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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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1

Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Field Test to Demonstrate Real-Time In-Situ Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds Hazmat Spill Center, Nevada Test Site September 19-25, 2001 Clifford K. Ho Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque-filled 55- gallon drum at the Hazmat Spill Center at the Nevada Test Site. Background and Objectives Tens

Ho, Cliff

2

DOE-Sponsored Field Test Demonstrates Viability of Simultaneous CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A field test conducted by a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has demonstrated that using carbon dioxide in an enhanced oil recovery method dubbed "huff-and-puff" can help assess the carbon sequestration potential of geologic formations while tapping America's valuable oil resources.

3

Research and development of energy-efficient appliance motor-compressors. Volume IV. Production demonstration and field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two models of a high-efficiency compressor were manufactured in a pilot production run. These compressors were for low back-pressure applications. While based on a production compressor, there were many changes that required production process changes. Some changes were performed within our company and others were made by outside vendors. The compressors were used in top mount refrigerator-freezers and sold in normal distribution channels. Forty units were placed in residences for a one-year field test. Additional compressors were built so that a life test program could be performed. The results of the field test reveal a 27.0% improvement in energy consumption for the 18 ft/sup 3/ high-efficiency model and a 15.6% improvement in the 21 ft/sup 3/ improvement in the 21 ft/sup 3/ high-efficiency model as compared to the standard production unit.

Middleton, M.G.; Sauber, R.S.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

Taylor, P D

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

AVTA ? PHEV Demonstrations and Testing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

using dedicated drivers and other methods to accumulate miles and cycles - Fleet testing, uses unstructured vehicle utilization - Different testing methods are used to balance...

6

Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Ultra-Low-Temperature...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Field Demonstration of High Efficiency Gas Heaters Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures Building Science "Power Words"...

7

Test and Demonstration Assets of New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was developed by the Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), funded by a DOE/NNSA grant. The NSPP has three primary components: business incubation, workforce development, and technology demonstration and validation. The document contains a survey of test and demonstration assets in New Mexico available for external users such as small businesses with security technologies under development. Demonstration and validation of national security technologies created by incubator sources, as well as other sources, are critical phases of technology development. The NSPP will support the utilization of an integrated demonstration and validation environment.

None

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is a demand-side management strategy to reduce electricity use during times of high peak electric loads;1 Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest

9

Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact, Light-Weight, and Scalable High Temperature Inverter for HEVs, PHEVs, and FCVs Development, Test and Demonstration...

10

Alternate retrieval technology demonstrations program - test report (ARD Environmental, Inc.)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A prototype vehicle, control system, and waste and water scavenging system were designed and fabricated with essentially the full capabilities of the vehicle system proposed by ARD Environmental. A test tank mockup, including riser and decontamination chamber were designed and fabricated, and approximately 830 cubic feet of six varieties of waste simulants poured. The tests were performed by ARD Environmental personnel at its site in Laurel, Maryland, from 4/22/97 through 5/2/97. The capabilities tested were deployment and retrieval, extended mobility and productivity, the ability to operate the system using video viewing only, retrieval after simulated failure, and retrieval and decontamination. Testing commenced with deployment of the vehicle into the tank. Deployment was accomplished using a crane and auxiliary winch to position the vehicle and lower it through the decontamination chamber, into the 36`` diameter x 6` high riser, and touch down on the waste field in the tank. The initial mobility tests were conducted immediately after deployment, prior to sluicing, as the waste field exhibited the greatest amount of variation at this time. This test demonstrated the ability of the vehicle to maneuver over the simulated waste field, and the ability of the operator to work with only video viewing available. In addition, the ability of the vehicle to right itself after being turned on its side was demonstrated. The production rate was evaluated daily through the testing period by measuring the surface and estimating the amount of material removed. The test demonstrated the ability of the vehicle to reduce the waste surface using 400 psi (nominal) water jets, scavenge water and material from the work area, and move to any location, even in the relatively confined space of the 20` diameter test tank. In addition, the ability to sluice to a remote scavenging module was demonstrated. The failure mode test demonstrated the ability to retrieve a stuck vehicle by pulling on the tether, even if the vehicle wheels were locked or the vehicle was on its side. Line pull required to retrieve the vehicle was measured, and side load on the riser calculated from the line pull and line angles. Finally, the decontamination test demonstrated the ability to effectively clean the umbilical and vehicle. The issues addressed and resolved during the testing were: Feasibility of deploying a vehicle- based system, mobility, production rate and limitation of water in the tank during sluicing, mining strategy, operator efficiency, vehicle recovery, and decontamination. Water usage and waste removal rates were used to estimate the time and water usage requirements for cleaning a Hanford SST.

Berglin, E.J.

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

New Technology Demonstration Program - Results of an Attempted Field Test of Full-Spectrum Polarized Lighting in a Mail Processing/Office Space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of the potential energy savings associated with the use of full-spectrum polarized lighting in a work space was initiated as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) in 1997. This project was intended to provide information on the effectiveness and application of this technology that could help federal energy managers and other interested individuals determine whether this technology had benefits for their occupied spaces. The use of an actual mail processing/office work area provided the capability of evaluating the technologies effectiveness in the real world.

Richman, Eric E.

2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

12

New Technology Demonstration Program - Results of an Attempted Field Test of Multi-Layer Light Polarizing Panels in an Office Space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of the potential energy savings associated with the use of multi-layer light polarizing panels in an office space was initiated as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) in 1997. This project was intended to provide information on the effectiveness and application of this technology that could help federal energy managers and other interested individuals determine whether this technology had benefits for their occupied spaces. The use of an actual working office area provided the capability of evaluating the technology's effectiveness in the real world.

Richman, Eric E.

2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

13

Field demonstration of the ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moisture was generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

14

Field demonstration of the ICE 250[trademark] Cleaning System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ICE 250[trademark] Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moistur2048s generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

15

Integrated test schedule for buried waste integrated demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Test Schedule incorporates the various schedules the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports into one document. This document contains the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order schedules for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Reservation, Oak Ridge Reservation, and Fernald Environmental Materials Center. Included in the Integrated Test Schedule is the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration ``windows of opportunity`` schedule. The ``windows of opportunity`` schedule shows periods of time in which Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program-sponsored technology demonstrations could support key decisions in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order. Schedules for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration-sponsored technology task plans are categorized by technology area and divided by current fiscal year and out-year. Total estimated costs for Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration-sponsored Technology Task Plans for FY-92 through FY-97 are $74.756M.

Brown, J.T.; McDonald, J.K.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Integrated test schedule for buried waste integrated demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Test Schedule incorporates the various schedules the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports into one document. This document contains the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order schedules for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Reservation, Oak Ridge Reservation, and Fernald Environmental Materials Center. Included in the Integrated Test Schedule is the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration windows of opportunity'' schedule. The windows of opportunity'' schedule shows periods of time in which Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program-sponsored technology demonstrations could support key decisions in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order. Schedules for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration-sponsored technology task plans are categorized by technology area and divided by current fiscal year and out-year. Total estimated costs for Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration-sponsored Technology Task Plans for FY-92 through FY-97 are $74.756M.

Brown, J.T.; McDonald, J.K.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Reservoir class field demonstration. Publication and presentation bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reservoir Class Field Demonstration Program was initiated in FY92 in response to rapidly declining domestic production and the realization that huge volumes of oil are being abandoned in reservoirs because of uneconomic production techniques. This program is just one of the critical elements of the National Oil Program necessary to move Improved Oil Recovery (IOR) technology from the conceptual stage through research, pilot scale field experiments, and full-scale field demonstrations to industry acceptance and commercialization. Both the successful results and failures of the field demonstrations will provide focus to concurrent research programs. Elements of the field demonstrations that are suitable for broad industry application are being communicated to the industry through the oil program`s technology transfer effort. As part of the technology transfer effort, this listing of publications and presentations by the project operators has been compiled by the US Department of energy`s (DOE) National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO). The bibliography contains 240 citations for publications and a similar number of citations for presentations.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Spent nuclear fuel storage -- Performance tests and demonstrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of heat transfer and shielding performance tests and demonstrations conducted from 1983 through 1992 by or in cooperation with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Commercial Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The performance tests consisted of 6 to 14 runs involving one or two loadings, usually three backfill environments (helium, nitrogen, and vacuum backfills), and one or two storage system orientations. A description of the test plan, spent fuel load patterns, results from temperature and dose rate measurements, and fuel integrity evaluations are contained within the report.

McKinnon, M.A.; DeLoach, V.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Summary of Test Results for the Interagency Field Test &Evaluation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Summary of Test Results for the Interagency Field Test &Evaluation of Wind Turbine - Radar Interference Mitigation Technologies Summary of Test Results for the Interagency Field...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Supermarket refrigeration modeling and field demonstration: Interim report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a project to investigate supermarket refrigeration. The objectives of this project are (1) to develop an energy use and demand model of supermarket refrigeration systems and (2) to carry out an extensive field test of such systems in an operating supermarket. To accomplish these goals, a supermarket owned by Safeway Stores, Inc., and located in Menlo Park, CA, with an existing conventional refrigeration system utilizing single compressor units, was equipped with a state-of-the-art system with multiplexed parallel compressors. The store and both refrigeration systems were thoroughly instrumented and a test schedule was prepared and executed. Presented in this report are the preliminary results of this field test along with the initial validation of the energy use and demand model. 62 figs., 47 tabs.

Walker, D.H.; Deming, G.I.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nuclear waste repository transparency technology test bed demonstrations at WIPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, has stated that one of the nuclear waste legacy issues is ``The challenge of managing the fuel cycle's back end and assuring the safe use of nuclear power.'' Waste management (i.e., the back end) is a domestic and international issue that must be addressed. A key tool in gaining acceptance of nuclear waste repository technologies is transparency. Transparency provides information to outside parties for independent assessment of safety, security, and legitimate use of materials. Transparency is a combination of technologies and processes that apply to all elements of the development, operation, and closure of a repository system. A test bed for nuclear repository transparency technologies has been proposed to develop a broad-based set of concepts and strategies for transparency monitoring of nuclear materials at the back end of the fuel/weapons cycle. WIPP is the world's first complete geologic repository system for nuclear materials at the back end of the cycle. While it is understood that WIPP does not currently require this type of transparency, this repository has been proposed as realistic demonstration site to generate and test ideas, methods, and technologies about what transparency may entail at the back end of the nuclear materials cycle, and which could be applicable to other international repository developments. An integrated set of transparency demonstrations was developed and deployed during the summer, and fall of 1999 as a proof-of-concept of the repository transparency technology concept. These demonstrations also provided valuable experience and insight into the implementation of future transparency technology development and application. These demonstrations included: Container Monitoring Rocky Flats to WIPP; Underground Container Monitoring; Real-Time Radiation and Environmental Monitoring; Integrated level of confidence in the system and information provided. As the world's only operating deep geologic repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) offers a unique opportunity to serve as an international cooperative test bed for developing and demonstrating technologies and processes in a fully operational repository system setting. To address the substantial national security implications for the US resulting from the lack of integrated, transparent management and disposition of nuclear materials at the back-end of the nuclear fuel and weapons cycles, it is proposed that WIPP be used as a test bed to develop and demonstrate technologies that will enable the transparent and proliferation-resistant geologic isolation of nuclear materials. The objectives of this initiative are to: (1) enhance public confidence in safe, secure geologic isolation of nuclear materials; (2) develop, test, and demonstrate transparency measures and technologies for the back-end of nuclear fuel cycle; and (3) foster international collaborations leading to workable, effective, globally-accepted standards for the transparent monitoring of geological repositories for nuclear materials. Test-bed activities include: development and testing of monitoring measures and technologies; international demonstration experiments; transparency workshops; visiting scientist exchanges; and educational outreach. These activities are proposed to be managed by the Department of Energy/Carlsbad Area Office (DOE/CAO) as part of The Center for Applied Repository and Underground Studies (CARUS).

BETSILL,J. DAVID; ELKINS,NED Z.; WU,CHUAN-FU; MEWHINNEY,JAMES D.; AAMODT,PAUL

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

24

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

25

Preliminary Scaling Estimate for Select Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site double-shell tank (DST) system provides the staging location for waste that will be transferred to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Specific WTP acceptance criteria for waste feed delivery describe the physical and chemical characteristics of the waste that must be met before the waste is transferred from the DSTs to the WTP. One of the more challenging requirements relates to the sampling and characterization of the undissolved solids (UDS) in a waste feed DST because the waste contains solid particles that settle and their concentration and relative proportion can change during the transfer of the waste in individual batches. A key uncertainty in the waste feed delivery system is the potential variation in UDS transferred in individual batches in comparison to an initial sample used for evaluating the acceptance criteria. To address this uncertainty, a number of small-scale mixing tests have been conducted as part of Washington River Protection Solutionsí Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) project to determine the performance of the DST mixing and sampling systems.

Wells, Beric E.; Fort, James A.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Rector, David R.; Schonewill, Philip P.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Revision 1, Demonstration system design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last nine years IIT Research Institute (IITRI) has been developing and testing the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. The vaporized contaminants, water vapor and air are recovered from the heated zone by means of a vacuum manifold system which collects gases from below surface as well as from the soil surface. A vapor barrier is used to prevent fugitive emissions of the contaminants and to control air infiltration to minimize dilution of the contaminant gases and vapors. The recovered gases and vapors are conveyed to an on site vapor treatment system for the clean up of the vent gases. Electrical energy is applied to the soil by forming an array of electrodes in the soil which are electrically interconnected and supplied with power. The electrodes are placed in drilled bore holes which are made through the contaminated zone. There are two versions of the in situ heating and soil treatment process: the f irst version is called the In Situ Radio Frequency (RF) Soil Decontamination Process and the second version is called the In Situ Electromagnetic (EM) Soil Decontamination Process. The first version, the RF Process is capable of heating the soil in a temperature range of 100{degrees} to 400{degrees}C. The soil temperature in the second version, the EM Process, is limited to the boiling point of water under native conditions. Thus the soil will be heated to a temperature of about 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. In this project IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site due to the fact that most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C.

Dev, H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

A design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of the viscous barrier technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The test site is located in central California in a quarry owned by the Los Banos Gravel Company in Los Banos, California, in heterogeneous unsaturated deposits of sand, silt, and -ravel typical of many of the and DOE cleanup sites and particularly analogous to the Hanford site. The coals of the field demonstration are (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier isolating a medium-scale volume (30 ft long by 30 ft wide by 20 ft deep, i.e. 1/10th to 1/8th the size of a buried tank at the Hanford Reservation) in the subsurface, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier.

Moridis, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Yen, P. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States); Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Williams, P.; Myer, L.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

AVTA HEV, NEV, BEV and HICEV Demonstrations and Testing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Testing * 18 HEV models and 47 HEVs tested to date: Year Model Vehicles Testing Status 2001 Honda Insight 6 Completed 2002 Gen I Toyota Prius 6 Completed 2003 Gen I Honda...

29

Bentonite mat demonstration: Field performance evaluation of an alternative geosynthetic composite cover system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site is investigating an alternative RCRA closure cover system configuration for hazardous solid-waste landfills. The bentonite mat demonstration is a field performance test of an alternative composite geosynthetic material cover configuration. The bentonite mat demonstration consists of four test pads; each test pad is a compacted sandy clay layer 30 ft wide, 80 ft long, and 2 ft deep. Three of the test pads will be blanketed with one of the commercially available bentonite mats (geosynthetic clay liner), then overlain by a flexible membrane liner to form the composite barrier. The remaining test pad will not contain any geosynthetic materials and will be used as the control pad for the demonstration. Each test pad will be constructed over a 4-ft sand layer. A series of access pipes will be embedded in the sand layer to provide a means for evacuating portions of the sand layer in order to create underlying cavities, thus inducing localized subsidence in the test pad. Material stress data will be collected to identify the composite barrier failure point. Infiltration data will be collected for each test pad to correlate permeability as a function of deflection. At the conclusion of the subsidence testing, the test pads will be dismantled to identify the failure mechanisms of the barriers. A finite-element analysis computer model is being developed to predict the structural behavior of the composite barrier system. The bentonite mat demonstration data will be used to verify this model, which will serve as a diagnostic tool for future designs. The formulation and execution of this demonstration is one element in achieving regulatory approval of the composite geosynthetic materials alternative cover system design configuration.

Serrato, M.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Energy Department Announces Funding for Demonstration and Testing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ideas across this emerging industry to demonstrate innovative technologies that produce energy from ocean waves. The funding opportunity announced today seeks an organization to...

31

Advancing Technology Readiness: Wave Energy Testing and Demonstration...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Establishing a Testing Center...

32

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) Overview: The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of power electronics that will be located at the TVA the testing of power electronics and energy storage technology from laboratory development and testing through

33

AVTA ¬Ö PHEV Demonstrations and Testing | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of Energy 601 High26-OPAM63-OPAMGuidanceAVTA ¬Ö PHEV Demonstrations

34

A Method for Evaluating Volt-VAR Optimization Field Demonstrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a regulated business environment a utility must be able to validate that deployed technologies provide quantifiable benefits to the end-use customers. For traditional technologies there are well established procedures for determining what benefits will be derived from the deployment. But for many emerging technologies procedures for determining benefits are less clear and completely absent in some cases. Volt-VAR Optimization is a technology that is being deployed across the nation, but there are still numerous discussions about potential benefits and how they are achieved. This paper will present a method for the evaluation, and quantification of benefits, for field deployments of Volt-VAR Optimization technologies. In addition to the basic methodology, the paper will present a summary of results, and observations, from two separate Volt-VAR Optimization field evaluations using the proposed method.

Schneider, Kevin P.; Weaver, T. F.

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Testing the Ge detectors for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High purity germanium (HPGe) crystals will be used for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, where they serve as both the source and the detector for neutrinoless double beta decay. It is crucial for the experiment to understand the performance of the HPGe crystals. A variety of crystal properties are being investigated, including basic properties such as energy resolution, efficiency, uniformity, capacitance, leakage current and crystal axis orientation, as well as more sophisticated properties, e.g. pulse shapes and dead layer and transition layer distributions. In this paper, we will present our measurements that characterize the HPGe crystals. We will also discuss our simulation package for the detector characterization setup, and show that additional information can be extracted from data-simulation comparisons.

W. Xu; N. Abgrall; E. Aguayo; F. T. Avignone III; A. S. Barabash; F. E. Bertrand; M. Boswell; V. Brudanin; M. Busch; D. Byram; A. S. Caldwell; Y-D. Chan; C. D. Christofferson; D. C. Combs; C. Cuesta; J. A. Detwiler; P. J. Doe; Yu. Efremenko; V. Egorov; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; J. E. Fast; P. Finnerty; F. M. Fraenkle; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. K. Giovanetti; J. Goett; M. P. Green; J. Gruszko; V. E. Guiseppe; K. Gusev; A. L. Hallin; R. Hazama; A. Hegai; R. Henning; E. W. Hoppe; S. Howard; M. A. Howe; K. J. Keeter; M. F. Kidd; O. Kochetov; S. I. Konovalov; R. T. Kouzes; B. D. LaFerriere; J. Leon; L. E. Leviner; J. C. Loach; J. MacMullin; S. MacMullin; R. D. Martin; S. Meijer; S. Mertens; M. Nomachi; J. L. Orrell; C. O'Shaughnessy; N. R. Overman; D. G. Phillips II; A. W. P. Poon; K. Pushkin; D. C. Radford; J. Rager; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; E. Romero-Romero; M. C. Ronquest; A. G. Schubert; B. Shanks; T. Shima; M. Shirchenko; K. J. Snavely; N. Snyder; A. M. Suriano; J. Thompson; V. Timkin; W. Tornow; J. E. Trimble; R. L. Varner; S. Vasilyev; K. Vetter; K. Vorren; B. R. White; J. F. Wilkerson; C. Wiseman; E. Yakushev; A. R. Young; C. H. Yu; V. Yumatov

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

36

Efficient Test to Demonstrate Genuine Nonlocality in Multipartite Scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the studies of genuine tripartite nonlocality in discrete variable quantum systems conducted so far, Svetlichny inequality is considered as the best Bell-type inequality to detect genuine (three way) nonlocality of pure tripartite genuine entangled states. In the present work, we have considered another Bell-type inequality (which has been reported as the $99$-th facet of $NS_2$ local polytope in (J.-D. Bancal, et.al.,Phys. Rev.A \\textbf{88}, 014102 (2013)), to reveal genuine tripartite nonlocality of GGHZ class and a subclass of extended GHZ class states. We compare the violation of this inequality with Svetlichny inequality which reveals the efficiency of the former inequality over the latter to demonstrate genuine nonlocality using the above classes of quantum states. Even in some cases discord monogamy score can be used as a better measure of quantum correlation over Svetlichny inequality for those classes of pure states. Besides, the $99$-th facet inequality is found efficient not only for revealing genuine nonlocal behavior of correlations emerging in systems using pure entangled states but also in some cases of mixed entangled states.

Kaushiki Mukherjee; Biswajit Paul; Debasis Sarkar

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

37

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Separate Nitrogen from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original proposal described the construction and operation of a 1 MMscfd treatment system to be operated at a Butcher Energy gas field in Ohio. The gas produced at this field contained 17% nitrogen. During pre-commissioning of the project, a series of well tests showed that the amount of gas in the field was significantly smaller than expected and that the nitrogen content of the wells was very high (25 to 30%). After evaluating the revised cost of the project, Butcher Energy decided that the plant would not be economical and withdrew from the project. Since that time, Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) has signed a marketing and sales partnership with ABB Lummus Global, a large multinational corporation. MTR is working with the company's Randall Gas Technology group, a supplier of equipment and processing technology to the natural gas industry. Randall's engineering group found a new site for the project at a North Texas Exploration (NTE) gas processing plant, which met with limited success. However, a small test system was installed at a Twin Bottoms Energy well in Kentucky. This unit operated successfully for six months, and demonstrated the technology's reliability on a small scale. MTR then located an alternative test site with much larger gas flow rates and signed a contract with Towne Exploration in the third quarter of 2006, for a demonstration plant in Rio Vista, California, to be run through May 2007. The demonstration for Towne has already resulted in the sale of two commercial skids to the company; both units will be delivered by the end of 2007. Total sales of nitrogen/natural gas membrane separation units from the partnership with ABB are now approaching $4.0 million.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

RM12-2703 Advanced Rooftop Unit Control Retrofit Kit Field Demonstration: Hawaii and Guam Energy Improvement Technology Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its overall strategy to meet its energy goals, the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) partnered with U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to rapidly demonstrate and deploy cost-effective renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. This was one of several demonstrations of new and underutilized commercial energy efficiency technologies. The consistent year-round demand for air conditioning and dehumidification in Hawaii provides an advantageous demonstration location for advanced rooftop control (ARC) retrofit kits to packaged rooftop units (RTUs). This report summarizes the field demonstration of ARCs installed on nine RTUs serving a 70,000-ft2 exchange store (large retail) and two RTUs, each serving small office buildings located on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam (JBPHH).

Doebber, I.; Dean, J.; Dominick, J.; Holland, G.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Demonstration and testing of an all-electric desiccant dehumidifying system at a New Jersey supermarket  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel all-electric desiccant dehumidifying system was demonstrated and evaluated at a supermarket field test site in New Jersey during 1995. Unlike traditional desiccant systems, this system uses waste heat from vapor-compression refrigerating condensers to regenerate a recently developed desiccant material. The 7,000-cfm (3,300-L/s) unit has a latent capacity of approximately 7 tons (25 kW), with fan energy as the only purchased energy source. This paper discusses the performance of the desiccant system under field conditions and its interactions with the refrigerating and conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Results indicate that the system is three to four times more efficient for moisture removal than a conventional HVAC system with no deleterious effects on refrigerating system operations.

Brandemuehl, M.J. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Joint Center for Energy Management; Khattar, M.K. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

RESULTS OF FIELD TESTING DOE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.Office ofMayPVREPORT TO THE2RESONANCE7FIELD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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41

NREL/SCE High-Penetration PV Integration Project: Report on Field Demonstration of Advanced Inverter Functionality in Fontana, CA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory/Southern California Edison High-Penetration PV Integration Project is (1) researching the distribution system level impacts of high-penetration photovoltaic (PV) integration, (2) determining mitigation methods to reduce or eliminate those impacts, and (3) seeking to demonstrate these mitigation methods on actual high-penetration PV distribution circuits. This report describes a field demonstration completed during the fall of 2013 on the Fontana, California, study circuit, which includes a total of 4.5 MW of interconnected utility-scale rooftop PV systems. The demonstration included operating a 2-MW PV system at an off-unity power factor that had been determined during previously completed distribution system modeling and PV impact assessment analyses. Data on the distribution circuit and PV system operations were collected during the 2-week demonstration period. This demonstration reinforces the findings of previous laboratory testing that showed that utility-scale PV inverters are capable of operating at off-unity power factor to mitigate PV impacts; however, because of difficulties setting and retaining PV inverter power factor set points during the field demonstration, it was not possible to demonstrate the effectiveness of off-unity power factor operation to mitigate the voltage impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Lessons learned from this field demonstration are presented to inform future field demonstration efforts.

Mather, B.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Quasinormal modes of test fields around regular black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational test fields in the Hayward, Bardeen and Ay\\'{o}n-Beato-Garc\\'{i}a regular black hole spacetimes and demonstrate that the test fields are stable in all these spacetimes. Using the sixth order WKB approximation of the linear "axial" perturbative scheme, we determine dependence of the quasinormal mode (QNM) frequencies on the characteristic parameters of the test fields and the spacetime charge parameters of the regular black holes. We give also the greybody factors, namely the transmission and reflection coefficients of scattered scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational waves. We show that damping of the QNMs in regular black hole spacetimes is suppressed in comparison to the case of Schwarzschild black holes, and increasing charge parameter of the regular black holes increases reflection and decreases transmission factor of incident waves for each of the test fields.

Bobir Toshmatov; Ahmadjon Abdujabbarov; Zden?k StuchlŪk; Bobomurat Ahmedov

2015-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

43

A TEST TO DEMONSTRATE A DIGITAL WEB-BASED OILFIELD DATA COLLECTION SERVICE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy and HIS Energy tested a web-based field data collection service, FieldDIRECT, at NPR-3. FieldDIRECT provided a way to digitally collect oil and gas data from the field, transfer it quickly, accurately and securely via the Internet, and utilize it immediately to generate executive, operational and administrative reports.

Rochelle, J.

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Field test of microemulsion flooding, Chateaurenard Field, France  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot test of microemulsion flooding was conducted in a single five-spot pattern in the Chateaurenard field in France. The test had to accommodate a 40-mPa*s (40-cp) oil viscosity and a regional pressure gradient across the pattern. A very clear oil bank was observed, resulting in a substantial increase in oil production. 9 refs.

Putz, A.; Chevalier, J.P.; Stock, G.; Philippot, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design and Field Test SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Wind Turbine Rotor. This work...

46

Field Testing of Environmentally Friendly Drilling System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program addresses new low-impact technology that reduces the footprint of drilling activities, integrates light weight drilling rigs with reduced emission engine packages, addresses on-site waste management, optimizes the systems to fit the needs of a specific development sites and provides stewardship of the environment. In addition, the program includes industry, the public, environmental organizations, and elected officials in a collaboration that addresses concerns on development of unconventional natural gas resources in environmentally sensitive areas. The EFD program provides the fundamentals to result in greater access, reasonable regulatory controls, lower development cost and reduction of the environmental footprint associated with operations for unconventional natural gas. Industry Sponsors have supported the program with significant financial and technical support. This final report compendium is organized into segments corresponding directly with the DOE approved scope of work for the term 2005-2009 (10 Sections). Each specific project is defined by (a) its goals, (b) its deliverable, and (c) its future direction. A web site has been established that contains all of these detailed engineering reports produced with their efforts. The goals of the project are to (1) identify critical enabling technologies for a prototype low-impact drilling system, (2) test the prototype systems in field laboratories, and (3) demonstrate the advanced technology to show how these practices would benefit the environment.

David Burnett

2009-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

IMPROVED APPROACHES TO DESIGN OF POLYMER GEL TREATMENTS IN MATURE OIL FIELDS: FIELD DEMONSTRATION IN DICKMAN FIELD, NESS COUNTY, KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the one-year project entitled ''Improved Approaches to Design of Polymer Gel Treatments in Mature Oil Fields: Field Demonstration in Dickman Field, Ness County, Kansas''. The project was a 12-month collaboration of Grand Mesa Operating Company (a small independent), TIORCO Inc. (a company focused on improved recovery technology) and the University of Kansas. The study undertook tasks to determine an optimum polymer gel treatment design in Mississippian reservoirs, demonstrate application, and evaluate the success of the program. The project investigated geologic and engineering parameters and cost-effective technologies required for design and implementation of effective polymer gel treatment programs in the Mississippian reservoir in the Midcontinent. The majority of Mississippian production in Kansas occurs at or near the top of the Mississippian section just below the regional sub-Pennsylvanian unconformity and karst surface. Dickman Field with the extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors is typical of Mississippian reservoirs. Producibility problems in these reservoirs include inadequate reservoir characterization, drilling and completion design problems, and most significantly extremely high water cuts and low recovery factors that place continued operations at or near their economic limits. Geologic, geophysical and engineering data were integrated to provide a technical foundation for candidate selection and treatment design. Data includes core, engineering data, and 3D seismic data. Based on technical and economic considerations a well was selected for gel-polymer treatment (Grand Mesa Operating Company Tilley No.2). The treatment was not successful due to the small amount of polymer that could be injected. Data from the initial well and other candidates in the demonstration area was analyzed using geologic, geophysical and engineering data. Based on the results of the treatment and the integrated reservoir characterization it was determined that a second polymer-gel treatment could not be justified. The Mississippian reservoir at Dickman Field is much more complex than originally anticipated with numerous reservoir compartments and potential attic oil beneath the irregular Mississippian karst. It appears that remaining oil in place could be best recovered using improved oil recovery techniques such as target infill drilling and horizontal wells.

Ronald Fowler

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provides onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 13 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

Field testing of waste forms using lysimeters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low-Level Waste Data Base Development - EPICOR-II Resin/Liner Investigation Program funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is obtaining information on performance of radioactive waste in a disposal environment. Waste forms manufactured from ion exchange resins used to clean up water from the accident at Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being examined in field tests. This paper presents a description of the field testing and results from the first year of operation. 8 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Structural analysis of closure cap barriers: A pre-test study for the Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project (BMDP) is a field demonstration study to determine the construction/installation requirements, permeability, and subsidence performance characteristics of a composite barrier. The composite barrier will consist of on-site sandy-clay blanketed by a bentonite mat and a flexible High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner (also called flexible membrane liner). Construction of one control test pad and three bentonite test pads are planned. The control test pad will be used to establish baseline data. Underneath the composite clay cap is a four feet thick loose sand layer in which cavities will be created by evacuation of sand. The present work provides a mathematical model for the BMDP. The mathematical model will be used to simulate the mechanical and structural responses of the composite clay cap during the testing processes. Based upon engineering experience and technical references, a set of nominal soil parameters have been selected.

Gong, Chung; Pelfrey, J.R.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

DEMONSTRATION OF ENERGY STORAGE INTEGRATED WITH A SOLAR DISH FIELD IN WHYALLA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy storage into the thermal cycle is a key point of differentiation between solar thermalDEMONSTRATION OF ENERGY STORAGE INTEGRATED WITH A SOLAR DISH FIELD IN WHYALLA Joe Coventry 1-of-a-kind demonstration of an integrated solar dish and molten- salt storage system, using the superheated steam energy

52

Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

Janke, Chris [ORNL; Yatsandra, Oyola [ORNL; Mayes, Richard [ORNL; none,; Gill, Gary [PNNL; Li-Jung, Kuo [PNNL; Wood, Jordana [PNNL; Sadananda, Das [ORNL

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Results and implications of the EBR-II inherent safety demonstration tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 3, 1986 two milestone tests were conducted in Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-II). The first test was a loss of flow without scram and the second was a loss of heat sink without scram. Both tests were initiated from 100% power and in both tests the reactor was shut down by natural processes, principally thermal expansion, without automatic scram, operator intervention or the help of special in-core devices. The temperature transients during the tests were mild, as predicted, and there was no damage to the core or reactor plant structures. In a general sense, therefore, the tests plus supporting analysis demonstrated the feasibility of inherent passive shutdown for undercooling accidents in metal-fueled LMRs. The results provide a technical basis for future experiments in EBR-II to demonstrate inherent safety for overpower accidents and provide data for validation of computer codes used for design and safety analysis of inherently safe reactor plants.

Planchon, H.P.; Golden, G.H.; Sackett, J.I.; Mohr, D.; Chang, L.K.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support...

55

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from January 1, 2002 to March 31, 2002. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre, 24.3 ha) CO2 demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. While this review process is being conducted, work is proceeding on well testing to obtain reservoir properties and on the VIP reservoir simulation model to improve model prediction and better understand the controls that certain parameters exert on predicted performance. In addition, evaluation of the economics of commercial application in the surrounding area was performed. In a meeting on January 14, 2002 the possibility of staging the demonstration, starting with a 10-acre sub-pattern flood was raised and the decision made to investigate this plan in detail. The influence of carbon dioxide on oil properties and the influence of binary interaction parameters (BIP) used in the VIP simulator were investigated. VIP calculated swelling factors are in good agreement with published values up to 65% mole-fraction CO2. Swelling factor and saturated liquid density are relatively independent of the BIP over the range of BIPs used (0.08-0.15) up to 65% mole-fraction CO2. Assuming a CO2 EOR recovery rate projected as being most likely by current modeling, commercial scale CO2 flooding at $20/BO is possible in the leases in Hall-Gurney field. Relatively small floods (240-320 acres, 4-6 patterns) are economically viable at $20/BO in areas of very high primary and secondary productivity (>14 MBO/net acre recovery). Leases with moderately high primary and secondary productivity (> 10 MBO/net acre recovery) can be economic when combined with high productivity leases to form larger floods (>640 acres, 9 or more patterns).

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Large-scale dynamic compaction demonstration using WIPP salt: Fielding and preliminary results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reconsolidation of crushed rock salt is a phenomenon of great interest to programs studying isolation of hazardous materials in natural salt geologic settings. Of particular interest is the potential for disaggregated salt to be restored to nearly an impermeable state. For example, reconsolidated crushed salt is proposed as a major shaft seal component for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project. The concept for a permanent shaft seal component of the WIPP repository is to densely compact crushed salt in the four shafts; an effective seal will then be developed as the surrounding salt creeps into the shafts, further consolidating the crushed salt. Fundamental information on placement density and permeability is required to ensure attainment of the design function. The work reported here is the first large-scale compaction demonstration to provide information on initial salt properties applicable to design, construction, and performance expectations. The shaft seals must function for 10,000 years. Over this period a crushed salt mass will become less permeable as it is compressed by creep closure of salt surrounding the shaft. These facts preclude the possibility of conducting a full-scale, real-time field test. Because permanent seals taking advantage of salt reconsolidation have never been constructed, performance measurements have not been made on an appropriately large scale. An understanding of potential construction methods, achievable initial density and permeability, and performance of reconsolidated salt over time is required for seal design and performance assessment. This report discusses fielding and operations of a nearly full-scale dynamic compaction of mine-run WIPP salt, and presents preliminary density and in situ (in place) gas permeability results.

Ahrens, E.H.; Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Waste Technology Repository Isolation Systems

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energyís (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOEís Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper and presentation will discuss PHEV testing activities and results. INL/CON-08-14333

James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Criticality Safety Evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor U-Mo Demonstration Elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reduced Enrichment Research Test Reactors (RERTR) fuel development program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic RERTR fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. Two RERTR-Full Size Demonstration fuel elements based on the ATR-Reduced YA elements (all but one plate fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The two fuel elements will be irradiated in alternating cycles such that only one element is loaded in the reactor at a time. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements (all plates fueled) from which controls have been derived. This criticality safety evaluation (CSE) documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the Demonstration fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and shows that the Demonstration elements are bound by the Standard HEU ATR elements and existing HEU ATR element controls are applicable to the Demonstration elements.

Leland M. Montierth

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Mobile Test and Demonstration Unit, A Cooperative Project Between EPRI, Utilities and Industry to Demonstrate New Water Treatment Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and has demonstrated that membrane processes like MF, UF, NF and RO can successfully be applied to remove BOD and TSS from process streams, often recovering valuable solids, reducing sewer charges and meeting environmental regulations....

Strasser, J.; Mannapperuma, J.

60

ORNL/SUB/94-SV044/3Report FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF ACTIVE DESICCANT-BASED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRECONDITIONING SYSTEMS Final Report: Phase 3 J. Fischer SEMCO, Inc. J. Sand Oak Ridge National Laboratory July#12;ORNL/SUB/94-SV044/3Report FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF ACTIVE DESICCANT-BASED OUTDOOR AIR by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 #12;iii CONTENTS

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

In Situ Field Testing of Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

J. Wang

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

62

Field Test of Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A main type of obstacles of practical applications of quantum key distribution (QKD) network is various attacks on detection. Measurement-device-independent QKD (MDIQKD) protocol is immune to all these attacks and thus a strong candidate for network security. Recently, several proof-of-principle demonstrations of MDIQKD have been performed. Although novel, those experiments are implemented in the laboratory with secure key rates less than 0.1 bps. Besides, they need manual calibration frequently to maintain the system performance. These aspects render these demonstrations far from practicability. Thus, justification is extremely crucial for practical deployment into the field environment. Here, by developing an automatic feedback MDIQKD system operated at a high clock rate, we perform a field test via deployed fiber network of 30 km total length, achieving a 16.9 bps secure key rate. The result lays the foundation for a global quantum network which can shield from all the detection-side attacks.

Yan-Lin Tang; Hua-Lei Yin; Si-Jing Chen; Yang Liu; Wei-Jun Zhang; Xiao Jiang; Lu Zhang; Jian Wang; Li-Xing You; Jian-Yu Guan; Dong-Xu Yang; Zhen Wang; Hao Liang; Zhen Zhang; Nan Zhou; Xiongfeng Ma; Teng-Yun Chen; Qiang Zhang; Jian-Wei Pan

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

Chateaurenard field test recovery mechanisms and interpretation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chateaurenard micellar/polymer field test was conducted between 1976 and 1980 in the south part of the Paris Bassin. Pilot design, operations and oil production results have already been presented. We present a detailled analysis of the effluents. It appears that surfactant, most of wich remained trapped in the reservoir, is associated with calcium in the oil when produced, as a result of sodium exchange with the calcium associated with the clay in the reservoir sand. Supporting phase studies and floods through sandpacks are presented to quantify this cation exchange and investigate its influence on oil recovery and phase trapping.

Bourdarot, G.; Putz, A.; Sardin, M.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

3X-100 blade field test.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of a Work-For-Other (WFO) agreement between the Wind Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories and 3TEX, one of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas, has been used to test a set of 9 meter wind turbine blades, manufactured by TPI composites using the 3TEX carbon material for the spar cap. Data collected from the test has been analyzed to evaluate both the aerodynamic performance and the structural response from the blades. The blades aerodynamic and structural performance, the meteorological inflow and the wind turbine structural response has been monitored with an array of 57 instruments: 15 to characterize the blades, 13 to characterize inflow, and 15 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For the test, data was sampled at a rate of 40 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow, as well as both modeling and field testing results.

Zayas, Jose R.; Johnson, Wesley D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

IN SITU FIELD TESTING OF PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts and surface-based boreholes through unsaturated zone (UZ) tuff rock units. In situ testing, monitoring, and associated laboratory studies are conducted to directly assess and evaluate the waste emplacement environment and the natural barriers to radionuclide transport at Yucca Mountain. This scientific analysis report supports and provides data to UZ flow and transport model reports, which in turn contribute to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of Yucca Mountain, an important document for the license application (LA). The objectives of ambient field-testing activities are described in Section 1.1. This report is the third revision (REV 03), which supercedes REV 02. The scientific analysis of data for inputs to model calibration and validation as documented in REV 02 were developed in accordance with the Technical Work Plan (TWP) ''Technical Work Plan for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167969]). This revision was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.4) for better integrated, consistent, transparent, traceable, and more complete documentation in this scientific analysis report and associated UZ flow and transport model reports. No additional testing or analyses were performed as part of this revision. The list of relevant acceptance criteria is provided by ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654]), Table 3-1. Additional deviations from the TWP regarding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) list are discussed in Section 1.3. Documentation in this report includes descriptions of how, and under what conditions, the tests were conducted. The descriptions and analyses provide data useful for refining and confirming the understanding of flow, drift seepage, and transport processes in the UZ. The UZ testing activities included measurement of permeability distribution, quantification of the seepage of water into the drifts, evaluation of fracture-matrix interaction, study of flow along faults, testing of flow and transport between drifts, characterization of hydrologic heterogeneity along drifts, estimation of drying effects on the rock surrounding the drifts due to ventilation, monitoring of moisture conditions in open and sealed drifts, and determination of the degree of minimum construction water migration below drift. These field tests were conducted in two underground drifts at Yucca Mountain, the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) drift, and the cross-drift for Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB), as described in Section 1.2. Samples collected in boreholes and underground drifts have been used for additional hydrochemical and isotopic analyses for additional understanding of the UZ setting. The UZ transport tests conducted at the nearby Busted Butte site (see Figure 1-4) are also described in this scientific analysis report.

J.S.Y. YANG

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

FIELD TEST OF THE FLAME QUALITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flame quality indicator concept was developed at BNL specifically to monitor the brightness of the flame in a small oil burner and to provide a ''call for service'' notification when the brightness has changed from its setpoint, either high or low. In prior development work BNL has explored the response of this system to operational upsets such as excess air changes, fouled atomizer nozzles, poor fuel quality, etc. Insight Technologies, Inc. and Honeywell, Inc. have licensed this technology from the U.S. Department of Energy and have been cooperating to develop product offerings which meet industry needs with an optimal combination of function and price. Honeywell has recently completed the development of the Flame Quality Monitor (FQM or Honeywell QS7100F). This is a small module which connects via a serial cable to the burners primary operating control. Primary advantages of this approach are simplicity, cost, and ease of installation. Call-for-service conditions are output in the form of front panel indicator lights and contact closure which can trigger a range of external communication options. Under this project a field test was conducted of the FQM in cooperation with service organizations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut. At total of 83 field sites were included. At each site the FQM was installed in parallel with another embodiment of this concept--the Insight AFQI. The AFQI incorporates a modem and provides the ability to provide detailed information on the trends in the flame quality over the course of the two year test period. The test site population was comprised of 79.5% boilers, 13.7% warm air furnaces, and 6.8% water heaters. Nearly all were of residential size--with firing rates ranging from 0.6 gallons of oil per hour to 1.25. During the course of the test program the monitoring equipment successfully identified problems including: plugged fuel lines, fouled nozzles, collapsed combustion chambers, and poor fuel pump cut-off. Service organizations can use these early indications to reduce problems and service costs. There were also some ''call-for-service'' indications for which problems were not identified. The test program also showed that monitoring of the flame can provide information on burner run times and this can be used to estimate current oversize factors and to determine actual fuel usage, enabling more efficient fuel delivery procedures.

Andrew M. Rudin; Thomas Butcher; Henry Troost

2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

Cooperative field test program for wind systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

DOE-Sponsored Field Test Finds Potential for Permanent Storage of CO2 in Lignite Seams  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A field test sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy has demonstrated that opportunities to permanently store carbon in unmineable seams of lignite may be more widespread than previously documented.

69

INTERAGENCY FIELD TEST & EVALUATION OF WIND TURBINE - RADAR INTERFEREN...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the tests and 2) summaries of three field tests designed to measure the impact of wind turbines on current air surveillance radars and the effectiveness of private sector...

70

Spent nuclear fuel integrity during dry storage - performance tests and demonstrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of fuel integrity surveillance determined from gas sampling during and after performance tests and demonstrations conducted from 1983 through 1996 by or in cooperation with the US DOE Office of Commercial Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The cask performance tests were conducted at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) between 1984 and 1991 and included visual observation and ultrasonic examination of the condition of the cladding, fuel rods, and fuel assembly hardware before dry storage and consolidation of fuel, and a qualitative determination of the effects of dry storage and fuel consolidation on fission gas release from the spent fuel rods. The performance tests consisted of 6 to 14 runs involving one or two loading, usually three backfill environments (helium, nitrogen, and vacuum backfills), and one or two storage system orientations. The nitrogen and helium backfills were sampled and analyzed to detect leaking spent fuel rods. At the end of each performance test, periodic gas sampling was conducted on each cask. A spent fuel behavior project (i.e., enhanced surveillance, monitoring, and gas sampling activities) was initiated by DOE in 1994 for intact fuel in a CASTOR V/21 cask and for consolidated fuel in a VSC-17 cask. The results of the gas sampling activities are included in this report. Information on spent fuel integrity is of interest in evaluating the impact of long-term dry storage on the behavior of spent fuel rods. Spent fuel used during cask performance tests at INEL offers significant opportunities for confirmation of the benign nature of long-term dry storage. Supporting cask demonstration included licensing and operation of an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) at the Virginia Power (VP) Surry reactor site. A CASTOR V/21, an MC-10, and a Nuclear Assurance NAC-I28 have been loaded and placed at the VP ISFSI as part of the demonstration program. 13 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

McKinnon, M.A.; Doherty, A.L.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Regulatory and extra-regulatory testing to demonstrate radioactive material packaging safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Packages for the transportation of radioactive material must meet performance criteria to assure safety and environmental protection. The stringency of the performance criteria is based on the degree of hazard of the material being transported. Type B packages are used for transporting large quantities of radioisotopes (in terms of A{sub 2} quantities). These packages have the most stringent performance criteria. Material with less than an A{sub 2} quantity are transported in Type A packages. These packages have less stringent performance criteria. Transportation of LSA and SCO materials must be in {open_quotes}strong-tight{close_quotes} packages. The performance requirements for the latter packages are even less stringent. All of these package types provide a high level of safety for the material being transported. In this paper, regulatory tests that are used to demonstrate this safety will be described. The responses of various packages to these tests will be shown. In addition, the response of packages to extra-regulatory tests will be discussed. The results of these tests will be used to demonstrate the high level of safety provided to workers, the public, and the environment by packages used for the transportation of radioactive material.

Ammerman, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar May 1, 2012 - 2:56pm Addthis The Department...

73

Structural analysis of closure cap barriers: A pre-test study for the Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the EPA-recommended closure cap design a waste site can either be covered with a single layer cap made of 36 inches of compacted soil (clay) or with a multilayer cap consisting of an upper vegetative layer underlain by a drainage layer over a low permeability layer. The Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project (BMDP) is a field demonstration study to determine the construction/installation requirements, permeability, and subsidence performance characteristics of a composite barrier. The composite barrier will consist of on-site sandy-clay blanketed by a bentonite mat and a flexible High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner (also called flexible membrane liner). Construction of one control test pad and three bentonite test pads are planned. The control test pad will be used to establish baseline data. Underneath the composite clay cap is a four-foot loose sand layer in which cavities will be created by evacuation of sand. The present work provides a mathematical model for the BMDP. The mathematical model will be used to simulate the mechanical and structural responses of the composite clay cap during the testing processes. Based upon engineering experience and technical references, a set of nominal soil parameters have been selected. Currently, detailed soil test data and cavity configuration data are not available to validate the mathematical model. Since the configuration of the cavities created in the testing process is irregular and unpredictable, two extreme configurations are considered in this mathematical model, viz., the circular cavity and the infinitely long trench in the sand underneath the cap. This approach will provide bounds for the testing results.

Gong, Chung

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control - Pilot-Scale Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Topical Report summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, ''Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive.'' The objective of the project is to demonstrate the use of a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additive, Degussa Corporation's TMT-15, to prevent the reemissions of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project intends to demonstrate that the additive can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine TMT salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project will conduct pilot and full-scale tests of the TMT-15 additive in wet FGD absorbers. The tests are intended to determine required additive dosage requirements to prevent Hg{sup 0} reemissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Power River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, TXU Generation Company LP, Southern Company, and Degussa Corporation. TXU Generation has provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests, Monticello Steam Electric Station Unit 3. Southern Company is providing the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, as well as the pilot and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems to be tested. A third utility, to be named later, will provide the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site. Degussa Corporation is providing the TMT-15 additive and technical support to the test program. The project is being conducted in six tasks. Of the six project tasks, Task 1 involves project planning and Task 6 involves management and reporting. The other four tasks involve field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. The four tasks include: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. This topical report presents the results from the Task 2 and Task 4 pilot-scale additive tests. The Task 3 and Task 5 full-scale additive tests will be conducted later in calendar year 2006.

Gary M. Blythe

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Dynamic Homecare Service Provisioning: A Field Test and Its Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Homecare Service Provisioning: A Field Test and Its Results Alireza Zarghami, Mohammad platform. The prototype was subsequently used in a real-world field test at a care institution in the Netherlands to validate the approach. This paper describes the design of the field test and reflects

Wieringa, Roel

77

Solar site test module. [DOE/NASA solar heating and cooling demonstration installations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solar site test module using the Rockwell AIM 65 micro-computer is described. The module is designed to work at any site where an IBM site data acquisition system (SDAS) is installed and is intended primarily as a troubleshooting tool for DOE/NASA commercial solar heating and cooling system demonstration installations. It collects sensor information (temperatures, flow rates, etc.) and displays or prints it immediately in calibrated engineering units. It will read one sensor on demand, periodically read up to 10 sensors or periodically read all sensors. Performance calculations can also be included with sensor data. Unattended operation is possible to, e.g., monitor a group of sensors once per hour. Work is underway to add a data acquisition system to the test module so that it can be used at sites which have no SDAS.

Kissel, R.R.; Scott, D.R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

SPACE-R nuclear power system TFE mock-up SC-320 demonstration test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of its 1993{endash}94 work, NII NPO {open_quote}{open_quote}LUCH{close_quote}{close_quote} developed a thermionic fuel element (TFE) SC-320 intended for use as part of a nuclear thermionic reactor-converter known as SPACE-R designed in the US and rated at 40 kW of output electric power. This paper presents the results of the demonstration electric power tests of the SC-320 TFE mock-up conducted in the US at the TSET testing facility located at the University of New Mexico. The data obtained are compared to the calculated characteristics as well as the output parameters of the Topaz-2 NPS TFEs. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Nikolaev, Y.V.; Eremin, S.A.; Kolesov, V.S.; Lapochkin, N.V.; Izhvanov, O.L.; Semin, R.N.; Androsov, V.N.; Agafonov, V.N. [Research Institute of SIA ``LUCH``, Podolsk (Russian Federation); Koester, J.K. [Space Power Incorporated, 621 River Oaks Parkway, San-Jose, California 95134 (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Compare Energy Use in Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pumps Field Demonstration and Computer Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are often regarded as energy efficient air-conditioning systems which offer electricity savings as well as reduction in peak electric demand while providing improved individual zone setpoint control. One of the key advantages of VRF systems is minimal duct losses which provide significant reduction in energy use and duct space. However, there is limited data available to show their actual performance in the field. Since VRF systems are increasingly gaining market share in the US, it is highly desirable to have more actual field performance data of these systems. An effort was made in this direction to monitor VRF system performance over an extended period of time in a US national lab test facility. Due to increasing demand by the energy modeling community, an empirical model to simulate VRF systems was implemented in the building simulation program EnergyPlus. This paper presents the comparison of energy consumption as measured in the national lab and as predicted by the program. For increased accuracy in the comparison, a customized weather file was created by using measured outdoor temperature and relative humidity at the test facility. Other inputs to the model included building construction, VRF system model based on lab measured performance, occupancy of the building, lighting/plug loads, and thermostat set-points etc. Infiltration model inputs were adjusted in the beginning to tune the computer model and then subsequent field measurements were compared to the simulation results. Differences between the computer model results and actual field measurements are discussed. The computer generated VRF performance closely resembled the field measurements.

Sharma, Chandan; Raustad, Richard

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Results of the fourth Hanna field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase (Hanna IVB) of a coal gasification experiment near Hanna, Wyoming, was completed in September 1979. The experiment attempted to link and gasify coal between process wells spaced 34.3 meters apart. Intermediate wells were positioned between the process wells so that the link could be relayed over shorter distances. Reverse combustion linking was attempted over a 22.9-meter and a 11.4-meter distance of the total well spacing. Thermal activity was generally noted in the upper 3 meters of the coal seam during the link. Two attempts to gasify over the 34.3-meter distance resulted in the propagation of the burn front at the coal overburden interface. Post-burn evaluation indicates fractures as major influencing factors of the combustion process. The Hanna IVB field test provided much insight into influence that geologic features have on in situ coal combustion. The influence of these faults, permeable zones, and cleats, on the air flow patterns can drastically change the overall results of a gasification experiment and should be studied further. The overall results of Hanna IVB were discouraging because of the rapid decline in the heating values for the production gas and the amount of coal gasified. With more complete geologic characerization prior to experimentation and proper well completions, it is believed that most of the subsurface operational problems encountered during Hanna IV could have been avoided.

Covell, J. R.; Wojdac, L. F.; Barbour, F. A.; Gardner, G. W.; Glass, R.; Hommert, P. J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. On September 27, 2002 the US DOE approved the proposed modified plan to flood a 10+-acre pattern. MV Energy has received informal notification that GE Capital will approve sale of the portion of the Colliver lease involved in the pilot. Murfin Drilling Company is seeking local small independent partners for the pilot and has received commitment from White Eagle Energy and John O. Farmer Oil Company to date. A Contract was signed between the Kansas Department of Commerce & Housing and Murfin formalizing the KSDOC&H contribution of $88,000 to the pilot project. This money will be used for well rework and testing. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. Proposed modifications to the project plan were reviewed in the previous quarterly technical progress report.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Field Testing of the Advanced Worker Protection System  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

tasks which simulate actual decontamination activities. + to shake down the new IUOE test facilities. The activities began with a demonstration of filling the backpack with...

83

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. The pilot water injection plant became operational 4/18/03 and began long-term injection in the CO2I No.1 on 4/23/03. The CO2I No.1 exhibits sufficient injectivity for pilot requirements with average absolute permeability surrounding this well equal to {approx}85 millidarcies. Response to injection in the CO2I No.1 has established that conductivity between CO2I No.1 and CO2 No.12, No.10, No.18 and TB Carter No.5 is sufficient for the demonstration. Workovers of the CO2 No.16 and CO2 No.13 were completed in April and May, respectively. Pressure response indicates No.16 communicates with the flood pattern area but core, swab-test, and pressure response data indicate permeability surrounding No.16 is not adequate to maintain the production rates needed to support the original pattern as the well is presently completed. Decisions concerning possible further testing and stimulation have been postponed until after testing of the No.13 is complete. Production rates for the No.13 are consistent with a surrounding reservoir average absolute permeability of {approx}80 md. However, pressure and rate tests results, partially due to the nature of the testing conducted to date, have not confirmed the nature of the CO2I No.1-CO2 No.13 conductivity. A build-up test and conductivity test are planned to begin the first weeks of the next quarter to obtain reservoir properties data and establish the connectivity and conductivity between CO2 I-1 and CO2 No.13. A new geomodel of the pattern area has been developed based on core from No.16 and the new wireline logs from the No.10, No.12, No.16, and No.13. The new geomodel is currently being incorporated into the basic calculations of reservoir volume and flood design and predicted response as well as the reservoir simulators. Murfin signed a letter agreement with FLOCO2 of Odessa, TX for supply of CO2 storage and injection equipment. Technology transfer activities have included presentations to the Environmental Protection Agency, Prof. Accountants Soc. of KS, Am. Assoc. of Petroleum Geologists, and a US Congressional aide staff member. The Associated Press also released a story concerning the project that was picked up by many Kansas newspapers.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Field Demonstration of Horizontal Infill Drilling Using Cost-effective Integrated Reservoir Modeling--Mississippian Carbonates, Central Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mississippian carbonate reservoirs have produced in excess of 1 billion barrels of oil in Kansas accounting for over 16% of the state's production. With declining production from other age reservoirs, the contribution of Mississippian reservoirs to Kansas's oil production has risen to 43% as of 2004. However, solution-enhanced features such as vertical shale intervals extending from the karst erosional surface at the top introduce complexities/compartmentalizations in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs. Coupled with this, strong water drives charge many of these reservoirs resulting in limited drainage from vertical wells due to high water cuts after an initial period of low water production. Moreover, most of these fields are operated by small independent operators without access to the knowledge bank of modern research in field characterization and exploitation/development practices. Thus, despite increasing importance of Mississippian fields to Kansas production, these fields are beset with low recovery factors and high abandonment rates leaving significant resources in the ground. Worldwide, horizontal infill wells have been successful in draining compartmentalized reservoirs with limited pressure depletion. The intent of this project was to demonstrate the application of horizontal wells to successfully exploit the remaining potential in mature Mississippian fields of the mid-continent. However, it is of critical importance that for horizontal wells to be economically successful, they must be selectively targeted. This project demonstrated the application of initial and secondary screening methods, based on publicly available data, to quickly shortlist fields in a target area for detailed studies to evaluate their potential to infill horizontal well applications. Advanced decline curve analyses were used to estimate missing well-level production data and to verify if the well produced under unchanging bottom-hole conditions--two commonly occurring data constraints afflicting mature Mississippian fields. A publicly accessible databank of representative petrophysical properties and relationships was developed to overcome the paucity of such data that is critical to modeling the storage and flow in these reservoirs. Studies in 3 Mississippian fields demonstrated that traditional reservoir models built by integrating log, core, DST, and production data from existing wells on 40-acre spacings are unable to delineate karst-induced compartments, thus making 3D-seismic data critical to characterize these fields. Special attribute analyses on 3D data were shown to delineate reservoir compartments and predict those with pay porosities. Further testing of these techniques is required to validate their applicability in other Mississippian reservoirs. This study shows that detailed reservoir characterization and simulation on geomodels developed by integrating wireline log, core, petrophysical, production and pressure, and 3D-seismic data enables better evaluation of a candidate field for horizontal infill applications. In addition to reservoir compartmentalization, two factors were found to control the economic viability of a horizontal infill well in a mature Mississippian field: (a) adequate reservoir pressure support, and (b) an average well spacing greater than 40-acres.

Saibal Bhattacharya

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Controller Field Tests on the NREL CART2 Turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of the field tests carried out on the CART2 turbine at NREL to validate individual pitch control and active tower damping.

Bossanyi, E.; Wright, A.; Fleming, P.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

ARC: A compact, high-field, fusion nuclear science facility and demonstration power plant with demountable magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The affordable, robust, compact (ARC) reactor conceptual design study aims to reduce the size, cost, and complexity of a combined fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF) and demonstration fusion Pilot power plant. ARC is a 270 MWe tokamak reactor with a major radius of 3.3 m, a minor radius of 1.1 m, and an on-axis magnetic field of 9.2 T. ARC has rare earth barium copper oxide (REBCO) superconducting toroidal field coils, which have joints to enable disassembly. This allows the vacuum vessel to be replaced quickly, mitigating first wall survivability concerns, and permits a single device to test many vacuum vessel designs and divertor materials. The design point has a plasma fusion gain of Q_p~13.6, yet is fully non-inductive, with a modest bootstrap fraction of only ~63%. Thus ARC offers a high power gain with relatively large external control of the current profile. This highly attractive combination is enabled by the ~23 T peak field on coil with newly available REBCO superconductor technology. External cu...

Sorbom, B N; Palmer, T R; Mangiarotti, F J; Sierchio, J M; Bonoli, P; Kasten, C; Sutherland, D A; Barnard, H S; Haakonsen, C B; Goh, J; Sung, C; Whyte, D G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ADVANCED FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY FOR TIGHT GAS: AN EAST TEXAS FIELD DEMONSTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research was to improve completion and fracturing practices in gas reservoirs in marginal plays in the continental United States. The Bossier Play in East Texas, a very active tight gas play, was chosen as the site to develop and test the new strategies for completion and fracturing. Figure 1 provides a general location map for the Dowdy Ranch Field, where the wells involved in this study are located. The Bossier and other tight gas formations in the continental Unites States are marginal plays in that they become uneconomical at gas prices below $2.00 MCF. It was, therefore, imperative that completion and fracturing practices be optimized so that these gas wells remain economically attractive. The economic viability of this play is strongly dependent on the cost and effectiveness of the hydraulic fracturing used in its well completions. Water-fracs consisting of proppant pumped with un-gelled fluid is the type of stimulation used in many low permeability reservoirs in East Texas and throughout the United States. The use of low viscosity Newtonian fluids allows the creation of long narrow fractures in the reservoir, without the excessive height growth that is often seen with cross-linked fluids. These low viscosity fluids have poor proppant transport properties. Pressure transient tests run on several wells that have been water-fractured indicate a long effective fracture length with very low fracture conductivity even when large amounts of proppant are placed in the formation. A modification to the water-frac stimulation design was needed to transport proppant farther out into the fracture. This requires suspending the proppant until the fracture closes without generating excessive fracture height. A review of fracture diagnostic data collected from various wells in different areas (for conventional gel and water-fracs) suggests that effective propped lengths for the fracture treatments are sometimes significantly shorter than those predicted by fracture models. There was no accepted optimal method for conducting hydraulic fracturing in the Bossier. Each operator used a different approach. Anadarko, the most active operator in the play, had tested at least four different kinds of fracture treatments. The ability to arrive at an optimal fracturing program was constrained by the lack of adequate fracture models to simulate the fracturing treatment, and an inability to completely understand the results obtained in previous fracturing programs. This research aimed at a combined theoretical, experimental and field-testing program to improve fracturing practices in the Bossier and other tight gas plays.

Mukul M. Sharma

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Qualification testing and full-scale demonstration of titanium-treated zeolite for sludge wash processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Titanium-treated zeolite is a new ion-exchange material that is a variation of UOP (formerly Union Carbide) IONSIV IE-96 zeolite (IE-96) that has been treated with an aqueous titanium solution in a proprietary process. IE-96 zeolite, without the titanium treatment, has been used since 1988 in the West Valley Demonstration Project`s (WVDP) Supernatant Treatment System (STS) ion-exchange columns to remove Cs-137 from the liquid supernatant solution. The titanium-treated zeolite (TIE-96) was developed by Battelle-Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Following successful lab-scale testing of the PNL-prepared TIE-96, UOP was selected as a commercial supplier of the TIE-96 zeolite. Extensive laboratory tests conducted by both the WVDP and PNL indicate that the TIE-96 will successfully remove comparable quantities of Cs-137 from Tank 8D-2 high-level radioactive liquid as was done previously with IE-96. In addition to removing Cs-137, TIE-96 also removes trace quantities of Pu, as well as Sr-90, from the liquid being processed over a wide range of operating conditions: temperature, pH, and dilution. The exact mechanism responsible for the Pu removal is not fully understood. However, the Pu that is removed by the TIE-96 remains on the ion-exchange column under anticipated sludge wash processing conditions. From May 1988 to November 1990, the WVDP processed 560,000 gallons of liquid high-level radioactive supernatant waste stored in Tank 8D-2. Supernatant is an aqueous salt solution comprised primarily of soluble sodium salts. The second stage of the high-level waste treatment process began November 1991 with the initiation of sludge washing. Sludge washing involves the mixing of Tank 8D-2 contents, both sludge and liquid, to dissolve the sulfate salts present in the sludge. Two sludge washes were required to remove sulfates from the sludge.

Dalton, W.J.

1997-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

Field Testing for Understanding In Situ Concrete Crosstie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slide 7 · Linear Potentiometer Fixture ­ Welded steel frame ­ Designed for flexible positioning ­ BoltedField Testing for Understanding In Situ Concrete Crosstie and Fastener Behavior Justin Grassé, David Lange 2012 Joint Rail Conference Philadelphia, PA 17-19 April 2012 #12;Field Testing

Barkan, Christopher P.L.

90

Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

91

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration. FY2005 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

Will Lewis, Compiler

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Field demonstration of in situ grouting of radioactive solid waste burial trenches with polyacrylamide. [Polyacrylamide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstrations of in situ grouting with polyacrylamide were carried out on two undisturbed burial trenches and one dynamically compacted burial trench in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The injection of polyacrylamide was achieved quite facilely for the two undisturbed burial trenches which were filled with grout, at typical pumping rates of 95 L/min, in several batches injected over several days. The compacted burial trench, however, failed to accept grout at more than 1.9 L/min even when pressure was applied. Thus, it appears that burial trenches, stabilized by dynamic compaction, have a permeability too low to be considered groutable. The water table beneath the burial trenches did not respond to grout injections indicating a lack of hydrologic connection between fluid grout and the water table which would have been observed if the grout failed to set. Because grout set times were adjusted to less than 60 min, the lack of hydrologic connection was not surprising. Postgrouting penetration testing revealed that the stability of the burial trenches was increased from 26% to 79% that measured in the undisturbed soil surrounding the trenches. In situ permeation tests on the grouted trenches indicated a significant reduction in hydraulic conductivity of the trench contents from a mean of 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} to 1.85 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm/s. Preliminary observations indicated that grouting with polyacrylamide is an excellent method for both improved stability and hydrologic isolation of radioactive waste and its incidental hazardous constituents.

Spalding, B.P.; Fontaine, T.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Accent Lighting at the Field Museum in Chicago, IL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews a demonstration of light-emitting diode (LED) accent lighting compared to halogen (typical) accent lighting in a gallery of the Field Museum in Chicago, IL.

Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

Field tests of a small instrumented pile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

made simultaneously. A mal. hematical model which describes thc &a&ion of a pilc- soil system during pile driving is examined. I. oad t&. -!. data is to evaluate soil damping constants in accordance with thc mathcc&ati- cal model. The load test data...

Korb, Kenneth Wayne

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from October 1, 2001 to December 31, 2001. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre) CO{sub 2} demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. While this review process is being conducted, work is proceeding on well testing to obtain reservoir properties and on the VIP reservoir simulation model to improve model prediction and better understand the controls that certain parameters exert on predicted performance. Testing of present Colliver lease injection water on Lansing-Kansas City (L-KC) oomoldic rock indicates that injection brine must be filtered to < {approx}3-5 um and <15 um to prevent plugging of rocks with permeability as low as 1 md (millidarcy; 0.001 um2) and 10 md (0.01 um2), respectively. Pressure build-up testing on the Carter-Colliver No.7 well is interpreted to indicate the L-KC reservoir surrounding this well is {approx}9 ft (2.7 m) thick having an average effective water permeability of 25-35 md (0.025-0.035 um2) that is connected to the wellbore by either a high permeability fracture, bed, or region with low skin. Reservoir simulation evaluation of gridcell size effect on model oil recovery prediction indicates that, based on the model prediction of distribution of produced oil and CO{sub 2} volumes, oil recovery is strongly influenced by gravity segregation of CO{sub 2} into the upper higher permeability layers and indicates the strong control that vertical permeability and permeability barriers between depositional flood cycles exert on the CO{sub 2} flooding process. Simulations were performed on modifications of the 60-acre, two-injector pattern to evaluate oil recovery using other large-scale patterns. Simulations indicated that several 73-acre patterns with a single injector located near the Colliver No.7 could provide improved economics without increasing the amount of CO{sub 2} injected. The US Energy Partners ethanol plant in Russell, KS began operations in October ahead of schedule.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Live Webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test Site Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 from 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT the Water Power Program will hold an informational webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test...

97

Test Functions Space in Noncommutative Quantum Field Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is proven that the $\\star$-product of field operators implies that the space of test functions in the Wightman approach to noncommutative quantum field theory is one of the Gel'fand-Shilov spaces $S^{\\beta}$ with $\\beta test functions smears the noncommutative Wightman functions, which are in this case generalized distributions, sometimes called hyperfunctions. The existence and determination of the class of the test function spaces in NC QFT is important for any rigorous treatment in the Wightman approach.

M. Chaichian; M. Mnatsakanova; A. Tureanu; Yu. Vernov

2008-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

98

NREL: Wind Research - Field Test Sites  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet Test and

99

Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

Giangiacomo, L.A.

1999-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Using Accelerated Life Tests Results to Predict Product Field Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Accelerated Life Tests Results to Predict Product Field Reliability William Q. Meeker Dept State University Ames, IA 50011 June 22, 2008 Abstract Accelerated life tests (ALTs) provide timely, invariably, accelerated life tests (ALTs) to assess the effect of the change is accompanied by a question

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101

Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energyís (DOEís) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

An Act to Facilitate Testing and Demonstration of Renewable Ocean Energy Technology (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This law streamlines and coordinates State permitting and submerged lands leasing requirements for renewable ocean energy demonstration projects, aiding Maine's goal to become an international...

103

Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience - What Do They All Mean? (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the need for a set of tests for modules that would predict their long term-field performance.

Wohlgemuth, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Test of QED at critical field strength  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The LLNL HFTF (High-Field Test Facility): A flexible superconducting test facility for fusion magnet development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) is a flexible and, in many ways, unique facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for providing the test capabilities needed to develop the superconducting magnet systems of the next generation fusion machines. The superconducting coil set in HFTF has been operated successfully at LLNL, but in its original configuration, its utility as a test facility was somewhat restricted and cryogenic losses were intolerable. A new cryostat for the coil set allows the magnet system to remain cold indefinitely so the system is available on short notice to provide high fields (about 11 T) inside a reasonably large test volume (0.3-m diam). The test volume is physically and thermally isolated from the coil volume, allowing test articles to be inserted and removed without disturbing the coil cryogenic volume, which is maintained by an on-line refrigerator. Indeed, with the proper precautions, it is even unnecessary to drop the field in the HFTF during such an operation. The separate test volume also allows reduced temperature operation without the expense and complication of subcooling the entire coil set (about 20-t cold mass). The HFTF has thus become a key facility in the LLNL magnet development program, where the primary goal is to demonstrate the technology for producing fields to 15 T with winding-pack current densities of 40 A.mm/sup -2/ in coils sized for fusion applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Miller, J.R.; Chaplin, M.R.; Leber, R.L.; Rosdahl, A.R.

1987-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

106

Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zenergy Power has successfully designed, built, tested, and installed in the US electrical grid a saturable reactor Fault Current Limiter. Beginning in 2007, first as SC Power Systems and from 2008 as Zenergy Power, Inc., ZP used DOE matching grant and ARRA funds to help refine the design of the saturated reactor fault current limiter. ZP ultimately perfected the design of the saturated reactor FCL to the point that ZP could reliably design a suitable FCL for most utility applications. Beginning with a very basic FCL design using 1G HTS for a coil housed in a LN2 cryostat for the DC bias magnet, the technology progressed to a commercial system that was offered for sale internationally. Substantial progress was made in two areas. First, the cryogenics cooling system progressed from a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen container housing the HTS coils to cryostats utilizing dry conduction cooling and reaching temperatures down to less than 20 degrees K. Large, round cryostats with ‚??warm bore‚?Ě diameters of 1.7 meters enabled the design of large tanks to hold the AC components. Second, the design of the AC part of the FCL was refined from a six legged ‚??spider‚?Ě design to a more compact and lighter design with better fault current limiting capability. Further refinement of the flux path and core shape led to an efficient saturated reactor design requiring less Ampere-turns to saturate the core. In conclusion, the development of the saturable reactor FCL led to a more efficient design not requiring HTS magnets and their associated peripheral equipment, which yielded a more economical product in line with the electric utility industry expectations. The original goal for the DOE funding of the ZP project ‚??Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters‚?Ě was to stimulate the HTS wire industry with, first 1G, then 2G, HTS wire applications. Over the approximately 5 years of ZP‚??s product development program, the amount of HTS wire employed per FCL and its cost as a percentage of the total FCL product content had not dropped substantially from an unsustainable level of more than 50% of the total cost of the FCL, nor had the availability increased (today the availability of 2G wire for commercial applications outside of specific partnerships with the leading 2G wire manufacturers is extremely limited). ZP had projected a very significant commercial potential for FCLs with higher performance and lower costs compared to the initial models built with 1G wire, which would come about from the widespread availability of low-cost, high-performance 2G HTS wire. The potential for 2G wires at greatly reduced performance-based prices compared to 1G HTS conductor held out the potential for the commercial production of FCLs at price and performance levels attractive to the utility industry. However, the price of HTS wire did not drop as expected and today the available quantities of 2G wire are limited, and the price is higher than the currently available supplies of 1G wire. The commercial option for ZP to provide a reliable and reasonably priced FCL to the utility industry is to employ conventional resistive conductor DC electromagnets to bias the FCL. Since the premise of the original funding was to stimulate the HTS wire industry and ZP concluded that copper-based magnets were more economical for the foreseeable future, DOE and ZP decided to mutually terminate the project.

Frank Darmann; Robert Lombaerde; Franco Moriconi; Albert Nelson

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was purchased used and all of the equipment has nearly reached the end of its useful service.

Ronald Landreth

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

EA-1792-S1: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project Ė Castine Harbor Test Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Supplemental EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the University of Maine proposal to use Congressionally directed federal funding, from DOE, to deploy, test and retrieve one 1/8-scale floating wind turbine (20kw) prototype in Castine Harbor, offshore of Castine Maine. This test would be conducted prior to testing at the site 2 miles from Monhegan Island (evaluated under DOE EA-1792).

110

Advanced industrial gas turbine technology readiness demonstration program. Phase II. Final report: compressor rig fabrication assembly and test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a component technology demonstration program to fabricate, assemble and test an advanced axial/centrifugal compressor are presented. This work was conducted to demonstrate the utilization of advanced aircraft gas turbine cooling and high pressure compressor technology to improve the performance and reliability of future industrial gas turbines. Specific objectives of the compressor component testing were to demonstrate 18:1 pressure ratio on a single spool at 90% polytropic efficiency with 80% fewer airfoils as compared to current industrial gas turbine compressors. The compressor design configuration utilizes low aspect ratio/highly-loaded axial compressor blading combined with a centrifugal backend stage to achieve the 18:1 design pressure ratio in only 7 stages and 281 axial compressor airfoils. Initial testing of the compressor test rig was conducted with a vaneless centrifugal stage diffuser to allow documentation of the axial compressor performance. Peak design speed axial compressor performance demonstrated was 91.8% polytropic efficiency at 6.5:1 pressure ratio. Subsequent documentation of the combined axial/centrifugal performance with a centrifugal stage pipe diffuser resulted in the demonstration of 91.5% polytropic efficiency and 14% stall margin at the 18:1 overall compressor design pressure ratio. The demonstrated performance not only exceeded the contract performance goals, but also represents the highest known demonstrated compressor performance in this pressure ratio and flow class. The performance demonstrated is particularly significant in that it was accomplished at airfoil loading levels approximately 15% higher than that of current production engine compressor designs. The test results provide conclusive verification of the advanced low aspect ratio axial compressor and centrifugal stage technologies utilized.

Schweitzer, J. K.; Smith, J. D.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required.

Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Strategies for designing, testing and demonstrating safety : what synthetic biology can learn from retrospective cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthetic biology is an emerging technology field within the realm of genetic engineering, differing from traditional genetic engineering in that it focuses on the modularization of genetic parts and the creation of de ...

Yeddanapudi, Neelima, 1976-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Demonstration of an Enhanced Geothermal System at the Northwest Geysers Geothermal Field, CA  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit Report Department ofDecouplingDemonstrationDemonstration of

114

attempted field test: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

attempted field test First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Tests as Documentation: a First...

115

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Health and safety plan (Revision 2)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the demonstration of IITRI`s EM Treatment Technology. In this process, soil is heated in situ by means of electrical energy for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants. This process will be demonstrated on a small plot of contaminated soil located in the Pit Area of Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D, K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN. The purpose of the demonstration is to remove organic contaminants present in the soil by heating to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The soil will be heated in situ by applying 60-Hz AC power to an array of electrodes placed in boreholes drilled through the soil. In this section a brief description of the process is given along with a description of the site and a listing of the contaminants found in the area.

Dev, H.

1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Demonstration: The Key to Technology Transfer in the Field of Energy Conservation in the UK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology transfer has been one of the most intractable problems faced on a worldwide basis. The problem is particularly acute in the field of energy efficiency because none of the 3 major parties involved, the researcher, the manufacturer...

Carter, D. E. F.; Lawrence, J. E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fort Meade demonstration test LEDS in freezer rooms, fiber optics in display cases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstration projects at Fort George G. Meade, MD, substituted LED lighting for incandescent bulbs in commisary wal-in freezers and fiber optic lighting in reach-in display cases. The goal was to reduce energy consumption and the results were positive. Journal article published in Public Works Digest

Parker, Steven; Parker, Graham B.

2008-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

119

Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Laboratory and field corrosion test results on aluminum-transition-steel systems on automobiles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Use of steel clad aluminum transition material to join aluminum body panels and structural members to steel is demonstrated. The transition material allows joining of aluminum and steel by conventional techniques such as spot welding and eliminates galvanic corrosion at the joints. Corrosion test results for a wide range of aluminum-transition-steel systems in laboratory tests, atmospheric exposure, and field test plates are presented. The break strength of joints containing two, three, or four members was used as a measure of performance after corrosion testing. Statistical analysis of the results showed that the transition material prevented degradation of the mechanical properties of the joints.

Haynes, G.; Baboian, R. [Texas Instruments Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States). Electrochemical and Corrosion Lab.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energyís (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. Assessment of the demonstration site has defined many aspects of the reservoir. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre, 24.3 ha) CO2 demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. Further analysis of the pilot site by the partners has indicated that a staged demonstration is considered optimal. A phased approach to implementation of the demonstration is proposed to reduce the risk of uncertainties as to whether the reservoir has basic properties (connectivity and ability to pressure-up) conducive to a meaningful CO2 flood demonstration. The proposed plan is to flood a 10+-acre pattern. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale ({approx}60-acre) demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. In general, the following significant modifications to the original Statement of Work are proposed: (1) The proposed plan would extend the period of Budget Period 1 to May 7, 2003. (2) Redefine the period of Budget Period 2 from 3/7/01-3/7/05 to 5/7/03-3/7/08. (3) Redefine the period of Budget Period 3 from 3/7/05-3/7/06 to 3/7/08-3/7/09. (4) To allow initial verification of the viability of the process before proceeding into the flood demonstration, move activities involved with preparing wells in the flood pattern (Task 5.1), repressurizing the pattern (Task 5.2), and constructing surface facilities (Task 5.3) from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1. (5) Allow US Energy Partners (USEP) to be a supplier of carbon dioxide from the ethanol plant in Russell, Kansas. (6) Change the pilot flood pattern, including the number and location of wells involved in the pilot. (7) Expenses are shifted from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1 to cover costs of additional reservoir characterization. All modified activities and tasks would maintain the existing required industry match of 55% in Budget Period 1, 65% in Budget Period 2, and 90% in Budget Period 3. Carbon dioxide supplied by the USEP ethanol facility would be valued such that the total cost of CO2 delivered to the demonstration site injection wellhead would not exceed the $3.00/MCF cost of supplying CO2 from Guymon, OK. Total cost of the modified project is $4,415,300 compared with $5,388,064 in the original project. The modified project would require no additional funding from US DOE.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

124

Concept tests: Wind tunnel tests in controlled wind Comparison tests: Free field comparison to 3D sonic anemometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comparable potential. Wind measurements on wind turbines in undisturbed wind, relative to nacelle anemometryConcept tests: Wind tunnel tests in controlled wind Comparison tests: Free field comparison to 3D" by CFD calculations Spinner AnemometrySpinner Anemometry -- An Innovative Wind Measurement Concept

125

Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

McAlpine, J.L. (White Buffalo Petroleum Co., Tulsa, OK (US)); Joshi, S.D. (Joshi Technologies International Inc., Tulsa, OK (US))

1991-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

126

Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, ďComplete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbentĒ. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Das, Sadananda [ORNL; Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T. [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Gill, Gary [PNNL; Kuo, Li-Jung [PNNL; Wood, Jordana [PNNL

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Field test of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrost refrigerator-freezer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the successful design, development, and demonstration of a high efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype, work was done to design and manufacture pre-production units for home usage tests. The purpose of the field test and the associated market evaluation is to confirm the energy saving potential of the high-efficiency design, identify possible design deficiencies or service difficulties, and assess the consumer appeal of the new unit. The first five months of field test data have shown an average 57% decrease in energy consumption when compared to a baseline unit of convention design. This energy savings is larger than predicted by the standard DOE test procedure. No serious design or service problems have been encountered. Consumers have not been adversely affected by the larger cabinet and thicker doors, and responded favorably in an actual retail sales test to initially spending more for an energy-saving refrigerator that will reduce electric usage.

Topping, R.F.; Vineyard, E.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

Test plan, the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the bioremediation project is to provide a cost effective bioremediation demonstration of petroleum contaminated soil at the Czechowice Oil Refinery. Additional objectives include training of personnel, and transfer of this technology by example to Poland, and the Risk Abatement Center for Central and Eastern Europe (RACE). The goal of the remediation is to reduce the risk of PAH compounds in soil and provide a green zone (grassy area) adjacent to the site boundary. Initial project discussions with the Czechowice Oil Refinery resulted in helping the refinery find an immediate cost effective solution for the dense organic sludge in the lagoons. They found that when mixed with other waste materials, the sludge could be sold as a fuel source to local cement kilns. Thus the waste was incinerated and provided a revenue stream for the refinery to cleanup the lagoon. This allowed the bioremediation project to focus on remediation of contaminated soil that unusable as fuel, less recalcitrant and easier to handle and remediate. The assessment identified 19 compounds at the refinery that represented significant risk and would require remediation. These compounds consisted of metals, PAH`s, and BTEX. The contaminated soil to be remediated in the bioremediation demonstration contains only PAH (BTEX and metals are not significantly above background concentrations). The final biopile design consists of (1) dewatering and clearing lagoon A to clean clay, (2) adding a 20 cm layer of dolomite with pipes for drainage, leachate collection, air injection, and pH adjustment, (3) adding a 1.1 m layer of contaminated soil mixed with wood chips to improve permeability, and (4) completing the surface with 20 cm of top soil planted with grass.

Altman, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.; Tien, A.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Worsztynowicz, A.; Ulfig, K. [Inst. for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice (Poland)

1997-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

Field Demonstration of Active Desiccant Modules Designed to Integrate with Standard Unitary Rooftop Package Equipment - Final Report: Phase 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the investigation of two active desiccant module (ADM) pilot site installations initiated in 2001. Both pilot installations were retrofits at existing facilities served by conventional heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems that had encountered frequent humidity control, indoor air quality (IAQ), and other operational problems. Each installation involved combining a SEMCO, Inc., ADM (as described in Fischer and Sand 2002) with a standard packaged rooftop unit built by the Trane Company. A direct digital control (DDC) system integral to the ADM performed the dual function of controlling the ADM/rooftop combination and facilitating data collection, trending, and remote performance monitoring. The first installation involved providing preconditioned outdoor air to replace air exhausted from the large kitchen hood and bathrooms of a Hooters restaurant located in Rome, Georgia. This facility had previously added an additional rooftop unit in an attempt to achieve occupant comfort without success. The second involved conditioning the outdoor air delivered to each room of a wing of the Mountain Creek Inn at the Callaway Gardens resort. This hotel, designed in the ''motor lodge'' format with each room opening to the outdoors, is located in southwest Georgia. Controlling the space humidity always presented a serious challenge. Uncomfortable conditions and musty odors had caused many guests to request to move to other areas within the resort. This is the first field demonstration performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory where significant energy savings, operating cost savings, and dramatically improved indoor environmental conditions can all be claimed as the results of a retrofit desiccant equipment field installation. The ADM/rooftop combination installed at the restaurant resulted in a reduction of about 34% in the electricity used by the building's air-conditioning system. This represents a reduction of approximately 15% in overall electrical energy consumption and a 12.5-kW reduction in peak demand. The cost of gas used for regeneration of the desiccant wheel over this period of time is estimated to be only $740, using a gas cost of $0.50 per therm--the summer rate in 2001. The estimated net savings is $5400 annually, resulting in a 1-2 year payback. It is likely that similar energy/cost savings were realized at the Callaway Gardens hotel. In this installation, however, a central plant supplied the chilled water serving fan coil units in the hotel wing retrofitted with the ADM, so it was not metered separately. Consequently, the owner could not provide actual energy consumption data specific to the facility. The energy and operating cost savings at both sites are directly attributable to higher cooling-season thermostat settings and decreased conventional system run times. These field installations were selected as an immediate and appropriate response to correct indoor humidity and fresh air ventilation problems being experienced by building occupants and owners, so no rigorous baseline-building vs. test-building energy use/operating cost savings results can be presented. The report presents several simulated comparisons between the ADM/roof HVAC approach and other equipment combinations, where both desiccant and conventional systems are modeled to provide comparable fresh air ventilation rates and indoor humidity levels. The results obtained from these simulations demonstrate convincingly the energy and operating cost savings obtainable with this hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression technology, verifying those actually seen at the pilot installations. The ADM approach is less expensive than conventional alternatives providing similar performance and indoor air quality and provides a very favorable payback (1 year or so) compared with oversized rooftop units that cannot be operated effectively with the necessary high outdoor air percentages.

Fischer, J

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from January 1, 2003 to March 31, 2003. A water supply well was permitted, drilled, and completed in the shallow, fresh-water, Dakota Sandstone. The pumphouse has been put in place and the long-term injection equipment is being set-up. Although the short-term injectivity test was cut short by power failure following an ice storm, results indicate the well exhibits sufficient injectivity to proceed with the long-term injectivity test, which will start in the beginning of the second quarter. The CO2 Project No.10 and No.12 wells were reworked and the Lansing-Kansas City (LKC) ''C'' interval in both wells isolated. The CO2 Project No.16 well was drilled deeper, cored in the LKC ''C'' and ''G'' zones, and cased to the ''C'' zone and will be perforated and stimulated in the beginning of second quarter. Initial wireline log analysis and examination of the core indicate that the porosity of the ''C'' zone in this location may be lower than in other parts of the pattern by 3-5 porosity units. Log analysis indicates water saturations are near 60% consistent with predicted residual oil saturation to waterflood modeling. Lower porosities may indicate lower permeability may also be present. Core analysis is being conducted and results will be available in the first week of the second quarter. A draft letter agreement has been presented to FLOCO2 Company for supply of CO2 storage and injection pump equipment.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave VanderGriend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2004, 6.26 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 250 MCFD. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May. The amount of carbon dioxide produced was small during this period. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.5 B/D in May and June. Operational problems encountered during the initial stages of the flood were identified and resolved.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2003 to September 30, 2003. Conductivity testing between the CO{sub 2}I No.1 and CO{sub 2} No.13 was performed over the period 08/20/03 through 09/05/03. Observed response in CO{sub 2} 13 production rates to changes in CO{sub 2}I No.1 injection rates are consistent with sufficient permeability between CO{sub 2}I No.1 and CO{sub 2} No.13 for a viable CO{sub 2} flood with a sufficient Process Pore Volume Rate (PPV). Based on the permeabilities near the CO{sub 2} No.16, a 2-producing well pattern has been determined to be optimal but may be changed during the flood depending on the response observed in the CO{sub 2} No.16. Present inter-well test results indicate there is greater permeability architecture complexity than originally predicted and that a low-permeability region or barrier that restricts but does stop flow may exist between the CO{sub 2}I No.1 and the CO{sub 2} No.13. Pilot area repressurization began on 09/05/03, immediately after CO{sub 2}I No.1-CO{sub 2} No.13 conductivity testing was complete, by increasing injection in the CO{sub 2}I No.1, CO{sub 2} No.10, and CO{sub 2} No.18. Adequate reservoir pressure in the portion of the pilot area needed to be above minimum miscibility pressure should be reached in November at which time initial CO{sub 2} injection could begin. It is estimated the 2-producing well, 10+-acre (4.05 ha) producing pattern will produce 18,000-21,000 BO (barrels oil; 2,880-3,360 m{sup 3}). Depending primarily on surface facilities costs, operating expenses, and the price of oil, for the predicted range of oil recovery the pilot is estimated to either break-even or be profitable from this point forward. Final arrangements and agreements for CO{sub 2} supply and delivery are being worked on and will be finalized in the next month.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

Field demonstration of three-phase Wanlass motors. Final report Aug 81-Apr 83  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electric motors are major part of the load at Naval shore facilities. The Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (NCEL) investigated the Wanlass motor as a means of reducing power consumption, reducing current flow, and improving power factor, as compared to standard motors. NCEL surveyed the literature on single-phase and poly-phase Wanlass motors and tested poly-phase Wanlass motors. Efficiency, current, power factor, load sharing, temperature rise, vibration and noise, torque-speed, and reliability were judged. A reduction in current flow and a corresponding improvement in power factor can be expected with the Wanlass rewind. A small improvement in efficiency - a reduction in power consumption - is possible but not certain. It was recommended that Wanlass rewinds not be purchased on the basis of energy savings or power factor improvement.

Dann, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from October 1, 2002 to December 31, 2002. On September 27, 2002 the US DOE approved the proposed modified plan to flood a 10+-acre pattern. On November 1, 2002 Murfin Drilling Company purchased the 70-acre pilot area and will continue as the operator of the pilot. Murfin is seeking working interest partners and meetings with local small independents were conducted. To date, White Eagle Resources and John O. Farmer Oil Company have committed to working interest in the project. Arrangements have been made with Rein Operating to test the Rein No. 7 water supply well on the neighboring lease. Based on review of wellbore conditions in the Colliver No. 9 and No. 16 it has been decided to use the No. 16 in the pilot. A new tank battery was installed near the Colliver No. 10 well and the existing producers plumbed to the new tank battery to isolate production from the pilot area. Reservoir simulations have indicated that the low-permeability interval in the Carter-Colliver CO2I No. 1 injection well below 2,900 ft does not exhibit sufficient injectivity to warrant special stimulation or conformance treatment programs at the present time. Discussions have been initiated with FLOCO2 and preliminary conditions have been agreed upon for the exchange of CO2 for the use of storage and pump equipment at the pilot. A short-term injection test and the well reworks have been scheduled. Proposed modifications to the project plan were reviewed in the previous quarterly technical progress report. A presentation was given at the DOE Class II Review Meeting in Midland, TX on December 12, 2002.

Alan P. Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

High-Level Waste Tank Cleaning and Field Characterization at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) is nearing completion of radioactive high-level waste (HLW) retrieval from its storage tanks and subsequent vitrification of the HLW into borosilicate glass. Currently, 99.5% of the sludge radioactivity has been recovered from the storage tanks and vitrified. Waste recovery of cesium-137 (Cs-137) adsorbed on a zeolite media during waste pretreatment has resulted in 97% of this radioactivity being vitrified. Approximately 84% of the original 1.1 x 1018 becquerels (30 million curies) of radioactivity was efficiently vitrified from July 1996 to June 1998 during Phase I processing. The recovery of the last 16% of the waste has been challenging due to a number of factors, primarily the complex internal structural support system within the main 2.8 million liter (750,000 gallon) HLW tank designated 8D-2. Recovery of this last waste has become exponentially more challenging as less and less HLW is available to mobilize and transfer to the Vitrification Facility. This paper describes the progressively more complex techniques being utilized to remove the final small percentage of radioactivity from the HLW tanks, and the multiple characterization technologies deployed to determine the quantity of Cs-137, strontium-90 (Sr-90), and alpha-transuranic (alpha-TRU) radioactivity remaining in the tanks.

Drake, J. L.; McMahon, C. L.; Meess, D. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

137

Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By December 31, 2006, 79,072 bbls of water were injected into CO2 I-1 and 3,923 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Water injection rates into CO2 I-1, CO2 No.10 and CO2 No.18 were stabilized during this period. Oil production rates increased from 4.7 B/D to 5.5 to 6 B/D confirming the arrival of an oil bank at CO2 No.12. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver No.7, Colliver No.3 and possibly Graham A4 located on an adjacent property. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Our management plan is to continue water injection maintaining oil displacement by displacing the carbon dioxide remaining in the C zone,. If the decline rate of production from the Colliver Lease remains as estimated and the oil rate from the pilot region remains constant, we estimate that the oil production attributed to carbon dioxide injection will be about 12,000 bbl by December 31, 2007. Oil recovery would be equivalent to 12 MCF/bbl, which is consistent with field experience in established West Texas carbon dioxide floods. The project is not economic.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of December 2004, 11.39 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 242 MCFD. Vent losses were excessive during June as ambient temperatures increased. Installation of smaller plungers in the carbon dioxide injection pump reduced the recycle and vent loss substantially. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May and in the second production well in August. No channeling of carbon dioxide was observed. The GOR has remained within the range of 3000-4000 for most the last six months. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.35 B/D for the six month period between July 1 and December 31. Cumulative oil production was 814 bbls. Neither well has experienced increased oil production rates expected from the arrival of the oil bank generated by carbon dioxide injection.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfn; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Field Testing: Independent, Accredited Testing and Validation for the Wind Industry (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the field testing capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's specialized facilities and personnel at the NWTC provide the U.S. wind industry with scientific and engineering support that has proven critical to the development of wind energy for U.S. energy needs. The NWTC's specialized field-testing capabilities have evolved over 30 years of continuous support by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program and long standing industry partnerships. The NWTC provides wind industry manufacturers, developers, and operators with turbine and component testing all in one convenient location. Although industry utilizes sophisticated modeling tools to design and optimize turbine configurations, there are always limitations in modeling capabilities, and testing is a necessity to ensure performance and reliability. Designs require validation and testing is the only way to determine if there are flaws. Prototype testing is especially important in capturing manufacturing flaws that might require fleet-wide retrofits. The NWTC works with its industry partners to verify the performance and reliability of wind turbines that range in size from 400 Watts to 3 megawatts. Engineers conduct tests on components and full-scale turbines in laboratory environments and in the field. Test data produced from these tests can be used to validate turbine design codes and simulations that further advance turbine designs.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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141

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By the end of December 2005, 14,115 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,091 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Continued injection of water is planned to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

142

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By June 30, 2006, 41,566 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,726 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. Oil rates increased from about 3.3 B/D for the period from January through March to about 4.7 B/D for the period from April through June. If the oil rate is sustained, this may be the first indication of the arrival of the oil bank mobilized by carbon dioxide injection. A sustained fluid withdrawal rate of about 200 B/D from CO2 No.12 and CO2 No.13 appears to be necessary to obtain higher oil rates. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Water injection will continue to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

143

Smart Parking Mangement Field Test: A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District Parking Demonstration Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and destinations using a grid map. They were then asked towhich they located using a grid map attached to the survey.

Rodier, Caroline J.; Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

Hofstetter, K.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced ďRISMC toolkitĒ that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Test plan for in situ bioremediation demonstration of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Project DOE/OTD TTP No.: SR 0566-01. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms will be simulated to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. in situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work.

Hazen, T.C.

1991-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

147

Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are growing strains on the electric grid as cooling peaks grow and equipment ages. Increased penetration of renewables on the grid is also straining electricity supply systems and the need for flexible demand is growing. This paper summarizes results of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest. The objective of the research was two fold. One objective was to evaluate the use demand response automation technologies. A second objective was to evaluate control strategies that could change the electric load shape in both winter and summer conditions. Winter conditions focused on cold winter mornings, a time when the electric grid is often stressed. The summer test evaluated DR strategies in the afternoon. We found that we could automate both winter and summer control strategies with the open automated demand response communication standard. The buildings were able to provide significant demand response in both winter and summer events.

Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao H.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

Design and field testing of a Savonius windpump in Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One important means of improving water availability and reducing disease exposure from polluted or stagnant sources involves the design and diffusion of inexpensive and reliable water pumps. Modernized versions of the decades-old Savonius vertical axis windmill present one technology that can play an important role in this effort. To be successful, these systems must be tailored to exploit the local wind and hydrological resources, constructed and managed locally, and inexpensive to operate and maintain. We report here on our design efforts and cooperative field research with several Kenyan development organizations. Performance tests from 10-15 meter deep water pumping applications at two field sites are presented, as well as preliminary results of an analysis of the steps involved in disseminating such technology. Our research suggests that the combination of reliability and performance offered by the Savonius design make it a useful resource for community managed energy initiatives, particularly in developing nation settings.

Smalera, A.; Kammen, D.M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

Field Testing of Nano-PCM Enhanced Building Envelope Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE) Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential end-use energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase change material (PCM)-enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field-testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative phase change material (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility at Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections, which were separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCM-enhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure, in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheets-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side, which served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. Further, numerical modeling of the walls containing the nano-PCM wallboards were performed to determine their actual impact on wall-generated heating and cooling loads. The models were first validated using field data, and then used to perform annual simulations using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data. This article presents the measured performance and numerical analysis to evaluate the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced building components.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC-DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC- DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER By Richard F. Topping and manufacture pre-production units for home usage tests. The purpose of the field test and the associated market been promising. The first five months of field test data have shown an average 57% decrease in energy

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

151

Pricetown I underground coal gasification field test: operations report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) field test in bituminous coal was successfully completed near Pricetown, West Virginia. The primary objective of this field test was to determine the viability of the linked vertical well (LVV) technology to recover the 900 foot deep, 6 foot thick coal seam. A methane rich product gas with an average heating value of approximately 250 Btu/SCF was produced at low air injection flow rates during the reverse combustion linkage phase. Heating value of the gas produced during the linkage enhancement phase was 221 Btu/SCF with air injection. The high methane formation has been attributed to the thermal and hydrocracking of tars and oils along with hydropyrolysis and hydrogasification of coal char. The high heating value of the gas was the combined effect of residence time, flow pattern, injection flow rate, injection pressure, and back pressure. During the gasification phase, a gas with an average heating value of 125 Btu/SCF was produced with only air injection, which resulted in an average energy production of 362 MMBtu/day.

Agarwal, A.K.; Seabaugh, P.W.; Zielinski, R.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Initial test results of the limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) demonstration project. Report for September 1984-April 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency and low-NOx burner performance obtained during short term tests, as well as the impact of LIMB ash on electrostatic precipitator (ESP) performance at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station. Project goals are to demonstrate 50% or more SO/sub 2/ removal at a Ca/S molar stoichiometry of 2.0 and NOx emissions of less than 0.5 lb/million Btu while maintaining boiler operability and reliability. The tests, conducted before September 1987, indicated that 55-60% SO/sub 2/ removal and NOx emissions on the order of 0.48 lb/million Btu are achievable. The increased dust loading of a high-resistivity ash typically limited continuous operation to 2-6 hr. The paper discusses how the LIMB ash gave rise to back corona which, in turn, increased stack opacity to regulated levels. The extension of the project to include humidification of the flue gas is also described as a way to minimize these effects.

Nolan, P.S.; Hendriks, R.V.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Exploration 3-D Seismic Field Test/Native Tribes Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine current acquisition procedures and costs and to further the goals of the President's Initiative for Native Tribes, a seismic-survey project is to be conducted on Osage tribal lands. The goals of the program are to demonstrate the capabilities, costs, and effectiveness of 3-D seismic work in a small-operator setting and to determine the economics of such a survey. For these purposes, typical small-scale independent-operator practices are being followed and a shallow target chose in an area with a high concentration of independent operators. The results will be analyzed in detail to determine if there are improvements and/or innovations which can be easily introduced in field-acquisition procedures, in processing, or in data manipulation and interpretation to further reduce operating costs and to make the system still more active to the small-scale operator.

Carroll, Herbert B.; Chen, K.C.; Guo, Genliang; Johnson, W.I.; Reeves,T.K.; Sharma,Bijon

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Evidence of Multi-Process Matrix Diffusion in a Single Fracturefrom a Field Tracer Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compared to values inferred from laboratory tests on matrix cores, many field tracer tests in fractured rock have shown enhanced matrix diffusion coefficient values (obtained using a single-process matrix-diffusion model with a homogeneous matrix diffusion coefficient). To investigate this phenomenon, a conceptual model of multi-process matrix diffusion in a single-fracture system was developed. In this model, three matrix diffusion processes of different diffusion rates were assumed to coexist: (1) diffusion into stagnant water and infilling materials within fractures, (2) diffusion into a degraded matrix zone, and (3) further diffusion into an intact matrix zone. The validity of the conceptual model was then demonstrated by analyzing a unique tracer test conducted using a long-time constant-concentration injection. The tracer-test analysis was conducted using a numerical model capable of tracking the multiple matrix-diffusion processes. The analysis showed that in the degraded zone, a diffusion process with an enhanced diffusion rate controlled the steep rising limb and decay-like falling limb in the observed breakthrough curve, whereas in the intact matrix zone, a process involving a lower diffusion rate affected the long-term middle platform of slowly increasing tracer concentration. The different matrix-diffusion-coefficient values revealed from the field tracer test are consistent with the variability of matrix diffusion coefficient measured for rock cores with different degrees of fracture coating at the same site. By comparing to the matrix diffusion coefficient calibrated using single-process matrix diffusion, we demonstrated that this multi-process matrix diffusion may contribute to the enhanced matrix-diffusion-coefficient values for single-fracture systems at the field scale.

Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur; Molz, Fred J.

2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

155

Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Field Test Results of Using a Nacelle-Mounted Lidar for Improving Wind Energy Capture by Reducing Yaw Misalignment (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented at the Nordic Wind Power Conference on November 5, 2014. This presentation describes field-test campaigns performed at the National Wind Technology Center in which lidar technology was used to improve the yaw alignment of the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) 2 and CART3 wind turbines. The campaigns demonstrated that whether by learning a correction function to the nacelle vane, or by controlling yaw directly with the lidar signal, a significant improvement in power capture was demonstrated.

Fleming, P.; Scholbrock, A.; Wright, A.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

NREL Gearbox Reliability Collaborative: Comparing In-Field Gearbox Response to Different Dynamometer Test Conditions: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of NREL's Gearbox Reliability Collaborative comparison of dynamometer tests conducted on a 750-kW gearbox to field testing.

LaCava, W.; van Dam, J.; Wallen, R.; McNiff, B.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides and overview of field testing of 18 pre-production prototype residential heat pump water heaters

160

FY 1994 program summary: Office of Technology Development, Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management, formerly the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), was established in November 1989 as the first step toward correcting contamination problems resulting from nearly 50 years of nuclear weapons production and fuel processing activities. EM consolidates several DOE organizations previously responsible for the handling, treatment, and disposition of radioactive and hazardous waste. Within EM, the Office of Technology Development (OTD/EM-50) is responsible for developing technologies to meet DOE`s goal for environmental restoration. OTD manages an aggressive national program of applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) for environmental cleanup, waste management, and related technologies. The program is designed to resolve major technical issues, to rapidly advanced beyond current technologies for environmental restoration and waste management operations, and to expedite compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. This report summarizes Fiscal Year 1994 (FY94) programmatic information, accomplishments, and planned activities relevant to the individual activities within OTD`s RDDT and E.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Field test of a high efficiency, automatic defrost refrigerator-freezer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the market evaluation and field test portion of a program to design, develop, and demonstrate a high efficiency, automatic defrosting refrigerator-freezer for the residential market. After the successful completion of Phase I of the program, which concentrated on the design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) high-efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype, Phase II was initiated in February 1979 to evaluate the sales potential and performance of the high-efficiency refrigerator concept under field conditions, as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. In Phase I, a survey of food consumption and storage trends, family size, and consumer buying habits led to a sales-weighted average-capacity forecast for 1985 of approximately 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) and identification of the top-mount, automatic defrosting refrigerator as the projected sales leader. To meet this market demand, a 453 1 (16 ft/sup 3/) top-mount was selected as the baseline for the Phase I design and development. In Phase II, a 509 1 (18 ft/sup 3/) unit using Phase I technology was chosen for the field test, since the slightly larger model better fit the participating manufacturer's new product development efforts and market.

Topping, R.F.; Vineyard, E.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evaluation of plasma melter technology for verification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes: Demonstration test No. 4 preliminary test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a preliminary report of plasma arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. Phase I test conduct included 26 hours (24 hours steady state) of melting of simulated high-sodium low-level radioactive liquid waste. Average processing rate was 4.9 kg/min (peak rate 6.2 kg/min), producing 7330 kg glass product. Free-flowing glass pour point was 1250 C, and power input averaged 1530 kW(e), for a total energy consumption of 19,800 kJ/kg glass. Restart capability was demonstrated following a 40-min outage involving the scrubber liquor heat exchanger, and glass production was continued for another 2 hours. Some volatility losses were apparent, probably in the form of sodium borates. Roughly 275 samples were collected and forwarded for analysis. Sufficient process data were collected for heat/material balances. Recommendations for future work include lower boron contents and improved tuyere design/operation.

McLaughlin, D.F.; Gass, W.R.; Dighe, S.V.; D`Amico, N.; Swensrud, R.L.; Darr, M.F.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive for Enhanced Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final report for DOE-NETL Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42309, 'Field Testing of a Wet FGD Additive'. The objective of the project has been to demonstrate the use of two flue gas desulfurization (FGD) additives, Evonik Degussa Corporation's TMT-15 and Nalco Company's Nalco 8034, to prevent the re-emission of elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in flue gas exiting wet FGD systems on coal-fired boilers. Furthermore, the project was intended to demonstrate whether such additives can be used to precipitate most of the mercury (Hg) removed in the wet FGD system as a fine salt that can be separated from the FGD liquor and bulk solid byproducts for separate disposal. The project involved pilot- and full-scale tests of the additives in wet FGD absorbers. The tests were intended to determine required additive dosages to prevent Hg{sup 0} re-emissions and to separate mercury from the normal FGD byproducts for three coal types: Texas lignite/Powder River Basin (PRB) coal blend, high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal, and low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. The project team consists of URS Group, Inc., EPRI, Luminant Power (was TXU Generation Company LP), Southern Company, IPL (an AES company), Evonik Degussa Corporation and the Nalco Company. Luminant Power provided the Texas lignite/PRB co-fired test site for pilot FGD tests and project cost sharing. Southern Company provided the low-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal host site for wet scrubbing tests, the pilot- and full-scale jet bubbling reactor (JBR) FGD systems tested, and project cost sharing. IPL provided the high-sulfur Eastern bituminous coal full-scale FGD test site and cost sharing. Evonik Degussa Corporation provided the TMT-15 additive, and the Nalco Company provided the Nalco 8034 additive. Both companies also supplied technical support to the test program as in-kind cost sharing. The project was conducted in six tasks. Of the six tasks, Task 1 involved project planning and Task 6 involved management and reporting. The other four tasks involved field testing on FGD systems, either at pilot or full scale. These four tasks included: Task 2 - Pilot Additive Testing in Texas Lignite Flue Gas; Task 3 - Full-scale FGD Additive Testing in High-sulfur Eastern Bituminous Flue Gas; Task 4 - Pilot Wet Scrubber Additive Tests at Plant Yates; and Task 5 - Full-scale Additive Tests at Plant Yates. The pilot-scale tests were completed in 2005 and the full-scale test using high-sulfur coal was completed in 2006; only the TMT-15 additive was tested in these efforts. The Task 5 full-scale additive tests conducted at Southern Company's Plant Yates Unit 1 were completed in 2007, and both the TMT-15 and Nalco 8034 additives were tested.

Gary Blythe; MariJon Owens

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Field Demonstration of a High-Efficiency Packaged Rooftop Air Conditioning Unit at Fort Gordon, Augusta, GA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a larger program targeting the market transformation of packaged rooftop air conditioning, five high-efficiency rooftop air conditioning products were selected in 2002 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Unitary Air Conditioner (UAC) Technology Procurement (http://www.pnl.gov/uac). In February 2003, Fort Gordon in Augusta, Georgia was chosen as the demonstration site. With the goal of validating the field performance and operation of one of the awarded products, a 10-ton high-efficiency packaged rooftop unit (RTU) manufactured by Global Energy Group (GEG) was installed at Fort Gordon in October 2003. Following equipment installation, power metering, air- and refrigerant-side instrumentation was installed on the GEG RTU and a 4-year old typical-efficiency 20-ton RTU manufactured by AAON . The GEG and AAON units were instrumented identically and operated May through July, 2005, to observe performance under a range of conditions. Based on the data collected as part of this demonstration, the GEG equipment performed at least 8% better in stage-1 (single compressor running) cooling and at least 16% better in stage-2 (both compressors running) than the baseline AAON equipment. Performance comparisons are based on what we call application EER normalized to equivalent specific fan power. The full-load, specific-fan-power-normalized application EERs at ARI design conditions were 10.48 Btu/Wh for the GEG and 9.00 Btu/Wh for the baseline machine. With a cost premium of nearly 50%, and slightly higher maintenance costs, the life-cycle cost analysis shows that the GEG technology pays for itself--a positive net-present value (NPV)--only in climates and buildings with long cooling seasons. Manufacture of this equipment on a larger scale can be expected to reduce costs to the point where it is more broadly cost-effective. The assumed 10-ton baseline and new-technology unit costs are $3824.00 and $5525.00 respectively. If the new technology cost is assumed to drop as sales increase to $4674.50 for a 10-ton unit (i.e. the original cost difference is halved), the life-cycle costs improve. A grid of first cost, annual maintenance cost and electricity price is enumerated and the results presented in the report show the sensitivity of life cycle cost to these three financial parameters in each of eight different climates.

Armstrong, Peter R.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Parker, Graham B.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Technology Demonstration Partnership Policy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This City Council memorandum establishes a framework for engaging in and evaluating demonstration partnerships with the goal of developing, testing, and demonstrating emerging technologies, product, and service innovations.

166

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Design of field test plots for a sloped waste rock surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westmin Resources Limited is a Western Canadian mining company with producing interests in base and precious metals and coals. Westmin`s Myra Falls Operations produce copper, zinc, and gold concentrates. The Myra Falls Operations are located in the central interior of Vancouver Island in a hanging glacial valley. Mean annual precipitation is approximately 3,000 mm with more than 75% occurring during the months of October to April. Historic surface deposition of waste rock has resulted in acid rock drainage (ARD). An applied research program was initiated to develop a cover system for the waste rock material at the Myra Falls site. The objective is to develop a cover system which controls the ingress of oxygen and infiltration of water, while providing a medium for sustainable vegetation that is consistent with the end land use of the area. Progress to date suggests that modified local till materials (amended with either fly ash or bentonite) can be used in soil cover construction. Four test plots were designed using two-dimensional saturated-unsaturated modelling tools to ensure that the performance of each test plot was representative of a full scale ARD cover system. This paper summarizes the design philosophy and principles of the cover system as well as the methodology for the two-dimensional numerical modelling program. Conclusions and results from the numerical modelling program are presented with a focus on implications for construction of the field test plots and installation of the performance monitoring instruments. The numerical modelling demonstrated that the hydraulic performance of a soil cover system placed on a sloped waste rock surface will be much different than that predicted by idealized one-dimensional numerical models, and in general current design methodologies. The modelling clearly demonstrated that the design of small scale field test plots was not a simple task. The physical dimensions of the field test plots had a significant impact on the ideal location for monitoring instruments and incorrect placement of instruments would lead to an erroneous measure of test plot performance.

O`Kane, M. [O`Kane Consultants, Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Stoicescu, J.; Haug, M. [M.D. Haug and Associates Ltd., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Januszewski, S. [Westmin Resources Ltd., Campbell River, British Columbia (Canada). Myra Falls Operations; Mchaina, D.M. [Westmin Resources Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Product Demonstrations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Consortium will pursue a number of demonstrations following the general procedure used by DOE's GATEWAY demonstration program. Specific products to be featured in a demonstration may be...

170

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q97.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 1Q97.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercialization demonstration. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Summary report on close-coupled subsurface barrier technology: Initial field trials to full-scale demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the installation and measure the performance of a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional, low-cost, cement-grout containment barrier followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement-polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of the issues concerning the use of polymers to laboratory compatibility and performance measurements of various polymer systems to a pilot-scale, single column injection at Sandia to full-scale demonstration. The feasibility of the close-coupled barrier concept was proven in a full-scale cold demonstration at Hanford, Washington and then moved to the final stage with a full-scale demonstration at an actual remediation site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). At the Hanford demonstration the composite barrier was emplaced around and beneath a 20,000 liter tank. The secondary cement layer was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45{degree} angle to the ground, forming a cone-shaped barrier. The primary barrier was placed by panel jet-grouting with a dual-wall drill stem using a two part polymer grout. The polymer chosen was a high molecular weight acrylic. At the BNL demonstration a V-trough barrier was installed using a conventional cement grout for the secondary layer and an acrylic-gel polymer for the primary layer. Construction techniques were identical to the Hanford installation. This report summarizes the technology development from pilot- to full-scale demonstrations and presents some of the performance and quality achievements attained.

Heiser, J.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Dwyer, B. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

SciTech Connect: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Conference: Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint Citation Details In-Document...

175

E-Print Network 3.0 - area field test Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

develop, adjust and test two different methods... digital elevation model (DEM) of a potato field in central Sweden. Elevation data were registered Source: Harrie, Lars -...

176

Smart Parking Linked to Transit: Lessons Learned from the San Francisco Bay Area Field Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LINKED TO TRANSIT: LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE SAN FRANCISCOmonth on average. Key lessons learned include that it wouldof the field test, and lessons learned. Key Words: Smart

Shaheen, Susan; Kemmerer, Charlene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

178

I(DDQ) testing of field programmable gate arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vectors needed are significantly less than for a voltage-based testing technique. All components in the FPGA chip except the configuration logic are considered. The resources consist of three parts: configurable logic blocks (CLBs), input/output blocks...

Zhao, Lan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Description and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Information Systems (EIS) and Energy Management andstudy used their existing EIS systems for the Auto-DR test.different types of EMCS and EIS systems, they were ďunifiedĒ

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Project CRAFT: A Test Bed for Demonstrating the Real Time Acquisition and Archival of WSR-88D Base  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the long-term needs for WSR-88D base data archival, and in light of the compelling need for real time. The initial test bed of six radars, located in and around Oklahoma, has been delivering real time base data to substantial improvements in the identification and short-term warning of hazardous local weather (e.g., Crum

Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Field demonstration of optimized variable speed compressor and condenser fan control for commercial refrigeration systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demonstration project discussed in this report consisted of two separate programs intended to examine methods of implementing variable-frequency drives (VFDs) to increase the efficiency of supermarket refrigeration racks. The first program examined the optimum control strategy for minimizing the power consumption of medium-temperature parallel compressor racks driven by VFDs. The second program, aimed at developing the optimum control strategy for variable-speed control of supermarket condenser fans.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energyís Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

Benson, C.H. [University of WisconsinĖMadison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

183

Defining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering1 by marine cloud brightening2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering1 by marine cloud radiation9 management approach to geoengineering the Earth's climate in order to offset10 anthropogenic deemed successful.17 18 19 20 Keywords: geoengineering, clouds, albedo, field test21 #12;1. Introduction

Wood, Robert

184

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic Anemometers Wiel Wauben R&D Information and Observation Technology, KNMI September 17, 2007 #12;#12;Wind Tunnel and Field Test of Three 2D Sonic.....................................................................................................1 2. Wind sensors

Stoffelen, Ad

185

OIKOS 101: 499504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIKOS 101: 499­504, 2003 Do seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed seedlings in gaps interact? A field test of assumptions in ESS seed size models. ­ Oikos 101: 499­504. ESS for the occupancy of `safe sites' or vegetation gaps. If mortality rates are high and/or frequency-independent, ESS

Silvertown, Jonathan

186

A COMPARISON OF LABORATORY AND FIELD-TEST MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;A COMPARISON OF LABORATORY AND FIELD-TEST MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS William P a heat pump water heater (HPWH). After developing the HPWH, a field-test plan was implemented whereby 20 evaluate this effect. #12;INTRODUCTION Domestic water heaters account for approximately 2.5 EJ (2.4 x 1015

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

187

Removal of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils -- Phase 1: Bench-scale testing. Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address the management of uranium-contaminated soils at Fernald and other DOE sites, the DOE Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program. The USID has five major tasks. These include the development and demonstration of technologies that are able to (1) characterize the uranium in soil, (2) decontaminate or remove uranium from the soil, (3) treat the soil and dispose of any waste, (4) establish performance assessments, and (5) meet necessary state and federal regulations. This report deals with soil decontamination or removal of uranium from contaminated soils. The report was compiled by the USID task group that addresses soil decontamination; includes data from projects under the management of four DOE facilities [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the Savannah River Plant (SRP)]; and consists of four separate reports written by staff at these facilities. The fundamental goal of the soil decontamination task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating waste forms that are difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Emphasis in research was placed more strongly on chemical extraction techniques than physical extraction techniques.

Francis, C. W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

FIELD TESTING & OPTIMIZATION OF CO2/SAND FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These contract efforts involved the demonstration of a unique liquid free stimulation technology which was, at the beginning of these efforts, in 1993 unavailable in the US. The process had been developed, and patented in Canada in 1981, and held promise for stimulating liquid sensitive reservoirs in the US. The technology differs from that conventionally used in that liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), instead of water is the base fluid. The CO{sub 2} is pumped as a liquid and then vaporizes at reservoir conditions, and because no other liquids or chemicals are used, a liquid free fracture is created. The process requires a specialized closed system blender to mix the liquid CO{sub 2} with proppant under pressure. These efforts were funded to consist of up to 21 cost-shared stimulation events. Because of the vagaries of CO{sub 2} supplies, service company support and operator interest only 19 stimulation events were performed in Montana, New Mexico, and Texas. Final reports have been prepared for each of the four demonstration groups, and the specifics of those demonstrations are summarized. A summary of the demonstrations of a novel liquid-free stimulation process which was performed in four groups of ''Candidate Wells'' situated in Crockett Co., TX; San Juan Co., NM; Phillips Co., MT; and Blaine Co., MT. The stimulation process which employs CO{sub 2} as the working fluid and the production responses were compared with those from wells treated with conventional stimulation technologies, primarily N{sub 2} foam, excepting those in Blaine Co., MT where the reservoir pressure is too low to clean up spent stimulation liquids. A total of 19 liquid-free CO{sub 2}/sand stimulations were performed in 16 wells and the production improvements were generally uneconomic.

Raymond L. Mazza

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on fuel economy was determined, either through on-road testing or full-size wind tunnel testing. All of the manufacturers worked with devices and systems that offer practical solutions to reduce aerodynamic drag, accounting for functionality, durability, cost effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability. The project team members and their roles and responsibilities are shown in Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2 shows the Phase I and II project schedules for all four projects and associated management activities.

Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Next Generation Fast RF Interlock Module and ATCA Adapter for ILC High Availability RF Test Station Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High availability interlocks and controls are required for the ILC (International Linear Collider) L-Band high power RF stations. A new F3 (Fast Fault Finder) VME module has been developed to process both fast and slow interlocks using FPGA logic to detect the interlock trip excursions. This combination eliminates the need for separate PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) control of slow interlocks. Modules are chained together to accommodate as many inputs as needed. In the next phase of development the F3's will be ported to the new industry standard ATCA (Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture) crate (shelf) via a specially designed VME adapter module with IPMI (Intelligent Platform Management Interface). The goal is to demonstrate auto-failover and hot-swap for future partially redundant systems.

Larsen, R

2009-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

191

Geologic Sequestration of CO2 in Deep, Unmineable Coalbeds: An Integrated Researdh and Commercial-Scale Field Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Coal-Seq consortium is a government-industry collaborative consortium with the objective of advancing industry's understanding of complex coalbed methane and gas shale reservoir behavior in the presence of multi-component gases via laboratory experiments, theoretical model development and field validation studies. This will allow primary recovery, enhanced recovery and CO{sub 2} sequestration operations to be commercially enhanced and/or economically deployed. The project was initially launched in 2000 as a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored investigation into CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coalseams. The initial project accomplished a number of important objectives, which mainly revolved around performing baseline experimental studies, documenting and analyzing existing field projects, and establishing a global network for technology exchange. The results from that Phase have been documented in a series of reports which are publicly available. An important outcome of the initial phase was that serious limitations were uncovered in our knowledge of reservoir behavior when CO{sub 2} is injected into coal. To address these limitations, the project was extended in 2005 as a government-industry collaborative consortium. Selected accomplishments from this phase have included the identification and/or development of new models for multi-component sorption and diffusion, laboratory studies of coal geomechanical and permeability behavior with CO{sub 2} injection, additional field validation studies, and continued global technology exchange. Further continuation of the consortium is currently being considered. Some of the topics that have been identified for investigation include further model development/refinement related to multicomponent equations-of-state, sorption and diffusion behavior, geomechanical and permeability studies, technical and economic feasibility studies for major international coal basins, the extension of the work to gas shale reservoirs, and continued global technology exchange.

Scott Reeves; George Koperna

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

Moreno, J.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Analysis of potential self-guarantee tests for demonstrating financial assurance by non-profit colleges, universities, and hospitals and by business firms that do not issue bonds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on December 29, 1993, promulgated self-guarantee requirements that materials licensees may use to demonstrate financial assurance for decommissioning costs. However, nonprofit colleges and universities, nonprofit hospitals, and for-profit firms that do not issue bonds are currently precluded, by their unique accounting and financial reporting systems, or by other features of their business practices, from using the financial tests for self-guarantors adopted by the NRC. This Report evaluates several alternative financial tests that might serve as the basis for self-guarantee by these three categories of licensees.

Bailey, P.; Dean, C.; Collier, J.; Dasappa, V.; Goldberg, W. [ICF, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ON THE DETECTION AND TRACKING OF SPACE DEBRIS USING THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY. I. SIMULATIONS AND TEST OBSERVATIONS DEMONSTRATE FEASIBILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency interferometric radio telescope, operating in the benign radio frequency environment of remote Western Australia. The MWA is the low-frequency precursor to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and is the first of three SKA precursors to be operational, supporting a varied science mission ranging from the attempted detection of the Epoch of Reionization to the monitoring of solar flares and space weather. In this paper we explore the possibility that the MWA can be used for the purposes of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). In particular we propose that the MWA can be used as an element of a passive radar facility operating in the frequency range 87.5-108 MHz (the commercial FM broadcast band). In this scenario the MWA can be considered the receiving element in a bi-static radar configuration, with FM broadcast stations serving as non-cooperative transmitters. The FM broadcasts propagate into space, are reflected off debris in Earth orbit, and are received at the MWA. The imaging capabilities of the MWA can be used to simultaneously detect multiple pieces of space debris, image their positions on the sky as a function of time, and provide tracking data that can be used to determine orbital parameters. Such a capability would be a valuable addition to Australian and global SSA assets, in terms of southern and eastern hemispheric coverage. We provide a feasibility assessment of this proposal, based on simple calculations and electromagnetic simulations, that shows that the detection of sub-meter size debris should be possible (debris radius of >0.5 m to ?1000 km altitude). We also present a proof-of-concept set of observations that demonstrate the feasibility of the proposal, based on the detection and tracking of the International Space Station via reflected FM broadcast signals originating in southwest Western Australia. These observations broadly validate our calculations and simulations. We discuss some significant challenges that need to be addressed in order to turn the feasible concept into a robust operational capability for SSA. The aggregate received power due to reflections off space debris in the FM band is equivalent to a <1 mJy increase in the background confusion noise for the long integrations needed for Epoch of Reionization experiments, which is insignificant.

Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Kennewell, J.; Arcus, W.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Emrich, D.; Herne, D.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lynch, M.; Ord, S. M.; Waterson, M. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Kaplan, D. L. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee (United States); McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bell, M.; Gaensler, B. M. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), Sydney (Australia); Smith, C. [Electro Optic Systems Pty Ltd, Canberra (Australia); Zhang, K. [RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Barnes, D. G., E-mail: s.tingay@curtin.edu.au [Monash e-Research Centre, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); and others

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Field Tests with Corn at College Station and Beeville.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . 4.13 4.69 2.87 * 4.04 2.33 5.33 1.77 2.62 4.43 R ain fa ll in inches for J u ly .................. 2.47 .45 1.36 .75 .45 1.64 1.51 .48 1.45 2.60 Rain fa ll in inches for A u gu stf .......... 1.19 .75 .09 3.99 1.85 7.01 2.81 .60 4.68 .21 * Data... inches in the drill. 2. V arie ty and D istance Test?Embracing 5 varieties, th e d istance varying between rows from 3 feet to 5 feet, and 2 1-2 feet to 3 feet in the drill. SUMMARY OF RESULTS. COLLEGE STATION. Varieties?W ith th e varie...

Pittuck, B. C.; Connell, J. H.

1898-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Field testing of new multilateral drilling and completion technology at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has played an important role in bringing new multilateral well technology to the marketplace. Multilateral technology is more complex than most new technologies being brought to the oilfield. It is very difficult to test new designs in the laboratory or conventional test wells. They must be tested downhole in specialized wells to work out design and procedural details. Most of the applications for multilateral technology are in high cost drilling areas, such as offshore or in remote, environmentally sensitive areas. For this reason, opportunities for testing the new technology in the course of routine drilling and completion operations are scarce. Operators are not willing to risk expensive rig time, or losing a wellbore itself, on a test. RMOTC offers a neutral site where the technology can be tested in a relatively low cost environment. There are two drilling rigs and three workover and completion rigs available. Most associated services such as warehouse, roustabouts, backhoe, welders, and mechanics are also available on site, while specialized oilfield services and machine shops are available in nearby Casper. Technologies such as the hollow whipstock, adjustable stabilizer, downhole kickoff assembly, single trip sidetrack tool, stacked multidrain system, rotary steerable systems, and procedures for abandoning an open hole lateral have benefited through the use of RMOTC`s facilities. This paper details the capabilities of the new technologies and the benefits of testing them in a real oilfield environment before taking them to market.

Giangiacomo, L.A. [Fluor Daniel NPOSR, Inc., Casper, WY (United States). Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Laboratory and field-scale test methodology for reliable characterization of solidified/stabilized hazardous wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A methodology for flow through leach testing is proposed and discussed and preliminary testing using strontium doped cement based S/S samples is presented. The complementary and necessary characterization of the S/S matrix before and after testing is discussed and placed in perspective to the total evaluation of the laboratory-field scale leach testing for predicting long term performance and S/S technology design and improvement.

Gray, K.E.; Holder, J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for Earth Sciences and Engineering; Mollah, M.Y.A.; Hess, T.R.; Vempati, R.K.; Cocke, D.L. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Field Test Best Practices: A Dynamic Web Tool for Practical Guidance  

Energy Savers [EERE]

b y t he A lliance f or S ustainable E nergy, L LC. Field Test Best Practices A dynamic web tool for practical guidance BA Webinar Lieko Earle & Bethany Sparn March 18, 2015...

202

Field tests and new design procedure for laterally loaded drilled shafts in clay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIELD TESTS AND NEW DESIGN PROCEDURE FOR LATERALLY LOADED DRILLED SHAFTS IN CLAY A Thesis by l1ARK WILLIAM BIERSCHWALE Submitted to ihe Graduate College Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Civil Engineering FIELD TESTS AND NEW DESIGN PROCEDURE FOR LATERALLY LOADED DRILLED SHAFTS IN CLAY A Thesis by NARK WILLIAM BIERSCHWALE Approved as to style and content by: Harry M. Coyle - Chairman...

Bierschwale, Mark W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Technical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie unmeasured because of the time required to clip plots and process samples, as well as limited access or proximity to a drying oven. We tested the digital photography biomass estimation technique for measuring

Morrison, Lloyd W.

204

GC GRAVITY Astrometry GYOTO Simulation Perspective Conclusion Testing strong-field general relativity at the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GC GRAVITY Astrometry GYOTO Simulation Perspective Conclusion Testing strong-field general relativity at the galactic center with the GRAVITY instrument Seminar - December 15th, 2010 Frédéric VINCENT1/34 Frédéric VINCENT Testing GR at the galactic center #12;GC GRAVITY Astrometry GYOTO Simulation Perspective

Gourgoulhon, Eric

205

Novel Cleanup Agents Designed Exclusively for Oil Field Membrane Filtration Systems Low Cost Field Demonstrations of Cleanup Agents in Controlled Experimental Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of our project is to develop innovative processes and novel cleaning agents for water treatment facilities designed to remove fouling materials and restore micro-filter and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane performance. This project is part of Texas A&M University's comprehensive study of the treatment and reuse of oilfield brine for beneficial purposes. Before waste water can be used for any beneficial purpose, it must be processed to remove contaminants, including oily wastes such as residual petroleum hydrocarbons. An effective way of removing petroleum from brines is the use of membrane filters to separate oily waste from the brine. Texas A&M and its partners have developed highly efficient membrane treatment and RO desalination for waste water including oil field produced water. We have also developed novel and new cleaning agents for membrane filters utilizing environmentally friendly materials so that the water from the treatment process will meet U.S. EPA drinking water standards. Prototype micellar cleaning agents perform better and use less clean water than alternate systems. While not yet optimized, the new system restores essentially complete membrane flux and separation efficiency after cleaning. Significantly the amount of desalinated water that is required to clean the membranes is reduced by more than 75%.

David Burnett; Harold Vance

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Field Testing of Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test wall built with phase change material (PCM)-enhanced loose-fill cavity insulation was monitored for a period of about a year in the warm-humid climate of Charleston, South Carolina. The test wall was divided into various sections, one of which contained only loose-fill insulation and served as a control for comparing and evaluating the wall sections with the PCM-enhanced insulation. This report summarizes the findings of the field test.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

GATEWAY Demonstrations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE GATEWAY demonstrations showcase high-performance LED products for general illumination in a variety of commercial and residential applications. Demonstration results provide real-world experience and data on state-of-the-art solid-state lighting (SSL) product performance and cost effectiveness. These results connect DOE technology procurement efforts with large-volume purchasers and provide buyers with reliable data on product performance.

208

Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by ĺ of a mile toward the north and is located over Ĺ mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

Glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium-content low-level, radioactive, liquid wastes: Phase 1, SBS demonstration with simulated low-level waste. Final test report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attached vendor report was prepared for Westinghouse Hanford Company by Babcock & Wilcox as documentation of the Phase I Final Test Report, Cyclone Combustion Melter Demonstration.

Holmes, M.J.; Scotto, M.V.; Shiao, S.Y. [Babcock & Wilcox, Alliance, OH (United States) Research Center

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

SUPPORT FOR THE COMPLETION OF THE ARM PROJECT AND DEVELOPMENT OF A FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE GWIS MODEL FOR A VIRTUAL ENTERPRISE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strategic Technology Resources, L.L.C. (STR) provided work for Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in response to Request for Proposal 005BZ0019-35. The objectives of the work in this project were to: (1) support the completion of the Advanced Reservoir Management (ARM) cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) LA9502037, and (2) support the development of a field demonstration of the LANL-developed Global Weapons Information System (GWIS) model for virtual enterprises. The second objective was contingent upon DOE approval of the Advanced Information Management (AIM) CRADA. At the request of the LANL Technical Representative, the project was granted a no-cost extension to November 30, 1999. As part of the project, STR provided managerial support for the ARM CRADA by: (1) assessing the data resources of the participating companies, (2) facilitating the transfer of technical data to LANL, (3) preparing reports, (4) managing communications between the parties to the ARM CRADA, and (5) assisting with the dissemination of information between the parties to technical professional societies and trade associations. The first phase of the current project was to continue to engage subcontractors to perform tasks in the ARM CRADA for which LANL expertise was lacking. All of the ARM field studies required of the project were completed, and final reports for all of the project studies are appended to this final report. The second phase of the current project was to support the field demonstration of the GWIS model for virtual enterprises in an oilfield setting. STR developed a hypertext Webpage that describes the concept and implementation of a virtual enterprise for reservoir management in the petroleum industry. Contents of the hypertext document are included in this report on the project.

F. DAVID MARTIN; MARK B. MURPHY - STRATEGIC TECHNOLOGY RESOURCES, LLC

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Results from field tests of the one-dimensional Time-Encoded Imaging System.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of field experiments were undertaken to evaluate the performance of the one dimensional time encoded imaging system. The significant detection of a Cf252 fission radiation source was demonstrated at a stand-off of 100 meters. Extrapolations to different quantities of plutonium equivalent at different distances are made. Hardware modifications to the system for follow on work are suggested.

Marleau, Peter; Brennan, James S.; Brubaker, Erik

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Propagation of Test Particles and Scalar Fields on a Class of Wormhole Space-Times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we consider the problem of test particles and test scalar fields propagating on the background of a class of wormhole space-times. For test particles, we solve for arbitrary causal geodesics in terms of integrals which are solved numerically. These integrals are parametrized by the radius and shape of the wormhole throat as well as the initial conditions of the geodesic trajectory. In terms of these parameters, we compute the conditions for the geodesic to traverse the wormhole, to be reflected by the wormhole's potential or to be captured on an unstable bound orbit at the wormhole's throat. These causal geodesics are visualized by embedding plots in Euclidean space in cylindrical coordinates. For test scalar fields, we compute transmission coefficients and quasi-normal modes for arbitrary coupling of the field to the background geometry in the WKB approximation. We show that there always exists an unstable mode whenever the coupling constant is greater than 1/2. This analysis is interesting since recent computations of self-interactions of a static scalar field in wormhole space-times reveal some anomalous dependence on the coupling constant, principally, the existence of an infinite discrete set of poles. We show that this pathological behavior of the self-field is an artifact of computing the interaction for values of the coupling constant that do not lie in the domain of stability.

Peter Taylor

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

214

A Test of HTS Power Cable in a Sweeping Magnetic Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Short sample HTS power cable composed of multiple 344C-2G strands and designed to energize a fast-cycling dipole magnet was exposed to a sweeping magnetic field in the (2-20) T/s ramping rate. The B-field orientation toward the HTS strands wide surface was varied from 0{sup 0} to 10{sup 0}, in steps of 1{sup 0}. The test arrangement allowed measurement of the combined hysteresis and eddy current power losses. For the validity of these measurements, the power losses of a short sample cable composed of multiple LTS wire strands were also performed to compare with the known data. The test arrangement of the power cable is described, and the test results are compared with the projections for the eddy and hysteresis power losses using the fine details of the test cable structures.

Piekarz, H.; Hays, S.; Blowers, J.; Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

215

Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

216

Office of Technology Development FY 1993 program summary: Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes significant FY93 programmatic information and accomplishments relevant to the individual activities within the Office of Technology Development Program for Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E). A brief discussion of the mission of the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Technology Development is presented. An overview is presented of the major problem areas confronting DOE. These problem areas include: groundwater and soils cleanup; waste retrieval and processing; and pollution prevention. The organizational elements within EM are highlighted. An EM-50 Funding Summary for FY92 and FY93 is also provided. RDDT&E programs are discussed and their key problem areas are summarized. Three salient program-formulating concepts are explained. They are: Integrated Demonstrations, Integrated Programs, and the technology window of opportunity. Detailed information for each of the programs within RDDT&E is presented and includes a fact sheet, a list of technical task plans and an accomplishments and objectives section.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Laboratory and Modeling Evaluations in Support of Field Testing for Desiccation at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau includes testing of the desiccation technology as a potential technology to be used in conjunction with surface infiltration control to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. Laboratory and modeling efforts were conducted to investigate technical uncertainties related to the desiccation process and its impact on contaminant transport. This information is intended to support planning, operation, and interpretation of a field test for desiccation in the Hanford Central Plateau.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Ward, Anderson L.

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

Steam tracer experiment at the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water plays an important role in in-situ coal gasification. To better understand this role, we conducted a steam tracer test during the later stages of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test. Deuterium oxide was used as the tracer. This report describes the tracer test and the analysis of the data obtained. The analysis indicates that at Hoe Creek the injected steam interacts with a large volume of water as it passes through the underground system. We hypothesize that this water is undergoing continual reflux in the underground system, resulting in a tracer response typical of a well-stirred tank.

Thorsness, C.B.

1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

219

Field evaluation of a standard test method for screening fuels in soils at a railroad site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D-5831-95 is a standard test method for screening fuel contamination in soils. This method uses low-toxicity chemicals and can be used to screen organic-rich soils. It is also fast, easy, and inexpensive to perform. The screening method calls for extracting a sample of soil with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) following treatment with calcium oxide. The resulting extract is filtered, and the ultraviolet (UV) absorbance of the extract is measured at 254 nm. Depending on the information available concerning the contaminant fuel type and availability of the contaminant fuel for calibration, the method can be used to determine the approximate concentration of fuel contamination, an estimated value of fuel contamination, or an indication of the presence or absence of fuel contamination. Fuels containing aromatic compounds, such as diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as other aromatic-containing hydrocarbon materials, such as motor oil, crude oil, and coal oil can be determined. ASTM Method D-5831 was evaluated by using the method to screen soil samples at an actual field site. Soil contaminated with weathered and fresh diesel fuel was sampled and tested for its contaminant concentration. Soil samples were screened in the field using ASTM Method D-5831 and a portable soil test kit. In addition, splits of the soil samples were analyzed in the laboratory using an extractable petroleum hydrocarbon method. Field and laboratory data were compared and show good correlation between field screening and laboratory results.

Schabron, J.F.; Sorini, S.S. [Western Research Institute, Laramie, WY (United States); Butler, E.L. [Gradient Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States); Frisbie, S. [Johnson Co., Inc., Montpelier, VT (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Defining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering by marine cloud brightening  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defining success and limits of field experiments to test geoengineering by marine cloud brightening radiation management approach to geoengineering the Earth's climate in order to offset anthropogenic global) approach for geoengineering the Earth's climate to offset anthropogenic global warming (Latham 1990

Wood, Robert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

FOCUS: HARSH ENVIRONMENT MASS SPECTROMETRY Field Testing of Lake Water Chemistry with a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOCUS: HARSH ENVIRONMENT MASS SPECTROMETRY Field Testing of Lake Water Chemistry with a Portable waters. KOALA is a backpackable MS operated from above the water surface, in which samples are pumped for temperature control of a membrane inlet when steep thermal gradients are present in a water body, as well

Entekhabi, Dara

222

Application of Direct Tension Testing to Field Samples to Investigate the Effects of HMA Aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

binder testing. Findings show that oxidative aging has an impact on the stiffness and performance of HMA. Chip seal surface treatments can extend the life of the pavement, but their affects are found primarily at the surface. Two additional field sites...

Lawrence, James 1973-

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

223

PLANT RESISTANCE Field and Storage Testing Bt Potatoes for Resistance to Potato  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANT RESISTANCE Field and Storage Testing Bt Potatoes for Resistance to Potato Tuberworm Lansing, MI 48824 J. Econ. Entomol. 97(4): 1425√ź1431 (2004) ABSTRACT Potato tuberworm, Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller), is the most serious insect pest of potatoes worldwide. The introduction of the Bacillus

Douches, David S.

224

Lessons from two field tests on pipeline damage detection using acceleration measurement (Invited Paper)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons from two field tests on pipeline damage detection using acceleration measurement (Invited, Irvine, CA USA 92697-2700 ABSTRACT Early detection of pipeline damages has been highlighted in water supply industry. Water pressure change in pipeline due to a sudden rupture causes pipe to vibrate

Shinozuka, Masanobu

225

Evolving Einstein's Field Equations with Matter: The ``Hydro without Hydro'' Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We include matter sources in Einstein's field equations and show that our recently proposed 3+1 evolution scheme can stably evolve strong-field solutions. We insert in our code known matter solutions, namely the Oppenheimer-Volkoff solution for a static star and the Oppenheimer-Snyder solution for homogeneous dust sphere collapse to a black hole, and evolve the gravitational field equations. We find that we can evolve stably static, strong-field stars for arbitrarily long times and can follow dust sphere collapse accurately well past black hole formation. These tests are useful diagnostics for fully self-consistent, stable hydrodynamical simulations in 3+1 general relativity. Moreover, they suggest a successive approximation scheme for determining gravitational waveforms from strong-field sources dominated by longitudinal fields, like binary neutron stars: approximate quasi-equilibrium models can serve as sources for the transverse field equations, which can be evolved without having to re-solve the hydrodynamical equations (``hydro without hydro'').

Thomas W. Baumgarte; Scott A. Hughes; Stuart L. Shapiro

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

226

Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is the transcript of the Building America webinar, Field Test Best Practices, BEopt, and the National Residential Efficiency Measures Database, held on March 18, 2015.

227

SEISMIC RESPONSE PREDICTION OF NUPEC'S FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES WITH ADJACENT BUILDING EFFECT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis computer codes for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model tests to address the dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effect on the seismic response of NPP structures built in close proximity to each other. The program provided field data to study the methodologies commonly associated with seismic analyses considering the DCI effect. As part of a collaborative program between the United States and Japan on seismic issues related to NPP applications, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored a program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform independent seismic analyses which applied common analysis procedures to predict the building response to recorded earthquake events for the test models with DCI effect. In this study, two large-scale DCI test model configurations were analyzed: (1) twin reactor buildings in close proximity and (2) adjacent reactor and turbine buildings. This paper describes the NUPEC DCI test models, the BNL analysis using the SASSI 2000 program, and comparisons between the BNL analysis results and recorded field responses. To account for large variability in the soil properties, the conventional approach of computing seismic responses with the mean, mean plus and minus one-standard deviation soil profiles is adopted in the BNL analysis and the three sets of analysis results were used in the comparisons with the test data. A discussion is also provided in the paper to address (1) the capability of the analysis methods to capture the DCI effect, and (2) the conservatism of the practice for considering soil variability in seismic response analysis for adjacent NPP structures.

XU,J.COSTANTINO,C.HOFMAYER,C.ALI,S.

2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

228

Field Test Design Simulations of Pore-Water Extraction for the SX Tank Farm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proof of principle test of pore water extraction is being performed by Washington River Protection Solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection. This test is being conducted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989) Milestone M 045-20, and is described in RPP-PLAN-53808, 200 West Area Tank Farms Interim Measures Investigation Work Plan. To support design of this test, numerical simulations were conducted to help define equipment and operational parameters. The modeling effort builds from information collected in laboratory studies and from field characterization information collected at the test site near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. Numerical simulations were used to evaluate pore-water extraction performance as a function of the test site properties and for the type of extraction well configuration that can be constructed using the direct-push installation technique. Output of simulations included rates of water and soil-gas production as a function of operational conditions for use in supporting field equipment design. The simulations also investigated the impact of subsurface heterogeneities in sediment properties and moisture distribution on pore-water extraction performance. Phenomena near the extraction well were also investigated because of their importance for pore-water extraction performance.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reseach and development of energy-efficient appliance motor-compressors. Final report. Volume III: development and field test plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By means of a program of theoretical analysis, development, and testing of samples, it was found that significant improvements could be made in the energy efficiency ratio (EER) of hermetic motor-compressor assemblies. The high efficiency designs resulting from the development program are believed to be suitable for quantity production without excessive facilities cost, to have acceptable levels of performance and reliability, and to be producible at costs which will make them commercially attractive. The steps involved in the development of the improved compressor design are described in detail. The major purpose of Phase II of the project is to verify the reliability of the high-efficiency designs by means of a field demonstration program.

Nelson, R.T.; MacCarthy, P.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Insert Coil Test for HEP High Field Magnets Using YBCO Coated Conductor Tapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 30-50 T. In this paper we present progress in insert coil development using commercially available YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} Coated Conductor. Technological aspects covered in the development, including coil geometry, insulation, manufacturing process and testing are summarized and discussed. Test results of double pancake coils operated in liquid nitrogen and liquid helium are presented and compared with the performance of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} tape short samples.

Lombardo, V.; Barzi, E.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Field Test of Advanced Duct-Sealing Technologies Within the Weatherization Assistance Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test of an aerosol-spray duct-sealing technology and a conventional, best-practice approach was performed in 80 homes to determine the efficacy and programmatic needs of the duct-sealing technologies as applied in the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program. The field test was performed in five states: Iowa, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. The study found that, compared with the best-practice approach, the aerosol-spray technology is 50% more effective at sealing duct leaks and can potentially reduce labor time and costs for duct sealing by 70%, or almost 4 crew-hours. Further study to encourage and promote use of the aerosol-spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program is recommended. A pilot test of full production weatherization programs using the aerosol-spray technology is recommended to develop approaches for integrating this technology with other energy conservation measures and minimizing impacts on weatherization agency logistics. In order to allow or improve adoption of the aerosol spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program, issues must be addressed concerning equipment costs, use of the technology under franchise arrangements with Aeroseal, Inc. (the holders of an exclusive license to use this technology), software used to control the equipment, safety, and training. Application testing of the aerosol-spray technology in mobile homes is also recommended.

Ternes, MP

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Duplex stainless steel corrosion behavior during acidification: Laboratory versus field test results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory tests and field acidizing operations have been conducted on a 25% Cr-140 ksi duplex stainless steel utilizing a 90% HCl 15% + 10% CHs{sub 3}COOH acid mixture inhibited with a commercial package. Laboratory tests proved that the duplex stainless steel can be effectively protected in the adopted experimental conditions at 150 C. Examination of parts of tubings extracted from a real completion showed appreciable corrosion attack only in the sections of the string placed at higher depth (operating temperatures {approximately}130 C): in these cases the estimated rates of corrosion attack can be about one order of magnitude higher than that foreseeable on the basis of laboratory tests. However even in these cases the severity of attack is maintained within acceptable limits.

Cheldi, T.; Obracaj, I. [AGIP S.p.A. CORM, San Donato Milanese (Italy). Corrosion and Materials Technologies Dept.; Cigada, A.; Cabrini, M. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica Applicata; Vicentini, B.; Rondelli, G. [C.N.R.-I.T.M., Milano (Italy)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Compatibility of Einstein minimally coupled self interacting scalar field theory with the solar system tests of gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the compatibility of the Einstein minimally coupled self-interacting scalar field theory with the local tests of gravity. We find that apart from the trivial case of the Schwarzschild-de Sitter solution with constant scalar field the theory does not admit any other static solution, which is consistent with the solar system tests of gravity.

A. Bhadra

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

Developing an Innovative Field Expedient Fracture Toughness Testing Protocol for Concrete Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spiral Notch Torsion Fracture Toughness Test (SNTT) was developed recently to determine the intrinsic fracture toughness (KIC) of structural materials. The SNTT system operates by applying pure torsion to uniform cylindrical specimens with a notch line that spirals around the specimen at a 45? pitch. KIC values are obtained with the aid of a three-dimensional finite-element computer code, TOR3D-KIC. The SNTT method is uniquely suitable for testing a wide variety of materials used extensively in pressure vessel and piping structural components and weldments. Application of the method to metallic, ceramic, and graphite materials has been demonstrated. One important characteristic of SNTT is that neither a fatigue precrack or a deep notch are required for the evaluation of brittle materials, which significantly reduces the sample size requirement. In this paper we report results for a Portland cement-based mortar to demonstrate applicability of the SNTT method to cementitious materials. The estimated KIC of the tested mortar samples with compressive strength of 34.45 MPa was found to be 0.19 MPa m.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Liu, Ken C [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) and nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison's Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0[sub 2] removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0[sub 2] emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

Cleary, M.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test procedure which could lead to the certification of building materials and systems as flood damage resistant.

Aglan, H.

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

239

Residual-oil-saturation-technology test, Bell Creek Field, Montana. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test was conducted of the technology available to measure residual oil saturation following waterflood secondary oil recovery processes. The test was conducted in a new well drilled solely for that purpose, located immediately northwest of the Bell Creek Micellar Polymer Pilot. The area where the test was conducted was originally drilled during 1968, produced by primary until late 1970, and was under line drive waterflood secondary recovery until early 1976, when the area was shut in at waterflood depletion. This report presents the results of tests conducted to determine waterflood residual oil saturation in the Muddy Sandstone reservoir. The engineering techniques used to determine the magnitude and distribution of the remaining oil saturation included both pressure and sidewall cores, conventional well logs (Dual Laterolog - Micro Spherically Focused Log, Dual Induction Log - Spherically Focused Log, Borehole Compensated Sonic Log, Formation Compensated Density-Compensated Neutron Log), Carbon-Oxygen Logs, Dielectric Logs, Nuclear Magnetism Log, Thermal Decay Time Logs, and a Partitioning Tracer Test.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Development and Field Testing of a High Temperature Ceramic Recuperator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for this demonstration unit. One of the goals of the design process for tub ular ceramic heat exchangers was to minimize the number of tubes and hence, tube-to-header plate joints. Sohio/Carborundum had fabricated internally finned tubes with a cruciform pattern out... of Ilexoloy-SA by an extrusion process. Hexoloy-SA is SOhio/Carborundum's sintered alpha-silicon carbide material. This was identified as the most promising tube material during the prototype recuperator fab "ication and testing. A photograph of a sample...

Childs, F. W.; Sohal, M. S.

242

Design and field test of collaborative tools in the service of an innovative organization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the design process of collaborative tools, based on ICT, aiming at supporting the tasks of the team that manages an outage of an energy production plant for maintenance activities. The design process follows an iterative and multidisciplinary approach, based on a collective tasks modeling of the outage management team in the light of Socio Organizational and Human (SOH) field studies, and on the state of the art of ICT. Field test of the collaborative tools designed plays a great place in this approach, allowing taking into account the operational world but involves also some risks which must be managed. To implement tools on all the production plants, we build an 'operational concept' with a level of description which authorizes the evolution of tools and allows some local adaptations. The field tests provide lessons on the ICT topics. For examples: the status of the remote access tools, the potential of use of a given information input by an actor for several individual and collective purposes, the actors perception of the tools meaning, and the requirements for supporting the implementation of change. (authors)

De Beler, N.; Parfouru, S. [EdF R and D -Industrial Risk Management Dept., Human Factors Group, 1, avenue du General de Gaulle, 92 141 Clamart Cedex (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground coal gasification data base. [US DOE-supported field tests; data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of field projects to determine the feasibility of converting the nation's vast coal reserves into a clean efficient energy source via underground coal gasification (UCG). Due to these tests, a significant data base of process information has developed covering a range of coal seams (flat subbituminous, deep flat bituminous and steeply dipping subbituminous) and processing techniques. A summary of all DOE-sponsored tests to data is shown. The development of UCG on a commercial scale requires involvement from both the public and private sectors. However, without detailed process information, accurate assessments of the commercial viability of UCG cannot be determined. To help overcome this problem the DOE has directed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a UCG data base containing raw and reduced process data from all DOE-sponsored field tests. It is our intent to make the data base available upon request to interested parties, to help them assess the true potential of UCG.

Cena, R. J.; Thorsness, C. B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

244

HFC supermarket refrigeration demonstration. Phases 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HFC Supermarket Refrigeration Demonstration tested and evaluated HFC refrigerants in a new Shop `n Save supermarket in Glens Falls, New York. This project included laboratory testing of HFC refrigerants for medium- and low-temperature application, the design of a supermarket refrigeration system to accommodate the new refrigerants, installation, start-up, and field monitoring.

Borhanian, H.; Rafuse, L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Field tests of probes for detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of electrochemical corrosion rate (ECR) probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. Results and interpretation will be reported from four different field tests. Flange and flush-mount probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different orientations at a natural gas plant. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions in a gas transmission pipeline. The environments consisted of 2 different levels of humidified natural gas/organic/water mixtures removed from natural gas, and the environments at the 6 and 12 o'clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Cayard, Michael S. (Intercorr International Inc.); Kane, Russell D. (Intercorr International Inc.); Meidinger, Brian (RMOTC-DOE)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

2-D Stellar Evolution Code Including Arbitrary Magnetic Fields. I. Mathematical Techniques and Test Cases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A high-precision two-dimensional stellar evolution code has been developed for studying solar variability due to structural changes produced by varying internal magnetic fields of arbitrary configurations. Specifically, we are interested in modeling the effects of a dynamo-type field on the detailed internal structure and on the global parameters of the Sun. The high precision is required both to model very small solar changes (of order of $10^{-4}$) and short time scales (or order of one year). It is accomplished by using the mass coordinate to replace the radial coordinate, by using fixed and adjustable time steps, a realistic stellar atmosphere, elements diffusion, and by adjusting the grid points. We have also built into the code the potential to subsequently include rotation and turbulence. The current code has been tested for several cases, including its ability to reproduce the 1-D results.

L. H. Li; P. Ventura; S. Basu; S. Sofia; P. Demarque

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

247

Comparing State-Space Multivariable Controls to Multi-SISO Controls for Load Reduction of Drivetrain-Coupled Modes on Wind Turbines through Field-Testing: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the structure of an ongoing controller comparison experiment at NREL's National Wind Technology Center; the design process for the two controllers compared in this phase of the experiment, and initial comparison results obtained in field-testing. The intention of the study is to demonstrate the advantage of using modern multivariable methods for designing control systems for wind turbines versus conventional approaches. We will demonstrate the advantages through field-test results from experimental turbines located at the NWTC. At least two controllers are being developed side-by-side to meet an incrementally increasing number of turbine load-reduction objectives. The first, a multiple single-input, single-output (m-SISO) approach, uses separately developed decoupled and classicially tuned controllers, which is, to the best of our knowledge, common practice in the wind industry. The remaining controllers are developed using state-space multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) techniques to explicity account for coupling between loops and to optimize given known frequency structures of the turbine and disturbance. In this first publication from the study, we present the structure of the ongoing controller comparison experiment, the design process for the two controllers compared in this phase, and initial comparison results obtained in field-testing.

Fleming, P. A.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Wright, A. D.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Permeation Dispersal of Treatment Agents for In Situ Remediation in Low Permeability Media: 1. Field Studies in Unconfined Test Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chlorocarbons like trichloroethylene (TCE) are common contaminants of concern at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and industrial sites across the US and abroad. These contaminants of concern are present in source areas and in soil and ground water plumes as dissolved or sorbed phase constituents as well as dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). These DNAPL compounds can be released to the environment through a variety of means including leaks in storage tanks and transfer lines, spills during transportation, and land treatment of wastes. When DNAPL compounds are present in low permeability media (LPM) like silt and clay layers or deposits, there are major challenges with assessment of their behavior and implementation of effective in situ remediation technologies. This report describes a field demonstration that was conducted at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) Clean Test Site (CTS) to evaluate the feasibility of permeation and dispersal of reagents into LPM. Various reagents and tracers were injected at seven test cells primarily to evaluate the feasibility of delivery, but also to evaluate the effects of the injected reagents on LPM. The various reagents and tracers were injected at the PORTS CTS using a multi-port injection system (MPIS) developed and provided by Hayward Baker Environmental, Inc.

Siegrist, R.L.; Smuin, D.R.; Korte, N.E.; Greene, D.W.; Pickering, D.A.; Lowe, K.S.; Strong-Gunderson, J.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

An evaluation of new asphaltene inhibitors: Laboratory study and field testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three candidate asphaltene inhibitors have been laboratory tested for their effectiveness on a Canadian crude. One inhibitor, an oil-soluble polymeric dispersant developed by Shell Chemicals, showed superior behavior compared to the others: flocculation titrations with n-heptane resulted in an optimum concentration of 1,300 ppm. PVT calculations, however, indicated that the prevailing conditions downhole can be quite favorable with respect to the amount of effective inhibitor compared to the atmospheric laboratory titrations which appear to be quite severe tests. Therefore, lower initial concentrations were recommended for a field trial. The chemical could be continuously injected through a capillary string, thereby avoiding the lost oil production associated with solvent cleaning operations. It has proved to be very effective at concentrations as low as 66 ppm, resulting in both a technically and an economically successful trial.

Bouts, M.N.; Wiersma, R.J.; Muijs, H.M.; Samuel, A.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Test Plan: Phase 1 demonstration of 3-phase electric arc melting furnace technology for vitrifying high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a test plan for the conduct of electric arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384216] is the US Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior, Albany Research Center, Albany, Oregon. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes feed preparation activities and melting of glass with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a 3-phase electric arc (carbon electrode) furnace.

Eaton, W.C. [ed.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Field testing results for the strategic petroleum reserve pipeline corrosion control program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of two studies conducted as part of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Pipeline Corrosion Control Program are reported. These studies focused on evaluation of rotary-applied concrete materials for internal pipeline protection against the erosive and corrosive effects of flowing brine. The study also included evaluation of liners applied by hand on pipe pieces that cannot be lined by rotary methods. Such pipe pieces include tees, elbows and flanged pipe sections. Results are reported from a corrosion survey of 17 different liner formulations tested at the-Big-Rill SPR Site. Testing consisted of electrochemical corrosion rate measurements made on lined pipe sections exposed, in a test manifold, to flowing SPR generated fluids. Testing also involved cumulative immersion exposure where samples were exposed to static site-generated brine for increasing periods of time. Samples were returned to the laboratory for various diagnostic analyses. Results of this study showed that standard calcium silicate concrete (API RP10E) and a rotary calcium aluminate concrete formulation were excellent performers. Hand-lined pipe pieces did not provide as much corrosion protection. The focus of the second part of the study was on further evaluation of the calcium silicate, calcium aluminate and hand-applied liners in actual SPR equipment and service. It was a further objective to assess the practicality of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) for field corrosion monitoring of concrete lined pipe compared to the more well-known linear polarization technique. This study showed that concrete linings reduced the corrosion rate for bare steel from 10 to 15 mils per year to 1 mil per year or less. Again, the hand-applied liners did not provide as much corrosion protection as the rotary-applied liners. The EIS technique was found to be robust for field corrosion measurements. Mechanistic and kinetic corrosion rate data were reliably obtained.

Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; Hinkebein, T.E.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

253

New vertical cryostat for the high field superconducting magnet test station at CERN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the framework of the R and D program for new superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator upgrades, CERN is building a new vertical test station to test high field superconducting magnets of unprecedented large size. This facility will allow testing of magnets by vertical insertion in a pressurized liquid helium bath, cooled to a controlled temperature between 4.2 K and 1.9 K. The dimensions of the cryostat will allow testing magnets of up to 2.5 m in length with a maximum diameter of 1.5 m and a mass of 15 tons. To allow for a faster insertion and removal of the magnets and reducing the risk of helium leaks, all cryogenics supply lines are foreseen to remain permanently connected to the cryostat. A specifically designed 100 W heat exchanger is integrated in the cryostat helium vessel for a controlled cooling of the magnet from 4.2 K down to 1.9 K in a 3 m{sup 3} helium bath. This paper describes the cryostat and its main functions, focusing on features specifically developed for this project. The status of the construction and the plans for assembly and installation at CERN are also presented.

Vande Craen, A.; Atieh, S.; Bajko, M.; Benda, V.; Rijk, G. de; Favre, G.; Giloux, C.; Minginette, P.; Parma, V.; Perret, P.; Pirotte, O.; Ramos, D.; Viret, P. [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, Meyrin 1211, Geneva 23, CH (Switzerland); Hanzelka, P. [Institute of Scientific Instruments of the ASCR, Kralovopolska 147, 612 64 Brno, CZ (Czech Republic)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). ETA and SCE operated the S-10s with the goal of placing 25,000 miles on each vehicle within 1 year, providing an accelerated life-cycle analysis. The testing was performed according to established and published test procedures. The S-10s' average ranges were highest during summer months; changes in ambient temperature from night to day and from season-to-season impacted range by as much as 10 miles. Drivers also noted that excessive use of power during acceleration also had a dramatic effect on vehicle range. The spirited performance of the S-10s created a great temptation to inexperienced electric vehicle drivers to ''have a good time'' and to fully utilize the S-10's acceleration capability. The price of injudicious use of power is greatly reduced range and a long-term reduction in battery life. The range using full-power accelerations followed by rapid deceleration in city driving has been 20 miles or less.

J. Francfort (INEEL); J. Argueta; M. Wehrey (Southern California Edison); D. Karner; L. Tyree (Electric Transportation Applications)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

On-Road and In-Laboratory Testing to Demonstrate Effects of ULSD, B20 and B99 on a Retrofit Urea-SCR Aftertreatment System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emissions changes for a 2005 International tractor operating on low-sulfur diesel and biodiesel in Santa Monica were measured to demonstrate performance and impacts of selective catalytic reduction.

Walkowicz, K.; Na, K.; Robertson, W.; Sahay, K.; Bogdanoff, M.; Weaver, C.; Carlson, R.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Field studies of the potential for wind transport of plutonium- contaminated soils at sites in Areas 6 and 11, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes and documents a series of field experiments carried out in Areas 6 and 11 of the Nevada Test Site in June and July 1994 to determine parameters of boundary layer winds, surface characteristics, and vegetation cover that can be used to predict dust emissions from the affected sites. Aerodynamic roughness of natural sites is determined largely by the lateral cover of the larger and more permanent roughness elements (shrubs). These provide a complete protection of the surface from wind erosion. Studies using a field-portable wind tunnel demonstrated that natural surfaces in the investigated areas of the Nevada Test Site are stable except at very high wind speeds (probably higher than normally occur, except perhaps in dust devils). However, disturbance of silty-clay surfaces by excavation devices and vehicles reduces the entrainment threshold by approximately 50% and makes these areas potentially very susceptible to wind erosion and transport of sediments.

Lancaster, N.; Bamford, R.; Metzger, S. [University and Community Coll. System of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Utility Advanced Turbine System (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration phase 3. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detailed design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Utility Advanced Turbine System (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration -- Phase 3. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detailed design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This report summarizes work accomplished during the period 2Q96.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria north east field in Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tracer and injection tests were performed in the Olkaria North East Field with the objective to reduce uncertainty in the engineering design and to determine the suitability of well OW-704 as a re-injection well for the waste brine from the steam field during production. An organic dye (sodium fluorescein) was injected into well OW-704 as a slug. The tracer returns were observed in well OW-M2 which is 580 m deep, 620 m from well OW-704 and well OW-716 which is 900 m from well OW-704. The other wells on discharge, OW-714, and OW-725 did not show any tracer returns. However, other chemical constituents suggested., that well OW-716 experienced a chemical breakthrough earlier than OW-M2. Tracer return velocities of 0.31 m/hr and 1.3 m/hr were observed. Results of the tracer and injection tests indicate that OW-704 may be used as a re-injection well provided a close monitoring program is put in place.

Karingithi, C.W. [Kenya Power Company Ltd., Naivasha (Kenya)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

3. FIELD DEMONSTRATION STATUS We are currently in the final stages of preparation in the pilot area prior to CO2 injection.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these tests to characterize further the reservoir and develop proper reservoir management strategy has been-well interference test. Stable water injection was initiated in October of 1999 in order to increase the reservoir of a waterflood baseline decline so that all produced oil as a result of CO2 injection can be quantified

Schechter, David S.

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261

Combined cosmological tests of a bivalent tachyonic dark energy scalar field model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A recently investigated tachyonic scalar field dark energy dominated universe exhibits a bivalent future: depending on initial parameters can run either into a de Sitter exponential expansion or into a traversable future soft singularity followed by a contraction phase. We also include in the model (i) a tiny amount of radiation, (ii) baryonic matter ($\\Omega _{b}h^{2}=0.022161$, where the Hubble constant is fixed as $h=0.706$) and (iii) cold dark matter (CDM). Out of a variety of six types of evolutions arising in a more subtle classification, we identify two in which in the past the scalar field effectively degenerates into a dust (its pressure drops to an insignificantly low negative value). These are the evolutions of type IIb converging to de Sitter and type III hitting the future soft singularity. We confront these background evolutions with various cosmological tests, including the supernova type Ia Union 2.1 data, baryon acoustic oscillation distance ratios, Hubble parameter-redshift relation and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) acoustic scale. We determine a subset of the evolutions of both types which at 1$\\sigma $ confidence level are consistent with all of these cosmological tests. At perturbative level we derive the CMB temperature power spectrum to find the best agreement with the Planck data for $\\Omega _{CDM}=0.22$. The fit is as good as for the $\\Lambda $CDM model at high multipoles, but the power remains slightly overestimated at low multipoles, for both types of evolutions. The rest of the CDM is effectively generated by the tachyonic field, which in this sense acts as a combined dark energy and dark matter model.

ZoltŠn Keresztes; LŠszlů Ń. Gergely

2014-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

262

A field test of electromagnetic geophysical techniques for locating simulated in situ mining leach solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Bureau of Mines, The University of Arizona, Sandia National Laboratories, and Zonge Engineering and Research Organization, Inc., conducted cooperative field tests of six electromagnetic (EM) geophysical methods to compare their effectiveness in locating a brine solution simulating in situ leach solution or a high-conductivity plume of contamination. The brine was approximately 160 m below the surface. The testsite was the University's San Xavier experimental mine near Tucson, AZ. Geophysical surveys using surface and surface-borehole, time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) induction; surface controlled-source audiofrequency magnetotellurics (CSAMT); surface-borehole, frequency-domain electromagnetic (FEM) induction; crosshole FEM; and surface magnetic field ellipticity were conducted before and during brine injection. The surface TEM data showed a broad decrease in resistivity. CSAMT measurements with the conventional orientation did not detect the brine, but measurements with another orientation indicated some decrease in resistivity. The surface-borehole and crosshole methods located a known fracture and other fracture zones inferred from borehole induction logs. Surface magnetic field ellipticity data showed a broad decrease in resistivity at depth following brine injection.

Tweeton, D.R.; Hanson, J.C.; Friedel, M.J.; Sternberg, B.K.; Dahl, L.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria East Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents results of a six month Injection and Tracer test done in Olkaria East Geothermal Field The Injection tests show that commencement of injection prior to onset of large drawdown in the reservoir leads to greater sustenance of well production and can reduce well cycling which is a common feature of wells in Olkaria East Field. For cases where injection is started after some drawdown has occurred in the reservoir, injection while leading to improvement of well output can also lead to increase in well cycling which is a non desirable side effect. Tracer tests reveal slow rate of fluid migration (< 5 m/hr). However estimates of the cumulative tracer returns over the period of injection is at least 31% which is large and reveals the danger of late time thermal drawdown and possible loss of production. It is shown in the discussion that the two sets of results are consistent with a reservoir where high permeability occurs along contact surfaces which act as horizontal "fractures" while the formations between the "fractures" have low permeability. This type of fracture system will lead to channeled flow of injected fluid and therefore greater thermal depletion along the fractures while formations further from the fracture would still be at higher temperature. In an attempt to try and achieve a more uniform thermal depletion in the reservoir, it is proposed that continuous injection be done for short periods (~2 years) and this be followed by recovery periods of the nearly the same length of time before resumption of injection again.

Ambusso, Willis J.

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Blade Testing Trends (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

industry support. * Field Testing o Small to megawatt-scale turbines (more than 10 MW installed) o Demonstrates advances in control systems and innovative technologies. *...

265

SECONDARY NATURAL GAS RECOVERY IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN: APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES IN A FIELD DEMONSTRATION SITE, HENDERSON DOME, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two independent high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys flown by Airmag Surveys, Inc. and interpreted by Pearson, de Ridder and Johnson, Inc were merged, processed and reinterpreted by Pearson, de Ridder and Johnson, Inc for this study. Derived products included depth filtered and reduced to pole maps of total magnetic intensity, vertical and horizontal gradients, interpreted STARMAG structure, lineament analysis and an overall interpretation. The total magnetic intensity patterns of the combined survey conformed reasonably well to those of coarser grid, non-proprietary regional aeromagnetic surveys reviewed. The merged study also helped illustrate regional basement patterns adjacent to and including the northwest edge of the Rome trough. The tectonic grain interpreted is dominantly southwest-northeast with a secondary northwest-southeast component that is consistent with this portion of the Appalachian basin. Magnetic susceptibility appears to be more important locally than basement structure in contributing to the magnetic intensity recorded, based on seismic to aeromagnetic data comparisons made to date. However, significant basement structures cannot be ruled out for this area, and in fact are strongly suspected to be present. The coincidence of the Henderson Dome with a total magnetic intensity low is an intriguing observation that suggests the possibility that structure in the overlying Lower Paleozoic section may be detached from the basement. Rose diagrams of lineament orientations for 2.5 minute unit areas are more practical to use than the full-quadrangle summaries because they focus on smaller areas and involve less averaging. Many of these illustrate a northeast bias. Where orientations abruptly become scattered, there is an indication of intersecting fractures and possible exploration interest. However, the surface lineament study results are less applicable in a practical sense relative to the seismic, subsurface or aeromagnetic control used. Subjectivity in interpretation and uncertainty regarding the upward propagation of deeper faulting through multiple unconformities, salt-bearing zones and possible detachments are problematic. On the other hand, modern day basement-involved earthquakes like the nearby 1998 Pymatuning event have been noted which influenced near-surface, water-bearing fractures. This suggests there is merit in recognizing surface features as possible indicators of deeper fault systems in the area. Suggested future research includes confirmation of the natural mode-conversion of P-waves to down going S-waves at the level of the Onondaga Limestone, acquisition of 3-C, 2-D seismic as an alternative to more expensive 3-D seismic, and drilling one or two test wells in which to collect a variety of reservoir information. Formation Imaging Logs, a Vertical Seismic Profile and sidewall cores would be run or collected in each well, providing direct evidence of the presence of fractures and the calibration of fractured rocks to the seismic response. If the study of these data had indicated the presence of fractures in the well(s), and efforts to calibrate from well bores to VSPs had been successful, then a new seismic survey would have been designed over each well. This would result in a practical application of the naturally mode-converted, multi-component seismic method over a well bore in which microfractures and production-scale fractures had been demonstrated to exist, and where the well-bore stratigraphy had been correlated from well logs to the seismic response.

Douglas G. Patchen

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

2006/07 Field Testing of Cellulose Fiber Insulation Enhanced with Phase Change Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most recent improvements in building envelope technologies suggest that in the near future, residences will be routinely constructed to operate with very low heating and cooling loads. In that light, the application of novel building materials containing active thermal components (e.g., phase change materials [PCMs,] sub-venting, radiant barriers, and integrated hydronic systems) is like a final step in achieving relatively significant heating and cooling energy savings from technological improvements in the building envelope. It is expected that optimized building envelope designs using PCMs for energy storage can effectively bring notable savings in energy consumption and reductions in peak hour power loads. During 2006/07, a research team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a series of laboratory and field tests of several wall and roof assemblies using PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. This report summarizes the test results from the perspective of energy performance. The ORNL team is working on both inorganic and organic PCMs; this report discusses only paraffinic PCMs. A limited economical analysis also is presented. PCMs have been tested as a thermal mass component in buildings for at least 40 years. Most of the research studies found that PCMs enhanced building energy performance. In the case of the application of organic PCMs, problems such as high initial cost and PCM leaking (surface sweating) have hampered widespread adoption. Paraffinic hydrocarbon PCMs generally performed well, with the exception that they increased the flammability of the building envelope.

Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL; Miller, William A [ORNL; Petrie, Thomas [ORNL; Childs, Phillip W [ORNL; Syed, Azam M [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Test Plan for the Demonstration of Geophysical Techniques for Single-Shell Tank Leak Detection at the Hanford Mock Tank Site: Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Leak Detection, Monitoring and Mitigation (LDMM) program conducted by CH2M HILL 105-A during FY 2001. These tests are being conducted to assess the applicability of these methods (Electrical Resistance Tomography [ERT], High Resolution Resistivity [HRR], Cross-Borehole Seismography [XBS], Cross-Borehole Radar [XBR], and Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction [CEMI]) to the detection and measurement of Single Shell Tank (SST) leaks into the vadose zone during planned sluicing operations. The testing in FY 2001 will result in the selection of up to two methods for further testing in FY 2002. In parallel with the geophysical tests, a Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT) study will be conducted simultaneously at the Mock Tank to assess the effectiveness of this technology in detecting and quantifying tank leaks in the vadose zone. Preparatory and background work using Cone Penetrometer methods (CPT) will be conducted at the Mock Tank site and an adjacent test area to derive soil properties for groundtruthing purposes for all methods.

Barnett, D. Brent; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Utility advanced turbine system (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration -- Phase 3. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detailed design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This initial report summarizes work accomplished during the third quarter of 1995. The most significant accomplishments reported include the following. Overall design continued, progressing from preliminary and conceptual design activities to detailed design activities. The aerodynamic design of six out of eight 9H turbine airfoils was completed. The 9H compressor design concept was finalized including rotor configuration, aerodynamic design of compressor, and compressor structure. Conceptual on-base and external piping layout was begun. The ATS Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement was negotiated and signed.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

NONE

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank and field experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic characterization of aquifers by thermal response testing: Validation by large-scale tank by application to a well-controlled, large-scale tank experiment with 9 m length, 6 m width, and 4.5 m depth, and by data interpretation from a field-scale test. The tank experiment imitates an advection-influenced TRT

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

271

Field Testing LIDAR Based Feed-Forward Controls on the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems driven by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic forces. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a chaotic three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. In order to reduce cost of energy, future large multimegawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and University of Stuttgart are designing, implementing, and testing advanced feed-back and feed-forward controls in order to reduce the cost of energy for wind turbines.

Scholbrock, A. K.; Fleming, P. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.; Schlipf, D.; Haizmann, F.; Belen, F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Negative magnetic eddy diffusivities from test-field method and multiscale stability theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generation of large-scale magnetic field in the kinematic regime in the absence of an alpha-effect is investigated by following two different approaches, namely the test-field method and multiscale stability theory relying on the homogenisation technique. We show analytically that the former, applied for the evaluation of magnetic eddy diffusivities, yields results that fully agree with the latter. Our computations of the magnetic eddy diffusivity tensor for the specific instances of the parity-invariant flow-IV of G.O. Roberts and the modified Taylor-Green flow in a suitable range of parameter values confirm the findings of previous studies, and also explain some of their apparent contradictions. The two flows have large symmetry groups; this is used to considerably simplify the eddy diffusivity tensor. Finally, a new analytic result is presented: upon expressing the eddy diffusivity tensor in terms of solutions to auxiliary problems for the adjoint operator, we derive relations between magnetic eddy dif...

Andrievsky, Alexander; Noullez, Alain; Zheligovsky, Vladislav

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Negative magnetic eddy diffusivities from test-field method and multiscale stability theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generation of large-scale magnetic field in the kinematic regime in the absence of an alpha-effect is investigated by following two different approaches, namely the test-field method and multiscale stability theory relying on the homogenisation technique. We show analytically that the former, applied for the evaluation of magnetic eddy diffusivities, yields results that fully agree with the latter. Our computations of the magnetic eddy diffusivity tensor for the specific instances of the parity-invariant flow-IV of G.O. Roberts and the modified Taylor-Green flow in a suitable range of parameter values confirm the findings of previous studies, and also explain some of their apparent contradictions. The two flows have large symmetry groups; this is used to considerably simplify the eddy diffusivity tensor. Finally, a new analytic result is presented: upon expressing the eddy diffusivity tensor in terms of solutions to auxiliary problems for the adjoint operator, we derive relations between magnetic eddy diffusivity tensors that arise for opposite small-scale flows v(x) and -v(x).

Alexander Andrievsky; Axel Brandenburg; Alain Noullez; Vladislav Zheligovsky

2015-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

The MOG Weak Field approximation II. Observational test of Chandra X-ray Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the weak field approximation limit of the covariant Scalar-Tensor-Vector Gravity (STVG) theory, so-called MOdified gravity (MOG), to the dynamics of clusters of galaxies by using only baryonic matter. The MOG effective gravitational potential in the weak field approximation is composed of an attractive Newtonian term and a repulsive Yukawa term with two parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\mu$. The numerical values of these parameters have been obtained by fitting the predicted rotation curves of galaxies to observational data, yielding the best fit result: $\\alpha = 8.89 \\pm 0.34$ and $\\mu= 0.042\\pm 0.004$ kpc$^{-1}$~\\cite{rah13}. We extend the observational test of this theory to clusters of galaxies, using data for the ionized gas and the temperature profile of nearby clusters obtained by the Chandra X-ray telescope. Using the MOG virial theorem for clusters, we compare the mass profiles of clusters from observation and theory for eleven clusters. The theoretical mass profiles for the inner parts of clusters exceed the observational data. However, the observational data for the inner parts of clusters (i.e., $r<0.1 r_{500}$) is scattered, but at distances larger than $\\sim 300$ kpc, the observed and predicted mass profiles converge. Our results indicate that MOG as a theory of modified gravity is compatible with the observational data from the the solar system to Mega parsec scales without invoking dark matter.

J. W. Moffat; S. Rahvar

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Field drilling tests on improved geothermal unsealed roller-cone bits. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and field testing of a 222 mm (8-3/4 inch) unsealed, insert type, medium hard formation, high-temperature bit are described. Increased performance was gained by substituting improved materials in critical bit components. These materials were selected on bases of their high temperature properties, machinability and heat treatment response. Program objectives required that both machining and heat treating could be accomplished with existing rock bit production equipment. Six of the experimental bits were subjected to air drilling at 240/sup 0/C (460/sup 0/F) in Franciscan graywacke at the Geysers (California). Performances compared directly to conventional bits indicate that in-gage drilling time was increased by 70%. All bits at the Geysers are subjected to reaming out-of-gage hole prior to drilling. Under these conditions the experimental bits showed a 30% increase in usable hole drilled, compared with the conventional bits. The materials selected improved roller wear by 200%, friction per wear by 150%, and lug wear by 150%. These tests indicate a potential well cost savings of 4 to 8%. Savings of 12% are considered possible with drilling procedures optimized for the experimental bits.

Hendrickson, R.R.; Jones, A.H.; Winzenried, R.W.; Maish, A.B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

Marshall, B.W.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Laser Scanner Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Summer of 2004 a request for proposals went out to potential vendors to offer a three-dimensional laser scanner for a number of unique metrology tasks at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). Specifications were established including range, accuracy, scan density, resolution and field of view in consideration of anticipated department requirements. Four vendors visited the site to present their system and they were asked to perform three unique tests with their system on a two day visit to SLAC. Two of the three tests were created to emulate real-world applications at SLAC while the third was an accuracy and resolution series of experiments. The scope of these tests is presented and some of the vendor's results are included.

Fuss, B.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

280

Economic assessment of proposed electric-discharge non-thermal plasma field-pilot demonstration units for NO{sub x} removal in jet-engine exhaust: White paper for SERDP Project CP-1038  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is currently evaluating non-thermal plasma (NTP) technologies for treating jet-engine exhaust arising from DoD test facilities. In the past, some economic analyses for NTP de-NO{sub x} have shown that it is not economical, compared to other techniques. The main reasons for this conclusion was that the previous analyses examined stand-alone, or less mature electrical-discharge reactors, or electron-beam based systems that incorporated both chemical additives and quite expensive electron accelerators. Also, in contrast to more recent developments, both the discharge and electron-beam techniques of the past did not extensively incorporate methods to increase the yields of active NO{sub x}-decomposing species. In an earlier White paper and a Project Report, the authors have analyzed the costs of more mature NTP systems incorporating chemical additives and new-concept NTP technologies for jet-engine emissions control and have shown lower exhaust-gas treatment costs for NTP systems compared to baseline standard de-NO{sub x} technologies like Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) combined with a wet scrubber or SCR combined with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). In this paper, the authors will examine their most-promising candidate NTP reactor systems for a field-pilot demonstration on jet-engine exhaust and discuss the economic analyses for these hybrid units, which show that the economics of the proposed candidate systems are more favorable than earlier NTP reactor economic-assessment conclusions for NO{sub x} removal.

Rosocha, L.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chang, J.S.; Urashima, Kuniko; Kim, S.J. [McMaster Univ. (Canada); Miziolek, A.W. [Army Research Lab. (United States)

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Weaver, Phyllis C.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Field Lysimeter Investigations - test results: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1994-1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (1) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (2) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (3) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (4) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the final 2 (10 total) years of data acquisition from operation of the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period. At the end of the tenth year, the experiment was closed down. Examination of soil and waste forms is planned to be conducted next and will be reported later.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rodgers, R.D.; Hilton, L.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Field lysimeter investigations - test results. Low-level waste data base development program: Test results for fiscal years 1986, 1987, 1988, and 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the first 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both Portland type I-II cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s {open_quotes}Technical Position on Waste Form{close_quotes} are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Findlay, M.W.; Davis, E.C.; Jastrow, J.D.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Field Lysimeter Investigations -- Test results. Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program: Test results for fiscal years 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993; Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Field Lysimeter Investigations: Low-Level Waste Data Base Development Program, funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is (a) studying the degradation effects in EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins caused by radiation, (b) examining the adequacy of test procedures recommended in the Branch Technical Position on Waste Form to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61 using solidified EPICOR-II resins, (c) obtaining performance information on solidified EPICOR-II ion-exchange resins in a disposal environment, and (d) determining the condition of EPICOR-II liners. Results of the second 4 years of data acquisition from the field testing are presented and discussed. During the continuing field testing, both portland type 1--2 cement and Dow vinyl ester-styrene waste forms are being tested in lysimeter arrays located at Argonne National Laboratory-East in Illinois and at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental equipment is described and results of waste form characterization using tests recommended by the NRC`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` are presented. The study is designed to provide continuous data on nuclide release and movement, as well as environmental conditions, over a 20-year period.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Rogers, R.D.; Brey, R.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Hilton, L.D. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.; Jastrow, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wickliff Hicks, D.S.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sullivan, T.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Experimental test results presented for field-damaged orifice meter plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests demonstrate that, unlike other types of meters, there is minimal loss of accuracy with orifice meters even when operational excursions are such that severe damage occurs. Both flange taps and pipe taps effectively have the same general pattern in that the actual coefficient increases with increasing permanent deformation. Of the two types of orifice tap, these data indicate that flange-tapped orifices may be less susceptible to severe deformation. This is probably caused by changes in the local pressure gradients in the vicinity of the plate. Since pipe taps are at such a large distance from the plate, these changes are probably not noticeable due to the turbulent mixing that takes place. With orifice meters, visual inspection of the plates after severe operation is recommended, to tell the user if the plate is beyond specifications. With other types of meters (i.e., other than differential meters) recalibration is the only method of determining if the meter has been affected. Where damage is apparent, the plate (or the meter if it is not of the differential type) should be immediately replaced.

Teyssandier, R.G.; Chisman, W.E.

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Using Whole-House Field Tests to Empirically Derive Moisture Buffering Model Inputs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building energy simulations can be used to predict a building's interior conditions, along with the energy use associated with keeping these conditions comfortable. These models simulate the loads on the building (e.g., internal gains, envelope heat transfer), determine the operation of the space conditioning equipment, and then calculate the building's temperature and humidity throughout the year. The indoor temperature and humidity are affected not only by the loads and the space conditioning equipment, but also by the capacitance of the building materials, which buffer changes in temperature and humidity. This research developed an empirical method to extract whole-house model inputs for use with a more accurate moisture capacitance model (the effective moisture penetration depth model). The experimental approach was to subject the materials in the house to a square-wave relative humidity profile, measure all of the moisture transfer terms (e.g., infiltration, air conditioner condensate) and calculate the only unmeasured term: the moisture absorption into the materials. After validating the method with laboratory measurements, we performed the tests in a field house. A least-squares fit of an analytical solution to the measured moisture absorption curves was used to determine the three independent model parameters representing the moisture buffering potential of this house and its furnishings. Follow on tests with realistic latent and sensible loads showed good agreement with the derived parameters, especially compared to the commonly-used effective capacitance approach. These results show that the EMPD model, once the inputs are known, is an accurate moisture buffering model.

Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.; Hancock, E.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Well test plan for the City of El Centro utility core field experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are included in the well test plan: well test program schedule and order of work; the injection well drilling program details; the production well drilling program details; and long-term (30-day) production testing program details. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Solar system tests and interpretation of gauge field and Newtonian prepotential in general covariant Ho?ava-Lifshitz gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study spherically symmetric, stationary vacuum configurations in general covariant theory (U(1) extension) of Ho\\v{r}ava-Lifshitz gravity with the projectability condition and an arbitrary coupling constant $\\lambda$, and obtain all the solutions in closed forms. If the gauge field $A$ and the Newtonian prepotential $\\varphi$ do not directly couple to matter fields, the theory is inconsistent with solar system tests for $\\lambda\

Kai Lin; Shinji Mukohyama; Anzhong Wang

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

BNL PREDICTION OF NUPECS FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO SMALL TO MODERATE MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis codes for NPP structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model test programs to ensure the adequacy of methodologies employed for seismic analyses of NPP structures. A collaborative program between the United States and Japan was developed to study seismic issues related to NPP applications. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its contractor, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this program to apply common analysis procedures to predict both free field and soil-structure interaction (SSI) responses to recorded earthquake events, including embedment and dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effects. This paper describes the BNL effort to predict seismic responses of the large-scale realistic model structures for reactor and turbine buildings at the NUPEC test facility in northern Japan. The NUPEC test program has collected a large amount of recorded earthquake response data (both free-field and in-structure) from these test model structures. The BNL free-field analyses were performed with the CARES program while the SSI analyses were preformed using the SASS12000 computer code. The BNL analysis includes both embedded and excavated conditions, as well as the DCI effect, The BNL analysis results and their comparisons to the NUPEC recorded responses are presented in the paper.

XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

2003-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

BNL PREDICTION OF NUPECS FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES SUBJECT TO SMALL TO MODERATE MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKES.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis codes for NPP structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model test programs to ensure the adequacy of methodologies employed for seismic analyses of NPP structures. A collaborative program between the United States and Japan was developed to study seismic issues related to NPP applications. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its contractor, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this program to apply common analysis procedures to predict both free field and soil-structure Interaction (SSI) responses to recorded earthquake events, including embedment and dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effects. This paper describes the BNL effort to predict seismic responses of the large-scale realistic model structures for reactor and turbine buildings at the NUPEC test facility in northern Japan. The NUPEC test program has collected a large amount of recorded earthquake response data (both free-field and in-structure) from these test model structures. The BNL free-field analyses were performed with the CARES program while the SSI analyses were preformed using the SASS12000 computer code. The BNL analysis includes both embedded and excavated conditions, as well as the DCI effect, The BNL analysis results and their comparisons to the NUPEC recorded responses are presented in the paper.

XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

2003-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

291

Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Development of a Simple Field Test for Vehicle Exhaust to Detect Illicit Use of Dyed Diesel Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of tax-free dyed fuel on public highways in the United States provides a convenient way of evading taxes. Current enforcement involves visual inspection for the red azo dye added to the fuel to designate its tax-free status. This approach has shortcomings such as the invasive nature of the tests and/or various deceptive tactics applied by tax evaders. A test designed to detect dyed fuel use by analyzing the exhaust would circumvent these shortcomings. This paper describes the development of a simple color spot test designed to detect the use of tax-free (dyed) diesel fuel by analyzing the engine exhaust. Development first investigated the combustion products of C.I. Solvent Red 164 (the azo dye formulation used in the United States to tag tax-free fuel). A variety of aryl amines were identified as characteristic molecular remnants that appear to survive combustion. A number of microanalytical color tests specific for aryl amines were then investigated. One test based on the use of 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde seemed particularly applicable and was used in a proof-of-principle experiment. The 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde color spot test was able to clearly distinguish between engines burning regular and dyed diesel fuel. Further development will refine this color spot test to provide an easy-to-use field test for Internal Revenue Service Field Compliance specialists.

Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

On-site field tests for study of low-rank western coal fly ash. Technical summary report, field test No. 3. Big Brown Station electrostatic precipitator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of field and laboratory studies of combined NH/sub 3/ and SO/sub 3/ conditioning at the Big Brown Station of Texas Utilities Generating Company. This unusual combination of conditioning agents is used routinely at the Big Brown Station in order to improve the performance of the cold-side electrostatic precipitators. The primary objectives of this field study were to evaluate the performance of one of the Big Brown precipitators, and to obtain data on the concentration, composition, and size distribution of the fly ash, as well as the composition of the flue gas and the overall and fractional collection efficiencies of the precipitator. The laboratory studies of the Big Brown fly ash were intended to further characterize the ash both physically and chemically, and to study the attenuation of the electrical resistivity of the ash associated with the surface film produced by the dual conditioning process and by the use of SO/sub 3/ conditioning alone. 6 references, 22 figures, 9 tables.

Dahlin, R. S.; Bickelhaupt, R. E.; Marchant, Jr., G. H.; Gooch, J. P.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Energy Smart Schools--Applied Research, Field Testing, and Technology Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) in conjunction with the California Energy Commission, the Energy Center of Wisconsin, the Florida Solar Energy Center, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and the Ohio Department of Development's Office of Energy Efficiency conducted a four-year, cost-share project with the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to focus on energy efficiency and high-performance technologies in our nation's schools. NASEO was the program lead for the MOU-State Schools Working group, established in conjunction with the USDOE Memorandum of Understanding process for collaboration among state and federal energy research and demonstration offices and organizations. The MOU-State Schools Working Group included State Energy Offices and other state energy research organizations from all regions of the country. Through surveys and analyses, the Working Group determined the school-related energy priorities of the states and established a set of tasks to be accomplished, including the installation and evaluation of microturbines, advanced daylighting research, testing of schools and classrooms, and integrated school building technologies. The Energy Smart Schools project resulted in the adoption of advanced energy efficiency technologies in both the renovation of existing schools and building of new ones; the education of school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide about the energy-saving, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improved the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in classrooms. It also provided an opportunity for states to share and replicate successful projects to increase their energy efficiency while at the same time driving down their energy costs.

Nebiat Solomon; Robin Vieira; William L. Manz; Abby Vogen; Claudia Orlando; Kimberlie A. Schryer

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A procedure for testing across-condition rhythmic spike-field association change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many experiments in neuroscience have compared the strength of association between neural spike trains and rhythms present in local field potential (LFP) recordings. The measure employed in these comparisons, ďspike-field ...

Lepage, Kyle Q.

296

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Techniques† for† Demand† Response. † Lawrence† Berkeley†Communications† for† Demand†Response†and†Energy†Efficiency†for† Automated† Demand† Response† Demonstration. † 2004. †

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

2 15.10.2013 Enrico Fraccari, Emerson Climate Technologies GmbH Analysis of Field Test data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kW Ambient Temperature ¬ļC Load [kW] Heat pump Bin [hrs] Monovalent Application ¬≠ 15kW @ -10¬ļC ZH of an Air-to-Water Heat Pump equipped with a Variable Speed Scroll Compressor Enrico Fraccari & Eric WinandyH Content Unit Technology Field test Locations Types Analysis SCOP calculation method (EN14825) Results

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

298

Field Test and Evaluation Report Five Photovoltaic Power Systems for the City of Tucson  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Members of the DOE solar energy Tiger Team tested five municipally owned, grid connected photovoltaic (PV) power systems for the City of Tucson on March 26 and 27, 2008. The five PV systems tested were Southeast Service Center, Clements Fitness Center, and Thonydale water treatment plant systems 1, 2, and 3. During all tests, skies were virtually cloudless with only occasional, high cirrus present, and none during array testing.

299

DOE Underground-Coal-Conversion-Program field-test activities for 1979 and 1980. [Pricetown 1, Hoe Creek 3, Hanna IV, and SDB 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the US Department of Energy's Underground-Coal-Conversion program, four field tests were completed in 1979 and preparations were begun in 1980 for two additional field tests to be operated in 1981. The Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) completed Hanna IV, an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) completed Pricetown 1, an air gasification test in West Virginia bituminous coal. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) completed Hoe Creek 3, a steam-oxygen gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. Gulf Research and Development Co. completed Steeply Dipping Beds (SDB) Test 1, primarily an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal and the first SDB test in the US. In 1980, Gulf R and D Co. began preparation of SDB Test 2, scheduled for operation in the fall of 1981. The DOE project teams at LETC, METC, LLNL, and SNL, in association with the Washington Irrigation and Development Co. (WIDCo), Washington Water Power (WWP), and the State of Washington, are preparing a field test site in the Centralia-Chehalis coal district of Washington. A series of large coal block tests will be completed prior to the field test, scheduled for operation in 1982 or 1983. This field test will utilize a directionally drilled link and steam-oxygen gasification system. This paper summarizes the results of the four recently completed field tests and the plans for additional tests.

Bartke, T.C.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence - phase II - small scale field demonstration. Topical report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been proposed that a mix made from fly and bottom ash from atmospheric pressure fluidized bed coal combusters (FBC ash), water, and stabilizers be injected from the surface into abandoned room and pillar coal mines through boreholes. Besides ash disposal, this process would prevent subsidence and acid mine drainage. Such a mix (called `grout`) needs to be an adequately stable and flowable suspension for it to spread and cover large areas in the mine. This is necessary as the drilling of the boreholes will be an expensive operation and the number such holes should be minimized. Addition of bentonite was found to be needed for this purpose. A suitable grout mix was tested rheologically to determine its fluid flow properties. Finding little published information on such materials, tests were performed using a commercial rotational viscometer with a T-bar rotor and a stand which produced a helical rotor path. Existing mixer viscometer test methods were modified and adapted to convert the measurements of torque vs. angular speed to the material properties appearing in several non-Newtonian constitutive equations. Yield stress was measured by an independent test called the vane method. The rheological behavior was a close fit to the Bingham fluid model. Bleed tests were conducted to ascertain the stability of the mixtures. Spread tests were conducted to compare the flowability of various mixes. Using the flow parameters determined in the laboratory, numerical simulations of grout flow were performed and compared with the results of scale model and field tests. A field injection of this grout was performed at the Fairfax mines in Preston county, W.V.. The observations there proved that this FBC ash grout flows as desired, is a very economical way of disposing the environmentally menacing ash, while also preventing the subsidence and acid mine drainage of the mines.

Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Head, W.J.; Gray, D.D.; Siriwardane, H.J.; Sack, W.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Final report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes two in situ vitrification field tests conducted on simulated buried waste pits during June and July 1990 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to access the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information on the field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste. Test results indicate the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 33 refs., 109 figs., 39 tabs.

Callow, R.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Loehr, C.A.; Bates, S.O. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Thompson, L.E.; McGrail, B.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Field performance of residential refrigerators: A comparison with the laboratory test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field electricity use of 209 refrigerators was compared to their labeled consumption. The mean field use of all units was 1009 kWh/year, 882 kWh/year for top-freezers, and 1366 kWh/year for side-by-sides. There was considerable scatter in the results but, in general, the label overpredicted field use. The relationship could be best described with the formula, Annual Field Use = 0.94 [times] (Annual Label Us) - 85. For a typical unit with a labeled use of 1160 kWh/year, the field use was about 15% lower. There was considerable seasonality in energy use: the peak weeks generally occurred around the beginning of August. However, there was no simple relationship between the label value and the peak-week consumption.

Meier, A.; Jansky, R.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Field performance of residential refrigerators: A comparison with the laboratory test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field electricity use of 209 refrigerators was compared to their labeled consumption. The mean field use of all units was 1009 kWh/year, 882 kWh/year for top-freezers, and 1366 kWh/year for side-by-sides. There was considerable scatter in the results but, in general, the label overpredicted field use. The relationship could be best described with the formula, Annual Field Use = 0.94 {times} (Annual Label Us) - 85. For a typical unit with a labeled use of 1160 kWh/year, the field use was about 15% lower. There was considerable seasonality in energy use: the peak weeks generally occurred around the beginning of August. However, there was no simple relationship between the label value and the peak-week consumption.

Meier, A.; Jansky, R.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Underground coal gasification: Development of theory, laboratory experimentation, interpretation, and correlation with the Hanna field tests: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report is a description of a 7 year effort to develop a theoretical understanding of the underground coal gasification process. The approach used is one of the mathematical model development from known chemical and principles, simplification of the models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models with laboratory experiments and field test data. Chapter I contains only introductory material. Chapter II describes the development of two models for reverse combustion: a combustion model and a linearized model for combustion front instability. Both models are required for realistic field predictions. Chapter III contains a discussion of a successful forward gasification model. Chapter IV discusses the spalling-enhanced-drying model is applicable to prediction of cavity growth and subsidence. Chapter VI decribes the correct use of energy and material balances for the analysis of UCG field test data. Chapter VII shows how laboratory experiments were used to validate the models for reverse combustion and forward gasification. It is also shown that laboratory combustion tube experiments can be used to simulate gas compositions expected from field tests. Finally, Chapter VII presents results from a comprehensive economic analysis of UCG involving 1296 separate cases. 37 refs., 49 figs., 12 tabs.

Gunn, R.D.; Krantz, W.B.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

E-Print Network 3.0 - analog field tests Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science and Engineering, SOC (System-on-Chip) Design and Test Lab. Collection: Engineering 73 How scientists think: On-line creativity and conceptual change in Summary:...

306

A Field Tested Model of Industrial Energy Conservation Assistance to Small Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The University of Tennessee is one of three universities selected by the Industrial Energy Conservation Program of the Department of Energy to develop and demonstrate the concept of an Energy Analysis and Diagnostics Center (EADC). The objective...

Jendrucko, R. J.; Mitchell, D. S.; Snyder, W. T.; Symonds, F. W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Sandia National Laboratories: Clean Energy Demonstration Field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergy EfficientFacility

308

WSF Biodiesel Demonstration Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2004, WSF canceled a biodiesel fuel test because of ďproduct quality issuesĒ that caused the fuel purifiers to clog. The cancelation of this test and the poor results negatively impacted the use of biodiesel in marine application in the Pacific Northwest. In 2006, The U.S. Department of Energy awarded the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency a grant to manage a scientific study investigating appropriate fuel specifications for biodiesel, fuel handling procedures and to conduct a fuel test using biodiesel fuels in WSF operations. The Agency put together a project team comprised of experts in fields of biodiesel research and analysis, biodiesel production, marine engineering and WSF personnel. The team reviewed biodiesel technical papers, reviewed the 2004 fuel test results, designed a fuel test plan and provided technical assistance during the test. The research reviewed the available information on the 2004 fuel test and conducted mock laboratory experiments, but was not able to determine why the fuel filters clogged. The team then conducted a literature review and designed a fuel test plan. The team implemented a controlled introduction of biodiesel fuels to the test vessels while monitoring the environmental conditions on the vessels and checking fuel quality throughout the fuel distribution system. The fuel test was conducted on the same three vessels that participated in the canceled 2004 test using the same ferry routes. Each vessel used biodiesel produced from a different feedstock (i.e. soy, canola and yellow grease). The vessels all ran on ultra low sulfur diesel blended with biodiesel. The percentage of biodiesel was incrementally raised form from 5 to 20 percent. Once the vessels reached the 20 percent level, they continued at this blend ratio for the remainder of the test. Fuel samples were taken from the fuel manufacturer, during fueling operations and at several points onboard each vessel. WSF Engineers monitored the performance of the fuel systems and engines. Each test vessel did experience a microbial growth bloom that produced a build up of material in the fuel purifiers similar to material witnessed in the 2004 fuel test. A biocide was added with each fuel shipment and the problem subsided. In January of 2009, the WSF successfully completed an eleven month biodiesel fuel test using approximately 1,395,000 gallons of biodiesel blended fuels. The project demonstrated that biodiesel can be used successfully in marine vessels and that current ASTM specifications are satisfactory for marine vessels. Microbial growth in biodiesel diesel interface should be monitored. An inspection of the engines showed no signs of being negatively impacted by the test.

Washington State University; University of Idaho; The Glosten Associates, Inc.; Imperium Renewables, Inc.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

First-of-a-Kind Sequestration Field Test Begins in West Virginia  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) began today in a first-of-a-kind field trial of enhanced coalbed methane recovery with simultaneous CO2 sequestration in an unmineable coal seam.

310

LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program: Presentation Summary of the State Capitol Complex Building Operation and Maintenance Field Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requests, only 58% to 95% of AHUs identified in earlier report were shut off S. F. Austin Whole Building Electricity & Chilled Water Consumption Over 600 kW reduction when AHUs and lights turned off L.B. Johnson Whole Building Electricity & Chilled Water...LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program Presentation Summary of the State Capitol Complex Building Operation and Maintenance Field Test Presented to the State Purchasing and General Services Commission By the Monitoring Analysis Task E Dr. W. D...

Turner, W. D.; Houcek, J. K.; Liu, M.; Claridge, D. E.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

9977 TYPE B PACKAGING INTERNAL DATA COLLECTION FEASIBILITY TESTING - MAGNETIC FIELD COMMUNICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to document the findings from proof-of-concept testing performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) R&D Engineering and Visible Assets, Inc. for the DOE Packaging Certification Program (PCP) to determine if RuBee (IEEE 1902.1) tags and readers could be used to provide a communication link from within a drum-style DOE certified Type B radioactive materials packaging. A Model 9977 Type B Packaging was used to test the read/write capability and range performance of a RuBee tag and reader. Testing was performed with the RuBee tags placed in various locations inside the packaging including inside the drum on the outside of the lid of the containment vessel and also inside of the containment vessel. This report documents the test methods and results. A path forward will also be recommended.

Shull, D.

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

312

Test Results of HD2, A High Field Nb3Sn Dipole with A 36 MM Bore  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Superconducting Magnet Program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed the 1 m long Nb{sub 3}Sn dipole magnet HD2. With tilted (flared) ends to avoid obstructing a 36 mm clear bore, HD2 represents a step towards the use of block-type coils in high-field accelerator magnets. The coil design has been optimized to minimize geometric harmonics and reduce the conductor peak field in the end region, resulting in an expected short sample dipole field of 15 T. The support structure is composed by an external aluminum shell pre-tensioned with pressurized bladders and interference keys, and by two stainless steel end plates compressing the coil ends through four aluminum axial rods. We report on magnet design, assembly, and test results, including training performance, quench locations, and strain gauge measurements.

Ferracin, Paolo

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

313

Scattered-radiation field of a small betatron in nondestructive testing under nonstationary conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scattered-radiation fields of MIB-4 and TB-15 miniature betatrons have been determined experimentally and numerically, with a relative error in each measurement not exceeding 5 percent. An analysis of a three-dimensional topographic map of the scattered radiation field of TB-15 betatron shows that there exist regions near the betatron where the hazard to apparatus or man is a minimum for a given mode of operation. Such regions occur both in the forward (with respect to the direction of the beam) and rear hemispheres. Thus, the radiation dose to equipment and man can be substantially reduced by appropriately selecting a position near the betatron. 17 references.

Bespalov, V.I.; Lunev, V.I.; Sedoi, A.G.; Chakhlov, V.L.; Shtein, M.M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A Test to Verify the Speed Change of Light in the Gravitational Field of the Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the Schwarzschild solution of the Einstein equation of gravitational field, it is proved that the speed of light speed would change and isotropy of light speed would be violated in gravitational field with spherical symmetry. On the surface of the earth, the speed of light vertical to the surface is 0.2m/s less than that parallel to the surface. It is suggested to use the method of the Michelson Morley interference to verify the change of light speed and the violation of isotropy in the gravitational field of the earth. In the proposed experiment, one arm of interferometer is vertical to the earth surface while another is parallel to the surface. When two arms are turned over 90 degree, the shift of about 0.07 interference stripe would be caused which can be observed directly. So this experiment can be considered as a new verification for general relativity in the gravitational field with spherical symmetry. If the experiment shows that gravitation would change the speed of light and violate the isotropy of light speed, the result would cause great effects on foundational physics, astrophysics and cosmolo

Mei Xiaochun

2006-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

ORNL/Sub-01-4000031065 Field Test and Performance Verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..............................................................8 8 Projected supply air temperature delivered by IADR heat pump option when operated as a 100 with Heat Pump Capability Final Report: Phase 5 Subcontract Number 4000031065 John Fischer SEMCO, Inc. Dr............................................................................................................................v Abstract: Field Verification of IADR with Heat Pump Capability............................ vii 1

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

316

Building America Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization Methods for Multifamily Construction (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 IECC has an airtightness requirement of 3 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals test pressure for both single family and multifamily construction in Climate Zones 3-8. Other programs (LEED, ASHRAE 189, ASHRAE 62.2) have similar or tighter compartmentalization requirements, thus driving the need for easier and more effective methods of compartmentalization in multifamily buildings.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Development of Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines for Large Commercial Parabolic Trough Solar Fields: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass a performance acceptance test conducted by the EPC contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of engineering code developed for this purpose, NREL has undertaken the development of interim guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to utilize an analytical performance model in the acceptance process. These factors bring into play the need to establish methods to measure steady state performance, potential impacts of transient processes, comparison to performance model results, and the possible requirement to test, or model, multi-day performance within the scope of the acceptance test procedure. The power block and BOP are not within the boundaries of this guideline. The current guideline is restricted to the solar thermal performance of parabolic trough systems and has been critiqued by a broad range of stakeholders in CSP development and technology.

Kearney, D.; Mehos, M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind.

319

Cyclone Boiler Field Testing of Advanced Layered NOx Control Technology in Sioux Unit 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A four week testing program was completed during this project to assess the ability of the combination of deep staging, Rich Reagent Injection (RRI), and Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) to reduce NOx emissions below 0.15 lb/MBtu in a cyclone fired boiler. The host site for the tests was AmerenUE's Sioux Unit 1, a 500 MW cyclone fired boiler located near St. Louis, MO. Reaction Engineering International (REI) led the project team including AmerenUE, FuelTech Inc., and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This layered approach to NOx reduction is termed the Advanced Layered Technology Approach (ALTA). Installed RRI and SNCR port locations were guided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based modeling conducted by REI. During the parametric testing, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were achieved consistently from overfire air (OFA)-only baseline NOx emissions of 0.25 lb/MBtu or less, when firing the typical 80/20 fuel blend of Powder River Basin (PRB) and Illinois No.6 coals. From OFA-only baseline levels of 0.20 lb/MBtu, NOx emissions of 0.12 lb/MBtu were also achieved, but at significantly reduced urea flow rates. Under the deeply staged conditions that were tested, RRI performance was observed to degrade as higher blends of Illinois No.6 were used. NOx emissions achieved with ALTA while firing a 60/40 blend were approximately 0.15 lb/MBtu. NOx emissions while firing 100% Illinois No.6 were approximately 0.165 lb/MBtu. Based on the performance results of these tests, economics analyses of the application of ALTA to a nominal 500 MW cyclone unit show that the levelized cost to achieve 0.15 lb/MBtu is well below 75% of the cost of a state of the art SCR.

Marc A. Cremer; Bradley R. Adams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

Precision timing of PSR J1012+5307 and strong-field GR tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the high precision timing analysis of the pulsar-white dwarf binary PSR J1012+5307. Using 15 years of multi-telescope data from the European Pulsar Timing Array (EPTA) network, a significant measurement of the variation of the orbital period is obtained. Using this ideal strong-field gravity laboratory we derive theory independent limits for both the dipole radiation and the variation of the gravitational constant.

Kosmas Lazaridis; Norbert Wex; Axel Jessner; Michael Kramer; J. Anton Zensus; Ben W. Stappers; Gemma H. Janssen; Mark B. Purver; Andrew G. Lyne; Christine A. Jordan; Gregory Desvignes; Ismael Cognard; Gilles Theureau

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The role of combustion diagnostics in coal quality impact and NO{sub x} emissions field test programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many utilities are examining low sulfur coal or coal blending options to comply with the Clean Air Act Amendment SO{sub 2} emission limits. Test burns have been conducted with the more promising candidate coals to characterize the potential impact of a change in coal quality on boiler operation and performance. Utilities are also under considerable pressure to evaluate NO{sub x} control options and develop a compliance plan to meet strict NO{sub x} regulations, particularly in high population density metropolitan areas on the Eastern seaboard. Field test programs have been conducted to characterize baseline NO{sub x} emissions, evaluate the NO{sub x} reduction potential of combustion modifications, and assess the potential of combustion tuning as an alternative to burner replacement. Coal quality impacts (slagging, fouling, heat absorption, ash removal) and NO{sub x} emissions are both strongly dependent upon the coal combustion process and site-specific boiler firing practices. Non-uniform combustion in the burner region can result in adverse ash deposition characteristics, carbon carryover problems, high furnace exit gas temperatures, and NO{sub x}emission characteristics that are not representative of the coal or the combustion equipment. Advanced combustion diagnostic test procedures have been developed to evaluate and improve burner zone combustion uniformity, even in cases where the coal flow to the individual burners may be non-uniform. The paper outlines a very practical solving approach to identifying combustion related problems that affect ash deposition and NO{sub x} emissions. The benefits of using advanced diagnostic instrumentation to identify problems and tune combustion conditions is illustrated using test data from recent quality field test programs.

Thompson, R.E. [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States); Dyas, B. [New England Power Company, Westborough, MA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT, U.S. Department of Energy: Award No. DE-EE0002855 "Demonstrating the Commercial Feasibility of Geopressured-Geothermal Power Development at Sweet Lake Field - Cameron Parish, Louisiana"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of geopressured-geothermal power development by exploiting the extraordinarily high pressured hot brines know to exist at depth near the Sweet Lake oil and gas field in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The existence of a geopressured-geothermal system at Sweet Lake was confirmed in the 1970's and 1980's as part of DOE's Geopressured-Geothermal Program. That program showed that the energy prices at the time could not support commercial production of the resource. Increased electricity prices and technological advancements over the last two decades, combined with the current national support for developing clean, renewable energy and the job creation it would entail, provided the justification necessary to reevaluate the commercial feasibility of power generation from this vast resource.

Gayle, Phillip A., Jr.

2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

Strategy Guideline: Demonstration Home  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guideline will provide a general overview of the different kinds of demonstration home projects, a basic understanding of the different roles and responsibilities involved in the successful completion of a demonstration home, and an introduction into some of the lessons learned from actual demonstration home projects. Also, this guideline will specifically look at the communication methods employed during demonstration home projects. And lastly, we will focus on how to best create a communication plan for including an energy efficient message in a demonstration home project and carry that message to successful completion.

Savage, C.; Hunt, A.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000--2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES has developed a portable system that will be tested at four different utility power plants. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as activated carbon, which removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter.

Michael D. Durham

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we describe the work done in FY 1998 at Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMA) funded by the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE/NV). The major part of our research effort was to measure radionuclides present in water or soil samples collected from near nuclear tests. We report our measurements for materials collected in both saturated and unsaturated horizons adjacent to nuclear test cavities or collapse chimneys and from within several cavities. Soil samples collected from above the cavities formed by the Halfbeak, Jerboa, and Bobac tests contained no radioactivity, although a test similar to Bobac in the same area had been contaminated with {sup 137}Cs. Water samples from near the Shoal test contained no measurable radionuclides, whereas those from near Faultless and Aleman had concentrations similar to previous measurements. Water from the Tybo-Benham site was similar to earlier collections at that site; this year, we added {sup 241}Am to the list of radionuclides measured at this location. Two Bennett pumps in tandem were used to extract water from the piezometer tube in the cavity of the Dalhart event. This extraction is a significant achievement in that it opens the possibility of purging similar tubes at other locations on the NTS. The Cheshire post shot hole was reconfigured and pumped from two horizons for the first time since mid-1980. We are especially interested in examining water from the level of the working point to determine the hydrologic source term in a cavity filled with groundwater for over 20 years. We devoted much time this year to examining the colloid content of NTS groundwater. After developing protocols for collecting, handling, and storing groundwater samples without altering their colloid content, we analyzed water from the Tybo-Benham and from the Cheshire sites. Whereas the colloid concentration did not vary much with depth at Tybo-Benham, there were 20 times more colloids in groundwater from the Cheshire cavity than were found a few hundred meters higher. Electron micrographs show the wide variety of colloid sizes and shapes present in NTS groundwater. Our experiences with filtration of groundwater samples illustrate the difficulties of colloid size characterization using this methodology. Our report ends with a description of our consultative and educational activities and a list of recent publications.

B. A. Martinez; D. L. Finnegan; Joseph L. Thompson; K. S. Kung

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Fourth Novatek Hammer Field Test Department of Energy Well PM-2-31  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds" Give Forms (AllKurt'sKinne andFourth

327

Testing non-linear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolations with the Titov-Demoulin equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTEXT: As the coronal magnetic field can usually not be measured directly, it has to be extrapolated from photospheric measurements into the corona. AIMS: We test the quality of a non-linear force-free coronal magnetic field extrapolation code with the help of a known analytical solution. METHODS: The non-linear force-free equations are numerically solved with the help of an optimization principle. The method minimizes an integral over the force-free and solenoidal condition. As boundary condition we use either the magnetic field components on all six sides of the computational box in Case I or only on the bottom boundary in Case II. We check the quality of the reconstruction by computing how well force-freeness and divergence-freeness are fulfilled and by comparing the numerical solution with the analytical solution. The comparison is done with magnetic field line plots and several quantitative measures, like the vector correlation, Cauchy Schwarz, normalized vector error, mean vector error and magnetic energy. RESULTS: For Case I the reconstructed magnetic field shows good agreement with the original magnetic field topology, whereas in Case II there are considerable deviations from the exact solution. This is corroborated by the quantitative measures, which are significantly better for Case I. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the strong nonlinearity of the considered force-free equilibrium, the optimization method of extrapolation is able to reconstruct it; however, the quality of reconstruction depends significantly on the consistency of the input data, which is given only if the known solution is provided also at the lateral and top boundaries, and on the presence or absence of flux concentrations near the boundaries of the magnetogram.

Thomas Wiegelmann; Bernd Inhester; Bernhard Kliem; Gherardo Valori; Thomas Neukirch

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

328

Macroscopic and Microscopic Paradigms for the Torsion Field: from the Test-Particle Motion to a Lorentz Gauge Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Torsion represents the most natural extension of General Relativity and it attracted interest over the years in view of its link with fundamental properties of particle motion. The bulk of the approaches concerning the torsion dynamics focus their attention on their geometrical nature and they are naturally led to formulate a non-propagating theory. Here we review two different paradigms to describe the role of the torsion field, as far as a propagating feature of the resulting dynamics is concerned. However, these two proposals deal with different pictures, i.e., a macroscopic approach, based on the construction of suitable potentials for the torsion field, and a microscopic approach, which relies on the identification of torsion with the gauge field associated with the local Lorentz symmetry. We analyze in some detail both points of view and their implications on the coupling between torsion and matter will be investigated. In particular, in the macroscopic case, we analyze the test-particle motion to fix the physical trajectory, while, in the microscopic approach, a natural coupling between torsion and the spin momentum of matter fields arises.

Nakia Carlevaro; Orchidea Maria Lecian; Giovanni Montani

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System: Spectral Variation on Kuiper Belt Objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we present additional photometry of targets observed as part of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. 12 targets were re-observed with the Wide Field Camera 3 in optical and NIR wavebands designed to compliment those used during the first visit. Additionally, all observations originally presented by Fraser and Brown (2012) were reanalyzed through the same updated photometry pipeline. A reanalysis of the optical and NIR colour distribution reveals a bifurcated optical colour distribution and only two identifiable spectral classes, each of which occupies a broad range of colours and have correlated optical and NIR colours, in agreement with our previous findings. We report the detection of significant spectral variations on 5 targets which cannot be attributed to photometry errors, cosmic rays, point spread function or sensitivity variations, or other image artifacts capable of explaining the magnitude of the variation. The spectrally variable objects are found to have ...

Fraser, Wesley C; Glass, Florian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Field corrosion testing and performance of cable shielding materials in soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article discusses the importance of corrosion resistance in cable-shielding materials, describes the mechanisms of shielding corrosion that occur in buried telephone cable, and evaluates the results of the six-year REA Horry Cooperative buried telephone cable corrosion test. In this study, both active and static cables were included. Withdrawals were made over a six-year period. These cables were evaluated for cable-shielding corrosion. Special attention was paid to the comparative behavior of active and static cables. Results indicate that steel shieldings are most susceptible to the effects of alternating current (AC) in active cables. Results of a wide range of shieldings are presented and evaluated.

Haynes, G.; Baboian, R. (Texas Instruments Inc., Electrochemical and Corrosion Lab., 34 Forest St., Mail Station 10-13, Attleboro, MA (US))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

ANL/APS/TB-32 Test of Horizontal Field Measurements Using Two-Axis Hall  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered¬ČPNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2 Print258Department of31 . Wiggler92 Test

332

Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An automated fault detection and diagnosis tool for HVAC systems is being developed, based on an integrated, life-cycle, approach to commissioning and performance monitoring. The tool uses component-level HVAC equipment models implemented in the SPARK equation-based simulation environment. The models are configured using design information and component manufacturers' data and then fine-tuned to match the actual performance of the equipment by using data measured during functional tests of the sort using in commissioning. This paper presents the results of field tests of mixing box and VAV fan system models in an experimental facility and a commercial office building. The models were found to be capable of representing the performance of correctly operating mixing box and VAV fan systems and detecting several types of incorrect operation.

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration Fleet Summary Report Reporting period: October 2011 through December 2011 Number of vehicles: 135 Number of vehicle days driven: 4,746 All...

334

Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection when inlet loading and mercury removal were low. The resulting mercury removal varied between 50 and 98%, with an overall average of 85.6%, showing that the process was successful at removing high percentages of vapor-phase mercury even with a widely varying mass loading. In an effort to improve baghouse performance, high-permeability bags were tested. The new bags made a significant difference in the cleaning frequency of the baghouse. Before changing the bags, the baghouse was often in a continuous clean of 4.4 p/b/h, but with the new bags the cleaning frequency was very low, at less than 1 p/b/h. Alternative sorbent tests were also performed using these high-permeability bags. The results of these tests showed that most standard, high-quality activated carbon performed similarly at this site; low-cost sorbent and ash-based sorbents were not very effective at removing mercury; and chemically enhanced sorbents did not appear to offer any benefits over standard activated carbons at this site.

C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Field Test Results from Lidar Measured Yaw Control for Improved Yaw Alignment with the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes field tests of a light detection and ranging (lidar) device placed forward looking on the nacelle of a wind turbine and used as a wind direction measurement to directly control the yaw position of a wind turbine. Conventionally, a wind turbine controls its yaw direction using a nacelle-mounted wind vane. If there is a bias in the measurement from the nacelle-mounted wind vane, a reduction in power production will be observed. This bias could be caused by a number of issues such as: poor calibration, electromagnetic interference, rotor wake, or other effects. With a lidar mounted on the nacelle, a measurement of the wind could be made upstream of the wind turbine where the wind is not being influenced by the rotor's wake or induction zone. Field tests were conducted with the lidar measured yaw system and the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system. Results show that a lidar can be used to effectively measure the yaw error of the wind turbine, and for this experiment, they also showed an improvement in power capture because of reduced yaw misalignment when compared to the nacelle wind vane measured yaw system.

Scholbrock, A.; Fleming, P.; Wright, A.; Slinger, C.; Medley, J.; Harris, M.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Standard practice for in situ examination of ferromagnetic Heat-Exchanger tubes using remote field testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This practice describes procedures to be followed during remote field examination of installed ferromagnetic heat-exchanger tubing for baseline and service-induced discontinuities. 1.2 This practice is intended for use on ferromagnetic tubes with outside diameters from 0.500 to 2.000 in. [12.70 to 50.80 mm], with wall thicknesses in the range from 0.028 to 0.134 in. [0.71 to 3.40 mm]. 1.3 This practice does not establish tube acceptance criteria; the tube acceptance criteria must be specified by the using parties. 1.4 UnitsóThe values stated in either inch-pound units or SI units are to be regarded separately as standard. The values stated in each system may not be exact equivalents; therefore, each system shall be used independently of the other. Combining values from the two systems may result in nonconformance with the standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this practice to establ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Chemical flood progress evaluation test, South Pass Block 27 field, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Final report, September 28, 1979-May 16, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test of a surfactant flooding process has been designed for a reservoir located in the South Pass Block 27 field, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. The objectives of the test are to continue chemical flooding research by applying the process in a reservoir which is a candidate for this enhanced oil recovery technique if the process is proved economically viable. The plan is to acquire field data which will lead to a better understanding of how the process works under reservoir conditions at a well-to-well distance intermediate to laboratory floods and economic well spacing. The initial step in starting the field test began late in 1979 when the first pilot injection-residual oil saturation determination well was drilled and pressured cored in the selected test reservoir, the N/sub 4/ sand Reservoir B, at about 8000 feet. A log-inject-log measurement in this well has also been completed to provide an added evaluation. This report documents the results of the N/sub 4/, sand residual oil saturation measurements in Well SL 1011 No. 88. The Shell-DOE contract is restricted to this phase of the field test. Results indicate a waterswept residual oil saturation less than 20% at the objective location based on coring and PNC log-inject-log measurements. The value is lower than anticipated. Consequently, an alternate test site must be selected if the field test plans are continued.

Johnston, J. R.; Guillory, A. J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Groundwater restoration field test at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three underground coal gasification burns were conducted at the Hoe Creek Site in the Powder River Basin. Some contaminants were released in the groundwater. The Department of Energy (DOE) analyzed the water from a network of wells. Two million gallons of groundwater were pumped from wells adjacent to the Hoe Creek II underground coal gasification cavity, passed through filters and carbon adsorbers, and reinjected into the cavity. Phenol was the target compound of the water treatment system. The phenol concentration pumped from well WS-10 decreased from 974 parts per billion (ppB) when treatment began on July 2, 1987, to about 200 ppB when treatment ceased on August 29, 1987. Phenol concentrations pumped from well WS-22 fluctuated during the tests, but they decreased to the 150 to 200 ppB range by the time treatment was terminated. The phenol concentration of treated water reinjected into the Hoe Creek II cavity was below detectable limits (less than 20 ppB). Pumping rates were about 18 gallons per minute (gpm) from well WS-10 and 6 to 8 gpm from well WS-22. Hoe Creek is located approximately 20 miles southwest of Gillette, Wyoming. 12 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

Nordin, J.S.; Barrash, W.; Nolan, B.T.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER ó RESULTS OF PROTOTYPE FIELD TESTS IN BANGLADESH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 50 million people in Bangladesh drink arsenic-laden water, making it the largest case of mass poisoning in human history. Many methods of arsenic removal (mostly using chemical adsorbents) have been studied, but most of these are too expensive and impractical to be implemented in poor countries such as Bangladesh. This project investigates ElectroChemical Arsenic Remediation (ECAR) as an affordable means of removing arsenic. Experiments were performed on site in Bangladesh using a prototype termed ďsushiĒ. This device consists of carbon steel sheets that serve as electrodes wrapped into a cylinder, separated by plastic mesh and surrounded by a tube-like container that serves as a holding cell in which the water is treated electrochemically. During the electrochemical process, current is applied to both electrodes causing iron to oxidize to various forms of iron (hydr)oxides. These species bind to arsenic(V) with very high affi nity. ECAR also has the advantage that As(III), the more toxic form of arsenic, oxidizes to As(V) in situ. Only As(V) is known to complex with iron (hydr)oxides. One of the main objectives of this research is to demonstrate the ability of the new prototype to reduce arsenic concentrations in Bangladesh groundwater from >200 ppb to below the WHO limit of 10 ppb. In addition, varying fl ow rate and dosage and the effect on arsenic removal was investigated. Experiments showed that ECAR reduced Bangladeshi water with an initial arsenic concentration as high as 250 ppb to below 10 ppb. ECAR proved to be effective at dosages as high as 810 Coulombs/Liter (C/L) and as low as 386 C/L (current 1 A, voltage 12 V). These results are encouraging and provide great promise that ECAR is an effi cient method in the remediation of arsenic from contaminated groundwater. A preliminary investigation of arsenic removal trends with varying Coulombic dosage, complexation time and fi ltration methods is also presented.

Kowolik, K; Addy, S.E.A.; Gadgil, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV): Flight testing and evaluation of two-channel E-field very low frequency (VLF) instrument  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using VLF frequencies, transmitted by the Navy`s network, for airborne remote sensing of the earth`s electrical, magnetic characteristics was first considered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) around the mid 1970s. The first VLF system was designed and developed by the USGS for installation and operation on a single engine, fixed wing aircraft used by the Branch of Geophysics for geophysical surveying. The system consisted of five channels. Two E-field channels with sensors consisting of a fixed vertical loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on top of the fuselage and a gyro stabilized horizontal loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on a tail boom. The three channel magnetic sensor consisted of three orthogonal coils mounted on the same gyro stabilized platform as the horizontal E-field antenna. The main features of the VLF receiver were: narrow band-width frequency selection using crystal filters, phase shifters for zeroing out system phase variances, phase-lock loops for generating real and quadrature gates, and synchronous detectors for generating real and quadrature outputs. In the mid 1990s the Branch of Geophysics designed and developed a two-channel E-field ground portable VLF system. The system was built using state-of-the-art circuit components and new concepts in circuit architecture. Small size, light weight, low power, durability, and reliability were key considerations in the design of the instrument. The primary purpose of the instrument was for collecting VLF data during ground surveys over small grid areas. Later the system was modified for installation on a Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV). A series of three field trips were made to Easton, Maryland for testing and evaluating the system performance.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the plan of activities for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program which supports the environmental restoration (ER) objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Discussed in this plan are the objectives, organization, roles and responsibilities, and the process for implementing and managing BWID. BWID is hosted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), but involves participants from throughout the DOE Complex, private industry, universities, and the international community. These participants will support, demonstrate, and evaluate a suite of advanced technologies representing a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for applicability and maturity, selecting appropriate technologies for demonstration, field demonstrating, evaluation of results and transferring technologies to environmental restoration programs are also presented. This document further describes the elements of project planning and control that apply to BWID. It addresses the management processes, operating procedures, programmatic and technical objectives, and schedules. Key functions in support of each demonstration such as regulatory coordination, safety analyses, risk evaluations, facility requirements, and data management are presented.

Kostelnik, K.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Core Drilling Demonstration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tank Farms workers demonstrate core drilling capabilities for Hanford single-shell tanks. Core drilling is used to determine the current condition of each tank to assist in the overall assessment...

343

Chevrolet Volt Vehicle Demonstration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Volt Vehicle Demonstration Fleet Summary Report Reporting period: January 2013 through March 2013 Number of vehicles: 146 Number of vehicle days driven: 6,680 4292013 2:38:13 PM...

344

Controllable adhesion using field-activated fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate that field-responsive magnetorheological fluids can be used for variable-strength controllable adhesion. The adhesive performance is measured experimentally in tensile tests (a.k.a. probe-tack experiments) ...

Ewoldt, Randy H.

345

Electrokinetic demonstration at the unlined chromic acid pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy-metal contaminated soils are a common problem at Department of Energy (DOE)-operated sites and privately owned facilities throughout the nation. One emerging technology which can remove heavy metals from soil in situ is electrokinetics. To conduct electrokinetic (EK) remediation, electrodes are implanted into the ground, and a direct current is imposed between the electrodes. Metal ions dissolved in the soil pore water migrate towards an electrode where they can be removed. The electrokinetic program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been focusing on electrokinetic remediation for unsaturated soils. A patent was awarded for an electrokinetic electrode system designed at SNL for applications to unsaturated soils. Current research described in this report details an electrokinetic remediation field demonstration of a chromium plume that resides in unsaturated soil beneath the SNL Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL). This report describes the processes, site investigation, operation and monitoring equipment, testing procedures, and extraction results of the electrokinetic demonstration. This demonstration successfully removed chromium contamination in the form of chromium(VI) from unsaturated soil at the field scale. After 2700 hours of operation, 600 grams of Cr(VI) was extracted from the soil beneath the SNL CWL in a series of thirteen tests. The contaminant was removed from soil which has moisture contents ranging from 2 to 12 weight percent. This demonstration was the first EK field trial to successfully remove contaminant ions from and soil at the field scale. Although the new patented electrode system was successful in removing an anionic contaminant (i.e., chromate) from unsaturated sandy soil, the electrode system was a prototype and has not been specifically engineered for commercialization. A redesign of the electrode system as indicated by the results of this research is suggested for future EK field trials.

Lindgren, E.R.; Hankins, M.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mattson, E.D. [Salt-Unsat, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Duda, P.M. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

347

Field Testing of Suction Caissons at Bothkennar and Luce Bay G.T. Houlsby, R.B. Kelly, J. Huxtable and B.W. Byrne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field Testing of Suction Caissons at Bothkennar and Luce Bay by G.T. Houlsby, R.B. Kelly, J.T. Houlsby, R.B. Kelly, J. Huxtable and B.W. Byrne This report consists of three papers that have resulted.T., Kelly, R.B., Huxtable, J. and Byrne, B.W. Abstract: A programme of testing of caisson foundations

Byrne, Byron

348

Geothermal Demonstration Plant  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

a 50 W e binary conversion plant at Heber was initiated and is presented herein. Chevron Oil Company (the field operator) predicts that the reservoir i ill decline from an initial...

349

Detecting internal corrosion of natural gas transmission pipelines: field tests of probes and systems for real-time corrosion measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field study was conducted to evaluate the use of automated, multi-technique electrochemical corrosion-rate monitoring devices and probes for detecting corrosion in environments similar to those found in natural gas transmission pipelines. It involved measurement of real-time corrosion signals from operating pipelines. Results and interpretation were reported from four different field test locations. Standard flush-mount and custom flange probes were used in four different environments at a gas-gathering site and one environment but two different probe orientations at a natural gas site. These sites were selected to represent normal and upset conditions common in gas transmission pipelines. The environments consisted of two different levels of humidified natural gas, liquid hydrocarbon, and water from natural gas. Probe locations included the 6 and 12 o?clock positions of a natural gas pipeline carrying 2-phase gas/liquid flow. The probe data was monitored using completely remote solar powered systems that provided real-time data transmission via wireless back to a pipeline control station. Data are also presented comparing the ECR probe data to that for coupons used to determine corrosion rate and to detect the presence of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC).

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Kane, R.D. (InterCorr International); Meidinger, B. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential, Conoco MCA unit well No. 358, Maljamar Field, Lea County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes part of the work done to fulfill a contract awarded to Gruy Federal, Inc., by the Department of Energy (DOE) on Feburary 12, 1979. The work includes pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report details the second such project. Core porosities agreed well with computed log porosities. Core water saturation and computed log porosities agree fairly well from 3692 to 3712 feet, poorly from 3712 to 3820 feet and in a general way from 4035 to 4107 feet. Computer log analysis techniques incorporating the a, m, and n values obtained from Core Laboratories analysis did not improve the agreement of log versus core derived water saturations. However, both core and log analysis indicated the ninth zone had the highest residual hydrocarbon saturations and production data confirmed the validity of oil saturation determinations. Residual oil saturation, for the perforated and tested intervals were 259 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 4035 to 4055 feet, and 150 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 3692 to 3718 feet. Nine BOPD was produced from the interval 4035 to 4055 feet and no oil was produced from interval 3692 to 3718 feet, qualitatively confirming the relative oil saturations as calculated. The low oil production in the zone from 4022 to 4055 and the lack of production from 3692 to 3718 feet indicated the zone to be at or near residual waterflood conditions as determined by log analysis. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log, and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood.

Swift, T.E.; Marlow, R.E.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Controls of coal fabric on coalbed gas production and compositional shift in both field production and canister desorption tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production rates of coalbed gas wells commonly vary significantly, even in the same field with similar reservoir permeability and gas content. The compositional variation in produced gas is also not everywhere predictable, although in most fields produced gas becomes progressively enriched in CO, through the production life of a reservoir, such as parts of the San Juan basin. In contrast, it is generally observed that the ratio of CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} declines with time during field and laboratory desorption testing of coal cores. In this study, we investigate numerically the importance of coal fabric, namely cleat spacing and aperture width, on the performance of coalbed gas wells and gas compositional shifts during production. Because of the cubic relationship between fracture permeability and fracture aperture width (and thus fracture porosity) for a given cleat permeability, the production profile of coal seams varies depending on whether the permeability is distributed among closely spaced fractures (cleat) with narrower apertures or more widely spaced fractures (cleat) with wider apertures. There is a lower fracture porosity for coal with widely spaced fractures than for coal with closely spaced fractures. Therefore, the relative permeability to gas increases more rapidly for coals with more widely spaced cleats as less dewatering from fractures is required, assuming that the fractures are initially water saturated. The enrichment of CO{sub 2} in the production gas with time occurs because of the stronger adsorption of coals for CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 4}. However, during desorption of coal cores, CO{sub 2} desorbs more rapidly than methane because desorption rate is governed more by diffusion than by sorption affinity, and CO{sub 2} has much higher effective diffusivity in microporous coals than CH{sub 4}.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

New Technology Demonstration Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Technology Demonstration Program Technical Brief FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Tom for saving energy in refrigerated walk-in coolers, and to evaluate the potential for this technology in Federal facilities. The focus of this study was on a single manufacturer of the technology, Nevada Energy

353

MAJORANA Demonstrator Motivation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 #12;OVERVIEW MAJORANA Demonstrator Motivation Neutrinoless double beta decay Search for axions: MAJORANA Collaboration #12;NEUTRINOLESS DOUBLE BETA DECAY Emission of 2 electrons from Ge-76 and application to neutrinoless double beta decay search in Ge- 76." Journal of Instrumentation 6 (2011).13 #12

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

354

Nucla CFB Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized-Bed Combustion (AFBC) demonstration project. It describes the plant equipment and system design for the first US utility-size circulating AFBC boiler and its support systems. Included are equipment and system descriptions, design/background information and appendices with an equipment list and selected information plus process flow and instrumentation drawings. The purpose of this report is to share the information gathered during the Nucla circulating AFBC demonstration project and present it so that the general public can evaluate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of replacing pulverized or stoker-fired boiler units with circulating fluidized-bed boiler units. (VC)

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic goal of the Limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) demonstration is to extend LIMB technology development to a full- scale application on a representative wall-fired utility boiler. The successful retrofit of LIMB to an existing boiler is expected to demonstrate that (a) reductions of 50 percent or greater in SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions can be achieved at a fraction of the cost of add-on FGD systems, (b) boiler reliability, operability, and steam production can be maintained at levels existing prior to LIMB retrofit, and (c) technical difficulties attributable to LIMB operation, such as additional slagging and fouling, changes in ash disposal requirements, and an increased particulate load, can be resolved in a cost-effective manner. The primary fuel to be used will be an Ohio bituminous coal having a nominal sulfur content of 3 percent or greater.

Not Available

1989-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

In situ testing to determination field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of UMTRA Project disposal cell covers, liners, and foundation areas. Special study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This special study was conducted to prepare a guidance document for selecting in situ hydraulic conductivity (K) tests, comparing in situ testing methods, and evaluating the results of such tests. This report may be used as a practical decision-making tool by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project staff to determine which testing method will most efficiently achieve the field-saturated K results needed for long-term planning. A detailed section on near-surface test methods discusses each method which may be applicable to characterization of UMTRA disposal cell covers, liners and foundation materials. These potentially applicable test methods include the sealed double-ring infiltrometer (SDRI), the air-entry permeameter (AEP), the guelph permeameter, the two-stage borehole technique (TSB), the pressure infiltrometer, and the disk permeameter. Analytical solutions for these methods are provided, and limitations of these solutions are discussed, and a description of testing equipment design and installation are provided.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Bentonite mat demonstration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bentonite Mat Demonstration was developed to provide the Environmental Restoration Department with field performance characteristics and engineering data for an alternative closure cover system configuration. The demonstration was initiated in response to regulatory concerns regarding the use of an alternative cover system for future design configurations. These design considerations are in lieu of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Recommended Design for Closure Cover Systems and specifically a single compacted kaolin clay layer with a hydraulic conductivity of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/sec. This alternative configuration is a composite geosynthetic material hydraulic barrier consisting from bottom to top: 2 ft compacted sandy clay layer (typical local Savannah River Site soil type) that is covered by a bentonite mat--geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) and is overlaid by a 40 mil High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane--flexible membrane liner. This effort was undertaken to obtain and document the necessary field performance/engineering data for future designs and meet regulatory technical requirements for an alternative cover system configuration. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is the recommended alternative cover system configuration for containment of hazardous and low level radiological waste layers that have a high potential of subsidence to be used at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This alternative configuration mitigates subsidence effects in providing a flexible, lightweight cover system to maintain the integrity of the closure. The composite geosynthetic materials hydraulic barrier is recommended for the Sanitary Landfill and Low Level Radiological Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) Closures.

Serrato, M.G.

1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific recommendations are presented relative to the application of the technique, including ways to mitigate and manage potential sources of error.

He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Vorobieff, Peter V. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Demonstration aid internship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ivas in the cotton field. As I encountered some of the pests. especially some of the pests of minor importance. this little handbook became quite valus, ble. Another aspect of entomological knowledge is a basic understanding of the pesticides used... by the producer. The extension service provided me with a bulletin that gave pesticide recommendations. The bulletin l'1986 bfanagement of Cotton Insects (Stewarf and Parker 1986)) proved very useful ivhile I ivas involved in the internship, especially when I...

Lifsey, Glen Phillips

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Residential Transactive Control Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arguably the most exciting aspect of the smart grid vision is the full participation of end-use resources with all forms of generation and energy storage in the reliable and efficient operation of an electric power system. Engaging all of these resources in a collaborative manner that respects the objectives of each resource, is sensitive to the system and local constraints of electricity flow, and scales to the large number of devices and systems participating is a grand challenge. Distributed decision-making system approaches have been presented and experimentation is underway. This paper reports on the preliminary findings of a residential demand response demonstration that uses the bidding transactions of supply and end-use air conditioning resources communicating with a real-time, 5 minute market to balance the various needs of the participants on a distribution feeder. The nature of the demonstration, the value streams being explored, and the operational scenarios implemented to characterize the system response are summarized along with preliminary findings.

Widergren, Steven E.; Fuller, Jason C.; Marinovici, Maria C.; Somani, Abhishek

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PFBC Utility Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of activities by American Electric Power Service Corporation during the first budget period of the PFBC Utility Demonstration Project. In April 1990, AEP signed a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy to repower the Philip Sporn Plant, Units 3 4 in New Haven, West Virginia, with a 330 KW PFBC plant. The purpose of the program was to demonstrate and verify PFBC in a full-scale commercial plant. The technical and cost baselines of the Cooperative Agreement were based on a preliminary engineering and design and a cost estimate developed by AEP subsequent to AEP's proposal submittal in May 1988, and prior to the signing of the Cooperative Agreement. The Statement of Work in the first budget period of the Cooperative Agreement included a task to develop a preliminary design and cost estimate for erecting a Greenfield plant and to conduct a comparison with the repowering option. The comparative assessment of the options concluded that erecting a Greenfield plant rather than repowering the existing Sporn Plant could be the technically and economically superior alternative. The Greenfield plant would have a capacity of 340 MW. The ten additional MW output is due to the ability to better match the steam cycle to the PFBC system with a new balance of plant design. In addition to this study, the conceptual design of the Sporn Repowering led to several items which warranted optimization studies with the goal to develop a more cost effective design.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Jennings Demonstration PLant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verenium operated a demonstration plant with a capacity to produce 1.4 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol from agricultural resiues for about two years. During this time, the plant was able to evaluate the technical issues in producing ethanol from three different cellulosic feedstocks, sugar cane bagasse, energy cane, and sorghum. The project was intended to develop a better understanding of the operating parameters that would inform a commercial sized operation. Issues related to feedstock variability, use of hydrolytic enzymes, and the viability of fermentative organisms were evaluated. Considerable success was achieved with pretreatment processes and use of enzymes but challenges were encountered with feedstock variability and fermentation systems. Limited amounts of cellulosic ethanol were produced.

Russ Heissner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

A model comparison initiative for a CO2 injection field test: An introduction to Sim-SEQ  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the water leg of a CO 2 -EOR field with a strong waterwater leg of an active CO 2 -EOR field with a strong waterthe presence of an active EOR operation nearby may also

Mukhopadhyay, S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Navy fuel cell demonstration project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report on a field evaluation by the Department of the Navy of twenty 5-kW PEM fuel cells carried out during 2004 and 2005 at five Navy sites located in New York, California, and Hawaii. The key objective of the effort was to obtain an engineering assessment of their military applications. Particular issues of interest were fuel cell cost, performance, reliability, and the readiness of commercial fuel cells for use as a standalone (grid-independent) power option. Two corollary objectives of the demonstration were to promote technological advances and to improve fuel performance and reliability. From a cost perspective, the capital cost of PEM fuel cells at this stage of their development is high compared to other power generation technologies. Sandia National Laboratories technical recommendation to the Navy is to remain involved in evaluating successive generations of this technology, particularly in locations with greater environmental extremes, and it encourages their increased use by the Navy.

Black, Billy D.; Akhil, Abbas Ali

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Kelly, R. B., Houlsby, G. T. & Byrne, B. W. (2006). Geotechnique 56, No. 9, 617626 A comparison of field and laboratory tests of caisson foundations in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kelly, R. B., Houlsby, G. T. & Byrne, B. W. (2006). Ge¬īotechnique 56, No. 9, 617¬≠626 617 A comparison of field and laboratory tests of caisson foundations in sand and clay R. B. KELLY √? , G. T. (2002, 2003), Kelly et al. (2003, 2004) and Houlsby et al. (2005, 2006). Suction caissons for offshore

Byrne, Byron

366

CERTIFICATE OF FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING CF-4R-ENV-22 Quality Insulation Installation (QII) -Insulation Stage Checklist (Page 1 of 3)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CERTIFICATE OF FIELD VERIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTIC TESTING CF-4R-ENV-22 Quality Insulation Installation (QII) - Insulation Stage Checklist (Page 1 of 3) Site Address: Enforcement Agency: Permit Number: ____________ 2008 Residential Compliance Forms May 2012 All structural framing areas shall be insulated in a manner

367

Forced Vibration Testing of a Four-Story Reinforced Concrete Building Utilizing the nees@UCLA Mobile Field Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing and Analytical Modeling of a Four-Story Reinforced ConcreteForced Vibration Testing of a Four-Story Reinforced Concretetesting capabilities of the nees@UCLA Site were deployed on a four-story reinforced concrete

Yu, Eunjong; Skolnik, Derek; Whang, Daniel H.; Wallace, John W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Field Test Report: Preliminary Aquifer Test Characterization Results for Well 299-W15-225: Supporting Phase I of the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit Remedial Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the hydrologic test results for both local vertical profile characterization and large-scale hydrologic tests associated with a new extraction well (well 299-W15-225) that was constructed during FY2009 for inclusion within the future 200-West Area Groundwater Treatment System that is scheduled to go on-line at the end of FY2011. To facilitate the analysis of the large-scale hydrologic test performed at newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225 (C7017; also referred to as EW-1 in some planning documents), the existing 200-ZP-1 interim pump-and-treat system was completely shut-down ~1 month before the performance of the large-scale hydrologic test. Specifically, this report 1) applies recently developed methods for removing barometric pressure fluctuations from well water-level measurements to enhance the detection of hydrologic test and pump-and-treat system effects at selected monitor wells, 2) analyzes the barometric-corrected well water-level responses for a preliminary determination of large-scale hydraulic properties, and 3) provides an assessment of the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of newly constructed extraction well 299-W15-225. The hydrologic characterization approach presented in this report is expected to have universal application for meeting the characterization needs at other remedial action sites located within unconfined and confined aquifer systems.

Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting.

Roscha, V. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery: Bald Unit Test Site, Mumford Hills Oil Field, Posey County, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a small-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in a sandstone within the Clore Formation (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) in order to gauge the large-scale CO2 storage that might be realized from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of mature Illinois Basin oil fields via miscible liquid CO2 flooding. As part of the MGSC√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s Validation Phase (Phase II) studies, the small injection pilot test was conducted at the Bald Unit site within the Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, which was chosen for the project on the basis of site infrastructure and reservoir conditions. Geologic data on the target formation were extensive. Core analyses, porosity and permeability data, and geophysical logs from 40 wells were used to construct cross sections and structure contour and isopach maps in order to characterize and define the reservoir architecture of the target formation. A geocellular model of the reservoir was constructed to improve understanding of CO2 behavior in the subsurface. At the time of site selection, the Field was under secondary recovery through edge-water injection, but the wells selected for the pilot in the Bald Unit had been temporarily shut-in for several years. The most recently shut-in production well, which was surrounded by four nearby shut-in production wells in a five-spot pattern, was converted to CO2 injection for this pilot. Two additional wells outside the immediate five-spot pattern, one of which was an active producer, were instrumented to measure surface temperature and pressure. The CO2 injection period lasted from September 3, 2009, through December 14, 2010, with one three-month interruption caused by cessation of CO2 deliveries due to winter weather. Water was injected into the CO2 injection well during this period. A total of 6,300 tonnes (6,950 tons) of CO2 were injected into the reservoir at rates that generally ranged from 18 to 32 tonnes (20 to 35 tons) per day. The CO2 injection bottomhole pressure generally remained at 8.3 to 9.0 MPag (1,200 to 1,300 psig). The CO2 injection was followed by continued monitoring for nine months during post-CO2 water injection. A monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) program was designed to determine the fate of injected CO2. Extensive periodic sampling and analysis of brine, groundwater, and produced gases began before CO2 injection and continued through the monitored waterflood periods. Samples were gathered from production wells and three newly installed groundwater monitoring wells. Samples underwent geochemical and isotopic analyses to reveal any CO2-related changes. Groundwater and kinetic modeling and mineralogical analysis were also employed to better understand the long-term dynamics of CO2 in the reservoir. No CO2 leakage into groundwater was detected, and analysis of brine and gas chemistry made it possible to track the path of plume migration and infer geochemical reactions and trapping of CO2. Cased-hole logging did not detect any CO2 in the near-wellbore region. An increase in CO2 concentration was first detected in February 2010 from the gas present in the carboy during brine sampling; however, there was no appreciable gas volume associated with the detection of CO2. The first indication of elevated gas rates from the commingled gas of the pilot√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬Ę√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?s production wells occurred in July 2010 and reached a maximum of 0.36 tonnes/day (0.41 tons/day) in September 2010. An estimated 27 tonnes (30 tons) of CO2 were produced at the surface from the gas separator at the tank battery from September 3, 2009, through September 11, 2011, representing 0.5% of the injected CO2. Consequently, 99.5%

Frailey, Scott M.; Krapac, Ivan G.; Damico, James R.; Okwen, Roland T.; McKaskle, Ray W.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Testing of Performance of Optical Fibers Under Irradiation in Intense Radiation Fields, When Subjected to Very High Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to measure and model the performance of optical fibers in intense radiation fields when subjected to very high temperatures. This research will pave the way for fiber optic and optically based sensors under conditions expected in future high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Sensor life and signal-to-noise ratios are susceptible to attenuation of the light signal due to scattering and absorbance in the fibers. This project will provide an experimental and theoretical study of the darkening of optical fibers in high-radiation and high-temperature environments. Although optical fibers have been studied for moderate radiation fluence and flux levels, the results of irradiation at very high temperatures have not been published for extended in-core exposures. Several previous multi-scale modeling efforts have studied irradiation effects on the mechanical properties of materials. However, model-based prediction of irradiation-induced changes in silica√ʬ?¬?s optical transport properties has only recently started to receive attention due to possible applications as optical transmission components in fusion reactors. Nearly all damage-modeling studies have been performed in the molecular-dynamics domain, limited to very short times and small systems. Extended-time modeling, however, is crucial to predicting the long-term effects of irradiation at high temperatures, since the experimental testing may not encompass the displacement rate that the fibers will encounter if they are deployed in the VHTR. The project team will pursue such extended-time modeling, including the effects of the ambient and recrystallization. The process will be based on kinetic MC modeling using the concept of amorphous material consisting of building blocks of defect-pairs or clusters, which has been successfully applied to kinetic modeling in amorphized and recrystallized silicon. Using this procedure, the team will model compensation for rate effects, and the interplay of rate effects with the effects of annealing, to accurately predict the fibers√ʬ?¬? reliability and expected lifetime

Thomas Blue; Wolfgang Windl; Bryan Dickerson

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

372

NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report summarizes unit operating experience and test program progress for 1989 on Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Nucla CFB Demonstration Program. During this period, the objectives of the Nucla Station operating group were to correct problems with refractory durability, resolve primary air fan capacity limitations, complete the high ash and high sulfur coal tests, switch to Salt Creek coal as the operating fuel, and make the unit available for testing without capacity restrictions. Each of these objectives was addressed and accomplished, to varying degrees, except for the completion of the high sulfur coal acceptance tests. (VC)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Dansk Gasteknisk Center a/s Dr. Neergaards Vej 5B 2970 Hrsholm Tlf. 2016 9600 Fax 4516 1199 www.dgc.dk dgc@dgc.dk Field test of hydrogen in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4516 1199 ¬∑ www.dgc.dk ¬∑ dgc@dgc.dk Field test of hydrogen in the natural gas grid EFP05 J.nr. 033001/33031-0053 Project Report August 2010 #12;Field test of hydrogen in the natural gas grid EFP05 J.nr. 033001/33031-0053 Henrik Iskov Danish Gas Technology Centre H√łrsholm 2010 #12;Title : Field test of hydrogen in the natural

374

"This awesome field"; a history of United States nuclear testing and its influence on nuclear thought, 1945-1963.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The history of U. S. nuclear testing between 1945 and 1963 is not only a vivid and exciting story but also one of profound historicalÖ (more)

Blades, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Development and Demonstration of Ultrafiltration Simulants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-06-006, Rev 0, Simulant Development to Support the Development and Demonstration of Leaching and Ultrafiltration Pretreatment Processes,Ē simulants for boehmite, gibbsite, and filtration are to be developed that can be used in subsequent bench and integrated testing of the leaching/filtration processes for the waste treatment plant (WTP). These simulants will then be used to demonstrate the leaching process and to help refine processing conditions which may impact safety basis considerations (Smith 2006). This report documents the results of the filtration simulant development.

Russell, Renee L.; Billing, Justin M.; Peterson, Reid A.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Smith, Harry D.

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

Evaluation of a Decoupling-Based Fault Detection and Diagnostic Technique - Part II: Field Evaluation and Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intent is to validate the DB FDD performance and demonstrate its applications. The first part focuses on sensitivity and robustness evaluation through controlled field emulation testing. In this paper, the technique is applied to a number of field sites...

Li, H.; Braun, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Demonstration of Security Benefits of Renewable Generation at FE Warren Air Force Base  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report detailing field demonstration of security benefits of renewable generation at FE Warren Air Force Base.

Warwick, William M.; Myers, Kurt; Seifert, Gary

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

378

Using finite element analysis of retroreflective raised pavement markers to recommend testing procedures for simulating their field performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

procedures that can better simulate field conditions. This requires identifying critical locations and magnitudes of stresses inside the markers during the tire-marker impacts that happen on roads. The goal of this research was to identify critical magnitudes...

Agrawal, Ravi Prakash

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

Performance Demonstration Program Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To demonstrate compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste characterization program, each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP serves as a quality control check against expected results and provides information about the quality of data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed by an independent organization to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. There are three elements within the PDP: analysis of simulated headspace gases, analysis of solids for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents, and analysis for transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Because the analysis for TRU radionuclides using NDA techniques involves both the counting of drums and standard waste boxes, four PDP plans are required to describe the activities of the three PDP elements. In accordance with these PDP plans, the reviewing and approving authority for PDP results and for the overall program is the CBFO PDP Appointee. The CBFO PDP Appointee is responsible for ensuring the implementation of each of these plans by concurring with the designation of the Program Coordinator and by providing technical oversight and coordination for the program. The Program Coordinator will designate the PDP Manager, who will coordinate the three elements of the PDP. The purpose of this management plan is to identify how the requirements applicable to the PDP are implemented during the management and coordination of PDP activities. The other participants in the program (organizations that perform site implementation and activities under CBFO contracts or interoffice work orders) are not covered under this management plan. Those activities are governed by the organizationís quality assurance (QA) program and procedures or as otherwise directed by CBFO.

Carlsbad Field Office

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Field demonstration of aviation turbine fuel MIL-T-83133C, grade JP-8 (NATO code F-34) at Fort Bliss, TX. Interim report 1 Feb 89-31 Jul 90  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A JP-8 fuel demonstration was initiated at Ft. Bliss, TX, to demonstrate the impact of using aviation turbine fuel MIL-T-83133C, grade JP-8 in all military diesel fuel-consuming ground vehicles and equipment. Three major organizations, one ordnance battalion and two activities with a total of 2807 vehicles/equipment (V/E), were identified as participants in the demonstration program, which is authorized to continue through 30 September 1991. No fuel storage tank or V/E fuel cells were drained and flushed prior to introduction of JP-8 fuel. This procedure resulted in a commingling of JP-8 fuel with existing diesel fuel. As of 31 July 1990 approximately 4,700,000 gallons of JP-8 fuel had been dispensed to user units at Ft. Bliss and at Ft. Irwin National Training Center (NTC) in California. Three areas of concern arose from the beginning of the program: (1) plugging of fuel filters, (2) loss of power, and (3) overheating. The use of JP-8 fuel did not cause or exacerbate any V/E fuel filter plugging. Where power loss was apparent, generally it was commensurate with the difference in heating values between JP-8 and diesel fuel. The V/E at Ft. Bliss operated satisfactorily with the JP-8 fuel with no alterations, mechanical or otherwise, having to be made to any engines or fuel systems. There were no major differences in fuel procurement costs, V/E fuel consumption, AOAP-directed oil changes, and fuel-wetted component replacements.

Butler, W.E.; Alvarez, R.A.; Yost, D.M.; Westbrook, S.R.; Buckingham, J.P.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Field Testing of Automated Demand Response for Integration of Renewable Resources in California's Ancillary Services Market for Regulation Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

loads to deliver load following and regulation, withLOAD AND PSEUDO GENERATION PROFILE OF UC MERCED ON AUGUST 16, 2011 5.4 Results from latency tests The following

Kiliccote, Sila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Deep in Data: Empirical Data Based Software Accuracy Testing Using the Building America Field Data Repository: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An opportunity is available for using home energy consumption and building description data to develop a standardized accuracy test for residential energy analysis tools. That is, to test the ability of uncalibrated simulations to match real utility bills. Empirical data collected from around the United States have been translated into a uniform Home Performance Extensible Markup Language format that may enable software developers to create translators to their input schemes for efficient access to the data. This may facilitate the possibility of modeling many homes expediently, and thus implementing software accuracy test cases by applying the translated data. This paper describes progress toward, and issues related to, developing a usable, standardized, empirical data-based software accuracy test suite.

Neymark, J.; Roberts, D.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

New observations of infiltration through fractured alluvium in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site: A preliminary field investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regional tectonics coupled with the subsurface detonation of nuclear explosives has caused widespread fracturing of the alluvium of Yucca Flat. Fractures deeper than 30 meters have been observed in boreholes. Some of these fractures are large enough to capture significant amounts of runoff during storm events. Evidence of stream capture by fractures and observations of runoff flowing into open fractures give qualitative evidence of infiltration to depths greater than several meters and possibly to the saturated zone. Our field observations contradict the assumption that little infiltration occurs on Yucca Flat. The larger, hydrologically important fractures are associated with geologic faults or the regional stress field. Additional field studies are needed to investigate the impact of fractures on the transport of contaminants.

Kao, C.S. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Smith, D.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); McKinnis, W.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Mercury, NV (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

THE REQUIREMENTS OF A FUSION DEMONSTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and will analyze the strategies, facilities, and prior testing requirements needed to demonstrate electric power Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

Najmabadi, Farrokh

385

Effects of reduced voltage on the operation and efficiency of electric systems. Volume 3. Field tests in a northern utility service area. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 3 of this three-volume report for RP1419-1 describes the tests on selected residential, commercial, and small industry areas of the Detroit Edison Company system and the statistical analysis performed on the test data gathered. The purpose of the field testing was to provide data to analyze changes in energy consumption due to changes in feeder voltage levels. Detroit Edison was chosen to represent a winter peaking load area. Original intent was to present these results simultaneously with results from a summer peaking load area, Texas Electric Service Company (TESCO). Unavoidable delays retarded the Detroit study results to this Volume 3. TESCO results were reported in Volume 1, and the Distribution System Analysis and Simulation (DSAS) program for these studies was presented in Volume 2 in the form of a User's Manual.

Chen, M.S.; Shoults, R.R.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project Objectives The 1996 and 1997 Iowa General Assembly-share basis to livestock producers and operators selected to carry out various demonstration projects. Organization The Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project was administered by ISU Extension. Stewart

Lin, Zhiqun

387

CHP Fuel Cell Durability Demonstration - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug Power has managed a demonstration project that has tested multiple units of its high-temperature, PEM fuel cell system in micro-combined heat and power (?-CHP) applications in California. The specific objective of the demonstration project was to substantiate the durability of GenSys Blue, and, thereby, verify its technology and commercial readiness for the marketplace. In the demonstration project, Plug Power, in partnership with the National Fuel Cell Research Center (NFCRC) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI), and Sempra, will execute two major tasks: ē Task 1: Internal durability/reliability fleet testing. Six GenSys Blue units will be built and will undergo an internal test regimen to estimate failure rates. This task was modified to include 3 GenSys Blue units installed in a lab at UCI. ē Task 2: External customer testing. Combined heat and power units will be installed and tested in real-world residential and/or light commercial end user locations in California.

Petrecky, James; Ashley, Christopher J

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Test of the superluminality of supercurrents induced by a local electric field in a superconducting-core coaxial cable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experiment is proposed to test the prediction that induced supercurrents in a superconductor can become superluminal, as was predicted in the paper by S.J. Minter, K. Wegter-McNelly, R.Y. Chiao, Physica E 42 (2010) 234.

R. Y. Chiao

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

Development and demonstration of an enhanced spreadsheet-based well log analysis software. Final report, May 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Class Work Program is a field-based research and demonstration program for demonstration of advanced or improved technologies identified in the Department of Energy`s Class Field Demonstration Projects. The objective of the Advanced Class Work program is to conduct field demonstrations of technologies for which a small, incremental amount of work will produce or improve a transferable, useful technology for oil recovery. The goal of the program is to enhance the products of near-term Class projects and maximize the applicability and effectiveness of project results. PfEFFER (Petrofacies Evaluation of Formations For Engineering Reservoirs) is a well log analysis computer package. The software was tested and successfully applied in Schaben Field, a DOE Class 2 Field Demonstration Project to assist in improving reservoir characterization and assessing reservoir performance. PfEFFER v.1 was released in January, 1996 as a commercial spreadsheet-based well-log analysis program developed and distributed through the Kansas Geological Survey. The objectives of this project were: Task 1 -- Enhance the PfEFFER software package; Task 2 -- Develop major new modules to significantly augment PfEFFER capabilities; Task 3 -- Conduct field demonstration of software application using the necessary reservoir data acquired from oil operators and construct a database; and Task 4 -- Perform technology transfer activities that include workshops, reports, presentations, or other methods to communicate results to interested parties.

Watney, W.L.; Doveton, J.H.; Guy, W.J.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Calderon Cokemaking Process/Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon with the following objectives in order to enable its commercialization: (i) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in high driving (highly productive) blast furnaces; (ii) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; and (iii) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process. The activities of the past quarter were entirely focused on operating the Calderon Process Development Unit (PDU-I) in Alliance, Ohio conducting a series of tests under steady state using coal from Bethlehem Steel and U.S. Steel in order to demonstrate the above. The objectives mentioned above were successfully demonstrated.

None

1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

391

CALDERON COKEMAKING PROCESS/DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project deals with the demonstration of a coking process using proprietary technology of Calderon, with the following objectives geared to facilitate commercialization: (1) making coke of such quality as to be suitable for use in hard-driving, large blast furnaces; (2) providing proof that such process is continuous and environmentally closed to prevent emissions; (3) demonstrating that high-coking-pressure (non-traditional) coal blends which cannot be safely charged into conventional by-product coke ovens can be used in the Calderon process; (4) conducting a blast furnace test to demonstrate the compatibility of the coke produced; and (5) demonstrating that coke can be produced economically, at a level competitive with coke imports. The activities of the past quarter were focused on the following: Detailed workings of the team; Proposal to FETC for Phase II; Permitting and Environmental Work; and Engineering Progress.

Albert Calderon

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

Ninth USA/Europe Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (ATM2011) Demonstration of Reduced Airport Congestion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demonstration at Boston Logan International Airport (BOS) was to show that a significant portion Cambridge, MA, USA B. Reilly Boston Airport Traffic Control Tower Federal Aviation Administration Boston, MA and emissions at major airports. This paper describes the field tests of a congestion control strategy at Boston

Gummadi, Ramakrishna

393

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in- place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. Field demonstrations are in progress to collect data for evaluation of horizontal completions in both the Red River and Ratcliffe. A vertical well in the Red River will test attribute analysis of 3D seismic data for prediction of porosity development. Additional seismic acquisitions and interpretation are in progress for both the Ratcliffe and Red River. A water-injectivity test in a new horizontal completion in the Red Rive B zone at Buffalo Field is scheduled for next quarter.

Carrell, L.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Result Demonstration: A Method That Works  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E-449 05-07 ?A producer doing a result demonstration on his or her personal property is the ultimate in education: Hands-on and remembered! Don?t stop and file it. You?ve educated one, now educate the masses! Let the world know about it. Put.... County Extension educators in San Patri- cio County, in cooperation with the local Field Crops Committee, implemented several in-depth demonstration/applied research and educa- tional programs to help the local producers more effectively manage...

Boleman, Chris; Dromgoole, Darrell A.

2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

395

Development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-freezer. Phase II. Field test. Volume III. Executive summary and task reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase of the development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezer is described. Following the successful completion of Phase I (design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 16 ft/sup 3/ high efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype), Phase II was initiated to evaluate sales potential and in-home performance as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. Twenty-five pilot production 18 ft/sup 3/ units using prototype tooling were produced on the assembly line to confirm the feasibility of full-scale production. These units were then used in a market and field test program in which consumer appeal and in-home performance were assessed. The market evaluation confirmed that refrigerators incorporating high-efficiency features at added cost are saleable and that large capacity, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezers will continue to capture a large portion of the market in the years ahead, The field test confirmed the in-home energy saving potential of a high efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-frezer utilizing advanced design features such as optimized, thick-wall, foam an average energy savings of 60% compared to a baseline unit of conventional design.

Topping, R.F.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Laser spectroscopy of hyperfine structure in highly-charged ions: a test of QED at high fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview is presented of laser spectroscopy experiments with cold, trapped, highly-charged ions, which will be performed at the HITRAP facility at GSI in Darmstadt (Germany). These high-resolution measurements of ground state hyperfine splittings will be three orders of magnitude more precise than previous measurements. Moreover, from a comparison of measurements of the hyperfine splittings in hydrogen- and lithium-like ions of the same isotope, QED effects at high electromagnetic fields can be determined within a few percent. Several candidate ions suited for these laser spectroscopy studies are presented.

D. F. A. Winters; M. Vogel; D. M. Segal; R. C. Thompson; W. Noertershaeuser

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F) Enhanced ACP Date RAA ACP Demand Response Ė SpinningReserve Demonstration Demand Response Ė Spinning Reservesupply spinning reserve. Demand Response Ė Spinning Reserve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration Facility | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MDF Working with MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Titanium robotic hand holding sphere fabricated using additive manufacturing Home | User Facilities | MDF MDF | Manufacturing Demonstration...

399

JEA successfully completes world's largest CFB demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) has successfully completed an eighth year landmark demonstration project that continues in baseload commercial operation. It scales up atmospheric fluidized-bed technology demonstration to the near-300-MW size, providing important data on a technology that can achieve > 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% NOx reduction at relatively high efficiencies and at costs comparable to those of conventional pulverized coal plants. The article recounts the history of the project. Performance tests showed a blend of coal and petcoke were most efficient as a feedstock. 3 figs.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? PHEV Evaluations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities AVTA PHEV Demonstrations and Testing Argonne...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "field test demonstrating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fifth quarterly report for this project. This project is divided into three phases. Phase 1, which has been completed, involved design, engineering, and procurement for the CZD system, duct and facility modifications, and supporting equipment. Phase 2, also completed, included equipment acquisition and installation, facility construction, startup, and operator training for parametric testing. Phase 3 broadly covers testing, operation and disposition, but only a portion of Phase 3 was included in Budget Period 1. That portion was concerned with parametric testing of the CZD system to establish the optimum conditions for an extended, one-year, continuous demonstration. As of December 31, 1991, the following goals have been achieved. (1) Nozzle Selection - A modified Spraying Systems Company (SSC) atomizing nozzle has been selected for the one-year continuous CZD demonstration. (2) SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] Reduction - Preliminary confirmation of 50% SO[sub 2] reduction has been achieved, but the NO[sub x] reduction target cannot be confirmed at this time. (3) Lime Selection - Testing indicated an injection rate of 40 to 50 gallons per minute with a lime slurry concentration of 8 to 10% to achieve 50% SO[sub 2] reduction. There has been no selection of the lime to be used in the one year demonstration. (4) ESP Optimization - Tests conducted to date have shown that lime injection has a very beneficial effect on ESP performance, and little adjustment may be necessary. (5) SO[sub 2] Removal Costs - Testing has not revealed any significant departure from the bases on which Bechtel's original cost estimates (capital and operating) were prepared. Therefore, SO[sub 2] removal costs are still expected to be in the range of $300/ton or less.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL] [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL] [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy, LLC. IntroducMon * The c ommercial success o f P V is b ased on long t erm reliability and safety of t he d eployed PV modules. * Today most P V modules a re warranted...

404

Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

presentation, which was the opening session of the NREL 2013 Photovoltaic Module Reliability Workshop held on February 26, 2013 in Golden, CO, was presented by John Wohlgemuth....

405

A field test using coal:DRDF blends in spreader stoker-fired boilers. Final report, June 1976-July 1978  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program was conducted to characterize and demonstrate the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of combustion densified forms of refuse derived fuel (dRDF) blended with coal in spreader stoker-fired boilers. A total of 258.5 Mg (285 tons) of pelletized 1/2-inch-diameter x 3/4-inch-long dRDF was co-fired with coal in 2.7 x 7.5 kg/sec (60,000 lb/hr) and 3.6 x 10 kg/sec (75,000 lb/hr) of 1.03 MPa (150 psig) saturated steam. The results indicate that coal:dRDF blends up to 1:2 can be handled and burned in conventional spreader stoker-fired boilers without major equipment modification. As more dRDF was substituted for coal, the flame volume increased, the opacity decreased, the fly ash carbon burnout improved, and the turndown ratio of boiler operation increased. The emissions from the blend firing decreased slightly in mass flux, dropped significantly in particulate size and stack opacity, and had satisfactory particulate resistivities.

Degler, G.H.; Rigo, H.G.; Riley, B.T. Jr.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Project: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Project, which was funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The project had two objectives: (a) to develop and demonstrate a prototype of production-scale equipment for the dry, horizontal consolidation and packaging of spent nuclear fuel rods from commercial boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies, and (b) to report the development and demonstration results to the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. This report summarizes the activities and conclusions of the project management contractor, EG&G Idaho, Inc., and the fabrication and testing contractor, NUS Corporation (NUS). The report also presents EG&G Idaho`s assessments of the equipment and procedures developed by NUS.

Gili, J.A.; Poston, V.K.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

ARM - Field Campaign - UAV Field Test IOP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops Atmospheric Optical DepthgovCampaignsSpring(PROBE)govCampaignsTwo-ColumnEffects

408

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS ON NON-SCRUBBED COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury pollutants, the U.S. Department of Energy is funding projects that could offer power plant operators better ways to reduce these emissions at much lower costs. Mercury is known to have toxic effects on the nervous system of humans and wildlife. Although it exists only in trace amounts in coal, mercury is released when coal burns and can accumulate on land and in water. In water, bacteria transform the metal into methylmercury, the most hazardous form of the metal. Methylmercury can collect in fish and marine mammals in concentrations hundreds of thousands times higher than the levels in surrounding waters. One of the goals of DOE is to develop technologies by 2005 that will be capable of cutting mercury emissions 50 to 70 percent at well under one-half of today's costs. ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES) is managing a project to test mercury control technologies at full scale at four different power plants from 2000-2003. The ADA-ES project is focused on those power plants that are not equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization systems. ADA-ES will develop a portable system that will be moved to four different utility power plants for field testing. Each of the plants is equipped with either electrostatic precipitators or fabric filters to remove solid particles from the plant's flue gas. ADA-ES's technology will inject a dry sorbent, such as fly ash or activated carbon, that removes the mercury and makes it more susceptible to capture by the particulate control devices. A fine water mist may be sprayed into the flue gas to cool its temperature to the range where the dry sorbent is most effective. PG&E National Energy Group is providing two test sites that fire bituminous coals and both are equipped with electrostatic precipitators and carbon/ash separation systems. Wisconsin Electric Power Company is providing a third test site that burns Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and has an electrostatic precipitator for particulate control. Alabama Power Company will host a fourth test at its Plant Gaston, which is equipped with a hot-side electrostatic precipitator and a downstream fabric filter. During the seventh reporting quarter, progress was made on the project in the following areas: (1) PG&E NEG Brayton Point Station--Sorbent injection equipment was installed at the site during the quarter; Test plans were prepared for the field testing phase of the project; Baseline testing was completed during the quarter and parametric testing was begun; and A paper summarizing the full-scale tests was written and submitted to A&WMA for presentation at the annual meeting in June 2002. (2) Technology Transfer--A number of technical presentations and briefings were made during the quarter. Notable among them are papers published in the A&WMA EM journal and Pollution Engineering. Also, information was provided to the EPA MACT Working Group and a paper was presented at the annual A&WMA meeting.

Richard Schlager

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ape07taylor...

410

Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. ape012taylor2010o...

411

Oregon: Advancing Technology Readiness: Wave Energy Testing and Demonstration  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EEREís support enabled Northwest Energy Innovations to verify the functionality of its Wave Energy TechnologyóNew Zealand (WET-NZ) device.

412

Results from the microminiature thermionic converter demonstration testing program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is in progress to develop microminiature thermionic converters (MTCs) with high energy conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures using semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) fabrication methods. The use of IC techniques allows the fabrication of MTCs with cathode to anode spacing of several microns or less and with anode and cathode materials that will have work functions ranging from 1 eV to 3 eV. The small cathode to anode spacing and variable electrode work functions should allow the conversion of heat energy to relatively large current densities (up to tens of Amps/cm{sup 2}) at relatively high conversion efficiencies (15{endash}25{percent}). {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

King, Donald B.; Wyant, Francis J. [International Nuclear Safety Department, Sandia National Laboratories, MS-0744, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] Luke, James R. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, 901 University Blvd. SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Results from the Microminiature Thermionic Converter Demonstration Testing Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is in progress to develop microminiature thermionic converters (MTCS) with high energy conversion efficiencies and variable operating temperatures using semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) fabrication methods. The use of IC techniques allows the fabrication of MTCS with cathode to anode spacing of several microns or less and with anode and cathode materials that will have work fimctions ranging from 1 eV to 3 eV. The small cathode to anode spacing and variable electrode work functions should allow the conversion of heat energy to relatively large current densities (up to tens of Amps/cmz) at relatively high conversion efficiencies ( 15-25%).

King, D.B.; Luke, J.R.; Wyant, F.J.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

414

Advancing Technology Readiness: Wave Energy Testing and Demonstration |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South ValleyASGovLtr.pdfAboutSheet, AprilEdwardDepartment

415

Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMP AMDHeavy3 4.5.4Department

416

Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMP AMDHeavy3

417

Development, Test and Demonstration of a Cost-Effective, Compact,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMP AMDHeavy3Light-Weight, and Scalable

418

Energy Department Announces Funding for Demonstration and Testing of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department of EnergyStakeholdersEnergy Competition |Advanced Wave

419