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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

THE IMPACT OF CIRCUMPLANTARY JETS ON TRANSIT SPECTRA AND TIMING OFFSETS FOR HOT JUPITERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present theoretical wavelength-dependent transit light curves for the giant planet HD 209458b based on a number of state-of-the-art three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamical models. By varying the kinematic viscosity in the model, we calculate observable signatures associated with the emergence of a super-rotating circumplanetary jet that strengthens with decreased viscosity. We obtain excellent agreement between our mid-transit transit spectra and existing data from Hubble and Spitzer, finding the best fit for intermediate values of viscosity. We further exploit dynamically driven differences between eastern and western hemispheres to extract the spectral signal imparted by a circumplanetary jet. We predict that (1) the transit depth should decrease as the jet becomes stronger; (2) the measured transit times should show timing offsets of up to 6 s at wavelengths with higher opacity, which increases with jet strength; (3) wavelength-dependent differences between ingress and egress spectra increase with jet strength; and (4) the color-dependent transit shape should exhibit stronger asymmetry for planets with stronger jets. These techniques and trends should be valid for other hot Jupiters as well. Observations of transit timing offsets may be accessible with current instrumentation, though the other predictions may require the capabilities of the James Webb Space Telescope and other future missions. Hydrodynamical models utilized solve the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations together with decoupled thermal and radiative energy equations and wavelength-dependent stellar heating.

Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Burrows, Adam, E-mail: ianmdd@gmail.com [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Crosswell seismic waveguide phenomenology of reservoir sands & shales at offsets >600 m, Liaohe Oil Field, NE China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......employed to lower the cost of hydrocarbon production monitoring (de Waal...2001. Development Production (Special Section...continuity logging for oil and gas field applications...from the Antrim Shale gas play, Michigan Basin......

P. C. Leary; W. Ayres; W. J. Yang; X. F. Chang

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Off-set stabilizer for comparator output  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized off-set voltage is input as the reference voltage to a comparator. In application to a time-interval meter, the comparator output generates a timing interval which is independent of drift in the initial voltage across the timing capacitor. A precision resistor and operational amplifier charge a capacitor to a voltage which is precisely offset from the initial voltage. The capacitance of the reference capacitor is selected so that substantially no voltage drop is obtained in the reference voltage applied to the comparator during the interval to be measured.

Lunsford, James S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Time independent mean-field theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical and theoretical motivations for the time-dependent mean-field theory are presented, and the successes and limitations of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock initial-vaue problem are reviewed. New theoretical developments are described in the treatment of two-body correlations and the formulation of a quantum mean-field theory of large-amplitude collective motion and tunneling decay. Finally, the mean-field theory is used to obtain new insights into the phenomenon of pion condensation in finite nuclei. 18 figures.

Negele, J.W.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Offset Printing, Production Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Printing Printing Our full service print shop provides prepress services, single and multicolor offset printing, and complete bindery. We print Reports Forms Brochures, leaflets and flyers Name tags and meal tickets Newsletters, etc Prepress Electronic files and paper copy prepared for printing. Complete Bindery Apply address labels or tabs to printed material. Machine fold documents and insert into envelopes for mailing. Laminate printed items up to 35" wide. Numbering and perforating. Trimming, drilling, padding and stitching. Special Printing Special reports, full color printing, continuous and carbon forms printed through the U.S. Government Printing Office. Additional Information Printing can be reached on X2953 The supervisor is Rick Backofen who can be reached on X6183

6

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Agency/Company /Organization: Sandbag Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Industry, Solar, Wind Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: sandbag.org.uk/carbondata/cers Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Screenshot References: Sandbag Carbon Offset Map[1] Thinking about climate change can be a depressing occupation. It's a massive issue and personal actions like switching off lights and unplugging televisions can feel like small contributions. Background "Thinking about climate change can be a depressing occupation. It's a

7

Particle energization through time-periodic helical magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We solve for the motion of charged particles in a helical time-periodic ABC (Arnold-Beltrami-Childress) magnetic field. The magnetic field lines of a stationary ABC field with coefficients A=B=C=1 are chaotic, and we show ...

Mitra, Dhrubaditya

8

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent

9

Explaining the Price of Voluntary Carbon Offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) of 10 Northeastern and Mid-32, partici- pants in the RGGI are allowed to offset up to

Conte, Marc N.; Kotchen, Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Electromagnetic Field Quantization in Time-Dependent Dielectric Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a Gupta-Bleuler quantization scheme for the electromagnetic field in time-dependent dielectric media. Starting from the Maxwell equations, a generalization of the Lorentz gauge condition adapted to time varying dielectrics is derived. Using this gauge, a Gupta-Bleuler approach to quantize all polarizations of the radiation field and the corresponding constraint condition are introduced. This new approach is different from the quantized electromagnetic field in vacuum in the sense that here the contributions of unphysical photons cannot be thoroughly eliminated, which further lead to a surface charge density. Finally, a discussion of potential experimental tests and possible implication is also made.

Xiao-Min Bei; Zhong-Zhu Liu

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

11

Time Evolution of the External Field Problem in QED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct the time evolution for the second quantized Dirac equation subject to a smooth and compactly supported, time dependent, electrodynamic four-vector field. Earlier works on this (e.g. Ruijsenaars) observed the Shale-Stinespring condition and showed that the one particle time evolution can be lifted to Fock space if and only if the external field had zero magnetic components. The basic obstacle in the construction is that there is neither a distinguished Dirac sea, i.e. Fock space vacuum, nor a distinguished polarization. Therefore the key idea (suggested already by Fierz and Scharf) is to implement this time evolution between time varying Fock spaces. We show that this implementation is unique up to a phase. All induced transition amplitudes are unique and finite.

Deckert, D -A; Merkl, F; Schottenloher, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Time Evolution in the external field problem of Quantum Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A general problem of quantum field theories is the fact that the free vacuum and the vacuum for an interacting theory belong to different, non-equivalent representations of the canonical (anti-)commutation relations. In the external field problem of QED, we encounter this problem in the form that the Dirac time evolution for an external field with non-vanishing magnetic components will not satisfy the Shale-Stinespring condition, known to be necessary and sufficient for the existence of an implementation on the fermionic Fock space. Therefore, a second quantization of the time evolution in the usual way is impossible. In this thesis, we present several rigorous approaches to QED with time-dependent, external fields and analyze in what sense a time evolution can exist in the second quantized theory. We study different constructions of the fermionic Fock space and prove their equivalence. We study and compare the results of Deckert et. al. (2010), where the time evolution is realized as unitary transformations ...

Lazarovici, Dustin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

CARBON OFFSETTING IN A TOURSIM CONTEXT: WHISTLER BC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON OFFSETTING IN A TOURSIM CONTEXT: WHISTLER BC by Katie von Gaza Bachelor of Environmental: Carbon offsetting in a Tourism Context: Whistler, BC. Project No.: 471 Examining Committee: Chair 2.2 Carbon Offsetting

14

FIELD-BASED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION: JUST IN TIME TECHNOLOGY TRAINING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIELD-BASED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION: JUST IN TIME TECHNOLOGY TRAINING Sarah Irvine Belson1 and Teresa, Audio Technology, and Physics, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016, tlarkin@american.edu Abstract -- This paper outlines the current status of technology integration

Larkin, Teresa L.

15

Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching...

16

Missouri: EERE Funds Help Offset City Electricity Expenses |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Missouri: EERE Funds Help Offset City Electricity Expenses Missouri: EERE Funds Help Offset City Electricity Expenses November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The Pointe at Ballwin...

17

International Carbon Reduction Offset Alliance ICROA | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offset Alliance ICROA Jump to: navigation, search Name: International Carbon Reduction & Offset Alliance (ICROA) Place: United Kingdom Sector: Carbon Product: UK-based alliance of...

18

Noncommutativity in space-time extended by Liouville field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The world-sheet quantum conformal invariance can be realized in the presence of the conformal factor $F$, by inclusion of Liouville term. In the background with linear dilaton field, $\\Phi(x)=\\Phi_0+a_\\mu x^\\mu$, the field $F$ becomes a new noncommutative variable. Therefore, it is natural to extend space-time with a new coordinate, $F$, in order to unify expressions for noncommutativity parameter $\\Theta^{ij}$ of the space-time coordinates $x^i$, with the part $\\Theta^i$ connecting noncommutativity between coordinates $x^i$ and $F$. In this way we solve the problems of Dp-brane noncommutativity in a more elegant way. The technical advantage uses the fact that in the extended space-time the action with dilaton field can be rewritten in dilaton free form. We use canonical method and extend its application to the derivation of boundary conditions. From requirement that Hamiltonian, as the time translation generator, has well defined derivatives in the coordinates and momenta, we obtain boundary conditions directly in the canonical form.

B. Nikolic; B. Sazdovic

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

19

Stochastic quantization of real-time thermal field theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use the stochastic quantization method to obtain the free scalar propagator of a finite temperature field theory formulated in the Minkowski space-time. First, we use the Markovian stochastic quantization approach to present the two-point function of the theory. Second, we assume a Langevin equation with a memory kernel and a colored noise. The convergence of the Markovian and non-Markovian stochastic processes in the asymptotic limit of the fictitious time is obtained. Our formalism can be the starting point to discuss systems at finite temperature out of equilibrium.

Aguiar, T. C. de; Svaiter, N. F. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Rio de Janeiro 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Menezes, G. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bloco II, Barra Funda, Sao Paulo 01140-070, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Pushing the limits of CANPushing the limits of CAN --Scheduling frames with offsetsScheduling frames with offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60 70 80 90 100 5 2,5 0 110 5 2,5 0 Periods 20 ms 15 ms 10 ms Principle: desynchronize transmissions and size of the frame #12;4 System model (1/2)System model (1/2) ECU Frame Transmission request task Frame (2/2)System model (2/2) The offset of a message stream is the time at which the transmission request

Navet, Nicolas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

24-SEMA as a sensitive and offset compensated SLF sequence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Separated Local Field (SLF) spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the determination of structure and dynamics of oriented systems such as membrane proteins oriented in lipid bilayers and liquid crystals. Of many SLF techniques available, Polarization Inversion Spin Exchange at Magic Angle (PISEMA) has found wide application due to its many favorable characteristics. However the pulse sequence suffers from its sensitivity to proton resonance frequency offset. Recently we have proposed a new sequence named 24-SEMA (J. Chem. Phys. 132 (2010) 134301) that overcomes this problem of PISEMA. The present work demonstrates the advantage of 24-SEMA as a highly sensitive SLF technique even for very large proton offset. 24-SEMA has been designed for obtaining reliable dipolar couplings by switching the magic-angle spin-lock for protons over four quadrants as against the use of only two quadrants in PISEMA. It is observed that for on-resonance condition, 24-SEMA gives rise to signal intensity comparable to or slightly higher than that from PISEMA. But under off-resonance conditions, intensities from 24-SEMA are several fold higher than those from PISEMA. Comparison with another offset compensated pulse sequence, SAMPI4, also indicates a better intensity profile for 24-SEMA. Experiments carried out on a single crystal of 15N labeled N-acetyl–dl-valine and simulations have been used to study the relative performance of the pulse sequences considered.

S. Jayanthi; N. Sinha; K.V. Ramanathan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This webinar will provide information to help weatherization programs access carbon finance in a shorter timeframe and at a lower cost than before. Steve Erario, former Carbon Project Coordinator at MaineHousing, will describe how the agency developed and validated the process to quantify, verify, and sell residential offsets. Mr. Erario will outline lessons learned during MaineHousing's first-in-kind effort, and describe key factors that indicate whether a weatherization program is a good candidate for accessing carbon finance.

23

Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document contains the transcript for the Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets webinar held on March 12, 2013.

24

On Space Quantization in Time Varying Magnetic Fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transitions between states of different space quantization which take place when an atom is passed through a weak inhomogeneous magnetic field are calculated by approximate methods taking into account the coupling between the nucleus and the orbital electrons. Two types of field are considered, namely, the field introduced by Majorana and the one introduced by Güttinger. For the Majorana field a discussion of the cases I arbitrary J=12, J arbitrary I=12, and I and J arbitrary with explicit application to the nitrogen atom is given. For the Güttinger field the general equations are set up for a field of any strength and are then applied to the case I=J=12.

Lloyd Motz and M. E. Rose

1936-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Simulation of relaxation times and energy spectra of the CdTe/Hg{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Te/CdTe quantum well for variable valence band offset, well width, and composition x  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dependences of relaxation times and energy spectrum of the CdTe/Hg{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Te/CdTe quantum well (QW) on its parameters were simulated in the cadmium molar fraction range 0 < x < 0.16. It was found that the x increase from 0 to 0.16 changes electron wave function localization in the QW. A criterion for determining the number of interface levels of localized electrons depending on QW parameters was obtained. The effect of a sharp (by two orders of magnitude) increase in the relaxation time of localized electrons was detected at small QW widths and x close to 0.16.

Melezhik, E. O., E-mail: emelezhik@gmail.com; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J. V.; Sizov, F. F. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkariev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Coherent Time-Stretch Transform for Near-Field Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

losses results in reduction in peak power and loss of sensitivity; a key innovation has been diffraction theoryVthe Fraunhofer limit. We may also consider the temporal near-field regime in analogy

Jalali. Bahram

27

The sensitivity of patient specific IMRT QC to systematic MLC leaf bank offset errors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Patient specific IMRT QC is performed routinely in many clinics as a safeguard against errors and inaccuracies which may be introduced during the complex planning, data transfer, and delivery phases of this type of treatment. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the feasibility of detecting systematic errors in MLC leaf bank position with patient specific checks. Methods: 9 head and neck (H and N) and 14 prostate IMRT beams were delivered using MLC files containing systematic offsets ({+-}1 mm in two banks, {+-}0.5 mm in two banks, and 1 mm in one bank of leaves). The beams were measured using both MAPCHECK (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL) and the aS1000 electronic portal imaging device (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). Comparisons with calculated fields, without offsets, were made using commonly adopted criteria including absolute dose (AD) difference, relative dose difference, distance to agreement (DTA), and the gamma index. Results: The criteria most sensitive to systematic leaf bank offsets were the 3% AD, 3 mm DTA for MAPCHECK and the gamma index with 2% AD and 2 mm DTA for the EPID. The criterion based on the relative dose measurements was the least sensitive to MLC offsets. More highly modulated fields, i.e., H and N, showed greater changes in the percentage of passing points due to systematic MLC inaccuracy than prostate fields. Conclusions: None of the techniques or criteria tested is sufficiently sensitive, with the population of IMRT fields, to detect a systematic MLC offset at a clinically significant level on an individual field. Patient specific QC cannot, therefore, substitute for routine QC of the MLC itself.

Rangel, Alejandra; Palte, Gesa; Dunscombe, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2, Canada and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive North West, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada) and Department of Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, 1331-29 Street NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Spectral analysis of time-limited pulsed Gaussian wave fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Giza, Egypt Richard W. Ziolkowski Electromagnetics Laboratory, Department of Electrical of finite-energy field so- lutions has been deduced by using superpositions of the source-free FWM.3- namic apertures provides an efficient method to generate pulses of narrow Gaussian waists from extended

Ziolkowski, Richard W.

29

APPLICATION FOR NON-RESIDENT TAX OFFSET CREDIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION FOR NON-RESIDENT TAX OFFSET CREDIT (For Missouri Taxpayers) I wish to apply for the Tax as of 6/18/2014 is Ellis Library ­ Room 202) The following conditions must be met before any tax credit. Tax Offset Credit form must be completed, signed and notarized with appropriate supporting

Taylor, Jerry

30

Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities Agency/Company /Organization Overseas Development Institute Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass, Forestry Topics Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.odi.org.uk/resource Country Uganda, India Eastern Africa, Southern Asia References Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities[1] Summary "This report presents findings from a research study in Uganda and India looking at the opportunities that carbon offset projects offer for poor

31

Long Time Behavior of Magnetic Field in Two Department of Mathematical Sciences, Montana State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long Time Behavior of Magnetic Field in Two Dimensions I.Klapper Department of Mathematical Sciences, Montana State University Bozeman, MT 59717 Abstract: As noted by Zel'dovich (1957), geometric constraints restrict the behavior of magnetic field in two dimensions. Here, tight long time bounds and decay

Klapper, Isaac

32

Time-dependent Maxwell field operators and field energy density for an atom near a conducting wall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the time evolution of the electric and magnetic field operators for a two-level atom, interacting with the electromagnetic field, placed near an infinite perfectly conducting wall. We solve iteratively the Heisenberg equations for the field operators and obtain the electric and magnetic energy density operators around the atom (valid for any initial state). Then we explicitly evaluate them for an initial state with the atom in its bare ground state and the field in the vacuum state. We show that the results can be physically interpreted as the superposition of the fields propagating directly from the atom and the fields reflected on the wall. Relativistic causality in the field propagation is discussed. Finally we apply these results to the calculation of the dynamical Casimir-Polder interaction energy in the far zone between two atoms when a boundary condition such as a conducting wall is present. Magnetic contributions to the interatomic Casimir-Polder interaction in the presence of the wall are also considered. We show that, in the limit of large times, the known results of the stationary case are recovered.

R. Vasile; R. Messina; R. Passante

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

33

Notes on Gauss law applied for time varying electric field in vacuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gauss's law in integral form states that closed surface integral of electric field is proportional to net charge present within the volume bounded by this closed surface. Gauss's law in differential form states that divergence of electric field is proportional to charge's volume density. From Gauss's law it is concluded that in vacuum, where no electric charges are present, divergence of electric field and closed surface integral of electric field are zero. In this paper we make an attempt to theoretically prove that for time-varying electric fields Gauss's law is not valid. In other words, for time-varying electric field even in vacuum divergence of electric field and closed surface integral of electric field are non-zero. We do this by considering simple sinusoidal motion of the charge and then by calculating closed surface integral at specific time of time-varying electric field due to charge motion. Results show that for charges at still and at motion with constant velocity Gauss's law is valid. However f...

Zhakatayev, Altay

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Foresty offsets in emissions trading systems: a link between systems?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An important aspect in the linking of different emissions trading schemes is the degree to which these ... ban) external offset project categories. The EU Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) currently allows the ......

C. Streck; A. Tuerk; B. Schlamadinger

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Unitarity Bounds and RG Flows in Time Dependent Quantum Field Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We generalize unitarity bounds on operator dimensions in conformal field theory to field theories with spacetime dependent couplings. Below the energy scale of spacetime variation of the couplings, their evolution can strongly affect the physics, effectively shifting the infrared operator scaling and unitarity bounds determined from correlation functions in the theory. We analyze this explicitly for large-N double-trace flows, and connect these to UV complete field theories. One motivating class of examples comes from our previous work on FRW holography, where this effect explains the range of flavors allowed in the dual, time dependent, field theory.

Dong, Xi; Horn, Bart; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

36

The development of the time dependence of the nuclear EMP electric field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) electric field calculated with the legacy code CHAP is compared with the field given by an integral solution of Maxwell's equations, also known as the Jefimenko equation, to aid our current understanding on the factors that affect the time dependence of the EMP. For a fair comparison the CHAP current density is used as a source in the Jefimenko equation. At first, the comparison is simplified by neglecting the conduction current and replacing the standard atmosphere with a constant density air slab. The simplicity of the resultant current density aids in determining the factors that affect the rise, peak and tail of the EMP electric field versus time. The three dimensional nature of the radiating source, i.e. sources off the line-of-sight, and the time dependence of the derivative of the current density with respect to time are found to play significant roles in shaping the EMP electric field time dependence. These results are found to hold even when the conduction current and the standard atmosphere are properly accounted for. Comparison of the CHAP electric field with the Jefimenko electric field offers a direct validation of the high-frequency/outgoing wave approximation.

Eng, C

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Time-Dependent Green's Functions Description of One-Dimensional Nuclear Mean-Field Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The time-dependent Green's functions formalism provides a consistent description of the time evolution of quantum many-body systems, either in the mean-field approximation or in more sophisticated correlated approaches. We describe an attempt to apply this formalism to the mean-field dynamics of symmetric reactions for one-dimensional nuclear slabs. We pay particular attention to the off-diagonal elements of the Green's functions in real space representation. Their importance is quantified by means of an elimination scheme based on a super-operator cut-off field and their relevance for the global time evolution is assessed. The Wigner function and its structure in the mean-field approximation is also discussed.

Rios, Arnau; Danielewicz, Pawel; Barker, Brent [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States)

2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Photon emission in a constant magnetic field in 2+1 dimensional space-time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate by the proper-time method the amplitude of the two-photon emission by a charged fermion in a constant magnetic field in (2+1)-dimensional space-time. The relevant dynamics reduces to that of a supesymmetric quantum-mechanical system with one bosonic and one fermionic degrees of freedom.

J. T. S. Amaral; S. I. Zlatev

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Higher Rank Conformal Fields in the $Sp(2M)$ Symmetric Generalized Space-Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study various $Sp(2M)$ invariant field equations corresponding to rank $r$ tensor products of the Fock (singleton) representation of $Sp(2M)$. These equations are shown to describe localization on ``branes'' of different dimensions embedded into the generalized space-time $\\M_M$ with matrix (i.e., ``central charge'') coordinates. The case of bilinear tensor product is considered in detail. The conserved currents built from bilinears of rank 1 fields in $\\M_M$ are shown to satisfy the field equations of the rank 2 fields in $\\M_M$. Also, the rank 2 fields in $\\M_M$ are shown to be equivalent to the rank 1 fields in $\\M_{2M}$.

O. A. Gelfond; M. A. Vasiliev

2005-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

Strike-slip offset along the McKittrick fault, western Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reconstructions of offset Miocene strata in McKittrick and northern Midway-Sunset fields, western Kern County, California, show about 7 mi (11 km) of post-Miocene right-lateral offset along the McKittrick fault. Detailed correlations of facies within the Potter sand, an informal member of the late Miocene Reef Ridge formation, in these fields show consistent stratigraphic character when the offset of the McKittrick fault is removed. Achieving this correlation allows the further correlation of Stevens sands, an informal member of the underlying Monterey Formation, between Midway-Sunset and McKittrick fields, including the feeder channels of these turbidite deposits. Facies are more continuous in a dip direction than they are along strike, facilitating their use as piercing points along the fault. The McKittrick fault parallels a feature long mapped as a right-lateral structure, the Bacon Hills fault, along the southwestern edge of the Cymric field. The McKittrick fault has always been considered to have vertical separation only. However, strike-slip motion as now proposed for it clarifies a structural problem that has been unexplained: the resemblance of the multiple thrust slices along the McKittrick fault in northern Midway-Sunset field and southeast McKittrick to the palm structures of Sylvester and Smith, but for which the requisite strike-slip displacement was not proved. Further evidence for this structural interpretation is provided by the presence of northeast-southwest-trending strike-slip faults in McKittrick Valley, which are explained by this model as differential slip taking up rotation between the McKittrick and Bacon Hills faults.

Bowersox, J.R.; Olson, D.M.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Initial Simulation Results of Storm-Time Ring Current in a Self-Consistent Magnetic Field Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this issue. We assume for simplicity a model for B such that magnetic field lines lie in meridional planesInitial Simulation Results of Storm-Time Ring Current in a Self-Consistent Magnetic Field Model S a strong and time-dependent perturbation of the magnetospheric magnetic field B, and this magnetic-field

Lyons, Larry

42

Homebuyer Solar Option and Solar Offset Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Homebuyer Solar Option and Solar Offset Program Homebuyer Solar Option and Solar Offset Program Homebuyer Solar Option and Solar Offset Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider California Energy Commission [http://www.energy.ca.gov/2009-SOPR-1/documents/sb_1_bill_20060821_chapte... Senate Bill 1 of 2006], which established the statewide California Solar Initiative, also required the California Energy Commission (CEC) to implement regulations that require sellers of production homes to offer a solar energy system option to all prospective homebuyers. Besides offering solar as an option to prospective homebuyers, sellers of homes constructed on land for which an application for a tentative subdivision map has been

43

Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of Over 300 Power Plants Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions of Over 300 Power Plants April 8, 2011 - 4:26pm Addthis Dr. Art Rosenfeld Distinguished Scientist Emeritus at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory What does this project do? Builds energy savings. Promotes heat island mitigation and public health benefits. Encourages global cooling. I am delighted to learn that India, Mexico, and the United States have signed up to join the Cool Roofs Working Group, announced yesterday at the second Clean Energy Ministerial in Abu Dhabi. This working group was offered as part of the Clean Energy Ministerial, which is a high-level global forum to promote policies and programs that advance clean energy

44

Results from field tests of the one-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of field experiments were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the one dimensional time encoded imaging system. The significant detection of a Cf252 fission radiation source was demonstrated at a stand-off of 100 meters. Extrapolations to different quantities of plutonium equivalent at different distances are made. Hardware modifications to the system for follow on work are suggested.

Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Real-time formalism for studying the nonlinear response of "smart" materials to an electric field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-time formalism for studying the nonlinear response of "smart" materials to an electric field J developed for so-called "smart" materials that are tuned to lie close to the metal- insulator transition (RSFQ) ideas [3]. A "smart" material is a mate- rial that can have its properties altered by changing

Freericks, Jim

46

Fast, Precise Flattening of Cubic Bézier Segment Offset Curves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fast algorithm for generating a polyline approximation (flattening) for the offset curves of a cubic Bézier curve segment is described. It is shown to be more efficient than the standard recursive subdivision method by generating only 70% as many segments, ...

Thomas F. Hain; Sri Venkat R. Racherla; David D. Langan

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Insights from Agricultural GHG Offset studies that might  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insights from Agricultural GHG Offset studies that might Influence IAM Modeling Bruce A. Mc #12;How are landHow are land--use and terrestrial GHGuse and terrestrial GHG mitigation decisions/expert ­ Crop mix shift Varieties GHG Mitigation ­ Methane from rice, enteric, manure, others N2O from

McCarl, Bruce A.

48

Assessing Economic Potential for GHG Offsets in US Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing Economic Potential for GHG Offsets in US Agriculture and Forestry Presented at Workshop Goals Examine the portfolio of land based GHG mitigation strategies and identify ones for further Educate on needed scope of economic analysis Bring in a full cost and GHG accounting Look at market

McCarl, Bruce A.

49

Harvesting the Greenhouse: Comparing Biological Sequestration with Emissions Offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g., carbon emission taxes in Norway or potential multi pollutant electric utility regulation in the U photosynthetic processes by plants or trees and subsequent fixation into soils, plants or trees. GHGE offsets-ground stocks can be used in the future for energy and thus emissions may simply be delayed rather than

McCarl, Bruce A.

50

Spoofing GPS Receiver Clock Offset of Phasor Measurement Units  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satellites and decoding their data, the GPS receiver of a PMU estimates its own position and the offset the feasibility of a spoofing attack on the GPS receiver of a Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU). We formulate the attack as an optimization problem where the objective is to maximize the difference between the PMU

Liberzon, Daniel

51

Scalar Field Dark Matter: non-spherical collapse and late time behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show the evolution of non-spherically symmetric balls of a self-gravitating scalar field in the Newtonian regime or equivalently an ideal self-gravitating condensed Bose gas. In order to do so, we use a finite differencing approximation of the Shcr\\"odinger-Poisson (SP) system of equations with axial symmetry in cylindrical coordinates. Our results indicate: 1) that spherically symmetric ground state equilibrium configurations are stable against non-spherical perturbations and 2) that such configurations of the SP system are late-time attractors for non-spherically symmetric initial profiles of the scalar field, which is a generalization of such behavior for spherically symmetric initial profiles. Our system and the boundary conditions used, work as a model of scalar field dark matter collapse after the turnaround point. In such case, we have found that the scalar field overdensities tolerate non-spherical contributions to the profile of the initial fluctuation.

Argelia Bernal; F. Siddhartha Guzman

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

Measurement of the absolute timing of attosecond XUV bursts with respect to the driving field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate that a simple two-color ionization measurement can be used to extract the time of birth of attosecond extreme ultraviolet pulses. A high-order-harmonic attosecond pulse train generated in xenon gas is used to excite a laser-dressed helium atom, which we model using the Floquet formalism. The interference between ionization paths from different Fourier components of the Floquet states results in the oscillation of ion yield with time delay. Using two IR pulses to create a reference intensity modulation, we obtain the phase of ion-yield oscillations, which provides the absolute timing of attosecond bursts with respect to the driving IR field.

Niranjan Shivaram; Henry Timmers; Xiao-Min Tong; Arvinder Sandhu

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

Time-evolution of the external field problem in Quantum Electrodynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We construct the time-evolution for the second-quantized Dirac equation subject to a smooth, compactly supported, time dependent electromagnetic potential and identify the degrees of freedom involved. Earlier works on this (e.g., Ruijsenaars) observed the Shale-Stinespring condition and showed that the one-particle time-evolution can be lifted to Fock space if and only if the external field had zero magnetic components. We scrutinize the idea, observed earlier by Fierz and Scharf, that the time-evolution can be implemented between time varying Fock spaces. In order to define these Fock spaces we are led to consider classes of reference vacua and polarizations. We show that this implementation is up to a phase independent of the chosen reference vacuum or polarization and that all induced transition probabilities are well-defined and unique.

Deckert, D.-A.; Duerr, D.; Merkl, F.; Schottenloher, M. [Mathematisches Institut, Ludwigs-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 39, D-80333 Muenchen (Germany)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Propagation of Test Particles and Scalar Fields on a Class of Wormhole Space-Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we consider the problem of test particles and test scalar fields propagating on the background of a class of wormhole space-times. For test particles, we solve for arbitrary causal geodesics in terms of integrals which are solved numerically. These integrals are parametrized by the radius and shape of the wormhole throat as well as the initial conditions of the geodesic trajectory. In terms of these parameters, we compute the conditions for the geodesic to traverse the wormhole, to be reflected by the wormhole's potential or to be captured on an unstable bound orbit at the wormhole's throat. These causal geodesics are visualized by embedding plots in Euclidean space in cylindrical coordinates. For test scalar fields, we compute transmission coefficients and quasi-normal modes for arbitrary coupling of the field to the background geometry in the WKB approximation. We show that there always exists an unstable mode whenever the coupling constant is greater than 1/2. This analysis is interesting since recent computations of self-interactions of a static scalar field in wormhole space-times reveal some anomalous dependence on the coupling constant, principally, the existence of an infinite discrete set of poles. We show that this pathological behavior of the self-field is an artifact of computing the interaction for values of the coupling constant that do not lie in the domain of stability.

Peter Taylor

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

Measurement of time dependent fields in high gradient superconducting quadrupoles for the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic field measurements have been performed on prototype and production magnets from two high gradient superconducting quadrupoles designs. One design is a double shell quadrupole with 36 strand Rutherford cable. The other design is a single shell quadrupole with 5 individually monolithic strands connected in series. These magnets have similar bore diameters and cable dimensions. However, there are significant differences between the two designs, as well as differences between prototype and production magnets within each design, with regard to Cu to superconductor ratio, filament diameter and filament spacing to strand diameter. The time dependence of fixed currents of the measured magnetic fields is discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Lamm, M.J.; Coulter, K.; Gourlay, S.; Jaffery, T.S.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Wave function for harmonically confined electrons in time-dependent electric and magnetostatic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive via the interaction “representation” the many-body wave function for harmonically confined electrons in the presence of a magnetostatic field and perturbed by a spatially homogeneous time-dependent electric field—the Generalized Kohn Theorem (GKT) wave function. In the absence of the harmonic confinement – the uniform electron gas – the GKT wave function reduces to the Kohn Theorem wave function. Without the magnetostatic field, the GKT wave function is the Harmonic Potential Theorem wave function. We further prove the validity of the connection between the GKT wave function derived and the system in an accelerated frame of reference. Finally, we provide examples of the application of the GKT wave function.

Zhu, Hong-Ming; Chen, Jin-Wang; Pan, Xiao-Yin, E-mail: panxiaoyin@nbu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China)] [Department of Physics, Ningbo University, Ningbo 315211 (China); Sahni, Viraht [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College and The Graduate School of the City University of New York, New York, New York 10016 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Brooklyn College and The Graduate School of the City University of New York, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

57

Evolution of a mass-less test scalar field on Boson Stars space-times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We numerically solve the mass-less test scalar field equation on the space-time background of boson stars and black holes. In order to do so, we use a numerical domain that contains future null infinity. We achieve this construction using a scri-fixing conformal compactification technique based on hyperboloidal constant mean curvature foliations of the space-time and solve the conformally invariant wave equation. We present two results: the scalar field shows oscillations of the quasi- normal-mode type found for black holes only for boson star configurations that are compact, and no signs of tail decay is found in the parameter space we explored. Even though our results do not correspond to the master equation of perturbations of boson star solutions, they indicate that the parameter space of boson stars as black hole mimickers is restricted to compact configurations.

F. D. Lora-Clavijo; A. Cruz-Osorio; F. S. Guzmán

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

58

Magnetic field reversals and long-time memory in conducting flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employing a simple ideal magnetohydrodynamic model in spherical geometry,we show that the presence of either rotation or finite magnetic helicity is sufficient to induce dynamical reversals of the magnetic dipole moment. The statistical character of the model is similar to that of terrestrial magnetic field reversals, with the similarity being stronger when rotation is present.The connection between long time correlations, $1/f$ noise, and statistics of reversals is supported, consistent with earlier suggestions.

Dmitruk, P; Pouquet, A; Servidio, S; Matthaeus, W H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Thermonuclear Supernovae: Probing Magnetic Fields by Late-Time IR Line Profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the imprint of magnetic fields B on late-time IR line profiles and light curves of Type Ia Supernovae. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass M_{Ch White Dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 1E9G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 mu can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. Subsequently, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. By day 500, the profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B and directional dependent for dipole fields. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. After about 200 days, persistent broad-line, flat-topped or stumpy profiles require high density burning which is the signature of a WD close to M_Ch. Narrow peaked profiles are a signature of chemical mixing or sub-...

Penney, R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Abandoned Soviet farmlands could help offset global warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abandoned Soviet farmlands could help offset global warming ... Also, should these countries find themselves with carbon-emissions treaty obligations following the upcoming Copenhagen conference on global warming, burning grasses in lieu of coal “would give them carbon credits forever,” says Wolf. ... “Coal and oil, on the other hand, took the CO2 out of the atmosphere millions of years ago, so burning them only adds to the global CO2 supply. ...

Christopher Pala

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Questions Asked during the Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document contains the questions asked and the answers provided during the Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Webinar

62

Phase-field theory of brine entrapment in sea ice: Short-time frozen microstructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the early phase of brine entrapment in sea ice, using a phase field model. This model for a first-order phase transition couples non-conserved order parameter kinetics to salt diffusion. The evolution equations are derived from a Landau-Ginzburg order parameter gradient dynamics together with salinity conservation. The numerical solution of model equations by an exponential time differencing scheme describes the time evolution of phase separation between liquid water with high salinity and the ice phase with low salinity. The numerical solution in one and two dimensions indicates the formation of one dominant wavelength which sets the length scale of short-time frozen structures. A stability analysis provides the phase diagram in terms of two Landau parameters. It is distinguished an uniform ice phase, a homogeneous liquid saline water solution and a phase where solidification structures can be formed. The Landau parameters are extracted from the supercooling and superheating as well as the freezin...

Thoms, Silke; Morawetz, Klaus

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Insights from Agricultural and Forestry GHG Offset Bruce A. McCarl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insights from Agricultural and Forestry GHG Offset Studies Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor Agricultural and Forestry GHG Offset Studies that Might Influence IAM Modeling," that will appear in the book and Forestry GHG Offset Studies 1 Introduction The agricultural and forestry (AF) sectors exhibit critical

McCarl, Bruce A.

64

Geodesic motion in the space-time of cosmic strings interacting via magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the geodesic motion of test particles in the space-time of two Abelian-Higgs strings interacting via their magnetic fields. These bound states of cosmic strings constitute a field theoretical realization of p-q-strings which are predicted by inflationary models rooted in String Theory, e.g. brane inflation. In contrast to previously studied models describing p-q-strings our model possesses a Bogomolnyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) limit. If cosmic strings exist it would be exciting to detect them by direct observation. We propose that this can be done by the observation of test particle motion in the space-time of these objects. In order to be able to make predictions we have to solve the field equations describing the configuration as well as the geodesic equation numerically. The geodesics can then be classified according to the test particle's energy, angular momentum and momentum along the string axis. We find that the interaction of two Abelian-Higgs strings can lead to the existence of bound orbits that would be absent without the interaction. We also discuss the minimal and maximal radius of orbits and comment on possible applications in the context of gravitational wave emission.

Betti Hartmann; Valeria Kagramanova

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

65

Cortical pitch response components index stimulus onset/offset and dynamic features of pitch contours  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Voice pitch is an important information-bearing component of language that is subject to experience dependent plasticity at both early cortical and subcortical stages of processing. We have already demonstrated that pitch onset component (Na) of the cortical pitch response (CPR) is sensitive to flat pitch and its salience. In regards to dynamic pitch, we do not yet know whether the multiple pitch-related transient components of the CPR reflect specific temporal attributes of such stimuli. Here we examine the sensitivity of the multiple transient components of CPR to changes in pitch acceleration associated with the Mandarin high rising lexical tone. CPR responses from Chinese listeners were elicited by three citation forms varying in pitch acceleration and duration. Results showed that the pitch onset component (Na) was invariant to changes in acceleration. In contrast, Na–Pb and Pb–Nb showed a systematic increase in the interpeak latency and decrease in amplitude with increase in pitch acceleration that followed the time course of pitch change across the three stimuli. A strong correlation with pitch acceleration was observed for these two components only – a putative index of pitch-relevant neural activity associated with the more rapidly-changing portions of the pitch contour. Pc–Nc marks unambiguously the stimulus offset. We therefore propose that in the early stages of cortical sensory processing, a series of neural markers flag different temporal attributes of a dynamic pitch contour: onset of temporal regularity (Na); changes in temporal regularity between onset and offset (Na–Pb, Pb–Nb); and offset of temporal regularity (Pc–Nc). At the temporal electrode sites, the stimulus with the most gradual change in pitch acceleration evoked a rightward asymmetry. Yet within the left hemisphere, stimuli with more gradual change were indistinguishable. These findings highlight the emergence of early hemispheric preferences and their functional roles as related to sensory and cognitive properties of the stimulus.

Ananthanarayan Krishnan; Jackson T. Gandour; Saradha Ananthakrishnan; Venkatakrishnan Vijayaraghavan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Barriers in the transition to global chaos in collisionless magnetic reconnection. I. Ridges of the finite time Lyapunov exponent field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transitional phase from local to global chaos in the magnetic field of a reconnecting current layer is investigated. Regions where the magnetic field is stochastic exist next to regions where the field is more regular. In regions between stochastic layers and between a stochastic layer and an island structure, the field of the finite time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) shows a structure with ridges. These ridges, which are special gradient lines that are transverse to the direction of minimum curvature of this field, are approximate Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) that act as barriers for the transport of field lines.

Borgogno, D. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Grasso, D. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); CNR Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Pegoraro, F. [Physics Department, Pisa University, Pisa, CNISM (Italy); Schep, T. J. [Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Propagation of Test Particles and Scalar Fields on a Class of Wormhole Space-Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we consider the problem of test particles and test scalar fields propagating on the background of a class of wormhole space-times. For test particles, we solve for arbitrary causal geodesics in terms of integrals which are solved numerically. These integrals are parametrized by the radius and shape of the wormhole throat as well as the initial conditions of the geodesic trajectory. In terms of these parameters, we compute the conditions for the geodesic to traverse the wormhole, to be reflected by the wormhole's potential or to be captured on an unstable bound orbit at the wormhole's throat. These causal geodesics are visualized by embedding plots in Euclidean space in cylindrical coordinates. For test scalar fields, we compute transmission coefficients and quasi-normal modes for arbitrary coupling of the field to the background geometry in the WKB approximation. We show that there always exists an unstable mode whenever the coupling constant is greater than 1/2. This analysis is interesting si...

Taylor, Peter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Space-time contours to treat intense field-dressed molecular states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article we consider a molecular system exposed to an intense short-pulsed external field. It is a continuation of a previous publication [A. K. Paul, S. Adhikari, D. Mukhopadhyay et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 113, 7331 (2009)] in which a theory is presented that treats quantum effects due to nonclassical photon states (known also as Fock states). Since these states became recently a subject of intense experimental efforts we thought that they can be treated properly within the existing quantum formulation of dynamical processes. This was achieved by incorporating them in the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) treatment with time-dependent coefficients. The extension of the BO treatment to include the Fock states results in a formidable enhancement in numerical efforts expressed, in particular, in a significant increase in CPU time. In the present article we discuss an approach that yields an efficient and reliable approximation with only negligible losses in accuracy. The approximation is tested in detail for the dissociation process of H{sub 2}{sup +} as caused by a laser field.

Paul, Amit K.; Adhikari, Satrajit [Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Baer, Michael [Fritz Haber Research Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

Canonicalization and symplectic simulation of the gyrocenter dynamics in time-independent magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gyrocenter dynamics of charged particles in time-independent magnetic fields is a non-canonical Hamiltonian system. The canonical description of the gyrocenter has both theoretical and practical importance. We provide a general procedure of the gyrocenter canonicalization, which is expressed by the series of a small variable ? depending only on the parallel velocity u and can be expressed in a recursive manner. We prove that the truncation of the series to any given order generates a set of exact canonical coordinates for a system, whose Lagrangian approximates to that of the original gyrocenter system in the same order. If flux surfaces exist for the magnetic field, the series stops simply at the second order and an exact canonical form of the gyrocenter system is obtained. With the canonicalization schemes, the canonical symplectic simulation of gyrocenter dynamics is realized for the first time. The canonical symplectic algorithm has the advantage of good conservation properties and long-term numerical accuracy, while avoiding numerical instability. It is worth mentioning that explicitly expressing the canonical Hamiltonian in new coordinates is usually difficult and impractical. We give an iteration procedure that is easy to implement in the original coordinates associated with the coordinate transformation. This is crucial for modern large-scale simulation studies in plasma physics. The dynamics of gyrocenters in the dipole magnetic field and in the toroidal geometry are simulated using the canonical symplectic algorithm by comparison with the higher-order non symplectic Runge-Kutta scheme. The overwhelming superiorities of the symplectic method for the gyrocenter system are evidently exhibited.

Zhang, Ruili; Tang, Yifa; Zhu, Beibei [LSEC, ICMSEC, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [LSEC, ICMSEC, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Liu, Jian, E-mail: jliuphy@ustc.edu.cn; Xiao, Jianyuan [Department of Modern Physics and Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Fusion Energy and Plasma Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [Department of Modern Physics and Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Fusion Energy and Plasma Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Qin, Hong [Department of Modern Physics and Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Fusion Energy and Plasma Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China) [Department of Modern Physics and Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Fusion Energy and Plasma Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

field  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

9%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

field field-type-text field-field-page-name">

71

Phase-field theory of brine entrapment in sea ice: Short-time frozen microstructures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the early phase of brine entrapment in sea ice, using a phase field model. This model for a first-order phase transition couples non-conserved order parameter kinetics to salt diffusion. The evolution equations are derived from a Landau-Ginzburg order parameter gradient dynamics together with salinity conservation. The numerical solution of model equations by an exponential time differencing scheme describes the time evolution of phase separation between liquid water with high salinity and the ice phase with low salinity. The numerical solution in one and two dimensions indicates the formation of one dominant wavelength which sets the length scale of short-time frozen structures. A stability analysis provides the phase diagram in terms of two Landau parameters. It is distinguished an uniform ice phase, a homogeneous liquid saline water solution and a phase where solidification structures can be formed. The Landau parameters are extracted from the supercooling and superheating as well as the freezing point temperature of water. With the help of realistic parameters the distribution of brine inclusions is calculated and found in agreement with the measured samples. The size of the ice domains separating regions of concentrated seawater depends on salinity and temperature and corresponds to the size of sea ice platelets obtained from a morphological stability analysis for the solidification of salt water.

Silke Thoms; Bernd Kutschan; Klaus Morawetz

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Measurement of Plasma Energy Confinement Time in Presence of Resonant Helical Field in IR-T1 Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma energy confinement time is one of the main parameters of tokamak plasma and Lawson criterion. In this paper ... resonance helical field (RHF) in IR-T1 tokamak. For this purpose a diamagnetic loop with...L ...

A. Salar Elahi; M. Ghoranneviss

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Lab and field estimates of active time of chemical alarm cues of a cyprinid fish and an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab and field estimates of active time of chemical alarm cues of a cyprinid fish and an amphipod., 1999; Stankowich, 2008), seismic (Gregory et al., 1986) and vibratory mechanostimuli (Kirchner et al

Wisenden, Brian D.

74

Drill-bit with full offset cutter bodies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A rotary drag drill bit is seen wherein cutter bodies are rotatively connected to a main body structure at a fully offset position. The fully offset position is defined by a rotational axis of each cutter body, a longitudinal axis of the drill bit and end support points or positions of the cutter bodies. The rotational axes of the cutter bodies are perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the drill bit. The end supports of the cutter body are each equal distance from any point on the longitudinal axis of the drill bit. The cutter bodies of essentially ellipsoidal configuration, being slightly thicker at a mid-portion thereof. Cutting elements are connected to flutes projecting above an outer surface of each cutter body. In a primary rotational direction of the drill string and drill bit, the rows abrade the bottom and side walls of a well bore as the cutter body attacks the earth formation as the drill bit is rotated. The impingement of the cutting elements of the cutter body on the earth formation imparts a secondary rotation to the cutter bodies, which secondary rotation is induced by the primary rotation. The secondary rotation allows the rows of cutting elements to engage the side wall of the bore and gauge the hole as well as abrading away material from the bottom of the well bore. A roller bearing assembly is provided for the cutter body to permit the secondary rotation, while a thrust bearing assembly assists the primary abrasive action imparted by the primary rotational movement of the rotary drill bit. A lubrication system is included in the main body structure of the drill bit wherein both the roller bearing assembly and thrust bearing assembly are lubricated.

Frear, L.

1985-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

75

Training an Active Random Field for Real-Time Image Denoising  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, CRF training, Fields of Experts, image denoising. EDICS: TEC-RST I. INTRODUCTION Many real-world.g. material science), a unique energy function that can be described mathematically exists and can accurately on Markov Random Field (MRF) or Conditional Random Field (CRF) energy functions and obtaining the solution

Barbu, Adrian

76

A novel offset vertical comb-driven micromirror as an optical phase modulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an offset comb-driven micromirror with out-of-plane piston motion as an optical phase modulator (OPM) with high modulating accuracy. The upper and lower comb fingers of the comb-driver initially do not overlap, with a vertical offset ... Keywords: Micromirror, Optical phase modulator, Self-alignment process, Three-layer-mask process, Vertical comb actuator

Leiying Zhai; Jing Xu; Shaolong Zhong; Yaming Wu

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Real-Time Measurement of Rates of Outdoor Airflow into HVACSystems: A Field Study of Three Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies for real-time continuous measurement of the flow rates of outdoor air (OA) into HVAC systems are now available commercially. Our prior papers reported on laboratory-based evaluations of these measurement technologies and this document describes the methods and results of a field study of the accuracy of three of these technologies. From the field study data, we determined that neither wind speed nor wind direction have an important adverse impact on measurement accuracy. The field study confirmed that these three measurement technologies can provide reasonably accurate measurements of outdoor air intake rates in field settings, if the pressure signals are measured with high accuracy. Some of the pressure transducers marketed for use with commercial HVAC systems were determined to be sufficiently accurate for this application. Given the significant impact of OA flow rates on both energy use and occupant health, more widespread use of technologies that provide for real time measurements of OA flow rates seems warranted.

Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation experiments. We have also developed 4.3 mm diameter ion chambers with both tissue equivalent and carbon walls for the purpose of measuring dose mean lineal energy due to all radiations and due to all radiations except neutrons, respectively. By adjusting the gas pressure in the ion chamber, it can be made to simulate tissue volumes from a few nanometers to a few millimeters in diameter. The charge is integrated for 0.1 seconds, and the resulting pulse height is recorded by a multi channel analyzer. The system has been used in a variety of photon and neutron radiation fields, and measured values of dose and dose mean lineal energy are consistent with values extrapolated from measurements made by other techniques at much lower dose rates. It is expected that this technique will prove to be much more reliable than extrapolations from measurements made at low dose rates because these low dose rate exposures generally do not accurately reproduce the attenuation and scattering environment of the actual radiation exposure.

L. A. Braby; W. D. Reece; W. H. Hsu

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Transformation to zero offset in transversely isotropic media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly all dip-moveout correction (DMO) implementations to date assume isotropic homogeneous media. Usually, this has been acceptable considering the tremendous cost savings of homogeneous isotropic DMO and considering the difficulty of obtaining the anisotropy parameters required for effective implementation. In the presence of typical anisotropy, however, ignoring the anisotropy can yield inadequate results. Since anisotropy may introduce large deviations from hyperbolic moveout, accurate transformation to zero-offset in anisotropic media should address such nonhyperbolic moveout behavior of reflections. Artley and Hale`s v(z) ray-tracing-based DMO, developed for isotropic media, provides an attractive approach to treating such problems. By using a ray-tracing procedure crafted for anisotropic media, the author modifies some aspects of their DMO so that it can work for v(z) anisotropic media. Application of this anisotropic DMO to data from offshore Africa resulted in a considerably better alignment of reflections from horizontal and dipping reflectors in common-midpoint gather than that obtained using an isotropic DMO. Even the presence of vertical inhomogeneity in this medium could not eliminate the importance of considering the shale-induced anisotropy.

Alkhalifah, T. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Wave Phenomena] [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Center for Wave Phenomena

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Transformation to zero offset in transversely isotropic media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nearly all dip moveout correction (DMO) implementations to date assume isotropic homogeneous media. Usually, this has been acceptable considering the tremendous cost savings of homogeneous isotropic DMO and considering the difficulty of obtaining the anisotropy parameters required for effective implementation. In the presence of typical anisotropy, however, ignoring the anisotropy can yield inadequate results. Since anisotropy may introduce large deviations from hyperbolic moveout, accurate transformation to zero-offset in anisotropic media should address such nonhyperbolic moveout behavior of reflections. Artley and Hale`s (1994) v(z) ray tracing-based DMO, developed for isotropic media, provides an attractive approach to treating such problems. By using a ray-tracing procedure crafted for anisotropic media, the author modifies some aspects of Artley and Hale`s DMO so that it can work for v(z) anisotropic media. Application of this anisotropic DMO to data from offshore Africa resulted in a considerably better alignment of reflections from horizontal and dipping reflectors in common-midpoint gather than that obtained using an isotropic DMO. Even the presence of vertical inhomogeneity in this medium could not eliminate the importance of considering the shale induced anisotropy.

Alkhalifah, T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Mixing Time Evolution of Glauber Dynamics for the Mean-Field Ising Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dynamics for the mean-?eld Ising model. http://arxiv. org/dynamics for the mean-?eld Ising model: cut-off, criticalDynamics for the Mean-Field Ising Model Jian Ding 1, , Eyal

Ding, Jian; Lubetzky, Eyal; Peres, Yuval

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

ZnO/Sn:In2O3 and ZnO/CdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ZnOSn:In2O3 and ZnOCdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber photovoltaics . ZnOSn:In2O3 and ZnOCdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber photovoltaics . Abstract: Band...

83

Carbon offsets as a cost containment instrument : a case study of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission trading schemes that helps nations meet their emission commitments at lower costs. Carbon offsets take advantage of lower abatement cost ...

Kim, Jieun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing Emissions from in Technology and Policy Abstract Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission trading schemes that helps nations meet their emission commitments at lower costs. Carbon offsets take

85

Processing of a nine-component near-offset VSP for seismic anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A convolutional sequence of matrix operators is offered as a convenient deterministic scheme for processing a multicomponent vertical seismic profile (VSP). This sequence is applied to a nine-component near-offset VSP recorded at the Conoco borehole test facility, Kay County, Oklahoma. These data are corrected for tool spin and near-surface anisotropy together with source coupling or imbalance. After wave-field separation using a standard f-k filter, each source and receiver pair for the upgoing waves is adjusted to a common reference depth using a matrix operator based on the downgoing wavefield. The up- and downgoing waves are then processed for anisotropy by a similarity transformation, to separate the qS1 and qS2 waves, from which the anisotropic properties are estimated. These estimates reveal a strong (apparent) vertical birefringence in the near-surface, but weak or moderate values for the majority of the subsurface. The target zone consists of a thin sandstone and deeper shale layer, both of which possess a strong vertical birefringence. The sandstone corresponds to a zone of known fluid flow. An observed qS2 attenuation and polarization change in the shale suggest it contains large fractures.

MacBeth, C.; Li, X.Y.; Zeng, X. [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [British Geological Survey, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Cox, D.; Queen, J. [Conoco Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States). Exploration Research/Services Div.] [Conoco Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States). Exploration Research/Services Div.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Kevin Craft Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency and Conservation block grant - and the small town of 412 is using that Recovery Act funding to cut costs through wind energy. Through a $242,500 Recovery Act grant, town officials purchased four 5 kW and one 10 kW wind turbines. Officials are using wind energy to offset electricity costs for all town-owned buildings and save an estimated $24,000 a year. According to Therese Kephart, Carmen's town clerk and treasurer, the goal of the project is to produce enough electricity to run all town-owned buildings.

87

Crop Residue Removal for Bioenergy Reduces Soil Carbon Pools: How Can We Offset Carbon Losses?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crop residue removal for bioenergy can deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) ... been, however, widely discussed. This paper reviews potential practices that can be used to offset the SOC lost with residue removal. Literature

Humberto Blanco-Canqui

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Solute Transport Measurement Under Transient Field Conditions Using Time Domain Reflectometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surface and groundwater resources by agrochemicals (e.g., pesticide, and nitrate...about the movement and management of agrochemicals in soil. Characterization of water...Assessing temporal vacations in soil water composition with time domain reflectometry. Soil...

K. Noborio; R. G. Kachanoski; C. S. Tan

89

The Cost of Superconducting Magnets as a Function of Stored Energy and Design Magnetic Induction Times the Field Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By various theorems one can relate the capital cost of superconducting magnets to the magnetic energy stored within that magnet. This is particularly true for magnet where the cost is dominated by the structure needed to carry the magnetic forces. One can also relate the cost of the magnet to the product of the magnetic induction and the field volume. The relationship used to estimate the cost the magnet is a function of the type of magnet it is. This paper updates the cost functions given in two papers that were published in the early 1990 s. The costs (escalated to 2007 dollars) of large numbers of LTS magnets are plotted against stored energy and magnetic field time field volume. Escalated costs for magnets built since the early 1990 s are added to the plots.

Green, Mike; Green, M.A.; Strauss, B.P.

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

Theoretical analysis on effect of band offsets in perovskite solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of band offsets in CH3NH3PbI3-xClx perovskite-based solar cells with planar junction configuration was analyzed using one-dimensional device simulator. As widely known in thin-film compound solar cells, the band offset between buffer/absorber layers is a decisive factor for carrier recombination at the interface, determining open-circuit voltage (Voc). In this study, the impact of two kinds of band offsets, i.e., the conduction band offset of buffer (or blocking layer)/absorber layers and the valence band offset of absorber/hole transport material (HTM) were examined. When the conduction band of the buffer was lower than that of the absorber, the interface recombination became prominent and Voc decreased. In contrast, when the conduction band of the buffer was higher than that of the absorber by more than 0.3 eV, the collection of photo-generated carriers, i.e. electron in this case, was impeded by the spike formed by the conduction band offset. Thus, the optimum position of the conduction band of the buffer was 0.0~0.3 eV higher than that of the absorber. Also, the optimum position of the valence band of the HTM was derived to be 0.0~0.2 eV lower than that of the absorber. These findings will be useful for new material choice and optimization of buffers and HTMs.

Takashi Minemoto; Masashi Murata

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Systematic study of low-lying E1 strength using the time-dependent mean field theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We carry out systematic investigation of electric dipole (E1) mode from light to heavy nuclei, using a new time-dependent mean field theory: the Canonical-basis Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (Cb-TDHFB) theory. The Cb-TDHFB in the three-dimensional coordinate space representation can deal with pairing correlation and any kind of deformation in the timedependent framework. We report the neutron-number dependence of the low-energy E1 mode for light (A > 40) and heavy isotopes (A < 100) around N= 82.

Ebata, S.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Inakura, T. [Center for Nuclear Study, Univ. of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, 113-0033, Japan and Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako-shi, 351-0198 (Japan); Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako-shi, 351-0198 (Japan) and Center for Computational Sciences, Univ. of Tsukuba, Tsukuba-shi, 305-8571 (Japan); Theoretical Nuclear Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako-shi, 351-0198 (Japan)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

92

Numerical calculation of dynamical friction in electron cooling systems, including magnetic field perturbations and finite time effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The orders-of-magnitude higher luminosities required by future electron-ion collider concepts require a dissipative force to counteract the numerous factors acting to gradually increase the phase space volume of relativistic ion beams. High-energy electron cooling systems could provide the necessary dissipation via dynamical friction, but will have to be designed for new parameter regimes. It is expected that magnetic field errors, finite interaction time and other effects will reduce the dynamical friction and hence increase the cooling time, so improved understanding of the underlying dynamics is important. We present a generalized form of the classical field-free friction force equation, which conveniently captures some of these effects. Previous work (Bell et al 2008 J. Comput. Phys. 227 8714) shows both numerical and conceptual subtleties associated with undersampling of strong collisions, and we present a rigorous mathematical treatment of such difficulties, based on the use of a modified Pareto distribution for the electron-ion impact parameters. We also present a very efficient numerical algorithm for calculating the dynamical friction on a single ion in the field free case. For the case of arbitrary magnetic field errors, we present numerical simulation results, showing agreement with our generalized friction force formula.

Sobol, A.V.; Fedotov, A.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Bell, G.I.; Litvinenko, V.

2010-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

93

Kaluza–Klein unified field theory and apparent four?dimensional space?time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the 1920s Kaluza and Klein achieved an elegant unified theory of gravitation and electromagnetism by assuming that space?time is really 5?dimensional. Their approach has since been extended to even higher dimensions in an effort to provide a geometrical unification of all the fundamental interactions. Any such scheme must answer the obvious objection emphasized by Einstein: Why then does space?time a p p e a r to be only 4?dimensional? This paper provides a semihistorical introduction to Kaluza–Klein unification on a level accessible to those with a basic knowledge of general relativity and particle physics and examines the progress made in answering Einstein’s and related objections.

Christopher F. Chyba

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Real-time quantum trajectories for classically allowed dynamics in strong laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Both the physical picture of the dynamics of atoms and molecules in intense infrared fields and its theoretical description use the concept of electron trajectories. Here we address a key question which arises in this context: Are distinctly quantum features of these trajectories, such as the complex-valued coordinates, physically relevant in the classically allowed region of phase space, and what is their origin? First, we argue that solutions of classical equations of motion can account for quantum effects. To this end, we construct an exact solution to the classical Hamilton-Jacobi equation which accounts for dynamics of the wave packet, and show that this solution is physically correct in the limit $\\hbar \\to 0$. Second, we show that imaginary components of classical trajectories are directly linked to the finite size of the initial wavepacket in momentum space. This way, if the electronic wavepacket produced by optical tunneling in strong infrared fiels is localised both in coordinate and momentum, its m...

Plimak, L I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Time-specific measurements of energy deposition from radiation fields in simulated sub-micron tissue volumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tissue-equivalent spherical proportional counter is used with a modified amplifier system to measure specific energy deposited from a uniform radiation field for short periods of time ({approximately}1 {micro}s to seconds) in order to extrapolate to dose in sub-micron tissue volumes. The energy deposited during these time intervals is compared to biological repair processes occurring within the same intervals after the initial energy deposition. The signal is integrated over a variable collection time which is adjusted with a square-wave pulse. Charge from particle passages is collected on the anode during the period in which the integrator is triggered, and the signal decays quickly to zero after the integrator feedback switch resets; the process repeats for every triggering pulse. Measurements of energy deposited from x rays, {sup 137}Cs gamma rays, and electrons from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source for various time intervals are taken. Spectral characteristics as a function of charge collection time are observed and frequency plots of specific energy and collection time-interval are presented. In addition, a threshold energy flux is selected for each radiation type at which the formation of radicals (based on current measurements) in mammalian cells equals the rate at which radicals are repaired.

Famiano, M.A.

1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

96

Seismic Amplitude Versus Offset (AVO) Character of Geopressured Transition Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overpressured for ations in advance of drilling. In the oil and gas industry, work on the seismic signature. Local conductivity logs and regional drilling mud weight compilations estab ish the presence propagation in seals an eflection data from abnormally-pressured oil and gas fields. Our objective

97

Time-synchronized continuous wave laser-induced fluorescence axial velocity measurements in a diverging cusped field thruster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements are presented of time-synchronized axial ion velocities at three positions in the discharge channel and plume of a diverging cusped field thruster operating on xenon. Xenon axial ion velocities for the thruster are derived from laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the 5d[4]7/2–6p[3]5/2 xenon ion excited state transition centred at ? = 834.72 nm. The thruster is operated in a high-current mode, where the anode discharge current is shown to oscillate quasi-periodically. A sample-hold scheme is implemented to correlate ion velocities to phases along the current cycle. These time-synchronized measurements show that median axial ion velocities decrease as discharge current increases, and that the widths of ion velocity distributions increase with increases in discharge current for positions at the exit plane and outside the thruster channel.

N A MacDonald; M A Cappelli; W A Hargus Jr

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 9 January, 2014 - 13:12 carbon cities CO2 emissions OpenEI suburbs US New research from the University of California-Berkeley shows that those who live in cities in the United States have significantly smaller per-capita carbon footprints than their suburban counterparts. The difference is such that suburban dwellers essentially offset the low carbon footprints of urban dwellers. Vehicle emissions accounted for the biggest contributor to carbon dioxide, accounted by longer commutes to work, school, and shopping. The data, balancing 37 factors such as weather, income, home size, shows that those dwelling in major cities have a carbon footprint about 50 percent below the

99

CO2 Offset Options: Comparative Assessment of Terrestial Sinks vs. Natural Gas Combined Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

W. South (south@energyresources.com; 202-785-8833) W. South (south@energyresources.com; 202-785-8833) Energy Resources International, Inc. 1015 18 th Street, N.W., Suite 650 Washington, DC 20036 CO 2 Offset Options: Comparative Assessment of Terrestial Sinks vs. Natural Gas Combined Cycle 1 Abstract This study compares the economic value of two CO 2 mitigation actions: terrestrial reforestation to sequester CO 2 emitted from coal-fired power generation versus natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power generation to avoid (minimize) CO 2 release. The same quantity of carbon offset was assumed for both actions. Tree stock growth, carbon absorption/release cycles, and replanting were considered to maintain the quantity of carbon offset via reforestation. The study identified important parameters with both CO 2 mitigation options that should be considered when examining alternative strategies.

100

Direct measurement of onset and offset phonation threshold pressure in normal subjects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phonation threshold pressures were directly measured in five normal subjects in a variety of voicing conditions. The effects of fundamental frequency intensity closure speed of the vocal folds and laryngeal airway resistance on phonation threshold pressures were determined. Subglottic air pressures were measured using percutaneous puncture of the cricothyroid membrane. Both onset and offset of phonation were studied to see if a hysteresis effect produced lower offset pressures than onset pressures. Univariate analysis showed that phonation threshold pressure was influenced most strongly by fundamental frequency and intensity. Multiple linear regression showed that these two variables as well as laryngeal airway resistance most strongly predicted phonation threshold pressure. Two of the five subjects demonstrated a significant hysteresis effect but one subject actually had higher offset pressures than onset pressures.

Randall L. Plant; Gary L. Freed; Richard E. Plant

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Temperature dependent band offsets in PbSe/PbEuSe quantum well heterostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The band offsets of PbSe/Pb{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}Se multi-quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy are determined as a function of temperature and europium content using temperature-modulated differential transmission spectroscopy. The confined quantum well states in the valence and conduction bands are analyzed using a k{center_dot}p model with envelope function approximation. From the fit of the experimental data, the normalized conduction band offset is determined as 0.45{+-}0.15 of the band gap difference, independently of Eu content up to 14% and temperature from 20 to 300 K.

Simma, M.; Bauer, G.; Springholz, G. [Institut fuer Halbleiter und Festkoerperphysik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

102

Euclidean Time Formulation for the Superstring Ensembles: Perturbative Canonical Ensemble with Neveu-Schwarz B Field Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the Euclidean time formulation for the equilibrium canonical ensemble of the type IIA and type IIB superstrings, and the spin(32)$/{\\rm Z}_2$ heterotic string. We compactify on $R^8 \\times T^2$, and twist by the Neveu-Schwarz sector antisymmetric 2-form $B$-field potential, spontaneously breaking supersymmetry at low temperatures, while preserving the tachyon free low-energy gravitational field theory limit. We verify that the super partners of the massless dilaton-graviton multiplet obtain a mass which is linear in the temperature. In addition, we show that the free energy for the superstring canonical ensemble at weak coupling is always strongly convergent in the ultraviolet, high-temperature, regime dominated by the highest mass level number states. We derive the precise form of the exponential suppression as a linear power of the mass level, which erases the exponential Hagedorn growth of the degeneracies as the square root of mass level number. Finally, we close a gap in previous research giving an unambiguous derivation of the normalization of the one-loop vacuum energy density of the spin(32)$/Z_2$ perturbative heterotic string theory. Invoking the O(32) type IB--heterotic strong-weak duality, we match the normalization of the one loop vacuum energy densities of the $T$-dual O(32) type IA open and closed string with that of the Spin(32)$/Z_2$ heterotic string on $R^9 \\times S^1$, for values of the compactification radius, $R_{\\rm [O(32)]}, ~ R_{\\rm IB}$ $>>$ $ \\alpha^{\\prime 1/2}$, with $R_{\\rm IA} $ $winding spectrum is a simple model for finite temperature pure QCD, transitioning above the critical duality phase transformation temperature to the deconfined ensemble of thermally excited IB gluons.

Shyamoli Chaudhuri

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

103

Beyond Additionality in Cap-and-Trade Offset Policy Reuters/Nguyen Huy Kham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), continues to cite additionality as the most important part of any offset for additionality rules. Ironically, even as programs such as RGGI have stopped rewarding higher emitters through gases (GHGs), including the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), the Western Climate Initiative

104

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING in strategies for climate protection. 1. Introduction Carbon sequestration has been highlighted recently concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmo- sphere include sequestering carbon (C) in soils

105

Viability of shear-wave amplitude versus offset studies in anisotropic media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......amplitude versus offset studies in anisotropic media Gareth S. Yardley 1...viable method of determining anisotropic parameters in thin reservoir...for example a gas sand to shale interface), without substantially...SV-waves at an isotropic/anisotropic reflector. The second layer......

Gareth S. Yardley; Gerhard Graham; Stuart Crampin

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

LARGE DEXTRAL OFFSET ACROSS OWENS VALLEY, CALIFORNIA FROM 148 MA TO 1872 A.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lake (Fig. 2) along a branch of the Owens Valley fault zone, and is well dis- played just west1 LARGE DEXTRAL OFFSET ACROSS OWENS VALLEY, CALIFORNIA FROM 148 MA TO 1872 A.D. Allen F. Glazner1 (estimated moment magnitude ~7.5) occurred in Owens Valley. Ground breakage extended from Big Pine to Owens

Lee, Jeff

107

LM193/LM293/LM393/LM2903 Low Power Low Offset Voltage Dual Comparators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LM193/LM293/LM393/LM2903 Low Power Low Offset Voltage Dual Comparators General Description The LM clock timers; multivibrators and high voltage digital logic gates. The LM193 series was designed to directly interface with TTL and CMOS. When operated from both plus and minus power supplies, the LM193

Lanterman, Aaron

108

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after@kom.aau.dk Abstract-- Currently available video traces for scalable en- coded video with more than one layer are a convenient repre- sentation of the encoded video for the evaluation of networking mechanisms. The video

Reisslein, Martin

109

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after video traces for scalable encoded video with more than one layer are a convenient representation of the encoded video for the evaluation of networking mechanisms. The video distortion (RMSE) or quality (PSNR

Reisslein, Martin

110

LM139/LM239/LM339/LM2901/LM3302 Low Power Low Offset Voltage Quad Comparators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LM139/LM239/LM339/LM2901/LM3302 Low Power Low Offset Voltage Quad Comparators General Description The LM139 series consists of four independent precision voltage comparators with an offset voltage clock timers; multivibrators and high voltage digital logic gates. The LM139 series was designed

Lanterman, Aaron

111

"Carbon emission offsets for aviation-generated emissions due to international travel to and from New Zealand" revised personal version of paper to appear in Energy Policy (in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Carbon emission offsets for aviation-generated emissions due to international travel to and from.1016/j.enpol.2008.10.046 1 CARBON EMISSION OFFSETS FOR AVIATION-GENERATED EMISSIONS DUE TO INTERNATIONAL. It is then shown that no single #12;"Carbon emission offsets for aviation-generated emissions due to international

Otago, University of

112

Unified Theory of Bivacuum, Particles Duality, Fields & Time. New Bivacuum Mediated Interaction, Overunity Devices, Cold Fusion & Nucleosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New concept of Bivacuum is introduced, as a dynamic matrix of the Universe, composed from sub-quantum particles and antiparticles, forming vortical structures. These structures are presented by continuum of dipoles, each dipole containing a pair of correlated torus and antitorus: V(+) and V(-) of the opposite energy/mass, spin, charge and magnetic moments, compensating each other. The rest mass and charge of sub-elementary fermions or antifermions is a result of Bivacuum dipoles opposite symmetry shifts. Their fusion to triplets follows by elementary particles and antiparticles origination. The [corpuscle (C) - wave (W)] duality is a result of correlated beats between the 'actual' and 'complementary' states of sub-elementary fermions of triplets. It is shown, that Principle of least action, the 2d and 3d laws of thermodynamics can be a consequences of forced combinational resonance between positive and negative virtual pressure waves (VPW+/-) of Bivacuum and [C-W] pulsation of elementary particles. The quantum entanglement, mediated by virtual microtubules, composed from Bivacuum dipoles, connecting remote particles, is a result of such Bivacuum-matter interaction. The pace of time for any closed system is determined by pace of kinetic energy change of this system. The proposed mechanism of overunity devices can be provided by the electrons acceleration, induced by their resonant interaction with high frequency positive and negative VPW+/- in pull-in range conditions. The latter can be excited by pulsing currents and fields. The mechanism of overheating and cold fusion in electrolytic cells without violation of energy conservation is proposed also.

Alex Kaivarainen

2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

113

Zero-field ?SR search for a time-reversal-symmetry-breaking mixed pairing state in superconducting Ba1?xKxFe2As2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the results of a zero-field muon-spin relaxation (ZF-?SR) study of superconducting Ba1?xKxFe2As2 (0.5?x?0.9) in search of weak spontaneous internal magnetic fields associated with proposed time-reversal-symmetry-breaking mixed pairing states. The measurements were performed on polycrystalline samples, which do not exhibit the mesoscopic phase separation previously observed in single crystals of Ba1?xKxFe2As2. No evidence of spontaneous internal magnetic fields is found in any of the samples at temperatures down to T?0.02 K.

Z. Lotfi Mahyari; A. Cannell; C. Gomez; S. Tezok; A. Zelati; E. V. L. de Mello; J.-Q. Yan; D. G. Mandrus; J. E. Sonier

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

114

Band Offsets at the Epitaxial Anatase TiO2/n-SrTiO3(001) Interface...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to measure valence band offsets at the epitaxial anatase TiO2(002)n-SrTiO3(001) heterojunction prepared by molecular beam epitaxy, Within experimental error, the valance band...

115

Magnetically insulated baffled probe for real-time monitoring of equilibrium and fluctuating values of space potentials, electron and ion temperatures, and densities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By restricting the electron-collection area of a cold Langmuir probe compared to the ion-collection area, the probe floating potential can become equal to the space potential, and thus conveniently monitored, rather than to a value shifted from the space potential by an electron-temperature-dependent offset, i.e., the case with an equal-collection-area probe. This design goal is achieved by combining an ambient magnetic field in the plasma with baffles, or shields, on the probe, resulting in species-selective magnetic insulation of the probe collection area. This permits the elimination of electron current to the probe by further adjustment of magnetic insulation which results in an ion-temperature-dependent offset when the probe is electrically floating. Subtracting the floating potential of two magnetically insulated baffled probes, each with a different degree of magnetic insulation, enables the electron or ion temperature to be measured in real time.

Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Raitses, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

General Physics II Exam 1 -Chs. 1619 -Electric Fields, Potential, Current Feb. 14, 2011 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

styrofoam ball? a. It has a negative net charge b. It has zero net charge. c. It has positive net charge. d at finite x where the electric field is zero. c) (8) Determine the magnitude of the net electric field. Its net charge changes when then rods are placed near it. 2. (6) An excess charge of -88 pC is placed

Wysin, Gary

117

High-resolution shear-wave reflection profiling to image offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution shear-wave reflection profiling to image offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments By Copyright 2014 Bevin L. Bailey Submitted to the Department of Geology and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas... offset in unconsolidated near-surface sediments ________________________________ Chairperson Richard D. Miller Date approved: April 4th, 2014 iii Abstract S-wave reflection profiling has many theoretical...

Bailey, Bevin

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Full-Field Vibration Measurement by Time-Average Speckle Interferometry and by Doppler Vibrometry - a Comparison  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Identification of dynamic material properties, non-destructive testing and study of vibroacoustic behaviour of different structures impose complex, pointwise and full-field measurements. Among other techniques, o...

Aurélien Moreau; Dan Borza; 1Ioana Nistea…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Genesis field, Gulf of Mexico: Recognizing reservoir compartments on geologic and production time scales in deep-water reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Factors for the Pleistocene Reservoirs of Genesis Field Reservoir EOD Reserves (MMBOE) Recovery Factor () Drive Mechanism Completions...49-63 Weak water drive 5 All completions are fracture packed. EOD environment of deposition. Table 2 Cumulative Production and...

Michael L. Sweet; Larry T. Sumpter

120

On p-adic L-functions for ${\\rm GL}(n)\\times{\\rm GL}(n-1)$ over totally real fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We refine and extend previous constructions of p-adic L-functions for Rankin-Selberg convolutions on ${\\rm GL}(n)\\times{\\rm GL}(n-1)$ for regular algebraic representations over totally real fields. We also proof a functional equation for this p-adic L-function, which will be of interest in further study of its arithmetic properties.

Januszewski, Fabian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Band offsets of ultrathin high-{kappa} oxide films with Si  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Valence- and conduction-band edges of ultrathin oxides (SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, Hf{sub 0.7}Si{sub 0.3}O{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) grown on a silicon substrate have been measured using ultraviolet photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopies in the same UHV chamber. The combination of these two techniques has enabled the direct determination of the oxide energy gaps as well as the offsets of the oxide valence- and conduction-band edges from those of the silicon substrate. These results are supplemented with synchrotron x-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements allowing further characterization of the oxide composition and the evaluation of the silicon substrate contribution to the spectra. The electron affinity has also been systematically measured on the same samples. We find reasonably good agreement with earlier experiments where assumptions regarding energy-gap values were needed to establish the conduction-band offsets. The systematics of our photoemission and inverse photoemission results on different ultrathin films provide a comprehensive comparison of these related systems.

Bersch, Eric; Rangan, Sylvie; Bartynski, Robert Allen; Garfunkel, Eric; Vescovo, Elio [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Laboratory for Surface Modification, Rutgers University, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Laboratory for Surface Modification, Rutgers University, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Baselines for Greenhouse Gas Reductions: Problems, Precedents, Solutions.” Paper prepared for the Carbon Offsets Unit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acknowledgements: Much of section 7 on lessons from demand-side-management is based on a background paper by Daniel Violette and Shannon Ragland of Hagler-Bailly Consulting. The discussion of the US emissions reductions credits draws on a background paper by Byron Swift of the Environmental Law Institute. The menu-choice method for baseline revelation was proposed in background material by Tracy Lewis. I am grateful to Johannes Heister and Charles Feinstein for helpful discussions and comments. However, all interpretations, conclusions, and errors are mine. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the author. They do not necessarily represent the view of the World Bank, its Executive Directors, or the countries they represent. SUMMARY Rigor in baselines It's important to establish the right degree of rigor in baselining. Overly lax baselines will threaten the system's credibility and usefulness, and shift rents from high quality providers to low quality providers of offsets. Overly stringent baselines will discourage valid projects and drive up project costs. The only 'magic bullet ' for baselining is to set up a national or sectoral baseline, and define offsets

Kenneth M. Chomitz

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Real-Time Frame Selector and its Application to Observations of the Horizontal Velocity Field in the Solar Photosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......RTFS at the Domeless Solar Telescope (DST) of...rapid development of PC technology, our system can evaluate...applied our RTFS to obtain solar granulation im- ages...ture is located in a SG cell boundary (figure 6a...Velocity Field in the Solar Photosphere 519 G - b......

Reizaburo Kitai; Yasuhiro Funakoshi; Satoru Ueno; Shusaku Sano; Kiyoshi Ichimoto

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Band offsets from two special GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs quantum-well structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Half-parabolic quantum wells and two-stepped quantum wells have been grown by molecular-beam epitaxy with the GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs system and investigated by photoluminescence techniques to determine the band offsets at the heterointerfaces. Both structures provide interband transitions that are sensitive to the partitioning of the energy-gap discontinuity ?Eg=?Ec+?Ev between the conduction and valence bands. It is concluded that the data require valence-band offsets ?Ev equal to 38% and 41% of ?Eg for the half-parabolic wells and the two-stepped wells, respectively. These band offsets are therefore in agreement with the trend of other recent determinations.

R. C. Miller; A. C. Gossard; D. A. Kleinman

1985-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Comparison of dipole layers, band offsets, and formation enthalpies of GaAs-AlAs(110) and (001) interfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report a very careful, self-consistent, relativistic pseudopotential calculation of the interfacial dipole double-layer potential, valence-band offset, and formation enthalpy of (GaAs)3(AlAs)3(110). A comparison is made with identical calculations for the (001) superlattice with the following results [(001) in parentheses]: The interfacial dipole layer is 315 (154) meV. The formation enthalpy per twelve-atom unit cell is -21.9 (+1.7) meV. The valence-band offset is 447 (446) meV. This lends credence to the idea that the band offset is a difference of bulk quantities and that vastly different interfaces set up whatever double layer is necessary to maintain that difference.

D. M. Bylander and Leonard Kleinman

1987-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

126

Seismic amplitude anomalies at Mestena Grande field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mestena Grande field is located in northeast Jim Hogg County, Texas. Gas and condensate are produced from the middle lobe of the middle Eocene Queen City Formation. The Queen City is approximately 100 ft thick and the middle lobe, the main reservoir, is only 30 ft thick, which is well below tuning thickness. Porosities in the producing sands are generally 15-25% and permeabilities are usually 15-25 md, the maximum being about 80 md. The most recent seismic data exhibit amplitude anomalies that have some correspondence with the production. The strongest amplitudes are from the vicinity of the better wells and increase with offset. Most of the dry holes are on weak amplitudes that decrease with offset. Modeling the AVO response of a productive well, however, has predicted an amplitude decrease with offset. This disagreement is attributed to the lack of accurate shear wave velocities and the very thinly laminated sands.

Burnett, R. (Union Texas Petroleum, Houston, TX (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Dependencies of high-latitude plasma convection: Consideration of interplanetary magnetic field, seasonal, and universal time factors in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements were collected over the period 1998­2002. The data were first used to derive a new statistical is kept in motion by processes that couple energy and momentum from the solar wind into Earth, seasonal, and universal time factors in statistical patterns J. M. Ruohoniemi and R. A. Greenwald Johns

Shepherd, Simon

128

Real-Time Gridless 800G Super-channel Transport Field Trial over 410km Using Coherent DP-16 QAM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the first successful trial of real-time gridless 800G super-channel over a 410km DCM-less, EDFA-only fibre link using production grade DP - 16QAM, demonstrating 4.76b/s/Hz...

Zhou, Yu Rong; Smith, Kevin; Payne, Roger; Lord, Andrew; Whalley, Glenn; Bennett, Tex; Maniloff, Eric; Alexander, Savchenko; Boymel, David

129

Heat transfer and pressure drop correlations for the rectangular offset strip fin compact heat exchanger  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of thermal-hydraulic design tools for rectangular offset strip fin compact heat exchangers and the associated convection process are delineated. On the basis of current understanding of the physical phenomena and enhancement mechanisms, existing empirical f and j data for actual cores are reanalyzed. The asymptotic behavior of the data in the deep laminar and fully turbulent flow regimes is identified. The respective asymptotes for f and j are shown to be correlated by power law expressions in terms of Re and the dimensionless geometric parameters ?, ?, and ?. Finally, rational design equations for f and j are presented in the form of single continuous expressions covering the laminar, transition, and turbulent flow regimes.

Raj M. Manglik; Arthur E. Bergles

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Band offsets in HfO{sub 2}/InGaZnO{sub 4} heterojunctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The valence band discontinuity ({Delta}E{sub V}) of sputter deposited HfO{sub 2}/InZnGaO{sub 4} (IGZO) heterostructures was obtained from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The HfO{sub 2} exhibited a bandgap of 6.07 eV from absorption measurements. A value of {Delta}E{sub V} = 0.48 {+-} 0.025 eV was obtained by using the Ga 2p{sub 3/2}, Zn 2p{sub 3/2}, and In 3d{sub 5/2} energy levels as references. This implies a conduction band offset {Delta}E{sub C} of 2.39 eV in HfO{sub 2}/InGaZnO{sub 4} heterostructures and a nested interface band alignment.

Cho, Hyun [Department of Nanomechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Gyeongnam 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Douglas, E. A.; Gila, B. P.; Craciun, V.; Lambers, E. S.; Pearton, S. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Ren Fan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

131

Image processing with cellular nonlinear networks implemented on field-programmable gate arrays for real-time applications in nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past years cameras have become increasingly common tools in scientific applications. They are now quite systematically used in magnetic confinement fusion, to the point that infrared imaging is starting to be used systematically for real-time machine protection in major devices. However, in order to guarantee that the control system can always react rapidly in case of critical situations, the time required for the processing of the images must be as predictable as possible. The approach described in this paper combines the new computational paradigm of cellular nonlinear networks (CNNs) with field-programmable gate arrays and has been tested in an application for the detection of hot spots on the plasma facing components in JET. The developed system is able to perform real-time hot spot recognition, by processing the image stream captured by JET wide angle infrared camera, with the guarantee that computational time is constant and deterministic. The statistical results obtained from a quite extensive set of examples show that this solution approximates very well an ad hoc serial software algorithm, with no false or missed alarms and an almost perfect overlapping of alarm intervals. The computational time can be reduced to a millisecond time scale for 8 bit 496x560-sized images. Moreover, in our implementation, the computational time, besides being deterministic, is practically independent of the number of iterations performed by the CNN - unlike software CNN implementations.

Palazzo, S.; Vagliasindi, G.; Arena, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, 95125 Catania (Italy); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Mazon, D. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); De Maack, A. [Arts et Metiers Paris Tech Engineering College (ENSAM), 13100 Aix-en-Provence (France); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration Offset Programs: Strengths, Difficulties, and Suggestions for Their Potential Use in AB 32's Cap and Trade Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

offset credits for installing “a biogas control system thatemissions by installing biogas control systems (BCS), whichin exchange for installing biogas control systems (BCS), a

Bernadett, Lauren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Section 5 Time Dependent Processes The interaction of a molecular species with electromagnetic fields can cause transitions to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the speed of light. The vector potential A depends on time t and on the spatial location r of the particle) and the wave vector k (the magnitude of k is |k| = 2/, where is the wavelength of the light) control0 as measuring the strength of both exp(i(t - k·r)) and exp(- i(t - k·r)) components of the cos (t

Simons, Jack

134

Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field after the first two MESSENGER flybys Igor I. Alexeev a,*, Elena S. Belenkaya a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is offset from Mercury's center by 405 km in the north- ward direction. The dipole inclination to Mercury smaller than Earth's surface magnetic field (Ness et al., 1974). The higher solar wind pressure

Johnson, Catherine Louise

135

Time-resolved ion energy distribution measurements using an advanced neutral particle analyzer on the MST reversed-field pinch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced neutral particle analyzer (ANPA) capable of simultaneously measuring hydrogen and deuterium ions of energies up to 45 keV has recently been developed for use on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The charge-to-mass separation allows for separate analysis of bulk deuterium ions and hydrogen ions injected with a 1 MW, 25 keV neutral beam. Orientation of the ANPA allows sampling of different regions of ion velocity space; a radial viewport favors collection of ions with high v{sub Up-Tack }/ Double-Vertical-Line v Double-Vertical-Line while a recently installed tangential viewport favors ions with high v{sub Double-Vertical-Line Double-Vertical-Line }/ Double-Vertical-Line v Double-Vertical-Line , such as those from the core-localized fast ion population created by the neutral beam. Signals are observed in the ANPA's highest energy channels during periodic magnetic reconnection events, which are drivers of anisotropic, non-Maxwellian ion energization in the reversed-field pinch. ANPA signal strength is dependent on the background neutral density, which also increases during magnetic reconnection events, so careful analysis must be performed to identify the true change in the ion distribution. A Monte Carlo neutral particle tracing code (NENE) is used to reconstruct neutral density profiles based on D{sub {alpha}} line emission, which is measured using a 16-chord filtered photodiode array.

Eilerman, S.; Anderson, J. K.; Reusch, J. A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Liu, D. [University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Fiksel, G. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Polosatkin, S.; Belykh, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

Fluid pressure arrival time tomography: Estimation and assessment in the presence of inequality constraints, with an application to a producing gas field at Krechba, Algeria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deformation in the overburden proves useful in deducing spatial and temporal changes in the volume of a producing reservoir. Based upon these changes we estimate diffusive travel times associated with the transient flow due to production, and then, as the solution of a linear inverse problem, the effective permeability of the reservoir. An advantage an approach based upon travel times, as opposed to one based upon the amplitude of surface deformation, is that it is much less sensitive to the exact geomechanical properties of the reservoir and overburden. Inequalities constrain the inversion, under the assumption that the fluid production only results in pore volume decreases within the reservoir. We apply the formulation to satellite-based estimates of deformation in the material overlying a thin gas production zone at the Krechba field in Algeria. The peak displacement after three years of gas production is approximately 0.5 cm, overlying the eastern margin of the anticlinal structure defining the gas field. Using data from 15 irregularly-spaced images of range change, we calculate the diffusive travel times associated with the startup of a gas production well. The inequality constraints are incorporated into the estimates of model parameter resolution and covariance, improving the resolution by roughly 30 to 40%.

Rucci, A.; Vasco, D.W.; Novali, F.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution, and demonstrate a method of using crosswell seismic profiling for identification of trapped oil, bypassed reservoir compartments, and location of fluid fronts in carbonate reefs. The method of crosswell seismic

138

Real-time data processing and magnetic field pitch angle estimation of the JET motional Stark effect diagnostic based on Kalman filtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel technique for the real-time measurement of the magnetic field pitch angle in JET discharges using the motional Stark effect diagnostic is presented. Kalman filtering techniques are adopted to estimate the amplitude of the avalanche photodiode signals' harmonics that are relevant for the pitch angle calculation. The proposed technique {l_brace}for extended technical details of the generic algorithm see [R. Coelho and D. Alves, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 37, 164 (2009)]{r_brace} is shown to be much more robust and provides less noisy estimates than an equivalent lock-in amplifier scheme, in particular when dealing with edge localized modes.

Coelho, R.; Alves, D. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Associacao Euratom/IST, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Hawkes, N.; Brix, M. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

LM139,LM239,LM2901,LM3302,LM339 LM139/LM239/LM339/LM2901/LM3302 Low Power Low Offset Voltage Quad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LM139,LM239,LM2901,LM3302,LM339 LM139/LM239/LM339/LM2901/LM3302 Low Power Low Offset Voltage Quad Comparators Literature Number: SNOSBJ3C #12;LM139/LM239/LM339/LM2901/LM3302 Low Power Low Offset Voltage Quad Comparators General Description The LM139 series consists of four independent precision voltage comparators

Ravikumar, B.

140

Field and polarity dependence of time-to-resistance increase in Fe-O films studied by constant voltage stress method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Constant voltage stress (CVS) was applied to Fe-O films prepared by a sputtering process to investigate a stress-induced resistance increase leading to a fundamental mechanism for switching behaviors. Under the CVS, an abrupt resistance increase was found for both stress polarities. A conduction mechanism after the resistance increase exhibited non-Ohmic transport. The time-to-resistance increase (t{sub r}) under the CVS was revealed to strongly depend on stress voltage as well as the polarity. From a polarity-dependent resistance increase determined by a time-zero measurement, the voltage and polarity-dependent t{sub r} were discussed on the basis of field- and structure-enhanced thermochemical reaction mechanisms.

Eriguchi, Koji; Ohta, Hiroaki; Ono, Kouichi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Wei Zhiqiang; Takagi, Takeshi [Advanced Device Development Center, Matsushita Electric Ind. Co., Ltd., 3-1-1 Yagumo-Nakamachi, Moriguchi, Osaka 570-8501 (Japan)

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

SDSS 0956+5128: A BROAD-LINE QUASAR WITH EXTREME VELOCITY OFFSETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the discovery of a Type 1 quasar, SDSS 0956+5128, with a surprising combination of extreme velocity offsets. SDSS 0956+5128 is a broad-lined quasar exhibiting emission lines at three substantially different redshifts: a systemic redshift of z {approx} 0.714 based on narrow emission lines, a broad Mg II emission line centered 1200 km s{sup -1} bluer than the systemic velocity, at z {approx} 0.707, and broad H{alpha} and H{beta} emission lines centered at z {approx} 0.690. The Balmer line peaks are 4100 km s{sup -1} bluer than the systemic redshift. There are no previously known objects with such an extreme difference between broad Mg II and broad Balmer emission. The two most promising explanations are either an extreme disk emitter or a high-velocity black hole recoil. However, neither explanation appears able to explain all of the observed features of SDSS 0956+5128, so the object may provide a challenge to our general understanding of quasar physics.

Steinhardt, Charles L.; Schramm, Malte; Silverman, John D. [Kavli IPMU, University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba (Japan); Alexandroff, Rachael; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Capak, Peter [California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Masters, Dan; Mobasher, Bahram [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92508 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Spin dynamics in a spin-correlated radical pair of photosystem I. Pulsed time-resolved EPR at high magnetic field.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spin-dynamics of the spin-correlated radical pair (SCRP) P{sub 700}{sup +}A{sub 1A}{sup -} in the photosystem I (PSI) reaction center protein have been investigated with high-frequency (HF), time-resolved EPR spectroscopy. The superior spectral resolution of HF EPR enables spin-dynamics for both the donor and acceptor radicals in the pair to be monitored independently. Decay constants of each spin were measured as a function of temperature and compared to data obtained at X-band EPR. Relaxation times, T{sub 1}, and decay rates, k{sub S}, are the same at both X- and D-band magnetic fields. The spin-dynamics within the radical pair were determined from theoretical simulation of experimental time-resolved HF EPR spectra. At low temperatures, T < 60 K, the decay of the SCRP from the singlet state, k{sub S}, is the predominant process, while at high temperatures, T > 130 K, the T{sub 1} relaxation is much faster than k{sub S}. The recombination rate k{sub S} was observed to decrease as the temperature is increased. These EPR spectral results are in agreement with previously reported optical measurements of P{sub 700}{sup +}A{sub 1}{sup -} radical pair recombination.

Poluektov, O. G.; Paschenko, S. V.; Utschig, L. M.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Determination of Band Offsets between the High-k Dielectric LaAlO3 Film and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determination of Band Offsets Determination of Band Offsets between the High-k Dielectric LaAlO3 Film and the In0.53Ga0.47As Substrate Scaling of conventional silicon based metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) transistors requires thinner and thinner SiO2 films. However, the figure 1 Figure 1: Intel 45 nm SRAM chip and IntelrCoreTM2 family processor. Hafnium-based high-k dielectric materials are used in the fabrication of those chips. increase of leakage current through thinner SiO2 films puts a fundamental limit on the existing MOS technology. High dielectric constant (high-k) materials are natural substitutes for SiO2 as insulators because they can maintain sufficient thickness to achieve desired capacitance. In fact, hafnium based high-k dielectric materials are already used by Intel in the

144

Comment on "Late-time tails of a self-gravitating massless scalar field revisited" by Bizon et al: The leading order asymptotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Class. Quantum Grav. 26 (2009) 175006 (arXiv:0812.4333v3) Bizon et al discuss the power-law tail in the long-time evolution of a spherically symmetric self-gravitating massless scalar field in odd spatial dimensions. They derive explicit expressions for the leading order asymptotics for solutions with small initial data by using formal series expansions. Unfortunately, this approach misses an interesting observation that the actual decay rate is a product of asymptotic cancellations occurring due to a special structure of the nonlinear terms. Here, we show that one can calculate the leading asymptotics more directly by recognizing the special structure and cancellations already on the level of the wave equation.

Nikodem Szpak

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fining Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

147

Time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field theory for laser-driven many-electron dynamics. II. Extended formulation and numerical analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The time-dependent restricted-active-space self-consistent-field (TD-RASSCF) method is formulated based on the TD variational principle. In analogy with the configuration-interaction singles (CIS), singles-and-doubles (CISD), singles-doubles-and-triples (CISDT) methods in quantum chemistry, the TD-RASSCF-S, -SD, and -SDT methods are introduced as extensions of the TD-RASSCF dou- bles (-D) method [Phys. Rev. A 87, 062511 (2013)]. Based on an analysis of the numerical cost and test calculations for one-dimensional (1D) models of atomic helium, beryllium, and carbon, it is shown that the TD-RASSCF-S and -D methods are computationally feasible for systems with many electrons and more accurate than the TD Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and TDCIS methods. In addition to the discussion of methodology, an analysis of electron dynamics in the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) process is presented. For the 1D beryllium atom, a state-resolved analysis of the HHG spectrum based on the time-independent HF orbitals shows that while only single-orbital excitations are needed in the region below the cutoff, single- and double-orbital excitations are es- sential beyond, where accordingly the single-active-electron (SAE) approximation and the TDCIS method break down. On the other hand, the TD-RASSCF-S and -D methods accurately describe the multi-orbital excitation processes throughout the entire region of the HHG spectrum. For the 1D carbon atom, our calculations show that multi-orbital excitations are essential in the HHG process even below the cutoff. Hence, in this test system a very accurate treatment of electron correlation is required. The TD-RASSCF-S and -D approaches meet this demand, while the SAE approximation and the TDCIS method are inadequate.

Haruhide Miyagi; Lars Bojer Madsen

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) Reflectance Imaging: A Label-Free/Real-Time Mapping of Microscale Mixture Concentration Fields (Water+Ethanol)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mixture Concentration Fields (Water+Ethanol) Iltai Kim and Kenneth D. Kihm Department of Mechanical (water+ethanol) concentration fields with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) reflectance technique based the refractive index and mixture concentration fields. The presented results show that ethanol penetrates

Kihm, IconKenneth David

149

Optical Rotation Curves of Distant Field Galaxies: Sub-L* Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Moderate-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Keck 10m telescope are used to derive internal kinematics for eight faint disk galaxies in the fields flanking the Hubble Deep Field. The spectroscopic data are combined with high-resolution F814W WFPC2 images from the Hubble Space Telescope which provide morphologies and scale-lengths, inclinations and orientations. The eight galaxies have redshifts 0.15 < z < 0.75, magnitudes 18.6 < I_814 < 22.1 and luminosities -21.8 < M_B < -19.0 (H_0 = 75 and q_0 = 0.05). Terminal disk velocities are derived from the spatially-resolved velocity profiles by modeling the effects of seeing, slit width, slit misalignment with galaxy major axis, and inclination for each source. These data are combined with the sample of Vogt et al. (1996) to provide a high-redshift Tully-Fisher relation that spans three magnitudes. This sample was selected primarily by morphology and magnitude, rather than color or spectral features. We find no obvious change in the shape or slope of the relation with respect to the local Tully-Fisher relation. The small offset of < 0.4 B mag with respect to the local relation is presumably caused by luminosity evolution in the field galaxy population, and does not correlate with galaxy mass. A comparison of disk surface brightness between local and high-redshift samples yields a similar offset, ~0.6 mag. These results provide further evidence for only a modest increase in luminosity with lookback time.

Nicole P. Vogt; Andrew C. Phillips; S. M. Faber; Jesus Gallego; Caryl Gronwall; R. Guzman; Garth D. Illingworth; David C. Koo; J. D. Lowenthal

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Linearized inversion of 3-D multi-offset data: background reconstruction and AVO inversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......computation time, in this process, can be substantially...62ndAnn. Internat. Mtg, Soc. Expl. Geophys...Presented at the 46th Mtg Europ.Assn Expl. Geophys...computation time, in this process, can be substantially...outside the plane where the process is applied. The 3-D......

L. T. Ikelle

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

STUDY OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD OF ACTIVE REGION 11117 AROUND THE TIME OF A CONFINED FLARE USING A DATA-DRIVEN CESE-MHD MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We apply a data-driven magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare that occurred on 2010 October 25. The MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma {beta}. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photosphere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria based on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory around the time of the flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most cases. The magnetic configuration changes very little during the studied time interval of 2 hr. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photosphere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the computed magnetic free energy drops during the flare by {approx}10{sup 30} erg, which seems to be adequate in providing the energy budget of a minor C-class confined flare.

Jiang Chaowei; Feng Xueshang [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wu, S. T.; Hu Qiang, E-mail: cwjiang@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn, E-mail: wus@uah.edu, E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

A new 2D FEM analysis of a disc machine with offset rotor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents a new 2-Dimensional Finite Element Method (2D FEM) analysis of a double sided axial field, permanent magnet excited brushless DC motor. The rotor of the machine is free to move in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the shaft. Computed 2D results are compared with 3D FEM analysis and the new analysis method is shown to give close agreement.

Gair, S.; Canova, A. [Napier Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering; Eastham, J.F.; Betzer, T. [Univ. of Bath (United Kingdom). School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

ZnO/Sn:In2O3 and ZnO/CdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Band alignments were measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for thin films of ZnO on polycrystalline Sn:In2O3 (ITO) and single crystal CdTe. Hybrid density functional theory calculations of epitaxial zinc blende ZnO(001) on CdTe(001) were performed to compare with experiment. A conduction band offset of -0.6 eV was measured for ZnO/ITO, which is larger than desired for efficient electron injection. For ZnO/CdTe, the experimental conduction band offset of 0.25 eV is smaller than the calculated value of 0.67 eV, likely due to the TeOx layer at the ZnO/CdTe interface. The measured conduction band offset for ZnO/CdTe is favorable for photovoltaic devices.

Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Jaffe, John E.

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Time Brightness  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Perlmutter, et al., in Thermonuclear Supernovae, NATO ASI, v. 486 (1997) Perlmutter, et al., in Thermonuclear Supernovae, NATO ASI, v. 486 (1997) Cosmology from . . . Time Brightness ... . . . 50-100 Fields Lunar Calendar Scheduled Follow-Up Imaging at Hubble, Cerro Tololo, WIYN, Isaac Newton Scheduled Follow-Up Spectroscopy at Keck Almost 1000 Galaxies per Field RESULT: ~24 Type Ia supernovae discovered while still brightening, at new moon Berkeley Lab Keck WIYN Cerro Tololo Isaac Newton Hubble Strategy We developed a strategy to guarantee a group of supernova discoveries on a certain date. Just after a new moon, we observe some 50 to 100 high-galactic lattitute fields-each containing almost a thousand high-redshift galaxies-in two nights on the Cerro Tololo 4-meter telescope with Tyson & Bernstein's wide-field camera. We return three weeks later to observe the same

155

Field Demonstration of an Automated Heliostat Tracking Correction Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study provides a demonstration of an eight-parameter heliostat tracking-error correction method applied to heliostats at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. This method models the non-random physical error sources that arise from imperfect mount fabrication and installation processes. Previous work demonstrated this method for a single heliostat over a one-month period [1]. This study extends the previous work by expanding the number of heliostats modeled and tested to over 200. The duration over which errors were collected and modeled spanned 7 months. Smaller subsets of heliostats were observed and tested over an even longer, 10 month period. Error data was obtained by bringing heliostat beams (one by one) to a surveyed target on the Solar Tower and recording the measured elevation and azimuthal offsets. Beam position was determined by the centroid of the intensity image. Using automated sequencing, we were able to limit the time to process a heliostat to ?32 seconds. This allowed us to process the entire 200 heliostat field in just 2 full days (weather permitting). These 2- day collections were performed about once every 2-3 months, to cover the full annual range of motion. All error data were automatically collected, time tagged and synchronized, in real-time. The error data were then converted, by a post-processor, to updated model parameters. The updated model data were subsequently uploaded to the heliostat field for model performance testing. In this way, almost 50,000 error observations were collected for 200 heliostats during the course of the study. In addition, 19,000 model performance observations were also recorded. Initial results indicate this method was able to halve the RMS average pointing error from 1.5 mrad to 0.78 mrad across the field of 200 heliostats.

E.J. Smith; C.K. Ho

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Iterative receivers for OFDM systems with dispersive fading and frequency offset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Further work is then extended to space-time block coded (STBC) OFDM system. At last, the technique is applied to STBC-OFDM system through a newly built channel model, which is based on a physical description of the propagation environment. The performance...

Liu, Hui

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Simulating Solid-Solid Phase Transition in Shape-Memory Alloy Microstructure by Face-Offsetting Method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in the understanding of martensitic transformations (diffusionless, solid-solid phase transformations) have been instrumental to the recent discovery of new low hysteresis alloys. However, some key fundamental issues must be better understood to design still better alloys. Restricting attention to antiplane shear, we use finite element analysis to model the shape-memory alloy microstructure within the Abeyaratne-Knowles continuum thermomechanical framework and use an interface kinetic relation of the kind proposed by Rosakis and Tsai. Geometric singularities and topological changes associated with microstructural evolution pose significant numerical challenges. We address such challenges with a recently developed front-tracking scheme called the face-offsetting method (FOM) to explicitly model phase interfaces. Initial results demonstrate the effectiveness of FOM in resolving needle-like twinned microstructures.

Bellur Ramaswamy, Ravi S.; Tortorelli, Daniel A. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Fried, Eliot [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Washington University, Campus Box 1185, St. Louis, MO 63130-4899 (United States); Jiao Xiangmin [Computational Science and Engineering Division, College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, 801 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Electronic properties of InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface: Band offsets and oxygen dependence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using ab-initio methods, atomic structures and electronic properties of InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface are studied within the framework of density functional theory. We examine the InP/HfO{sub 2} model interface electronic structures under varying oxidation conditions. The effects of indium and phosphorous concentrations on interfacial bonding, defect states, band offsets, and the thermodynamic stability at the interface are also investigated. The origin of interfacial gap states in InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface are proposed, mainly from the P-rich oxides, which is validated by our experimental work. This highlights the importance of surface passivation prior to high-? deposition based on the in situ spectroscopic results of atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} on InP.

KC, Santosh; Dong, Hong; Longo, Roberto C.; Xiong, Ka [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Wang, Weichao [Department of Electronics and Microelectronics and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Photo-Electronic Thin Film Device and Technology, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae, E-mail: kjcho@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

159

Empirical timing analysis of CPUs and delay fault tolerant design using partial redundancy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the dynamic frequency-step-down takes place before a pipe flush, and retry is issued. The significant timing overhead associated with the retry is offset by the rarity of the timing violation events. Simulation results on ISCAS Benchmark circuits show that 10...

Chang, Sanghoan

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Time in quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION II. HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT A. Classical Mechanics B. Quantum Theory . C. The Problem 3 4 6 III. TIME ATOMS AND DISCRETE TIME A. The Earliest Applications of Atomistic and Discrete Time . . . . . B. The Radiating Electron... . C. Quantum Field Theory 8 10 l2 IV. TIME OPERATOR FORMULATIONS 16 A. Advocates Against a Time Operator . B. The Possibility of a Time Operator C, Advocates in Favor of a Time Operator D. A Restricted Time Delay Operator: Scattering Theory...

Chapin, Kimberly R.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Predicted roles of defects on band offsets and energetics at CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2/CdS) solar cell interfaces and implications for improving performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and in- deed the global operating capacity for solar photovoltaics is increasing steadily.1 CurrentlyPredicted roles of defects on band offsets and energetics at CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2/CdS) solar cell ZnO sputtering on the performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells Appl. Phys. Lett. 105, 083906

Goddard III, William A.

162

Abstract--We propose a compact tip-reflection fiber-optic vibration sensing system that uses a lateral-offset tilted fiber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a lateral-offset tilted fiber grating (TFBG) as sensor head and a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser the coupling of light from the forward propagating core mode to backward propagating cladding modes and reduces cladding mode resonances appear. Since the response of core mode to external perturbations (temperature

Wai, Ping-kong Alexander

163

University Statement on Carbon Offsetting for Travel July 2011 Travel contributes significantly to the emissions of the University. We all have a role to play in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the emissions of the University. We all have a role to play in reducing our own and the organisations carbonUniversity Statement on Carbon Offsetting for Travel July 2011 Travel contributes significantly footprint: reducing our travel emissions by travelling less or by choosing more sustainable modes should

Haase, Markus

164

Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1983, the Bonneville Power Administration contracted for an evaluation and ranking of all geothermal resource sites in the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington which have a potential for electrical generation and/or electrical offset through direct utilization of the resource. The objective of this program was to consolidate and evaluate all geologic, environmental, legal, and institutional information in existing records and files, and to apply a uniform methodology to the evaluation and ranking of all known geothermal sites. This data base would enhance the making of credible forecasts of the supply of geothermal energy which could be available in the region over a 20 year planning horizon. The four states, working together under a cooperative agreement, identified a total of 1,265 potential geothermal sites. The 1,265 sites were screened to eliminate those with little or no chance of providing either electrical generation and/or electrical offset. Two hundred and forty-five of the original 1,265 sites were determined to warrant further study. The Four-State team proceeded to develop a methodology which would rank the sites based upon an estimate of development potential and cost. Development potential was estimated through the use of weighted variables selected to approximate the attributes which a geothermal firm might consider in its selection of a site for exploration and possible development. Resource; engineering; and legal, institutional, and environmental factors were considered. Cost estimates for electrical generation and direct utilization sites were made using the computer programs CENTPLANT, WELLHEAD, and HEATPLAN. Finally, the sites were ranked utilizing a technique which allowed for the integration of development and cost information. On the basis of the developability index, 78 high temperature sites and 120 direct utilization sites were identified as having ''good'' or ''average'' potential for development and should be studied in detail. On the basis of cost, at least 29 of the high temperature sites appear to be technically capable of supporting a minimum total of at least 1,000 MW of electrical generation which could be competitive with the busbar cost of conventional thermal generating technologies. Sixty direct utilization sites have a minimum total energy potential of 900+ MW and can be expected to provide substantial amounts of electrical offset at or below present conventional energy prices. The combined development and economic rankings can be used to assist in determining sites with superior characteristics of both types. Five direct utilization sites and eight high temperature sites were identified with both high development and economic potential. An additional 27 sites were shown to have superior economic characteristics, but development problems. The procedure seems validated by the fact that two of the highest ranking direct utilization sites are ones that have already been developed--Boise, Idaho and Klamath Falls, Oregon. Most of the higher ranking high temperature sites have received serious examination in the past as likely power production candidates.

Bloomquist, R.G.; Black, G.L.; Parker, D.S.; Sifford, A.; Simpson, S.J.; Street, L.V.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Time growth rate and field profiles of hybrid modes excited by a relativistic elliptical electron beam in an elliptical metallic waveguide with dielectric rod  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dispersion relation of guided electromagnetic waves propagating in an elliptical metallic waveguide with a dielectric rod driven by relativistic elliptical electron beam (REEB) is investigated. The electric field profiles and the growth rates of the waves are numerically calculated by using Mathieu functions. The effects of relative permittivity constant of dielectric rod, accelerating voltage, and current density of REEB on the growth rate are presented.

Jazi, B.; Rahmani, Z.; Abdoli-Arani, A. [Faculty of Physics, Department of Laser and Photonics, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heidari-Semiromi, E. [Faculty of Physics, Department of Condense Matter, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional theory for molecular processes in strong fields: High-order harmonic generation of H2 in intense laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional theory for molecular processes in strong work of Hohenberg and Kohn 1 and Kohn and Sham 2 , the steady-state density-functional theory DFT has-electron systems, within the density-functional theory, is much less developed. The central theme of the modern

Chu, Shih-I

167

Subsurface characterization using time-domain electromagnetics at the Texas A&M University Brazos River Hydrologic Field Site, Burleson County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data of June 1996 . 47 5. 7 TDEM response of a 2. 0flm resistivity half-space plotted against the Brazos field data of June 1996. . . . . 5. 8 Sensitivity of TDEM response due to small perturbations in TX and RX parameters is shown for a half...-space of p =1. 0flm. . . . . . . . 51 5. 9 Survey error at small TX-RX separation 5. 10 Survey error at a large TX-RX separation FIGURE Page 7. 1 Linc 3 TDFM response of data with and without, thc pipeline 7. 2 Line 6 TDEM response of data with anrl...

Sananikone, Khamla

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

Physics II Exam 2 -Chs. 18A,19,20 -Electric Current, Magnetic Field Feb. 23, 2009 Name Rec. Instr. Rec. Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics II Exam 2 - Chs. 18A,19,20 - Electric Current, Magnetic Field Feb. 23, 2009 Name Rec. Instr·m/A, elementary charge e = 1.602�10-19 C, electron mass me = 9.11�10-31 kg, 1 electron-volt = 1.0 eV = 1. (aluminum resistivity is = 2.65�10-8 ·m). a) (4) What resistance should a 1.00 meter length of the wire

Wysin, Gary

169

Modulation of redox status and calcium handling by extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields in C2C12 muscle cells: A real-time, single-cell approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The biological effects of electric and magnetic fields, which are ubiquitous in modern society, remain poorly understood. Here, we applied a single-cell approach to study the effects of short-term exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) on muscle cell differentiation and function using C2C12 cells as an in vitro model of the skeletal muscle phenotype. Our focus was on markers of oxidative stress and calcium (Ca2+) handling, two interrelated cellular processes previously shown to be affected by such radiation in other cell models. Collectively, our data reveal that ELF-EMFs (1) induced reactive oxygen species production in myoblasts and myotubes with a concomitant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential; (2) activated the cellular detoxification system, increasing catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities; and (3) altered intracellular Ca2+homeostasis, increasing the spontaneous activity of myotubes and enhancing cellular reactivity to a depolarizing agent (KCl) or an agonist (caffeine) of intracellular store Ca2+channels. In conclusion, our data support a possible link between exposure to ELF-EMFs and modification of the cellular redox state, which could, in turn, increase the level of intracellular Ca2+and thus modulate the metabolic activity of C2C12 cells.

Caterina Morabito; Francesca Rovetta; Mariano Bizzarri; Giovanna Mazzoleni; Giorgio Fanò; Maria A. Mariggiò

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional theory for molecular processes in strong fields:? High-order harmonic generation of H2 in intense laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.29 215.30 25 210.20 210.19 49 216.48 216.50 FIG. 2. The induced dipole moment ^ z(t) & and dipole accelera- tion ^ (d2z(t)/dt2)/v02& of H2 at R51.4a0 as a function of time ~in optical cycles!. The laser intensity is 1014 W/cm2 and wavelength 1064 nm...

Chu, Shih-I; Chu, Xi

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

171

Economizers; a Field Perspective and Case Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economizers; a Field Perspective and Case Studies Economizers; a Field Perspective and Case Studies Speaker(s): David Sellers Date: January 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Liping Wang Economizers are a common HVAC process with the potential to deliver significant energy savings by using outdoor air cooling to offset internal loads. But evidence from the field suggests that their track record is not good in terms of delivering those savings. This talk will provide a field perspective on some of the issues behind the poor track record, frequently illustrated with mini-case studies, and will conclude with a case study of a dysfunctional economizer in a cold environment and how the problem it was having was corrected by applying some of the concepts discussed earlier in the talk

172

Time-dependent density-functional theory for molecular processes in strong fields: Study of multiphoton processes and dynamical response of individual valence electrons of N2 in intense laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the exchange ~x!- only limit. In the latter approach @1#, theTime-dependent density-functional theor Study of multiphoton processes and dynam of N2 in inten Xi Chu and Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas, and Kansas Ce ~Received 30 July 2001; pu We...-I CHU PHYSICAL REVIEW A 64 0634041sg 21su 22sg 22su 21pu 43sg 2 . According to the valence bond theory, this molecule has a triple bond formed with 3sg and 1pu electrons. The 3sg orbital is parallel to the internuclear axis and the two degen- erate 1pu...

Chu, Xi; Chu, Shih-I

2001-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

A review of "The Calendar of Venetian Opera. Song and Season: Scientific culture and theatrical time in Early Modern Venice" by Eleanor Selfridge-Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Opera. Song and Season: Scientific culture and theatrical time in Early Modern Venice. Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 2007. 394 pp. $60.00. Review by r. Bu r r Li t c h f i e L d, Br o w n un i v e r s i t y . This is a very... the year in January, just after the winter solstice and the re-birth of the sun. However, despite the reform and reinvigoration of the Julian calendar by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582, the March convention continued. Much of Italy began the calendar...

Litchfield, R. Burr

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Offset Fresnel Zoneplate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most common form of Fresnel zone reflectors and lenses is the circular zoneplate. The design of the simple circular zoneplate is well documented in the open literature, and experiments at various frequenci...

Y. Jay Guo; Stephen K. Barton

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Measurement of the valence band-offset in a PbSe/ZnO heterojunction by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A heterojunction of PbSe/ZnO has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to directly measure the valence-band offset (VBO) of the heterojunction. The VBO, {Delta}E{sub V}, was determined as 2.51 {+-} 0.05 eV using the Pb 4p{sup 3/2} and Zn 2p{sup 3/2} core levels as a reference. The conduction-band offset, {Delta}E{sub C}, was, therefore, determined to be 0.59 {+-} 0.05 eV based on the above {Delta}E{sub V} value. This analysis indicates that the PbSe/ZnO heterojunction forms a type I (Straddling Gap) heterostructure.

Li Lin; Qiu Jijun; Weng Binbin; Yuan Zijian; Shi Zhisheng [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Li Xiaomin; Gan Xiaoyan [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Sellers, Ian R. [Deparment of Physics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

THE BNL ASTD FIELD LAB - NEAR - REAL - TIME CHARACTERIZATION OF BNL STOCKPILED SOILS TO ACCELERATE COMPLETION OF THE EM CHEMICAL HOLES PROJECT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As of October 2001, approximately 7,000 yd{sup 3} of stockpiled soil remained at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) after the remediation of the BNL Chemical/Animal/Glass Pits disposal area. The soils were originally contaminated with radioactive materials and heavy metals, depending on what materials had been interred in the pits, and how the pits were excavated. During the 1997 removal action, the more hazardous/radioactive materials were segregated, along with, chemical liquids and solids, animal carcasses, intact gas cylinders, and a large quantity of metal and glass debris. Nearly all of these materials have been disposed of. In order to ensure that all debris was removed and to characterize the large quantity of heterogeneous soil, BNL initiated an extended sorting, segregation, and characterization project directed at the remaining soil stockpiles. The project was co-funded by the Department of Energy Environmental Management Office (DOE EM) through the BNL Environmental Restoration program and through the DOE EM Office of Science and Technology Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) program. The focus was to remove any non-conforming items, and to assure that mercury and radioactive contaminant levels were within acceptable limits for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. Soils with mercury concentrations above allowable levels would be separated for disposal as mixed waste. Sorting and segregation were conducted simultaneously. Large stockpiles (ranging from 150 to 1,200 yd{sup 3}) were subdivided into manageable 20 yd{sup 3} units after powered vibratory screening. The 1/2-inch screen removed almost all non-conforming items (plus some gravel). Non-conforming items were separated for further characterization. Soil that passed through the screen was also visually inspected before being moved to a 20 yd{sup 3} ''subpile.'' Eight samples from each subpile were collected after establishing a grid of four quadrants: north, east, south and west, and two layers: top and bottom. Field personnel collected eight 100-gram samples, plus quality assurance (QA) duplicates for chemical analysis, and a 1-liter jar of material for gamma spectroscopy. After analyses were completed and reviewed, the stockpiles were reconstructed for later disposal as discrete entities within a disposal site profile. A field lab was set up in a trailer close to the stockpile site, equipped with instrumentation to test for mercury, RCRA metals, and gamma spectroscopy, and a tumbler for carrying out a modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) protocol. Chemical analysis included X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to screen for high (>260 ppm) total mercury concentrations, and modified TCLP tests to verify that the soils were not RCRA hazardous. The modified TCLP tests were 1/10th scale, to minimize secondary (leachate) waste and maximize tumbler capacity and sampler throughput. TCLP leachate analysis was accomplished using a Milestone Direct Mercury Analyzer (DMA80). Gamma spectroscopy provided added assurance of previously measured Am-241, Cs-137, and Co-60 contamination levels.

BOWERMAN,B.S.; ADAMS,J.W.; HEISER,J.; KALB,P.D.; LOCKWOOD,A.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

T Tauri stellar magnetic fields: He I measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present measurements of the longitudinal magnetic field in the circumstellar environment of seven classical T Tauri stars. The measurements are based on high-resolution circular spectropolarimetry of the He I 5876 emission line, which is thought to form in accretion streams controlled by a stellar magnetosphere. We detect magnetic fields in BP Tau, DF Tau and DN Tau, and detect statistically significant fields in GM Aur and RW Aur A at one epoch but not at others. We detect no field for DG Tau and GG Tau, with the caveat that these objects were observed at one epoch only. Our measurements for BP Tau and DF Tau are consistent, both in terms of sign and magnitude, with previous studies, suggesting that the characteristics of T Tauri magnetospheres are persistent over several years. We observed the magnetic field of BP Tau to decline monotonically over three nights, and have detected a peak field of 4kG in this object, the highest magnetic field yet observed in a T Tauri star. We combine our observations with results from the literature in order to perform a statistical analysis of the magnetospheric fields in BP Tau and DF Tau. Assuming a dipolar field, we determine a polar field of ~3kG and a dipole offset of 40deg for BP Tau, while DF Tau's field is consistent with a polar field of ~-4.5kG and a dipole offset of 10deg. We conclude that many classical T Tauri stars have circumstellar magnetic fields that are both strong enough and sufficiently globally-ordered to sustain large-scale magnetospheric accretion flows.

Neil H. Symington; Tim J. Harries; Ryuichi Kurosawa; Tim Naylor

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Characterization of an expanded-field Schwarzschild objective for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of a new 10[times]-reduction Schwarzschild system for projection imaging at 13.4 nm wavelength is reported. The optical design is optimized to achieve 0.1 [mu]m resolution over a 0.4 mm image field of view, an increase in area of a factor of 100 over previous designs. An offset aperture, located on the convex primary, defines an unobscured 0.08 numerical aperture. The system is illuminated using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation emitted from a laser plasma source and collected by an ellipsoidal condenser. A 45[degree] turning mirror is used to relay the collected EUV radiation onto a near-normal reflecting mask. Multiple sets of primary and secondary elements were fabricated, matched, and clocked to minimize the effects of small figure errors on imaging performance. Optical metrology indicates that the wave-front error within the subaperture used is within a factor of 2 of the design value. Images recorded in poly(methyl methacrylate) and ZEP 520 (Nippon Zeon) resists reveal good imaging fidelity over much of the 0.4 mm field with equal line/space gratings being resolved to 0.1 [mu]m.

Kubiak, G.D.; Tichenor, D.A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A.K.; Malinowski, M.E.; Stulen, R.H.; Haney, S.J.; Berger, K.W.; Nissen, R.P.; Wilkerson, G.A.; Paul, P.H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551-0969 (United States)); Bjorkholm, J.E.; Fetter, L.A.; Freeman, R.R.; Himel, M.D.; MacDowell, A.A.; Tennant, D.M.; Wood, O.R. II (AT T Bell Laboratories, Holmdel, New Jersey 07733-3030 (United States)); Waskiewicz, W.K.; White, D.L.; Windt, D.L. (AT T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey 07974-2070 (United States)); Jewell, T.E. (Optical Engineering Consultant, Boulder, Colorado 80304 (United States))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of Heliostat Field Global Tracking Error Distributions by Monte Carlo Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Several error sources can contribute to the global tracking error of heliostats. These sources can be, for instance, angular offset in the reference position of the tracking mechanisms, imperfect leveling of the heliostat pedestal, lack of perpendicularity between the tracking axes, lack of precise clock synchronization. All these possible errors are characterized by angles that have very specific numerical values for each heliostat in a central receiver installation. However, they are intrinsically random in nature, and the errors in different heliostats are independent from each other. In principle, the overall drift behavior of the heliostats can be characterized by a statistical distribution of tracking errors. This global distribution characterizes the angular deviation of the heliostat normal and is used in ray tracing simulations of heliostat fields. It is usually assumed to be Gaussian, although some authors argue in favor of other types of distributions. In the present work, the dependence of the global tracking error distribution on the above mentioned primary error sources is investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. Random values are assumed for the different error parameters, and the resulting global tracking error distributions are evaluated for different times of the year for a heliostat field.

L.A. Díaz-Félix; M. Escobar-Toledo; J. Waissman; N. Pitalúa-Díaz; C.A. Arancibia-Bulnes

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Noncommutative Two Time Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a classical formalism describing two-time physics with Abelian canonical gauge field backgrounds. The formalism can be used as a starting point for the construction of an interacting quantized two-time physics theory in a noncommutative soace-time.

W. Chagas-Filho

2006-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Practice Field Practice Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courts Soccer Field Swimming pool Bandeen Hall Mountain House # 3 # 2 Golf Course Security Patterson Hall.B. Scott Arena Library Centennial Theater Mc Greer Hall Pollack Hall New Johnson Science Building Dewhurst Dining Hall Champlain Regional College # 4 Mackinnon Hall Residence # 6 Memorial House Retired Faculty

182

Radial Fokker-Planck model for plasmas confined by magnetic mirror fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A time-dependent computer model has been developed for the spatially dependent distribution function f(r,v,t). An orbit averaged Fokker-Planck equation treats Coulomb collisions and various atomic physics processes. The motivation for the present code is to provide an accurate treatment of gyro-radius effects and realistic beam geometries which have been neglected in previous Fokker-Planck codes. Finite width beams may be offset from the plasma center to determine beam injection for build-up studies. The inclusion of a finite gyro-radius is essential for studying radial transport due to both quasilinear fluctuations and charge exchange collisions. Charge exchange with energetic beam atoms and plasma erosion due to charge-exchange collisions with thermal gas are both included. Quasilinear diffusion terms include the effects of turbulent diffusion in the model. The model has been used to study particle and energy confinement times in the 2XIIB experiment and in the mirror plug of the TMX experiment. Calculated values of T/sub e/ decrease from classical Fokker-Planck values (1000 eV for 2XIIB) to the 50 eV to 200 eV range observed in 2XIIB and TMX experiments. Radial density profiles and n tau scaling with plasma radius and magnetic field agree with experimental data.

Futch, A.H.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Band offsets of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} oxides deposited by atomic layer deposition technique on hydrogenated diamond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-k oxide insulators (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) have been deposited on a single crystalline hydrogenated diamond (H-diamond) epilayer by an atomic layer deposition technique at temperature as low as 120 Degree-Sign C. Interfacial electronic band structures are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on core-level binding energies and valence band maximum values, valence band offsets are found to be 2.9 {+-} 0.2 and 2.6 {+-} 0.2 eV for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions, respectively. Band gaps of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} have been determined to be 7.2 {+-} 0.2 and 5.4 {+-} 0.2 eV by measuring O 1s energy loss spectra, respectively. Both the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions are concluded to be type-II staggered band configurations with conduction band offsets of 1.2 {+-} 0.2 and 2.7 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively.

Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Imura, M. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Koide, Y. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Nanofabrication Platform, NIMS, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Center of Materials Research for Low Carbon Emission, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

184

Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using a Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project summary: Drilling into large aperture open fractures (LAFs) typically yield production wells with high productivity and low pressure drawdown. Developing geophysical and geologic techniques for identifying and precisely mapping LAFsin 3-D will greatly reduce dry hole risk and the overall number of wells required for reaching a particular geothermal field power capacity.

185

Time-resolved x-ray scattering instrumentation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for increased speed and efficiency of data compilation and analysis in real time is presented in this disclosure. Data is sensed and grouped in combinations in accordance with predetermined logic. The combinations are grouped so that a simplified reduced signal results, such as pairwise summing of data values having offsetting algebraic signs, thereby reducing the magnitude of the net pair sum. Bit storage requirements are reduced and speed of data compilation and analysis is increased by manipulation of shorter bit length data values, making real time evaluation possible.

Borso, C.S.

1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

186

The effects of direct-current magnetic fields on turtle retinas vitro  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct-current magnetic fields of 10 to 100 gauss cause a significant short-term reduction of the in vitro electroretinographic b-wave response in turtle retina. This response compression is not accompanied by the usual reduction in retinal sensitivity that occurs with background illumination. Furthermore, this effect is obtained only briefly after the offset of ambient lighting in the diurnal light-dark cycle of nonhibernating animals.

Raybourn, M.S.

1983-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

187

field emission electron microprobe | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

field emission electron microprobe Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

188

Bacteriochlorophyll in Electric Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and a multilevel perturbation model to study the transition energies, polarizability, and dipole moments of a bacteriochlorophyll in an electric field. ... coupling strengths yield Car(S1)-to-BChl(Qy) excitation energy transfer times that are in good agreement with recent exptl. ...

Pär Kjellberg; Zhi He; Tõnu Pullerits

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Mitigated-force carriage for high magnetic field environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A carriage for high magnetic field environments includes a first work-piece holding means for holding a first work-piece, the first work-piece holding means being disposed in an operable relationship with a work-piece processing magnet having a magnetic field strength of at least 1 Tesla. The first work-piece holding means is further disposed in operable connection with a second work-piece holding means for holding a second work-piece so that, as the first work-piece is inserted into the magnetic field, the second work-piece is simultaneously withdrawn from the magnetic field, so that an attractive magnetic force imparted on the first work-piece offsets a resistive magnetic force imparted on the second work-piece.

Ludtka, Gerard M; Ludtka, Gail M; Wilgen, John B; Murphy, Bart L

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Proppant flowback control in coal bed methane wells: experimental study and field application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Proppant flowback after fracturing coal bed methane (CBM) wells is a very common challenge which results in fracture pinching out, noticeable well productivity decrease, downhole and surface facility damage, etc. In this paper, fibre was studied as a low-cost and environmentally friendly additive to control proppant flowback in CBM well fracturing operation. Two kinds of glass fibre (short fibre and long fibre) are selected. Extensive experimental studies have been conducted to test the effects of fibre concentration and fibre control length exerting on the critical proppant flowback rate. The optimal fibre combination is 1:2 as the mass ratio of long fibre to short fibre. And fibre control length is 225 mm in a 300 mm tube. An optimisation model is also presented to optimise the fibre concentration and fibre control length in the field application. So the in-situ fracturing design can be conducted by repeating fracture propagation and proppant transport simulations and parameters optimisations. The experimental results and the optimisation model were applied in CBM well fracturing in Hancheng area in China. 23 tested wells have achieved a significant increase of gas production and decrease of workover times than the 9 offset ones without fibre-added sand. [Received: 22 October 2012; Accepted: 3 April 2013

Kai Zhu; Dali Guo; Xiaohui Zeng; Shuguang Li; Chuanqing Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Quantized Gravitational Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A gravitational action operator is constructed that is invariant under general coordinate transformations and local Lorentz (gauge) transformations. To interpret the formalism the arbitrariness in description must be restricted by introducing gauge conditions and coordinate conditions. The time gauge is defined by locking the time axes of the local coordinate systems to the general coordinate time axis. The resulting form of the action operator, including the contribution of a spinless matter field, enables canonical pairs of variables to be identified. There are four field variables that lack canonical partners, in virtue of differential constraint equations, which can be interpreted as space-time coordinate displacements. In a physically distinguished class of coordinate system the gravitational field variables are not explicit functions of the coordinate displacement parameters. There remains the freedom of Lorentz transformation. The generators of spatial translations and rotations have the correct commutation properties. The question of Lorentz invariance is left undecided since the energy density operator is only given implicitly.

Julian Schwinger

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Dust time in quantum cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a formulation of quantum cosmology with a pressureless dust and arbitrary additional matter fields. The dust provides a natural time gauge corresponding to a cosmic time, yielding a physical time independent Hamiltonian. The approach simplifies the analysis of both Wheeler-deWitt and loop quantum cosmology models, broadening the applicability of the latter.

Husain, Viqar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reconstructing the supernova bounce time with neutrinos in IceCube  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Generic model predictions for the early neutrino signal of a core-collapse supernova (SN) imply that IceCube can reconstruct the bounce to within about ±3.5??ms at 95% C.L. (assumed SN distance 10 kpc), relevant for coincidence with gravitational-wave detectors. The timing uncertainty scales approximately with the distance squared. The offset between true and reconstructed bounce time of up to several ms depends on the neutrino flavor oscillation scenario. Our work extends the recent study of Pagliaroli et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 031102 (2009)] and demonstrates IceCube’s superb timing capabilities for neutrinos from the next nearby SN.

Francis Halzen and Georg G. Raffelt

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Controlling the magnetic field sensitivity of atomic clock states by microwave dressing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate control of the differential Zeeman shift between clock states of ultracold rubidium atoms by means of non-resonant microwave dressing. Using the dc-field dependence of the microwave detuning, we suppress the first and second order differential Zeeman shift in magnetically trapped $^{87}$Rb atoms. By dressing the state pair 5S$_{1/2} F= 1, m_F = -1$ and $F= 2, m_F = 1$, a residual frequency spread of magnetic offset field can be achieved. This is one order of magnitude smaller than the shift of the bare states at the magic field of the Breit-Rabi parabola. We further identify double magic points, around which the clock frequency is insensitive to fluctuations both in the magnetic field and the dressing Rabi frequency. The technique is compatible with chip-based cold atom systems and allows the creation of clock and qubit states with reduced sensitivity to magnetic field noise.

Sárkány, L; Hattermann, H; Fortágh, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Field ionization from carbon nanofibers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Micro Gas Analyzer project aims to develop power-efficient, high resolution, high sensitivity, portable and real-time gas sensors. We developed a field ionizer array based on gated CNTs. Arrays of CNTs are used because ...

Adeoti, Bosun J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Arun field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arun field is a giant gas-condensate field operated by Mobil and Pertamina with over 20,000 acres of closure at the top of the Arun reservoir. A middle-shelf patch reef complex of early to middle Miocene age is the producing facies at the Arun field. About 1,100 ft of porous limestones, encased in shales, create a stratigraphic trap for overpressure hydrocarbons. Three main carbonate lithologies were encountered during the examination of over 4,300 ft of core; (1) a reef facies consisting of vuggy, coral encrusting, red-algal boundstones, (2) a near-reef facies consisting of foraminiferal, mixed-skeletal packstones with gravel-size coral fragments, and (3) an interreef lagoonal facies consisting of benthonic-foram packstones. Twenty-two species of corals have been identified from Arun reef facies; major reef-forming coals, listed in order of decreasing abundance, are Porites cf P. Lutes, Cyphastrea microphthalma, Astreopora myriophthalma, Styloconiella gunetheri, Porites solida, and Acropora ssp. The Arun reef is comprised of limestones (with minor amounts of dolomite). No shale beds occur in the sequence, and all carbonate facies are in communication. A pervasive microporosity, occurring throughout the Arun Limestone, results from meteoric alteration of original carbonate mud to form a microrhombic porosity that accounts for about three-fourths of the field's total porosity.

Jordan, C.F. Jr.; Abdullah, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Quantum Field and Cosmic Field-Finite Geometrical Field Theory of Matter Motion Part Three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research establishes an operational measurement way to express the quantum field theory in a geometrical form. In four-dimensional spacetime continuum, the orthogonal rotation is defined. It forms two sets of equations: one set is geometrical equations, another set is the motion equations. The Lorentz transformation can be directly derived from the geometrical equations, and the proper time of general relativity is well expressed by time displacement field. By the motion equations, the typical time displacement field of matter motion is discussed. The research shows that the quantum field theory can be established based on the concept of orthogonal rotation. On this sense, the quantum matter motion in physics is viewed as the orthogonal rotation of spacetime continuum. In this paper, it shows that there are three typical quantum solutions. One is particle-like solution, one is generation-type solution, and one is pure wave type solution. For each typical solution, the force fields are different. Many fea...

Xiao, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Very-high-order harmonic generation from Ar atoms and Ar+ ions in superintense pulsed laser fields: An ab initio self-interaction-free time-dependent density-functional approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an ab initio nonpertubative investigation of the mechanisms responsible for the production of very-high-order harmonic generation (HHG) from Ar atoms and Ar+ ions by means of the self-interaction-free time-dependent density...

Carrera, Juan J.; Chu, Shih-I; Tong, X. M.

2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

199

Time functions as utilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Every time function on spacetime gives a (continuous) total preordering of the spacetime events which respects the notion of causal precedence. The problem of the existence of a (semi-)time function on spacetime and the problem of recovering the causal structure starting from the set of time functions are studied. It is pointed out that these problems have an analog in the field of microeconomics known as utility theory. In a chronological spacetime the semi-time functions correspond to the utilities for the chronological relation, while in a K-causal (stably causal) spacetime the time functions correspond to the utilities for the K^+ relation (Seifert's relation). By exploiting this analogy, we are able to import some mathematical results, most notably Peleg's and Levin's theorems, to the spacetime framework. As a consequence, we prove that a K-causal (i.e. stably causal) spacetime admits a time function and that the time or temporal functions can be used to recover the K^+ (or Seifert) relation which indeed turns out to be the intersection of the time or temporal orderings. This result tells us in which circumstances it is possible to recover the chronological or causal relation starting from the set of time or temporal functions allowed by the spacetime. Moreover, it is proved that a chronological spacetime in which the closure of the causal relation is transitive (for instance a reflective spacetime) admits a semi-time function. Along the way a new proof avoiding smoothing techniques is given that the existence of a time function implies stable causality, and a new short proof of the equivalence between K-causality and stable causality is given which takes advantage of Levin's theorem and smoothing techniques.

E. Minguzzi

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

200

Digestion time  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Digestion time Digestion time Name: Don Mancosh Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I have always given the rule of thumb in class that material we eat is with us for about 24 hours before exiting the body. The question arises about the time value of liquids. Getting a big coke prior to a 3 hour drive generally means that there will be a stop along the way. Is there a generalization made about liquids in the body similar to the one for solid food? Replies: A physician would give a better answer, but I hazard this: the only liquids which people consume (deliberately) in significant quantities are water, ethyl alcohol and various oils. Water and alcohol are absorbed on a time scale of seconds to minutes through the mouth, stomach and digestive tract. The oils are huge molecules, so I'd guess like any other greasy food they get absorbed in the upper digestive tract. Some of them, perhaps the longest and most nonpolar, are not absorbed at all --- cf. the old-time remedy of mineral oil for constipation --- so there should be some average time-before-what's-left-is-excreted such as you're looking for, and my (wild) guess is that it would not differ substantially from that for food. You can define an average lifetime in the body for alcohol, since the natural level is zero. Rough guidelines are widespread in the context of drunk driving laws. But this is not really possible for water. One's body is normally full up to the brim with water, and there's no way for the body to distinguish between water molecules recently absorbed and molecules that've been moping around since the Beatles split up. Thus the water entering the toilet bowl after the pit stop is not in general the same water as was in the big coke. If you were to consider for water just the average time between drinking and peeing, it would seem to depend strongly on how well hydrated the body was before the drink, and how much was drunk. During sustained heavy exertion in the sun and dry air one can easily drink a pint of water an hour without peeing at all. On the other hand, if one is willing to drink enough water fast enough, so as to establish a high excess of body water one can pee 8 ounces 15 minutes or less after drinking 8 ounces.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Coherence of neutron fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Glauber's definition of quantum coherence is used for neutron fields under the assumption that the complete occupation number space is a direct product of Fermi subspaces. As a result, completely coherent microfields are obtained which define a density operator in full analogy to Glauber's P representation of boson fields. For better physical significance, a transformation from the P representation to a momentum representation is performed. It is proved that the second-order coherence function in this representation is equivalent to Wolf's second-order coherence function of a classical Dirac field. Finally, the results of the theory are used to calculate explicitly the second-order coherence function and the coherence time of an ideally collimated neutron beam.

E. Ledinegg and E. Schachinger

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Nevada Field Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

about NNSS

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203

Female Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Female Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time 1 Amy:56:27.6 Deborah Mc Eligot Deborah Storrings Male Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time 1 Macon Fessenden 20 1 5:42.2 2 0:26.9 1 34:29.7 3:23 1 0:12.8 1 17:41.1 3

Suzuki, Masatsugu

204

Quantum fields in curved spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the theory of quantum fields propagating in an arbitrary, classical, globally hyperbolic spacetime. Our review emphasizes the conceptual issues arising in the formulation of the theory and presents known results in a mathematically precise way. Particular attention is paid to the distributional nature of quantum fields, to their local and covariant character, and to microlocal spectrum conditions satisfied by physically reasonable states. We review the Unruh and Hawking effects for free fields, as well as the behavior of free fields in deSitter spacetime and FLRW spacetimes with an exponential phase of expansion. We review how nonlinear observables of a free field, such as the stress-energy tensor, are defined, as well as time-ordered-products. The "renormalization ambiguities" involved in the definition of time-ordered products are fully characterized. Interacting fields are then perturbatively constructed. Our main focus is on the theory of a scalar field, but a brief discussion of gauge fields is included. We conclude with a brief discussion of a possible approach towards a nonperturbative formulation of quantum field theory in curved spacetime and some remarks on the formulation of quantum gravity.

Stefan Hollands; Robert M. Wald

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Measuring output factors of small fields formed by collimator jaws and multileaf collimator using plastic scintillation detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: As the practice of using high-energy photon beams to create therapeutic radiation fields of subcentimeter dimensions (as in intensity-modulated radiotherapy or stereotactic radiosurgery) grows, so too does the need for accurate verification of beam output at these small fields in which standard practices of dose verification break down. This study investigates small-field output factors measured using a small plastic scintillation detector (PSD), as well as a 0.01 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber. Specifically, output factors were measured with both detectors using small fields that were defined by either the X-Y collimator jaws or the multileaf collimator (MLC). Methods: A PSD of 0.5 mm diameter and 2 mm length was irradiated with 6 and 18 MV linac beams. The PSD was positioned vertically at a source-to-axis distance of 100 cm, at 10 cm depth in a water phantom, and irradiated with fields ranging in size from 0.5x0.5 to 10x10 cm{sup 2}. The field sizes were defined either by the collimator jaws alone or by a MLC alone. The MLC fields were constructed in two ways: with the closed leaves (i.e., those leaves that were not opened to define the square field) meeting at either the field center line or at a 4 cm offset from the center line. Scintillation light was recorded using a CCD camera and an estimation of error in the median-filtered signals was made using the bootstrapping technique. Measurements were made using a CC01 ionization chamber under conditions identical to those used for the PSD. Results: Output factors measured by the PSD showed close agreement with those measured using the ionization chamber for field sizes of 2.0x2.0 cm{sup 2} and above. At smaller field sizes, the PSD obtained output factors as much as 15% higher than those found using the ionization chamber by 0.6x0.6 cm{sup 2} jaw-defined fields. Output factors measured with no offset of the closed MLC leaves were as much as 20% higher than those measured using a 4 cm leaf offset. Conclusions: The authors' results suggest that PSDs provide a useful and possibly superior alternative to existing dosimetry systems for small fields, as they are inherently less susceptible to volume-averaging and perturbation effects than larger, air-filled ionization chambers. Therefore, PSDs may provide more accurate small-field output factor determination, regardless of the collimation mechanism.

Klein, David M.; Tailor, Ramesh C.; Archambault, Louis; Wang, Lilie; Therriault-Proulx, Francois; Beddar, A. Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Radio Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States) and Departement de Radio Oncologie, Hotel Dieu de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

207

Pair production in inhomogeneous fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We employ the recently developed worldline numerics, which combines string-inspired field theory methods with Monte Carlo techniques, to develop an algorithm for the computation of pair-production rates in scalar QED for inhomogeneous background fields. We test the algorithm with the classic Sauter potential, for which we compute the local production rate for the first time. Furthermore, we study the production rate for a superposition of a constant E field and a spatially oscillating field for various oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal that the approximation by a local derivative expansion already fails for frequencies small compared to the electron-mass scale, whereas for strongly oscillating fields a derivative expansion for the averaged field represents an acceptable approximation. The worldline picture makes the nonlocal nature of pair production transparent and facilitates a profound understanding of this important quantum phenomenon.

Gies, Holger; Klingmueller, Klaus [Institut fuer theoretische Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Philosophenweg 16, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Pair production in inhomogeneous fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ the recently developed worldline numerics, which combines string-inspired field theory methods with Monte-Carlo techniques, to develop an algorithm for the computation of pair-production rates in scalar QED for inhomogeneous background fields. We test the algorithm with the classic Sauter potential, for which we compute the local production rate for the first time. Furthermore, we study the production rate for a superposition of a constant E field and a spatially oscillating field for various oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal that the approximation by a local derivative expansion fails already for frequencies small compared to the electron mass scale, whereas for strongly oscillating fields a derivative expansion for the averaged field represents an acceptable approximation. The worldline picture makes the nonlocal nature of pair production transparent and facilitates a profound understanding of this important quantum phenomenon.

Holger Gies; Klaus Klingmuller

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

209

High Throughput Web Inspection System using Time-stretch Real-time Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

successfully report a dark-field web inspection system withsample substrate for our dark-field web inspection systemweb inspection system exploiting time- stretch and utilizing the merits coming from dark-

Kim, Chanju

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations September 29, 2003 1 Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations Nicholas S. Sereno, Suk H. Kim 1.0 Abstract Time-varying magnetic fields of magnets in booster accelerators induce substantial eddy currents in the vacuum chambers. The eddy currents in turn act to produce various multi- pole fields that act on the beam. These fields must be taken into account when doing a lat- tice design. In the APS booster, the relatively long dipole magnets (3 meters) are linearly ramped to accelerate the injected 325 MeV beam to 7 GeV. Substantial dipole and sextu- pole fields are generated in the elliptical vacuum chamber from the induced eddy currents. In this note, formulas for the induced dipole and sextupole fields are derived for elliptical and rectangular vacuum chambers for a time-varying dipole field. A discussion is given

211

Tular Lake Field, Kings County, California - a significant onshore development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tulare Lake field is located in Kings County, California, on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley and 10 mi east of the Kettleman Hills (North Dome) field and 30 mi souuheast of the city of Coalinga. The field was discovered by Husky Oil Co. (Marathon) in October 1981 with the completion of the Boswell 22-16, Sec. 16, T22S, R20E from sands in the Burbank formation of Oligocene geologic age. Chevron USA offset the Husky discovery well with the completion of the Salyer 678X, Sec. 8, T22S, R20E, in May 1983. Both Chevron and Husky have continued an orderly development of the field, and to date Chevron has 9 producing wells and Husky 10 producing wells. Production is found in the Burbank formation at a vertical depth below 12,800 ft. The entrapment of hydrocarbons is caused by a low amplitude, seismically subtle, anticlinal fold trending northwest/southeast. Isochore maps of the Burbank formation show that stratigraphy is important in the distribution of the four producing sand intervals. Oil gravities form the sands vary 39/sup 0/ API to 51/sup 0/ API and the GOR ranges from 1050 to over 5500. As of January 1, 1984, the field has a cumulative production of 1.7 million bbl of oil and 3.5 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas.

Lindblom, R.G.; Waldron, J.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Effects of multiple electronic shells on strong-field multiphoton ionization and high-order harmonic generation of diatomic molecules with arbitrary orientation: An all-electron time-dependent density-functional approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and have the values #4;=1.19 and #5;=0.01 #3;23#4;. The first two terms in Eq. #2;7#1;, vx,#2; LSDA and vc,#2; LSDA are the exchange and correlation potentials within the local spin density approximation #2;LSDA#1;. The last term in Eq. #2... the initial Kohn-Sham spin orbitals #1;n#2;#2;r , t=0#1;. This problem is solved within the framework of the time-independent DFT, using the same LB#4; xc potential and appropriate self-consistent procedure. The wave functions and operators are discretized...

Chu, Shih-I; Telnov, Dmitry A.

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

213

Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses research conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin burnup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PF1/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design burnup. Using peaking factors commensurate with actual burnups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document provides appendices K and L of this report which provide plots for the timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures for Oconee and Seabrook respectively.

Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Straka, M. (Halliburton NUS, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Quantum fields in toroidal topology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard representation of c*-algebra is used to describe fields in compactified space-time dimensions characterized by topologies of the type {Gamma}{sub D}{sup d}=(S{sup 1}){sup d}xM{sup D-d}. The modular operator is generalized to introduce representations of isometry groups. The Poincare symmetry is analyzed and then we construct the modular representation by using linear transformations in the field modes, similar to the Bogoliubov transformation. This provides a mechanism for compactification of the Minkowski space-time, which follows as a generalization of the Fourier integral representation of the propagator at finite temperature. An important result is that the 2x2 representation of the real-time formalism is not needed. The end result on calculating observables is described as a condensate in the ground state. We initially analyze the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields, and then formulate non-abelian gauge theories in {Gamma}{sub D}{sup d}. Using the S-matrix, the decay of particles is calculated in order to show the effect of the compactification. - Highlights: > C*-algebra is used to describe fields in compactified space-time dimensions. > The space-time is characterized by toroidal topologies. > Representations of the Poincare group are studied by using the modular operator. > We derive non-abelian gauge theories in compactified regions of space-time. > We show the compactification effect in the decay of particles using the S-matrix.

Khanna, F.C., E-mail: fkhanna@ualberta.ca [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2J1 (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Malbouisson, A.P.C., E-mail: adolfo@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas/MCT, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Malbouisson, J.M.C., E-mail: jmalboui@ufba.br [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Santana, A.E., E-mail: asantana@unb.br [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2J1 (Canada); Instituto de Fisica, International Center for Condensed Matter Physics, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Theory of Quantized Fields. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The arguments leading to the formulation of the action principle for a general field are presented. In association with the complete reduction of all numerical matrices into symmetrical and antisymmetrical parts, the general field is decomposed into two sets, which are identified with Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac fields. The spin restriction on the two kinds of fields is inferred from the time reflection invariance requirement. The consistency of the theory is verified in terms of a criterion involving the various generators of infinitesimal transformations. Following a discussion of charged fields, the electromagnetic field is introduced to satisfy the postulate of general gauge invariance. As an aspect of the latter, it is recognized that the electromagnetic field and charged fields are not kinematically independent. After a discussion of the field strength commutation relations, the independent dynamical variables of the electromagnetic field are exhibited in terms of a special gauge.

Julian Schwinger

1953-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Field Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Techniques Field Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Field Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Map surface geology and hydrothermal alteration. Rock samples are used to define lithology. Field and lab analyses can be used to measure the chemical and isotopic constituents of rock samples. Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments. Identify and document surface geology and mineralogy. Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals.[1] Stratigraphic/Structural: Locates active faults in the area of interest. Map fault and fracture patterns, kinematic information. Can reveal relatively high permeability zones. Provides information about the time and environment which formed a particular geologic unit. Microscopic rock textures can be used to estimate the history of stress and strain, and/or faulting.

217

Magnetic Field Safety Training  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Safety Training Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain...

218

Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

McQuade, D. Tyler

219

Magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have observed that some of our model SSC dipoles have long time constant decays of the magnetic field harmonics with amplitudes large enough to result in significant beam loss, if they are not corrected. The magnets were run at constant current at the SSC injection field level of 0.3 tesla for one to three hours and changes in the magnetic field were observed. One explanation for the observed field decay is time dependent superconductor magnetization. Another explanation involves flux creep or flux flow. Data are presented on how the decay changes with previous flux history. Similar magnets with different Nb-Ti filament spacings and matrix materials have different long time field decay. A theoretical model using proximity coupling and flux creep for the observed field decay is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Information operations with an excitable field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is well established that a traveling wave can be generated on an excitable field, which is described with a pair of partial differential equations for an activator and inhibitor. In the present paper, we use a numerical simulation to show that the traveling wave, or signaling pulse, can be transmitted from an excitable field to an opposing excitable field via an intervening passive diffusion field in a characteristic manner depending on the spatial geometry of the excitable fields. Using such characteristics, it is possible to design various kinds of logic gates together with a time-sequential memory device. Thus, these functions can perform time-sensitive operations in the absence of any controlling clock. It may be possible to accomplish these computations with excitable fields in an actual system, or to create a “field computer” composed of electronic active and passive units.

Ikuko Motoike and Kenichi Yoshikawa

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Modulation Field Induces Universe Rotation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we consider a time dependent module field on spacetime extension without modifying commutative relation on noncommutative quantum plane. The significant idea is that $Lorentz$ symmetry is conserved in module and unmodule coordinate. We focus on the redefinition of spacetime structure without considering noncommutative bosonic gas in deforming the product between fields. Which the null vector is a vector on orthogonal $D$ dimensional $Hilbert$ spacetime. In $Riemann$ geometry, the equation of motion is deformed from an induced rotation. Particle field survives on the state composed by two theoretical assumed $null$ vectors, one is commutative, another is anticommutative. In the point of view, neutrino and photon mass are produced by its shift, the rotated effect generates a horizon in redefining particle field.

Chien Yu Chen

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

An overview of time?reversal acoustics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time?reversal invariance is a very powerful concept in physics. In the field of acoustics where time reversal invariance occurs time?reversal experiments may be achieved simply with arrays of transmit?receive transducers allowing an incident wave field to be sampled recorded time?reversed and re?emitted. Time reversal mirrors (TRMs) may be used to study random media and chaotic reverberating structures. Common to these complex media is a remarkable robustness exemplified by observations that the more complex the medium between the probe source and the TRM the sharper the focus. TRMs open the way to new signal processings that interest imaging detection telecommunications and therapy. Time reversal mirrors have plenty of applications including ultrasonic therapy and medical imaging non destructive testing telecommunications underwater acoustics seismology sound control home automation. An overview of these fields will be presented.

Mathias Fink

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Time variation of the European gravity field from superconducting gravimeters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......comparison between ground and satellite data like the one initiated...Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) that may...semi-annual periods and longer. A satellite will naturally do the ideal...removed before comparison with satellite data because a satellite does......

David Crossley; Jacques Hinderer; Jean-Paul Boy

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Speed of Light as a Dilaton Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Through dimensional analysis, eliminating the physical time, we identify the speed of light as a dilaton field. This leads to a restmass zero, spin zero gauge field which we call the speedon field. The complete Lagrangian for gravitational, electromagnetic and speedon field interactions with a charged scalar field, representing matter, is given. We then find solutions for the gravitational-electromagnetic-speedon field equations. This then gives an expression for the speed of light.

Walter Wyss

1997-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

Geology of Bravo Dome carbon dioxide gas field, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bravo Dome carbon dioxide gas field is located in Union and Harding Counties of northeast New Mexico. The Bravo Dome field covers approximately 800,000 acres, but areal boundaries of the field have not been fully defined. Production in 1989 was 113 bcf of gas from 272 wells. Cumulative production at the end of 1989 was 626 bcf. Estimated recoverable reserves are more than 10 tcf. The gas is 98-99% CO{sub 2}. Most CO{sub 2} produced from Bravo Dome is used for enhanced oil recovery in the Permian basin. The Bravo Dome is a faulted, southeast-plunging, basement-cored anticlinal nose. It is bordered on the east and south by large high-angle faults of Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian (Early Permian) age. The principal reservoir in the Bravo Dome field is the Tubb sandstone (Leonardian-Permian) at depths of 1,900 to 2,950 ft. The Tubb consists of 0-400 ft of fine- to medium-grained, well-sorted, orange feldspathic sandstone. It rests unconformably on Precambrian basement on the highest parts of the Bravo Dome and is not offset by late Paleozoic faults that form the dome. The Cimmaron Anhydrite (Leonardian-Permian) conformably overlies the Tubb and is a vertical seal. The trap at Bravo Dome has structural and stratigraphic aspects. Drape of Tubb sandstone over the dome created structural closure on the northeast, southeast, and southwest flanks of the field. Trapping on the northwest flank of the field is associated with regional northwest thinning of the Tubb.

Broadhead, R.F. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Space-time Curvature of Classical Electromagnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The space-time curvature carried by electromagnetic fields is discovered and a new unification of geometry and electromagnetism is found. Curvature is invariant under charge reversal symmetry. Electromagnetic field equations are examined with De Rham co homology theory. Radiative electromagnetic fields must be exact and co exact to preclude unobserved massless topological charges. Weyl's conformal tensor, here called ``the gravitational field'', is decomposed into a divergence-free non-local piece with support everywhere and a local piece with the same support as the matter. By tuning a local gravitational field to a Maxwell field the electromagnetic field's local gravitational field is discovered. This gravitational field carries the electromagnetic field's polarization or phase information, unlike Maxwell's stress-energy tensor. The unification assumes Einstein's equations and derives Maxwell's equations from curvature assumptions. Gravity forbids magnetic monopoles! This unification is stronger than the Einstein-Maxwell equations alone, as those equations must produce the electromagnetic field's local gravitational field and not just any conformal tensor. Charged black holes are examples. Curvature of radiative null electromagnetic fields is characterized.

R. W. M. Woodside

2004-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Fundamental Plane of field early-type galaxies at intermediate redshift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present preliminary results on the evolution of the stellar populations of field early-type galaxies (E/S0) from z=0.4 to z=0. The diagnostic tool used in this study is the Fundamental Plane (FP), a tight empirical correlation between their central velocity dispersion (sigma), effective radius (Re), and effective surface brightness (SBe), which is observed to hold in the local Universe. Using HST-WFPC2 archive images and spectra obtained at the ESO-3.6m telescope we measured the FP parameters for a sample of ~30 field E/S0s at z=0.2-0.4. Remarkably, field E/S0s at intermediate redshift also define a tight FP, with scatter unchanged with respect to that of local samples. The intermediate redshift FP is offset from the local one, in the sense that, for given RE and sigma, galaxies are brighter at z=0.4 than at z=0. The implication of the offset of the FP in terms of passive evolution of the stellar population depends on its star formation history. In a single burst scenario, the stellar populations of field E/S0s were formed at z=0.8-1.6 (Omega=0.3; Omega_{Lambda}=0.7; H_0=50 km/s/Mpc). Alternatively, the bulk of stars (90% in mass) can be formed at high redshift (z~3), and the rest in a secondary burst occurred more recently (z~0.5-0.8).

T. Treu; M. Stiavelli; S. Casertano; P. Moller; G. Bertin

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

230

Chameleon Field Theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chameleons are light scalar fields with remarkable properties. Through the interplay of self-interactions and coupling to matter, chameleon particles have a mass that depends on the ambient matter density. The manifestation of the fifth force mediated by chameleons therefore depends sensitively on their environment, which makes for a rich phenomenology. In this article, we review two recent results on chameleon phenomenology. The first result a pair of no-go theorems limiting the cosmological impact of chameleons and their generalizations: i) the range of the chameleon force at cosmological density today can be at most ~Mpc; ii) the conformal factor relating Einstein- and Jordan-frame scale factors is essentially constant over the last Hubble time. These theorems imply that chameleons have negligible effect on the linear growth of structure, and cannot account for the observed cosmic acceleration except as some form of dark energy. The second result pertains to the quantum stability of chameleon theories. We ...

Khoury, Justin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Description and Simulation of Gust Front Wind Field Lijuan Wanga  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-stationarity of the wind field associated with these extreme events poses serious challenges in their modelingDescription and Simulation of Gust Front Wind Field Lijuan Wanga , Ahsan Kareemb a Nat front wind field is proposed based on the time-frequency description of the wind field. Traditionally

Kareem, Ahsan

232

WD1953-011 - a magnetic white dwarf with peculiar field structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present H-alpha spectra of the magnetic white dwarf star WD1953-011 which confirm the presence of the broad Zeeman components corresponding to a field strength of about 500kG found by Maxted & Marsh (1999). We also find that the line profile is variable over a timescale of a day or less. The core of the H-alpha line also shows a narrow Zeeman triplet corresponding to a field strength of of about 100kG which appears to be almost constant in shape. These observations suggest that the magnetic field on WD1953-011 has a complex structure and that the star has a rotational period of hours or days which causes the observed variability of the spectra. We argue that neither an offset dipole model nor a double-dipole model are sufficient to explain our observations. Instead, we propose a two component model consisting of a high field region of magnetic field strength of about 500kG covering about 10% of the surface area of the star superimposed on an underlying dipolar field of mean field strength of about 70kG. Radial velocity measurements of the narrow Zeeman triplet show that the radial velocity is constant to within a few km/s so this star is unlikely to be a close binary.

P. F. L. Maxted; L. Ferrario; T. R. Marsh; D. T. Wickramasinghe

2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

233

Golden Field Office Contacts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Field contacts at the U.S. Department of Energy's Golden Field Office who support the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

234

Quantum Field Theory & Gravity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Theory & Gravity Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email...

235

Free energy in thermo field dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A formula to obtain the free energy within the framework of thermo field dynamics (a real-time quantum field theory at finite temperature) is presented. The relation to the Matsubara method is discussed. Examples of a perturbation calculation are presented for the ?4 model up to the two-loop order and are compared with the corresponding result obtained in the Matsubara formalism.

H. Matsumoto; Y. Nakano; H. Umezawa

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Path integral quantization of parametrised field theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free scalar field theory on a flat spacetime can be cast into a generally covariant form known as parametrised field theory in which the action is a functional of the scalar field as well as the embedding variables which describe arbitrary, in general curved, foliations of the flat spacetime. We construct the path integral quantization of parametrised field theory in order to analyse issues at the interface of quantum field theory and general covariance in a path integral context. We show that the measure in the Lorentzian path integral is non-trivial and is the analog of the Fradkin- Vilkovisky measure for quantum gravity. We construct Euclidean functional integrals in the generally covariant setting of parametrised field theory using key ideas of Schleich and show that our constructions imply the existence of non-standard `Wick rotations' of the standard free scalar field 2 point function. We develop a framework to study the problem of time through computations of scalar field 2 point functions. We illustrate our ideas through explicit computation for a time independent 1+1 dimensional foliation. Although the problem of time seems to be absent in this simple example, the general case is still open. We discuss our results in the contexts of the path integral formulation of quantum gravity and the canonical quantization of parametrised field theory.

Madhavan Varadarajan

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

237

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2006.01.01 - 2006.12.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. In an extension of our earlier work on crop systems, we investigated the effects of burning on the cycles of carbon, water, and energy in an example of grazed land of the Southern Great Plains. In collaboration with Dr. Herman Mayeux, of the USDA Grazing

238

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2004.04.15 - 2004.12.15 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. Models predicting fluxes for un-irrigated agriculture were posed with the challenge of characterizing the onset and severity of plant water stress. We conducted a study that quantified the spatial heterogeneity and temporal variations in land

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - ac electromagnetic field Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topics (time permitting). 12;The Nature of Electromagnetism Electric and magnetic fields... that are coupled; they are then referred to as an electromagnetic field....

240

Precision Timed Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.4 Precision Timed Machines . . . . .Precision Timed Machine 2.1precision timed (PRET) machine. pages 264–265, June 2007. [

Liu, Isaac Suyu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Heteronuclear isotropic mixing separated local field NMR spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a theoretical numerical and experimental study of a new class of separated local field (SLF) techniques. These techniques are based on the heteronuclear isotropic mixing leading to spin exchange via the local field (HIMSELF). It is shown that highly efficient and robust SLF experiments can be designed based on double channel windowless homonuclear decoupling sequences. Compared to rotating frame techniques based on Hartmann-Hahn cross polarization the new approach is less susceptible to the frequency offset and chemical shift interaction and can be applied in the structural studies of macromolecules that are uniformly labeled with isotopes such as C 13 and N 15 . Furthermore isotropic mixing sequences allow for transfer of any magnetization component of one nucleus to the corresponding component of its dipolar coupled partner. The performance of HIMSELF is studied by analysis of the average Hamiltonian and numerical simulation and is experimentally demonstrated on a single crystalline sample of a dipeptide and a liquid crystalline sample exhibiting motionally averaged dipolar couplings.

Sergey V. Dvinskikh; Kazutoshi Yamamoto; Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Mixing time for the Ising model and random walks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3.2.2 The Ising model on trees . . . . . . . .I Mixing time for the Ising model 2 Mixing evolutionmean-field Ising model 2.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . .

Ding, Jian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hippocampal ``Time Cells'': Time versus Path Integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neuron Article Hippocampal ``Time Cells'': Time versus Path Integration Benjamin J. Kraus,1 function of hippocampal networks (Etienne and Jeffery, 2004; McNaughton et al., 1991, 1996, 2006; O

Hasselmo, Michael

244

Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

Praeg, Walter F. (Palos Park, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Warm inflation in presence of magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present preliminary results on the possible effects that primordial magnetic fields can have for a warm inflation scenario, based on global supersymmetry, with a new-inflation-type potential. This work is motivated by two considerations: first, magnetic fields seem to be present in the universe on all scales which rises de possibility that they could also permeate the early universe; second, the recent emergence of inflationary models where the inflaton is not assumed to be isolated but instead it is taken as an interacting field, even during the inflationary expansion. The effects of magnetic fields are included resorting to Schwinger's proper time method.

Piccinelli, Gabriella [Centro Tecnológico, FES Aragón, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Rancho Seco S/N, Bosques de Aragón, Nezahualcóyotl, Estado de México 57130 (Mexico)] [Centro Tecnológico, FES Aragón, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Rancho Seco S/N, Bosques de Aragón, Nezahualcóyotl, Estado de México 57130 (Mexico); Sánchez, Ángel [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Ayala, Alejandro; Mizher, Ana Julia [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, México Distrito Federal 04510 (Mexico)] [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, México Distrito Federal 04510 (Mexico)

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

246

Sensor for detecting changes in magnetic fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sensor is described for detecting changes in the magnetic field of the equilibrium-field coil of a Tokamak plasma device that comprises a pair of bifilar wires disposed circumferentially, one inside and one outside the equilibrium-field coil. Each is shorted at one end. The difference between the voltages detected at the other ends of the bifilar wires provides a measure of changing flux in the equilibrium-field coil. This difference can be used to detect faults in the coil in time to take action to protect the coil.

Praeg, W.F.

1980-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

247

Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

248

Electromagnetic field with constraints and Papapetrou equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that geometric optical description of electromagnetic wave with account of its polarization in curved space-time can be obtained straightforwardly from the classical variational principle for electromagnetic field. For this end the entire functional space of electromagnetic fields must be reduced to its subspace of locally plane monochromatic waves. We have formulated the constraints under which the entire functional space of electromagnetic fields reduces to its subspace of locally plane monochromatic waves. These constraints introduce variables of another kind which specify a field of local frames associated to the wave and contain some congruence of null-curves. The Lagrangian for constrained electromagnetic field contains variables of two kinds, namely, a congruence of null-curves and the field itself. This yields two kinds of Euler-Lagrange equations. Equations of first kind are trivial due to the constraints imposed. Variation of the curves yields the Papapetrou equations for a classical massless particle with helicity 1.

Z. Ya. Turakulov; A. T. Muminov

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

249

Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current...

250

Golden Field Office  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Golden Field Office was designated a Department of Energy field office in December 1992 to provide EERE with enhanced capability to develop and commercialize renewable energy and energy...

251

Smoothness- transferred random field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new random field (RF) model, smoothness-transfer random field (ST-RF) model, for image modeling. In the objective function of RF models, smoothness energy is defined with compatibility function to capture the ...

Wei, Donglai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Heliostat Field Performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heliostat is the first subsystem in a central ... report of the SSPS Central Receiver System.The heliostat field was designed and manufactured by the ... Corporation.The original field design consisted of 160...

Pierre Wattiez; Juan Ramos; Sevillana…

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Quantized Gravitational Field. II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A consistent formulation is given for the quantized gravitational field in interaction with integer spin fields. Lorentz transformation equivalence within a class of physically distinguished coordinate systems is verified.

Julian Schwinger

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Primordial magnetic fields from self-ordering scalar fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A symmetry-breaking phase transition in the early universe could have led to the formation of cosmic defects. Because these defects dynamically excite not only scalar and tensor type cosmological perturbations but also vector type ones, they may serve as a source of primordial magnetic fields. In this study, we calculate the time evolution and the spectrum of magnetic fields that are generated by a type of cosmic defects, called global textures, using the non-linear sigma (NLSM) model. Based on the standard cosmological perturbation theory, we show, both analytically and numerically, that a vector-mode relative velocity between photon and baryon fluids is induced by textures, which inevitably leads to the generation of magnetic fields over a wide range of scales. We find that the amplitude of the magnetic fields is given by $B\\sim{10^{-9}}{((1+z)/10^3)^{-2.5}}({v}/{m_{\\rm pl}})^2({k}/{\\rm Mpc^{-1}})^{3.5}/{\\sqrt{N}}$ Gauss in the radiation dominated era for $k\\lesssim 1$ Mpc$^{-1}$, with $v$ being the vacuum ...

Horiguchi, Kouichirou; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a feature class (FC) with the following attributes: Field_name Buffer distance (can be unique for each well to represent reservoirs with different drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class in same GDB as the well points FC, with one polygon field record (may be multiple polygon rings) per field_name. Overlapping buffers for the same field name are dissolved and unioned (see figure below). Adds an attribute PCTFEDLAND which can be populated using the VBA

256

Intrinsic Magnetic Fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emission theory of electromagnetic fields.—(1) Intrinsic magnetic field. The intrinsic magnetic field of a point charge is defined as that portion of the field which cannot be annihilated by the Lorentz transformation. It is shown that the intrinsic field can be represented by lines of force carried by the same moving elements as carry the electric field, and a potential is given for it. (2) Frequency of emission of moving elements. A relation between the frequency of emission of moving elements and the number of lines of force to a tube is deduced on the assumption that the latter number is the same for the electric and magnetic fields and that each moving element marks the intersection of an electric and magnetic line of force.

Leigh Page

1923-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Electric field divertor plasma pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode (56) positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak (20), or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix (40) of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode (56), which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum (54) or other duct near the electrode (56) includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode (56) is insulated laterally with insulators (63,64), one of which (64) is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode (56) and a vacuum vessel wall (22), with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E.times.B/B.sup.2 drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable.

Schaffer, Michael J. (San Diego, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Electric field divertor plasma pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric field plasma pump includes a toroidal ring bias electrode positioned near the divertor strike point of a poloidal divertor of a tokamak, or similar plasma-confining apparatus. For optimum plasma pumping, the separatrix of the poloidal divertor contacts the ring electrode, which then also acts as a divertor plate. A plenum or other duct near the electrode includes an entrance aperture open to receive electrically-driven plasma. The electrode is insulated laterally with insulators, one of which is positioned opposite the electrode at the entrance aperture. An electric field E is established between the ring electrode and a vacuum vessel wall, with the polarity of the bias applied to the electrode being relative to the vessel wall selected such that the resultant electric field E interacts with the magnetic field B already existing in the tokamak to create an E [times] B/B[sup 2] drift velocity that drives plasma into the entrance aperture. The pumped plasma flow into the entrance aperture is insensitive to variations, intentional or otherwise, of the pump and divertor geometry. Pressure buildups in the plenum or duct connected to the entrance aperture in excess of 10 mtorr are achievable. 11 figs.

Schaffer, M.J.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

Antisymmetric field in string gas cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how the introduction of a 2-form field flux modify the dynamics of a T-duality invariant string gas cosmology model of Greene, Kabat and Marnerides. It induces a repulsive potential term in the effective action for the scale factor of the spacial dimensions. Without the 2-form field flux, the universe fails to expand when the pressure due to string modes vanishes. With the presence of a homogeneous 2-form field flux, it propels 3 spacial dimensions to grow into a macroscopic 4 dimensional space-time. We find that it triggers an expansion of a universe away from the oscillating phase around the self-dual radius. We also investigate the effects of a constant 2-form field. We can obtain an expanding 4 dimensional space-time by tuning it at the critical value.

Igmar C. Rosas-López; Yoshihisa Kitazawa

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

260

Density waves in a transverse electric field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a quasi-one-dimensional conductor with an open Fermi surface, a charge- or a spin-density-wave phase can be destroyed by an electric field perpendicular to the direction of high conductivity. This mechanism, due to the breakdown of electron-hole symmetry, is very similar to the orbital destruction of superconductivity by a magnetic field, due to time-reversal symmetry.

Gilles Montambaux

1996-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Forest and Carbon offset investments: problems and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and problems related to forest investments as C sinks 2. The two markets: ­The "regulated" market ­The voluntary market 3. Some final considerations 1. Mitigation options and problems related to forest (Bioenergy / biofuels) Mitigation options in the forest sector #12;2 Source: Schlamadinger, 2000 2. The two

Pettenella, Davide

262

Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions reductions from GHG emissions reductions policies; AND WE should incentivize agriculture.S. Agriculture in Climate Change Mitigation: Agriculture is both a source of GHG, and a sink (GHG reservoir) As a source of GHG, agriculture contributes approximately 7% of US GHG emissions* ­ mostly from small, diffuse

263

Explaining the Price of Voluntary Carbon Offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on fuel efficiency, hydropower, fuel substitution, solarbiomass methane, wind, hydropower, solar, and other. 8 OECDtypes of biomass methane, hydropower, so- lar, and wind. All

Conte, Marc N.; Kotchen, Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Semiconductor heterojunction band offsets and charge neutrality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on semi- conductors A and B like Figure 3. 1, and commutativity of semiconductors A and B, i. e. , DEs(A ? B) = DE?(B ? A). (3. 33) We predict the charge neutrality levels &b, 4is and 4i, might align in semiconductors A, B and C as shown in Figure 3...

Lee, Chomsik

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

265

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Field Test Best Practices (FTBP) Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Field Test Best Practices (FTBP) Update: Field Test Best Practices (FTBP) Update: It's here! And we need you! Lieko Earle Dane Christensen Bethany Sparn Building America Stakeholder Meeting 2012-03-02 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Identified Field Testing Needs 2 * Difficult to find good general guidelines * Difficult to find examples of good field test plans * Difficult to find information on instrumentation options * No easily-accessible central repository for best practices knowledge * Field tests were taking longer and costing more $$ than initially estimated * We keep reinventing the wheel * Start from scratch each time we write a data-logger program? * Repeat each other's mistakes? NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY What is the FTBP Resource?

267

The Theory of Quantized Fields. IV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The principal development in this paper is the extension of the eigenvalue-eigenvector concept to complete sets of anticommuting operators. With the aid of this formalism we construct a transformation function for the Dirac field, as perturbed by an external source. This transformation function is enlarged to describe phase transformations and, when applied to the isolated Dirac field, yields the charge and energy-momentum eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. The transformation function describing the system in the presence of the source is then used as a generating function to construct the matrices of all ordered products of the field operators, for the isolated Dirac field. The matrices in the occupation number representation are exhibited with a classification that effectively employs a time-reversed description for negative frequency modes. The last section supplements III by constructing the matrices of all ordered products of the potential vector, for the isolated electromagnetic field.

Julian Schwinger

1953-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Hot Pot Field Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

Hot Pot Field Observations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

270

Time-Resolved  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Time-Resolved Time-Resolved Print Of the four fundamental parameters that we use to perceive the physical world (energy, momentum, position, and time) three correspond to the three broad categories of synchrotron experimental measurement techniques: spectroscopy (energy), scattering (momentum), and imaging (position). The fourth parameter-time-can in principle be applied to all the techniques. At the ALS, many experiments can be carried out in real time, with data being recorded from the same sample as it changes over time. Some time-resolved experiments take advantage of the pulsed nature of the ALS's synchrotron radiation, which, like a strobe light, can capture a series of "snapshots" of a process that, when viewed sequentially, show us how a given process evolves over time. Other experiments simply require two pulses: one to "pump" energy into the sample system and a second to probe the system's excited state.

271

Separation of magnetic field lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field lines of magnetic fields that depend on three spatial coordinates are shown to have a fundamentally different behavior from those that depend on two coordinates. Unlike two-coordinate cases, a flux tube in a magnetic field that depends on all three spatial coordinates that has a circular cross section at one location along the tube characteristically has a highly distorted cross section at other locations. In an ideal evolution of a magnetic field, the current densities typically increase. Crudely stated, if the current densities increase by a factor {sigma}, the ratio of the long to the short distance across a cross section of a flux tube characteristically increases by e{sup 2{sigma}}, and the ratio of the longer distance to the initial radius increases as e{sup {sigma}}. Electron inertia prevents a plasma from isolating two magnetic field structures on a distance scale shorter than c/{omega}{sub pe}, which is about 10 cm in the solar corona, and reconnection must be triggered if {sigma} becomes sufficiently large. The radius of the sun, R{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }=7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm is about e{sup 23} times larger, so when {sigma} Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 23, two lines separated by c/{omega}{sub pe} at one location can be separated by the full scale of any magnetic structures in the corona at another. The conditions for achieving a large exponentiation, {sigma}, are derived, and the importance of exponentiation is discussed.

Boozer, Allen H. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Hyperon bulk viscosity in strong magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the bulk viscosity of neutron star matter including {lambda} hyperons in the presence of quantizing magnetic fields. Relaxation time and bulk viscosity due to both the nonleptonic weak process involving {lambda} hyperons and direct Urca processes are calculated here. In the presence of a strong magnetic field of 10{sup 17} G, the hyperon bulk viscosity coefficient is reduced, whereas bulk viscosity coefficients due to direct Urca processes are enhanced compared with their field free cases when many Landau levels are populated by protons, electrons, and muons.

Sinha, Monika; Bandyopadhyay, Debades [Theory Division and Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Casimir Effect of Scalar Massive Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy momentum tensor is used to introduce the Casimir force of the massive scalar field acting on a nonpenetrating surface. This expression can be used to evaluate the vacuum force by employing the appropriate field operators. To simplify our formalism we also relates the vacuum force expression to the imaginary part of the Green function via the fluctuation dissipation theorem and Kubo formula. This allows one to evaluate the vacuum force without resorting to the process of field quantization. These two approaches are used to calculate the attractive force between two nonpenetrating plates. Special attention is paid to the generalization of the formalism to D + 1 space-time dimensions.

Sonia Mobassem

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

274

Formation of morphogen gradients: Local accumulation time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spatial regulation of cell differentiation in embryos can be provided by morphogen gradients, which are defined as the concentration fields of molecules that control gene expression. For example, a cell can use its surface receptors to measure the local concentration of an extracellular ligand and convert this information into a corresponding change in its transcriptional state. We characterize the time needed to establish a steady-state gradient in problems with diffusion and degradation of locally produced chemical signals. A relaxation function is introduced to describe how the morphogen concentration profile approaches its steady state. This function is used to obtain a local accumulation time that provides a time scale that characterizes relaxation to steady state at an arbitrary position within the patterned field. To illustrate the approach we derive local accumulation times for a number of commonly used models of morphogen gradient formation.

Alexander M. Berezhkovskii; Christine Sample; Stanislav Y. Shvartsman

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

275

Interpreting Attoclock Measurements of Tunnelling Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss measurements of time-delays during strong-field ionization of atoms using few-cycle circularly polarized laser pulses -- the attoclock setup. We perform numerical experiments for the benchmark system of the hydrogen atom and analyze them using fully quantum analytical theory with no ad-hoc assumptions or adjustable parameters. Excellent quantitative agreement between theory and ab initio simulations allows us to characterize time-delays measured by the attoclock, demonstrate that these delays are not related to tunnelling delays and are induced entirely by the interaction of the liberated electron with the long-range Coulomb potential of the ionic core. Our analysis gives access to 'ionization times' -- the times when an electron exits the tunnelling barrier created by the combination of the laser field and the core potential, showing that some of the key assumptions used in the semiclassical interpretation of the attoclock experiments do not always agree with the fully quantum analysis.

Torlina, Lisa; Kaushal, Jivesh; Muller, Harm Geert; Ivanov, Igor; Kheifets, Anatoli; Zielinski, Alejandro; Scrinzi, Armin; Ivanov, Misha; Smirnova, Olga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Interpreting Attoclock Measurements of Tunnelling Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss measurements of time-delays during strong-field ionization of atoms using few-cycle circularly polarized laser pulses -- the attoclock setup. We perform numerical experiments for the benchmark system of the hydrogen atom and analyze them using fully quantum analytical theory with no ad-hoc assumptions or adjustable parameters. Excellent quantitative agreement between theory and ab initio simulations allows us to characterize time-delays measured by the attoclock, demonstrate that these delays are not related to tunnelling delays and are induced entirely by the interaction of the liberated electron with the long-range Coulomb potential of the ionic core. Our analysis gives access to 'ionization times' -- the times when an electron exits the tunnelling barrier created by the combination of the laser field and the core potential, showing that some of the key assumptions used in the semiclassical interpretation of the attoclock experiments do not always agree with the fully quantum analysis.

Lisa Torlina; Felipe Morales; Jivesh Kaushal; Harm Geert Muller; Igor Ivanov; Anatoli Kheifets; Alejandro Zielinski; Armin Scrinzi; Misha Ivanov; Olga Smirnova

2014-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

CHAPTER XV - TIME SERIES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter provides an overview of time series. A time series is a set of observations of a variable made at different points of time and arranged in chronological order, each observation representing the value of the variable either at a given moment or during the interval of time between this observation and the preceding one. In general, the observations forming a time-series as made at equidistant intervals of time are considered. The factors affecting time-series may be recurring or nonrecurring, or evolutionary, periodic, or random. The method of moving averages consists in determining the average value for a certain number of terms of a time series and taking this average as the trend normal value for the middle of the period covered in the calculation of the average, that is, the period extent of the moving average.

ISAAC PAENSON

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Y-12 Times  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

good use Pages 4 and 5 The comings and goings during June Page 7 Y-12's new talent Ray Smith Donna Watson Bill Wilburn Lisa Xiques times times the B&W Technical Services Y-12,...

279

Field of Expertise Biotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field of Expertise Human- & Biotechnology #12;Human- and biotechnology is one of the key possible by research in human- and biotechnology is not just restricted to medicine and pharmacy, but also laboratory to support introduction of medical products to the market. In the field of biotechnology, Graz

280

Diamond fiber field emitters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B. (Wilmington, DE); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Eaton, David F. (Wilmington, DE); Silzars, Aris K. (Landenburg, PA); Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Heel effect adaptive flat field correction of digital x-ray detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Anode heel effect renders large-scale background nonuniformities in digital radiographs. Conventional offset/gain calibration is performed at mono source-to-image distance (SID), and disregards the SID-dependent characteristic of heel effect. It results in a residual nonuniform background in the corrected radiographs when the SID settings for calibration and correction differ. In this work, the authors develop a robust and efficient computational method for digital x-ray detector gain correction adapted to SID-variant heel effect, without resorting to physical filters, phantoms, complicated heel effect models, or multiple-SID calibration and interpolation.Methods: The authors present the Duo-SID projection correction method. In our approach, conventional offset/gain calibrations are performed only twice, at the minimum and maximum SIDs of the system in typical clinical use. A fast iterative separation algorithm is devised to extract the detector gain and basis heel patterns from the min/max SID calibrations. The resultant detector gain is independent of SID, while the basis heel patterns are parameterized by the min- and max-SID. The heel pattern at any SID is obtained from the min-SID basis heel pattern via projection imaging principles. The system gain desired at a specific acquisition SID is then constructed using the projected heel pattern and detector gain map.Results: The method was evaluated for flat field and anatomical phantom image corrections. It demonstrated promising improvements over interpolation and conventional gain calibration/correction methods, lowering their correction errors by approximately 70% and 80%, respectively. The separation algorithm was able to extract the detector gain and heel patterns with less than 2% error, and the Duo-SID corrected images showed perceptually appealing uniform background across the detector.Conclusions: The Duo-SID correction method has substantially improved on conventional offset/gain corrections for digital x-ray imaging in an SID-variant environment. The technique is relatively simple, and can be easily incorporated into multiple-point gain calibration/correction techniques. It offers a potentially valuable tool for preprocessing digital x-ray images to boost image quality of mammography, chest and cardiac radiography, as well as automated computer aided diagnostic radiology.

Yu, Yongjian [X-ray Products, Varian Medical Systems Inc., Liverpool, New York 13088 (United States)] [X-ray Products, Varian Medical Systems Inc., Liverpool, New York 13088 (United States); Wang, Jue [Department of Mathematics, Union College, Schenectady, New York 12308 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, Union College, Schenectady, New York 12308 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Causality Is Inconsistent With Quantum Field Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Causality in quantum field theory means the vanishing of commutators for spacelike separated fields (VCSSF). I will show that VCSSF is not tenable. For VCSSF to be tenable, and therefore, to have both retarded and advanced propagators vanish in the elsewhere, a superposition of negative energy antiparticle and positive energy particle propagators, traveling forward in time, and a superposition of negative energy particle and positive energy antiparticle propagators, traveling backward in time, are required. Hence VCSSF predicts non-vanishing probabilities for both negative energy particles in the forward-through-time direction and positive energy antiparticles in the backwards-through-time direction. Therefore, since VCSSF is unrealizable in a stable universe, tachyonic propagation must occur in denial of causality.

Wolf, Fred Alan [Global Quantum Physics Educational Company, San Francisco CA (United States)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Asia Times -Search Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asia Times - Search Asia Times Advanced Search Southeast Asia Scapegoats for Indonesia's timber://www.atimes.com/atimes/Southeast_Asia/EI19Ae01.html (1 of 4)9/4/2007 3:01:50 PM Search #12;Asia Times - rather than on the nationwide band

284

Asia Times -Search Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Asia Times - Search Asia Times Advanced Search Southeast Asia Scapegoats for Indonesia's timber://www.atimes.com/atimes/Southeast_Asia/EI19Ae01.html (1 of 4)9/4/2007 12:55:07 PM Search #12;Asia Times - rather than on the nationwide band

285

Abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data are presented for approximately 165 abandoned oil fields in Oklahoma that have produced 10,000 or more barrels of oil prior to abandonment. The following information is provided for each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date of field; year of last production, if known; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; gravity of oil production; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (ATT)

Chism, J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Active Cores in Deep Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep field observations are an essential tool to probe the cosmological evolution of galaxies. In this context, X-ray deep fields provide information about some of the most energetic cosmological objects: active galactic nuclei (AGN). Astronomers are interested in detecting sufficient numbers of AGN to probe the accretion history at high redshift. This talk gives an overview of the knowledge resulting from a highly complete soft X-ray selected sample collected with ROSAT, XMM-Newton and Chandra deep fields. The principal outcome based on X-ray luminosity functions and space density evolution studies is that low-luminosity AGN evolve in a dramatically different way from high-luminosity AGN: The most luminous quasars perform at significantly earlier cosmic times and are most numerous in a unit volume at cosmological redshift z~2. In contrast, low-luminosity AGN evolve later and their space density peaks at z~0.7. This finding is also interpreted as an anti-hierarchical growth of supermassive black holes in the Universe. Comparing this with star formation rate history studies one concludes that supermassive black holes enter the cosmic stage before the bulk of the first stars. Therefore, first solutions of the so-called hen-egg problem are suggested. Finally, status developments and expectations of ongoing and future extended observations such as the XMM-COSMOS project are highlighted.

G. Hasinger; A. Mueller

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hydrogen atom moving across a magnetic field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hydrogen atom moving across a magnetic field is considered in a wide region of magnitudes of magnetic field and atom momentum. We solve the Schrödinger equation of the system numerically using an imaginary time method and find wave functions of the lowest states of atom. We calculate the energy and the mean electron-nucleus separation as a function of atom momentum and magnetic field. All the results obtained could be summarized as a phase diagram on the “atom-momentum – magnetic-field” plane. There are transformations of wave-function structure at critical values of atom momentum and magnetic field that result in a specific behavior of dependencies of energy and mean interparticle separation on the atom momentum P. We discuss a transition from the Zeeman regime to the high magnetic field regime. A qualitative analysis of the complicated behavior of wave functions vs P based on the effective potential examination is given. We analyze a sharp transition at the critical momentum from a Coulomb-type state polarized due to atom motion to a strongly decentered (Landau-type) state at low magnetic fields. A crossover occurring at intermediate magnetic fields is also studied.

Yu. E. Lozovik and S. Yu. Volkov

2004-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

288

Time-resolved measurements of plasma-induced momentum in air and nitrogen under dielectric barrier discharge actuation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been much recent interest in boundary layer (BL) actuation by offset surface dielectric barrier discharges (SDBD). These discharges either act directly on the gas momentum through the mechanism of charge separation or they increase the flow stability through the creation of disturbances to the BL at a particular frequency. The objective of the work reported here is to clarify the physical mechanism of plasma-flow interaction. Two problems are considered in detail: the exact spatial/temporal distribution of the plasma-related force, and the specific role of negative ions in the net force budget. The experiments were made with an offset electrode configuration of SDBD at voltage amplitude U{<=}12 kV and frequency f=0.02-2 kHz. The main data were obtained by time-resolved Pitot tube pressure measurements in air and nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. Three main features of SDBD behavior were considered. First, the strong inhomogeneity in the spatial distribution of the plasma-induced flow were detected. Second, the principal role of negative ions in plasma-induced flow generation was established. Third, the two types of gas disturbances were observed: the thermal effect and momentum transfer effect (ion wind). To explain the aforementioned features of SDBD behavior in air and nitrogen the results of numerical simulation have been used.

Leonov, Sergey [Joint Institute for High Temperature, RAS, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Opaits, Dmitry; Miles, Richard [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Soloviev, Victor [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow Region 141700 (Russian Federation)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

Secondary natural gas recovery in mature fluvial sandstone reservoirs, Frio Formation, Agua Dulce Field, South Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An approach that integrates detailed geologic, engineering, and petrophysical analyses combined with improved well-log analytical techniques can be used by independent oil and gas companies of successful infield exploration in mature Gulf Coast fields that larger companies may consider uneconomic. In a secondary gas recovery project conducted by the Bureau of Economic Geology and funded by the Gas Research Institute and the U.S. Department of Energy, a potential incremental natural gas resource of 7.7 bcf, of which 4.0 bcf may be technically recoverable, was identified in a 490-ac lease in Agua Dulce field. Five wells in this lease had previously produced 13.7 bcf from Frio reservoirs at depths of 4600-6200 ft. The pay zones occur in heterogeneous fluvial sandstones offset by faults associated with the Vicksburg fault zone. The compartments may each contain up to 1.0 bcf of gas resources with estimates based on previous completions and the recent infield drilling experience of Pintas Creek Oil Company. Uncontacted gas resources occur in thin (typically less than 10 ft) bypassed zones that can be identified through a computed log evaluation that integrates open-hole logs, wireline pressure tests, fluid samples, and cores. At Agua Dulce field, such analysis identified at 4-ft bypassed zone uphole from previously produced reservoirs. This reservoir contained original reservoir pressure and flowed at rates exceeding 1 mmcf/d. The expected ultimate recovery is 0.4 bcf. Methodologies developed in the evaluation of Agua Dulce field can be successfully applied to other mature gas fields in the south Texas Gulf Coast. For example, Stratton and McFaddin are two fields in which the secondary gas recovery project has demonstrated the existence of thin, potentially bypassed zones that can yield significant incremental gas resources, extending the economic life of these fields.

Ambrose, W.A.; Levey, R.A. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Vidal, J.M. (ResTech, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Sippel, M.A. (Research and Engineering Consultants, Inc., Englewood, CA (United States)); Ballard, J.R. (Envirocorp Services and Technology, Houston, TX (United States)); Coover, D.M. Jr. (Pintas Creek Oil Company, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)); Bloxsom, W.E. (Coastal Texas Oil and Gas, Houston, TX (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Analysis Driven Field Testing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ANALYSIS DRIVEN FIELD TESTING ANALYSIS DRIVEN FIELD TESTING Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 MODELING DRIVEN FIELD TESTING Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 MODELING DRIVEN MEASUREMENTS Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 "Modeling without measuring lacks credibility. Measuring without modeling lacks generality." Ed Hancock

292

Magnetic Field Viewing Cards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For some years now laminated cards containing a green magnetically sensitive film have been available from science education suppliers. When held near a magnet these cards appear dark green in regions where the field is perpendicular to the card and light green where the field is parallel to the card. The cards can be used to explore the magnetic field near a variety of magnets as well as near wire loops. In this paper we describe how to make these cards and how we have used them in our physics classrooms and labs.

Stephen Kanim; John R. Thompson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Hard thermal loops in static external fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study, in the imaginary-time formalism, the high temperature behavior of n-point thermal loops in static Yang-Mills and gravitational fields. We show that in this regime, any hard thermal loop gives the same leading contribution as the one obtained by evaluating the loop at zero external energies and momenta.

J. Frenkel; S. H. Pereira; N. Takahashi

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

Evaluating stream predicates over dynamic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Technological advances have created an unprecedented availability of inexpensive sensors able to stream environmental data in real-time. However, we still seek appropriate data management technology capable of handling this onslaught of sampling in previously ... Keywords: continuous phenomena, data streams system, fields, sensor data streams

J. C. Whittier, Qinghan Liang, Silvia Nittel

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Field Devices for Monitoring Soil Water Content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1. Volumetric Field Methods 2.1.1. Neutron Moderation 2.1.2. Dielectric Methods 2.1.2.1. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) 2.1.2.2. Frequency Domain (FD): Capacitance and FDR 2.1.2.3. Amplitude Domain Reflectometry

296

Hard thermal loops in static external fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine, in the imaginary-time formalism, the high temperature behavior of n-point thermal loops in static Yang-Mills and gravitational fields. We show that in this regime, any hard thermal loop gives the same leading contribution as the one obtained by evaluating the loop integral at zero external energies and momenta.

Frenkel, J.; Takahashi, N. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187-05508-090 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, S. H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas Rua do Matao, 1226-05508-090 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Non-Equilibrium Conformal Field Theories with Impurities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a construction of non-equilibrium steady states within conformal field theory. These states sustain energy flows between two quantum systems, initially prepared at different temperatures, whose dynamical properties are represented by two, possibly different, conformal field theories connected through an impurity. This construction relies on a real time formulation of conformal defect dynamics based on a field scattering picture parallelizing - but yet different from - the Euclidean formulation. We present the basic characteristics of this formulation and give an algebraic construction of the real time scattering maps that we illustrate in the case of SU(2)-based conformal field theories.

D. Bernard; B. Doyon; J. Viti

2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

Carlsbad Field Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the ORNLCCP Dear Mr. Kieling: This letter transmits the Final Audit Report for Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Audit A-14-03 of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Central...

299

Temporary Hourly Archaeological Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, conduct applied research, and offer career development and learning opportunities to support resource carpooled. RESPONSIBILITIES Under the general direction of the CEMML archaeological Crew Chief, conduct archaeological field work involving archaeological inventory survey operations on various tracts of military

300

Intelligent field emission arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field emission arrays (FEAs) have been studied extensively as potential electron sources for a number of vacuum microelectronic device applications. For most applications, temporal current stability and spatial current ...

Hong, Ching-yin, 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

subsurface geological field | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorptiondesorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations...

302

EMSL - subsurface geological field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorptiondesorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations...

303

Field Theory of Matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A speculative field theory of matter is developed. Simple computational methods are used in a preliminary survey of its consequences. The theory exploits the known properties of leptons by means of a principle of symmetry between electrical and nucleonic charge. There are fundamental fields with spins 0, ½, 1. The spinless field is neutral. Spin ½ and 1 fields can carry both electrical and nucleonic charge. The multiplicity of any nonzero charge is 3. Explicit dynamical mechanisms for the breakdown of unitary symmetry and for the muon-electron mass difference are given. A more general view of lepton properties is proposed. Mass relations for baryon and meson multiplets are derived, together with approximate couplings among the multiplets. The weakness of ? production in ?-N collisions and the suppression of the ???+? decay is explained.

Julian Schwinger

1964-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Dangerous electromagnetic fields?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dangerous electromagnetic fields? Dangerous electromagnetic fields? Name: Tommy T Joseph Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why are electromagnetic fields supposedly dangerous? Replies: I assume you are asking about power line frequency (60 Hz) fields, since they have been in the news lately. No one knows for sure that they are dangerous. There have been a few studies which seem to show an association between how close homes are to power lines, and the incidence of childhood cancer (mostly leukemia) in children living (or who have lived) in those homes. Other similar studies have not found such an association. In all the studies which have found an association, none has actually measured the fields. Studies which actually have measured the fields find no association. There is no known mechanism for 60 Hz fields to cause cancer. Furthermore, the classic "dose-response relationship," that is, the greater the dose, the greater the response, does not seem to work here. Many laboratory studies have found that 60 Hz fields have an effect on organisms under certain conditions, but none of the observed effects can be convincingly related to a hazard. The bottom line is, no one knows for sure. It is important to realize that it is impossible to prove that anything is completely safe. My personal opinion is that, if there is a risk, it must be very small, or it wouldn't be so hard to prove. I can supply some good unbiased references if you are interested.

305

Field studies of wildlife at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA): Relevance to risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies of wildlife at contaminated sites can provide information about past and present effects, but are limited in spatial and temporal resolution. They cannot be used to predict future risks without utilizing risk assessment methodologies, including exposure-response relationships. RMA is unusual among Superfund sites in that its large size permits the existence of diverse wildlife populations in peripheral areas, despite high levels of contamination in central areas. Risk assessments conducted at RMA predict steep gradients in severity of effects from high in the central areas to low in peripheral areas. The population effects of such gradients will vary among species, depending on their exposure ranges and dispersal behavior. Effects on survival or reproduction in core areas may be partly or wholly offset by immigration from peripheral or offsite areas. Most field studies of wildlife populations at RMA have been conducted at scales inappropriate for ecological risk characterization, and have not been integrated with information on patterns of contamination or exposure. Hence, they do not provide much useful information to complement or modify the results of risk assessments. More focused field studies are needed to provide useful information on wildlife effects before and after remediation.

Nisbet, I.C.T. [I.C.T. Nisbet and Co., Inc., N. Falmouth, MA (United States); Swain, W.R. [ECO Logic, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Star, I. [GeoTrans, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Intrinsic Time Quantum Geometrodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Geometrodynamics with intrinsic time development and momentric variables is presented. An underlying SU(3) group structure at each spatial point regulates the theory. The intrinsic time behavior of the theory is analyzed, together with its ground state and primordial quantum fluctuations. Cotton-York potential dominates at early times when the universe was small; the ground state naturally resolves Penrose's Weyl Curvature Hypothesis, and thermodynamic and gravitational `arrows of time' point in the same direction. Ricci scalar potential corresponding to Einstein's General Relativity emerges as a zero-point energy contribution. A new set of fundamental canonical commutation relations without Planck's constant emerges from the unification of Gravitation and Quantum Mechanics.

Eyo Eyo Ita III; Chopin Soo; Hoi-Lai Yu

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

Time Series Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Know how to apply simple methods for time series forecasting such as moving averages and the three levels of exponential smoothing.

Marc Goetschalckx

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Magnetic Fields Analogous to electric field, a magnet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characteristic of elementary particles such as an electron #12;Magnetic Fields Magnetic field lines Direction;Magnetic Fields Magnetic field lines enter one end (south) of magnet and exit the other end (north) Opposite magnetic poles attract like magnetic poles repel #12;Like the electric field lines

Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

309

An optical time-delay estimate for the double gravitational lens system B1600+434  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present optical I-band light curves of the gravitationally lensed double QSO B1600+434 from observations obtained at the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) between April 1998 and November 1999. The photometry has been performed by simultaneous deconvolution of all the data frames, involving a numerical lens galaxy model. Four methods have been applied to determine the time delay between the two QSO components, giving a mean estimate of \\Delta_t = 51+/-4 days (95% confidence level). This is the fourth optical time delay ever measured. Adopting a Omega=0.3, Lambda=0 Universe and using the mass model of Maller et al. (2000), this time-delay estimate yields a Hubble parameter of H_0=52 (+14, -8) km s^-1 Mpc^-1 (95% confidence level) where the errors include time-delay as well as model uncertainties. There are time-dependent offsets between the two (appropriately shifted) light curves that indicate the presence of external variations due to microlensing.

I. Burud; J. Hjorth; A. O. Jaunsen; M. I. Andersen; H. Korhonen; J. W. Clasen; J. Pelt; F. P. Pijpers; P. Magain; R. OEstensen

2000-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

310

Coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and corresponding method for coherent hybrid electromagnetic field imaging of a target, where an energy source is used to generate a propagating electromagnetic beam, an electromagnetic beam splitting means to split the beam into two or more coherently matched beams of about equal amplitude, and where the spatial and temporal self-coherence between each two or more coherently matched beams is preserved. Two or more differential modulation means are employed to modulate each two or more coherently matched beams with a time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, and amplitude signal. An electromagnetic beam combining means is used to coherently combine said two or more coherently matched beams into a coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more electromagnetic beam controlling means are used for collimating, guiding, or focusing the coherent electromagnetic beam. One or more apertures are used for transmitting and receiving the coherent electromagnetic beam to and from the target. A receiver is used that is capable of square-law detection of the coherent electromagnetic beam. A waveform generator is used that is capable of generation and control of time-varying polarization, frequency, phase, or amplitude modulation waveforms and sequences. A means of synchronizing time varying waveform is used between the energy source and the receiver. Finally, a means of displaying the images created by the interaction of the coherent electromagnetic beam with target is employed.

Cooke, Bradly J. (Jemez Springs, NM); Guenther, David C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

311

The Theory of Quantized Fields. III  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss the electromagnetic field, as perturbed by a prescribed current. All quantities of physical interest in various situations, eigenvalues, eigenfunctions, and transition probabilities, are derived from a general transformation function which is expressed in a non-Hermitian representation. The problems treated are: the determination of the energy-momentum eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the isolated electromagnetic field, and the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for the field perturbed by a time-independent current; the evaluation of transition probabilities and photon number expectation values for a time-dependent current that departs from zero only within a finite time interval, and for a time-dependent current that assumes non-vanishing time-independent values initially and finally. The results are applied in a discussion of the infrared catastrophe and of the adiabatic theorem. It is shown how the latter can be exploited to give a uniform formulation for all problems requiring the evaluation of transition probabilities or eigenvalue displacements.

Julian Schwinger

1953-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Acceleration of Time Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We outline our strategies for accelerating time integration for long-running simulations, such as those for global climate modeling. The strategies target the Cray XT systems at the National Center for Computational Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Our strategies include fully implicit, parallel-in-time, and curvelet methods.

White III, James B [ORNL; Drake, John B [ORNL; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Archibald, Richard K [ORNL; Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Kothe, Douglas B [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Is Time Inhomogeneous ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we discuss probability of inhomogeneous time in high or low energy scale of physics. Consequently, the possibility was investigated of using theories such as varying speed of light (VSL) and fractal mathematics to build a framework within which answers can be found to some of standard cosmological problems and physics theories on the basis of time non-homogeneity.

S. Davood Sadatian

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

TIMELY WARNING CAMPUS ALERT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TIMELY WARNING CAMPUS ALERT 13 September 2007 This communication is prepared as part of the Timely of 1990. This federal law requires a general communication to the campus community of all crimes reported. Consider carefully whether your presence at or near the Lancaster Green Apartments while unaccompanied

Hardy, Christopher R.

315

AC field exposure study: human exposure to 60-Hz electric fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a method of estimating human exposure to the 60 Hz electric fields created by transmission lines. The Activity Systems Model simulates human activities in a variety of situations where exposure to electric fields is possible. The model combines maps of electric fields, activity maps, and experimentally determined activity factors to provide histograms of time spent in electric fields of various strengths in the course of agricultural, recreational, and domestic activities. For corroboration, the study team measured actual human exposure at locations across the United States near transmission lines ranging in voltage from 115 to 1200 kV. The data were collected with a specially designed vest that measures exposure. These data demonstrate the accuracy of the exposure model presented in this report and revealed that most exposure time is spent in fields of magnitudes similar to many household situations. The report provides annual exposure estimates for human activities near transmission lines and in the home and compares them with exposure data from typical laboratory animal experiments. For one exposure index, the cumulative product of time and electric field, exposure during some of the laboratory animal experiments is two to four orders of magnitude greater than cumulative exposure for a human during one year of outdoor work on a farm crossed by a transmission line.

Silva, J.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Observation and Interpretation of Magnetic-Field-Line Reconnection and Tearing in a Theta Pinch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements and calculations are presented of reconnection and tearing of magnetic fields in a theta pinch operated with initial bias and driving fields in opposite directions. Open magnetic field lines reconnect and form magnetic islands on time scales of the order of an Alfvén transit time across the plasma sheath. Implications of these results for plasma confinement are discussed.

J. H. Irby; J. F. Drake; Hans R. Griem

1979-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

317

Bose-Einstein condensation in the Rindler space-time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the critical acceleration of the Bose-Einstein condensation induced by the Unruh effect in a complex scalar field at the finite density in the Rindler space-time.

Takeuchi, Shingo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Cosmologies with a time dependent vacuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The idea that the cosmological term, Lambda, should be a time dependent quantity in cosmology is a most natural one. It is difficult to conceive an expanding universe with a strictly constant vacuum energy density, namely one that has remained immutable since the origin of time. A smoothly evolving vacuum energy density that inherits its time-dependence from cosmological functions, such as the Hubble rate or the scale factor, is not only a qualitatively more plausible and intuitive idea, but is also suggested by fundamental physics, in particular by quantum field theory (QFT) in curved space-time. To implement this notion, is not strictly necessary to resort to ad hoc scalar fields, as usually done in the literature (e.g. in quintessence formulations and the like). A "running" Lambda term can be expected on very similar grounds as one expects (and observes) the running of couplings and masses with a physical energy scale in QFT. Furthermore, the experimental evidence that the equation of state of the dark energy could be evolving with time/redshift (including the possibility that it might currently behave phantom-like) suggests that a time-variable Lambda term (possibly accompanied by a variable Newton's gravitational coupling G=G(t)) could account in a natural way for all these features. Remarkably enough, a class of these models (the "new cosmon") could even be the clue for solving the old cosmological constant problem, including the coincidence problem.

Joan Sola

2011-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

319

Field Operations Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

688 688 May 1999 Field Operations Program Activities Status Report Fiscal Years 1997 through mid-1999 J. E. Francfort D. V. O'Hara L. A. Slezak DOE/ID-10688 Field Operations Program Activities Status Report Fiscal Years 1997 through mid-1999 J. E. Francfort 1 D. V. O'Hara 2 L. A. Slezak 2 Published May 1999 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Automotive Systems and Technology Department Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office 1 INEEL/Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co. 2 U.S. Department of Energy iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Field Operations Program is an electric vehicle testing and evaluation program sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy and managed by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental

320

Pulsed hybrid field emitter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ARM - Field Campaign - PGS Validatation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPGS Validatation govCampaignsPGS Validatation Related Campaigns Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2008.01.01, Fischer, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : PGS Validatation 2009.03.01 - 2010.02.28 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description The focus of this project was the prediction of landscape-scale fluxes of CO2, water, and sensible heat that drive variations in carbon cycle and regional climate (e.g., cloud formation and precipitation). Variation in these fluxes, caused by land use, management, and changing climate, requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales.

322

Effective Maxwell equations from time-dependent density functional theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The behavior of interacting electrons in a perfect crystal under macroscopic external electric and magnetic fields is studied. Effective Maxwell equations for the macroscopic electric and magnetic fields are derived starting from time-dependent density functional theory. Effective permittivity and permeability coefficients are obtained.

Weinan E; Jianfeng Lu; Xu Yang

2010-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fields and Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum field theories (QFT) constructed in [1,2] include phenomenology of interest. The constructions approximate: scattering by $1/r$ and Yukawa potentials in non-relativistic approximations; and the first contributing order of the Feynman series for Compton scattering. To have a semi-norm, photon states are constrained to transverse polarizations and for Compton scattering, the constructed cross section deviates at large momentum exchanges from the cross section prediction of the Feynman rules. Discussion includes the incompatibility of canonical quantization with the constructed interacting fields, and the role of interpretations of quantum mechanics in realizing QFT.

Glenn Eric Johnson

2014-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Relaxing the bounds on primordial magnetic seed fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We point out that the lower bound on the primordial magnetic field required to seed the galactic dynamo is significantly relaxed in an open universe or in a universe with a positive cosmological constant. In such universes, the increased age of galaxies gives a dynamo mechanism more time to amplify a small initial field. It is shown that, for reasonable cosmological parameters, primordial seed fields of strength 10-30 G or less at the time of galaxy formation could explain observed galactic magnetic fields. As a consequence, mechanisms of primordial magnetic seed-field generation that have previously been ruled out could well be viable. We also comment on the implications of the observation of micro-Gauss magnetic fields in galaxies at high redshift.

Anne-Christine Davis; Matthew Lilley; Ola Törnkvist

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

Kairoscope : coordinating time socially  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If everyone says time is relative, why is it still so rigidly defined? There have been many attempts to address the issue of coordinating schedules, but each of these attempts runs into an issue of rigidity: in order to ...

Martin, Reed Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

California's Shaking Next Time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ground along a road. Only 10 hours...expect that the design expertise lavished...architectural designs ofthat time as...the left. The pipelines, rail lines, and aqueducts crossing the San Andreas...block mountain roads. Forty-six...

RICHARD A. KERR

1982-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

SP - 19 Magnetic Field Safety  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

19 Page 1 Revision 02 August 6, 2007 NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY NHMFL FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY SAFETY PROCEDURE SP-19 MAGNETIC FIELD SAFETY ...

328

Drop in drilling hurts oil-field chemicals market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drop in drilling hurts oil-field chemicals market ... But events in the past few years have proven that notion faulty, and oil-field chemicals have fallen on hard times as drilling activity declines. ... The consumption of oil-field chemicals is directly related to drilling activity, and two new studies point out how far that market has declined and where opportunities still exist. ...

1985-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

Maxwell field with Torsion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a generalizing gauge-invariant model of propagating torsion which couples to the Maxwell field and to charged particles. As a result we have an Abelian gauge invariant action which leads to a theory with nonzero torsion and which is consistent with available experimental data.

R. Fresneda; M. C. Baldiotti; T. S. Pereira

2014-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

330

Electromagnetic Field Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

physicists around the world and from WWW `hit' statistics it seems that the book serves as a frequently used formulation of classical electrodynamics, force, momentum and energy of the electromagnetic field, radiation and scope to make it useful in higher university education anywhere in the world, it was produced within

Hart, Gus

331

Home Workspace Field Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal Management Reviewer Home Workspace Field Description Last updated: 4/1/2013 1 of 2 http://eresearch.umich.edu Proposal Management Reviewer Home Workspace Your Home Workspace is your launch pad for eResearch Proposal to the project. Who Can See the Reviewer Home Workspace: People with Reviewer or Reviewer Who Can Sign access

Shyy, Wei

332

Facilities Management Field Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that have gone on there in 2006. My department, Geological Sciences, makes use of all of the field stations the geology of the Australian Plate. Stakeholders who employ geoscience graduates tell use loud and clear of Earth Sciences, ANU, Canberra, to determine the crystallization ages of rocks and minerals using uranium

Hickman, Mark

333

Chandra Deep Field South: The 1Msec Catalog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this Paper we present the source catalog obtained from a 942 ks exposure of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), using ACIS-I on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Catalog generation proceeded simultaneously using two different methods; a method of our own design using a modified version of the SExtractor algorithm, and a wavelet transform technique developed specifically for Chandra observations. The detection threshold has been set in order to have less than 10 spurious sources, as assessed by extensive simulations. We subdivided the catalog into four sections. The primary list consists of objects common to the two detection methods. Two secondary lists contain sources which were detected by: 1) the SExtractor algorithm alone and 2) the wavelet technique alone. The fourth list consists of possible diffuse or extended sources. The flux limits at the aimpoint for the soft (0.5--2 keV) and hard (2--10 keV) bands are 5.5E-17 erg/s/cm^2 and 4.5E-16 erg/s/cm^2 respectively. The total number of sources is 346; out of them, 307 were detected in the 0.5--2 keV band, and 251 in the 2--10 keV band. We also present optical identifications for the catalogued sources. Our primary optical data is R band imaging to a depth of R~26.5 (Vega). We found that the R-band/Chandra offsets are small, ~1 arcsec. Coordinate cross-correlation finds 85% of the Chandra sources covered in R to have counterparts within the 3-sigma error box (>~1.5 arcsec depending on off-axis angle and signal-to-noise). The unidentified fraction of sources, approximately ~10--15 %, is close to the limit expected from the observed X-ray flux to R-band ratio distribution for the identified sample.

R. Giacconi; A. Zirm; J. Wang; P. Rosati; M. Nonino; P. Tozzi; R. Gilli; V. Mainieri; G. Hasinger; L. Kewley; J. Bergeron; S. Borgani; R. Gilmozzi; N. Grogin; A. Koekemoer; E. Schreier; W. Zheng; C. Norman

2001-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

334

Visualization of a changing dose field.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help visualize the results of dose modeling for nuclear materials processing opcrations, we have developed an integrated model that uses a simple dosc calculation tool to obtain estimates of the dose field in a complex geomctry and then post-process the data to produce a video of the now time-dependent data. We generate two-dimensional radiation fields within an existing physical cnvironment and then analyze them using three-dimensional visualization techniques. The radiation fields are generated for both neutrons and photons. Standard monoenergetic diffusion theory is used to estimate the neutron dosc fields. The photon dose is estimated using a point-kernel formalism, with photon shielding effects and buildup taken into account. The radiation field dynamics are analyzed by interleaving individual 3D graphic 'snapshots' into a smoothed, lime dependent, video-based display. In-the-room workers are 'seen' in the radiation fields via a graphical, 3D fly-through rendering of the room. Worker dose levels can reveal surprising dependencies on operational source placement, source types, worker alignment, shielding alignments, and indirect operations from external workers.

Helm, T. M (Terry M.); Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Time Limits and Work Schedules Time Limits and Work Schedules Graduate Program Time Limits and Work Schedules Point your career towards LANL: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Student Programs (505) 665-8899 Email Time Limits The length of participation in the graduate program is limited as follows: With a bachelor's pursuing a master's degree: 4 years With a bachelor's pursuing a PhD: 7 years With a master's pursuing a second master's degree: 2 years With a master's pursuing a PhD: 4 years With a master's pursuing a master's and PhD in a new field: 6 years Students may remain in the GRA program for up to three months after receiving their PhD. Work schedules Year-round students Students participating in the MBA program, post-baccalaureate appointments,

336

Nature of time and causality in Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conceptual definition and understanding of the nature of time, both qualitatively and quantitatively is of the utmost difficulty and importance, and plays a fundamental role in physics. Physical systems seem to evolve in paths of increasing entropy and of complexity, and thus, the arrow of time shall be explored in the context of thermodynamic irreversibility and quantum physics. In Newtonian physics, time flows at a constant rate, the same for all observers; however, it necessarily flows at different rates for different observers in special and general relativity. Special relativity provides important quantitative elucidations of the fundamental processes related to time dilation effects, and general relativity provides a deep analysis to effects of time flow, such as in the presence of gravitational fields. Through the special theory of relativity, time became intimately related with space, giving rise to the notion of spacetime, in which both parameters cannot be considered as separate entities. As time is incorporated into the proper structure of the fabric of spacetime, it is interesting to note that general relativity is contaminated with non-trivial geometries that generate closed timelike curves, and thus apparently violates causality. The notion of causality is fundamental in the construction of physical theories; therefore time travel and its associated paradoxes have to be treated with great caution. These issues are briefly analyzed in this review paper.

Francisco S. N. Lobo

2008-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

Far-field radiation of photonic crystal organic light-emitting diode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Utilizing the near- to far-field transformation based on the 3-D finite difference time domain (FDTD) method and Fourier transformation, the far-field profile of a photonic crystal...

Lee, Yong-Jae; Kim, Se-Heon; Kim, Guk-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Hee; Cho, Sang-Hwan; Song, Young-Woo; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Do, Young Rag

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Field Trip: Hydrographic in-situ measurements, water and plankton Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field studies are an important and integral part of any course in marine biology and oceanography. Field: · All students aboard have to wear life preservers all the time. · Wear solid shoes with rubber sole

Jochem, Frank J.

339

Merging electromagnetism with space-time metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present work, it is shown that the electromagnetism may be directly associated to the four-dimensional space-time geometry. The starting point is an analysis of the geodesic equation of general relativity where it is verified that it contains implicitly the effects of the Coulomb and the Lorentz forces. Consequently, some components of the metric tensor are identified with the components of the four-vector electromagnetic potential. Then, it is constructed a low-field equation for the electromagnetism in the same structure of the Einstein field equations for the gravitation, relating the curvature of space-time to sources of charge and current density. In this framework, all the Maxwell equations are implicit. A proof of consistency with the framework of quantum mechanics is shown.

C. A. Duarte

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

340

Magnetic fields in Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Isolated neutron stars show a diversity in timing and spectral properties, which has historically led to a classification in different sub-classes. The magnetic field plays a key role in many aspects of the neutron star phenomenology: it regulates the braking torque responsible for their timing properties and, for magnetars, it provides the energy budget for the outburst activity and high quiescent luminosities (usually well above the rotational energy budget). We aim at unifying this observational variety by linking the results of the state-of-the-art 2D magneto-thermal simulations with observational data. The comparison between theory and observations allows to place two strong constraints on the physical properties of the inner crust. First, strong electrical currents must circulate in the crust, rather than in the star core. Second, the innermost part of the crust must be highly resistive, which is in principle in agreement with the presence of a novel phase of matter so-called nuclear pasta phase.

Viganò, Daniele; Miralles, Juan A; Rea, Nanda

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Space-Time Curvature Signatures in Bose-Einstein Condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive a generalized Gross-Pitaevski (GP) equation immersed on a electromagnetic and a weak gravitational field starting from the covariant Complex Klein-Gordon field in a curved space-time. We compare it with the GP equation where the gravitational field is added by hand as an external potential. We show that there is a small difference of order $g z/c^2$ between them that could be measured in the future using Bose-Einstein Condensates (BEC). This represents the next order correction to the Newtonian gravity in a curved space-time.

Matos, Tonatiuh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Chandra Deep Field South: The 1 Ms Catalog  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present the source catalog obtained from a 942 ks exposure of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS), using the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS-I) on the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Eleven individual pointings made between 1999 October and 2000 December were combined to generate the final image used for object detection. Catalog generation proceeded simultaneously using two different methods; a method of our own design using a modified version of the SExtractor algorithm, and a wavelet transform technique developed specifically for Chandra observations. The detection threshold has been set in order to have less than 10 spurious sources, as assessed by extensive simulations. We subdivided the catalog into four sections. The primary list consists of objects common to the two detection methods. Two secondary lists contain sources which were detected by (1) the SExtractor algorithm alone and (2) the wavelet technique alone. The fourth list consists of possible diffuse or extended sources. The flux limits at the aimpoint for the soft (0.5-2 keV) and hard (2-10 keV) bands are 5.5 ? 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2 and 4.5 ? 10-16 erg s-1 cm-2, respectively. The total number of sources is 346; out of them, 307 were detected in the 0.5-2 keV band, and 251 in the 2-10 keV band.     We also present optical identifications for the cataloged sources. Our primary optical data are R band imaging from VLT/FORS1 to a depth of R ~ 26.5 (Vega). In regions of the field not covered by the VLT/FORS1 deep imaging, we use R-band data obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) on the ESO-MPI 2.2 m telescope, as part of the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS), which cover the entire X-ray survey. We found that the FORS1/Chandra offsets are small, ~1''. Coordinate cross-correlation finds 85% of the Chandra sources covered by FORS1 R to have counterparts within the 3 ? error box (15 depending on off-axis angle and X-ray signal-to-noise). The unidentified fraction of sources, approximately ~10%-15%, is close to the limit expected from the observed X-ray flux to R-band ratio distribution for the identified sample.

Riccardo Giacconi; Andrew Zirm; JunXian Wang; Piero Rosati; Mario Nonino; Paolo Tozzi; Roberto Gilli; Vincenzo Mainieri; Guenther Hasinger; Lisa Kewley; Jacqueline Bergeron; Stefano Borgani; Roberto Gilmozzi; Norman Grogin; Anton Koekemoer; Ethan Schreier; Wei Zheng; Colin Norman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Field's Logic of Truth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saving Truth from Paradox is a re-exciting development. The 70s and 80s were a time of excitement among people working on the semantic paradoxes. There were continual formal developments, with the constant hope that these ...

McGee, Vann

344

Characterization of an expanded-field Schwarzschild objective for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of a new 10x-reduction Schwarzschild system for projection imaging at 13.4 nm wavelength is reported. The optical design is optimized to achieve 0.1 {mu}m resolution over a 0.4 mm image field of view, an increase in area of a factor of 100 over previous designs. An off-set aperture, located on the convex primary, defines an unobscured 0.08 numerical aperture. The system is illuminated using extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation emitted from a laser plasma source and collected by an ellipsoidal condenser. A 450 turning mirror is used to relay the collected EUV radiation onto a near-normal reflecting mask. Multiple sets of primary and secondary elements were fabricated, matched and clocked to minimize the effects of small figure errors on imaging performance. Optical metrology indicates that the wave-front error within the subaperture used is within a factor of two of the design value. Images recorded in PMMA and ZEP 520 resists reveal good imaging fidelity over much of the 0.4 mm field with equal line/space gratings being resolved to 0.1 {mu}m.

Kubiak, G.D.; Tichenor, D.A.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A.K. [and others

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Characterization of an expanded?field Schwarzschild objective for extreme ultraviolet lithography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of a new 10×?reduction Schwarzschild system for projection imaging at 13.4 nm wavelength is reported. The optical design is optimized to achieve 0.1 ?m resolution over a 0.4 mm image field of view an increase in area of a factor of 100 over previous designs. An offset aperture located on the convex primary defines an unobscured 0.08 numerical aperture. The system is illuminated using extreme ultraviolet(EUV)radiation emitted from a laser plasma source and collected by an ellipsoidal condenser. A 45° turning mirror is used to relay the collected EUVradiation onto a near?normal reflecting mask. Multiple sets of primary and secondary elements were fabricated matched and clocked to minimize the effects of small figure errors on imaging performance. Optical metrology indicates that the wave?front error within the subaperture used is within a factor of 2 of the design value. Images recorded in poly(methyl methacrylate) and ZEP 520 (Nippon Zeon) resists reveal good imaging fidelity over much of the 0.4 mm field with equal line/space gratings being resolved to 0.1 ?m.

G. D. Kubiak; D. A. Tichenor; A. K. Ray?Chaudhuri; M. E. Malinowski; R. H. Stulen; S. J. Haney; K. W. Berger; R. P. Nissen; G. A. Wilkerson; P. H. Paul; J. E. Bjorkholm; L. A. Fetter; R. R. Freeman; M. D. Himel; A. A. MacDowell; D. M. Tennant; O. R. Wood II; W. K. Waskiewicz; D. L. White; D. L. Windt; T. E. Jewell

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The nature of HHL 73 from optical imaging and Integral Field Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new results on the nature of the Herbig-Haro-like object 73 (HHL73, also known as [G84b] 11) based on narrow-band CCD H_alpha and [SII] images of the HHL73 field, and Integral Field Spectroscopy and radio continuum observations at 3.6 cm covering the emission of the HHL 73 object. The CCD images allow us to resolve the HHL 73 comet-shaped morphology into two components and a collimated emission feature of ~4" long, reminiscent of a microjet. The IFS spectra of HHL 73 showed emission lines characteristic of the spectra of Herbig--Haro objects. The kinematics derived for HHL~73 are complex. The profiles of the [SII] lambda6717, 6731AA lines were well fitted with a model of three Gaussian velocity components peaking at -100, -20 and +35 km/s. We found differences among the spatial distribution of the kinematic components that are compatible with the emission from a bipolar outflow with two blueshifted (low- and high-velocity) components. Extended radio continuum emission at 3.6 cm was detected showing a distribution in close agreement with the HHL~73 redshifted gas. From the results discussed here, we propose HHL 73 to be a true HH object. IRAS 21432+4719, offset 30 arcsec northeast from the HHL 73 apex, is the most plausible candidate to be driving HHL 73, although the evidence is not conclusive.

R. Lopez; S. F. Sanchez; B. Garcia-Lorenzo; R. Estalella; A. Riera; G. Busquet

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

347

Methane Hydrate Field Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

None

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Viscosity, Black Holes, and Quantum Field Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent progress in applying the AdS/CFT correspondence to finite-temperature field theory. In particular, we show how the hydrodynamic behavior of field theory is reflected in the low-momentum limit of correlation functions computed through a real-time AdS/CFT prescription, which we formulate. We also show how the hydrodynamic modes in field theory correspond to the low-lying quasinormal modes of the AdS black p-brane metric. We provide a proof of the universality of the viscosity/entropy ratio within a class of theories with gravity duals and formulate a viscosity bound conjecture. Possible implications for real systems are mentioned.

D. T. Son; A. O. Starinets

2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

349

Ca rlsbad Field Office  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

En ergy En ergy Ca rlsbad Field Office P. O . Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 AUG 2 9 2013 Mr. John E. Kieling , Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Class 1 Permit Modification to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF

350

Microbial Field Pilot Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Probabilistic timed behavior trees  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Behavior Tree notation has been developed as a method for systematically and traceably capturing user requirements. In this paper we extend the notation with probabilistic behaviour, so that reliability, performance, and other dependability properties ... Keywords: behavior trees, model checking, probabilities, timed automata

Robert Colvin; Lars Grunske; Kirsten Winter

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Time reversal communication system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

Candy, James V. (Danville, CA); Meyer, Alan W. (Danville, CA)

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

353

Time-Encoded Imagers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

EFFECTIVE MAXWELL EQUATIONS FROM TIME-DEPENDENT DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTIVE MAXWELL EQUATIONS FROM TIME-DEPENDENT DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY WEINAN E, JIANFENG LU and magnetic fields are derived starting from time-dependent density functional theory. Effective permittivity with the density functional theory [2­4] instead of the many-body Schr¨odinger or Dirac equations. This is because

Bigelow, Stephen

355

Real?Time Plasma Control Tools for Advanced Tokamak Operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Real?time control will play an important role in the operation and scientific exploitation of the new generation fusion devices. This paper summarizes the real?time systems and diagnostics developed by the Portuguese Fusion Euratom Association based on digital signal processors and field programmable gate arrays.

C. A. F. Varandas; J. Sousa; A. P. Rodrigues; B. B. Carvalho; H. Fernandes; A. J. Batista; N. Cruz; A. Combo; R. C. Pereira; CFN Control and Data Acquisition Group

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Genepool Time Heatmaps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genepool Time Heatmaps Genepool Time Heatmaps Heatmap of Time and Slots Requested vs Time Waited (in hours) | Queue: All | Last 7 Days Time Requested Slots 1wk Job Count Longest Wait 1 23.0 (233) 0.37 (1819) 27.54 (49888) 5.85 (124593) 1.23 (39835) 0.34 (732) 0 0.4 (224) 0.02 (1) 217325 538.96 2 0 0.01 (19) 2.54 (78) 0.2 (140) 0.99 (2683) 0 0 0 0 2920 9.1 4 0.08 (1) 0 2.82 (141) 0.36 (143) 1.07 (12) 0.06 (5) 0.01 (5) 0.06 (1) 1.3 (5) 313 20.48 6 0.01 (2) 0 0.09 (32) 0.07 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 35 1.22 8 0.04 (24) 4.32 (7423) 5.31 (1999) 0.53 (316) 13.14 (2486) 0.01 (2) 1.21 (88) 1.3 (34) 8.33 (68) 12440 46.16 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8.56 (1) 0 1 8.56 16 0 0 0 0.03 (1) 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.03 24 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.01 (1) 1 0.01 32 0 0 0 0.04 (14) 0 0 0 0.01 (6) 0 20 0.26

357

Field-Particle Dynamics in Spacetime Geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the aid of a Fermi-Walker chart associated with an orthonormal frame attached to a time-like curve in spacetime, a discussion is given of relativistic balance laws that may be used to construct models of massive particles with spin, electric charge and a magnetic moment,interacting with background electromagnetic fields and gravitation described by non-Riemannian geometries. A natural generalisation to relativistic Cosserat media is immediate.

Robin W. Tucker

2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

358

STOPPING TIMES IN QUANTUM MECHANICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Stinespring, Kraus). 3". Time-dependant case General time evolution of an open quantum sys- tem = (Pt)t0

Attal, Stéphane

359

Generalized Gravitational Entropy of Interacting Scalar Field and Maxwell Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generalized gravitational entropy proposed by Lewkowycz and Maldacena in recent is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

Wung-Hong Huang

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

360

Rick Grush Brain time and phenomenological time (draft) Page 1/37 Brain time and phenomenological time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rick Grush Brain time and phenomenological time (draft) Page 1/37 Brain time and phenomenological "forthwith" in a common structure. - Edmund Husserl, Phenomenology of Inner Time Consciousness1 1 time and phenomenological time (draft) Page 2/37 information-processing structure that accounts

Grush, Rick

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Magnetic Field Production during Preheating at the Electroweak Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the generation of magnetic fields during preheating within a scenario of hybrid inflation at the electroweak scale. We find that the nonperturbative and strongly out-of-equilibrium process of generation of magnetic fields with a nontrivial helicity occurs along the lines predicted by Vachaspati many years ago. The magnitude (?B/?EW?10-2) and correlation length of these helical magnetic fields grow linearly with time during preheating and are consistent with the possibility that these seeds gave rise to the microgauss fields observed today in galaxies and clusters of galaxies.

Andrés Díaz-Gil; Juan García-Bellido; Margarita García Pérez; Antonio González-Arroyo

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

362

Electron Dynamics in Nanostructures in Strong Laser Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of our research was to gain deeper insight into the collective electron dynamics in nanosystems in strong, ultrashort laser fields. The laser field strengths will be strong enough to extract and accelerate electrons from the nanoparticles and to transiently modify the materials electronic properties. We aimed to observe, with sub-cycle resolution reaching the attosecond time domain, how collective electronic excitations in nanoparticles are formed, how the strong field influences the optical and electrical properties of the nanomaterial, and how the excitations in the presence of strong fields decay.

Kling, Matthias

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

Probing strong-field gravity and black holes with gravitational waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational wave observations will be excellent tools for making precise measurements of processes that occur in very strong- field regions of space time. Extreme mass

Hughes, Scott A.

364

Let’s Try That Again: Selling the Teapot Dome Oil Field  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The first time the Teapot Dome Oilfield was sold, it threw the Harding administration into scandal. Now -- 93 years later -- we're selling the field legally.

365

E-Print Network 3.0 - astrophysical magnetic fields Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on this field. In newspapers with an interest in science, such as the New York Times, topics from astrophysics... - mation on the acceleration mechanisms associated with...

366

EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA EA at Patua Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field, Patua Geothermal Project Phase II General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Gradient Resources Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Project Location Fernley, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Drilling Techniques, Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 327 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided

367

Global Stability of the Field Reversed Configuration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New computational results are presented which provide a theoretical basis for the stability of the Field Reversed Configuration (FRC). The FRC is a compact toroid with negligible toroidal field in which the plasma is confined by a poloidal magnetic field associated with toroidal diamagnetic current. Although many MHD modes are predicted to be unstable, FRCs have been produced successfully by several formation techniques and show surprising macroscopic resilience. In order to understand this discrepancy, we have developed a new 3D nonlinear hybrid code (kinetic ions and fluid electrons), M3D-B, which is used to study the role of kinetic effects on the n = 1 tilt and higher n modes in the FRC. Our simulations show that there is a reduction in the tilt mode growth rate in the kinetic regime, but no absolute stabilization has been found for s bar less than or approximately equal to 1, where s bar is the approximate number of ion gyroradii between the field null and the separatrix. However, at low values of s bar, the instabilities saturate nonlinearly through a combination of a lengthening of the initial equilibrium and a modification of the ion distribution function. These saturated states persist for many Alfven times, maintaining field reversal.

E.V. Belova; S.C. Jardin; H. Ji; R.M. Kulsrud; W. Park; M. Yamada

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Tevatron injection timing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bunched beam transfer from one accelerator to another requires coordination and synchronization of many ramped devices. During collider operation timing issues are more complicated since one has to switch from proton injection devices to antiproton injection devices. Proton and antiproton transfers are clearly distinct sequences since protons and antiprotons circulate in opposite directions in the Main Ring (MR) and in the Tevatron. The time bumps are different, the kicker firing delays are different, the kickers and lambertson magnets are different, etc. Antiprotons are too precious to be used for tuning purposes, therefore protons are transferred from the Tevatron back into the Main Ring, tracing the path of antiprotons backwards. This tuning operation is called ``reverse injection.`` Previously, the reverse injection was handled in one supercycle. One batch of uncoalesced bunches was injected into the Tevatron and ejected after 40 seconds. Then the orbit closure was performed in the MR. In the new scheme the lambertson magnets have to be moved and separator polarities have to be switched, activities that cannot be completed in one supercycle. Therefore, the reverse injection sequence was changed. This involved the redefinition of TVBS clock event $D8 as MRBS $D8 thus making it possible to inject 6 proton batches (or coalesced bunches) and eject them one at a time on command, performing orbit closure each time in the MR. Injection devices are clock event driven. The TCLK is used as the reference clock. Certain TCLK events are triggered by the MR beam synchronized clock (MRBS) events. Some delays are measured in terms of MRBS ticks and MR revolutions. See Appendix A for a brief description of the beam synchronized clocks.

Saritepe, S.; Annala, G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Golden Field Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Energy Department of Energy Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT UNIVERSITY OF MAINE'S DEEPWATER OFFSHORE FLOATING WIND TURBINE TESTING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - CASTINE DOE/EA-1792-S1 AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed a Supplemental Environmental Assessment (Supplemental EA) DOE/EA-1792-S1 for the University of Maine's (UMaine) Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project - Castine. DOE prepared the Supplemental EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of

370

On space-times admitting shear-free, irrotational, geodesic null congruences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-times admitting a shear-free, irrotational, geodesic null congruence are studied. Attention is focused on those space-times in which the gravitational field is a combination of a perfect fluid and null radiation.

A. M. Sintes; A. A. Coley; D. J. McManus

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Theory of Quantized Fields. I  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conventional correspondence basis for quantum dynamics is here replaced by a self-contained quantum dynamical principle from which the equations of motion and the commutation relations can be deduced. The theory is developed in terms of the model supplied by localizable fields. A short review is first presented of the general quantum-mechanical scheme of operators and eigenvectors, in which emphasis is placed on the differential characterization of representatives and transformation functions by means of infinitesimal unitary transformations. The fundamental dynamical principle is stated as a variational equation for the transformation function connecting eigenvectors associated with different spacelike surfaces, which describes the temporal development of the system. The generator of the infinitesimal transformation is the variation of the action integral operator, the spacetime volume integral of the invariant lagrange function operator. The invariance of the lagrange function preserves the form of the dynamical principle under coordinate transformations, with the exception of those transformations which include a reversal in the positive sense of time, where a separate discussion is necessary. It will be shown in Sec. III that the requirement of invariance under time reflection imposes a restriction upon the operator properties of fields, which is simply the connection between the spin and statistics of particles. For a given dynamical system, changes in the transformation function arise only from alterations of the eigenvectors associated with the two surfaces, as generated by operators constructed from field variables attached to those surfaces. This yields the operator principle of stationary action, from which the equations of motion are obtained. Commutation relations are derived from the generating operator associated with a given surface. In particular, canonical commutation relations are obtained for those field components that are not restricted by equations of constraint. The surface generating operator also leads to generalized Schrödinger equations for the representative of an arbitrary state. Action integral variations which correspond to changing the dynamical system are discussed briefly. A method for constructing the transformation function is described, in a form appropriate to an integral spin field, which involves solving Hamilton-Jacobi equations for ordered operators. In Sec. III, the exceptional nature of time reflection is indicated by the remark that the charge and the energy-momentum vector behave as a pseudoscalar and pseudovector, respectively, for time reflection transformations. This shows, incidentally, that positive and negative charge must occur symmetrically in a completely covariant theory. The contrast between the pseudo energy-momentum vector and the proper displacement vector then indicates that time reflection cannot be described within the unitary transformation framework. This appears most fundamentally in the basic dynamical principle. It is important to recognize here that the contributions to the lagrange function of half-integral spin fields behave like pseudoscalars with respect to time reflection. The non-unitary transformation required to represent time reflection is found to be the replacement of a state vector by its dual, or complex conjugate vector, together with the transposition of all operators. The fundamental dynamical principle is then invariant under time reflection if inverting the order of all operators in the lagrange function leaves an integral spin contribution unaltered, and reverses the sign of a half-integral spin contribution. This implies the essential commutativity, or anti-commutativity, of integral and half-integral field components, respectively, which is the connection between spin and statistics.

Julian Schwinger

1951-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Visualizing Field Lines...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Now You See It: Visualizing Field Lines Try This At Home The magnetic field is the area around the magnet where the magnetic forces act. Actually, magnets are made up of many, many...

373

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Drawing Field Lines...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Portrait of Magnetism: Drawing Field Lines Try This At Home Magnets have two poles; the field lines spread out from the north pole and circle back around to the south pole. In...

374

OFFICIAL FIELD CROP INSPECTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mr. Elmer D. Merrill having resigned to utilize his whole time in the interests of the Bureau of Science. MR. HAROLD BOYD SIFTON, of the Seed Lab-oratory of the Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, has resigned to accept a position in the botanical laboratories...

Frank A. Spragg

1920-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

Field Notes february 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ten times the cost of carrying a light vehicle.1 Freight moves america: the public interest in Freight kotowsky, david kosnik, dan Marron design, layout & photography Melissa Mattenson the research engineering group daniel r. Marron Chief Research Engineer Mathew P. kotowsky Research Engineer david e. kosnik

376

Extended Coherence Time with Atom-Number Squeezed Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coherence properties of Bose-Einstein condensates offer the potential for improved interferometric phase contrast. However, decoherence effects due to the mean-field interaction shorten the coherence time, thus limiting potential sensitivity. In this work, we demonstrate increased coherence times with number squeezed states in an optical lattice using the decay of Bloch oscillations to probe the coherence time. We extend coherence times by a factor of 2 over those expected with coherent state BEC interferometry. We observe quantitative agreement with theory both for the degree of initial number squeezing as well as for prolonged coherence times.

Wei Li; Ari K. Tuchman; Hui-Chun Chien; Mark A. Kasevich

2006-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

377

Extended Coherence Time with Atom-Number Squeezed States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coherence properties of Bose-Einstein condensates offer the potential for improved interferometric phase contrast. However, decoherence effects due to the mean-field interaction shorten the coherence time, thus limiting potential sensitivity. In this work, we demonstrate increased coherence times with number squeezed states in an optical lattice using the decay of Bloch oscillations to probe the coherence time. We extend coherence times by a factor of 2 over those expected with coherent state Bose-Einstein condensate interferometry. We observe quantitative agreement with theory both for the degree of initial number squeezing as well as for prolonged coherence times.

Li Wei; Tuchman, Ari K.; Chien, H.-C.; Kasevich, Mark A. [Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Efficient thermal field computation in phase-field models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We solve the phase-field equations in two dimensions to simulate crystal growth in the low undercooling regime. The novelty is the use of a fast solver for the free space heat equation to compute the thermal field. This solver is based on the efficient ... Keywords: Crystal growth, Dendritic solidification, Diffusion equation, Fast solvers, Integral representation, Phase-field, Unbounded domain

Jing-Rebecca Li; Donna Calhoun; Lucien Brush

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t{sup 2}, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to t{sup ?}, where ??>?1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics, both of magnetic field lines and of particles moving in these fields, strongly suggest that theories of transport in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields need a shift from the usual paradigm of quasilinear diffusion.

Ram, Abhay K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dasgupta, Brahmananda [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States); Krishnamurthy, V. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Mitra, Dhrubaditya [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Exploiting VERITAS Timing Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 499 pixel photomultiplier cameras of the VERITAS gamma ray telescopes are instrumented with 500MHz sampling Flash ADCs. This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the best methods by which to exploit this information so as to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio for the detection of Cherenkov light pulses. The FADCs also provide unprecedented resolution for the study of the timing characteristics of Cherenkov images of cosmic-ray and gamma-ray air showers. This capability is discussed, together with the implications for gamma-hadron separation.

J. Holder; for the VERITAS Collaboration

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Athletic Fields and Water Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following an 18-step procedure for performing an irrigation audit will help athletic field managers conserve water while maintaining a pleasing facility for recreational use. To perform the audit correctly, a field manager must determine the answers...

Taylor, Gene R.; White, Richard; Abernathy, Scott; Smith, David

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

382

Golden Field Office Reading Room  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Golden Field Office was designated a Department of Energy (DOE) field office in December 1992 to support the development and commercialization of renewable energy and energy-efficient...

383

RESULTS OF FIELD TESTING DOE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Energy facility located within Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), also known as Teapot Dome Oil Field, about 35 miles north of Casper, Wyoming. Teapot Dome Field, Natrona...

384

Generalized Bogoliubov transformation for confined fields: Applications for the Casimir effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bogoliubov transformation in thermofield dynamics, an operator formalism for the finite-temperature quantum field theory, is generalized to describe a field in arbitrary confined regions of space and time. Starting with the scalar field, the approach is extended to the electromagnetic field and the energy-momentum tensor is written via the Bogoliubov transformation. In this context, the Casimir effect is calculated for zero and nonzero temperature, and therefore it can be considered as a vacuum condensation effect of the electromagnetic field. This aspect opens an interesting perspective for using this procedure as an effective scheme for calculations in the studies of confined fields, including interacting fields.

Silva, J.C. da [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus de Ondina, 40210-340, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Bahia, Rua Emidio Santos, 40000-900, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Khanna, F.C. [Physics Department, Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2J1 (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004, Westbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Matos Neto, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus de Ondina, 40210-340, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Santana, A.E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus de Ondina, 40210-340, Salvador, Bahia (Brazil); Physics Department, Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2J1 (Canada)

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Diamond-graphite field emitters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Invariant time-series factorization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time-series analysis is an important domain of machine learning and a plethora of methods have been developed for the task. This paper proposes a new representation of time series, which in contrast to existing approaches, decomposes a time-series dataset ... Keywords: Data mining, Time-series classification, Time-series factorization

Josif Grabocka; Lars Schmidt-Thieme

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Low field magnetic resonance imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Sakellariou, Dimitrios (Billancourt, FR); Meriles, Carlos A. (Fort Lee, NJ); Trabesinger, Andreas H. (London, GB)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

388

Magnetic-field-dosimetry system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Cryptography in Quadratic Function Fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe several cryptographic schemes in quadratic function fields of odd characteristic. In both the real and the imaginary representation of such a field, we present a Diffie-Hellman-like key exchange protocol as well as a public-key cryptosystem ... Keywords: Diffie-Hellman key exchange protocol, ElGamal signature scheme, discrete logarithm, public key cryptosystem, quadratic function field

R. Scheidler

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Golden Field Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1617 Cole Boulevard Golden , Colorado 80401-3393 DOE/EA-1791 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA WIND ENERGY RESEARCH CONSORTIllM PROJECT AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION : Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of Federal funding by the University of Minnesota to design, permit, and construct a wind turbine research facility I. This funding has been appropriated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of2009. The University would use the funding to install a wind turbine research facility at its University of Minnesota Outreach Research and Education (UMore) Park in Rosemount, Minnesota. The proposed research facility would consist of a 2.5-megawatt-

391

Golden Field Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT MONARCH WARREN COUNTY WIND TURBINE PROJECT LENOX TOWNSIDP, WARREN COUNTY, IL AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding orNo Significant Impact (FONS!) DOEIEA-JSOO SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided Federal funding appropriated under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act 0(2009 to the Illinois Department ofComrnerce and Econom ic Opportunity (DeEO) under the State Energy Program (SEP). DeEO proposes to provide approximately $5 million of its SEP funds to Monarch Wind Power (MWP) for the Monarch Warren County Wind Turbine Project (MWTP). DOE's Proposed Action is to authorize the expenditure of Federal funding under State Energy Program to design, permit, and construct

392

ARM - Field Campaigns  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alpacas clouds-anvil german-scene instrumentfield pye-night racoro-inst rhubc-layout snowy-site twpice-ship walter-annemarie alpacas clouds-anvil german-scene instrumentfield pye-night racoro-inst rhubc-layout snowy-site twpice-ship walter-annemarie How Do I Propose a Campaign? First, review the guidelines for submitting proposals. Next, submit a preproposal; a short summary of the proposed campaign. Wait for a response from the Infrastructure Management Board (IMB) and/or ARM Science Board. A full proposal or science plan, may be requested. Decision is made-now what is expected? ARM Climate Research Facility users regularly conduct field campaigns to augment routine data acquisitions and to test and validate new instruments. Announcements 13 Dec 2013 Now accepting proposals for use of an AMF, AAF, or augment observations at one of our fixed sites. Smaller campaigns in FY2014 and FY2015 can also be

393

Golden Field Office  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

80401 -3393 DOEIEA-1818 80401 -3393 DOEIEA-1818 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT PETTISVILLE WIND ENERGY PROJECT AGENCY: U.S . Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provided Federal funding to the Ohio Department of Development (0000) under the State Energy Program (SEP). 0000 proposes to provide $1 ,225 ,000 of its SEP funds to the Pettisvil Ie Local Schools (Pettisville) for the Pettisville Local Schools Wind Energy Project (Wind Energy Project). DOE' s Proposed Action is to authorize the expenditure of Federal funding under State Energy Program to design, permit, and construct the Pettisville Wind Energy Project, a 750-kilowatt wind turbine at the Pettisville Pre-Kindergarten through Twelfth Grade School located at

394

On the efficiency of field star capture by star clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An exciting recent finding regarding scaling relations among globular clusters is the so-called 'blue tilt': clusters of the blue sub-population follow a trend of redder colour with increasing luminosity. In this paper we evaluate to which extent field star capture over a Hubble time may explain the 'blue tilt'. We perform collisional N-body simulations to quantify the amount of field star capture occuring over a Hubble time to star clusters with 10^3 to 10^6 stars. In the simulations we follow the orbits of field stars passing through a star cluster and calculate the energy change that the field stars experience due to gravitational interaction with cluster stars during one passage through the cluster. The capture condition is that their total energy after the passage is smaller than the gravitational potential at the cluster's tidal radius. By folding this with the fly-by rates of field stars with an assumed space density as in the solar neighbourhood and a range of velocity dispersions, we derive estimates on the mass fraction of captured field stars as a function of environment. We find that integrated over a Hubble time, the ratio between captured field stars and total number of clusters stars is very low (capture is not a probable mechanism for creating the colour-magnitude trend of metal-poor globular clusters.

Steffen Mieske; Holger Baumgardt

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

Effect of daylight saving time on lighting energy use: A literature review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The principal reason for introducing (and extending) daylight saving time (DST) was, and still is, projected energy savings, particularly for electric lighting. This paper presents a literature review concerning the effects of DST on energy use. Simple estimates suggest a reduction in national electricity use of around 0.5%, as a result of residential lighting reduction. Several studies have demonstrated effects of this size based on more complex simulations or on measured data. However, there are just as many studies that suggest no effect, and some studies suggest overall energy penalties, particularly if gasoline consumption is accounted for. There is general consensus that DST does contribute to an evening reduction in peak demand for electricity, though this may be offset by an increase in the morning. Nevertheless, the basic patterns of energy use, and the energy efficiency of buildings and equipment have changed since many of these studies were conducted. Therefore, we recommend that future energy policy decisions regarding changes to DST be preceded by high-quality research based on detailed analysis of prevailing energy use, and behaviours and systems that affect energy use. This would be timely, given the extension to DST underway in North America in 2007.

Myriam B.C. Aries; Guy R. Newsham

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Geodesic structure of Janis-Newman-Winicour space-time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present paper we study the geodesic structure of the Janis-Newman-Winicour(JNW) space-time which contains a strong curvature naked singularity. This metric is an extension of the Schwarzschild geometry when a massless scalar field is included. We find that the strength parameter $\\mu$ of the scalar field effects on the geodesic structure of the JNW space-time. By solving the geodesic equation and analyzing the behavior of effective potential, we investigate all geodesic types of the test particle and the photon in the JNW space-time. At the same time we simulate all the geodesic orbits corresponding to the energy levels of the effective potential in the JNW space-time.

Sheng Zhou; Ruanjing Zhang; Juhua Chen; Yongjiu Wang

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Real time automated inspection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges are segmented out by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections.

Fant, Karl M. (Minneapolis, MN); Fundakowski, Richard A. (Saint Paul, MN); Levitt, Tod S. (Minneapolis, MN); Overland, John E. (Plymouth, MN); Suresh, Bindinganavle R. (New Brighton, MN); Ulrich, Franz W. (Minneapolis, MN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Real time automated inspection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are described relating to the real time automatic detection and classification of characteristic type surface imperfections occurring on the surfaces of material of interest such as moving hot metal slabs produced by a continuous steel caster. A data camera transversely scans continuous lines of such a surface to sense light intensities of scanned pixels and generates corresponding voltage values. The voltage values are converted to corresponding digital values to form a digital image of the surface which is subsequently processed to form an edge-enhanced image having scan lines characterized by intervals corresponding to the edges of the image. The edge-enhanced image is thresholded to segment out the edges and objects formed by the edges by interval matching and bin tracking. Features of the objects are derived and such features are utilized to classify the objects into characteristic type surface imperfections. 43 figs.

Fant, K.M.; Fundakowski, R.A.; Levitt, T.S.; Overland, J.E.; Suresh, B.R.; Ulrich, F.W.

1985-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Time encoded radiation imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

400

REAL TIME SYSTEM OPERATIONS 2006-2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Real Time System Operations (RTSO) 2006-2007 project focused on two parallel technical tasks: (1) Real-Time Applications of Phasors for Monitoring, Alarming and Control; and (2) Real-Time Voltage Security Assessment (RTVSA) Prototype Tool. The overall goal of the phasor applications project was to accelerate adoption and foster greater use of new, more accurate, time-synchronized phasor measurements by conducting research and prototyping applications on California ISO's phasor platform - Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System (RTDMS) -- that provide previously unavailable information on the dynamic stability of the grid. Feasibility assessment studies were conducted on potential application of this technology for small-signal stability monitoring, validating/improving existing stability nomograms, conducting frequency response analysis, and obtaining real-time sensitivity information on key metrics to assess grid stress. Based on study findings, prototype applications for real-time visualization and alarming, small-signal stability monitoring, measurement based sensitivity analysis and frequency response assessment were developed, factory- and field-tested at the California ISO and at BPA. The goal of the RTVSA project was to provide California ISO with a prototype voltage security assessment tool that runs in real time within California ISO?s new reliability and congestion management system. CERTS conducted a technical assessment of appropriate algorithms, developed a prototype incorporating state-of-art algorithms (such as the continuation power flow, direct method, boundary orbiting method, and hyperplanes) into a framework most suitable for an operations environment. Based on study findings, a functional specification was prepared, which the California ISO has since used to procure a production-quality tool that is now a part of a suite of advanced computational tools that is used by California ISO for reliability and congestion management.

Eto, Joseph H.; Parashar, Manu; Lewis, Nancy Jo

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Chiral-field microwave antennas (Chiral microwave near fields for far-field radiation)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a single-element structure we obtain a radiation pattern with a squint due to chiral microwave near fields originated from a magnetostatic-mode ferrite disk. At the magnetostatic resonances, one has strong subwavelength localization of energy of microwave radiation. Magnetostatic oscillations in a thin ferrite disk are characterized by unique topological properties: the Poynting-vector vortices and the field helicity. The chiral-topology near fields allow obtaining unique phase structure distribution for far-field microwave radiation.

Kamenetskii, E O; Shavit, R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Triangular Ising antiferromagnet in a staggered field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the equilibrium properties of the nearest-neighbor Ising antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice in the presence of a staggered field conjugate to one of the degenerate ground states. Using a mapping of the ground states of the model without the staggered field to dimer coverings on the dual lattice, we classify the ground states into sectors specified by the number of “strings.” We show that the effect of the staggered field is to generate long-range interactions between strings. In the limiting case of the antiferromagnetic coupling constant J becoming infinitely large, we prove the existence of a phase transition in this system and obtain a finite lower bound for the transition temperature. For finite J, we study the equilibrium properties of the system using Monte Carlo simulations with three different dynamics. We find that in all the three cases, equilibration times for low-field values increase rapidly with system size at low temperatures. Due to this difficulty in equilibrating sufficiently large systems at low temperatures, our finite-size scaling analysis of the numerical results does not permit a definite conclusion about the existence of a phase transition for finite values of J. A surprising feature in the system is the fact that unlike usual glassy systems, a zero-temperature quench almost always leads to the ground state, while a slow cooling does not.

Abhishek Dhar; Pinaki Chaudhuri; Chandan Dasgupta

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Comparison Between Two Models for Interactions Between Electric and Magnetic Fields and Proteins in Cell Membranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Melbourne, Australia. Departments of 2 Medical Radiation Physics and 3 Neurosurgery, Lund University, Lund Lines; Interaction Models; Biological Effects Introduction Static magnetic and electric fields occur naturally; time-varying fields, however, do not. These man-made fields have health consequences remains

Halgamuge, Malka N.

404

Experimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field Frank M. Lee,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in global ocean mixing, it is important to understand the power present in the internal wave fieldExperimental determination of radiated internal wave power without pressure field data Frank M. Lee to determine, using only velocity field data, the time-averaged energy flux J and total radiated power P

Morrison, Philip J.,

405

First versus subsequent return-stroke current and field peaks in negative cloud-to-ground lightning discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First versus subsequent return-stroke current and field peaks in negative cloud-to-ground lightning examine relative magnitudes of electric field peaks of first and subsequent return strokes in negative, the electric field peak of the first stroke is appreciably, 1.7 to 2.4 times, larger than the field peak

Florida, University of

406

Whistler Modes with Wave Magnetic Fields Exceeding the Ambient Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Whistler-mode wave packets with fields exceeding the ambient dc magnetic field have been excited in a large, high electron-beta plasma. The waves are induced with a loop antenna with dipole moment either along or opposite to the dc field. In the latter case the excited wave packets have the topology of a spheromak but are propagating in the whistler mode along and opposite to the dc magnetic field. Field-reversed configurations with net zero helicity have also been produced. The electron magnetohydrodynamics fields are force free, have wave energy density exceeding the particle energy density, and propagate stably at subelectron thermal velocities through a nearly uniform stationary ion density background.

R. L. Stenzel; J. M. Urrutia; K. D. Strohmaier

2006-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

Field Evaluation of Windows  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Windows Evaluation of Windows Last Updated: 10/20/2009 Various tools can be used to evaluate windows in the field. Unless a new window still has the NFRC label attached to it, it is nearly impossible to determine by sight what the thermal and optical performance of a window is. These tools can provide information, such as low-e coating, gap width and gas fill, that can be used to approximate the performance of a window. Solar gain and Low-e detector This device can be used to determine if a low-e coating is present in the window, what type of coating it is, and where it is located. The type of low-e coating will indicate the amount of solar gain that is admitted through the coating. Readings can be "low", "medium" or "high". The device will also indicate on which glass surface the low-e coating is in relation to the position of the device. Limitations: Only works on glass of 1/8" (3 mm) or thinner. Cost: around $350 from EDTM.com

408

Analytical tools for investigating strong-field QED processes in tightly focused laser fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present paper is the natural continuation of the letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{113}, 040402 (2014)], where the electron wave functions in the presence of a background electromagnetic field of general space-time structure have been constructed analytically, assuming that the initial energy of the electron is the largest dynamical energy scale in the problem and having in mind the case of a background tightly focused laser beam. Here, we determine the scalar and the spinor propagators under the same approximations, which are useful tools for calculating, e.g., total probabilities of processes occurring in such complex electromagnetic fields. In addition, we also present a simpler and more general expression of the electron wave functions found in [Phys. Rev. Lett. \\textbf{113}, 040402 (2014)] and we indicate a substitution rule to obtain them starting from the well-known Volkov wave functions in a plane-wave field.

Di Piazza, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Time-lapse gravity inversion with an active time constraint  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......volcanic activity and geothermal fields (e.g...potential (potential energy per unit mass...the computational cost of the inversion...funding from DOE (Geothermal Technology Advancement...the CO2 plume. Energy Proc. (2011...ground water flow in geothermal fields. J. geophys......

M. Karaoulis; A. Revil; B. Minsley; M. Todesco; J. Zhang; D.D. Werkema

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

On the electromagnetic fields produced by marine frequency domain controlled sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......time-averaged flow of energy through the structure...that a producing offshore petroleum field could...Troll gas field off Norway; Johansen et al...time-averaged flow of energy through a structure...fluctuations induced by wind waves on the deep-sea...by magnetometric offshore electrical sounding......

Alan D. Chave

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF YOUNG FIELD ULTRACOOL DWARFS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a near-infrared (0.9-2.4 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 73 field ultracool dwarfs having spectroscopic and/or kinematic evidence of youth ( Almost-Equal-To 10-300 Myr). Our sample is composed of 48 low-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 100) spectra and 41 moderate-resolution spectra (R {approx}> 750-2000). First, we establish a method for spectral typing M5-L7 dwarfs at near-IR wavelengths that is independent of gravity. We find that both visual and index-based classification in the near-IR provides consistent spectral types with optical spectral types, though with a small systematic offset in the case of visual classification at J and K band. Second, we examine features in the spectra of {approx}10 Myr ultracool dwarfs to define a set of gravity-sensitive indices based on FeH, VO, K I, Na I, and H-band continuum shape. We then create an index-based method for classifying the gravities of M6-L5 dwarfs that provides consistent results with gravity classifications from optical spectroscopy. Our index-based classification can distinguish between young and dusty objects. Guided by the resulting classifications, we propose a set of low-gravity spectral standards for the near-IR. Finally, we estimate the ages corresponding to our gravity classifications.

Allers, K. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Liu, Michael C., E-mail: k.allers@bucknell.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microseismic imaging can be an important tool for characterizing geothermal reservoirs. Since microseismic sources occur more or less continuously both due to the operations of a geothermal field and the naturally occurring background seismicity, passive seismic monitoring is well suited to quantify the temporal variations in the vicinity of a

413

Primordial magnetic fields and formation of molecular hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the implications of primordial magnetic fields for the thermal and ionization history of the post-recombination era. In particular we compute the effects of dissipation of primordial magnetic fields owing to ambipolar diffusion and decaying turbulence in the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the collapsing halos and compute the effects of the altered thermal and ionization history on the formation of molecular hydrogen. We show that, for magnetic field strengths in the range $2 \\times 10^{-10} {\\rm G} \\la B_0 \\la 2 \\times 10^{-9} {\\rm G}$, the molecular hydrogen fraction in IGM and collapsing halo can increase by a factor 5 to 1000 over the case with no magnetic fields. We discuss the implication of the increased molecular hydrogen fraction on the radiative transfer of UV photons and the formation of first structures in the universe.

Shiv K Sethi; Biman B. Nath; Kandaswamy Subramanian

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

Publications : Daylighting The New York Times Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications Publications Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Publications Technical Publications Post-occupancy Evaluation A post-occupancy monitored evaluation of the dimmable lighting, automated shading, and underfloor air distribution system in The New York Times Building. Eleanor S. Lee, Luis L. Fernandes, Brian Coffey, Andrew McNeil, Robert Clear, Tom Webster, Fred Bauman, Darryl Dickerhoff, David Heinzerling, Tyler Hoyt. LBNL Technical report, January 2013. LBNL-6023E.

415

Graphene transparency in weak magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We carry out an explicit calculation of the vacuum polarization tensor for an effective low-energy model of monolayer graphene in the presence of a weak magnetic field of intensity $B$ perpendicularly aligned to the membrane. By expanding the quasiparticle propagator in the Schwinger proper time representation up to order $(eB)^2$, where $e$ is the unit charge, we find an explicitly transverse tensor, consistent with gauge invariance. Furthermore, assuming that graphene is radiated with monochromatic light of frequency $\\omega$ along the external field direction, from the modified Maxwell's equations we derive the intensity of transmitted light and the angle of polarization rotation in terms of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_{xx}$) and transverse ($\\sigma_{xy}$) conductivities. Corrections to these quantities, both calculated and measured, are of order $(eB)^2/\\omega^4$. Our findings generalize and complement previously known results reported in literature regarding the light absorption problem in graphene from th...

Valenzuela, David; Loewe, Marcelo; Raya, Alfredo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Electric Field and Humidity Trigger Contact Electrification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here, we study the old problem of why identical insulators can charge one another on contact. We perform several experiments showing that, if driven by a preexisting electric field, charge is transferred between contacting insulators. This happens because the insulator surfaces adsorb small amounts of water from a humid atmosphere. We believe the electric field then separates positively from negatively charged ions prevailing within the water, which we believe to be hydronium and hydroxide ions, such that at the point of contact, positive ions of one insulator neutralize negative ions of the other one, charging both of them. This mechanism can explain for the first time the observation made four decades ago that wind-blown sand discharges in sparks if and only if a thunderstorm is nearby.

Zhang, Yanzhen; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Yang; Ji, Renjie; Cai, Baoping

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Electric Field and Humidity Trigger Contact Electrification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here, we study the old problem of why identical insulators can charge one another on contact. We perform several experiments showing that, if driven by a preexisting electric field, charge is transferred between contacting insulators. This happens because the insulator surfaces adsorb small amounts of water from a humid atmosphere. We believe the electric field then separates positively from negatively charged ions prevailing within the water, which we believe to be hydronium and hydroxide ions, such that at the point of contact, positive ions of one insulator neutralize negative ions of the other one, charging both of them. This mechanism can explain for the first time the observation made four decades ago that wind-blown sand discharges in sparks if and only if a thunderstorm is nearby.

Yanzhen Zhang; Thomas Pähtz; Yonghong Liu; Xiaolong Wang; Rui Zhang; Yang Shen; Renjie Ji; Baoping Cai

2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

Wireless Roadside Inspection Field Operations.pub  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Operational Test (FOT) Field Operational Test (FOT) Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief T he U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has commissioned the Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program to validate technologies and methodologies that can improve safety through inspections using wireless technologies that convey real-time identification of commercial vehicles, drivers, and carriers, as well as information about the status of the vehicles and their drivers. It is hypothesized that

419

Definition: Time-Domain Electromagnetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Time-Domain Electromagnetics Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Time-Domain Electromagnetics Time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) surveys are active-source soundings which provide information about the electrical structure of the shallow subsurface.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Transient electromagnetics, (also time-domain electromagnetics / TDEM), is a geophysical exploration technique in which electric and magnetic fields are induced by transient pulses of electric current and the subsequent decay response measured. TEM / TDEM methods are generally able to determine subsurface electrical properties, but are also sensitive to subsurface magnetic properties in applications like UXO detection and

420

Program or Field Office:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

site activities and seismic survey at Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico. LM #01 site activities and seismic survey at Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico. LM #01 -12 Location: Gnome-Coach Site, Eddy County, New Mexico Proposed Action or Project Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for monitoring contaminant levels in groundwater from three groundwater monitoring wells at the Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site. Two of the wells contain elevated levels of radionuclides and these samples are managed in accordance with the DOE Investigation-Derived Waste Plan. Activities related to the groundwater monitoring program include installing water access tubes and obtaining water levels each time the wells are sampled. Some or all of the wells would have a new well box installed and/or the well head would be modified. The top well casing would be surveyed. A potential future action may include downloading transducers. DOE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Tensor distributions on signature-changing space-times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irregularities in the metric tensor of a signature-changing space-time suggest that field equations on such space-times might be regarded as distributional. We review the formalism of tensor distributions on differentiable manifolds, and examine to what extent rigorous meaning can be given to field equations in the presence of signature-change, in particular those involving covariant derivatives. We find that, for both continuous and discontinuous signature-change, covariant differentiation can be defined on a class of tensor distributions wide enough to be physically interesting.

David Hartley; Robin W. Tucker; Philip A. Tuckey; Tevian Dray

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

422

SLH Timing Belt Powertrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine?, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon-#12;fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning a timing-belt based hydroEngine ?powertrain: 1. Can a belt handle the high torques and power loads demanded by the SLH? (Yes.) 2. Can the SLH blades be mounted to belt with a connection that can withstand the loads encountered in operation? (Yes.) 3. Can the belt, with blade attachments, live through the required cyclic loading? (Yes.) The research adds to the general understanding of sustainable small hydropower systems by using innovative system testing to develop and demonstrate performance of a novel powertrain solution, enabling a new type of hydroelectric turbine to be commercially developed. The technical effectiveness of the methods investigated has been shown to be positive through an extensive design and testing process accommodating many constraints and goals, with a major emphasis on high cycle fatigue life. Economic feasibility of the innovations has been demonstrated through many iterations of design for manufacturability and cost reduction. The project is of benefit to the public because it has helped to develop a solution to a major problem -- despite the large available potential for new low-head hydropower, high capital costs and high levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) continue to be major barriers to project development. The hydroEngine? represents a significant innovation, leveraging novel fluid mechanics and mechanical configuration to allow lower-cost turbine manufacture and development of low head hydropower resources.

Schneider, Abe

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

423

Map-making in small field modulated CMB polarisation experiments: approximating the maximum-likelihood method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Map-making presents a significant computational challenge to the next generation of kilopixel CMB polarisation experiments. Years worth of time ordered data (TOD) from thousands of detectors will need to be compressed into maps of the T, Q and U Stokes parameters. Fundamental to the science goal of these experiments, the observation of B-modes, is the ability to control noise and systematics. In this paper, we consider an alternative to the maximum-likelihood method, called destriping, where the noise is modelled as a set of discrete offset functions and then subtracted from the time-stream. We compare our destriping code (Descart: the DEStriping CARTographer) to a full maximum-likelihood map-maker, applying them to 200 Monte-Carlo simulations of time-ordered data from a ground based, partial-sky polarisation modulation experiment. In these simulations, the noise is dominated by either detector or atmospheric 1/f noise. Using prior information of the power spectrum of this noise, we produce destriped maps of T, Q and U which are negligibly different from optimal. The method does not filter the signal or bias the E or B-mode power spectra. Depending on the length of the destriping baseline, the method delivers between 5 and 22 times improvement in computation time over the maximum-likelihood algorithm. We find that, for the specific case of single detector maps, it is essential to destripe the atmospheric 1/f in order to detect B-modes, even though the Q and U signals are modulated by a half-wave plate spinning at 5-Hz.

D. Sutton; B. R. Johnson; M. L. Brown; P. Cabella; P. G. Ferreira; K. M. Smith

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

Daylighting The New York Times Building  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team NEW: Post-occupancy Evaluation Publications Daylighting The New York Times Headquarters Building This website provides information on a collaboration between The New York Times Company, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, industry, and three major public funding agencies designed to transform the market for emerging automated window shade systems and daylighting controls so that these types of energy-efficient products become the norm. Project activities included documenting and demonstrating that the technology works and generates energy savings in real world applications, creating a market response so that these systems are available at commodity prices and are cost-effective, making third party performance data available to the public, and providing guidance to support widespread deployment.

425

Steam Field | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: Steam Field Dictionary.png Steam Field: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Steam field reservoirs are special cases where the fluid is predominantly found in a gas phase between 230°C to 240°C. "This special class of resource needs to be recognized, its uniqueness being the remarkably consistent initial temperature and pressure

426

Mass Operator and Gauge Field Theory with Five-variable Field Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To investigate the mass generating problem without Higgs mechanism we present a model in which a new scalar gauge coupling is naturally introduced. Because of the existence of production and annihilation for particles in quantum field theory, we extend the number of independent variables from conventional four space-time dimensions to five ones in order to describe all degrees of freedom for field functions while the conventional space-time is still retained to be the background. The potential fifth variable is nothing but the proper time of particles. In response, a mass operator $(\\hat{m}=-i\\hbar \\frac{\\partial}{\\partial\\tau})$ should be introduced. After that, the lagrangian for free fermion fields in terms of five independent variables and mass operator is written down. By applying the gauge principle, three kinds of vector gauge couplings and one kind of scalar gauge coupling are naturally introduced. In the current scenario, the mass spectrum for all fundamental particles is accounted for in principle by solving the eigenvalue of mass operator under the function of all kinds of interactions. Moreover, there no any auxiliary mechanism including spontaneous symmetry breaking get involved in the model. Therefore, traditional problems in the standard model such as the vacuum energy problem are removed from our model, as well as the hierarchy problem on the mass spectrum for fundamental particles.

ChiYi Chen

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

427

Torsion and the Electromagnetic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity, we study the dynamics of a gravitationally coupled electromagnetic field. It is shown that the electromagnetic field is able not only to couple to torsion, but also, through its energy-momentum tensor, to produce torsion. Furthermore, it is shown that the coupling of the electromagnetic field with torsion preserves the local gauge invariance of Maxwell's theory.

V. C. de Andrade; J. G. Pereira

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

428

Noncommutivity and Scalar Field Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we extend and apply a previous proposal to study noncommutative cosmology to the FRW cosmological background coupled to a scalar field, this is done in classical and quantum scenarios. In both cases noncommutativity is introduced in the gravitational field as well as in the scalar field through a deformation of minisuperspace and are able to find exact solutions. Finally, the effects of noncommutativity on the classical evolution are analyzed.

W. Guzmán; M. Sabido; J. Socorro

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, 336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's proposal to participate with a group of international organizations in an experiment to evaluate the dispersion and diffusion of liquid carbon dioxide droplets in ocean waters. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 4, 2001 EA-1336: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment May 4, 2001 EA-1336: Final Environmental Assessment Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment

430

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Together, field and 40Ar/39Ar results suggest that Late Cretaceous extension occurred in the Sevier belt hinterland at the same time as shortening in the eastern foreland and at depth in the hinterland. Sufficient topography must have been present to drive upper-crustal extension in the eastern hinterland. References Wells, M.L.; Allmendinger, R.W.; Dallmeyer, R.D. (1 October 1990) Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt,

431

Independent Manipulation of Electric and Thermal Fields with Bilayer Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recently, increasing attention has been focused on the employment of transformation and metamaterial for manipulation of various physical fields, which requires complicated configuration and usually limits in single field. Here, for the first time, we propose and experimentally demonstrated bilayer structure to achieve simultaneously independent manipulation of multi-physics field (dc electric fields and thermal) by directly solving the dc electric/ thermal field equations. This structure is composed of two layers: the outer layer is made of isotropic and homogeneous material, while the inner layer is fan-shape layer. Since it is not based on TO, it can be readily experimentally fabricated with naturally occurring materials. Experimentally, we has designed, fabricated and characterized two structures simultaneously behaving as dc electric cloak/ thermal concentrator and dc electric concentrator/ thermal cloak, respectively. The simulation results agree well with the experiment ones, thus confirming the feasib...

Lan, Chuwen; Wu, Lingling; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Magnetic field contribution to the last electron-photon scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When the cosmic microwave photons scatter electrons just prior to the decoupling of matter and radiation, magnetic fields do contribute to the Stokes matrix as well as to the scalar, vector and tensor components of the transport equations for the brightness perturbations. The magnetized electron-photon scattering is hereby discussed in general terms by including, for the first time, the contribution of magnetic fields with arbitrary direction and in the presence of the scalar, vector and tensor modes of the geometry. The propagation of relic vectors and relic gravitons is discussed for a varying magnetic field orientation and for different photon directions. The source terms of the transport equations in the presence of the relativistic fluctuations of the geometry are also explicitly averaged over the magnetic field orientations and the problem of a consistent account of the small-scale and large-scale magnetic field is briefly outlined.

Giovannini, Massimo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Quantization of Spin-2 Fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A massive spin-2 field has been quantized using Schwinger's action principle. Lorentz invariance and physical positive-definiteness requirements have been verified.

Shau-jin Chang

1966-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

434

EMSL - field emission electron microprobe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

field-emission-electron-microprobe en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

435

Electrochemical formation of field emitters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Quantum Field as a Quantum Computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is supposed that at very small scales a quantum field is an infinite homogeneous quantum computer. On a quantum computer the information cannot propagate faster than $c=a/\\tau$, $a$ and $\\tau$ being the minimum space and time distances between gates, respectively. It is shown that the information flow satisfies a Dirac equation, with speed $v=\\zeta c$ and $\\zeta=\\zeta(m)$ mass-dependent. For $a/\\tau=c$ the speed of light $\\zeta^{-1}$ is a vacuum refraction index increasing monotonically from $\\zeta^{-1}(0)=1$ to $\\zeta^{-1}(M)=\\infty$, $M$ being the Planck mass for $2a$ the Planck length.

Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

437

Compact boson stars in K field theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a scalar field theory with a non-standard kinetic term minimally coupled to gravity. We establish the existence of compact boson stars, that is, static solutions with compact support of the full system with self-gravitation taken into account. Concretely, there exist two types of solutions, namely compact balls on the one hand, and compact shells on the other hand. The compact balls have a naked singularity at the center. The inner boundary of the compact shells is singular, as well, but it is, at the same time, a Killing horizon. These singular, compact shells therefore resemble black holes.

C. Adam; N. Grandi; P. Klimas; J. Sanchez-Guillen; A. Wereszczynski

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

Compact boson stars in K field theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a scalar field theory with a non-standard kinetic term minimally coupled to gravity. We establish the existence of compact boson stars, that is, static solutions with compact support of the full system with self-gravitation taken into account. Concretely, there exist two types of solutions, namely compact balls on the one hand, and compact shells on the other hand. The compact balls have a naked singularity at the center. The inner boundary of the compact shells is singular, as well, but it is, at the same time, a Killing horizon. These singular, compact shells therefore resemble black holes.

Adam, C; Klimas, P; Sánchez-Guillén, J; Wereszczynski, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Quantum field theory on a growing lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct the classical and canonically quantized theories of a massless scalar field on a background lattice in which the number of points--and hence the number of modes--may grow in time. To obtain a well-defined theory certain restrictions must be imposed on the lattice. Growth-induced particle creation is studied in a two-dimensional example. The results suggest that local mode birth of this sort injects too much energy into the vacuum to be a viable model of cosmological mode birth.

Brendan Z. Foster; Ted Jacobson

2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

440

Kinetic Stability of the Field Reversed Configuration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New computational results are presented which advance the understanding of the stability properties of the Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). The FRC is an innovative confinement approach that offers a unique fusion reactor potential because of its compact and simple geometry, translation properties, and high plasma beta. One of the most important issues is FRC stability with respect to low-n (toroidal mode number) MHD modes. There is a clear discrepancy between the predictions of standard MHD theory that many modes should be unstable on the MHD time scale, and the observed macroscopic resilience of FRCs in experiments.

E.V. Belova; R.C. Davidson; H. Ji; and M. Yamada

2002-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Scalar field collapse with negative cosmological constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of black holes or naked singularities is studied in a model in which a homogeneous time-dependent scalar field with an exponential potential couples to four dimensional gravity with negative cosmological constant. An analytic solution is derived and its consequences are discussed. The model depends only on one free parameter, which determines the equation of state and decides the fate of the spacetime. Without fine tuning the value of this parameter the collapse ends in a generic formation of a black hole or a naked singularity. The latter case violates the cosmic censorship conjecture.

R. Baier; Hiromichi Nishimura; S. A. Stricker

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

442

Scalar field collapse with negative cosmological constant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The formation of black holes or naked singularities is studied in a model in which a homogeneous time-dependent scalar field with an exponential potential couples to four dimensional gravity with negative cosmological constant. An analytic solution is derived and its consequences are discussed. The model depends only on one free parameter which determines the equation of state and decides the fate of the spacetime. Depending on the value of this parameter the collapse ends in a black hole or a naked singularity. The latter case violates the cosmic censorship conjecture.

Baier, R; Stricker, S A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory: Superconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

opposes the magnetic field generating the current. In a perfect diamagnet, the magnetic field lines produced exactly mirror those of the changing magnetic field that induce them,...

444

Energy momentum flows for the massive vector field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a causal trajectory interpretation for the massive vector field, based on the flows of rest energy and a conserved density defined using the time-like eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the stress-energy-momentum tensor. This work extends our previous work which used a similar procedure for the scalar field. The massive, spin-one, complex vector field is discussed in detail and solutions are classified using the Pauli-Lubanski spin vector. The flows of energy-momentum are illustrated in a simple example of standing waves in a plane.

George Horton; Chris Dewdney

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

Heat pipes for use in a magnetic field  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat pipe configuration for use in a magnetic field environment of a fusion reactor is disclosed. Heat pipes for operation in a magnetic field when liquid metal working fluids are used are optimized by flattening of the heat pipes having an unobstructed annulus which significantly reduces the adverse side region effect of the prior known cylindrically configured heat pipes. The flattened heat pipes operating in a magnetic field can remove 2--3 times the heat as a cylindrical heat pipe of the same cross sectional area. 4 figs.

Werner, R.W.; Hoffman, M.A.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

446

Estimating of pulsed electric fields using optical measurements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We performed optical electric field measurements ion nanosecond time scales using the electrooptic crystal beta barium borate (BBO). Tests were based on a preliminary bench top design intended to be a proofofprinciple stepping stone towards a modulardesign optical Efield diagnostic that has no metal in the interrogated environment. The long term goal is to field a modular version of the diagnostic in experiments on large scale xray source facilities, or similarly harsh environments.

Flanagan, Timothy McGuire; Chantler, Gary R.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

First-passage-time problems in time-aware networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First passage time or the first time that a stochastic process crosses a boundary is a random variable whose probability distribution is sought in engineering, statistics, finance, and other disciplines. The probability ...

Suwansantisuk, Watcharapan, 1978-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Gauge Fields Emerging From Extra Dimensions a Born-Oppenheimer approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a dynamical mechanism to induce gauge fields in four dimensional space-time from a single scalar field or a spinor field in higher dimensions. The Born-Oppenheimer treatment of the extra dimensions is an essential ingredient in our approach. A possible applications of the idea to low dimensional condensed matter systems and high temperature field theory are also pointed out. This paper is an extended version of our previous unpublished work (SUNY-NTG-89-48, Jan. 1990).

T. Hatsuda; H. Kuratsuji

1994-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

449

Electromagnetic field with induced massive term: Case with scalar field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider an interacting system of massless scalar and electromagnetic field, with the Lagrangian explicitly depending on the electromagnetic potentials, i.e., interaction with broken gauge invariance. The Lagrangian for interaction is chosen in such a way that the electromagnetic field equation acquires an additional term, which in some cases is proportional to the vector potential of the electromagnetic field. This equation can be interpreted as the equation of motion of photon with induced nonzero rest-mass. This system of interacting fields is considered within the scope of Bianchi type-I (BI) cosmological model. It is shown that, as a result of interaction the electromagnetic field vanishes at $t \\to \\infty$ and the isotropization process of the expansion takes place.

Yu. P. Rybakov; G. N. Shikin; Yu. A. Popov; Bijan Saha

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

450

Electromagnetic field with induced massive term: Case with spinor field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider an interacting system of spinor and electromagnetic field, explicitly depending on the electromagnetic potentials, i.e., interaction with broken gauge invariance. The Lagrangian for interaction is chosen in such a way that the electromagnetic field equation acquires an additional term, which in some cases is proportional to the vector potential of the electromagnetic field. This equation can be interpreted as the equation of motion of photon with induced non-trivial rest-mass. This system of interacting spinor and scalar fields is considered within the scope of Bianchi type-I (BI) cosmological model. It is shown that, as a result of interaction the electromagnetic field vanishes at $t \\to \\infty$ and the isotropization process of the expansion takes place.

Yu. P. Rybakov; G. N. Shikin; Yu. A. Popov; Bijan Saha

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

451

Improved energy confinement in spheromaks with reduced field errors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An increase in the global energy confinement time (?E) was obtained in the CTX spheromak by replacing the high-field-error mesh-wall flux conserver with a low-field-error solid-wall flux conserver. The maximum ?E is now 0.18 ms, an order of magnitude greater than previously reported values of ?0.017 ms. Both ?E and the magnetic energy decay time (?W) now increase with central electron temperature, which was not previously observed. These new results are consistent with a previously proposed energy-loss mechanism associated with high edge helicity dissipation.

F. J. Wysocki; J. C. Fernández; I. Henins; T. R. Jarboe; G. J. Marklin

1990-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

452

Combined Effects of Unsteady Electric Field and Uniform Magnetic Field on Magnetoelectroconvection in a Poorly Conducting Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetoelectroconvective instability of a plane horizontal layer of a poorly conducting plasma subjected to a strong nonuniform electric field and uniform magnetic field is investigated in the combined magnetoelectrohydrodynamic approximations when charge formation is produced by this convection. The spatio?temporal variation of electric field density of charge distribution and temperature are found for the quiescent basic state. The influence of combined uniform magnetic field and a time?dependent electric field modulation on the behaviour of a poorly conducting plasma is studied using energy and moment methods along with Galerkin technique. The criterion for the onset of magnetoelectroconvection involving the effects of both strong electric and magnetic fields is computed and the results are compared with these obtained only in the presence of electric field. We found that the combined effect of electric and magnetic fields is more favourable to suppress convection significantly than in the presence of electric field alone. This result is useful in synthesizing smart and strong materials needed for many aeronautical automobile and biomedical engineering applications to minimize the weight and maximize the strength to achieve the sufficient dynamic advantages.

M. S. Gayathri

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Using Narrow and Wide Field of View Instruments to Evaluate Longwave Parameterizations for Fair Weather Cumulus Cloud Fields  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Using Narrow and Wide Field of View Instruments to Using Narrow and Wide Field of View Instruments to Evaluate Longwave Parameterizations for Fair Weather Cumulus Cloud Fields E. E. Takara and R. G. Ellingson Department of Meteorology Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction Full blown three-dimensional (3D) radiation calculations for broken cloud fields consume too much time and computing resources to be included in climate models. The 3D effects can be approximated by effective cloud fractions which reduce the three-dimensional calculation to an average of plane parallel solutions - a much easier problem. For broken cloud conditions, the longwave flux (F) can be written as the weighted average of clear and overcast fluxes: overcast e clear e F N )F N 1 ( F (1) F clear is the clear-sky flux; the flux that would occur if the broken cloud field was removed. F

454

Field observations and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Statistics of particle time-temperature histories.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particles in non - isothermal turbulent flow are subject to a stochastic environment tha t produces a distribution of particle time - temperature histories. This distribution is a function of the dispersion of the non - isothermal (continuous) gas phase and the distribution of particles relative to that gas phase. In this work we extend the one - dimensional turbulence (ODT) model to predict the joint dispersion of a dispersed particle phase and a continuous phase. The ODT model predicts the turbulent evolution of continuous scalar fields with a model for the cascade of fluctuations to smaller sc ales (the 'triplet map') at a rate that is a function of the fully resolved one - dimens ional velocity field . Stochastic triplet maps also drive Lagrangian particle dispersion with finite Stokes number s including inertial and eddy trajectory - crossing effect s included. Two distinct approaches to this coupling between triplet maps and particle dispersion are developed and implemented along with a hybrid approach. An 'instantaneous' particle displacement model matches the tracer particle limit and provide s an accurate description of particle dispersion. A 'continuous' particle displacement m odel translates triplet maps into a continuous velocity field to which particles respond. Particles can alter the turbulence, and modifications to the stochastic rate expr ession are developed for two - way coupling between particles and the continuous phase. Each aspect of model development is evaluated in canonical flows (homogeneous turbulence, free - shear flows and wall - bounded flows) for which quality measurements are ava ilable. ODT simulations of non - isothermal flows provide statistics for particle heating. These simulations show the significance of accurately predicting the joint statistics of particle and fluid dispersion . Inhomogeneous turbulence coupled with the in fluence of the mean flow fields on particles of varying properties alter s particle dispersion. The joint particle - temperature dispersion leads to a distribution of temperature histories predicted by the ODT . Predictions are shown for the lower moments an d the full distributions of the particle positions, particle - observed gas temperatures and particle temperatures. An analysis of the time scales affecting particle - temperature interactions covers Lagrangian integral time scales based on temperature autoco rrelations, rates of temperature change associated with particle motion relative to the temperature field and rates of diffusional change of temperatures. These latter two time scales have not been investigated previously; they are shown to be strongly in termittent having peaked distributions with long tails. The logarithm of the absolute value of these time scales exhibits a distribution closer to normal. A cknowledgements This work is supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) under their Counter - Weapons of Mass Destruction Basic Research Program in the area of Chemical and Biological Agent Defeat under award number HDTRA1 - 11 - 4503I to Sandia National Laboratories. The authors would like to express their appreciation for the guidance provi ded by Dr. Suhithi Peiris to this project and to the Science to Defeat Weapons of Mass Destruction program.

Hewson, John C.; Lignell, David O.; Sun, Guangyuan

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Tip timing measurement chain validation with the Universal Tip Timing Calibrator UTTC, approach and experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The presentation will outline the motivation results and experience of the development and application of a Universal Tip Timing Calibrator (UTTC) by the Siemens Tip Timing expert group. Due to the importance of the Tip Timing blade vibration measurement technology for the development of new gas turbine frames it is indispensible to calibrate these systems to international traceable standards. The very complex matter of tip timing signals does not allow to refer to simple physical and easy available laboratory standards in a standard working procedure. Even very sophisticated and expensive arbitrary wave and pattern generators are not able to generate signals to be used as calibration signals for multi-sensor tip timing systems of the last generation. So far these 3rd and 4th generation Blade Vibration Tip Timing Measurement (BVTTM) systems could not be tested and calibrated completely within their dedicated application range regarding blade vibration amplitude frequency and dynamic response. Based on this situation the Siemens Tip Timing expert community decided the development of a universal and wide range application Tip Timing Simulator and Calibrator four years ago. Meanwhile this device exists and is widely used for BVTTM system development field system set up data validation and off-line data evaluation. Inside the paper the technical features and the software capabilities as well will be described in detail. Finally two application examples with two different BVTTM systems are presented and the results are being discussed. As a summary it can be expressed that the UTTC was found as a very helpful instrument for an optimal Tip Timing system setup.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Plasma Production via Field Ionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

458

Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

459

New determination of the gravitational constant G with time-of-swing method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new determination of the Newtonian gravitational constant G is presented by using a torsion pendulum with the time-of-swing method. Compared with our previous measurement with the same method, several improvements greatly reduced the uncertainties as follows: (i) two stainless steel spheres with more homogeneous density are used as the source masses instead of the cylinders used in the previous experiment, and the offset of the mass center from the geometric center is measured and found to be much smaller than that of the cylinders; (ii) a rectangular glass block is used as the main body of the pendulum, which has fewer vibration modes and hence improves the stability of the period and reduces the uncertainty of the moment of inertia; (iii) both the pendulum and source masses are placed in the same vacuum chamber to reduce the error of measuring the relative positions; (iv) changing the configurations between the ''near'' and ''far'' positions is remotely operated by using a stepper motor to lower the environmental disturbances; and (v) the anelastic effect of the torsion fiber is first measured directly by using two disk pendulums with the help of a high-Q quartz fiber. We have performed two independent G measurements, and the two G values differ by only 9 ppm. The combined value of G is (6.673 49{+-}0.000 18)x10{sup -11} m{sup 3} kg{sup -1} s{sup -2} with a relative uncertainty of 26 ppm.

Tu Liangcheng; Li Qing; Wang Qinglan; Shao Chenggang; Yang Shanqing; Liu Linxia; Liu Qi; Luo Jun [Department of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Abandoned oil fields in Kansas and Nebraska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data on approximately 400 abandoned oil fields in Kansas and 90 abandoned oil fields in Nebraska are presented. The following information is obtained on each field: county; DOE field code; field name; AAPG geologic province code; discovery date; year of last production; discovery well operator; proven acreage; formation thickness; depth of field; API gravity; calendar year; yearly field oil production; yearly field gas production; cumulative oil production; cumulative gas production; number abandoned fields in county; cumulative production of oil from fields; and cumulative production of gas from fields. (DMC)

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field time offset" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Reverse?field reciprocity for conducting specimens in magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new static?electromagnetic reciprocity principle is presented extending ordinary resistive reciprocity to the case of nonzero magnetic fields by requiring the magnetic field to be reversed when the reciprocal measurement is made. The principle is supported by measurements on various types of specimens including those which exhibit the quantum?Hall effect. A derivation using elementary electromagnetic theory shows that the principle will hold provided only that the specimen is electrically linear (Ohmic) and that the Onsager form for the conductivity tensor applies throughout. The principle has important implications for electrical measurements on semiconductors in applied?magnetic fields.

H. H. Sample; W. J. Bruno; S. B. Sample; E. K. Sichel

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Magnetic field exposure among utility workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric and Magnetic Field Measurement Project for Utilities -- the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Electric and Magnetic Field Digital Exposure (EMDEX) Project (the EPRI EMDEX Project) -- was a multifaceted project that entailed technology transfer, measurement protocol design, data management, and exposure assessment analyses. This paper addresses one specific objective of the project: the collection, analysis, and documentation of power-frequency magnetic filed exposures for a diverse population of utility employees at 59 sites in four countries between September, 1988, and September, 1989. Specially designed sampling procedures and data collection protocols were used to ensure uniform implementation across sites. Volunteers within 13 job classifications recorded which of eight work or three nonwork environments they occupied while wearing an EMDEX meter. Approximately 50,000 hours of magnetic field exposure records taken at 10 s intervals were obtained, about 70% of which were from work environments. Exposures and time spent in environments were analyzed by primary work environment, by occupied environment, and by job classification.

Bracken, T.D.; Senior, R.S. [T. Dan Bracken, Inc., Portland, OR (United States); Rankin, R.F. [Applied Research Services, Inc., Lake Oswego, OR (United States); Alldredge, J.R. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Sussman, S.S. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Field theoretic description of charge regulation interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to find the exact form of the electrostatic interaction between two proteins with dissociable charge groups in aqueous solution, we have studied a model system composed of two macroscopic surfaces with charge dissociation sites immersed in a counterion-only ionic solution. Field-theoretic representation of the grand canonical partition function is derived and evaluated within the mean-field approximation, giving the Poisson-Boltzmann theory with the Ninham-Parsegian boundary condition. Gaussian fluctuations around the mean-field are then analyzed in the lowest order correction that we calculate analytically and exactly, using the path integral representation for the partition function of a harmonic oscillator with time-dependent frequency. The first order (one loop) free energy correction gives the interaction free energy that reduces to the zero-frequency van der Waals form in the appropriate limit but in general gives rise to a mono-polar fluctuation term due to charge fluctuation at the dissociation sites. Our formulation opens up the possibility to investigate the Kirkwood-Shumaker interaction in more general contexts where their original derivation fails.

Natasa Adzic; Rudolf Podgornik

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Graphene transparency in weak magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We carry out an explicit calculation of the vacuum polarization tensor for an effective low-energy model of monolayer graphene in the presence of a weak magnetic field of intensity $B$ perpendicularly aligned to the membrane. By expanding the quasiparticle propagator in the Schwinger proper time representation up to order $(eB)^2$, where $e$ is the unit charge, we find an explicitly transverse tensor, consistent with gauge invariance. Furthermore, assuming that graphene is radiated with monochromatic light of frequency $\\omega$ along the external field direction, from the modified Maxwell's equations we derive the intensity of transmitted light and the angle of polarization rotation in terms of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_{xx}$) and transverse ($\\sigma_{xy}$) conductivities. Corrections to these quantities, both calculated and measured, are of order $(eB)^2/\\omega^4$. Our findings generalize and complement previously known results reported in literature regarding the light absorption problem in graphene from the experimental and theoretical points of view, with and without external magnetic fields.

David Valenzuela; Saúl Hernández-Ortiz; Marcelo Loewe; Alfredo Raya

2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

465

Wayne field: A horizontal drilling case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in the spring of 1994, studies of Wayne field located on the northeastern flank of the Williston Basin were initiated to determine the feasibility of using horizontal drilling to increase recoverable reserves in the field. The Wayne subinterval is one of several shoaling-upwards cycles within the Mission Canyon Formation of the Mississippian Madison Group. The reservoir pay averages 24% porosity, 100 millidarcys permeability, and 50% water saturation. Vertical wells, since field discovery in 1957, typically IP for 70 bopd and 20% water with a rapid decline within a few months to 10 bopd and 90% water. This type of well performance is characteristic of severe water coning for which horizontal development can help to minimize. In late 1994 and early 1995 the Ballantyne Hedges No.7H and GeoResources O. Fossum No.H1 were drilled. The wells recorded IP`s of 280 bopd/5 bwpd and 390 bopd/80 bwpd respectively. After six months of production both wells stabilized at approximately 110 bopd with a 35% water cut. Projections indicate that each horizontal well will recover 250,000 bbls of oil as compared to 115,000 bbls for an average vertical well and will do so in half the time. These early results provide a significant improvement over the vertical production and would seem to be reducing water coning. Three more horizontal wells are planned for the fourth quarter of 1995.

Jennings, J.B. [GeoResources, Inc., Williston, ND (United States); Johnson, R.P. [Harris, Brown, & Kiemer, Inc., Bismarck, ND (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Conservation of reactive electromagnetic energy in reactive time  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The complex Poynting theorem (CPT) is extended to a canonical time-scale domain $(t,s)$. Time-harmonic phasors are replaced by the positive-frequency parts of general fields, which extend analytically to complex time $t+is$, with $s>0$ interpreted as a time resolution scale. The real part of the extended CPT gives conservation in $t$ of a time-averaged field energy, and its imaginary part gives conservation in $s$ of a time-averaged reactive energy. In both cases, the averaging windows are determined by a Cauchy kernel of width $\\Delta t\\sim \\pm s$. This completes the time-harmonic CPT, whose imaginary part is generally supposed to be vaguely `related to' reactive energy without giving a conservation law, or even an expression, for the latter. The interpretation of $s$ as reactive time, tracking the leads and lags associated with stored capacitative and inductive energy, gives a simple explanation of the volt-ampere reactive (var) unit measuring reactive power: a var is simply one Joule per reactive second. T...

Kaiser, Gerald

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla level Strongest non-destructive magnetic field: world record set at 100-tesla level National High Magnetic Field Laboratory magnet achieved a whopping 100.75 tesla-the 100-tesla level is roughly equivalent to 2 million times Earth's magnetic field. March 22, 2012 World record set at National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Los Alamos In 2011, researchers at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory set a new world record for the strongest nondestructive magnet field: 97.4 tesla. The feat positioned them to in March 2012 deliver a magnet capable of achieving the elusive 100-tesla goal, profoundly affecting a range of scientific investigations. Get Expertise Director, Pulsed Field Facility

468

Measuring near-field nanoparticle concentration profiles by correlating surface plasmon resonance reflectance with effective refractive index of nanofluids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time-dependent and near-field nanoparticle concentrations are determined by correlating the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) reflectance intensities with the effective refractive...

Kim, Iltai; Kihm, Kenneth D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Electron Spin Precession for the Time Fractional Pauli Equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we aim to extend the application of the fractional calculus in the realm of quantum mechanics. We present a time fractional Pauli equation containing Caputo fractional derivative. By use of the new equation we study the electron spin precession problem in a homogeneous constant magnetic field.

Hosein Nasrolahpour

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

470

Invited Talk: Mitigating the Effects of Internet Timing Faults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invited Talk: Mitigating the Effects of Internet Timing Faults Across Embedded Network Gateways and the Internet. The usual approach to making such a connection is to install a gateway node which translates from Internet protocols to embedded field bus network protocols. Such connections raise obvious security

Koopman, Philip

471

Timing-driven routing for symmetrical array-based FPGAs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present a timing-driven router for symmetrical array-based FPGAs. The routing resources in the FPGAs consist of segments of various lengths. Researchers have shown that the number of segments, instead of wirelength, used by a net is ... Keywords: computer-aided design of VLSI, field-programmable gate array, layout, synthesis

Yao-Wen Chang; Kai Zhu; D. F. Wong

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Predicting farm machinery operation time with a soil moisture mode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Criteria Used to Determine Trafficability Other Moisture Balance Models Evapotranspiration Moisture Redistribution . Runoff and Infiltration 10 Probability Distribution of Available Field Time . . 11 Chapter Summary III PROCEDURES Soil Moisture... Model Step 1 - Infiltration and Drainage Step 2 - Soil Evaporation . 12 14 14 20 vii 1 Chapter III (cont. ) Step 3 - Plant Evaporation Final Step - Redistribution Page 22 24 Trafficability Criteria Probability Distribution of Available...

Bordovsky, James Paul

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2003.04.02 - 2003.09.02 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon, water, and energy varies with climate, soil, and land management, in ways 1) that influence the CO2 flux and planetary boundary layer CO2 concentration in ARM CART and 2) that we can model and predict. This activity repeated portable flux system measurements that we performed in spring 2002, by continuing measurements of the spatial heterogeneity of carbon, water, and energy fluxes in fields surrounding the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF).

474

Zeeman tomography of magnetic white dwarfs IV. The complex field structure of the polars EF Eri, BL Hyi, and CP Tuc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The magnetic fields of the accreting white dwarfs (WDs) in magnetic cataclysmic variables (mCVs) determine the accretion geometries, the emission properties, and the secular evolution of these objects. We determine the structure of the surface magnetic fields of the WDs primaries in magnetic CVs using Zeeman tomography. Our study is based on orbital-phase resolved optical flux and circular polarization spectra of the polars EF Eri, BL Hyi, and CP Tuc obtained with FORS1 at the ESO VLT. An evolutionary algorithm is used to synthesize best fits to these spectra from an extensive database of pre-computed Zeeman spectra. The general approach has been described in previous papers of this series. The results achieved with simple geometries as centered or offset dipoles are not satisfactory. Significantly improved fits are obtained for multipole expansions that are truncated at degree l(max)=3 or 5 and include all tesseral and sectoral components with 0CP Tuc and the ranges of field strength covered are similar for the dipole and multipole models, but only the latter provide access to accreting matter at the right locations on the WD. The results suggest that the field geometries of the WDs in short-period mCVs are quite complex with strong contributions from multipoles higher than the dipole in spite of a typical age of the WDs in CVs in excess of 1 Gyr. It is feasible to derive the surface field structure of an accreting WD from phase-resolved low-state circular spectropolarimetry of sufficiently high signal-to-noise ratio. The fact that independent information is available on the strength and direction of the field in the accretion spot from high-state observations helps in unraveling the global field structure.

K. Beuermann; F. Euchner; K. Reinsch; S. Jordan; B. T. Gaensicke

2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

475

The Theory of Quantized Fields. VI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper treats the effect of a time-independent external electromagnetic field upon a Dirac field by constructing the transformation function in a representation adapted to the external field. In addition to the alteration of the Green's function, the structure of the transformation function differs from that of the zero field situation by a factor which describes the energy of the modified vacuum state. A formula for the vacuum energy is obtained and expressed in a form appropriate to a localized field, in terms of the energy eigenvalues of discrete modes, and of the phase shifts associated with continuum modes. Determinantal methods are then introduced, and the class of fields is established for which a certain frequency-dependent modified determinant is an integral function of the parameter measuring the strength of the field. The properties of the determinant are investigated in the two frequency regions |p0|m, with regard to the zeros of the real determinant in the former region, which are the frequencies of the discrete modes, and to the phase of the complex determinant in the latter region. In the second situation, a connection is established with a unitary matrix defined for modes of a given frequency, and the phase of the determinant is expressed in terms of the eigenphases of this matrix. Following a discussion of the asymptotic behavior of the determinant as a function of p0, the modified determinant is constructed in terms of the discrete mode energies and of the eigenphases. This yields a more precise version of the vacuum energy formula, in which a single divergent parameter is exhibited, for a suitable class of fields.The scattering description is introduced by an evaluation of the Green's function, for a sufficiently large time interval, in terms of the discrete modes, and of linear combinations of free particle modes expressed by a unitary matrix which is an extension of that referring to modes of a single frequency. Transition probabilities are derived and summarized in a generating function that serves to evaluate occupation number expectation values for the final state, upon which is based the definition of differential and total scattering cross sections. A discussion is presented of various symmetry operations and the resulting properties of cross sections. Then, a determinantal formula for the individual transition probabilities is used to examine the probability for the persistence of a state, in its dependence upon occupation numbers. An incidental result of this analysis is a qualitative upper limit to total cross sections in relation to the character of the angular distribution. A section is devoted to the properties of eigenphases, including the demonstration of equivalence between phase shifts and eigenphases, and the discussion of alternative procedures for their evaluation in terms of quantities exhibited as convergent power series in the potential. Finally, the determinantal asymptotic behavior is used to obtain a high-energy approximation to the eigenphases for an isotropic scalar potential. The resulting high energy, small angle, form of the scattering cross section is discussed in the extreme quantum and classical limits. An alternative derivation of the high-energy scattering formula is provided in terms of an approximate construction of the Green's function.

Julian Schwinger

1954-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

High field gradient particle accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

477

High field gradient particle accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

Nation, John A. (Ithaca, NY); Greenwald, Shlomo (Haifa, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Generation of Gaussian Density Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This document describes analytical and numerical techniques for the generation of Gaussian density fields, which represent cosmological density perturbations. The mathematical techniques involved in the generation of density harmonics in k-space, the filtering of the density fields, and the normalization of the power spectrum to the measured temperature fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background, are presented in details. These techniques are well-known amongst experts, but the current literature lacks a formal description. I hope that this technical report will prove useful to new researchers moving into this field, sparing them the task of reinventing the wheel.

Hugo Martel

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

479

Hydrodynamic construction of the electromagnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an alternative Eulerian hydrodynamic model for the electromagnetic field in which the discrete vector indices in Maxwell\\s equations are replaced by continuous angular freedoms, and develop the corresponding Lagrangian picture in which the fluid particles have rotational and translational freedoms. This enables us to extend to the electromagnetic field the exact method of state construction proposed previously for spin 0 systems, in which the time-dependent wavefunction is computed from a single-valued continuum of deterministic trajectories where two spacetime points are linked by at most a single orbit. The deduction of Maxwell\\s equations from continuum mechanics is achieved by generalizing the spin 0 theory to a general Riemannian manifold from which the electromagnetic construction is extracted as a special case. In particular, the flat-space Maxwell equations are represented as a curved-space Schr\\"odinger equation for a massive system. The Lorentz covariance of the Eulerian field theory is obtained from the non-covariant Lagrangian-