spitzer. The survey is one of the deepest ever achieved at ~15 micron, and is by far the widest among those with similar depths in the MIR. This makes this field unique for the MIR-selection of AGN at z~1. We design a source detection procedure, which performs joint Maximum Likelihood PSF fits on all of our 15 mosaicked Chandra pointings covering an area of 0.34 square degree. The procedure has been highly optimized and tested by simulations. We provide a point source catalog with photometry and Bayesian-based 90 per cent confidence upper limits in the 0.5-7, 0.5-2, 2-7, 2-4, and 4-7 keV bands. The catalog contains 457 X-ray sources and the spurious fraction is estimated to be ~1.7 per cent. Sensitivity and 90 per cent confidence upper flux limit...

  16. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

  17. Noncommutative Quantum Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. O. Girotti

    2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We start by reviewing the formulation of noncommutative quantum mechanics as a constrained system. Then, we address to the problem of field theories defined on a noncommutative space-time manifold. The Moyal product is introduced and the appearance of the UV/IR mechanism is exemplified. The emphasis is on finding and analyzing noncommutative quantum field theories which are renormalizable and free of nonintegrable infrared singularities. In this last connection we give a detailed discussion of the quantization of the noncommutative Wess-Zumino model as well as of its low energy behavior.

  18. Measurements of the cross-phase angle between density and electron temperature fluctuations and comparison with gyrokinetic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Anne E.

    This paper presents new measurements of the cross-phase angle, ?neTe [alpha n subscript n subscript e T subscript e], between long-wavelength (k??s<0.5) [k subscript theta p subscript s < 0.5)] density, n~e [n cedilla ...

  19. Experimental quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, J S

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented here, is, in the opinion of the author, the essential minimum of quantum field theory that should be known to cultivated experimental particle physicists. The word experimental describes not only the audience aimed at but also the level of mathematical rigour aspired to. (0 refs).

  20. Matthew Knight Hammer Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    MILLER THEATRE COMPLEX Beall Concert Outdoor Program Barn MRI Bean East Bean West Riverfront Fields Mc Military Science Moss Street Children's Center Knight Law Museum of Natural and Cultural History Bean East Innovation Center Rainier Romania Warehouse Chilled Water Plant Alder PeaceHealth University District

  1. Matthew Knight Hammer Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Outdoor Program Barn MRI Bean East Bean West Riverfront Fields McClure Morton Sheldon Stafford Young Law Museum of Natural and Cultural History Bean East Campus Graduate Village Ford Alumni Center Chilled Water Plant Alder PeaceHealth University District Northwest Christian University Pioneer Cemetery

  2. Single-field $?$-attractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Linde

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe a simple class of $\\alpha$-attractors, generalizing the single-field GL model of inflation in supergravity. The new class of models is defined for $0<\\alpha \\lesssim 1$, providing a good match to the present cosmological data. I also present a generalized version of these models which can describe not only inflation but also dark energy and supersymmetry breaking.

  3. Algebraic Quantum Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans Halvorson; Michael Mueger

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Algebraic quantum field theory provides a general, mathematically precise description of the structure of quantum field theories, and then draws out consequences of this structure by means of various mathematical tools -- the theory of operator algebras, category theory, etc.. Given the rigor and generality of AQFT, it is a particularly apt tool for studying the foundations of QFT. This paper is a survey of AQFT, with an orientation towards foundational topics. In addition to covering the basics of the theory, we discuss issues related to nonlocality, the particle concept, the field concept, and inequivalent representations. We also provide a detailed account of the analysis of superselection rules by S. Doplicher, R. Haag, and J. E. Roberts (DHR); and we give an alternative proof of Doplicher and Roberts' reconstruction of fields and gauge group from the category of physical representations of the observable algebra. The latter is based on unpublished ideas due to Roberts and the abstract duality theorem for symmetric tensor *-categories, a self-contained proof of which is given in the appendix.

  4. et 19 octob NE (Observa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    recomm sur la p préfére mécanis sont les OPALIN mère/e enfants temps compor l'enviro entretie Le collo vie afin d leur impact a impliqué dès le 7e mo temps jusq utils ont é entaires, le cipants (se

  5. Topographic Map Index NE Longitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    15' Aiquina Toconce Cerros de Tocorpuri 2230' Aguada de la Teca Barros Arana Ro Grande Putana 2245' Llano

  6. BIBLIOGRAPHIE GE NE RALE MONOGRAPHIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Michel (dir.), Normes, normes juridiques, normes pénales, pour une sociologie des frontières, Paris, L'Harmattan van Outrive, L'Harmattan, 1998, p. 143. DELMAS-MARTY Mireille, Union Européenne et droit pénal

  7. MiniBooNE Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA / USACE625DataNeutrino mode fit in 200 MeV -Requires

  8. BooNE Neutrino Oscillations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries Batteries An errorABisfuel RetreatsforBoard of

  9. BooNE News Articles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator|December 5, 2011ExperimentNews

  10. BooNE: Interesting Facts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticle Identification (PID) We

  11. BooNE: Picture Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewindParticle Identification (PID) WePicture

  12. ICARUS/MicroBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogen andHypernuclei in Hall CInby J. Stöhr

  13. Field/source duality in topological field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Delphenich

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the sources of physical fields and the fields themselves is investigated with regard to the coupling of topological information between them. A class of field theories that we call topological field theories is defined such that both the field and its source represent de Rham cocycles in varying dimensions over complementary subspaces and the coupling of one to the other is by way of an isomorphism of the those cohomology spaces, which we refer to as field/source duality. The deeper basis for such an isomorphism is investigated and the process is described for various elementary physical examples of topological field theories.

  14. HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY FIELD TRIP GUIDEBOOK GEOLOGY 143A ­ Field Geology of Northern Arizona 27 March University Geology 143A Northern Arizona Field Course, 27 March ­ 03 April 2010 Field Trip Guidebook by: Prof. Charles Merguerian 2010 Arizona ­ a Macro View Physically, he was not what you would call an imposing

  15. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report Methane Hydrate Workshop Report Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan Final Scientific/Technical Report

  16. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S., E-mail: shishirk@gmail.com; Raghavan, S. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Duesberg, G. S. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN) and School of Chemistry, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, D2 (Ireland); Pratap, R. [Centre for Nanoscience and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru (India)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ?10?nA ?m{sup ?1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  17. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  18. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  19. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  1. Polymer Parametrised Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Free scalar field theory on 2 dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using LQG type `polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation- annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the `triangulation' dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non- Fock nature of the representation ensures that the algebra of conformal isometries as well as that of spacetime diffeomorphisms are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analysed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that `physical weaves' necessarily underly such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  2. Noncommutative Dipole Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Dasgupta; M. M. Sheikh-Jabbari

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Assigning an intrinsic constant dipole moment to any field, we present a new kind of associative star product, the dipole star product, which was first introduced in [hep-th/0008030]. We develop the mathematics necessary to study the corresponding noncommutative dipole field theories. These theories are sensible non-local field theories with no IR/UV mixing. In addition we discuss that the Lorentz symmetry in these theories is ``softly'' broken and in some particular cases the CP (and even CPT) violation in these theories may become observable. We show that a non-trivial dipole extension of N=4, D=4 gauge theories can only be obtained if we break the SU(4) R (and hence super)-symmetry. Such noncommutative dipole extensions, which in the maximal supersymmetric cases are N=2 gauge theories with matter, can be embedded in string theory as the theories on D3-branes probing a smooth Taub-NUT space with three form fluxes turned on or alternatively by probing a space with R-symmetry twists. We show the equivalences between the two approaches and also discuss the M-theory realization.

  3. Generalized Gravitational Entropy of Interacting Scalar Field and Maxwell Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wung-Hong Huang

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The generalized gravitational entropy proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in recent is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

  4. Hamiltonian Vector Fields on Multiphase Spaces of Classical Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Forger; Mrio Otvio Salles

    2010-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a classification of hamiltonian vector fields on multisymplectic and polysymplectic fiber bundles closely analogous to the one known for the corresponding dual jet bundles that appear in the multisymplectic and polysymplectic approach to first order classical field theories.

  5. Quasi light fields: Extending the light field to coherent radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi, Anthony J.

    Imaging technologies such as dynamic viewpoint generation are engineered for incoherent radiation using the traditional light field, and for coherent radiation using electromagnetic field theory. We present a model of ...

  6. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Results are reported on the isolation/characterization of anaerobic bacteria; bacterial mobility and the importance of chemotaxis; careflood experiments; microbial modeling; and surface facilities design. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Progress is reported on growth/activity in porous media; coreflooding; and microbial modeling. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  8. ARM - Field Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40m DocumentationJanuary 9, 2009 [Events, Feature StoriesgovCampaignsSurface HeatField

  9. The Effective Field Theory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*The Effective Field Theory

  10. Field Office, Osk Ridge

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 7 s % @ {rField ,_

  11. Particle decay in Ising field theory with magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesualdo Delfino

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling limit of the two-dimensional Ising model in the plane of temperature and magnetic field defines a field theory which provides the simplest illustration of non-trivial phenomena such as spontaneous symmetry breaking and confinement. Here we discuss how Ising field theory also gives the simplest model for particle decay. The decay widths computed in this theory provide the obvious test ground for the numerical methods designed to study unstable particles in quantum field theories discretized on a lattice.

  12. Research Needs for Fusion-Fission Hybrid Systems. Report of the Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) Gaithersburg, Maryland, September 30 - October 2, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Largely in anticipation of a possible nuclear renaissance, there has been an enthusiastic renewal of interest in the fusion-fission hybrid concept, driven primarily by some members of the fusion community. A fusion-fission hybrid consists of a neutron-producing fusion core surrounded by a fission blanket. Hybrids are of interest because of their potential to address the main long-term sustainability issues related to nuclear power: fuel supply, energy production, and waste management. As a result of this renewed interest, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with the participation of the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), organized a three-day workshop in Gaithersburg, Maryland, from September 30 through October 2, 2009. Participants identified several goals. At the highest level, it was recognized that DOE does not currently support any R&D in the area of fusion-fission hybrids. The question to be addressed was whether or not hybrids offer sufficient promise to motivate DOE to initiate an R&D program in this area. At the next level, the workshop participants were asked to define the research needs and resources required to move the fusion-fission concept forward. The answer to the high-level question was given in two ways. On the one hand, when viewed as a standalone concept, the fusion-fission hybrid does indeed offer the promise of being able to address the sustainability issues associated with conventional nuclear power. On the other hand, when participants were asked whether these hybrid solutions are potentially more attractive than contemplated pure fission solutions (that is, fast burners and fast breeders), there was general consensus that this question could not be quantitatively answered based on the known technical information. Pure fission solutions are based largely on existing both fusion and nuclear technology, thereby prohibiting a fair side-by-side comparison. Another important issue addressed at the conference was the time scale on which long-term sustainability issues must be solved. There was a wide diversity of opinion and no consensus was possible. One group, primarily composed of members of the fission community, argued that the present strategies with respect to waste management (on-site storage) and fuel supply (from natural uranium) would suffice for at least 50 years, with the main short-term problem being the economics of light water reactors (LWRs). Many from the fusion community believed that the problems, particularly waste management, were of a more urgent nature and that we needed to address them sooner rather than later. There was rigorous debate on all the issues before, during, and after the workshop. Based on this debate, the workshop participants developed a set of high-level Findings and Research Needs and a companion set of Technical Findings and Research Needs. In the context of the Executive Summary it is sufficient to focus on the high-level findings which are summarized.

  13. BOUNDLESSLEARNING EXPLORERS FIELD EDUCATION FUND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    FOR FIELD EDUCATION The Department of Earth Sciences is expanding the field study components of our programs account. Claim charitable donations up to 75 per cent of your net income (a five-year carry forward

  14. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  15. Fermions in spherical field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    1999-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the spherical field formalism for fermions. We find that the spherical field method is free from certain difficulties which complicate lattice calculations, such as fermion doubling, missing axial anomalies, and computational problems regarding internal fermion loops.

  16. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  17. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  18. Introduction to spherical field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Lee

    1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical field theory is a new non-perturbative method for studying quantum field theories. It uses the spherical partial wave expansion to reduce a general d-dimensional Euclidean field theory into a set of coupled one-dimensional systems. The coupled one-dimensional systems are then converted to partial differential equations and solved numerically. We demonstrate the methods of spherical field theory by analyzing Euclidean phi^4 theory in two dimensions.

  19. Field Theory and Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Buchmller; C. Ldeling

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a short introduction to the Standard Model and the underlying concepts of quantum field theory.

  20. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History: We have audited

  1. Field Museum of Natural History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    Field Museum of Natural History Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended December 31 Auditors' Report #12;FIELD MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY TABLE OF CONTENTS Page INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT 1 Expenditures 22­23 #12;INDEPENDENT AUDITORS' REPORT To the Board of Trustees of Field Museum of Natural History

  2. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  3. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  4. Oil field management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  5. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  6. Field practice internship final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, T.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

  7. Visual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumoulin, Serge O.

    of processing in human motion-selective cortex. I N T R O D U C T I O N Neuroimaging experiments localize human by additional experiments. Defining human MT based on stimulus selectivity means that the identificationVisual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT

  8. Interplay Of Mean Field And Individual Nucleon Collisions Effects At Intermediate Energy Heavy Ion Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subotic, K.; Jordanov, D.; Durasevic, M.; Dragosavac, D. [VINCA Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Grabez, B. [Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 57, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In our study of the reaction 20Ne+27Al at energy of 84 A MeV, the track detectors were used to select the target like fragments arising from processes in which the interacting system becomes disintegrated into a large number of constituent nucleons and one massive fragment. Heavy ion reaction studies at bombarding energies of several tens of MeV/nucleon have provided the evidence that most of reaction cross section, in this energy range, is associated with the production of primary projectile like and target like fragment in the first step of the nuclear reaction. The subsequent evolution of the studied reaction systems, has been usually described either using low energy models based on mean field effects (MFE), or high energy models where reaction proceeds by independent collisions (INC) of individual nucleons in the overlap region between target and projectile. The analysis of our results in terms of different MFE and INC models, prescribing consistent timings, has shown that the reaction mechanism may be defined of interplay of the mean field and individual nucleon collisions effects.

  9. Noncommutative Field Theories and Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor O. Rivelles

    2003-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that after the Seiberg-Witten map is performed the action for noncommutative field theories can be regarded as a coupling to a field dependent gravitational background. This gravitational background depends only on the gauge field. Charged and uncharged fields couple to different backgrounds and we find that uncharged fields couple more strongly than the charged ones. We also show that the background is that of a gravitational plane wave. A massless particle in this background has a velocity which differs from the velocity of light and we find that the deviation is larger in the uncharged case. This shows that noncommutative field theories can be seen as ordinary theories in a gravitational background produced by the gauge field with a charge dependent gravitational coupling.

  10. D-brane effective field theory from string field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Open string field theory is considered as a tool for deriving the effective action for the massless or tachyonic fields living on D-branes. Some simple calculations are performed in open bosonic string field theory which validate this approach. The level truncation method is used to calculate successive approximations to the quartic terms \\phi^4, (A^\\mu A_\\mu)^2 and [A_\\mu, A_\

  11. Nonlinear Theory of Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitriy Palatnik

    2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Suggested modification of the Einstein-Maxwell system, such that Maxwell equations become non-gauge and nonlinear. The theory is based on assumption that observable (i.e., felt by particles) metric is $ {\\tilde{g}}_{ab} = g_{ab} - l^2{A}_a{A}_b$, where $g_{ab}$ is metric (found from Einstein equations), $A_a$ is electromagnetic potential, and $l$ is fundamental constant of the theory. Specific model of the mass and charge densities of a fundamental particle is considered. As a result, one obtains solutions corresponding to quantized electrical charge with spectrum $q_{n} = {{2n}\\over3}e$ and $q'_{n} = -{(2n+1)\\over3}e$, where $n = 0, 1, 2, ...$ Theory predicts Coulomb interaction between electrical charges and masses. Namely, if ($m, e$) and ($m',e'$) describe masses and electrical charges of two particles respectively, then energy of interaction (in non-relativistic limit) is $V(r) = [ee' - kmm' - \\sqrt k(em' + e'm)]/r$. It follows, then, that the Earth's mass, $M_E$, contributes negative electrical charge, $Q_E = - \\sqrt k M_E$, which explains why primary cosmic rays consist mainly of positively charged particles. One may attribute the fairweather electric field at the Earth's surface to the charge $Q_E$.

  12. Electronic field permeameter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandler, Mark A. (Madison, WI); Goggin, David J. (Austin, TX); Horne, Patrick J. (Austin, TX); Kocurek, Gary G. (Roundrock, TX); Lake, Larry W. (Austin, TX)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For making rapid, non-destructive permeability measurements in the field, a portable minipermeameter of the kind having a manually-operated gas injection tip is provided with a microcomputer system which operates a flow controller to precisely regulate gas flow rate to a test sample, and reads a pressure sensor which senses the pressure across the test sample. The microcomputer system automatically turns on the gas supply at the start of each measurement, senses when a steady-state is reached, collects and records pressure and flow rate data, and shuts off the gas supply immediately after the measurement is completed. Preferably temperature is also sensed to correct for changes in gas viscosity. The microcomputer system may also provide automatic zero-point adjustment, sensor calibration, over-range sensing, and may select controllers, sensors, and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements. Electronic sensors may provide increased accuracy and precision. Preferably one microcomputer is used for sensing instrument control and data collection, and a second microcomputer is used which is dedicated to recording and processing the data, selecting the sensors and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements, and instructing the user how to set-up and operate the minipermeameter. To provide mass data collection and user-friendly operation, the second microcomputer is preferably a lap-type portable microcomputer having a non-volatile or battery-backed CMOS memory.

  13. RESULTS OF FIELD TESTING DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FIELD TESTING AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER May through September of 2011 RMOTC is an energy testing center that partners with industry to...

  14. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  15. Continuous Profiling of Magnetotelluric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdin, C.T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    those employed in seismic data interpretation under the nameseismic nature, these techniques power implicit in the at least two decades of continued field and interpretation

  16. Cosmic Electromagnetic Fields due to Perturbations in the Gravitational Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop Mongwane; Peter K. S. Dunsby; Bob Osano

    2012-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use non-linear gauge-invariant perturbation theory to study the interaction of an inflation produced seed magnetic field with density and gravitational wave perturbations in an almost Friedmann-Lema\\^itre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime. We compare the effects of this coupling under the assumptions of poor conductivity, infinite conductivity and the case where the electric field is sourced via the coupling of velocity perturbations to the seed field in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) regime, thus generalizing, improving on and correcting previous results. We solve our equations for long wavelength limits and numerically integrate the resulting equations to generate power spectra for the electromagnetic field variables, showing where the modes cross the horizon. We find that the rotation of the electric field dominates the power spectrum on small scales, in agreement with previous arguments.

  17. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  18. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  19. Fermion measure and axion fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitra, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is known from path integral studies of the chiral anomaly that the fermion measure has to depend on gauge fields interacting with the fermion. It is argued here that in the presence of axion fields interacting with the fermion, they too may be involved in the measure, with unexpected consequences.

  20. Unified Field Theories Hitoshi Murayama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    Unified Field Theories Hitoshi Murayama Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley This article explains the idea of unified field theories in particle physics. It starts with a historical review of two successful theories which unified two apparently distinct forces: Maxwell's theory

  1. Gerbes and quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jouko Mickelsson

    2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic mechanism how gerbes arise in quantum field theory is explained; in particular the case of chiral fermions in background fields is treated. The role of of various gauge group extensions (central extensions of loop groups and their generalizations) is also explained, in relation to index theory computation of the Dixmier-Douady class of a gerbe.

  2. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  3. Are Cluster Magnetic Fields Primordial ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robi Banerjee; Karsten Jedamzik

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of a detailed and fully non-linear numerical and analytical investigation of magnetic field evolution from the very earliest cosmic epochs to the present. We find that, under reasonable assumptions concerning the efficiency of a putative magnetogenesis era during cosmic phase transitions, surprisingly strong magnetic fields 10^{-13} - 10^{-11} Gauss, on comparatively small scales 100 pc - 10 kpc may survive to the present. Building on prior work on the evolution of magnetic fields during the course of gravitational collapse of a cluster, which indicates that pre-collapse fields of 4\\times 10^{-12} Gauss extant on small scales may suffice to produce clusters with acceptable Faraday rotation measures, we question the widely hold view that cluster magnetic fields may not be entirely of primordial origin.

  4. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  5. Confluent primary fields in the conformal field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajime Nagoya; Juanjuan Sun

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For any complex simple Lie algebra, we generalize primary fileds in the Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten conformal field theory with respect to the case of irregular singularities and we construct integral representations of hypergeometric functions of confluent type, as expectation values of products of generalized primary fields. In the case of sl(2), these integral representations coincide with solutions to confluent KZ equations. Computing the operator product expansion of the energy-momentum tensor and the generalized primary field, new differential operators appear in the result. In the case of sl(2), these differential operators are the same as those of the confluent KZ equations.

  6. Reversed field pinch current drive with oscillating helical fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farengo, Ricardo; Clemente, Roberto Antonio [Centro Atomico Bariloche e Instituto Balseiro, S.C. de Bariloche (8400), RN (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of oscillating helical magnetic fields to produce and sustain the toroidal and poloidal currents in a reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated. A simple physical model that assumes fixed ions, massless electrons, and uniform density and resistivity is employed. Thermal effects are neglected in Ohm's law and helical coordinates are introduced to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear equations that must be advanced in time. The results show that it is possible to produce RFP-like magnetic field profiles with pinch parameters close to the experimental values. The efficiencies obtained for moderate resistivity, and the observed scaling, indicate that this could be a very attractive method for high temperature plasmas.

  7. fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM #12;The Field Museum | Field Trip Planning Guide for Educators 2 Welcome to The Field Museum! The Field Museum is an exciting place to explore and learn time. Taking a field trip to the Museum o ers students and teachers an opportunity to interact

  8. fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Bruce D.

    fieldmuseum.org/schools THE FIELD MUSEUM #12;The Field Museum | Field Trip Planning Guide for Educators 2 Welcome to The Field Museum! The Field Museum is an exciting place to explore and learn. Taking a field trip to the Museum o ers students and teachers an opportunity to interact with real

  9. DEEP X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD RADIO PULSAR J1119-6127 AND SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.2-0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Ho, W. C. G. [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Weltevrede, P. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bogdanov, S. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Shannon, R. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Sciences, Australia Telescope National Facility, Marsfield, NSW 2210 (Australia); Gonzalez, M. E., E-mail: ncy@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High-magnetic-field radio pulsars are important transition objects for understanding the connection between magnetars and conventional radio pulsars. We present a detailed study of the young radio pulsar J1119-6127, which has a characteristic age of 1900 yr and a spin-down-inferred magnetic field of 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, and its associated supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, using deep XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures of over 120 ks from each telescope. The pulsar emission shows strong modulation below 2.5 keV with a single-peaked profile and a large pulsed fraction of 0.48 {+-} 0.12. Employing a magnetic, partially ionized hydrogen atmosphere model, we find that the observed pulse profile can be produced by a single hot spot of temperature 0.13 keV covering about one-third of the stellar surface, and we place an upper limit of 0.08 keV for an antipodal hot spot with the same area. The non-uniform surface temperature distribution could be the result of anisotropic heat conduction under a strong magnetic field, and a single-peaked profile seems common among high-B radio pulsars. For the associated remnant G292.2-0.5, its large diameter could be attributed to fast expansion in a low-density wind cavity, likely formed by a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, similar to two other high-B radio pulsars.

  10. Quantum Field and Cosmic Field-Finite Geometrical Field Theory of Matter Motion Part Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianhua Xiao

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This research establishes an operational measurement way to express the quantum field theory in a geometrical form. In four-dimensional spacetime continuum, the orthogonal rotation is defined. It forms two sets of equations: one set is geometrical equations, another set is the motion equations. The Lorentz transformation can be directly derived from the geometrical equations, and the proper time of general relativity is well expressed by time displacement field. By the motion equations, the typical time displacement field of matter motion is discussed. The research shows that the quantum field theory can be established based on the concept of orthogonal rotation. On this sense, the quantum matter motion in physics is viewed as the orthogonal rotation of spacetime continuum. In this paper, it shows that there are three typical quantum solutions. One is particle-like solution, one is generation-type solution, and one is pure wave type solution. For each typical solution, the force fields are different. Many features of quantum field can be well explained by this theoretic form. Finally, the general matter motion is discussed, the main conclusions are: (1). Geometrically, cosmic vacuum field can be described by the curvature spacetime; (2). The spatial deformation of planet is related with a planet electromagnetic field; (3). For electric charge less matter, the volume of matter will be expanding infinitely; (4).For strong electric charge matter, it shows that the volume of matter will be contracting infinitely.

  11. An overview of craniospinal axis fields and field matching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Robin L., E-mail: robinscott631@gmail.com

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many methods are implemented for craniospinal axis (CSA) radiation treatment (RT). This papers goal is to define correctly matched CSA RT fields. Overlap or a space between matched RT fields can create variances of dose and the possibility of negative side effects or disease recurrence, respectively. An accurate CSA RT match procedure is created with localization markers, immobilization devices, equations, feathered matches, safety gap, and portal imaging. A CS match angle is predetermined to optimize patient position before immobilization device fabrication. Various central axis (CA) placements within the brain and spine fields that effect gantry, table, and collimator rotation are described. An overview of the methods used to create CSA RT fields and matches is presented for optimal CSA RT implementation. In addition, to the authors knowledge, this is the first time that a prone CSA RT with anesthesia has been described.

  12. Noncommutative field with constant background fields and neutral fermion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui-bai Luo; Feng-yao Hou; Zhu-fang Cui; Xiao-jun Liu; Hong-shi Zong

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Introducing constant background fields into the noncommutative gauge theory, we first obtain a Hermitian fermion Lagrangian which involves a Lorentz violation term, then we generalize it to a new deformed canonical noncommutation relations for fermion field. Massless neutrino oscillation in the deformed canonical noncommutation relations is analyzed. The restriction of the noncommutative coefficients is also discussed. By comparing with the existing experimental data of conventional neutrino oscillations, the order of noncommutative deformed coefficients is given from different ways.

  13. Generation of Gaussian Density Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugo Martel

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes analytical and numerical techniques for the generation of Gaussian density fields, which represent cosmological density perturbations. The mathematical techniques involved in the generation of density harmonics in k-space, the filtering of the density fields, and the normalization of the power spectrum to the measured temperature fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background, are presented in details. These techniques are well-known amongst experts, but the current literature lacks a formal description. I hope that this technical report will prove useful to new researchers moving into this field, sparing them the task of reinventing the wheel.

  14. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  15. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  16. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  17. Radial profile measurement of electron temperature in edge stochastic magnetic field layer of LHD using intensity ratio of extreme ultraviolet line emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Erhui [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Morita, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Murakami, Izumi; Goto, Motoshi [Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Dong Chunfeng [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical profile of neon line emissions in 30-650 A wavelength range has been observed in horizontally elongated plasma cross section of Large Helical Device (LHD). Intensity ratio between the neon line emissions is studied to measure the radial profile of electron temperature in the edge stochastic magnetic field layer of LHD. The edge temperature profile successfully obtained from the line ratio of NeVIII 2s-3p to 2p-3s transitions is compared with the simulation based on three-dimensional edge transport code. The result shows a reasonably good agreement with the edge temperature profile analyzed from atomic data and analysis structure code. The electron temperature at last closed flux surface measured from the intensity ratio is also in good agreement with that measured from Thomson scattering.

  18. Fsusy and Field Theoretical Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Sedra; J. Zerouaoui

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Following our previous work on fractional spin symmetries (FSS) \\cite{6, 7}, we consider here the construction of field theoretical models that are invariant under the $D=2(1/3,1/3)$ supersymmetric algebra.

  19. Field emission from organic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kymissis, Ioannis, 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission displays (FEDs) show great promise as high performance flat panel displays. The light emission process is efficient, long lifetimes are possible with high brightness, and bright passive matrix displays can ...

  20. Improvements in Low Field MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogier, Stephen E

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world of clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presently dominated by multi-million dollar machines that use large superconducting magnets to generate very high quality images. It is possible to perform MRI at lower magnetic field...

  1. Topics in double field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Seung Ki

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of momentum and winding modes of closed string on a torus leads to a natural idea that the field theoretical approach of string theory should involve winding type coordinates as well as the usual space-time ...

  2. Scalar Field Theory on Supermanifolds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Hameeda

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we will analyse a scalar field theory on a spacetime with noncommutative and non-anticommutative coordinates. This will be done using supermanifold formalism. We will also analyse its quantization in path integral formalism.

  3. Double field theory at order ??

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohm, Olaf

    We investigate ?? corrections of bosonic strings in the framework of double field theory. The previously introduced doubled ??-geometry gives ??-deformed gauge transformations arising in the Green-Schwarz anomaly ...

  4. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahn, Robert N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Flows of Dark Energy Robert N. Cahn, Roland de Putter,July 8, 2008) Scalar ?eld dark energy evolving from a longthe key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of

  5. Field ionization from carbon nanofibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeoti, Bosun J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Micro Gas Analyzer project aims to develop power-efficient, high resolution, high sensitivity, portable and real-time gas sensors. We developed a field ionizer array based on gated CNTs. Arrays of CNTs are used because ...

  6. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  7. Physical fields and Clifford algebras II. Neutrino field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim V. Varlamov

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino field is considered in the framework of a complex Clifford algebra $\\C_3\\cong\\C_2\\oplus\\stackrel{\\ast}{\\C}_2$. The factor-algebras ${}^{\\epsilon}\\C_2$ and ${}^{\\epsilon}\\stackrel{\\ast}{\\C}_2$, which are obtained by means of homomorphic mappings $\\C_3\\to\\C_2$ and $\\C_3\\to\\stackrel{\\ast}{\\C}_2$, are identified with the neutrino and antineutrino fields, respectively. In this framework we have natural explanation for absence of right-handed neutrino and left-handed antineutrino.

  8. Noncommutative field gas driven inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Barosi; Francisco A. Brito; Amilcar R. Queiroz

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate early time inflationary scenarios in an Universe filled with a dilute noncommutative bosonic gas at high temperature. A noncommutative bosonic gas is a gas composed of bosonic scalar field with noncommutative field space on a commutative spacetime. Such noncommutative field theories was recently introduced as a generalization of quantum mechanics on a noncommutative spacetime. As key features of these theories are Lorentz invariance violation and CPT violation. In the present study we use a noncommutative bosonic field theory that besides the noncommutative parameter $\\theta$ shows up a further parameter $\\sigma$. This parameter $\\sigma$ controls the range of the noncommutativity and acts as a regulator for the theory. Both parameters play a key role in the modified dispersion relations of the noncommutative bosonic field, leading to possible striking consequences for phenomenology. In this work we obtain an equation of state $p=\\omega(\\sigma,\\theta;\\beta)\\rho$ for the noncommutative bosonic gas relating pressure $p$ and energy density $\\rho$, in the limit of high temperature. We analyse possible behaviours for this gas parameters $\\sigma$, $\\theta$ and $\\beta$, so that $-1\\leq\\omega<-1/3$, which is the region where the Universe enters an accelerated phase.

  9. Noncommutative field gas driven inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barosi, Luciano; Brito, Francisco A [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Caixa Postal 10071, 58109-970 Campina Grande, Paraiba (Brazil); Queiroz, Amilcar R, E-mail: lbarosi@ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: fabrito@df.ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: amilcarq@gmail.com [Centro Internacional de Fisica da Materia Condensada, Universidade de Brasilia, Caixa Postal 04667, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate early time inflationary scenarios in a Universe filled with a dilute noncommutative bosonic gas at high temperature. A noncommutative bosonic gas is a gas composed of a bosonic scalar field with noncommutative field space on a commutative spacetime. Such noncommutative field theories were recently introduced as a generalization of quantum mechanics on a noncommutative spacetime. Key features of these theories are Lorentz invariance violation and CPT violation. In the present study we use a noncommutative bosonic field theory that, besides the noncommutative parameter {theta}, shows up a further parameter {sigma}. This parameter {sigma} controls the range of the noncommutativity and acts as a regulator for the theory. Both parameters play a key role in the modified dispersion relations of the noncommutative bosonic field, leading to possible striking consequences for phenomenology. In this work we obtain an equation of state p = {omega}({sigma},{theta};{beta}){rho} for the noncommutative bosonic gas relating pressure p and energy density {rho}, in the limit of high temperature. We analyse possible behaviours for these gas parameters {sigma}, {theta} and {beta}, so that -1{<=}{omega}<-1/3, which is the region where the Universe enters an accelerated phase.

  10. RELATIVISTIC QUANTUM FIELD THEORY OF A HYPERNUCLEI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boguta, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 Nuclei in Relativistic Field Theory of Nuclear Matter, LBLRelativistic Quantum Field Theory of Finite Nuclei, LBL prein a Relativistic Mean-Field Theory, Stanford preprint F.E.

  11. CLASSICAL FIELD THEORY WITH Z (3) SYMMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruck, H.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and H.M. Ruck, Quantum field theory Potts model, J. Math.in cyclic symmetry field theories, Nucl. Phys. B167 M.J.waves in nonlinear field theories, Phys. Rev. Lett. 32. R.

  12. Split string field theory I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Gross; Washington Taylor

    2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe projection operators in the matter sector of Witten's cubic string field theory using modes on the right and left halves of the string. These projection operators represent a step towards an analytic solution of the equations of motion of the full string field theory, and can be used to construct Dp-brane solutions of the string field theory when the BRST operator Q is taken to be pure ghost, as suggested in the recent conjecture by Rastelli, Sen and Zwiebach. We show that a family of solutions related to the sliver state are rank one projection operators on the appropriate space of half-string functionals, and we construct higher rank projection operators corresponding to configurations of multiple D-branes.

  13. Thermalization in External Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali-Akbari, Mohammad

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the AdS/CFT framework meson thermalization in the presence of a constant external magnetic field in a strongly coupled gauge theory has been studied. In the gravitational description the thermalization of mesons corresponds to the horizon formation on the flavour D7-brane which is embedded in the AdS_5 x S^5 background in the probe limit. The apparent horizon forms due to the time-dependent change in the baryon number chemical potential, the injection of baryons in the gauge theory. We will numerically show that the thermalization happens even faster in the presence of the magnetic field on the probe brane. We observe that this reduction in the thermalization time sustains up to a specific value of the magnetic field.

  14. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A0/%2A en6/%2A

  15. Variational methods for field theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Menahem, S.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four field theory models are studied: Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics (PQED) in (2 + 1) dimensions, free scalar field theory in (1 + 1) dimensions, the Quantum XY model in (1 + 1) dimensions, and the (1 + 1) dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. The last three parts deal exclusively with variational methods; the PQED part involves mainly the path-integral approach. The PQED calculation results in a better understanding of the connection between electric confinement through monopole screening, and confinement through tunneling between degenerate vacua. This includes a better quantitative agreement for the string tensions in the two approaches. Free field theory is used as a laboratory for a new variational blocking-truncation approximation, in which the high-frequency modes in a block are truncated to wave functions that depend on the slower background modes (Boron-Oppenheimer approximation). This ''adiabatic truncation'' method gives very accurate results for ground-state energy density and correlation functions. Various adiabatic schemes, with one variable kept per site and then two variables per site, are used. For the XY model, several trial wave functions for the ground state are explored, with an emphasis on the periodic Gaussian. A connection is established with the vortex Coulomb gas of the Euclidean path integral approach. The approximations used are taken from the realms of statistical mechanics (mean field approximation, transfer-matrix methods) and of quantum mechanics (iterative blocking schemes). In developing blocking schemes based on continuous variables, problems due to the periodicity of the model were solved. Our results exhibit an order-disorder phase transition. The transfer-matrix method is used to find a good (non-blocking) trial ground state for the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  16. Scully field - Marion County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salgat, B.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Scully field is a multipay new-field discovery located in the southern end of Salina basin, Marion County, Kansas. The Scully field was discovered using a combination of satellite imagery and subsurface control. The overall trapping mechanism at the Scully field is anticlinal closure. Infield drilling has demonstrated, however, that significant stratigraphic variations do exist within the productive area. The Simpson sands have been subdivided in five separate units which range from 4 to 12 ft (1 to 4 m) in thickness. Three of these are of economic importance in the field. In general, the sands with the most economic potential are distributed within relative Ordovician paleolows. The Viola has four main lithologic divisions. The uppermost of these is a relatively thin dolomite cap which ranges from 2 to 15 ft (1 to 5 m). This upper dolomite is the primary Viola pay zone. The Mississippian section is eroded deeply over the Scully structure and demonstrates about 70 ft (20 m) of thinning. The potential pay interval is chert which has 25 to 30% porosity based on log analysis. The trapping mechanism is a combination of erosional truncation and structural closure. In addition to the structural information obtained from satellite imagery, R.J. Walker Oil Co., Inc., evaluated the hydrocarbon potential of T18S, R1E, Marion County, Kansas, which contains the Scully field, using remote sensing technology developed by Earth Reference Systems of Long Beach, California. The technology involves direct detection of hydrocarbons in place, using satellite data, nonlinear mathematics, and the fundamental principles of molecular structure and electromagnetic wave propagation.

  17. Dynamics of generalized tachyon field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong-Jia Yang; Jingzhao Qi

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dynamics of generalized tachyon field in FRW spacetime. We obtain the autonomous dynamical system for the general case. Because the general autonomous dynamical system cannot be solved analytically, we discuss two cases in detail: $\\beta=1$ and $\\beta=2$. We find the critical points and study their stability. At these critical points, we also consider the stability of the generalized tachyon field, which is as important as the stability of critical points. The possible final states of the universe are discussed.

  18. Wide field of view telescope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM); McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  19. Solid phase microextraction field kit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nunes, Peter J.; Andresen, Brian D.

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A field kit for the collection, isolation and concentration of trace amounts of high explosives (HE), biological weapons (BW) and chemical weapons (CW) residues in air, soil, vegetation, swipe, and liquid samples. The field kit includes a number of Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) fiber and syringe assemblies in a hermetically sealed transportation container or tubes which includes a sampling port, a number of extra SPME fiber and syringe assemblies, the fiber and syringe assemblies including a protective cap for the fiber, and an extractor for the protective cap, along with other items including spare parts, protective glove, and an instruction manual, all located in an airtight container.

  20. String-Organized Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. S. Lam

    1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A low energy string theory should reduce to an ordinary quantum field theory, but in reality the structures of the two are so different as to make the equivalence obscure. The string formalism is more symmetrical between the spacetime and the internal degrees of freedom, thus resulting in considerable simplification in practical calculations and novel insights in theoretical understandings. We review here how tree or multiloop field-theoretical diagrams can be organized in a string-like manner to take advantage of this computational and conceptual simplicity.

  1. Spherically symmetric scalar field collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koyel Ganguly; Narayan Banerjee

    2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a scalar field, minimally coupled to gravity may have collapsing modes even when the energy condition is violated, that is, for $(\\rho+3p)<0$. This result may be useful in the investigation of the possible clustering of dark energy. All the examples dealt with have apparent horizons which form before the formation of the singularity. The singularities formed are shell focusing in nature. The density of the scalar field distribution is seen to diverge at singularity. The Ricci scalar also diverges at the singularity. The interior spherically symmetric metric is matched with exterior Vaidya metric at the hypersurface and the appropriate junction conditions are obtained.

  2. Negative Energies and Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The assumption that the vacuum is the minimum energy state, invariant under unitary transformations, is fundamental to quantum field theory. However, the assertion that the conservation of charge implies that the equal time commutator of the charge density and its time derivative vanish for two spatially separated points is inconsistent with the requirement that the vacuum be the lowest energy state. Yet, for quantum field theory to be gauge invariant, this commutator must vanish. This essay explores how this conundrum is resolved in quantum electrodynamics.

  3. Phenomenology of Noncommutative Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Carone

    2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental limits on the violation of four-dimensional Lorentz invariance imply that noncommutativity among ordinary spacetime dimensions must be small. In this talk, I review the most stringent bounds on noncommutative field theories and suggest a possible means of evading them: noncommutativity may be restricted to extra, compactified spatial dimensions. Such theories have a number of interesting features, including Abelian gauge fields whose Kaluza-Klein excitations have self couplings. We consider six-dimensional QED in a noncommutative bulk, and discuss the collider signatures of the model.

  4. Renormalization and quantum field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. E. Borcherds

    2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to describe how to use regularization and renormalization to construct a perturbative quantum field theory from a Lagrangian. We first define renormalizations and Feynman measures, and show that although there need not exist a canonical Feynman measure, there is a canonical orbit of Feynman measures under renormalization. We then construct a perturbative quantum field theory from a Lagrangian and a Feynman measure, and show that it satisfies perturbative analogues of the Wightman axioms, extended to allow time-ordered composite operators over curved spacetimes.

  5. Livermore Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Livermore Field Office Livermore Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year...

  6. Sandia Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Sandia Field Office Sandia Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  7. Pantex Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Pantex Field Office Pantex Field Office FY12 Semi Annual Report FY11 Year End...

  8. Nevada Field Office | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Us Our Operations Management and Budget Office of Civil Rights Workforce Statistics Nevada Field Office Nevada Field Office FY15 Semi Annual Report FY14 Year End...

  9. Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

  10. A new magnetic field integral measurement system

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measurements. b. Second field integral (horizontal and vertical) measurements. c. Multipole components of first field integral measurements. 2. Translation Coil a. Multipole...

  11. SHIP VELOCITY FIELDS , Lichuan Guib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui, Lichuan

    directions. 1. Introduction Knowledge of flow around ships is important for design, model development, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. Historically, five-hole pitot probes have been used for measuring of multi-hole pitot and Laser-doppler systems, they both require measurement of ship velocity fields

  12. Quantum Field Theory Mark Srednicki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    The Spin-Statistics Theorem (3) 45 5 The LSZ Reduction Formula (3) 49 6 Path Integrals in Quantum Mechanics Quantization of Spinor Fields II (38) 246 40 Parity, Time Reversal, and Charge Conjugation (23, 39) 254 #12, 59) 369 #12;6 63 The Vertex Function in Spinor Electrodynamics (62) 378 64 The Magnetic Moment

  13. Covariant Geometric Prequantization of Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanatchikov, I V

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geometric prequantization formula for the Poisson-Gerstenhaber bracket on forms found within the DeDonder-Weyl Hamiltonian formalism earlier is presented. The related aspects of covariant geometric quantization of field theories are sketched. In particular, the importance of the framework of Clifford and spinor bundles and superconnections in this context is underlined.

  14. Covariant Geometric Prequantization of Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Kanatchikov

    2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A geometric prequantization formula for the Poisson-Gerstenhaber bracket of forms found within the DeDonder-Weyl Hamiltonian formalism earlier is presented. The related aspects of covariant geometric quantization of field theories are sketched. In particular, the importance of the framework of Clifford and spinor bundles and superconnections in this context is underlined.

  15. Field Internship Claire P. Curtis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Paul Thomas

    POLI 402 Field Internship Claire P. Curtis Office: 114 Wentworth, #206 Office Hours: M, 9-11, W 12-2 Phone: 953-6510 e-mail: curtisc@cofc.edu This course provides an opportunity to do an internship in Charleston, to interact with other political science students also doing internships and to ground

  16. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffer, M.J.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

  17. Electric field divertor plasma pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Michael J. (San Diego, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

  18. Quantum Field Theory in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Fialkovsky; D. V. Vassilevich

    2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a short non-technical introduction to applications of the Quantum Field Theory methods to graphene. We derive the Dirac model from the tight binding model and describe calculations of the polarization operator (conductivity). Later on, we use this quantity to describe the Quantum Hall Effect, light absorption by graphene, the Faraday effect, and the Casimir interaction.

  19. Linear electric field mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McComas, D.J.; Nordholt, J.E.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry are described. The apparatus is compact and of low weight and has a low power requirement, making it suitable for use on a space satellite and as a portable detector for the presence of substances. High mass resolution measurements are made by timing ions moving through a gridless cylindrically symmetric linear electric field. 8 figs.

  20. FIELD RELIABILITY OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    study of in-the-field experience of electronics reliability. Tage Elm. Abstract. This report and internally) induced failures. The report is not meant to be merely an indication of the state of the art for the re- liability prediction methods we know, but also as a contribution to the investigation of man-machine