National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fields depleted reservoirs

  1. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Configuration Depleted Reservoir Storage Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Depleted Production Reservoir Underground Natural Gas Storage Well Configuration Depleted Production Reservoir Storage

  2. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Depleted Reservoir Storage Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Depleted Production ...

  3. Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    method are presented, and possible application to the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the Raft River System, and to reinjection of supersaturated fluids is discussed. Authors...

  4. Potential hazards of compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Paul W.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2011-09-01

    This report is a preliminary assessment of the ignition and explosion potential in a depleted hydrocarbon reservoir from air cycling associated with compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media. The study identifies issues associated with this phenomenon as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in geologic media has been proposed to help supplement renewable energy sources (e.g., wind and solar) by providing a means to store energy when excess energy is available, and to provide an energy source during non-productive or low productivity renewable energy time periods. Presently, salt caverns represent the only proven underground storage used for CAES. Depleted natural gas reservoirs represent another potential underground storage vessel for CAES because they have demonstrated their container function and may have the requisite porosity and permeability; however reservoirs have yet to be demonstrated as a functional/operational storage media for compressed air. Specifically, air introduced into a depleted natural gas reservoir presents a situation where an ignition and explosion potential may exist. This report presents the results of an initial study identifying issues associated with this phenomena as well as possible mitigating measures that should be considered.

  5. Design and Implementation of a C02 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The objective is to utilize reservoir characteristics and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO2) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. Also the project seeks to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field.

  6. Geological input to reservoir simulation, Champion Field, offshore Brunei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, R.; Salahudin, S.; Ho, T.C.

    1994-07-01

    Brunei Shell Petroleum's giant Champion field is in a mature stage of development with about 23 yr of production history to date. The field comprises a complex sequence of Miocene shallow marine and deltaic layered clastic reservoirs cut by numerous growth faults. This study was aimed at providing a quantified estimate of the effect of lateral and vertical discontinuities within the I and J reservoirs on the recovery for both depletion drive and in a waterflood, with a view to identifying the optimal method of completing the development of the oil reserves in this area. Geological input to the ECLIPSE simulator was aimed at quantifying two key parameters: (1) STOIIP connected to the well bore and (2) permeability contrast. Connected STOIIP is a function of the domain size of interconnected sand bodies, and this parameter was quantified by the use of detailed sedimentology resulting in sand-body facies maps for each reservoir sublayer. Permeability contrast was quantified by using a wireline-log based algorithm, calibrated against core data, which improved the existing accuracy of permeability estimates in this part of the field. Results of simulation runs illustrate the importance of quantifying geologic heterogeneity and provide valuable information for future field development planning.

  7. Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  8. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  9. Ohio Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  10. Montana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  11. Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  12. Alabama Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  13. Florida Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ... Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Florida Dry Natural Gas Proved ...

  14. Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  15. Virginia Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Virginia Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  16. Louisiana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  17. Utah Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  18. Alaska Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  19. Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  20. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  1. Arkansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  2. Design and Implementation of a CO(2) Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.; Durrett, E.G.; Bles, J.S

    1997-10-31

    The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide (CO) project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. All work this quarter falls within the demonstration project.

  3. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    2001-08-07

    This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  4. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1997-04-10

    This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  5. ,"Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

  6. Gypsy Field project in reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castagna, John P.; Jr., O'Meara, Daniel J.

    2000-01-12

    The overall objective of this project was to use extensive Gypsy Field Laboratory and data as a focus for developing and testing reservoir characterization methods that are targeted at improved recovery of conventional oil. This report describes progress since project report DOE/BC/14970-7 and covers the period June 1997-September 1998 and represents one year of funding originally allocated for the year 1996. During the course of the work previously performed, high resolution geophysical and outcrop data revealed the importance of fractures at the Gypsy site. In addition, personnel changes and alternative funding (OCAST and oil company support of various kinds) allowed the authors to leverage DOE contributions and focus more on geophysical characterization.

  7. Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chimahusky, J.S.

    1996-04-19

    The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a CO{sub 2} project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second objective is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. This report includes work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective and the demonstration project objective.

  8. Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chimahusky, J.S.

    1996-10-01

    The first objective is to utilize reservoir characterization and advanced technologies to optimize the design of a carbon dioxide project for the South Cowden Unit (SCU) located in Ector County, Texas. The SCU is a mature, relatively small, shallow shelf carbonate unit nearing waterflood depletion. The second object is to demonstrate the performance and economic viability of the project in the field. The report include work on the reservoir characterization and project design objective and demonstration project objective.

  9. Reservoir characterization of a Permian Giant: Yates Field, West Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tinker, S.W.; Mruk, D.H.

    1995-06-01

    The Yates Field reservoir characterization project provided the geologic framework, data, and tools that support the ongoing reservoir management of Yates Field. Geologic and engineering data from 1800 wells with digital log data, 23,000 feet of quantified core analysis and description, and six decades of production data, were integrated, analyzed, and displayed in a format which could be used for field evaluation, management, and simulation. The Yates Field reservoir characterization products include: quantified, standardized, digital core descriptions for 118 cores in the field; 2-D digital cross section through every well in the field; 2-D structure and isochore maps for major and internal marker horizons, net and gross reservoir maps, net and gross shale maps, secondary calcite distribution maps, cave distribution maps, and fracture distribution maps; a 6.8 million cell 3-D geologic model of the complete reservoir that includes log, core, and production data. The reservoir characterization project resulted in a quantified description of the heterogeneous matrix and fracture network in Yates Field. It is the efficient, ongoing management of this classic dual-porosity system that has stabilized production from this sixty-eight year old, 4.2 billion barrel field.

  10. Multidiscipline studies of the depletion behavior of the F23 Gas Field, offshore Sarawak, East Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heijna, H.B.; Sin, S.L.M.; Ing, S.T.T.; Van Vliet, A.; Wong, K.; Hassan, W.M.W. )

    1994-07-01

    The F23 gas field is located 178 km north-northwest of Bintulu in the central Luconia province, offshore Sarawak. The accumulation consists of a late Miocene layered platform-type carbonate buildup 22 km[sup 2] and a maximum gas thickness of over 1000 ft. Eleven development wells and one observation well were completed in 1983, with initial gas delivery to Malaysia LNG in October 1983. Annual TDT surveys are conducted in the observation well to monitor the movement of the GWC in the central area of the field. As of April 1992, a cumulative rise of 25 ft was observed. This contrasts with material balance calculations predicted rise of some 60 ft based on Sgr of 50% inferred from core measurements. Among the potential explanations were irregular bottom-water encroachment, preferential flank water advance, or larger GIIP. As all had potentially important consequences to depletion strategy and ultimate reserves, multidiscipline studies were initiated. Time-lapse seismic data were used to better determine the existing fluid levels across the field and reservoir simulation studies were used to match observation well data and predict future reservoir behavior. Concurrent reservoir and simulation studies suggested that the material balance and observation well data could be reconciled by (1) a reduced aquifer, and/or increased GIIP, and/or a lower residual gas saturation, or (2) preferential flank water influx due to internal low-permeability layers. As (1) would not lead to early water breakthrough, the simulation effort was aimed to investigate (2), the possibility and implications of early edge water breakthrough via the flank zone.

  11. INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

    2002-02-28

    This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

  12. Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H.

    1997-08-01

    We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

  13. Reservoir analysis of the Palinpinon geothermal field, Negros Oriental, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amistoso, A.E.; Aquino, B.G.; Aunzo, Z.P.; Jordan, O.T.; Ana, F.X.M.S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Doughty, C.

    1993-10-01

    The Philippine National Oil Company and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have conducted an informal cooperative project on the reservoir evaluation of the Palinpinon geothermal field in the Philippines. The work involved the development of various numerical models of the field in order to understand the observed data. A three-dimensional porous medium model of the reservoir has been developed that matches well the observed pressure declines and enthalpy transients of the wells. Submodels representing the reservoir as a fractured porous medium were developed for the analysis of chemical transport of chlorides within the reservoir and the movement of the cold water front away from injection wells. These models indicate that the effective porosity of the reservoir varies between 1 and 7% and the effective permeability between 1 and 45 millidarcies. The numerical models were used to predict the future performance of the Palinpinon reservoir using various possible exploitation scenarios. A limited number of make-up wells were allocated to each sector of the field. When all the make-up wells had been put on line, power production gradually began to decline. The model indicates that under the assumed conditions it will not be possible to maintain the planned power production of 112.5 MWe at Palinpinon I and 80 MWe at Palinpinon II for the next 30 years, but the decline in power output will be within acceptable normal operating capacities of the plants.

  14. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Don; Koerner, Roy; Moos, Dan; Nguyen, John; Phillips, Chris; Tagbor, Kwasi; Walker, Scott

    1999-11-09

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period July - September 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

  15. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott

    1999-11-09

    The objectives of this quarterly report was to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

  16. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-04-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  17. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-03-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  18. Integrated reservoir characterization and flow simulation for well targeting and reservoir management, Iagifu-Hedinia field, Southern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin, S.P.; Livingston, J.E.; Fitzmorris, R.E. )

    1996-01-01

    Infill drilling based on integrated reservoir characterization and flow simulation is increasing recoverable reserves by 20 MMBO, in lagifu-Hedinia Field (IHF). Stratigraphically-zoned models are input to window and full-field flow simulations, and results of the flow simulations target deviated and horizontal wells. Logging and pressure surveys facilitate detailed reservoir management. Flooding surfaces are the dominant control on differential depletion within and between reservoirs. The primary reservoir is the basal Cretaceous Toro Sandstone. Within the IHF, Toro is a 100 m quartz sandstone composed of stacked, coarsening-upward parasequences within a wave-dominated deltaic complex. Flooding surfaces are used to form a hydraulic zonation. The zonation is refined using discontinuities in RIFT pressure gradients and logs from development wells. For flow simulation, models use 3D geostatistical techniques. First, variograms defining spatial correlation are developed. The variograms are used to construct 3D porosity and permeability models which reflect the stratigraphic facies models. Structure models are built using dipmeter, biostratigraphic, and surface data. Deviated wells often cross axial surfaces and geometry is predicted from dip domain and SCAT. Faults are identified using pressure transient data and dipmeter. The Toro reservoir is subnormally pressured and fluid contacts are hydrodynamically tilted. The hydrodynamic flow and tilted contacts are modeled by flow simulation and constrained by maps of the potentiometric surface.

  19. Integrated reservoir characterization and flow simulation for well targeting and reservoir management, Iagifu-Hedinia field, Southern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin, S.P.; Livingston, J.E.; Fitzmorris, R.E.

    1996-12-31

    Infill drilling based on integrated reservoir characterization and flow simulation is increasing recoverable reserves by 20 MMBO, in lagifu-Hedinia Field (IHF). Stratigraphically-zoned models are input to window and full-field flow simulations, and results of the flow simulations target deviated and horizontal wells. Logging and pressure surveys facilitate detailed reservoir management. Flooding surfaces are the dominant control on differential depletion within and between reservoirs. The primary reservoir is the basal Cretaceous Toro Sandstone. Within the IHF, Toro is a 100 m quartz sandstone composed of stacked, coarsening-upward parasequences within a wave-dominated deltaic complex. Flooding surfaces are used to form a hydraulic zonation. The zonation is refined using discontinuities in RIFT pressure gradients and logs from development wells. For flow simulation, models use 3D geostatistical techniques. First, variograms defining spatial correlation are developed. The variograms are used to construct 3D porosity and permeability models which reflect the stratigraphic facies models. Structure models are built using dipmeter, biostratigraphic, and surface data. Deviated wells often cross axial surfaces and geometry is predicted from dip domain and SCAT. Faults are identified using pressure transient data and dipmeter. The Toro reservoir is subnormally pressured and fluid contacts are hydrodynamically tilted. The hydrodynamic flow and tilted contacts are modeled by flow simulation and constrained by maps of the potentiometric surface.

  20. Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, William Payton

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a

  1. Heavy oil reservoirs in the Tulare Fold Belt, Cymric-McKittrick fields, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farley, T. )

    1990-05-01

    The Tulare fold belt is a series of asymmetric, generally northeast-verging anticlines and synclines in the Pliocene-Pleistocene Tulare Formation that trend northwestward through the Cymric-McKittrick fields. Anticlines within the deformed belt generally originated as fault propagation folds above decollements, the most important of which is the regional decollement on top of the Amnicola sand, the basal Tulare unit. The Amnicola decollement is the northeast subsurface extension of the McKittrick thrust, a low-angle fault that has displaced the Miocene Antelope shale over the Pliocene San Joaquin Formation and locally over the Tulare Formation. The Amnicola decollement is itself deformed by folding related to a younger, deeper decollement near the base of the San Joaquin Formation that merges westward with the Amnicola decollement and defines a zone of faulting associated with the McKittrick thrust Heavy oil reservoirs in the Tulare Formation are currently undergoing active development by thermal recovery techniques. In general, the geometry of heavy oil reservoirs is determined by location within the Tulare fold belt combined with the position of a subhorizontal fluid level trap that forms the updip limit of fluid-saturated rock Reservoir geometry is complicated by complex local structure, discontinuous stratigraphy, and partial depletion of heavy oil reservoirs by fluid withdrawal due to gravity drainage. Proper resolution of fold geometry, fault geometry, and position of the fluid level trap is crucial to the design and monitoring of thermal recovery projects within the Tulare fold belt.

  2. Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2014 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and subdivision 12/31/13 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/14 Alaska 7,383 -25 268 690 167 195 146 0 0 305 6,805 Lower 48 States 346,611 4,930 55,060 53,654

  3. Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonassociated natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2014 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/13 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/14 Alaska 955 -24 89 137 0 34 138 0 0 101 954 Lower 48 States 294,549 3,533 41,975 44,047

  4. Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2014 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/13 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/14 Alaska 6,428 -1 179 553 167 161 8 0 0 204 5,851 Lower 48 States 52,062 1,397

  5. U.S. Shale Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Shale Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  6. U.S. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  7. New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  8. New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  9. Modeling of horizontal well and lifting mechanisms to improve ultimate recovery in a depleted field in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saputelli, L.; Mata, T.; Jimenez, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Recovery of the remaining reserve of millions of oil barrels is inhibited by depleted reservoir pressures and existing exploitation policies in Lower Lagunillas Reservoir in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela. Numerical simulation results indicated that proper production and reservoir management policies such as, controlled drawdown, producing wells at rates below the critical rates, low gas-oil-ratio production will promote efficient gravity segregation process, and subsequent optimum final recovery. Combination of infill horizontal wells and adequate lifting mechanisms yielded the recovery of additional reserves.

  10. Field development options for a waterflooded heavy-oil reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasraie, M. ); Sammon, P.H. ); Jespersen, P.J. )

    1993-09-01

    Battrum Unit 4 is a moderately heavy-oil reservoir in Saskatchewan producing under waterflood from a thin sand. This paper describes a history match of previous field behavior and systematically analyzes through the use of numerical simulation the potential benefits to production of further waterflooding (with and without infill drilling), steamflooding, and horizontal drilling. It is found that the remaining oil recovery potential of a steamflood with horizontal well is significantly higher than that of any of the waterflood options.

  11. Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Shale natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2014 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/13 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/14 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Lower 48 States 159,115 12,113 27,643 26,199 5,029 7,657 35,401

  12. Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coalbed methane proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2014 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/13 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/14 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Lower 48 States 12,392 1,796 3,299 1,020 442 680 395 0 0 1,404 15,696 Alabama 413 641 42 40 0 0 0

  13. Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2014 million barrels Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/13 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/14 Alaska 2,898 1 239 196 125 187 35 0 0 182 2,857 Lower 48 States 33,622 439 5,789 5,416 2,350 2,641 4,986 164 219

  14. Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude oil proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2014 million barrels Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/13 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/14 Alaska 2,898 1 238 196 125 186 35 0 0 182 2,855 Lower 48 States 30,473 515 5,077 4,798 2,032 2,234 4,395 151 207 2,692 33,530 Alabama

  15. Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Lease condensate proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, 2014 million barrels Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/13 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/14 Alaska 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 Lower 48 States 3,149 -76 712 618 318 407 591 13 12 326 3,546 Alabama 14 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 13

  16. Gypsy Field project in reservoir characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Meara, Jr., D. J.

    1997-05-01

    The overall objective of this project is to use the extensive Gypsy Field laboratory and data set as a focus for developing and testing reservoir characterization methods that are targeted at improved recovery of conventional oil. The Gypsy Field laboratory consists of coupled outcrop and subsurface sites which have been characterized to a degree of detail not possible in a production operation. Data from these sites entail geological descriptions, core measurements, well logs, vertical seismic surveys, a 3D seismic survey, crosswell seismic surveys, and pressure transient well tests. The overall project consists of four interdisciplinary sub-projects which are closely interlinked: modeling depositional environments; sweep efficiency; tracer testing; and integrated 3D seismic interpretation. The first of these aims at improving the ability to model complex depositional environments which trap movable oil. The second is a development geophysics project which proposes to improve the quality of reservoir geological models through better use of 3D seismic data. The third investigates the usefulness of a new numerical technique for identifying unswept oil through rapid calculation of sweep efficiency in large reservoir models. The fourth explores what can be learned from tracer tests in complex depositional environments, particularly those which are fluvial dominated.

  17. Reservoir class field demonstration. Publication and presentation bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The Reservoir Class Field Demonstration Program was initiated in FY92 in response to rapidly declining domestic production and the realization that huge volumes of oil are being abandoned in reservoirs because of uneconomic production techniques. This program is just one of the critical elements of the National Oil Program necessary to move Improved Oil Recovery (IOR) technology from the conceptual stage through research, pilot scale field experiments, and full-scale field demonstrations to industry acceptance and commercialization. Both the successful results and failures of the field demonstrations will provide focus to concurrent research programs. Elements of the field demonstrations that are suitable for broad industry application are being communicated to the industry through the oil program`s technology transfer effort. As part of the technology transfer effort, this listing of publications and presentations by the project operators has been compiled by the US Department of energy`s (DOE) National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO). The bibliography contains 240 citations for publications and a similar number of citations for presentations.

  18. The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A.; Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik; Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-08-01

    The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is conducting a reservoir evaluation study of the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador. This work is being performed in cooperation with the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report describes the work done during the first year of the study (FY 1988--89), and includes the (1) development of geological and conceptual models of the field, (2) evaluation of the initial thermodynamic and chemical conditions and their changes during exploitation, (3) evaluation of interference test data and the observed reservoir pressure decline, and (4) the development of a natural state model for the field. The geological model of the field indicates that there are seven (7) major and five (5) minor faults that control the fluid movement in the Ahuachapan area. Some of the faults act as a barrier to flow as indicated by large temperature declines towards the north and west. Other faults act as preferential pathways to flow. The Ahuachapan Andesites provide good horizontal permeability to flow and provide most of the fluids to the wells. The underlying Older Agglomerates also contribute to well production, but considerably less than the Andesites. 84 refs.

  19. Origin of reservoir fractures in Little Knife field, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narr, W.; Burrus, R.C.

    1984-09-01

    Thin, vertical, planar fractures observed in the Mission Canyon Formation, at the Little Knife field, are naturally occurring and appear to be extension fractures. The predominant east-west trend of the fractures, measured in oriented core from six wells, parallels the contemporary maximum horizontal compressive stress in the Williston basin. The fractures occur only in carbonate units, but within the carbonates their occurrence is not lithology dependent. Fracture density measured in the cores of the reservoir carbonates averages 1 ft (.3 m) of fracture per 2.3 ft (.7 m) of core. The formation and mineralization of reservoir fractures were the most recent diagenetic events in the Mission Canyon Formation at Little Knife. Study of aqueous and hydrocarbon fluid inclusions associated with the fractures reveals: (1) fractures formed after the strata were buried to at least their present depth of 9,800 ft (2,987 m), which indicates their age is post-Mesozoic; (2) the pore-fluid pressure gradient was normal hydrostatic immediately after, if not during, fracture system development; (3) formation-water salinity has remained fairly constant since fracture initiation; (4) migration of hydrocarbons into the reservoir probably preceded fracture genesis; and (5) methane concentration may have decreased since fracture initiation.

  20. Field Demonstration of Horizontal Infill Drilling Using Cost-effective Integrated Reservoir Modeling--Mississippian Carbonates, Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saibal Bhattacharya

    2005-08-31

    Mississippian carbonate reservoirs have produced in excess of 1 billion barrels of oil in Kansas accounting for over 16% of the state's production. With declining production from other age reservoirs, the contribution of Mississippian reservoirs to Kansas's oil production has risen to 43% as of 2004. However, solution-enhanced features such as vertical shale intervals extending from the karst erosional surface at the top introduce complexities/compartmentalizations in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs. Coupled with this, strong water drives charge many of these reservoirs resulting in limited drainage from vertical wells due to high water cuts after an initial period of low water production. Moreover, most of these fields are operated by small independent operators without access to the knowledge bank of modern research in field characterization and exploitation/development practices. Thus, despite increasing importance of Mississippian fields to Kansas production, these fields are beset with low recovery factors and high abandonment rates leaving significant resources in the ground. Worldwide, horizontal infill wells have been successful in draining compartmentalized reservoirs with limited pressure depletion. The intent of this project was to demonstrate the application of horizontal wells to successfully exploit the remaining potential in mature Mississippian fields of the mid-continent. However, it is of critical importance that for horizontal wells to be economically successful, they must be selectively targeted. This project demonstrated the application of initial and secondary screening methods, based on publicly available data, to quickly shortlist fields in a target area for detailed studies to evaluate their potential to infill horizontal well applications. Advanced decline curve analyses were used to estimate missing well-level production data and to verify if the well produced under unchanging bottom-hole conditions--two commonly occurring data

  1. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Number of Elements) Depleted Fields Capacity (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 335 2000's 336 351 340 318 320 320 322 326 324 331 2010's 331 329 330 332 333 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  2. U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 3,583,786 3,659,968 2010's 3,733,993 3,769,113 3,720,980 3,839,852 3,844,927 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  3. Reservoir geology of Landslide field, southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, T.R.; Tucker, R.D.; Singleton, M.T. )

    1991-02-01

    The Landslide field, which is located on the southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, was discovered in 1985 and consists of 13 producers and six injectors. Cumulative production as of mid-1990 was approximately 10 million bbl of oil with an average daily production of 4700 BOPD. Production is from a series of late Miocene turbidite sands (Stevens Sand) that were deposited as a small constructional submarine fan (less than 2 mi in diameter). Based on interpretation of wireline logs and engineering data, deposition of the fan and of individual lobes within the fan was strongly influenced by preexisting paleotopography and small syndepositional slump features. Based on mapping of individual depositional units and stratigraphic dipmeter analysis, transport direction of the sand was to the north-north across these paleotopographic breaks in slope. Dipmeter data and pressure data from individual sands are especially useful for recognition and mapping of individual flow units between well bores. Detailed engineering, geophysical and geological studies have increased our understanding of the dimensions, continuity, geometry, and inherent reservoir properties of the individual flow units within the reservoir. Based on the results of these studies a series of water isolation workovers and extension wells were proposed and successfully undertaken. This work has increased recoverable reserves and arrested the rapid production decline.

  4. Source Term Modeling for Evaluating the Potential Impacts to Groundwater of Fluids Escaping from a Depleted Oil Reservoir Used for Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-06-13

    In recent years depleted oil reservoirs have received special interest as carbon storage reservoirs because of their potential to offset costs through collaboration with enhanced oil recovery projects. Modeling is currently being conducted to evaluate potential risks to groundwater associated with leakage of fluids from depleted oil reservoirs used for storage of CO2. Modeling results reported here focused on understanding how toxic organic compounds found in oil will distribute between the various phases within a storage reservoir after introduction of CO2, understanding the migration potential of these compounds, and assessing potential groundwater impacts should leakage occur. Two model scenarios were conducted to evaluate how organic components in oil will distribute among the phases of interest (oil, CO2, and brine). The first case consisted of 50 wt.% oil and 50 wt.% water; the second case was 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil. Several key organic compounds were selected for special attention in this study based upon their occurrence in oil at significant concentrations, relative toxicity, or because they can serve as surrogate compounds for other more highly toxic compounds for which required input data are not available. The organic contaminants of interest (COI) selected for this study were benzene, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene. Partitioning of organic compounds between crude oil and supercritical CO2 was modeled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state over temperature and pressure conditions that represent the entire subsurface system (from those relevant to deep geologic carbon storage environments to near surface conditions). Results indicate that for a typical set of oil reservoir conditions (75°C, and 21,520 kPa) negligible amounts of the COI dissolve into the aqueous phase. When CO2 is introduced into the reservoir such that the final composition of the reservoir is 90 wt.% CO2 and 10 wt.% oil, a significant fraction of the oil

  5. Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

    2002-11-18

    The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

  6. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, D.; Koerner, R.; Moos D.; Nguyen, J.; Phillips, C.; Tagbor, K.; Walker, S.

    1999-04-05

    This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate.

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,780,700 2000's 6,788,130 6,768,622 6,747,108 6,733,983 6,776,894 6,667,222 6,711,656 6,801,291 6,805,490 6,917,547 2010's 7,074,773 7,104,948 7,038,245 7,074,916 7,085,773 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  8. Application of unconventional techniques in constructing an integrated reservoir simulation model for troll field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kydland, T.; Haugan, P.M.; Bousquet, G.; Havig, S.O.

    1988-08-01

    A number of unconventional techniques were used for constructing an integrated three-dimensional (3D), three-phase numerical reservoir model of the huge Troll field. The selected techniques included corner-point geometry (CPG), non-neighbor connections between grid cells, local grid refinement, improved vertical equilibrium (VE) description, and oilwell coning functions. By combining these techniques, an efficient model, capable of handling several complex reservoir problems simultaneously, was developed. This model became a flexible tool for reservoir management planning.

  9. Reservoir engineering applications for development and exploitation of geothermal fields in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasquez, N.C.; Sarmiento, Z.F.

    1986-07-01

    After a geothermal well is completed, several tests and downhole measurements are conducted to help evaluate the subsurface fluid and reservoir properties intersected. From these tests, a conceptual model of the well can be developed by integrating data from the various parts of the field. This paper presents the completion techniques applied in geothermal wells, as well as the role of reservoir engineering science in delineating a field for development. Monitoring techniques and other reservoir engineering aspects of a field under exploitation are also discussed, with examples from the Philippines.

  10. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, R.; Clarke, D.; Walker, S.; Phillips, C.; Nguyen, J.; Moos, D.; Tagbor, K.

    1997-10-21

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period July - September 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the `Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist`. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques.

  11. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker.

    1998-01-26

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period October - December 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist . The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

  12. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1998-04-22

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period January - March 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

  13. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nauyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    1997-07-28

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the `Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist`. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques.

  14. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1998-01-26

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period October - December 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

  15. Application of geochemical techniques to deduce the reservoir performance of the Palinpinon Geothermal Field, Philippines - an update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos-Candelaria, M.N.; Garcia, S.E.; Hermoso, D.Z.

    1997-12-31

    Regular monitoring of various geochemical parameters in the water and vapor phases of the production wells at the Palinpinon I and II sectors of the Southern Negros Geothermal Field have been useful in the identification of the dominant reservoir processes occurring related to the present exploitation strategy. Observed geochemical and physical changes in the output of production wells have dictated production and injection strategies adopted to maximize production to meet the steam requirements of the power plant. Correlation of both physical and chemical data have identified the following reservoir processes: (1) Injection breakthrough via the Ticala Fault of the highly mineralized (Cl {approximately}8,000-10,500 mg/kg), isotopically enriched ({delta}{sup 18}O = -3.00{per_thousand}, {delta}{sup 2} H = -39{per_thousand}), and gas depleted brine for wells in the SW and central Puhagan. Injection breakthrough is also occurring in Palinpinon II and has resulted in temperature drops of 5-10{degrees}C.2. Pressure drawdown enhanced boiling in the liquid reservoir with steam separation of 220-240{degrees}C, feeding wells tapping the natural steam zone. However, enhanced drawdown has induced the entry of shallow acid steam condensate fluids in some wells (e.g. OK-7, PN-29D, PN-18D), which if not arrested could reduce production.

  16. The Bulalo geothermal field, Philippines: Reservoir characteristics and response to production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemente, W.C.; Villadolid-Abrigo, F.L.

    1993-10-01

    The Bulalo geothermal field has been operating since 1979, and currently has 330 MWe of installed capacity. The field is associated with a 0.5 Ma dacite dome on the southeastern flank of the Late Pliocene to Quaternary Mt. Makiling stratovolcano. The reservoir occurs within pre-Makiling andesite flows and pyroclastic rocks capped by the volcanic products of Mt. Makiling. Initially, the reservoir was liquid-dominated with a two-phase zone overlying the neutral-pH liquid. Exploitation has resulted in an enlargement of the two-phase zone, return to the reservoir of separated waste liquid that has been injected, scaling in the wellbores and rock formation, and influx of cooler groundwaters. Return of injected waters to the reservoir and scaling have been the major reservoir management concerns. These have been mitigated effectively by relocating injection wells farther away from the production area and by dissolving scale from wells with an acid treatment.

  17. Evaluation of field development plans using 3-D reservoir modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seifert, D.; Lewis, J.J.M.; Newbery, J.D.H.

    1997-08-01

    Three-dimensional reservoir modelling has become an accepted tool in reservoir description and is used for various purposes, such as reservoir performance prediction or integration and visualisation of data. In this case study, a small Northern North Sea turbiditic reservoir was to be developed with a line drive strategy utilising a series of horizontal producer and injector pairs, oriented north-south. This development plan was to be evaluated and the expected outcome of the wells was to be assessed and risked. Detailed analyses of core, well log and analogue data has led to the development of two geological {open_quotes}end member{close_quotes} scenarios. Both scenarios have been stochastically modelled using the Sequential Indicator Simulation method. The resulting equiprobable realisations have been subjected to detailed statistical well placement optimisation techniques. Based upon bivariate statistical evaluation of more than 1000 numerical well trajectories for each of the two scenarios, it was found that the wells inclinations and lengths had a great impact on the wells success, whereas the azimuth was found to have only a minor impact. After integration of the above results, the actual well paths were redesigned to meet external drilling constraints, resulting in substantial reductions in drilling time and costs.

  18. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; Dwasi Tagbor; John Nguygen; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1997-04-10

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period January - March 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

  19. A reservoir engineering assessment of the San Jacinto-Tizate geothermal field, Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostapenko, S.; Spektor, S.; Davila, H.; Porras, E.; Perez, M.

    1996-12-31

    More than twenty years have passed since geothermal research and drilling took place at the geothermal fields in Nicaragua. The well known Momotombo Geothermal Field (70 MWe) has been generating electricity since 1983, and now a new geothermal field is under exploration, the San Jacinto-Tizate. Two reservoirs hydraulic connected were found. The shallow reservoir (270{degrees}C) at the depth of 550 - 1200 meters, and the deep one at > 1600 meters. Both of them are water dominated reservoirs although a two phase condition exist in the upper part of the shallow one. Different transient tests and a multi-well interference test have been carried out, very high transmissivity value were estimated around the well SJ-4 and average values for the others. A preliminary conceptual model of the geothermal system is given in this paper, as the result of the geology, geophysics, hydrology studies, drilling and reservoir evaluation.

  20. A reservoir engineering assessment of the San Jacinto-Tizate Geothermal Field, Nicaragua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostapenko, S.; Spektor, S.; Davila, H.; Porras, E.; Perez, M.

    1996-01-24

    More than twenty yews have passed since geothermal research and drilling took place at the geothermal fields in Nicaragua- Tbe well horn Momotombo Geothermal Field (70 We) has been generating electricity since 1983, and now a new geothermal field is under exploration. the San Jacinto-Tizate. Two reservoirs hydraulic connected were found. The shallow reservoir (270°C) at the depth of 550 - 1200 meters, and the deep one at > 1600 meters. Both of theme are water dominated reservoirs, although a two phase condition exist in the upper part of the shallow one. Different transient tests and a multi-well interference test have been carried out, very high transmissivity value were estimated around the well SJ-4 and average values for the others. A preliminar conceptual model of the geothermal system is given in this paper, as the result of the geology, geophysics, hydrology studies, drilling and reservoir evaluation.

  1. Geological and reservoir characterization of shallow-shelf carbonate fields, Southern Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Eby, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to three wells with primary per field production ranging from 700 MBO to 2 MMBO at a 15-20% recovery rate. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah have been evaluated for CO{sub 2}-flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Conventional cores from the five fields show that three compositional reservoir types are present: (1) phylloid algal, (2) bioclastic calcarenite, and (3) bryozoan-dominated. Phylloid algal mounds are abundant in four of the five fields, and exhibit the best overall porosity and permeability. This mound type developed where shallow water depths and low energy allowed establishment of calcareous algal colonies possibly on paleohighs. The principal reservoir rock is algal bafflestone composed mostly of the phylloid Ivanovia and occasionally dolomitized. The Heron North field is a bioclastic calcarenite reservoir. It represents high-energy conditions resulting in carbonate beaches developed over foreshore carbonate rubble. The principal reservoir rocks are grainstones and rudstones having grain-selective dissolution and complete dolomitization. Bryozoan-dominated mounds present in Runway field developed in quiet, below wave-base settings that appear to be localized along Mississippian fault blocks trends. The principal reservoir rocks are bindstone and framestone with no dolomitization. The resulting model suggests that CO{sub 2} miscible flooding of these and other small carbonate reservoirs in the Paradox basin could significantly increase ultimate recovery of oil.

  2. Geological and reservoir characterization of shallow-shelf carbonate fields, Southern Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr. ); Eby, D.E. )

    1996-01-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to three wells with primary per field production ranging from 700 MBO to 2 MMBO at a 15-20% recovery rate. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah have been evaluated for CO[sub 2]-flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Conventional cores from the five fields show that three compositional reservoir types are present: (1) phylloid algal, (2) bioclastic calcarenite, and (3) bryozoan-dominated. Phylloid algal mounds are abundant in four of the five fields, and exhibit the best overall porosity and permeability. This mound type developed where shallow water depths and low energy allowed establishment of calcareous algal colonies possibly on paleohighs. The principal reservoir rock is algal bafflestone composed mostly of the phylloid Ivanovia and occasionally dolomitized. The Heron North field is a bioclastic calcarenite reservoir. It represents high-energy conditions resulting in carbonate beaches developed over foreshore carbonate rubble. The principal reservoir rocks are grainstones and rudstones having grain-selective dissolution and complete dolomitization. Bryozoan-dominated mounds present in Runway field developed in quiet, below wave-base settings that appear to be localized along Mississippian fault blocks trends. The principal reservoir rocks are bindstone and framestone with no dolomitization. The resulting model suggests that CO[sub 2] miscible flooding of these and other small carbonate reservoirs in the Paradox basin could significantly increase ultimate recovery of oil.

  3. Design and Implementation of a CO(2) Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells in Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    The work reported herein covers select tasks in Budget Phase 11. The principle Task in Budget Phase 11 included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of many of the Field Demonstration tasks during the last report period enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual C0{sub 2} injection commencing in mid-July, 1996. This report summarizes activities incurred following initial project start-up, towards the goal of optimizing project performance. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative C0{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, C0{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreement (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive chaotic texture. The chaotic modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non- reservoir rock. The chaotic reservoir rock extends from Zone C (4780`-4800`) to the lower part of Zone F (4640`-4680`). Zones D (4755`-4780`) and E (4680`-4755`) are considered the main floodable zones, though Zone F is also productive and Zone C is productive above the oil- water contact

  4. Producing Light Oil from a Frozen Reservoir: Reservoir and Fluid Characterization of Umiat Field, National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanks, Catherine

    2012-12-31

    Umiat oil field is a light oil in a shallow, frozen reservoir in the Brooks Range foothills of northern Alaska with estimated oil-in-place of over 1 billion barrels. Umiat field was discovered in the 1940’s but was never considered viable because it is shallow, in the permafrost, and far from any transportation infrastructure. The advent of modern drilling and production techniques has made Umiat and similar fields in northern Alaska attractive exploration and production targets. Since 2008 UAF has been working with Renaissance Alaska Inc. and, more recently, Linc Energy, to develop a more robust reservoir model that can be combined with rock and fluid property data to simulate potential production techniques. This work will be used to by Linc Energy as they prepare to drill up to 5 horizontal wells during the 2012-2013 drilling season. This new work identified three potential reservoir horizons within the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation: the Upper and Lower Grandstand sands, and the overlying Ninuluk sand, with the Lower Grandstand considered the primary target. Seals are provided by thick interlayered shales. Reserve estimates for the Lower Grandstand alone range from 739 million barrels to 2437 million barrels, with an average of 1527 million bbls. Reservoir simulations predict that cold gas injection from a wagon-wheel pattern of multilateral injectors and producers located on 5 drill sites on the crest of the structure will yield 12-15% recovery, with actual recovery depending upon the injection pressure used, the actual Kv/Kh encountered, and other geologic factors. Key to understanding the flow behavior of the Umiat reservoir is determining the permeability structure of the sands. Sandstones of the Cretaceous Nanushuk Formation consist of mixed shoreface and deltaic sandstones and mudstones. A core-based study of the sedimentary facies of these sands combined with outcrop observations identified six distinct facies associations with distinctive permeability

  5. 4-D stratigraphic architecture and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirado Formation, Cusiana Field, Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajardo, A.A. ); Cross, T.A. )

    1996-01-01

    A high-resolution sequence stratigraphic study using 2300 feet of core calibrated with geophysical logs from 14 wells and 1800 measurements of porosity and permeability established the 4-D stratigraphy and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirador. Virtually all reservoir-quality facies are through cross-stratified sandstones which occur in channel facies successions in the lower Mirador, but in bay-head delta and estuarine channel facies successions in the upper Mirador. Petrophysical properties and the geometry, continuity and volume of reservoir-quality sandstones change regularly as function of their stratigraphic position. These vertical facies successions reflect increasing accommodation-to-sediment supply (A/S) ratio through each intermediate-term cycle. The upper long-term cycle comprises four intermediate-term, landward-stepping, symmetrical base-level cycles. These cycles consist of estuarine channel, bay-head to bay-fill facies successions. The transition from channel to bay-head to bay-fill facies successions represents an increase in A/S ratio, and the reverse transition indicates a decrease in A/S ratio. Sixteen reservoir zones were defined within the Cusiana field. Reservoirs within the upper and lower long-term cycles are separated by a continuous middle Mirador mudstone which creates two large reservoir divisions. At the second level of zonation, the reservoir compartments and fluid-flow retardants coincide with the intermediate-term stratigraphic cycles. A third level of reservoir compartmentalization follows the distribution of facies successions within the intermediate-term cycles. A strong stratigraphic control on reservoir properties occurs at the three scales of stratigraphic cyclicity. In all cases as A/S ratio increases, porosity and permeability decrease.

  6. 4-D stratigraphic architecture and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirado Formation, Cusiana Field, Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajardo, A.A.; Cross, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    A high-resolution sequence stratigraphic study using 2300 feet of core calibrated with geophysical logs from 14 wells and 1800 measurements of porosity and permeability established the 4-D stratigraphy and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirador. Virtually all reservoir-quality facies are through cross-stratified sandstones which occur in channel facies successions in the lower Mirador, but in bay-head delta and estuarine channel facies successions in the upper Mirador. Petrophysical properties and the geometry, continuity and volume of reservoir-quality sandstones change regularly as function of their stratigraphic position. These vertical facies successions reflect increasing accommodation-to-sediment supply (A/S) ratio through each intermediate-term cycle. The upper long-term cycle comprises four intermediate-term, landward-stepping, symmetrical base-level cycles. These cycles consist of estuarine channel, bay-head to bay-fill facies successions. The transition from channel to bay-head to bay-fill facies successions represents an increase in A/S ratio, and the reverse transition indicates a decrease in A/S ratio. Sixteen reservoir zones were defined within the Cusiana field. Reservoirs within the upper and lower long-term cycles are separated by a continuous middle Mirador mudstone which creates two large reservoir divisions. At the second level of zonation, the reservoir compartments and fluid-flow retardants coincide with the intermediate-term stratigraphic cycles. A third level of reservoir compartmentalization follows the distribution of facies successions within the intermediate-term cycles. A strong stratigraphic control on reservoir properties occurs at the three scales of stratigraphic cyclicity. In all cases as A/S ratio increases, porosity and permeability decrease.

  7. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Alan E.; Copp, John F.

    1991-01-01

    Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may represent two limbs of fluid migration away from an area of two-phase upwelling. During migration, the upwelling fluids mix with chemically evolved waters of moderately dissimilar composition. CO{sub 2} rich fluids found in the limb in the southeastern portion of the Coso field are chemically distinct from liquids in the northern limb of the field. Steam-rich portions of the reservoir also indicate distinctive gas compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the central and southwestern Coso reservoir is unusually enriched in both H{sub 2}S and H{sub 2}. Such a large enrichment in both a soluble and insoluble gas cannot be produced by boiling of any liquid yet observed in single-phase portions of the field. In accord with an upflow-lateral mixing model for the Coso field, at least three end-member thermal fluids having distinct gas and liquid compositions appear to have interacted (through mixing, boiling and steam migration) to produce the observed natural state of the reservoir.

  8. Field Studies of Geothermal Reservoirs: Rio Grande Rift, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract The Rio Grande rift provides an excellent field laboratory to study the nature of geothermal systems in an extensional environment. Much of the geologic complexity...

  9. Geochemical studies of reservoir processes in the NCPA field of The Geysers, a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truesdell, Alfred; Enedy, Steve; Smith, Bill

    1993-01-28

    Methods of tracing reservoir processes will be discussed and applied to the NCPA Geysers steam field. The gas and isotope chemistry of produced steam is far from uniform even in a restricted volume of the reservoir. The composition is affected by many factors. Differences in permeability, local existence of gas pockets or perched liquid and the pattern of fracture connection can cause neighboring wells to produce steam of different compositions. This study attempts to separate local effects from general influences by viewing the data across the field and over a period of time. The fits of the trend lines to the data are far from perfect but present a reasonably consistent picture.

  10. California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 38 2 3 1980's 13 0 2 6 11 1990's 32 11 13 15 7 14 17 10 12 3 2000's 5 2 5 0 5 2 4 1 14 0 2010's 0 0 9 2 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  11. Geomechanical modeling of reservoir compaction, surface subsidence, and casing damage at the Belridge diatomite field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FREDRICH,JOANNE T.; DEITRICK,G.L.; ARGUELLO JR.,JOSE G.; DEROUFFIGNAC,E.P.

    2000-05-01

    Geologic, and historical well failure, production, and injection data were analyzed to guide development of three-dimensional geomechanical models of the Belridge diatomite field, California. The central premise of the numerical simulations is that spatial gradients in pore pressure induced by production and injection in a low permeability reservoir may perturb the local stresses and cause subsurface deformation sufficient to result in well failure. Time-dependent reservoir pressure fields that were calculated from three-dimensional black oil reservoir simulations were coupled uni-directionally to three-dimensional non-linear finite element geomechanical simulations. The reservoir models included nearly 100,000 gridblocks (100--200 wells), and covered nearly 20 years of production and injection. The geomechanical models were meshed from structure maps and contained more than 300,000 nodal points. Shear strain localization along weak bedding planes that causes casing dog-legs in the field was accommodated in the model by contact surfaces located immediately above the reservoir and at two locations in the overburden. The geomechanical simulations are validated by comparison of the predicted surface subsidence with field measurements, and by comparison of predicted deformation with observed casing damage. Additionally, simulations performed for two independently developed areas at South Belridge, Sections 33 and 29, corroborate their different well failure histories. The simulations suggest the three types of casing damage observed, and show that although water injection has mitigated surface subsidence, it can, under some circumstances, increase the lateral gradients in effective stress, that in turn can accelerate subsurface horizontal motions. Geomechanical simulation is an important reservoir management tool that can be used to identify optimal operating policies to mitigate casing damage for existing field developments, and applied to incorporate the effect of

  12. Bogi and Capiron fields, Oriente Basin, Ecuador: Similar reservoirs but contrasting drive mechanisms and recoveries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, H.; Morales, M.; Young, R.; Zambrano, H.

    1996-08-01

    Bogi and Capiron fields are being developed under a unit agreement with Petroecuador. These adjoining fields straddle Block 16 in the Oriente Basin and probably share a common oil water contact. Both fields are simple four-way-dip closures which produce heavy oil from Campanian sandstones of similar quality. However, the two fields are remarkably different in terms of oil production and projected recovery as a result of differing structural closures, reservoir distributions and, hence, differing drive mechanisms. The main reservoir at Bogi field is an amalgamation of two fluvial sheet sandstones thought to be low-stand deposits associated with two falls in relative sea level. The reservoir is thick (56-78 ft) and, with an observed oil column of only 38 feet, a bottom-water drive mechanism is ubiquitous. The oil is heavy (18 API) and mobility ratios unfavorable; water production is high and oil recovery from conventional drilling is expected to be 3-5%. In contrast, only the upper fluvial sheet sandstone is present in Capiron field and a reservoir thickness of 32-48 ft combined with an oil column of 99 ft ensures an edge-water drive mechanism over most of the field with concomitant initial low water production and oil recoveries of approximately 30%. The contrast between Bogi and Capiron fields highlights the problems and challenges in the Block 16 area. Small structural closures filled with heavy oil are abundant and an accurate seismic depth map coupled with an understanding of reservoir distribution are vital to economic success.

  13. Reservoir fracture mapping using microearthquakes: Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and 76 field, Clinton Co., KY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, W.S.; Rutledge, J.T.; Gardner, T.L.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Miller, M.E.; Schuessler, B.K.

    1996-11-01

    Patterns of microearthquakes detected downhole defined fracture orientation and extent in the Austin chalk, Giddings field, TX and the 76 field, Clinton Co., KY. We collected over 480 and 770 microearthquakes during hydraulic stimulation at two sites in the Austin chalk, and over 3200 during primary production in Clinton Co. Data were of high enough quality that 20%, 31% and 53% of the events could be located, respectively. Reflected waves constrained microearthquakes to the stimulated depths at the base of the Austin chalk. In plan view, microearthquakes defined elongate fracture zones extending from the stimulation wells parallel to the regional fracture trend. However, widths of the stimulated zones differed by a factor of five between the two Austin chalk sites, indicating a large difference in the population of ancillary fractures. Post-stimulation production was much higher from the wider zone. At Clinton Co., microearthquakes defined low-angle, reverse-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated the mapped fractures had been previously drained. Drilling showed that the fractures currently contain brine. The seismic behavior was consistent with poroelastic models that predicted slight increases in compressive stress above and below the drained volume.

  14. Biocompetitive exclusion technology: A field system to control reservoir souring and increasing production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandbeck, K.A.; Hitzman, D.O.

    1995-12-31

    Biogenic formation of sulfide in reservoirs by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB) causes serious plugging, corrosion, and environmental safety problems. The production of sulfide can be decreased, and its concentration reduced, by the establishment and growth of an indigenous microbial population which results in a replacement of the SRB population. This approach to modify the reservoir ecology utilizing preexisting carbon sources coupled with the introduction of an alternate electron acceptor forms the basis of a new Biocompetitive Exclusion technology which has the potential to enhance oil recovery and decrease paraffin deposition and corrosion. Preliminary field results from an ongoing DOE-sponsored research program will be discussed.

  15. Reservoir-scale fracture permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C.A.; Zoback, M.D.; Hickman, S.; Morin, R.; Benoit, D.

    1998-08-01

    Wellbore image data recorded in six wells penetrating a geothermal reservoir associated with an active normal fault at Dixie Valley, Nevada, were used in conjunction with hydrologic tests and in situ stress measurements to investigate the relationship between reservoir productivity and the contemporary in situ stress field. The analysis of data from wells drilled into productive and non-productive segments of the Stillwater fault zone indicates that fractures must be both optimally oriented and critically stressed to have high measured permeabilities. Fracture permeability in all wells is dominated by a relatively small number of fractures oriented parallel to the local trend of the Stillwater Fault. Fracture geometry may also play a significant role in reservoir productivity. The well-developed populations of low angle fractures present in wells drilled into the producing segment of the fault are not present in the zone where production is not commercially viable.

  16. The Zechsteinkalk reservoir of the Hewett field, southern North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southwood, D.A.; Morgan, R.K. ); Hill, W.O.R. )

    1993-09-01

    The Zechsteinkalk of Hewett field is characterized by complex porosity and permeability distribution. Facies and diagenesis together control porosity distribution, while production rates are enhanced by subseismic [open quotes]megafractures.[open quotes] Highest porosities occur in the upper part of the sequence where dolomitized shoal and perishoal oolitic and peloidal grainstones predominate. Intershoal and main shoal facies show no significant differences in average porosity. Tidal-flat muds developed at the shoreward margin of shoals have only very low porosity. Extreme porosity variation within perishoal facies is caused by differential diagenesis. Porosity has been created by dolomitization and leaching but has been occluded by early carbonate cementation and anhydrite cementation. Anhydrite is volumetrically the most significant effect, destroying 20% porosity in many intervals and completely cementing many fractures. Its distribution is highly heterogeneous. Models for the origin of the anhydrite explain and predict gross distribution trends, but superimposed smaller scale trends are related to depositional grain size and the local development of evaporitic environment over subaerially exposed grainstones. Cementation took place in at least three phases, pre-, syn-, and postfracturing. Natural fracturing occurs throughout the field. Fractures are typically subvertical, planar, dilational, and completely or partially cemented by anhydrite. The cementation history of the fractures indicates formation prior to the development of the structure. Although fracture aperture porosity occurs in a significant proportion of fractures recorded in core (30-40%), DST results indicate fracture-enhanced flow from only a small number of fractured zones where individual fractures are sufficiently closely spaced to form an interconnected system or [open quotes]megafracture.[close quotes] The megafractures trend northwest-southwest oblique to the primary fracture trend.

  17. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF UPPER DEVONIAN GORDON SANDSTONE, JACKSONBURG STRINGTOWN OIL FIELD, NORTHWESTERN WEST VIRGINIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ameri; K. Aminian; K.L. Avary; H.I. Bilgesu; M.E. Hohn; R.R. McDowell; D.L. Matchen

    2001-07-01

    The Jacksonburg-Stringtown oil field contained an estimated 88,500,000 barrels of oil in place, of which approximately 20,000,000 barrels were produced during primary recovery operations. A gas injection project, initiated in 1934, and a pilot waterflood, begun in 1981, yielded additional production from limited portions of the field. The pilot was successful enough to warrant development of a full-scale waterflood in 1990, involving approximately 8,900 acres in three units, with a target of 1,500 barrels of oil per acre recovery. Historical patterns of drilling and development within the field suggests that the Gordon reservoir is heterogeneous, and that detailed reservoir characterization is necessary for understanding well performance and addressing problems observed by the operators. The purpose of this work is to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production. Conventional stratigraphic correlation and core description shows that the Gordon sandstone is composed of three parasequences, formed along the Late Devonian shoreline of the Appalachian Basin. The parasequences comprise five lithofacies, of which one includes reservoir sandstones. Pay sandstones were found to have permeabilities in core ranging from 10 to 200 mD, whereas non-pay sandstones have permeabilities ranging from below the level of instrumental detection to 5 mD; Conglomeratic zones could take on the permeability characteristics of enclosing materials, or could exhibit extremely low values in pay sandstone and high values in non-pay or low permeability pay sandstone. Four electrofacies based on a linear combination of density and scaled gamma ray best matched correlations made independently based on visual comparison of geophysical logs. Electrofacies 4 with relatively high permeability (mean value > 45 mD) was

  18. An integrated approach to seismic stimulation of oil reservoirs: laboratory, field and theoretical results from DOE/industry collaborations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, P. M.; Majer, Ernest Luther; Lo, W. C.; Sposito, Garrison,; Daley, T. M.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed repeatedly that low-frequency (10-500 Hz) seismic stress waves can enhance oil production from depleted reservoirs . Until recently, the majority of these observations have been anecdotal or at the proof-of-concept level. The physics coupling stress waves to multiphase fluid flow behavior in porous media is still poorly understood, even though numerous underlying physical mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observations . Basic research on the phenomenon is being conducted through a U .S. Department of Energy funded collaboration between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the U .S . oil and gas industry . The project has focused on three main areas of research: (1) laboratory core flow experiments, (2) field seismic monitoring of downhole stimulation tests, and (3) theoretical modeling of the coupled stress/flow phenomenon . The major goal is to obtain a comprehensive scientific understanding of the seismic stimulation phenomenon so that field application technologies can be improved. Initial developments and experimental results in all three research focus areas confirm historic observations that the stimulated flow phenomenon is real and that a fundamental scientific understanding can be obtained through continued research . Examples of project results and developments are presented here.

  19. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A CO2 FLOOD UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL INJECTION WELLS IN A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE APPROACHING WATERFLOOD DEPLETION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.J. Harpole; Ed G. Durrett; Susan Snow; J.S. Bles; Carlon Robertson; C.D. Caldwell; D.J. Harms; R.L. King; B.A. Baldwin; D. Wegener; M. Navarrette

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO{sub 2} horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields. The Unit was a mature waterflood with water cut exceeding 95%. Oil must be mobilized through the use of a miscible or near-miscible fluid to recover significant additional reserves. Also, because the unit was relatively small, it did not have the benefit of economies of scale inherent in normal larger scale projects. Thus, new and innovative methods were required to reduce investment and operating costs. Two primary methods used to accomplish improved economics were use of reservoir characterization to restrict the flood to the higher quality rock in the unit and use of horizontal injection wells to cut investment and operating costs. The project consisted of two budget phases. Budget Phase I started in June 1994 and ended late June 1996. In this phase Reservoir Analysis, Characterization Tasks and Advanced Technology Definition Tasks were completed. Completion enabled the project to be designed, evaluated, and an Authority for Expenditure (AFE) for project implementation submitted to working interest owners for approval. Budget Phase II consisted of the implementation and execution of the project in the field. Phase II was completed in July 2001. Performance monitoring, during Phase II, by mid 1998 identified the majority of producing wells which under performed their anticipated withdrawal rates. Newly drilled and re-activated wells had lower offtake rates than originally forecasted. As a result of poor offtake, higher reservoir pressure was a concern

  20. Genetic stratigraphy and reservoir characterization of the Spiro sandstone, Red Oak Field, Arkoma Basin, southeastern Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, B.W. )

    1996-01-01

    The Lower Atokan Spiro sandstone is a mixed carbonate-silicilastic reservoir that produces hydrocarbons from three discrete stratigraphic intervals at the Red Oak Field. Reservoir-quality sandstones develop in the seaward stepping sub-Spiro sequence (highstand system tract), landward stepping Foster [open quote]channel,[close quotes] and upper Spiro depositional sequences (transgressive and highstand system tract). The sub-Spiro and Foster [open quote]channel[close quote] sequences are separated by regional unconformity interpreted as a sequence boundary. Regressive marine shoreface cycles, genetically related to the sub-Spiro shale, comprise the lowermost producing interval. Fluvial/estuarine valley-fill (Foster channel) sandstones progressively onlap the sequence boundary overlying the regressive shoreface cycles and juxtapose reservoir-quality sandstones of different sequences, creating a complex reservoir architecture. Upper Spiro reservoir sandstones are developed within marine shoreface cycles that are deposited in a landward-stepping succession (highstand systems tract) following the drowning of incised paleovalleys. These aggradational / retrogradational successions downlap onto the valley-fill and sub-Spiro sequences representing the final stages of Spiro deposition prior to the high stand of sea level during Middle Atokan time. Regional stratigraphic correlations demonstrate progressive basinward truncation of the sub-Spiro regressive shoreface cycles by an erosional surface, creating a network of incised paleovalleys across the Pennsylvanian shelf. Based on core, well log, and outcrop interpretations, the magnitude of the facies offset across this sequence boundary indicates that a significant volume of reservoir-quality sediment has been partitioned basinward of the current producing areas.

  1. Kansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 7 18 14 1980's 3 99 7 5 6 6 2 1 5 4 1990's 1 6 24 3 7 3 3 4 1 1 2000's 0 1 2 0 0 4 3 0 2 0 2010's 1 1 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  2. Permian {open_quotes}Wolfcamp{close_quotes} limestone reservoirs: Powell Ranch field, Eastern Midland Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1996-09-01

    Deep-water carbonate channel reservoirs form important oil reservoirs along the toe of the Eastern Shelf of the Permian basin in west Texas. In northwestern Glasscock County, these `Wolfcamp` reservoirs are Leonardian (Early Permian) in age and define high-energy channels incised into surrounding carbonate detritus and basinal shale. Porous grain-flow material filling these channels, along with encasing detritus, was derived from the shallow shelf located six miles to the east. Reservoirs are in packstone and grainstone facies and have significant interparticle and moldic porosity. Relevant exploration began in the 1960s, but expanded slowly thereafter due to lack of success caused by complex patterns of channel occurrence. Results of a three-dimensional (3-D) seismic survey conducted in 1990 have greatly enhanced the identification and mapping of productive channels in the Powell Ranch field complex. Wells in this complex are capable of flowing 400-1200 bbl of oil per day, and have reserves ranging from 0.2 to 1.3 MBO. The new 3-D data have improved the relevant geologic model and dramatically increased rates of drilling success. Application of such data to this setting offers a potential model for other parts of the Permian basin.

  3. Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czirr, K.L.; Gaddis, M.P.; Moshell, M.K.

    2002-02-21

    The principle objective of this project is to demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of an innovative reservoir management and carbon dioxide (CO2) flood project development approach for improving CO2 flood project economics in shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs.

  4. Application of oil gas-chromatography in reservoir compartmentalization in a mature Venezuelan oil field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, N.G.; Mompart, L.; Talukdar, S.C.

    1996-08-01

    Gas chromatographic oil {open_quotes}fingerprinting{close_quotes} was successfully applied in a multidisciplinary production geology project by Maraven, S.A. to define the extent of vertical and lateral continuity of Eocene and Miocene sandstone reservoirs in the highly faulted Bloque I field, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela. Seventy-five non-biodegraded oils (20{degrees}-37.4{degrees} API) were analyzed with gas chromatography. Fifty were produced from the Eocene Misoa C-4, C-5, C-6 or C-7 horizons, fifteen from the Miocene basal La Rosa and ten from multizone completions. Gas chromatographic and terpane and sterane biomarker data show that all of the oils are genetically related. They were expelled from a type II, Upper Cretaceous marine La Luna source rock at about 0.80-0.90% R{sub o} maturity. Alteration in the reservoir by gas stripping with or without subsequent light hydrocarbons mixing was observed in some oils. Detailed chromatographic comparisons among the oils shown by star plots and cluster analysis utilizing several naphthenic and aromatic peak height ratios, resulted in oil pool groupings. This led to finding previously unknown lateral and vertical reservoir communication and also helped in checking and updating the scaling character of faults. In the commingled oils, percentages of each contributing zone in the mixture were also determined giving Maraven engineers a proven, rapid and inexpensive tool for production allocation and reservoir management The oil pool compartmentalization defined by the geochemical fingerprinting is in very good agreement with the sequence stratigraphic interpretation of the reservoirs and helped evaluate the influence of structure in oil migration and trapping.

  5. Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W.; McJannet, G.S.

    1996-12-31

    A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

  6. Application of turbidite facies of the Stevens Oil Zone for reservoir management, Elk Hills Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A.; Thompson, T.W. ); McJannet, G.S. )

    1996-01-01

    A detailed depositional model for the uppermost sand reservoirs of the Stevens Oil Zone, Elk Hills Field, California, contains three facies: turbidite channel-fill sand bodies, overbank Sandstone and mudstone, and pelagic and hemipelagic siliceous shale. Sand bodies are the primary producing facies and consist of layered, graded sandstone with good permeability. The presence of incipient anticlines with subsea relief in the late Miocene resulted in deposition of lenticular and sinuous sand Was within structurally created channels. Relief of these structural channels was low when the earliest sand bodies were deposited, leading to a wide channel complex bounded by broad overbank deposits of moderate to low permeability. As deposition proceeded, increased structural relief constrained the channels, resulting in narrower sand body width and relatively abrupt channel terminations against very low permeability siliceous shale. With post-Miocene uplift and differential compaction, stratigraphic mounding of sand bodies helped create structural domes such as the 24Z reservoir. Stratigraphic traps including the 26R reservoir were also created. Such traps vary in seal quality from very effective to leaky, depending on the lateral transition from sand bodies to siliceous shale. Application of the Elk Hills turbidity model (1) provides a framework for monitoring production performance in the 24Z and Northwest Stevens waterflood projects; and for tracking gas migration into and out of the 26R reservoir, (2) helps b identify undeveloped locations in the 26R reservoir ideally suited for horizontal wells, (3) has led to the identification of two new production trends in the 29R area, and (4) makes possible the development of exploration plays in western Elk Hills.

  7. Bioclastic turbiditic reservoirs: San Giorgio, Santa Maria Mare, Sarago Mare fields (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heritier, F.E.; Soudet, H.; Richert, J.

    1987-05-01

    These three fields and the associated Mormora discovery are located along the coastline of the central Adriatic Sea or on the very proximate shelf south of Ancona. Geologically they belong to the Marches basin. These fields are situated on highly faulted northwest-trending anticlines which are related to a north-south shear zone under the disharmonic cover of late Miocene and early Pliocene shales. Oil and gas are contained in the Scaglia limestone formation of Late Cretaceous to Paleocene age whose reservoirs consist of high-energy bioclastic grainstones interbedded in open marine chalk deposits, and spread and deposited by turbiditic currents. The diagenesis of these bioclastic grainstones is closely related to the thickness and composition of the different beds and is chiefly located at the top and bottom of them. It is also related to the fluid content of the reservoir. Fracturing of these beds under the tectonic stresses is linked to the reservoir's characteristics and to the extension of consolidated facies by diagenesis. This fracturing is responsible for the production behavior of the different wells. Source rocks are the evaporitic shales of upper Miocene age, mature in the deeper part of the Marches basin under the upper Pliocene olistostromes.

  8. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  9. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

  10. Preliminary reservoir engineering studies of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haukwa, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Mainieri, A.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in cooperation with the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad is conducting a reservoir engineering study of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica. Using data from eight exploration wells, a two-dimensional areal, natural-state model of Miravalles has been developed. The model was calibrated by fitting the observed temperature and pressure distributions and requires a geothermal upflow zone in the northern part of the field, associated with the Miravalles volcano and an outflow towards the south. The total hot (about 260 C) water recharge is 130 kg/s, corresponding to a thermal input of about 150 MWt. On the basis of the natural-state model a two-dimensional exploitation model was developed. The field has a production area of about 10 km{sup 2}, with temperatures exceeding 220 C. The model indicated that power generation of 55 MWe can be maintained for 30 years, with or without injection of the separated geothermal brine. Generation of 110 MWe could be problematic. Until more information becomes available on the areal extent of the field and the properties of the reservoir rocks, especially their relative permeability characteristics, it is difficult to ascertain if 110 MWe can be sustained during a 30-year period.

  11. Predicting the natural state of fractured carbonate reservoirs: An Andector Field, West Texas test of a 3-D RTM simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuncay, K.; Romer, S.; Ortoleva, P.; Hoak, T.; Sundberg, K.

    1998-12-31

    The power of the reaction, transport, mechanical (RTM) modeling approach is that it directly uses the laws of geochemistry and geophysics to extrapolate fracture and other characteristics from the borehole or surface to the reservoir interior. The objectives of this facet of the project were to refine and test the viability of the basin/reservoir forward modeling approach to address fractured reservoir in E and P problems. The study attempts to resolve the following issues: role of fracturing and timing on present day location and characteristics; clarifying the roles and interplay of flexure dynamics, changing rock rheological properties, fluid pressuring and tectonic/thermal histories on present day reservoir location and characteristics; and test the integrated RTM modeling/geological data approach on a carbonate reservoir. Sedimentary, thermal and tectonic data from Andector Field, West Texas, were used as input to the RTM basin/reservoir simulator to predict its preproduction state. The results were compared with data from producing reservoirs to test the RTM modeling approach. The effects of production on the state of the field are discussed in a companion report. The authors draw the following conclusions: RTM modeling is an important new tool in fractured reservoir E and P analysis; the strong coupling of RTM processes and the geometric and tensorial complexity of fluid flow and stresses require the type of fully coupled, 3-D RTM model for fracture analysis as pioneered in this project; flexure analysis cannot predict key aspects of fractured reservoir location and characteristics; fracture history over the lifetime of a basin is required to understand the timing of petroleum expulsion and migration and the retention properties of putative reservoirs.

  12. Bulalo field, Philippines: Reservoir modeling for prediction of limits to sustainable generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strobel, Calvin J.

    1993-01-28

    The Bulalo geothermal field, located in Laguna province, Philippines, supplies 12% of the electricity on the island of Luzon. The first 110 MWe power plant was on line May 1979; current 330 MWe (gross) installed capacity was reached in 1984. Since then, the field has operated at an average plant factor of 76%. The National Power Corporation plans to add 40 MWe base load and 40 MWe standby in 1995. A numerical simulation model for the Bulalo field has been created that matches historic pressure changes, enthalpy and steam flash trends and cumulative steam production. Gravity modeling provided independent verification of mass balances and time rate of change of liquid desaturation in the rock matrix. Gravity modeling, in conjunction with reservoir simulation provides a means of predicting matrix dry out and the time to limiting conditions for sustainable levelized steam deliverability and power generation.

  13. Geochemical Enhancement Of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs: An Integrated Field And Geochemical Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph N. Moore

    2007-12-31

    The geochemical effects of injecting fluids into geothermal reservoirs are poorly understood and may be significantly underestimated. Decreased performance of injection wells has been observed in several geothermal fields after only a few years of service, but the reasons for these declines has not been established. This study had three primary objectives: 1) determine the cause(s) of the loss of injectivity; 2) utilize these observations to constrain numerical models of water-rock interactions; and 3) develop injection strategies for mitigating and reversing the potential effects of these interactions. In this study rock samples from original and redrilled injection wells at Coso and the Salton Sea geothermal fields, CA, were used to characterize the mineral and geochemical changes that occurred as a result of injection. The study documented the presence of mineral scales and at both fields in the reservoir rocks adjacent to the injection wells. At the Salton Sea, the scales consist of alternating layers of fluorite and barite, accompanied by minor anhydrite, amorphous silica and copper arsenic sulfides. Amorphous silica and traces of calcite were deposited at Coso. The formation of silica scale at Coso provides an example of the effects of untreated (unacidified) injectate on the reservoir rocks. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the scale deposits. The silica scale in the reservoir rocks at Coso was initially deposited as spheres of opal-A 1-2 micrometers in diameter. As the deposits matured, the spheres coalesced to form larger spheres up to 10 micrometer in diameter. Further maturation and infilling of the spaces between spheres resulted in the formation of plates and sheets that substantially reduce the original porosity and permeability of the fractures. Peripheral to the silica deposits, fluid inclusions with high water/gas ratios provide a subtle record of interactions between the injectate and reservoir rocks

  14. Modeling CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifer and Depleted Oil Reservoir To Evaluate Regional CO2 Sequestration Potential of Ozark Plateau Aquifer System, South-Central Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watney, W. Lynn; Rush, Jason; Raney, Jennifer

    2014-09-30

    1. Drilled, cored, and logged three wells to the basement and collecting more than 2,700 ft of conventional core; obtained 20 mi2 of multicomponent 3D seismic imaging and merged and reprocessed more than 125 mi2 of existing 3D seismic data for use in modeling CO2- EOR oil recovery and CO2 storage in five oil fields in southern Kansas. 2. Determined the technical feasibility of injecting and sequestering CO2 in a set of four depleted oil reservoirs in the Cutter, Pleasant Prairie South, Eubank, and Shuck fields in southwest Kansas; of concurrently recovering oil from those fields; and of quantifying the volumes of CO2 sequestered and oil recovered during the process. 3. Formed a consortium of six oil operating companies, five of which own and operate the four fields. The consortium became part of the Southwest Kansas CO2-EOR Initiative for the purpose of sharing data, knowledge, and interest in understanding the potential for CO2-EOR in Kansas. 4. Built a regional well database covering 30,000 mi2 and containing stratigraphic tops from ~90,000 wells; correlated 30 major stratigraphic horizons; digitized key wells, including wireline logs and sample logs; and analyzed more than 3,000 drill stem tests to establish that fluid levels in deep aquifers below the Permian evaporites are not connected to the surface and therefore pressures are not hydrostatic. Connectivity with the surface aquifers is lacking because shale aquitards and impermeable evaporite layers consist of both halite and anhydrite. 5. Developed extensive web applications and an interactive mapping system that do the following: a. Facilitate access to a wide array of data obtained in the study, including core descriptions and analyses, sample logs, digital (LAS) well logs, seismic data, gravity and magnetics maps, structural and stratigraphic maps, inferred fault traces, earthquakes, Class I and II disposal wells, and

  15. Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual report, June 3, 1994--October 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Gerard, M.G.

    1996-05-01

    The work reported here covers Budget Phase I of the project. The principal tasks in Budget Phase I are the Reservoir Analysis and Characterization Task and the Advanced Technology Definition Task. Completion of these tasks have enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed and evaluated from an economic and risk analysis standpoint. Field implementation of the project has been recommended to the working interest owner of the South Cowden Unit (SCU) and approval has been obtained. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take or pay requirements, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing cost as opposed to large capital investments for compression) were negotiated to further improve project economics. A detailed reservoir characterization study was completed by an integrated team of geoscientists and engineers. The study consisted of detailed core description, integration of log response to core descriptions, mapping of the major flow units, evaluation of porosity and permeability relationships, geostatistical analysis of permeability trends, and direct integration of reservoir performance with the geological interpretation. The study methodology fostered iterative bidirectional feedback between the reservoir characterization team and the reservoir engineering/simulation team to allow simultaneous refinement and convergence of the geological interpretation with the reservoir model. The fundamental conclusion from the study is that South Cowden exhibits favorable enhanced oil recovery characteristics, particularly reservoir quality and continuity.

  16. An Integrated Study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, Robert C.; Weinbrandt, Richard; Robinson, William C.; Widner, Kevin

    2001-05-03

    The objectives of the project were to: (1) Thoroughly understand the 60-year history of the field. (2) Develop a reservoir description using geology and 3D seismic. (3) Isolate the upper Grayburg in wells producing from multiple intervals to stop cross flow. (4) Re-align and optimize the upper Grayburg waterflood. (5) Determine well condition, identify re-frac candidates, evaluate the effectiveness of well work and obtain bottom hole pressure data for simulation utilizing pressure transient testing field wide. (6) Quantitatively integrate all the data to guide the field operations, including identification of new well locations utilizing reservoir simulation.

  17. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-05-07

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through September 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood projects. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the fourth quarter 2000 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being evaluated.

  18. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2001-08-08

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a

  19. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-06-27

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

  20. Evaluating oil quality and monitoring production from heavy oil reservoirs using geochemical methods: Application to the Boscan Field, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufman, R.L.; Noguera, V.H.; Bantz, D.M.; Rodriguez, R.

    1996-08-01

    Many oil fields worldwide contain heavy oil in one or more reservoir units. The low gravity of these oils is most frequently due to biodegradation and/or low maturity. The challenge is to find ways to economically recover this oil. Methods which reduce the operating costs of producing heavy oil add significant value to such projects. Geochemical techniques which use the composition of the reservoir fluids as natural tracers offer cost effective methods to assist with reservoir management. The low viscosity and gravity of heavy oil, combined with frequent high water cuts, low flow rates, and the presence of downhole artificial lift equipment, make many conventional production logging methods difficult to apply. Therefore, monitoring production, especially if the produced oil is commingled from multiple reservoirs, can be difficult. Geochemical methods can be used to identify oil/water contacts, tubing string leaks and to allocate production to individual zones from commingled production. An example of a giant heavy oil field where geochemical methods may be applicable is the Boscan Field in Venezuela. Low maturity oil, averaging 10{degrees} API gravity, is produced from the Eocene Upper and Lower Boscan (Miosa) Sands. Geochemical, stratigraphic and engineering data have helped to better define the controls on oil quality within the field, identified new reservoir compartments and defined unique characteristics of the Upper and Lower Boscan oils. This information can be used to identify existing wells in need of workovers due to mechanical problems and to monitor production from new infill wells.

  1. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2004-03-05

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the

  2. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2003-09-04

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the

  3. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2003-06-04

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the

  4. Integrated reservoir characterization to define a hydrodynamic model in the Misoa formation, Eocene, Center Lake Field, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuaje, V.; Gil, J.

    1996-08-01

    The Center Lake Field is one of the most important light oil reservoirs in the Maracaibo Basin. Field production of {open_quotes}C{close_quotes} sandstones, Misoa formation, Eocene, started in 1968. Actual cumulative production is 630 MMBls, which represents 23% of the original oil in place. Flank water injection programs have been executed since 1976; however, reservoirs within this field still have shown pressure and production declination. A multidisciplinary study has been conducted to produce an updated hydrodynamic model which matches the static and dynamic behavior of the reservoirs. An integrated interpretation team has merged geological, geophysical and engineering data and criteria to generate an updated and consistent interpretation of today`s performance of reservoirs. The integration of a 3D seismic survey with a sequence- stratigraphy analysis, petrophysical and production data allowed us to determine a new structural and stratigraphic framework. The first important conclusion is that active aquifer is not located at the flanks of the structure, as traditionally worked out. Instead, a water-bottom drive system was interpreted and validated with production data so a different strategy for water injection was recommended. The latter interpretation restricted the injection to those areas where rock volume calculation, permeability, porosity and depositional environment make it suitable and profitable. A pattern injection program is going to be developed in C-4-X.46 reservoir and 21.6 MMBls additional recovery is expected in respect to the old production scheme.

  5. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-02-18

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 1999, project work has been completed related to data preparation, basic reservoir engineering, developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model, and a rock-log model, well drilling and completions, and surface facilities. Work is continuing on the stochastic geologic model, developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Fault Block IIA Tar (Tar II-A) Zone, and operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the steamflood project. Last quarter on January 12, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations. Seven water injection wells were placed in service in November and December 1998 on the flanks of the Phase 1 steamflood area to pressure up the reservoir to fill up the existing steam chest. Intensive reservoir engineering and geomechanics studies are continuing to determine the best ways to shut down the steamflood operations in Fault Block II while minimizing any future surface subsidence. The new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulator model is being used to provide sensitivity cases to optimize production, steam injection, future flank cold water injection and reservoir temperature and pressure. According to the model, reservoir fill up of the steam chest at the current injection rate of 28,000 BPD and gross

  6. Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual Report, July 1, 1995--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chimahusky, J.S.; Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Dollens, K.B.

    1997-05-01

    The work reported herein covers select tasks remaining in Budget Phase I and many of the tasks of Budget Phase II. The principal Tasks in Budget Phase I included in this report are Reservoir Analysis and Characterization; Advanced Technical Studies; and Technology Transfer, Reporting and Project Management Activities for Budget Phase I. The principle Task in Budget Phase II included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of these tasks has enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual CO{sub 2} injection scheduled for start-up in mid-July, 1996. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreements (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics. The Grayburg-San Andres section had previously been divided into multiple zones based on the core study and gamma ray markers that correlate wells within the Unit. Each zone was mapped as continuous across the field. Previous core studies concluded that the reservoir quality in the South Cowden Unit (SCU) is controlled primarily by the distribution of a bioturbated and diagenetically-altered rock type with a distinctive {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} texture. The {open_quotes}chaotic{close_quotes} modifier is derived from the visual effect of pervasive, small-scale intermixing of tan oil-stained reservoir rock with tight gray non-reservoir rock.

  7. Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

    1999-06-25

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

  8. Hot-dry-rock geothermal-reservoir fracturing initial field operations - 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.C.; Pettitt, R.A.; Matsunaga, I.; Dreesen, D.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Sinclair, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Initial fracturing operations were conducted during 1982 to create a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir at the Los Alamos Fenton Hill site. A preliminary work-over/cleaning operation in November to December 1981 had cleared the injection well, EE-2, and a detailed, comprehensive plan was prepared to accomplish the objectives of hydraulically connecting the injection and production wells. In January 1982, open-hole reservoir sections of both the production and injection wells were pressurized below the 9-5/8 in. casing. The injection well, EE-2, did not take fluid at 2200 psi, but the production well, EE-3, had a lost circulation zone and took water over a 240 ft zone immediately below the production casing. Subsequent field operations from May through December 14, 1982 involved ten major hydraulic injection and/or equipment tests. These ranged from 14,180 ft (4322 m) deep open-hole packer tests to installation of a cemented-in liner/PBR system. Injections of up to 1.3 x 10 gals. were performed in the injection well. Both wells were fractured in zones just below the production casings. Although several large volume injections were accomplished, hydraulic communication between wells was not achieved. Severe hardware problems were encountered due to temperature limitations, the high fracture gradient (breakdown and injection pressures), and the presence of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S during fracture back-flow and well venting. On-line and post-test analyses of seismic monitoring confirmed that fractures were created in each well that converged on, but did not intersect, the neighboring well.

  9. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim; Gilbert, Bob; Lake, Larry W.; Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Thomas, Sunil G.; Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Klie, Hector; Banchs, Rafael; Nunez, Emilio J.; Jablonowski, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging

  10. Reservoir monitoring and characterization using satellite geodetic data: Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar observations from the Krechba field, Algeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Deformation in the material overlying an active reservoir is used to monitor pressure change at depth. A sequence of pressure field estimates, eleven in all, allow us to construct a measure of diffusive travel time throughout the reservoir. The dense distribution of travel time values means that we can construct an exactly linear inverse problem for reservoir flow properties. Application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data gathered over a CO{sub 2} injection in Algeria reveals pressure propagation along two northwest trending corridors. An inversion of the travel times indicates the existence of two northwest-trending high permeability zones. The high permeability features trend in the same direction as the regional fault and fracture zones. Model parameter resolution estimates indicate that the features are well resolved.

  11. Reservoir Characterization of Upper Devonian Gordon Sandstone, Jacksonburg, Stringtown Oil Field, Northwestern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ameri, S.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Bilgesu, H.I.; Hohn, M.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Patchen, D.L.

    2002-05-21

    This report gives results of efforts to determine electrofacies from logs; measure permeability in outcrop to study very fine-scale trends; find the correlation between permeability measured by the minipermeameter and in core plugs, define porosity-permeability flow units; and run the BOAST III reservoir simulator using the flow units defined for the Gordon reservoir.

  12. Seismic estimation of porosity in the Permian San Andres carbonate reservoir, Welch Field, Dawson, County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, G.P.; Hinterlong, G.D. )

    1996-01-01

    OXY and the DOE Are partners in a advanced technology demonstration project at OXY's West Welch Unit. Production is from a low permeability San Andres reservoir of Permian age similar to many shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin. The project involves the construction of a detailed geological model for numerical simulation to design and then conduct a CO[sub 2] flood of the reservoir. Depositional textures of the reservoir rock are highly variable from diagenesis, mostly anhydritic cementing, creating a highly complex pore system. Identification of the interwell reservoir continuity and flow units present the greatest challenge to the reservoir description. A 1993 vintage 3-D seismic survey with a bin spacing of 110[prime] by 165[prime] has been used to assist with the interwell reservoir description. The structure definition at the top and base of the reservoir have been accurately mapped with respect to the well data. Core and well log measurements of porosity, permeability and water saturation were computed and summed across the seismic reservoir interval. Measurements of amplitude, frequency and phase within the 3-D volume were summed across the reservoir interval. All seismic attributes were sampled to the wells and compared through scatterplots to the well log and core measurements. Excellent correlation between three seismic attributes and porosity has been documented. A deterministic method has been used to estimate porosity values at each seismic bin location. The method uses the seismic measurements to shape the geology between the wells while maintaining agreement with the well data at the well locations.

  13. Seismic estimation of porosity in the Permian San Andres carbonate reservoir, Welch Field, Dawson, County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watts, G.P.; Hinterlong, G.D.

    1996-12-31

    OXY and the DOE Are partners in a advanced technology demonstration project at OXY`s West Welch Unit. Production is from a low permeability San Andres reservoir of Permian age similar to many shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin. The project involves the construction of a detailed geological model for numerical simulation to design and then conduct a CO{sub 2} flood of the reservoir. Depositional textures of the reservoir rock are highly variable from diagenesis, mostly anhydritic cementing, creating a highly complex pore system. Identification of the interwell reservoir continuity and flow units present the greatest challenge to the reservoir description. A 1993 vintage 3-D seismic survey with a bin spacing of 110{prime} by 165{prime} has been used to assist with the interwell reservoir description. The structure definition at the top and base of the reservoir have been accurately mapped with respect to the well data. Core and well log measurements of porosity, permeability and water saturation were computed and summed across the seismic reservoir interval. Measurements of amplitude, frequency and phase within the 3-D volume were summed across the reservoir interval. All seismic attributes were sampled to the wells and compared through scatterplots to the well log and core measurements. Excellent correlation between three seismic attributes and porosity has been documented. A deterministic method has been used to estimate porosity values at each seismic bin location. The method uses the seismic measurements to shape the geology between the wells while maintaining agreement with the well data at the well locations.

  14. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-04-30

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are

  15. Deliverable 3.1.4 -- Final reservoir report and field-scale models Bluebell Field, Utah, Class 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, Milind D.

    2000-07-12

    The objective of this project were to: (1) Simulate parts of the reservoir using the conventional dual-porosity, dual-permeability approach, generate progressively complex reservoir models and use the production history match results to quantify formation damage; (2) Examine the effect of the numerical aspects such as grid sizes and fracture properties on the simulations results; (3) Evaluate the effect of fluid thermodynamic properties on production; and (4) Study effect of inclusion of fractures on variability in production from stochastically generated reservoir models.

  16. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-05-08

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Second Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A steamflood reservoirs have been operated over fifteen months at relatively stable pressures, due in large part to the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase in January 1999. Starting in the Fourth Quarter 2000, the project team has ramped up activity to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical

  17. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-11-01

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through June 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Third Quarter 2001 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 to September 2001 to increase production and injection. This work will continue through 2001 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for

  18. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-01-31

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through September 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. The project team spent the Fourth Quarter 2001 performing routine well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood and Tar V pilot steamflood projects. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. The project team ramped up well work activity from October 2000 through November 2001 to increase production and injection. In December, water injection well FW-88 was plug and abandoned and replaced by new well FW-295 into the ''D'' sands to accommodate the Port of Long Beach at their expense. Well workovers are planned for 2002 as described in the Operational Management section. Expanding thermal recovery operations

  19. Waveguide-based Ultrasonic and Far-field Electromagnetic Sensors for Downhole Reservoir Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: To develop waveguide-based ultrasonic and farfield electromagnetic sensors to measure key Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) reservoir parameters, including directional temperature, pressure, fluidflow, fracture imaging, and flow/rock interaction.

  20. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-11-08

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and

  1. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, DGS, Robert C.; Robinson, M.S., William C.; Wider, Kevin; Weinbrandt, Ph.D.,PE, Richard

    2000-04-14

    A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1998-1999.

  2. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weislogel, Amy

    2014-01-31

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  3. SMALL, GEOLOGICALLY COMPLEX RESERVOIRS CAN BENEFIT FROM RESERVOIR SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Bennett

    2002-06-24

    on, and an expansion of the scope of the reservoir simulation and modeling effort was initiated, using DOE's BOAST98 (a visual, dynamic, interactive update of BOAST3), 3D, black oil reservoir simulation package as the basis for developing the reservoir model. Reservoir characterization, modeling, and reservoir simulation resulted in a significant change in the depletion strategy. Information from the reservoir characterization and modeling effort indicate that in-fill drilling and relying on natural water influx from the aquifer could increase remaining reserves by 125,000 barrels of oil per well, and that up to 10 infill wells could be drilled in the field. Through this scenario, field production could be increased two to three times over the current 65 bopd. Based on the results of the study, permits have been applied for to drill a directional infill well to encounter the productive zone at a high angle in order to maximize the amount of pay and reservoirs encountered.

  4. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-12-06

    to accurately project reservoir steam chest fill-up by October 1999. A geomechanics study and a separate reservoir simulation study have been performed to determine the possible indicators of formation compaction, the temperatures at which specific indicators are affected and the projected temperature profiles in the over and underburden shales over a ten year period following steam injection. It was believed that once steam chest fill-up occurred, the reservoir would act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection could be operated at lower Injection to production ratios (I/P) and net injection rates. In mid-September 1999, net water injection was reduced substantially in the ''D'' sands following steam chest fill-up. This caused reservoir pressures to plummet about 100 psi within six weeks. Starting in late-October 1999, net ''D'' sand injection was increased and reservoir pressures have slowly increased back to steam chest fill-up pressures as of the end of March 2000. When the ''T'' sands reached fill-up, net ''T'' sand injection was lowered only slightly and reservoir pressures stabilized. A more detailed discussion of the operational changes is in the Reservoir Management section of this report. A reservoir pressure monitoring program was developed as part of the poststeamflood reservoir management plan. This bi-monthly sonic fluid level program measures the static fluid levels in all idle wells an average of once a month. The fluid levels have been calibrated for liquid and gas density gradients by comparing a number of them with Amerada bomb pressures taken within a few days. This data allows engineering to respond quickly to rises or declines in reservoir pressure by either increasing injection or production or idling production. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil

  5. Study on detailed geological modelling for fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oil field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Hanqing; Fu Zhiguo; Lu Xiaoguang

    1997-08-01

    Guided by the sedimentation theory and knowledge of modern and ancient fluvial deposition and utilizing the abundant information of sedimentary series, microfacies type and petrophysical parameters from well logging curves of close spaced thousands of wells located in a large area. A new method for establishing detailed sedimentation and permeability distribution models for fluvial reservoirs have been developed successfully. This study aimed at the geometry and internal architecture of sandbodies, in accordance to their hierarchical levels of heterogeneity and building up sedimentation and permeability distribution models of fluvial reservoirs, describing the reservoir heterogeneity on the light of the river sedimentary rules. The results and methods obtained in outcrop and modem sedimentation studies have successfully supported the study. Taking advantage of this method, the major producing layers (PI{sub 1-2}), which have been considered as heterogeneous and thick fluvial reservoirs extending widely in lateral are researched in detail. These layers are subdivided into single sedimentary units vertically and the microfacies are identified horizontally. Furthermore, a complex system is recognized according to their hierarchical levels from large to small, meander belt, single channel sandbody, meander scroll, point bar, and lateral accretion bodies of point bar. The achieved results improved the description of areal distribution of point bar sandbodies, provide an accurate and detailed framework model for establishing high resolution predicting model. By using geostatistic technique, it also plays an important role in searching for enriched zone of residual oil distribution.

  6. Steamflooding in a waterdrive reservoir; Upper Tulare sands, South Belridge field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, J.K. )

    1990-08-01

    A steamflood project in the strong edgewater-drive Upper Tulare reservoir at South Belridge recovered about 31% of the original oil in place (OOIP) at a cumulative steam/oil ratio (SOR) of 2.7 vol/vol. Seven years of downdip steam injection depressed water influx and created an oil bank updip from the injectors. Response continued under the influence of returning aquifer water and heat scavenging after the injectors were shut down. Numerical reservoir simulation of the historical steamflood performance indicate that the high production/injection capacity (P/I) ratio induced early water encroachment and partial quenching of the growing steam zone. Restarting downdip steam injection at much higher rates after 6 years without injection is shown to recover more oil than continuing the steamflood with either a seven-spot or inverted nine-spot pattern.

  7. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Ronald; Wicks, John; Perry, Christopher

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian “Clinton” sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test (“Huff-n-Puff”) was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a “Clinton”-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day “soak” period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the “Clinton” sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent

  8. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Riley; John Wicks; Christopher Perry

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian 'Clinton' sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test ('Huff-n-Puff') was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a 'Clinton'-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day 'soak' period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the 'Clinton' sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of

  9. Secondary heat recovery from low-permeability high-temperature reservoir: A possible project in the Larderello Field, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianelli, G.; Squarci, P.; Capocecera, P.

    1997-12-31

    A project of fracture stimulation and secondary heat recovery from the metamorphic reservoir of the Larderello geothermal field could be developed in a next future. Geological and geophysical data suggest that the stimulation can enhance permeability and that the water injection can be recovered as steam. In particular, the area of the project is characterized by the presence of an important seismic reflector which has been explained assuming the presence of fractured rocks filled with high pressure fluids. Extensional and hydraulic fractures can present at temperatures of 300-350{degrees}C, and this makes the experiment of extreme interest.

  10. Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

  11. Increasing waterflood reserves in the Wilmington oil field through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, D.; Clarke, D.; Walker, S.; Phillips, C.; Nguyen, J.; Moos, D.; Tagbor, K.

    1996-01-23

    The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques. Technical progress is reported for the following tasks; reservoir characterization, reservoir engineering; deterministic (3-D) geologic modeling; pulsed acoustic logging; and technology transfer.

  12. Revitalizing mature miocene reservoirs in NE Anzoategui: A sequence stratigraphic perspective in the Quiamare and La Celba oil fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galeazzi, S.; Paredes, S.; Dellape, D.; Moroder, G.

    1996-08-01

    A large proportion of the oil reserves discovered in NE Anzoategui are contained in the 3000-m-thick Lower to Middle Miocene strata of the Oficina Formation. Light oil and gas are contained in multiple sandstone reservoirs. Most producing zones are isolated by shale separators, and feature independent fluid contacts. Individual producing zones are laterally extensive, but locally they show interruptions and considerable internal heterogeneity. Reservoir compartmentalization is due to second or third order accommodation faulting and stratigraphic terminations. Sandstones yielding commercial production range in thicknesses from 10 to 50 ft, and contain intergranular porosities that vary from 6 to 24%. Conjugate-type subvertical fractures locally provide the difference between commercial and non-commercial flow rates in low porosity sandstones. Typically, drive style varies from dissolved gas drive and gas cap expansion to natural water drive where unaltered oil coexists with meteoric water. The Miocene series are widespread deposits represented by two major transgressive-regressive genetic packages. Observation of facies, parasequence stacking and stratal termination patterns suggests the presence of at least ten depositional sequences. Strata patterns, lithologic and paleontologic criteria indicate that sedimentation took place within a low relief (ramp-type) depositional setting, in depositional environments ranging from coastal plain through estuarine and shallow marine. Individual producing zones represent a variety of systems tracts, which include transgressive systems tracts, lowstand prograding complexes, and less commonly incised valley fill and highstand deposits. A sequence stratigraphic analysis of the reservoirs in the mature Quiamare oil field has led to the delineation and development of important additional shallow reserves.

  13. Anatomy of a dolomitized carbonate reservoir - Mission Canyon formation at little Knife field, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, R.F.

    1985-05-01

    The Mission Canyon Formation is a regressive, shoaling-upward carbonate to anhydrite sequence deposited in a slowly shrinking epeiric sea. From its base upsection, the formation is mostly subtidal in origin and emergent at its top, and consists of (1) deeper water carbonates, (2) major cycles of open shallow-marine mudstones grading up into skeletal packstone or rainstone, (3) minor cycles of dolomitized transitional open to restricted marine mudstone grading up into skeletal wackestone, (4) dolomitized restricted marine pelletal wackestone or packstone, (5) partially dolomitized marginal marine skeletal wackestone, (6) slightly skeletal, oolitic-pisolitic wackestone, or grainstone barrier-island buildups with storm washover aprons, (7) thin lagoonal limestones, (8) tidal-flat anhydrite, and (9) sabkha anhydrite. The oil is structurally trapped on the north, east, and west, within the northward plunging Little Knife anticline. Facies changes entrap the oil southward; the vertical seal is the overlying anhydrite beds. Closure is less than 100 ft 930 m). Porous, hydrocarbon-bearing beds were deposited as transitional open-to-restricted marine, restricted marine, and marginal marine lime muds. These became porous dolomitic reservoir rock by undergoing three diagenetic changes: (1) anhydrite replacement of skeletal fragments, (2) dolomitization of the muddy matrix, and (3) later, leaching of the anhydrite to create moldic porosity. The reservoir's pore system is composed of moldic pores and three types of dolomite intercrystalline pores-polyhedral, tetrahedral, and interboundary-sheet pores. Pore throats in productive beds are of two general sizes (1.2-1.6..mu.. and 5.2..mu..).

  14. Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: to detect and locate more microearthquakes observed during EGS operations using the matched field processing (MFP) technique.

  15. The integration of geochemical, geological and engineering data to determine reservoir continuity in the Iagifu-Hedinia field, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufman, R.L.; Eisenberg, L.I.; Fitzmorris, R.E.

    1995-08-01

    A series of oil and gas fields, including Iagifu-Hedinia, occur along the leading edge of the Papuan fold and thrust belt. Formed during Pliocene to Recent compression, they are structurally complex, and typically broken into multiple reservoir compartments. The presence of the karstic Darai Limestone at the surface over most of the fold belt prevents acquisition of useful seismic data. Reservoir mapping, and establishment of reservoir continuity, is therefore based soley on (1) surface geologic data, (2) drilling data; initially dipmeter and RFT pressure data, and subsequently well production histories, and (3) geochemical correlation of reservoir fluids. During appraisal of the Iagifu-Hedinia discovery, these complimentary data sets demonstrated that (1) a single hydrocarbon column existed above a flowing aquifer in the main block of Iagifu-Hedinia field, (2) a separate acuumulation existed in the Usano area. Geochemical data have suggested the presence of reservoir compartments where other data were missing or inconclusive. Subsequently-acquired production history data have confirmed the geochemically-based interpretations. Geochemical data suggest that oils at Iagifu-Hedinia have a common source. The slight differences in oil composition between reservoirs are likely due to multiple phases of expulsion from the same source rock and/or migration-fractionation.

  16. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering text and exhibits: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The Dry Gas Zone in the Elk Hills field is comprised of fourteen separate productive horizons deposited in the MYA Group of the San Joaquin Formation of Pliocene Age. Eighty-six separate Reservoir Units have been identified within the interval over an area roughly ten miles long and four miles wide. One basal Tulare sand, the Tulare B, was also included in the geologic study. Five earlier studies have been made of the Dry Gas Zone; each is referenced in the Appendix of this report. Most of these studies were geologic in nature, and none provided in-depth reservoir analyses. This report is made up of ten (10) separate volumes which include: engineering text and exhibits (white dot); engineering data (black dot); geologic text and tables (green dot); structure and isochore maps (light blue dot); structural cross sections (dark blue dot); stratigraphic cross sections (brown dot); geologic data sheets -book 1 (yellow dot); geologic data sheets - book 2 (orange dot); geologic data sheets - book 3 (red dot); and geologic data sheets - book 4 (pink or coral dot). Basic production, injection, pressure, and other assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy engineering staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made at independent verification.

  17. Increasing waterflood reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. Annual report, March 21, 1995--March 20, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, D.; Clarke, D.; Walker, S.; Phillips, C.; Nguyen, J.; Moos, D.; Tagbor, K.

    1997-08-01

    This project uses advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three- dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturation sands will be stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as short radius and ultra-short radius laterals. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

  18. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the

  19. Lower Pennsylvanian reservoirs of Parkway-Empire south field area, Eddy County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The Parkway-Empire area is located on the Northwest shelf in central Eddy County, approximately 15 mi (24 km) northeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. This area produces oil and gas from the lower and middle Morrow sandstones, Atoka sandstones, and Strawn limestones. Oil is also produced from the Queen and Seven Rivers sandstones, and the Grayburg, San Andres, and Wolfcamp dolomites. All of the these zones are productive from stratigraphic traps. The lower Morrow sandstones occur at a depth of about 11,400 ft (3,474 m). In the Parkway area, the middle Morrow sandstones are thought to be a transgressive series of marine beaches and submarine bars which trend toward the northeast, parallel to depositional strike. Stratigraphic traps are created in the lower and middle Morrow sandstones by variations in cementation and depositional patterns. Productive Atoka sandstones occur at a depth of approximately 10,700 ft (3,261 m). Strawn limestones produce from a series of small, low-relief algal banks developed along depositional strike to the northeast. The Strawn limestone is about 300 ft (91 m) thick and occurs between 10,250 and 10,500 ft (3,124 and 3,200 m). Wells in this area have typical ultimate recoveries of between 1.0 and 3.0 bcf of gas. The combination of stacked reservoirs and good production makes this area of the Morrow trend especially attractive.

  20. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses

  1. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. Annual report, August 1, 1996--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robinson, W.

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this two-phase study is to demonstrate an integrated methodology for reservoir characterization of shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that is feasible, and cost effective for the independent operator. Furthermore, it will provide one of the first public demonstrations of the enhancement of reservoir characterization using high-resolution three dimensional (3D) seismic data. This particular project is evaluating the Grayburg and San Andres reservoirs in the Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. This 68 year old field was approaching its economic limit and the leases evaluated would have been abandoned in 10 years. A multidisciplinary approach to waterflood design and implementation, along with the addition of reserves by selective infill drilling and deepening, is being applied to this field. This approach in reservoir development will be applicable to a wide range of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs throughout the US. The first phase of the project included the design, acquisition, and interpretation of the 3D seismic survey, the collection and evaluation of geologic (core and log) data, and engineering (historical production, well test, injection) data from a variety of sources. From this work, a geologically based production history model was simulated. Based on the recommendations made at the end of Phase One, three new wells were drilled, one existing well was deepened, two wells were worked over, one TA`d well was re-entered, and one well was converted to injection. In addition, the quality of the injection water was greatly improved, a step necessary prior to increasing injection in the project area. The realignment of the waterflood and all additional well work await the completion of the seismic based history match and engineering simulation.

  2. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and south Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Reeves, J.J.

    1996-06-17

    The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.

  3. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly report, April 1--June 31, 1996. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robertson, W.

    1996-10-17

    The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.

  4. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly report, April 1--June 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robertson, W.

    1996-10-17

    The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.

  5. Using laboratory flow experiments and reactive chemical transport modeling for designing waterflooding of the Agua Fria Reservoir, Poza Rica-Altamira Field, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkle, P.; Pruess, K.; Xu, T.; Figueroa, R.A. Hernandez; Lopez, M. Diaz; Lopez, E. Contreras

    2008-10-01

    Waterflooding for enhanced oil recovery requires that injected waters must be chemically compatible with connate reservoir waters, in order to avoid mineral dissolution-and-precipitation cycles that could seriously degrade formation permeability and injectivity. Formation plugging is a concern especially in reservoirs with a large content of carbonates, such as calcite and dolomite, as such minerals typically react rapidly with an aqueous phase, and have strongly temperature-dependent solubility. Clay swelling can also pose problems. During a preliminary waterflooding pilot project, the Poza Rica-Altamira oil field, bordering the Gulf coast in the eastern part of Mexico, experienced injectivity loss after five months of reinjection of formation waters into well AF-847 in 1999. Acidizing with HCl restored injectivity. We report on laboratory experiments and reactive chemistry modeling studies that were undertaken in preparation for long-term waterflooding at Agua Frma. Using analogous core plugs obtained from the same reservoir interval, laboratory coreflood experiments were conducted to examine sensitivity of mineral dissolution and precipitation effects to water composition. Native reservoir water, chemically altered waters, and distilled water were used, and temporal changes in core permeability, mineral abundances and aqueous concentrations of solutes were monitored. The experiments were simulated with the multi-phase, nonisothermal reactive transport code TOUGHREACT, and reasonable to good agreement was obtained for changes in solute concentrations. Clay swelling caused an additional impact on permeability behavior during coreflood experiments, whereas the modeled permeability depends exclusively on chemical processes. TOUGHREACT was then used for reservoir-scale simulation of injecting ambient-temperature water (30 C, 86 F) into a reservoir with initial temperature of 80 C (176 F). Untreated native reservoir water was found to cause serious porosity and

  6. Carrier transport and collection in fully depleted semiconductors by a combined action of the space charge field and the field due to electrode voltages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rehak, Pavel; Gatti, Emilio

    1987-01-01

    A semiconductor charge transport device and method for making same, characterized by providing a thin semiconductor wafer having rectifying junctions on its opposing major surfaces and including a small capacitance ohmic contact, in combination with bias voltage means and associated circuit means for applying a predetermined voltage to effectively deplete the wafer in regions thereof between the rectifying junctions and the ohmic contact. A charge transport device of the invention is usable as a drift chamber, a low capacitance detector, or a charge coupled device each constructed according to the methods of the invention for making such devices. Detectors constructed according to the principles of the invention are characterized by having significantly higher particle position indicating resolution than is attainable with prior art detectors, while at the same time requiring substantially fewer readout channels to realize such high resolution.

  7. Carrier transport and collection in fully depleted semiconductors by a combined action of the space charge field and the field due to electrode voltages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1984-02-24

    A semiconductor charge transport device and method for making same, characterized by providing a thin semiconductor wafer having rectifying functions on its opposing major surfaces and including a small capacitance ohmic contact, in combination with bias voltage means and associated circuit means for applying a predetermined voltage to effectively deplete the wafer in regions thereof between the rectifying junctions and the ohmic contact. A charge transport device of the invention is usable as a drift chamber, a low capacitance detector, or a charge coupled device each constructed according to the methods of the invention for making such devices. Detectors constructed according to the principles of the invention are characterized by having significantly higher particle position indicating resolution than is attainable with prior art detectors, while at the same time requiring substantially fewer readout channels to realize such high resolution.

  8. Carrier transport and collection in fully depleted semiconductors by a combined action of the space charge field and the field due to electrode voltages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1987-08-18

    A semiconductor charge transport device and method for making same are disclosed, characterized by providing a thin semiconductor wafer having rectifying junctions on its opposing major surfaces and including a small capacitance ohmic contact, in combination with bias voltage means and associated circuit means for applying a predetermined voltage to effectively deplete the wafer in regions thereof between the rectifying junctions and the ohmic contact. A charge transport device of the invention is usable as a drift chamber, a low capacitance detector, or a charge coupled device each constructed according to the methods of the invention for making such devices. Detectors constructed according to the principles of the invention are characterized by having significantly higher particle position indicating resolution than is attainable with prior art detectors, while at the same time requiring substantially fewer readout channels to realize such high resolution. 16 figs.

  9. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Geologic text and tables: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-29

    The Dry Gas Zone was defined by US Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 Engineering Committee (1957) as ''/hor ellipsis/all sands bearing dry gas above the top of the Lower Scalez marker bed. The term is used to include the stratigraphic interval between the Scalez Sand Zone and the Tulare Formation - the Mya Sand Zone. The reservoirs in this upper zone are thin, lenticular, loosely cemented sandstones with relatively high permeabilities.'' Other than the limited Tulare production in the western part of the field, the Dry Gas Zone is the shallowest productive zone in the Elk Hills Reserve and is not included in the Shallow Oil Zone. It is Pliocene in age and makes up approximately eighty percent of the San Joaquin Formation as is summarized in Exhibit TL-1. The lithologic character of the zone is one of interbedded shales and siltstones with intermittent beds of various thickness sands. The stratigraphic thickness of the Dry Gas Zone ranges from 950 to 1150 feet with a general thickening along the flanks and thinning over the crests of the anticlines. The productive part of the Dry Gas Zone covers portions of 30 sections in an area roughly 10 miles long by 4 miles wide. 4 refs.

  10. North Dakota Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Dry Natural Gas ... Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields North Dakota Dry Natural Gas ...

  11. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum

  12. Reservoir Claddings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-14

    This information sheet explains how to properly decouple reservoir claddings from water sensitive materials of the wall assembly.

  13. An evaluation of the deep reservoir conditions of the Bacon-Manito geothermal field, Philippines using well gas chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amore, Franco; Maniquis-Buenviaje, Marinela; Solis, Ramonito P.

    1993-01-28

    Gas chemistry from 28 wells complement water chemistry and physical data in developing a reservoir model for the Bacon-Manito geothermal project (BMGP), Philippines. Reservoir temperature, THSH, and steam fraction, y, are calculated or extrapolated from the grid defined by the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) and H2-H2S (HSH) gas equilibria reactions. A correction is made for H2 that is lost due to preferential partitioning into the vapor phase and the reequilibration of H2S after steam loss.

  14. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-12-14

    Through June 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar (Tar II-A) Zone. Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood project. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the third quarter 2000 revising the draft 1997-2000 Annual Report submitted last quarter, writing final reports on the research projects mentioned above, and operating the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the Tar II-A steamflood project. On January 12, 1999, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations by injecting cold water into the flanks of the steamflood. The purpose of flank injection has been to increase and subsequently maintain reservoir pressures at a level that would fill-up the steam chests in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands before they can collapse and cause formation compaction and to

  15. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-12-06

    Through March 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar (Tar II-A) Zone. Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood project. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the second quarter 2000 writing the 1997-2000 Annual Report, completing research for the project on the subjects mentioned above, and operating the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the Tar II-A steamflood project. On January 12, 1999, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations by injecting cold water into the flanks of the steamflood. The purpose of flank injection has been to increase and subsequently maintain reservoir pressures at a level that would fill-up the steam chests in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands before they can collapse and cause formation compaction and to prevent the steam

  16. Simulation studies to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the performance of fractured reservoirs; Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howrie, I.; Dauben, D.

    1994-03-01

    A three-year research program to evaluate the effect of fracture closure on the recovery of oil and gas from naturally fractured reservoirs has been completed. The overall objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluate the reservoir conditions for which fracture closure is significant, and (2) evaluate innovative fluid injection techniques capable of maintaining pressure within the reservoir. The evaluations of reservoir performance were made by a modern dual porosity simulator, TETRAD. This simulator treats both porosity and permeability as functions of pore pressure. The Austin Chalk in the Pearsall Field in of South Texas was selected as the prototype fractured reservoir for this work. During the first year, simulations of vertical and horizontal well performance were made assuming that fracture permeability was insensitive to pressure change. Sensitivity runs indicated that the simulator was predicting the effects of critical reservoir parameters in a logical and consistent manner. The results confirmed that horizontal wells could increase both rate of oil recovery and total oil recovery from naturally fractured reservoirs. In the second year, the performance of the same vertical and horizontal wells was reevaluated with fracture permeability treated as a function of reservoir pressure. To investigate sensitivity to in situ stress, differing loading conditions were assumed. Simulated natural depletions confirm that pressure sensitive fractures degrade well performance. The severity of degradation worsens when the initial reservoir pressure approaches the average stress condition of the reservoir, such as occurs in over pressured reservoirs. Simulations with water injection indicate that degradation of permeability can be counteracted when reservoir pressure is maintained and oil recovery can be increased when reservoir properties are favorable.

  17. An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Abstract An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed...

  18. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.; Forster, C.; Jenkins, C.; Schamel, S.; Sprinkel, D.; and Swain, R.

    1999-02-01

    This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project completed in December 1996. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery is testing the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having simular producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially t o other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  19. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery Through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, Steven

    1997-07-29

    This project reactivates ARCO's idle Pru Fee property in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming was used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase begun in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery was initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and the recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  20. How to revitalize a mature reservoir: New development stategy-an integrated study in petroleum engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondon, L.; Coll, C.; Cordova, P.; Gamero, H.

    1996-08-01

    The results from a 3-D, 3-Phase numerical simulation model of Lower Lagunillas reservoir in Block IV Lake Maracaibo indicate the possibility of additional recovery from this mature field by drilling infill horizontal wells. The simulation model was the final outcome of an integrated work effort by a team of specialists. The field has produced approximately 920 MMSTB or 43% of OOIP to date and the remaining reserves are estimated to be 270 MMSTB. The reservoir pressure has declined from 4200 psi to 1400 psi, well below the bubble point pressure of 4000 psi. The objectives of an integrated reservoir study were to understand the reservoir heterogeneity and dynamics, evaluate the efficiency of the gas injection started in 1966 and the strength of the active aquifer as pressure support mechanisms. The new model shows the presence of layers with bypassed oil and higher pressures between layers that show greater pressure depletion and high GOR. This situation demonstrates the need to formulate a new development strategy for efficiently recovering the remaining reserves. The study indicates that the drilling of horizontal wells or infill deviated wells in some of these layers offers the best solution for maximizing recovery from this reservoir taking full advantage of the reservoir heterogeneity, aquifer support and secondary gas cap to optimize well locations.

  1. Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion. Annual report, July 1, 1996--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dollens, K.B.; Harpole, K.J.; Durrett, E.G.; Bles, J.S.

    1997-12-01

    The work reported herein covers select tasks in Budget Phase 2. The principle Task in Budget Phase 2 included in this report is Field Demonstration. Completion of many of the Field Demonstration tasks during the last report period enabled an optimum carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) flood project to be designed, economically evaluated, and implemented in the field. Field implementation of the project commenced during late 1995, with actual CO{sub 2} injection commencing in mid-July, 1996. This report summarizes activities incurred following initial project start-up, towards the goal of optimizing project performance. The current project has focused on reducing initial investment cost by utilizing horizontal injection wells and concentrating the project in the best productivity area of the field. An innovative CO{sub 2} purchase agreement (no take-or-pay provisions, CO{sub 2} purchase price tied to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price) and gas recycle agreement (expensing costs as opposed to a large upfront capital investment for compression) were negotiated to further improve the project economics.

  2. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1996--February 8, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-08-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The Anasazi field was selected for the initial geostatistical modeling and reservoir simulation. A compositional simulation approach is being used to model primary depletion, waterflood, and CO{sub 2}-flood processes. During this second year of the project, team members performed the following reservoir-engineering analysis of Anasazi field: (1) relative permeability measurements of the supra-mound and mound-core intervals, (2) completion of geologic model development of the Anasazi reservoir units for use in reservoir simulation studies including completion of a series of one-dimensional, carbon dioxide-displacement simulations to analyze the carbon dioxide-displacement mechanism that could operate in the Paradox basin system of reservoirs, and (3) completion of the first phase of the full-field, three-dimensional Anasazi reservoir simulation model, and the start of the history matching and reservoir performance prediction phase of the simulation study.

  3. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  4. Reproductive biomarkers responses induced by xenoestrogens in the characid fish Astyanax fasciatus inhabiting a South American reservoir: An integrated field and laboratory approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prado, Paula S.; Pinheiro, Ana Paula B.; Bazzoli, Nilo; Rizzo, Elizete

    2014-05-01

    Field studies evaluating the effects of endocrine disruption chemicals (EDCs) on the fish reproduction are scarce worldwide. The goal of this study was to assess hepatic levels of vitellogenin (Vtg), zona radiata proteins (Zrp) and insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II), and relating them to reproductive endpoints in a wild fish population habiting a reservoir that receive domestic sewage, agricultural and industrial residues. Adult fish Astyanax fasciatus were sampled during the reproductive season in five sites from the Furnas Reservoir, Grande River, and Paraguay–Paraná basin. As a control to field data, fish were experimentally exposed via dietary intake, to oestradiol benzoate (OB) for 7 days. Fish from site with little anthropogenic interference showed hepatic levels of Vtg, Zrp and IGF-I and IGF-II similar to those from the non-treated experimental group. In sites located immediately downstream from the municipal wastewater discharges, the water total oestrogen was >120 ng/l, and male fish displayed increased Vtg and Zrp and decreased IGF-I levels similar to OB treated fish. In females, levels of Vtg, Zrp, IGF-I and IGF-II suggest an impairment of final oocyte maturation and spawning, as also detected by frequency of over-ripening, follicular atresia and fecundity. At the sites that receive agricultural and industrial residues, the water total oestrogen was <50 ng/l and females showed decreased Zrp and increased IGF-II levels associated to reduced diameter of vitellogenic follicles, indicating an inhibition of oocyte growth. Overall, the current study reports oestrogenic contamination impairing the reproduction of a wild fish from a hydroeletric reservoir and, the data contribute to improving the current knowledge on relationship between hepatic Vtg, Zrp and IGF-I and IGF-II, and reproductive endpoints in a teleost fish. In addition, our data point out novel reproductive biomarkers (IGF-I, IGF-II and over-ripening) to assessing xenoestrogenic

  5. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-22

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  6. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  7. Petrographic and reservoir features of Hauterivian (Lower Cretaceous) Shatlyk horizon in the Malay gas field, Amu-Darya basin, east Turkmenia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, H.; Ersan, A.

    1996-08-01

    Malay gas field in Amu-Darya basin, eastern Turkmenia, is located on the structural high that is on the Malay-Bagadzha arch north of the Repetek-Kelif structure zone. With 500 km{sup 2} areal coverage, 16 producing wells and 200 billion m{sup 3} estimated reserves, the field was discovered in 1978 and production began in 1987 from 2400-m-deep Hauterivian-age (Early Cretaceous) Shatlyk horizon. The Shatlyk elastic sequence shows various thickness up to 100 m in the Malay structural closure and is studied through E-log, core, petrographic data and reservoir characteristics. The Shatlyk consists of poorly indurated, reddish-brown and gray sandstones, and sandy gray shales. The overall sand-shale ratio increases up and the shales interleave between the sand packages. The reservoir sandstones are very fine to medium grained, moderately sorted, compositionally immature, subarkosic arenites. The framework grains include quartz, feldspar and volcanic lithic fragments. Quartz grains are monocrystalline in type and most are volcanic in origin. Feldspars consist of K- Feldspar and plagioclase. The orthoclases are affected by preferential alteration. The sandstones show high primary intergranular porosity and variations in permeability. Patch-like evaporate cement and the iron-rich grain coatings are reducing effects in permeability. The coats are pervasive in reddish-brown sandstones but are not observed in the gray sandstones. The evaporate cement is present in all the sandstone samples examined and, in places, follows the oxidation coats. The petrographic evidences and the regional facies studies suggest the deposition in intersection area from continental to marine nearshore deltaic environment.

  8. Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  9. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  10. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  11. West Virginia Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  12. Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  13. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2006-01-31

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the

  14. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Horner

    2005-08-01

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the

  15. Performance prediction using geostatistics and window reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontanilla, J.P.; Al-Khalawi, A.A.; Johnson, S.G.

    1995-11-01

    This paper is the first window model study in the northern area of a large carbonate reservoir in Saudi Arabia. It describes window reservoir simulation with geostatistics to model uneven water encroachment in the southwest producing area of the northern portion of the reservoir. In addition, this paper describes performance predictions that investigate the sweep efficiency of the current peripheral waterflood. A 50 x 50 x 549 (240 m. x 260 m. x 0.15 m. average grid block size) geological model was constructed with geostatistics software. Conditional simulation was used to obtain spatial distributions of porosity and volume of dolomite. Core data transforms were used to obtain horizontal and vertical permeability distributions. Simple averaging techniques were used to convert the 549-layer geological model to a 50 x 50 x 10 (240 m. x 260 m. x 8 m. average grid block size) window reservoir simulation model. Flux injectors and flux producers were assigned to the outermost grid blocks. Historical boundary flux rates were obtained from a coarsely-ridded full-field model. Pressure distribution, water cuts, GORs, and recent flowmeter data were history matched. Permeability correction factors and numerous parameter adjustments were required to obtain the final history match. The permeability correction factors were based on pressure transient permeability-thickness analyses. The prediction phase of the study evaluated the effects of infill drilling, the use of artificial lifts, workovers, horizontal wells, producing rate constraints, and tight zone development to formulate depletion strategies for the development of this area. The window model will also be used to investigate day-to-day reservoir management problems in this area.

  16. Analysis of Injection-Induced Micro-Earthquakes in a Geothermal Steam Reservoir, The Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Rutqvist, J.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2008-05-15

    In this study we analyze relative contributions to the cause and mechanism of injection-induced micro-earthquakes (MEQs) at The Geysers geothermal field, California. We estimated the potential for inducing seismicity by coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical analysis of the geothermal steam production and cold water injection to calculate changes in stress (in time and space) and investigated if those changes could induce a rock mechanical failure and associated MEQs. An important aspect of the analysis is the concept of a rock mass that is critically stressed for shear failure. This means that shear stress in the region is near the rock-mass frictional strength, and therefore very small perturbations of the stress field can trigger an MEQ. Our analysis shows that the most important cause for injection-induced MEQs at The Geysers is cooling and associated thermal-elastic shrinkage of the rock around the injected fluid that changes the stress state in such a way that mechanical failure and seismicity can be induced. Specifically, the cooling shrinkage results in unloading and associated loss of shear strength in critically shear-stressed fractures, which are then reactivated. Thus, our analysis shows that cooling-induced shear slip along fractures is the dominant mechanism of injection-induced MEQs at The Geysers.

  17. Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy EGS Reservoir Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir Project objectives: Better understand and model fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field. Use seismic data to constrain geomechanical/hydrologic/thermal model of reservoir. seismic_fehler_fluid_flow.pdf (1.15 MB) More Documents & Publications Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs Detection and

  18. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  19. Tank depletion flow controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Georgeson, Melvin A.

    1976-10-26

    A flow control system includes two bubbler tubes installed at different levels within a tank containing such as radioactive liquid. As the tank is depleted, a differential pressure transmitter monitors pressure differences imparted by the two bubbler tubes at a remote, shielded location during uniform time intervals. At the end of each uniform interval, balance pots containing a dense liquid are valved together to equalize the pressures. The resulting sawtooth-shaped signal generated by the differential pressure transmitter is compared with a second sawtooth signal representing the desired flow rate during each time interval. Variations in the two signals are employed by a control instrument to regulate flow rate.

  20. Full Reviews: Reservoir Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are the project presentations and respective peer reviewer comments for Reservoir Characterization.

  1. Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

  2. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

    2004-04-01

    One of the main objectives of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. As part of the project, several field demonstrations were undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the microbial surface geochemical technique. The important observations from each of these field demonstrations are briefly reviewed in this annual report. These demonstrations have been successful in identifying the presence or lack of hydrocarbons in the subsurface and can be summarized as follows: (1) The surface geochemistry data showed a fair-to-good microbial anomaly that may indicate the presence of a fault or stratigraphic facies change across the drilling path of the State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 horizontal demonstration well in Manistee County, Michigan. The well was put on production in December 2003. To date, the well is flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which is a good well in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. Two successful follow-up horizontal wells have also been drilled in the Springdale area. Additional geochemistry data will be collected in the Springdale area in 2004. (2) The surface geochemistry sampling in the Bear Lake demonstration site in Manistee County, Michigan was updated after the prospect was confirmed and production begun; the original subsurface and seismic interpretation used to guide the location of the geochemical survey for the Charlich Fauble re-entry was different than the interpretation used by the operator who ultimately drilled the well. As expected, the anomaly appears to be diminishing as the positive (apical) microbial anomaly is replaced by a negative (edge) anomaly, probably due to the pressure draw-down in the reservoir. (3) The geochemical sampling program over the Vernon Field, Isabella County, Michigan is now

  3. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  4. Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schamel, S.

    1996-11-01

    This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway- Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program. One of the main objectives of Budget Period I was to return the Pru Fee property to economic production and establish a baseline productivity with cyclic steaming. By the end of the second quarter 1996, all Pru producers except well 101 had been cyclic steamed two times. Each steam cycle was around 10,000 barrels of steam (BS) per well. No mechanical problems were found in the existing old wellbores. Conclusion is after several years of being shut-in, the existing producers on the Pru lease are in reasonable mechanical condition, and can therefore be utilized as viable producers in whatever development plan we determine is optimum. Production response to cyclic steam is very encouraging in the new producer, however productivity in the old producers appears to be limited in comparison.

  5. POST WATERFLOOD CO2 MISCIBLE FLOOD IN LIGHT OIL FLUVIAL DOMINATED DELTAIC RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Tipton

    2004-04-06

    Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. (TEPI) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cost sharing cooperative agreement to conduct an Enhanced Oil Recovery demonstration project at Port Neches. The field is located in Orange County near Beaumont, Texas, and shown in Appendix A. The project would demonstrate the effectiveness of the CO{sub 2} miscible process in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoirs. It would also evaluate the use of horizontal CO{sub 2} injection wells to improve the overall sweep efficiency and determine the recovery efficiency of CO{sub 2} floods in waterflooded and partial waterdrive reservoirs. Texaco's objective on this project was (1) to utilize all available technologies, and to develop new ones, and (2) to design a CO{sub 2} flood process which is cost effective and can be applied to many other reservoirs throughout the US. A database of potential reservoirs for the gulf coast region was developed by LSU, using a screening model developed by Texaco Research Center in Houston. A PC-based CO{sub 2} screening model was developed and the aforementioned database generated to show the utility of this technology throughout the US. Finally, the results and the information gained from this project was disseminated throughout the oil industry via a series of SPE papers and industry open forums. Reservoir characterization efforts for the Marginulina sand shown in Appendix C, were accomplished utilizing conventional and advanced technologies including 3-D seismic. Sidewall and conventional cores were cut and analyzed, lab tests were conducted on reservoir fluids and reservoir voidage was monitored as shown in Appendices B through M. Texaco has utilized the above data to develop a Stratamodel to best describe and characterize the reservoir and to use it as input for the compositional simulator. The compositional model was revised several times to integrate the new data from the 3-D seismic and field performance under CO{sub 2} injection, to

  6. Geology of Ziliujing gas field - The gas field developed earliest in the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Chuanbai )

    1991-03-01

    Ziliujing gas field, located in Zigong municipality, Sichuan, is an asymmetric anticline, and well depth is generally less than 1,300 m. There are eight gas- and brine-producing intervals. Tc-3 of the Lower Triassic is the main gas-producing horizon, which is a carbonate with a combination of fracture and intergranular porosities. As early as 1,500 years ago, the production of brine and natural gas was started; over 13,000 wells were drilled of which over 1,000 wells were gas wells. The total area of different producing zones is about 22 km{sup 2}. The distribution and production of natural gas are controlled by structural faults. The gas sources supplied are beyond the limit of the structure. Tc-3 reservoir is a typical fissured reservoir, and most of the wells have the characteristics of (1) high initial production rate; (2) rapid depletion; and (3) long producing life. Owing to the favorable geological conditions; the great number of wells; outstanding ancient technologies in drilling, production, and transportation; comprehensive utilization; and very long production history, tremendous success is achieved in the development of gas fields. The total cumulative gas production by the end of 1985 was 33 billion cubic meters in which 17.2 billion cubic meters were contributed by Tc-3 reservoir; maximum gas and brine recoveries have been achieve. So far the gas reservoirs have not been depleted and new discoveries have been found in recent years. The brilliant achievements of the ancestors remain.

  7. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, M.

    1992-09-01

    This annual report describes the progress during the second year of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description and scale-up procedures; (ii) outcrop investigation; (iii) in-fill drilling potential. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be characterized, can be described in three dimensions, and can be scaled up with respect to its properties, appropriate for simulation purposes. The second section describes the progress on investigation of an outcrop. The outcrop is an analog of Bartlesville Sandstone. We have drilled ten wells behind the outcrop and collected extensive log and core data. The cores have been slabbed, photographed and the several plugs have been taken. In addition, minipermeameter is used to measure permeabilities on the core surface at six inch intervals. The plugs have been analyzed for the permeability and porosity values. The variations in property values will be tied to the geological descriptions as well as the subsurface data collected from the Glen Pool field. The third section discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to infer in-fill well locations. The geostatistical technique used is the simulated annealing technique because of its flexibility. One of the important reservoir data is the production data. Use of production data will allow us to define the reservoir continuities, which may in turn, determine the in-fill well locations. The proposed technique allows us to incorporate some of the production data as constraints in the reservoir descriptions. The technique has been validated by comparing the results with numerical simulations.

  8. Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    296,096 311,096 335,396 349,296 364,296 364,296 2008-2014 Colorado 48,129 49,119 48,709 60,582 60,582 63,774 2008-2014 Illinois 51,418 87,368 87,368 87,368 11,768 11,768...

  9. Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Separation, as of Dec. 31 33,383 35,746 42,823 53,156 58,490 69,117 1979-2014 Federal Offshore U.S. 5,223 5,204 5,446 5,864 5,530 5,334 1990-2014 Pacific (California) 731 722 711 652 264 243 1979-2014 Louisiana & Alabama 3,863 3,793 4,196 4,358 4,293 4,253 1981-2014 Texas 629 689 539 854 973 838 1981-2014 Alaska 8,093 7,896 8,535 8,672 6,428 5,851 1979-2014 Lower 48 States 25,290 27,850 34,288 44,484 52,062 63,266 1979-2014 Alabama 29 38 48 100 46 141 1979-2014 Arkansas 20 29 46 82 135

  10. Status of Norris Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Norris Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses, conditions that impair reservoir uses, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most up-to-date publications and data available, and from interviews with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies, and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-05-06

    Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

  12. Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

  13. Use of geostatistic techniques to describe a reservoir to be submitted into a secondary recovery process field case: {open_quotes}Eocene B-Inferior/VLG-3659, Ceuta, Venezuela{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, T.; Poquioma, W.

    1997-08-01

    This study presents the results of an integrated reservoir study of the Eocene B-Inferior/VLG-3659, Area 7, Ceuta filed. This field located in the Maracaibo Lake in the western side of Venezuela. The objective was to evaluating the feasibility to implement a secondary recovery project by means of water flooding. Core information was used for this study (194 ft), PVT analysis, RFI, build-up and statistic`s pressure analysis, modem logs and production history data. Using geostatistical techniques (Kriging) it was defined a low uncertainty geological model that was validated by means of a black oil simulator (Eclipse). The results showed a good comparison of historical pressure of the reservoir against those obtained from the model, without the need of {open_quotes}history matching{close_quotes}. It means without modifying neither the initial rock properties nor reservoir fluids. The results of this study recommended drilling in two new locations, also the reactivation of four producing wells and water flooding under peripherical array by means of four injection wells, with the recovery of an additional 30.2 MMSTB. The economical evaluation shows an internal return rate of 31.4%.

  14. Reactivation of an idle lease to increase heavy oil recovery through application of conventional steam drive technology in a low dip slope and basin reservoir in the Midway-Sunset field, San Jaoquin Basin, California. Annual report, June 13, 1995--June 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.; Jenkins, C.; Sprinkel, D.; Swain, R.; Wydrinski, R.; Schamel, S.

    1998-09-01

    This project reactivates ARCO`s idle Pru Fee lease in the Midway-Sunset field, California and conducts a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery demonstration aided by an integration of modern reservoir characterization and simulation methods. Cyclic steaming is being used to reestablish baseline production within the reservoir characterization phase of the project. During the demonstration phase scheduled to begin in January 1997, a continuous steamflood enhanced oil recovery will be initiated to test the incremental value of this method as an alternative to cyclic steaming. Other economically marginal Class III reservoirs having similar producibility problems will benefit from insight gained in this project. The objectives of the project are: (1) to return the shut-in portion of the reservoir to optimal commercial production; (2) to accurately describe the reservoir and recovery process; and (3) to convey the details of this activity to the domestic petroleum industry, especially to other producers in California, through an aggressive technology transfer program.

  15. Application of {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr, {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}{sup 13}C Isotopes to diagenesis, correlation and connectivity of a fractured chalk reservoir, the Sidi El Kilani Field Tunisia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mearns, E.W.; Mcbride, J.J.; Bramwell, M.

    1995-08-01

    Strontium Stratigraphy Analysis of the primary matrix chalk of the Abiod Formation reservoir in the Sidi El Kilani Field indicate a Campanian to Maastrichtian age (Upper Cretaceous). A resolution of {+-}1Ma has been achieved and results suggest that there are no major stratigraphic breaks in the studied sequences. Sr-O-C isotope data from early fracture-filling calcite cements suggest they may have formed by the redistribution of CaCO{sub 3} from underlying carbonate sequences and may have precipitated at temperatures in the region of 35-55{degrees}C. The {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr isotope ratios of formation waters determined by residual salt analysis (SrRSA) suggest that the chemical evolution of waters during reservoir filling was controlled by the influx of basinal waters as opposed to in situ water-rock interaction. Late, fracture-filling dolomite and barite cements have Sr-O-C isotope characteristics consistent with precipitation from these migrating basinal fluids at temperatures similar to current reservoir conditions (70-75{degrees}C). Sr RSA results suggest that the reservoir section in two of the wells may have been in direct lateral communication at the time of oil emplacement. These wells however are separated by a strike-slip fault. The SrRSA results therefore suggest that the fault is a partial barrier which has restricted pressure equilibration in the relatively short timescale of oil production, but which may have allowed homogenization of Sr isotope ratios in formation water.

  16. ,"New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

  17. Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  18. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Impact: LCOE improvements primarily result from better definition of the reservoir geometry and pressure field - Improved management of injectionproduction strategies to more ...

  19. U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves New Reservoir Discoveries...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Coalbed Methane Proved ... Release Date: 11192015 Next Release Date: 12312016 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane ...

  20. Status of Cherokee Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Status of Wheeler Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  2. U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) U.S. Crude Oil + Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  3. Feasibility studies of waterflooding gas-condensate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, J.D.; Howes, R.I.; Hawkyard, I.R.; Fishlock, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Preliminary results obtained from a program of experimental and theoretical studies examining the uncertainties of waterflooding gas-condensate reservoirs are reported. In spite of high trapped-gas saturations (35 to 39%), further aggravated by an unusual type of hysteresis, recoveries of gas and liquids can be increased over those obtained under natural depletion.

  4. Reservoir facies architecture of microtidal barrier systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galloway, W.E.

    1986-06-01

    Sandstone reservoirs deposited in microtidal barrier systems contain large oil and gas reserves in several Gulf Coast basin plays. Three representative Frio Sandstone reservoirs in West Ranch field show that barrier-island sand bodies are complex mosaics of barrier-core, inlet-fill, flood-tidal-delta, washover-fan, barrier-flat, and shoreface facies. The proportions of these facies differ within progradational, aggradational, and transgressive barrier sand bodies. The 41-A reservoir is a progradational barrier sand body. The most important producing facies include the barrier core and crosscutting inlet fill. Permeability and distributions of irreducible water saturation reveal depositional patterns and subdivisions of the sand body into numerous facies-controlled compartments. Both original hydrocarbon saturation and irregularities in water encroachment show that the facies compartments locally affect fluid movement within the reservoir. The Greta reservoir is an aggradational barrier complex. This massive sand body consists of intermixed barrier-core and inlet-fill units. Prominent resistivity compartments are dip oriented, indicating the importance of inlet development during barrier aggradation. Despite the uniform appearance of the Greta reservoir, water encroachment has been irregular. The Glasscock reservoir is characterized by comparatively low permeability and is an atypically thin and discontinuous Frio reservoir. It is interpreted to be a transgressive barrier deposit that consists mainly of large washover-fan and associated barrier-flat sands. Hydrocarbon saturation, drainage, and injection response all reflect the facies geometry typical of a transgressive barrier complex.

  5. Reactivation of an Idle Lease to Increase Heavy Oil Recovery through Application of Conventional Steam Drive Technology in a Low Dip Slope and Basin Reservoir in the Midway-Sunset Field, San Jaoquin Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Schamel

    1998-02-27

    A previously idle portion of the Midway-Sunset field, the ARCO Western Energy Pru Fee property, is being brought back into commercial production through tight integration of geologic characterization, geostatistical modeling, reservoir simulation, and petroleum engineering. This property, shut-in over a decade ago as economically marginal using conventional cyclic steaming methods, has a 200-300 foot thick oil column in the Monarch Sand. However, the sand lacks effective steam barriers and has a thick water-saturation zone above the oil-water contact. These factors require an innovative approach to steam flood production design that will balance optimal total oil production against economically viable steam-oil ratios and production rates. The methods used in the Class III demonstration are accessible to most operators in the Midway-Sunset field and could be used to revitalize properties with declining production of heavy oils throughout the region. In January 1997 the project entered its second and main phase with the purpose of demonstrating whether steamflood can be a more effective mode of production of the heavy, viscous oils from the Monarch Sand reservoir than the more conventional cyclic steaming. The objective is not just to produce the pilot site within the Pru Fee property south of Taft, but to test which production parameters optimize total oil recovery at economically acceptable rates of production and production costs.

  6. Reservoir Characterization, Production Characteristics, and Research Needs for Fluvial/Alluvial Reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Jackson, S.R.; Madden, M.P.; Raw-Schatzinger, V.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.; Young, M.A.

    1999-04-28

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program was initiated in 1992 to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from known domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. Cost-shared field demonstration projects are being initiated in geology defined reservoir classes which have been prioritized by their potential for incremental recovery and their risk of abandonment. This document defines the characteristics of the fifth geological reservoir class in the series, fluvial/alluvial reservoirs. The reservoirs of Class 5 include deposits of alluvial fans, braided streams, and meandering streams. Deposit morphologies vary as a complex function of climate and tectonics and are characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity to fluid flow as a result of extreme variations in water energy as the deposits formed.

  7. Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten; Xu, Tianfu; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Yingqi; Wu,Yu-Shu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zhang,Guoxiang; Kennedy, Mack

    2005-03-15

    This project has been active for several years and has focused on developing, enhancing and applying mathematical modeling capabilities for fractured geothermal systems. The emphasis of our work has recently shifted towards enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and hot dry rock (HDR), and FY05 is the first year that the DOE-AOP actually lists this project under Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Our overall purpose is to develop new engineering tools and a better understanding of the coupling between fluid flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and rock-mechanical deformation, to demonstrate new EGS technology through field applications, and to make technical information and computer programs available for field applications. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Improve fundamental understanding and engineering methods for geothermal systems, primarily focusing on EGS and HDR systems and on critical issues in geothermal systems that are difficult to produce. (2) Improve techniques for characterizing reservoir conditions and processes through new modeling and monitoring techniques based on ''active'' tracers and coupled processes. (3) Improve techniques for targeting injection towards specific engineering objectives, including maintaining and controlling injectivity, controlling non-condensable and corrosive gases, avoiding scale formation, and optimizing energy recovery. Seek opportunities for field testing and applying new technologies, and work with industrial partners and other research organizations.

  8. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel

  9. Depletion Aggregation > Batteries & Fuel Cells > Research > The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Batteries & Fuel Cells In This Section Battery Anodes Battery Cathodes Depletion Aggregation Membranes Depletion Aggregation We are exploring a number of synthetic strategies to ...

  10. Enhanced oil recovery by CO/sub 2/ miscible displacement in the Little Knife Field, Billings County, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desch, J.B.; Larsen, W.K.; Lindsay, R.F.; Nettle, R.L.

    1984-09-01

    A CO/sub 2/ minitest involving the miscible displacement process was conducted in the Mission Canyon formation (lower Mississippian) at Little Knife field, ND. The Mission Canyon is a dolomitized carbonate reservoir at approximately 9,700 to 9,900 ft (2957 to 3018 m) subsurface, which is undergoing primary depletion. Four wells were drilled in an inverted four-spot configuration, covering 5 acres (20 234 m/sup 2/). The central well served as the injection well and was surrounded by three nonproducing observation wells. Oriented cores were cut in each well for detailed reservoir characterization and laboratory testing. In addition, a well test program was conducted that involved two pulse tests and injectivity tests on the individual wells. Results from these tests were used to upgrade two reservoir simulation models. Various parameters within the computer models were modified to determine the most efficient injection plan for the specific reservoir characteristics.

  11. Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With...

  12. Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  13. Fully depleted back illuminated CCD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2001-01-01

    A backside illuminated charge coupled device (CCD) is formed of a relatively thick high resistivity photon sensitive silicon substrate, with frontside electronic circuitry, and an optically transparent backside ohmic contact for applying a backside voltage which is at least sufficient to substantially fully deplete the substrate. A greater bias voltage which overdepletes the substrate may also be applied. One way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is by physically connecting the voltage source to the ohmic contact. An alternate way of applying the bias voltage to the substrate is to physically connect the voltage source to the frontside of the substrate, at a point outside the depletion region. Thus both frontside and backside contacts can be used for backside biasing to fully deplete the substrate. Also, high resistivity gaps around the CCD channels and electrically floating channel stop regions can be provided in the CCD array around the CCD channels. The CCD array forms an imaging sensor useful in astronomy.

  14. Geostatistics applied to gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meunier, G.; Coulomb, C.; Laille, J.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The spatial distribution of many of the physical parameters connected with a gas reservoir is of primary interest to both engineers and geologists throughout the study, development, and operation of a field. It is therefore desirable for the distribution to be capable of statistical interpretation, to have a simple graphical representation, and to allow data to be entered from either two- or three-dimensional grids. To satisfy these needs while dealing with the geographical variables, new methods have been developed under the name geostatistics. This paper describes briefly the theory of geostatistics and its most recent improvements for the specific problem of subsurface description. The external-drift technique has been emphasized in particular, and in addition, four case studies related to gas reservoirs are presented.

  15. Heavy oil reservoirs recoverable by thermal technology. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kujawa, P.

    1981-02-01

    This volume contains reservoir, production, and project data for target reservoirs which contain heavy oil in the 8 to 25/sup 0/ API gravity range and are susceptible to recovery by in situ combustion and steam drive. The reservoirs for steam recovery are less than 2500 feet deep to comply with state-of-the-art technology. In cases where one reservoir would be a target for in situ combustion or steam drive, that reservoir is reported in both sections. Data were collectd from three source types: hands-on (A), once-removed (B), and twice-removed (C). In all cases, data were sought depicting and characterizing individual reservoirs as opposed to data covering an entire field with more than one producing interval or reservoir. The data sources are listed at the end of each case. This volume also contains a complete listing of operators and projects, as well as a bibliography of source material.

  16. LBL/Industry fractured reservoir performance definition project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, S.M.

    1995-04-01

    One of the problems facing the petroleum industry is the recovery of oil from heterogeneous, fractured reservoirs and from reservoirs that have been partially depleted. In response to this need, several companies, notably British Petroleum USA, (BP) and Continental Oil Company (CONOCO), have established integrated reservoir description programs. Concurrently, LBL is actively involved in developing characterization technology for heterogeneous, fractured rock, mainly for DOE`s Civilian Nuclear Waste Program as well as Geothermal Energy programs. The technology developed for these programs was noticed by the petroleum industry and resulted in cooperative research centered on the petroleum companies test facilities. The emphasis of this work is a tightly integrated interdisciplinary approach to the problem of characterizing complex, heterogeneous earth materials. In this approach we explicitly combine the geologic, geomechanical, geophysical and hydrologic information in a unified model for predicting fluid flow. The overall objective is to derive improved integrated approaches to characterizing naturally fractured gas reservoirs.

  17. Seismic imaging of reservoir flow properties: Resolving waterinflux and reservoir permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Keers, Henk

    2006-11-27

    Methods for geophysical model assessment, in particuale thecomputation of model parameter resolution, indicate the value and thelimitations of time-lapse data in estimating reservoir flow properties. Atrajectory-based method for computing sensitivities provides an effectivemeans to compute model parameter resolutions. We examine the commonsituation in which water encroaches into a resrvoir from below, as due tothe upward movement of an oil-water contact. Using straight-forwardtechniques we find that, by inclusing reflections off the top and bottomof a reservoir tens of meters thick, we can infer reservoir permeabilitybased upon time-lapse data. We find that, for the caseof water influxfrom below, using multiple time-lapse 'snapshots' does not necessarilyimprove the resolution of reservoir permeability. An application totime-lapse data from the Norne field illustrates that we can resolve thepermeability near a producing well using reflections from threeinterfaces associated with the reservoir.

  18. Influence of reservoir stress path on deformation and permeability of weakly cemented sandstone reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruistuen, H.; Teufel, L.W.; Rhett, D.

    1996-12-31

    The influence of production-induced changes in reservoir stress state on compressibility and permeability of weakly cemented sandstones has been analyzed. Laboratory experiments simulating reservoir depletion have been conducted for the full range of stress paths that a reservoir may follow. Samples were loaded by reducing the pore pressure and controlling the confining pressure according to the desired stress path from initial reservoir conditions. The results show that compressibility of weakly cemented sandstones are stress path dependent. Compressibilities measured under uniaxial strain conditions, or a stress path with a K value lower than the one associated with uniaxial strain, are more than twice the corresponding value found under hydrostatic loading conditions. In contrast, matrix permeability measured in the maximum stress direction show no significant stress path dependence. Independently of stress path, the observed permeability reductions fall within the general trend expected for a sedimentary rock of relatively high initial permeability. A significant permeability decrease was only observed as the shear stress exceeded the yield limit of the rock, probably due to both mobilization of fine arains and an increase in tortuosity due to collapse of pore space. Results of this study suggest that stress path dependent properties of weakly cemented sandstones is a consequence of the heterogeneous nature of the sedimentary rock. Material properties are affected by grain-scale inelastic deformation processes and the pattern of these deformation processes is primarily controlled by reservoir stress path.

  19. An innovative secondary recovery approach for a marginal reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, T.J.; Hanafy, H.H.

    1995-11-01

    The Younis Lower Rudeis reservoir is operated by the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Company (GUPCO) in a remote area of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. Before concluding that Younis had no future potential, GUPCO commissioned a reservoir/facility engineering team to study the reservoir development potential. First, reservoir simulation would be used to improve the understanding of the depletion mechanism and the original oil in place. Second, simulation would be used to determine the potential for waterflooding. Third, if waterflooding potential exists,the team must find a way to economically develop the incremental reserves. The reservoir simulation work clarified the depletion mechanism in Younis, and indicated a significant potential for waterflooding exists. History matching of the historical reservoir performance discovered that a much larger reservoir volume is actually present than mapped, and that ultimate recovery will actually reach only 22 percent of the OOIP. Furthermore, while gravity segregation of gas is occurring, significant unrecovered oil reserves will remain downdip of the current producers. Waterflooding could aid recovery of this downdip oil. With expected reserves from the waterflood project to total 5.3 MMBO, the facility engineers were challenged with providing up to 6000 BPD of water to the platform. An innovative technique was ultimately designed to install all needed equipment on the Younis unmanned platform for a remote waterflood. Since surface injection is expected to occur under a vacuum due to the low reservoir pressure, inexpensive equipment would be used to withdraw water from the Gulf, treat and filter, and deliver to the injection well at the required rate.

  20. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of themore » weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.« less

  1. Using Recent Advances in 2D Seismic Technology and Surface Geochemistry to Economically Redevelop a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir: Vernon Field, Isabella County, M, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, James R.; Bornhorst, T.J.; Chittick, S.D.; Harrison, William B.; Tayjor, W. Quinlan

    2001-08-07

    In this project a consortium consisting of Cronus Exploration (Traverse City, MI), Michigan Technological University (Houghton, MI) and Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI) proposed to develop and execute an economical and environmentally sensitive plan for recovery of hydrocarbons from an abandoned shallow-shelf carbonate field that is typical of many fields in the U.S. Midwest. This is a 5-year project that will use surface geochemistry as a tool to reduce risk in locating and producing hydrocarbons in Class II fields. The project will develop new techniques for measuring hydrocarbon gases in the soil horizon to locate new and bypassed oil in the shallow-shelf carbonate environments typified by the Dundee and Trenton Formations of the Michigan Basin (Fisher et. al., 1988). In Phase I of the project, the consortium proposes to re-develop the Vernon Oil field located in Vernon Twp, Isabella County, Michigan and produce both bypassed hydrocarbons from the original field and to locate and produce extensions of the original field.

  2. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-01-01

    Presented in this quarterly report is the Case History and Well Summary for the Vernon Field demonstration project in Isabella County, Michigan. This new case history and well summary format organizes and presents the technical and historical details of the Vernon Field demonstration, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion. Planning for the annual project meeting in Tampa, Florida has begun. This meeting will be held March 7-9, 2003 at the same site as the last three meetings. The goals of this project were to: (1) test the use of multi-lateral wells to recover bypassed hydrocarbons and (2) to access the potential of using surface geochemistry to reduce drilling risk. Two new demonstration wells, the State-Smock and the Bowers 4-25, were drilled to test the Dundee Formation at Vernon Field for bypassed oil. Neither well was commercial, although both produced hydrocarbon shows. An extensive geochemical survey in the vicinity of Vernon Field, covering much of Isabella County, has produced a base map for interpretation of anomalies in Michigan. Several potential new anomalies were discovered that could be further investigated.

  3. Application of nonmarine genetic sequence stratigraphic concepts to reservoir characterization in the fluvial-lacustrine Westbourne Formation, Eromanga basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, D.S.; Holtz, M.H.; Yeh, J. )

    1996-01-01

    A high-resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Westbourne Formation identified five chronostratigraphic genetic units each separated by thin, but laterally extensive, shale markers interpreted as maximum lacustrine flooding surfaces. The flooding surfaces were primarily identified by their lateral persistence and high gamma-ray log response, but marked changes in bedding architecture across these surfaces also facilitated their identification. The changes in bedding architecture reflect reorganization of the depositional systems from one depositional episode to the next. The Westbourne Formation is interpreted as a series of fluvially-dominated lacustrine delta sequences. Although the genetic units generally display lobate to digitate sand body geometries, sediment transport directions between successive units is highly variable. The complex morphology of the distributary network and accompanying high degree of facies variability indicates shallow lacustrine sedimentation similar to that in the modern inland Niger River delta which provides a modern analog. Westbourne fluid flow trends were established by mapping water encroachment during field development, observing differential depletion in repeat formation test data, and monitoring production response to water shut-off workovers. The fluid flow trends emphasized the highly layered character of the Westbourne reservoirs and integrating these trends with the geologic architecture defined stratigraphic controls on Westbourne flow units. The stratigraphic framework proved essential for unraveling sediment transport patterns and thus, predicting reservoir sandstone distribution. The stratigraphic framework also provided the key to understanding water encroachment and pressure a depletion which, when combined with predicted sandstone geometries, identified several step-out drilling and recompletion opportunities.

  4. Application of nonmarine genetic sequence stratigraphic concepts to reservoir characterization in the fluvial-lacustrine Westbourne Formation, Eromanga basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, D.S.; Holtz, M.H.; Yeh, J.

    1996-12-31

    A high-resolution sequence stratigraphic analysis of the Westbourne Formation identified five chronostratigraphic genetic units each separated by thin, but laterally extensive, shale markers interpreted as maximum lacustrine flooding surfaces. The flooding surfaces were primarily identified by their lateral persistence and high gamma-ray log response, but marked changes in bedding architecture across these surfaces also facilitated their identification. The changes in bedding architecture reflect reorganization of the depositional systems from one depositional episode to the next. The Westbourne Formation is interpreted as a series of fluvially-dominated lacustrine delta sequences. Although the genetic units generally display lobate to digitate sand body geometries, sediment transport directions between successive units is highly variable. The complex morphology of the distributary network and accompanying high degree of facies variability indicates shallow lacustrine sedimentation similar to that in the modern inland Niger River delta which provides a modern analog. Westbourne fluid flow trends were established by mapping water encroachment during field development, observing differential depletion in repeat formation test data, and monitoring production response to water shut-off workovers. The fluid flow trends emphasized the highly layered character of the Westbourne reservoirs and integrating these trends with the geologic architecture defined stratigraphic controls on Westbourne flow units. The stratigraphic framework proved essential for unraveling sediment transport patterns and thus, predicting reservoir sandstone distribution. The stratigraphic framework also provided the key to understanding water encroachment and pressure a depletion which, when combined with predicted sandstone geometries, identified several step-out drilling and recompletion opportunities.

  5. Programmable nanometer-scale electrolytic metal deposition and depletion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, James Weifu; Greenbaum, Elias

    2002-09-10

    A method of nanometer-scale deposition of a metal onto a nanostructure includes the steps of: providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart; and depositing metal on at least one of the nanostructures by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal deposition. Moreover, a method of nanometer-scale depletion of a metal from a nanostructure includes the steps of providing a substrate having thereon at least two electrically conductive nanostructures spaced no more than about 50 .mu.m apart, at least one of the nanostructures having a metal disposed thereon; and depleting at least a portion of the metal from the nanostructure by electric field-directed, programmable, pulsed electrolytic metal depletion. A bypass circuit enables ultra-finely controlled deposition.

  6. Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization.

  7. Development and exploitation stategies in a high-pressure-temperature reservoir with a complex hydrocarbon fluid column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maan, N.; Rosales, E.; Medina, H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper summarizes an interdisciplinary study performed to plan final Reservoir Development and Secondary Recovery Strategies for The Carito Field discovered in late 1987. Carito is a very large oil Field located in Northeastern Venezuela, with an estimated Volumetric Oil in Place of 1.8 Billion Stb. Production is mainly from Naricual Formation with a thickness of about 1300 feet in a faulted anticline. At the time of this Study, 25 wells had been drilled below 12200 ft ss. These wells were producing about 90000 Stb/D through 39 completions. Original reservoir pressure was abnormally high (11300 psig at 14040 ft SS) and the Temperature averages 300 degrees Fahrenheit. The field shows a graded fluid system that varies from a gas condensate to a medium oil. Gas cap to oil zone ratio is about 1.2 and crude oil gravity varies with depth from 36 to 21 API degrees. The simulation study, conducted to establish the optimum exploitation strategy, incorporated a detailed geologic model based on seismic, sedimentary environment. and production geologic concepts. The data from the geologic model, routine and special test data from conventional cores, and the data from 58 fluid analysis were consolidated in a numerical reservoir simulator model, which predicted the potential reservoir performance under various Development, Production and Secondary Recovery Planning. The results of this study led us to design a Gas Injection Secondary Recovery Process encompassing a rate injection of 600 MMScf/D through 10 injector wells and the perforation of an additional 16 producer wells. We expect to double the natural depletion oil Recovery as a consequence of the Pressure Maintenance Program.

  8. Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Reservoir. Quarterly technical report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, D.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this research and the pilot project planned is to test the feasibility of CO{sub 2} for recovering oil from the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in the Midland Basin. This notoriously marginal reservoir has confounded operators for 40 years with rapid depletion, low recovery during primary, disappointing waterflood results and low ultimate recovery. Yet, the tremendous areal coverage and large amount of remaining oil (up to 10 Bbbl) warrants further investigation to expend all possible process options before large numbers of Spraberry wellbores need to be plugged and abandoned. CO{sub 2} injection on a continuous, pattern-wide basis has not been attempted in the Spraberry Trend. This is due to the obvious existence of a network of naturally-occurring fractures. However, it has become clear in recent years that neglecting CO{sub 2} injection as an option in fractured reservoirs may overlook potential projects which may be viable. The 15-well pilot field demonstration and supporting research will provide the necessary information to quantify the conditions whereby CO{sub 2} flooding would be economic in the Spraberry Trend.

  9. Effects of differential compaction fracturing shown in four reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, G.E. )

    1992-02-03

    With the advent of horizontal drilling in the U.S., fractured reservoirs have become a major target in the ongoing search for hydrocarbons. This paper will examine four fractured-reservoir fields in the U.S.: Silo (Niobrara), Wyoming; Elkhorn Ranch (Bakken), North Dakota; Pearsal (Austin chalk), Texas; and the Syndicated Options Ltd. 9372 Ferguson Brothers well (Ordovician carbonates), Kentucky. The paper will show that differential compaction fracturing is more of a major factor in long-term, sustainable production in a fractured reservoir than is tectonic fracturing. In this paper, a general discussion of the two types of fracturing and how they affect reservoir production is provided.

  10. USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Wood; W. Quinlan

    2003-04-01

    The principal objective of the study was to test a new analytical technique, Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME), for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. This involved measuring the effectiveness of SPME to extract hydrocarbons under controlled conditions in the laboratory. As part of the study, a field demonstration was undertaken to assess the validity and usefulness of the laboratory results. Presented in this quarterly report is the condensed version of the Case History and Well Summary for the Bear Lake area in Manistee County, Michigan. The full version will be in the annual report. The condensed case history presents the important technical details regarding the geochemistry and horizontal lateral for Bear Lake, as well as the field demonstration results and the applicability of these results to other demonstration projects. This format could be duplicated for other demonstration projects and will be used on all subsequent field demonstrations as they near completion.