National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for field techniques observation

  1. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  2. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  3. Investigating High Field Gravity using Astrophysical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, Elliott D.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to astrophysical techniques. These techniques can help us understand certain phenomena important to particle physics that are currently impossible to address using standard particle physics experimental techniques. As the subject matter is vast, compromises are necessary in order to convey the central ideas to the reader. Many general references are included for those who want to learn more. The paragraphs below elaborate on the structure of these lectures. I hope this discussion will clarify my motivation and make the lectures easier to follow. The lectures begin with a brief review of more theoretical ideas. First, elements of general relativity are reviewed, concentrating on those aspects that are needed to understand compact stellar objects (white dwarf stars, neutron stars, and black holes). I then review the equations of state of these objects, concentrating on the simplest standard models from astrophysics. After these mathematical preliminaries, Sec. 2(c) discusses 'The End State of Stars'. Most of this section also uses the simplest standard models. However, as these lectures are for particle physicists, I also discuss some of the more recent approaches to the equation of state of very dense compact objects. These particle-physics-motivated equations of state can dramatically change how we view the formation of black holes. Section 3 focuses on the properties of the objects that we want to characterize and measure. X-ray binary systems and Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are stressed because the lectures center on understanding very dense stellar objects, black hole candidates (BHCs), and their accompanying high gravitational fields. The use of x-ray timing and gamma-ray experiments is also introduced in this section. Sections 4 and 5 review information from x-ray and gamma-ray experiments. These sections also discuss the current state of the art in x-ray and gamma-ray satellite experiments and plans for future experiments.

  4. Category:Field Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermalField

  5. Mapping Diffuse Seismicity Using Empirical Matched Field Processing Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C; Harris, D B

    2011-01-21

    The objective of this project is to detect and locate more microearthquakes using the empirical matched field processing (MFP) method than can be detected using only conventional earthquake detection techniques. We propose that empirical MFP can complement existing catalogs and techniques. We test our method on continuous seismic data collected at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field during November 2009 and January 2010. In the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC) earthquake catalog, 619 events were identified in our study area during this time frame and our MFP technique identified 1094 events. Therefore, we believe that the empirical MFP method combined with conventional methods significantly improves the network detection ability in an efficient matter.

  6. Observational Field Assessment of Invasiveness for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eucalyptus grandis observations..................................................... 13 Eucalyptus grandis), Eucalyptus grandis, African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and arboreal Leucaenas found on Oahu, Maui, Hawai

  7. Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terralog Technologies

    2002-11-25

    The goals of this project have was to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to apply these improved models and guidelines in the field.

  8. Development of Improved Oil Field Waste Injection Disposal Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terralog Technologies USA Inc.

    2001-12-17

    The goals of this DOE sponsored project are to: (1) assemble and analyze a comprehensive database of past waste injection operations; (2) develop improved diagnostic techniques for monitoring fracture growth and formation changes; (3) develop operating guidelines to optimize daily operations and ultimate storage capacity of the target formation; and (4) to test these improved models and guidelines in the field.

  9. New techniques in 3D scalar and vector field visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max, N.; Crawfis, R.; Becker, B.

    1993-05-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have recently developed several techniques for volume visualization of scalar and vector fields, all of which use back-to-front compositing. The first renders volume density clouds by compositing polyhedral volume cells or their faces. The second is a ``splatting`` scheme which composites textures used to reconstruct the scalar or vector fields. One version calculates the necessary texture values in software, and another takes advantage of hardware texture mapping. The next technique renders contour surface polygons using semi-transparent textures, which adjust appropriately when the surfaces deform in a flow, or change topology. The final one renders the ``flow volume`` of smoke or dye tracer swept out by a fluid flowing through a small generating polygon. All of these techniques are applied to a climate model data set, to visualize cloud density and wind velocity.

  10. AAO support observations for the Hubble Deep Field Sout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Boyle

    1998-04-09

    We present proposed ground-based support observations at the AAO for the forthcoming Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) campaign.

  11. Algebraic constructive quantum field theory: Integrable models and deformation techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandalf Lechner

    2015-03-12

    Several related operator-algebraic constructions for quantum field theory models on Minkowski spacetime are reviewed. The common theme of these constructions is that of a Borchers triple, capturing the structure of observables localized in a Rindler wedge. After reviewing the abstract setting, we discuss in this framework i) the construction of free field theories from standard pairs, ii) the inverse scattering construction of integrable QFT models on two-dimensional Minkowski space, and iii) the warped convolution deformation of QFT models in arbitrary dimension, inspired from non-commutative Minkowski space.

  12. Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-04-15

    Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

  13. Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

  14. An Efficient Technique for making maps from Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Piccirillo; G. Romeo; R. K. Schaefer; M. Limon

    1996-08-12

    We describe a new technique for turning scans of the microwave sky into intensity maps. The technique is based on a Fourier series analysis and is inspired by the lock-in deconvolution used in experiments which typically sweep the sky continuously. We test the technique on computer generated microwave skies and compare it to the more standard map making technique based on linear algebra. We find that our technique is much faster than the usual technique and, in addition, does not suffer from the problem of memory limitations. Lastly we demonstrate that the technique works under real experimental conditions using observations of the moon.

  15. November 18, 2005 Chandra Observations of Magnetic Fields and Relativistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Daniel

    November 18, 2005 Chandra Observations of Magnetic Fields and Relativistic Beaming in Four Quasar microwave background. If particles and magnetic #12;elds are near minimum energy density 1 Harvard CSIRO Australia Telescope National Facility, PO Box 76, Epping NSW 1710, Australia 4 Jet Propulsion

  16. INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELDS OBSERVED BY VOYAGER 1 BEYOND THE HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ness, N. F., E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Voyager 1 (V1) was beyond the heliopause between 2013.00 and 2014.41, where it was making in situ observations of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). The average azimuthal angle and elevation angle of the magnetic field B were (?) = 292.°5 ± 1.°4 and (?) = 22.°1 ± 1.°2, respectively. The angles ? and ? varied linearly at (1.°4 ± 0.°1) yr{sup –1} and (–1.°1 ± 0.°1) yr{sup –1}, respectively, suggesting that V1 was measuring the draped ISMF around the heliopause. The distributions of hourly averages of ? and ? were Gaussian distributions, with most probable values 292.°5 and 22.°1, and standard deviations (SDs) 1.°3 and 1.°1, respectively. The small SD indicates little or no turbulence transverse to B . An abrupt decrease in B from 0.50 nT on 2013/129.9 to 0.46 nT on 2013/130.6 was observed, possibly associated with a weak reverse shock or magnetoacoustic pressure wave following a burst of electron plasma oscillations. Between 2013/130.6 and 2013/365.3, (B) = 0.464 ± 0.009 nT, (?) = 292.°6 ± 0.°8, and (?) = 22.°1 ± 1.°1. The corresponding distribution of hourly averages of B was Gaussian with the most probable value 0.464 nT and ? = 0.009 nT. Since the uncertainty ? corresponds to the instrument and digitization noise, these observations provided an upper limit to the turbulence in the ISMF. The distributions of the hourly increments of B were Gaussian distributions with ? = 0.05 nT, 0.°4, and 0.°4, respectively, indicating that the V1 did not detect evidence of ''intermittent bursts'' of interstellar turbulence.

  17. Statistical techniques for detecting the intergalactic magnetic field from large samples of extragalactic Faraday rotation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akahori, Takuya; Gaensler, B. M.; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: bryan.gaensler@sydney.edu.au

    2014-08-01

    Rotation measure (RM) grids of extragalactic radio sources have been widely used for studying cosmic magnetism. However, their potential for exploring the intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) in filaments of galaxies is unclear, since other Faraday-rotation media such as the radio source itself, intervening galaxies, and the interstellar medium of our Galaxy are all significant contributors. We study statistical techniques for discriminating the Faraday rotation of filaments from other sources of Faraday rotation in future large-scale surveys of radio polarization. We consider a 30° × 30° field of view toward the south Galactic pole, while varying the number of sources detected in both present and future observations. We select sources located at high redshifts and toward which depolarization and optical absorption systems are not observed so as to reduce the RM contributions from the sources and intervening galaxies. It is found that a high-pass filter can satisfactorily reduce the RM contribution from the Galaxy since the angular scale of this component toward high Galactic latitudes would be much larger than that expected for the IGMF. Present observations do not yet provide a sufficient source density to be able to estimate the RM of filaments. However, from the proposed approach with forthcoming surveys, we predict significant residuals of RM that should be ascribable to filaments. The predicted structure of the IGMF down to scales of 0.°1 should be observable with data from the Square Kilometre Array, if we achieve selections of sources toward which sightlines do not contain intervening galaxies and RM errors are less than a few rad m{sup –2}.

  18. Existence of solutions for Hamiltonian field theories by the Hamilton-Jacobi technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilo Bruno

    2010-07-12

    The paper is devoted to prove the existence of a local solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in field theory, whence the general solution of the field equations can be obtained. The solution is adapted to the choice of the submanifold where the initial data of the field equations are assigned. Finally, a technique to obtain the general solution of the field equations, starting from the given initial manifold, is deduced.

  19. Technical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Lloyd W.

    on a linear transformation (i.e., regressing dry clipped weights against percent digital obstruction). We usedTechnical Note Field Test of Digital Photography Biomass Estimation Technique in Tallgrass Prairie or proximity to a drying oven. We tested the digital photography biomass estimation technique for measuring

  20. Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations: A Bayesian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations parameter values (hydraulic conductivity in this case) which, in turn, determine flow paths. This work (2009), Obtaining parsimonious hydraulic conductivity fields using head and transport observations

  1. Deep ATLAS radio observations of the CDFS-SWIRE field Ray P. Norris1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Ray

    1 Deep ATLAS radio observations of the CDFS-SWIRE field Ray P. Norris1 , José Afonso5 , Phil N), which consist of deep radio observations of a 3.7 square degree field surrounding the Chandra Deep Field can only be discovered in wide, deep surveys such as this. Subject headings: Catalogs --- surveys

  2. Technique development for field inspection of cracking in seam welded ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shell, Eric B.; Benson, Craig [Wyle Laboratories, Inc., Dayton, OH 45440 (United States); Liljestrom, Greg C.; Shanahan, Stephen [Wyle Laboratories, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK 73110 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    The resistance seam weld interfaces between alloyed and pure titanium are an in service concern due to precipitation of titanium hydride and resulting embrittlement and cracking. Several inspection techniques were developed and evaluated for field use to characterize the damage in the fleet. Electromagnetic, ultrasonic, florescent penetrant, thermographic, and radiographic techniques were considered. The ultrasonic and electromagnetic approaches were both found suitable. However, the electromagnetic approach is more desirable for field inspections, due to consistency and ease of use. The electromagnetic inspection procedure is able to discriminate between precursor damage and through cracking with sufficient sensitivity to small cracks.

  3. Representation of the mesoscale wind field using a line integral technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trares, John S

    1982-01-01

    REPPESENTATION OF THE MESOSCALE WIND FIELD USING A LINE INTEGRAL TECHNII1UE A Thesis by JOHN SEBASTIAN TRARES, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... t May 1982 ABSTRACT Representation of the Mesoscale Wind Field Using a Line Integral Technique. (May 1982) John Sebastian Trares, Jr. , B. S. , University of Missouri Chairman of Advisory Committee: Or. Phanindramohan Das An interpolated...

  4. Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content using ground-penetrating radar ground wave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content using ground- penetrating radar ground wave] Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) ground wave techniques were applied to estimate soil water content travel time measurements using 900 and 450 MHz antennas and analyzed these data to estimate water content

  5. Automated Layout and Phase Assignment Techniques for Dark Field Alternating PSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelikovsky, Alexander

    Automated Layout and Phase Assignment Techniques for Dark Field Alternating PSM Andrew B. Kahng-optimization of layout and phase assignment for alternating PSM. Preliminary computational experience appears promising. Keywords: Layout veri cation, manufacturability, alternating phase-shift mask PSM, compaction, physical

  6. Automated Layout and Phase Assignment Techniques for Dark Field Alternating PSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelikovsky, Alexander

    Automated Layout and Phase Assignment Techniques for Dark Field Alternating PSM Andrew B. Kahng­optimization of layout and phase assignment for alternating PSM. Preliminary computational experience appears promising. Keywords: Layout verification, manufacturability, alternating phase­shift mask (PSM), compaction, physical

  7. Lunar Outgassing, Transient Phenomena and The Return to The Moon, III: Observational and Experimental Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arlin P. S. Crotts

    2007-06-27

    In Papers II and III we show that Transient Lunar Phenomena (TLPs) are likely related to lunar outgassing, albeit in ways not fully understood. Here we propose a path forward, in which current and forthcoming technologies provide a more controlled, sensitive probe of lunar outgassing. Many of these techniques are being realized for the first time. Given the optical transient/outgassing connection, progress can be made by remote sensing, and we suggest programs of imaging, spectroscopy and combinations thereof. However, as found in Paper II, many aspects of lunar outgassing seem covert in nature. TLPs betray outgassing, but not all outgassing produces TLPs. Some outgassing may never appear at the surface, but remain trapped in the regolith. We also suggest more intrusive techniques, from radar mapping to in-situ probes. Understanding these volatiles seems promising in terms of a resource for humans on the Moon and beyond, and offers an interesting scientific goal in its own right. Hence this paper is a series of proposed techniques, some in practice, some which might be soon, and some requiring significant future investment, some of which may prove unwise pending results from predecessor investigations. These point towards enhancement of our knowledge of lunar outgassing, its relation to other lunar processes, and an increase in our understanding of how volatiles are involved in the evolution of the Moon. We emphasize certain ground-based observations in time for flights of SELENE, LRO and other robotic missions, and others before extensive human xploration. We discuss how study of the pristine lunar atmosphere pertains to understanding the role of anthropogenic volatiles, an important confusing signal

  8. Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Mosher, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-08-11

    Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

  9. Observations of improved confinement in field reversed configurations sustained by antisymmetric rotating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    plasma, resulting in a mostly azimuthal field near the FRC separatrix with a very small radial component rotating magnetic fields H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and L. C. Steinhauer Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory in field reversed configurations FRC . A major concern about this method has been the fear of opening up

  10. Comparison of soft computing techniques for a three-phase oil field centrifuge.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. E.; Parkinson, w; Miller, N.

    2002-01-01

    In this work we compare fuzzy techniques to neural network techniques for building a soft sensor for a three-phase oil field centrifuge. The soft sensor is used in a feed-forward control system that augments a feedback control system. Two approaches were used to develop the soft sensor. The first approach was to use a fuzzy rule based system based upon the experience of an expert operator. The expert operator's experience was supplemented using a computer model of the system. The second approach was to use a neural network to build the inverse of the computer model. The pros and cons of both techniques are discussed. KEYWORDS: fuzzy logic, neural networks, soft sensor, soft computing

  11. New techniques for the scientific visualization of three-dimensional multi-variate and vector fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawfis, R.A.

    1995-10-01

    Volume rendering allows us to represent a density cloud with ideal properties (single scattering, no self-shadowing, etc.). Scientific visualization utilizes this technique by mapping an abstract variable or property in a computer simulation to a synthetic density cloud. This thesis extends volume rendering from its limitation of isotropic density clouds to anisotropic and/or noisy density clouds. Design aspects of these techniques are discussed that aid in the comprehension of scientific information. Anisotropic volume rendering is used to represent vector based quantities in scientific visualization. Velocity and vorticity in a fluid flow, electric and magnetic waves in an electromagnetic simulation, and blood flow within the body are examples of vector based information within a computer simulation or gathered from instrumentation. Understand these fields can be crucial to understanding the overall physics or physiology. Three techniques for representing three-dimensional vector fields are presented: Line Bundles, Textured Splats and Hair Splats. These techniques are aimed at providing a high-level (qualitative) overview of the flows, offering the user a substantial amount of information with a single image or animation. Non-homogenous volume rendering is used to represent multiple variables. Computer simulations can typically have over thirty variables, which describe properties whose understanding are useful to the scientist. Trying to understand each of these separately can be time consuming. Trying to understand any cause and effect relationships between different variables can be impossible. NoiseSplats is introduced to represent two or more properties in a single volume rendering of the data. This technique is also aimed at providing a qualitative overview of the flows.

  12. Global mapping and characterization of Titan's dune fields with Cassini: Correlation between RADAR and VIMS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narteau, Clément

    Global mapping and characterization of Titan's dune fields with Cassini: Correlation between RADAR dunes have been observed in the equatorial regions of Titan, Saturn's largest moon. As the Cassini-resolution coverage of Titan's surface increases, revealing new dune fields and allowing refinements

  13. Estimating the Galactic center magnetic field strength from the observed synchrotron flux density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    that the magnetic field and cosmic rays are in a minimum-energy state across this region is unlikely to be valid fila- ments observed there is inconsistent with the minimum-energy requirement that there be a substantial energy exchange between the cosmic rays and the magnetic field on time scales short compared

  14. Larmor electric field observed at the Earth's magnetopause by Polar satellite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koga, D., E-mail: dkaqua@kyudai.jp; Gonzalez, W. D.; Silveira, M. V. D. [National Institute for Space Research - INPE, São José dos Campos, São Paulo (Brazil); Mozer, F. S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Cardoso, F. R. [School of Engineering - EEL, University of São Paulo, Lorena, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    We present, for the first time, observational evidence of a kinetic electric field near the X-line associated with asymmetric reconnection at the Earth's dayside magnetopause using Polar observations. On March 29, 2003, Polar satellite detected an asymmetric collisionless reconnection event. This event shows a unipolar Hall electric field signature and a simple deviation from the guide field during the magnetopause crossing, with the absence of an ion plasma jet outflow indicating that the magnetopause crossing was near the X-line. As expected from particle-in-cell simulations by Malakit et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 135001 (2013)), an earthward pointing normal electric field appears in the magnetospheric side of the ion diffusion region. The electric field satisfies two necessary conditions for the existence of the finite ion Larmor radius effect: (1) the ion Larmor radius (r{sub g2}) is larger than the distance between the stagnation point and the edge of the ion diffusion region in the strong magnetic field side (?{sub S2}) and (2) the spatial extent of the kinetic electric field (?{sub EL}) is of the order of the ion Larmor radius. Furthermore, it is shown that the peak value of the Larmor electric field is comparable to the predicted value. The observation of the Larmor electric field can be valuable in other analyses to show that the crossing occurred near the X-line.

  15. THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE OBSERVED DURING DOE ARM'S 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE OBSERVED DURING DOE ARM'S 2009 CLOUD TOMOGRAPHY FIELD EXPERIMENT on Cloud Physics, Portland, OR June 28-July 2, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department/Atmospheric Sciences Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)'s cloud tomography Intensive Observation Period (IOP

  16. Experimental Observation and Measurements of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer using PIV, Shadowgraphy, RICM Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di, Yuan 1988-

    2012-12-05

    This present study seeks to contribute detailed visualization data on a pool boiling experiments using HFE-7000. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the time resolved whole field liquid velocity. Bubble dynamic parameters...

  17. ESO Imaging Survey. Hubble Deep Field South: Optical-Infrared Observations, Data Reduction and Photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. da Costa; M. Nonino; R. Rengelink; S. Zaggia; C. Benoist; T. Erben; A. Wicenec; M. Scodeggio; L. F. Olsen; M. D. Guarnieri; E. Deul; S. D'Odorico; R. Hook; A. Moorwood; R. Slijkhuis

    1998-12-04

    This paper presents ground-based data obtained from deep optical and infrared observations of the HST Hubble Deep Field South (HDF-S) field carried out at the ESO 3.5 New Technology Telescope (NTT). These data were taken as part of the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) program, a public survey coordinated by ESO and member states, in preparation for the first year of operation of the VLT. Deep CCD images are available for five optical passbands, reaching 2 sigma limiting magnitudes of U_AB~27.0, B_AB~26.5, V_AB~26, R_AB~26, I_AB~25, covering a region of ~25 square arcmin, which includes the HST WPFC2 field. The infrared observations cover a total area of ~42 square arcmin and include both the HST WFPC2 and STIS fields. The observations of the WFPC2 region were conducted in JHKs passbands, reaching J_AB~25, and H_AB and K_AB~24.0. Due to time constraints, the adjacent field, covering the STIS field, has been observed only in R, I and JHKs, while no observations were conducted covering the NIC3 field. This paper describes the observations and data reduction. It also presents images of the surveyed region and lists the optical and infrared photometric parameters of the objects detected on the co-added images of each passband, as well as multicolor optical and infrared catalogs. These catalogs together with the astrometrically and photometrically calibrated co-added images are being made public world-wide and can be retrieved from the world-wide web (http://www.eso.org/eis).

  18. Transmission Electron Microscope In Situ Straining Technique to Directly Observe Defects and Interfaces During Deformation in Magnesium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morrow, Benjamin M.; Cerreta, E. K.; McCabe, R. J.; Tomé, C. N.

    2015-05-14

    In-situ straining was used to study deformation behavior of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) metals.Twinning and dislocation motion, both essential to plasticity in hcp materials, were observed.Typically, these processes are characterized post-mortem by examining remnant microstructural features after straining has occurred. By imposing deformation during imaging, direct observation of active deformation mechanisms is possible. This work focuses on straining of structural metals in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), and a recently developed technique that utilizes familiar procedures and equipment to increase ease of experiments. In-situ straining in a TEM presents several advantages over conventional post-mortem characterization, most notably time-resolution of deformation andmore »streamlined identification of active deformation mechanisms. Drawbacks to the technique and applicability to other studies are also addressed. In-situ straining is used to study twin boundary motion in hcp magnesium. A {101¯2} twin was observed during tensile and compressive loading. Twin-dislocation interactions are directly observed. Notably, dislocations are observed to remain mobile, even after multiple interactions with twin boundaries, a result which suggests that Basinki’s dislocation transformation mechanism by twinning is not present in hcp metals. The coupling of in-situ straining with traditional post-mortem characterization yields more detailed information about material behavior during deformation than either technique alone.« less

  19. Observations of Multi-Resonance Effect in ELM Control with Magnetic Perturbation Fields on the JET Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observations of Multi-Resonance Effect in ELM Control with Magnetic Perturbation Fields on the JET Tokamak

  20. Observation of transient electric fields in particle-in-cell simulation of capacitively coupled discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, S., E-mail: sarvsarvesh@gmail.com; Mishra, S. K.; Kaw, Predhiman K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-07-15

    The analytical prediction of the presence of transient electric field regions between the bulk plasma and sheath edge in radio frequency capacitively coupled plasma (RF-CCP) discharges has been reported by Kaganovich [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 265006 (2002)]. In this paper, we have used the semi-infinite particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation technique to verify the theoretical prediction for the existence of transient electric field in the linear regime; it is shown that the PIC simulation results are in good agreement with the results predicted by analytical model in this regime. It is also demonstrated that the linear theory overestimates the transient electric field as one moves from linear to weakly nonlinear regime. The effect of applied RF current density and electron temperature on evolution of transition field and phase mixing regime has been explored.

  1. VLBA Observations of G5.89-0.39: OH masers and magnetic field structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. Stark; W. M. Goss; E. Churchwell; V. L. Fish; I. M. Hoffman

    2006-10-05

    We present VLBA observations of 1667 MHz OH maser emission from the massive star formation region G5.89-0.39. The observations were phase referenced allowing the absolute positions of the masers to be obtained. The 1667 MHz masers have radial velocities that span ~50 km/s but show little evidence of tracing the bipolar molecular outflow, as has been claimed in previous studies. We identify 23 Zeeman pairs through comparison of masers in left and right circular polarization. Magnetic field strengths range from -2 mG to +2 mG, and an ordered reversal in magnetic field direction is observed toward the southern region of the UC HII region. We suggest that the velocity and magnetic field structure of the 1667 MHz masers can be explained in the context of a model in which the masers arise in a neutral shell just outside a rapidly exanding ionized shell.

  2. Observation of magnetic field lines in the vicinity of a superconductor with the naked eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshihiko Saito

    2008-11-04

    Meissner effect and pinning effect are clearly observed with the naked eye. A GdBaCuO high-temperature superconductor (HTS) disk fabricated by Nippon Steel Corporation, a 100mm cubic NdFeB sintered magnet, and iron wires coated by colored are used. When the HTS is put in the magnetic field of the magnet, it can be observed by the wires that the magnetic field lines are excluded from the superconductor (Meissner effect) as well as are pinned in the superconductor (pinning effect).

  3. NEW OBSERVATION OF FAILED FILAMENT ERUPTIONS: THE INFLUENCE OF ASYMMETRIC CORONAL BACKGROUND FIELDS ON SOLAR ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Su, J.; Lin, H.; Shibata, K.; Kurokawa, H.

    2009-05-01

    Failed filament eruptions not associated with a coronal mass ejection (CME) have been observed and reported as evidence for solar coronal field confinement on erupting flux ropes. In those events, each filament eventually returns to its origin on the solar surface. In this Letter, a new observation of two failed filament eruptions is reported which indicates that the mass of a confined filament can be ejected to places far from the original filament channel. The jetlike mass motions in the two failed filament eruptions are thought to be due to the asymmetry of the background coronal magnetic fields with respect to the locations of the filament channels. The asymmetry of the coronal fields is confirmed by an extrapolation based on a potential field model. The obvious imbalance between the positive and negative magnetic flux (with a ratio of 1:3) in the bipolar active region is thought to be the direct cause of the formation of the asymmetric coronal fields. We think that the asymmetry of the background fields can not only influence the trajectories of ejecta, but also provide a relatively stronger confinement for flux rope eruptions than the symmetric background fields do.

  4. New techniques and instrumentation for the characterisation of magnetic and electrostatic fields in nanocrystals and working devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    microscope (TEM) [1]. The interpretation of the recorded phase shift can be used to obtain quantitative@fz-juelich.de Keywords: off-axis electron holography, Lorentz imaging, magnetic fields, electric fields, working devices Off-axis electron holography is a powerful technique that be used to record the phase shift of a high

  5. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  6. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  7. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  8. Observations of toroidicity-induced Alfvn eigenmodes in a reversed field pinch plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio

    Observations of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in a reversed field pinch plasma G. Regnoli H. Bergsåker and E. Tennfors Alfvén Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology (Association EURATOM Alfvén Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology (Association EURATOM/VR), 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden V

  9. Numerical simulation of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami: Comparison with field observations and sensitivity to model parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Numerical simulation of the 2011 Tohoku tsunami: Comparison with field observations and sensitivity history, created a major tsunami that caused numerous deaths and enormous destruction on the nearby Hon- shu coast. Various tsunami sources were developed for this event, based on inverting seismic or GPS

  10. Hinode Observations of Vector Magnetic Field Change Associated with a Flare on 2006 December 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahito Kubo; Takaaki Yokoyama; Yukio Katsukawa; Bruce W Lites; Saku Tsuneta; Yoshinori Suematsu; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Toshifumi Shimizu; Shin'ichi Nagata; Theodore D Tarbell; Richard A Shine; Alan M Title; David Elmore

    2007-09-17

    Continuous observations of a flare productive active region 10930 were successfully carried out with the Solar Optical Telescope onboard the Hinode spacecraft during 2007 December 6 to 19. We focus on the evolution of photospheric magnetic fields in this active region, and magnetic field properties at the site of the X3.4 class flare, using a time series of vector field maps with high spatial resolution. The X3.4 class flare occurred on 2006 December 13 at the apparent collision site between the large, opposite polarity umbrae. Elongated magnetic structures with alternatingly positive and negative polarities resulting from flux emergence appeared one day before the flare in the collision site penumbra. Subsequently, the polarity inversion line at the collision site became very complicated. The number of bright loops in Ca II H increased during the formation of these elongated magnetic structures. The flare ribbons and bright loops evolved along the polarity inversion line and one footpoint of the bright loop was located in a region having a large departure of field azimuth angle with respect to its surroundings. The SOT observations with high spatial resolution and high polarization precision reveal temporal change in fine structure of magnetic fields at the flare site: some parts of the complicated polarity inversion line then disappeared, and in those regions the azimuth angle of photospheric magnetic field changed by about 90 degrees, becoming more spatially uniform within the collision site.

  11. Possible features of galactic halo with electric field and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koushik Chakraborty; Farook Rahaman; Saibal Ray; Arka Nandi; Nasarul Islam

    2014-12-15

    Observed rotational curves of neutral hydrogen clouds strongly support the fact that galactic halo contains huge amount of nonluminous matter, the so called gravitational dark matter. The nature of dark matter is a point of debate among the researchers. Recent observations reported the presence of ions of O, S, C, Si etc in the galactic halo and intergalactic medium. This supports the possibility of existence of electric field in the galactic halo region. We therefore propose a model of galactic halo considering this electric field arising due to charged particles as one of the inputs for the background spacetime metric. Considering dark matter as an anisotropic fluid we obtain the expressions for energy density and pressure of dark matter there and consequently the equation of state of dark matter. Various other aspects of the solutions are also analyzed along with a critical comparison with and constraints of different observational evidences.

  12. Evaluation of electric and magnetic fields distribution and SAR induced in 3D models of water containers by radiofrequency radiation using FDTD and FEM simulation techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelsamie, Maher A A; Mustafa, Shuhaimi; Hashim, Dzulkifly

    2014-01-01

    In this study, two software packages using different numerical techniques FEKO 6.3 with Finite-Element Method (FEM) and XFDTD 7 with Finite Difference Time Domain Method (FDTD) were used to assess exposure of 3D models of square, rectangular, and pyramidal shaped water containers to electromagnetic waves at 300, 900, and 2400 MHz frequencies. Using the FEM simulation technique, the peak electric field of 25, 4.5, and 2 V/m at 300 MHz and 15.75, 1.5, and 1.75 V/m at 900 MHz were observed in pyramidal, rectangular, and square shaped 3D container models, respectively. The FDTD simulation method confirmed a peak electric field of 12.782, 10.907, and 10.625 V/m at 2400 MHz in the pyramidal, square, and rectangular shaped 3D models, respectively. The study demonstrated an exceptionally high level of electric field in the water in the two identical pyramid shaped 3D models analyzed using the two different simulation techniques. Both FEM and FDTD simulation techniques indicated variations in the distribution of elect...

  13. Accessing interior magnetic field vector components in neutron electric dipole moment experiments via exterior measurements, I. Boundary-value techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Plaster

    2013-09-22

    We propose a new concept for determining the interior magnetic field vector components in neutron electric dipole moment experiments. If a closed three-dimensional boundary surface surrounding the fiducial volume of an experiment can be defined such that its interior encloses no currents or sources of magnetization, each of the interior vector field components and the magnetic scalar potential will satisfy a Laplace equation. Therefore, if either the vector field components or the normal derivative of the scalar potential can be measured on the surface of this boundary, thus defining a Dirichlet or Neumann boundary-value problem, respectively, the interior vector field components or the scalar potential (and, thus, the field components via the gradient of the potential) can be uniquely determined via solution of the Laplace equation. We discuss the applicability of this technique to the determination of the interior magnetic field components during the operating phase of neutron electric dipole moment experiments when it is not, in general, feasible to perform direct in situ measurements of the interior field components. We also study the specifications that a vector field probe must satisfy in order to determine the interior vector field components to a certain precision. The technique we propose here may also be applicable to experiments requiring monitoring of the vector magnetic field components within some closed boundary surface, such as searches for neutron-antineutron oscillations along a flight path or measurements in storage rings of the muon anomalous magnetic moment $g-2$ and the proton electric dipole moment.

  14. Calculation methods and detection techniques for electric and magnetic fields from power lines with measurement verification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamishev, Alexander V

    1994-01-01

    An accurate determination and characterization of electric and magnetic fields produced by power lines is a complex task. Different models must be used for far fields and for near fields. This study is centered on computation and measurement aspects...

  15. Tropical synoptic scale moisture fields observed from the Nimbus-7 SMMR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fink, Jeffrey David

    1989-01-01

    eastern Pacific Ocean weather systems are ea. sy to observe on visual and infrared satellite images. However, it is difficult to quantify their moisture fields due to the great scarcity of conventional data. . In addition, it is difficult to examine... rainfall over the eastern part of the tropical Pacific Ocean because there are few island stations or ship reports available. Satellite passive microwave instruments have been used to determine precip- itable water, liquid water and precipitation over...

  16. Observation of localized heating phenomena during microwave heating of mixed powders using in situ x-ray diffraction technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabelström, N., E-mail: sabelstrom.n.aa@m.titech.ac.jp; Hayashi, M. [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Watanabe, T. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Nagata, K. [Department of Conservation Science, Tokyo University of the Arts, 12-8 Ueno Park, Taito-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-10-28

    In materials processing research using microwave heating, there have been several observations of various phenomena occurring known as microwave effects. One significant example of such a phenomenon is increased reaction kinetics. It is believed that there is a possibility that this might be caused by localized heating, were some reactants would attain a higher than apparent temperature. To examine whether such thermal gradients are indeed possible, mixed powders of two microwave non-absorbers, alumina and magnesia, were mixed with graphite, a known absorber, and heated in a microwave furnace. During microwave irradiation, the local temperatures of the respective sample constituents were measured using an in situ x-ray diffraction technique. In the case of the alumina and graphite sample, a temperature difference of around 100?°C could be observed.

  17. Voyager 1 observations of the interstellar magnetic field and the transition from the heliosheath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ness, N. F., E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Voyager 1 (V1) has been observing interstellar magnetic fields for more than one year beginning ?2012/209, when V1 crossed a current sheet, a 'CS0' having the structure of a tangential discontinuity. The inclination of this current sheet is consistent with an interstellar magnetic field B draped on a blunt heliopause. Two other current sheets (sector boundaries) were observed at ?2012/167 and ?2011/276 with high inclinations (99° ± 10° and 89° ± 10°, respectively). From 2013.0 to ?2013.6, the difference between the azimuthal angle ? of B from the Parker spiral angle at the latitude 34.°6 of V1 was ? – ?{sub P} = 22° ± 3° and the corresponding difference of the elevation angle ? was ? – ?{sub P} = 23° ± 8°. During 2012, the deviation from the Parker spiral angle was somewhat smaller. The interstellar magnetic field has a 'west to east polarity,' opposite to the direction of planetary motions. The magnitude of B varied smoothly in the range 0.38-0.59 nT with an average B = 0.486 ± 0.045 after 2012/237.7. The transition from heliosheath to interstellar magnetic fields is related to a 'two-step' increase in the cosmic ray intensity observed by V1 from ?2012.30 to ?2012.65. The first step increase began near the end of an unusual 'away-polarity' sector, and it reached a plateau when V1 moved into a 'toward-polarity' sector that ended at CS0. The second step increase began slowly after V1 crossed CS0, and it ended abruptly at 2012/237.728.

  18. NON-POTENTIAL FIELDS IN THE QUIET SUN NETWORK: EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET AND MAGNETIC FOOTPOINT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Orange, N. B.

    2013-11-20

    The quiet Sun (QS) magnetic network is known to contain dynamics which are indicative of non-potential fields. Non-potential magnetic fields forming ''S-shaped'' loop arcades can lead to the breakdown of static activity and have only been observed in high temperature X-ray coronal structures—some of which show eruptive behavior. Thus, analysis of this type of atmospheric structuring has been restricted to large-scale coronal fields. Here we provide the first identification of non-potential loop arcades exclusive to the QS supergranulation network. High-resolution Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory have allowed for the first observations of fine-scale ''S-shaped'' loop arcades spanning the network. We have investigated the magnetic footpoint flux evolution of these arcades from Heliospheric and Magnetic Imager data and find evidence of evolving footpoint flux imbalances accompanying the formation of these non-potential fields. The existence of such non-potentiality confirms that magnetic field dynamics leading to the build up of helicity exist at small scales. QS non-potentiality also suggests a self-similar formation process between the QS network and high temperature corona and the existence of self-organized criticality (SOC) in the form of loop-pair reconnection and helicity dissipation. We argue that this type of behavior could lead to eruptive forms of SOC as seen in active region (AR) and X-ray sigmoids if sufficient free magnetic energy is available. QS magnetic network dynamics may be considered as a coronal proxy at supergranular scales, and events confined to the network can even mimic those in coronal ARs.

  19. A fast, flexible, approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogeneous cloud fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Pincus

    A fast, flexible, approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogeneous cloud.-J. Morcrette, A fast, flexible, approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogeneous cloud, which computes fluxes at each level. [3] The description of clouds in current LSMs is quite simple: Most

  20. Chandra Observations of Cygnus A: Magnetic Field Strengths in the Hot Spots of a Radio Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Wilson; A. J. Young; P. L. Shopbell

    2000-09-19

    We report X-ray observations of the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This letter focuses on the radio hot spots, all four of which are detected in X-rays with a very similar morphology to their radio structure. X-ray spectra have been obtained for the two brighter hot spots (A and D). Both are well described by a power law with photon index \\Gamma = 1.8 \\pm 0.2 absorbed by the Galactic column in the direction of Cygnus A. Thermal X-ray models require too high gas densities and may be ruled out. The images and spectra strongly support synchrotron self-Compton models of the X-ray emission, as proposed by Harris, Carilli & Perley on the basis of ROSAT imaging observations. Such models indicate that the magnetic field in each of the brighter hot spots is 1.5 \\times 10^-4 gauss, with an uncertainty of a few tens of percent. This value is close to the equipartition field strengths assuming no protons are present. The possibility that the X-rays are synchrotron radiation is briefly discussed, but not favored. We speculate that production of the \\gamma \\sim 10^7 electrons necessary for X-ray synchrotron radiation from hot spots is inhibited when the external gas density is high, as is the case when the radio galaxy is within a cooling flow.

  1. Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content using ground-penetrating radar ground wave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content using ground- penetrating radar ground wave that the GPR estimates had a root mean square error of volumetric water content of the order of 0 agriculture Citation: Grote, K., S. Hubbard, and Y. Rubin, Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content

  2. Calculation of nuclear matter in the presence of strong magnetic field using LOCV technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordbar, G H

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we are interested in the properties of nuclear matter at zero temperature in the presence of strong magnetic fields using the lowest order constraint variational (LOCV) method employing $AV_{18}$ nuclear potential. Our results indicate that in the absence of a magnetic field, the energy per particle is a symmetric function of the spin polarization parameter. This shows that for the nuclear matter, the spontaneous phase transition to a ferromagnetic state does not occur. However, we have found that for the magnetic fields $ B\\gtrsim 10 ^ {18}\\ G$, the symmetry of energy is broken and the energy has a minimum at a positive value of the spin polarization parameter. We have also found that the effect of magnetic field on the value of energy is more significant at the low densities. Our calculations show that at lower densities, the spin polarization parameter is more sensitive to the magnetic field.

  3. Enhanced carbonate reservoir model for an old reservoir utilizing new techniques: The Schaben Field (Mississippian), Ness County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, T.P.; Guy, W.J.; Franseen, E.K.; Bhattacharya, S. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The Pennsylvanian-Mississippian unconformity is a major stratigraphic event in Kansas that truncates rocks ranging from Precambrian to Mississippian. Many of the 6,000 fields in Kansas are located immediately beneath this unconformity. One example, Schaben Field located in Ness County, Kansas, has produced approximately 9 million barrels since it was discovered in 1963. Production is from the Mississippian (Osagian) cherty dolomites beneath the inconformity. The field was initially developed on a regular forty-acre spacing, but recent drilling has demonstrated the potential for additional targeted infill drilling. To develop an enhanced reservoir model for the Schabin field modern core, log, and well data were integrated with the existing data. New techniques such as {open_quotes}Pseudoseismic{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Pickett plot were used to leverage the existing data and provide tools for analysis and 3D visualization. The pseudoseismic approach uses well-logs within a standard 3D seismic visualization system to provide a detailed macroscale view of karst patterns. The petrophysical analyses using the {open_quotes}Super{close_quotes} Pickett plot were used to recognize subtle trends and patterns for each of multiple reservoir intervals. Visual and petrographic examination of core from the field confirms karst development and indicates multiple stages of fracturing, brecciation, and dissolution features that were important in controlling and modifying development of reservoirs. The understanding of the reservoir heterogeneities resulting from the paleokarst model at Schaben field emphasizes the importance of integrating available data with new techniques to provide a predictive tool for discovery of additional pay within existing subunconformity fields in Kansas.

  4. Enhanced carbonate reservoir model for an old reservoir utilizing new techniques: The Schaben Field (Mississippian), Ness County, Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, T.P.; Guy, W.J.; Franseen, E.K.; Bhattacharya, S. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States))

    1996-01-01

    The Pennsylvanian-Mississippian unconformity is a major stratigraphic event in Kansas that truncates rocks ranging from Precambrian to Mississippian. Many of the 6,000 fields in Kansas are located immediately beneath this unconformity. One example, Schaben Field located in Ness County, Kansas, has produced approximately 9 million barrels since it was discovered in 1963. Production is from the Mississippian (Osagian) cherty dolomites beneath the inconformity. The field was initially developed on a regular forty-acre spacing, but recent drilling has demonstrated the potential for additional targeted infill drilling. To develop an enhanced reservoir model for the Schabin field modern core, log, and well data were integrated with the existing data. New techniques such as [open quotes]Pseudoseismic[close quotes] and the [open quotes]Super[close quotes] Pickett plot were used to leverage the existing data and provide tools for analysis and 3D visualization. The pseudoseismic approach uses well-logs within a standard 3D seismic visualization system to provide a detailed macroscale view of karst patterns. The petrophysical analyses using the [open quotes]Super[close quotes] Pickett plot were used to recognize subtle trends and patterns for each of multiple reservoir intervals. Visual and petrographic examination of core from the field confirms karst development and indicates multiple stages of fracturing, brecciation, and dissolution features that were important in controlling and modifying development of reservoirs. The understanding of the reservoir heterogeneities resulting from the paleokarst model at Schaben field emphasizes the importance of integrating available data with new techniques to provide a predictive tool for discovery of additional pay within existing subunconformity fields in Kansas.

  5. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGasObservation of aof

  6. MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS IN THE HELIOSHEATH: VOYAGER 1 OBSERVATIONS DURING 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlaga, L. F. [Geospace Physics Laboratory, Code 673, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ness, N. F., E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ''microscale fluctuations'' of the magnetic field strength B on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of B range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of B during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) 1 to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or 'pink noise' spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days, and it has a broad multifractal spectrum f({alpha}) with 0.57 {<=} {alpha} {<=} 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + {tau}) - SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with {alpha}' = 0.88 {+-} 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 {+-} 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and S(t) are often associated with a change in B across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The 'turbulence' observed by V1 during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of 'turbulence' in the heliosheath.

  7. Field and Laboratory Evaluation of a New Ramping Technique for Duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that ramping is more time efficient and time savings are about 10 to 15 minutes and that the repeatability This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office. A new ramping technique for obtaining the measured data has been developed in order to increase

  8. TRANSVERSE COMPONENT OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE OBSERVED BY SUNRISE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilovic, S.; Beeck, B.; Pietarila, A.; Schuessler, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; MartInez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A.; Domingo, V.; Berkefeld, T.; Schmidt, W.; Knoelker, M.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    We present the first observations of the transverse component of a photospheric magnetic field acquired by the imaging magnetograph SUNRISE/IMaX. Using an automated detection method, we obtain statistical properties of 4536 features with significant linear polarization signal. We obtain a rate of occurrence of 7 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1} arcsec{sup -2}, which is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than the values reported by previous studies. We show that these features have no characteristic size or lifetime. They appear preferentially at granule boundaries with most of them being caught in downflow lanes at some point. Only a small percentage are entirely and constantly embedded in upflows (16%) or downflows (8%).

  9. Cosmology with hybrid expansion law: scalar field reconstruction of cosmic history and observational constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akarsu, Özgür [Department of Physics, Koç University, 34450 Sariyer, ?stanbul (Turkey); Kumar, Suresh [Department of Mathematics, BITS Pilani, Pilani Campus, Rajasthan-333031 (India); Myrzakulov, R.; Sami, M. [Centre of Theoretical Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India); Xu, Lixin, E-mail: oakarsu@ku.edu.tr, E-mail: sukuyd@gmail.com, E-mail: rmyrzakulov@gmail.com, E-mail: samijamia@gmail.com, E-mail: lxxu@dlut.edu.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, 116024 (China)

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a simple form of expansion history of Universe referred to as the hybrid expansion law - a product of power-law and exponential type of functions. The ansatz by construction mimics the power-law and de Sitter cosmologies as special cases but also provides an elegant description of the transition from deceleration to cosmic acceleration. We point out the Brans-Dicke realization of the cosmic history under consideration. We construct potentials for quintessence, phantom and tachyon fields, which can give rise to the hybrid expansion law in general relativity. We investigate observational constraints on the model with hybrid expansion law applied to late time acceleration as well as to early Universe a la nucleosynthesis.

  10. Observable effects caused by vacuum pair creation in the field of high-power optical lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David B. Blaschke; Andrey V. Filatov; Irina A. Egorova; Alexander V. Prozorkevich; Stanislav A. Smolyansky

    2008-11-29

    We consider the possibility of an experimental proof of vacuum e+e- pair creation in the focus of two counter-propagating optical laser beams with an intensity of the order of 10^20 - 10^22 W/cm^2. Our approach is based on the collisionless kinetic equation for the distribution function of the e+e- pairs with the source term for particle production. As a possible experimental signal of vacuum pair production we consider the refraction of a high-frequency probe laser beam by the produced e+e- plasma to be observed by an interference filter. The generation of higher harmonics of the laser frequency in the self-consistent electric field is also investigated.

  11. The longest thermonuclear X-ray burst ever observed? (A BeppoSAX Wide Field Camera observation of 4U 1735-44)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Cornelisse; J. Heise; E. Kuulkers; F. Verbunt; J. J. M. in 't Zand

    2000-03-30

    A long flux enhancement, with an exponential decay time of 86 min, is detected in 4U 1735-44 with the BeppoSAX Wide Field Cameras. We argue that this is a type-I X-ray burst, making it the longest such burst ever observed. Current theories for thermonuclear bursts predict shorter and more frequent bursts for the observed persistent accretion rate.

  12. Diagnosis of magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets through spectropolarimetric observations of H I Paschen lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anan, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Casini, R. E-mail: ichimoto@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2014-05-10

    Magnetic fields govern the plasma dynamics in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, and electric fields acting on neutral atoms that move across the magnetic field enable us to study the dynamical coupling between neutrals and ions in the plasma. In order to measure the magnetic and electric fields of chromospheric jets, the full Stokes spectra of the Paschen series of neutral hydrogen in a surge and in some active region jets that took place at the solar limb were observed on 2012 May 5, using the spectropolarimeter of the Domeless Solar Telescope at Hida observatory, Japan. First, we inverted the Stokes spectra taking into account only the effect of magnetic fields on the energy structure and polarization of the hydrogen levels. Having found no definitive evidence of the effects of electric fields in the observed Stokes profiles, we then estimated an upper bound for these fields by calculating the polarization degree under the magnetic field configuration derived in the first step, with the additional presence of a perpendicular (Lorentz type) electric field of varying strength. The inferred direction of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky approximately aligns to the active region jets and the surge, with magnetic field strengths in the range 10 G < B < 640 G for the surge. Using magnetic field strengths of 70, 200, and 600 G, we obtained upper limits for possible electric fields of 0.04, 0.3, and 0.8 V cm{sup –1}, respectively. This upper bound is conservative, since in our modeling we neglected the possible contribution of collisional depolarization. Because the velocity of neutral atoms of hydrogen moving across the magnetic field derived from these upper limits of the Lorentz electric field is far below the bulk velocity of the plasma perpendicular to the magnetic field as measured by the Doppler shift, we conclude that the neutral atoms must be highly frozen to the magnetic field in the surge.

  13. ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY OBSERVATIONS OF CORONAL LOOPS: CROSS-FIELD TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Jenkins, B. S.; Pathak, S., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    We construct revised response functions for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) using the new atomic data, ionization equilibria, and coronal abundances available in CHIANTI 7.1. We then use these response functions in multithermal analysis of coronal loops, which allows us to determine a specific cross-field temperature distribution without ad hoc assumptions. Our method uses data from the six coronal filters and the Monte Carlo solutions available from our differential emission measure (DEM) analysis. The resulting temperature distributions are not consistent with isothermal plasma. Therefore, the observed loops cannot be modeled as single flux tubes and must be composed of a collection of magnetic strands. This result is now supported by observations from the High-resolution Coronal Imager, which show fine-scale braiding of coronal strands that are reconnecting and releasing energy. Multithermal analysis is one of the major scientific goals of AIA, and these results represent an important step toward the successful achievement of that goal. As AIA DEM analysis becomes more straightforward, the solar community will be able to take full advantage of the state-of-the-art spatial, temporal, and temperature resolution of the instrument.

  14. CAN FIELD OBSERVATIONS BE COMBINED SYSTEMATICALLY WITH THE REGIONAL DANGER RATING TO ESTIMATE THE LOCAL AVALANCHE DANGER?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    CAN FIELD OBSERVATIONS BE COMBINED SYSTEMATICALLY WITH THE REGIONAL DANGER RATING TO ESTIMATE THE LOCAL AVALANCHE DANGER? Bruce Jamieson Dept. of Civil Engineering, Dept. of Geoscience, University and Avisualanche Consulting, Vancouver, Canada ABSTRACT: Snow avalanche danger can vary considerably within

  15. Holographic Theory of Accelerated Observers, the S-matrix, and the Emergence of Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Banks; Willy Fischler

    2013-01-24

    We present a theory of accelerated observers in the formalism of holographic space time, and show how to define the analog of the Unruh effect for a one parameter set of accelerated observers in a causal diamond in Minkowski space. The key fact is that the formalism splits the degrees of freedom in a large causal diamond into particles and excitations on the horizon. The latter form a large heat bath for the particles, and different Hamiltonians, describing a one parameter family of accelerated trajectories, have different couplings to the bath. We argue that for a large but finite causal diamond the Hamiltonian describing a geodesic observer has a residual coupling to the bath and that the effect of the bath is finite over the long time interval in the diamond. We find general forms of the Hamiltonian, which guarantee that the horizon degrees of freedom will decouple in the limit of large diamonds, leaving over a unitary evolution operator for particles, with an asymptotically conserved energy. That operator converges to the S-matrix in the infinite diamond limit. The S-matrix thus arises from integrating out the horizon degrees of freedom, in a manner reminiscent of, but distinct from, Matrix Theory. We note that this model for the S-matrix implies that Quantum Gravity, as opposed to quantum field theory, has a natural adiabatic switching off of the interactions. We argue that imposing Lorentz invariance on the S-matrix is natural, and guarantees super-Poincare invariance in the HST formalism. Spatial translation invariance is seen to be the residuum of the consistency conditions of HST.

  16. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis ismore »on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.« less

  17. Fielding the magnetically applied pressure-shear technique on the Z accelerator (completion report for MRT 4519).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, C. Scott; Haill, Thomas A.; Dalton, Devon Gardner; Rovang, Dean Curtis; Lamppa, Derek C.

    2013-09-01

    The recently developed Magnetically Applied Pressure-Shear (MAPS) experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms was fielded on August 16, 2013 on shot Z2544 utilizing hardware set A0283A. Several technical and engineering challenges were overcome in the process leading to the attempt to measure the dynamic strength of NNSA Ta at 50 GPa. The MAPS technique relies on the ability to apply an external magnetic field properly aligned and time correlated with the MHD pulse. The load design had to be modified to accommodate the external field coils and additional support was required to manage stresses from the pulsed magnets. Further, this represents the first time transverse velocity interferometry has been applied to diagnose a shot at Z. All subsystems performed well with only minor issues related to the new feed design which can be easily addressed by modifying the current pulse shape. Despite the success of each new component, the experiment failed to measure strength in the samples due to spallation failure, most likely in the diamond anvils. To address this issue, hydrocode simulations are being used to evaluate a modified design using LiF windows to minimize tension in the diamond and prevent spall. Another option to eliminate the diamond material from the experiment is also being investigated.

  18. VLF wave activity in the solar wind and the photoelectron effect in electric field measurements: Ulysses observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    solar wind streams, Ulysses observed nearly continuous electric wave activity with peak power belowVLF wave activity in the solar wind and the photoelectron effect in electric field measurements present observations of very low frequency (VLF) waves (0.2 to 448 Hz) made by Ulysses during the solar

  19. Group, field and isolated early-type galaxies I. Observations and nuclear data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenda Denicolo; Roberto Terlevich; Elena Terlevich; Duncan Forbes; Alejandro Terlevich; Luis Carrasco

    2004-11-04

    This is the first paper of a series on the investigation of stellar population properties and galaxy evolution of an observationally homogeneous sample of early-type galaxies in groups, field and isolated galaxies. We present high S/N long-slit spectroscopy of 86 nearby elliptical and S0 galaxies. 8 of them are isolated, selected according to a rigorous criterion. This survey has the advantage of covering a larger wavelength range than normally found in the literature, including [OIII]5007 and Halpha, both important for emission correction. Among the 86 galaxies with S/N>15 (per resolution element, for r_e/8 central aperture), 57 have their Hbeta-index corrected for emission, average correction is 0.190A in Hbeta; 42 galaxies reveal [OIII]5007 emission, of which 16 also show obvious Halpha emission. Most of the galaxies in the sample do not show obvious signs of disturbances nor tidal features in the morphologies, although 11 belong to the Arp catalogue of peculiar galaxies; only 3 of them (NGC750, NGC751, NGC3226) seem to be strongly interacting. We present the measurement of 25 central line-strength indices calibrated to the Lick/IDS system. Kinematic information is obtained for the sample. We analyse the line-strength index vs velocity dispersion relations for our sample of mainly low density environment galaxies, and compare the slope of the relations with cluster galaxies from the literature. Our main findings are that the index-sigma_0 relations presented for low-density regions are not significantly different from those of cluster E/S0s. The slope of the index-sigma_0 relations does not seem to change for early-type galaxies of different environmental densities, but the scatter of the relations seems larger for group, field and isolated galaxies than for cluster galaxies.

  20. Integral Field Unit Observations of NGC 4302: Kinematics of the Diffuse Ionized Gas Halo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George H. Heald; Richard J. Rand; Robert A. Benjamin; Matthew A. Bershady

    2007-03-13

    We present moderate resolution spectroscopy of extraplanar diffuse ionized gas (EDIG) emission in the edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 4302. The spectra were obtained with the SparsePak integral field unit (IFU) at the WIYN Observatory. The spectra are used to construct position-velocity (PV) diagrams at several ranges of heights above the midplane. Azimuthal velocities are directly extracted from the PV diagrams using the envelope tracing method, and indicate an extremely steep dropoff in rotational velocity with increasing height, with magnitude ~30 km/s/kpc. We find evidence for a radial variation in the velocity gradient on the receding side. We have also performed artificial observations of galaxy models in an attempt to match the PV diagrams. The results of a statistical analysis also favor a gradient of ~30 km/s/kpc. We compare these results with an entirely ballistic model of disk-halo flow, and find a strong dichotomy between the observed kinematics and those predicted by the model. The disagreement is worse than we have found for other galaxies in previous studies. The conclusions of this paper are compared to results from two other galaxies, NGC 5775 and NGC 891. We find that the vertical gradient in rotation speed, per unit EDIG scale height, for all three galaxies is consistent with a constant magnitude (within the errors) of approximately 15-25 km/s/scaleheight, independent of radius. This relationship is also true within the galaxy NGC 4302. We also discuss how the gradient depends on the distribution and morphology of the EDIG and the star formation rates of the galaxies, and consequences for the origin of the gas.

  1. Measurements of ionospheric electric field convection by the long-line technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDougall, J.W.

    1981-06-01

    Ionospheric E x B convections are measured by a new technique that uses satellite scintillations. The measurements are for and ionospheric region centred on 39/sup 0/N, 82/sup 0/W geographic or 53/sup 0/ invarient latitude. Results are presented for spring equinox 1980. The quiet condition eastward convection drift is approximately V/sub i/E = -12+43 cos(2..pi../24)(t-13.4). During disturbed conditions at nighttime the westward convection becomes large and highly variable. The northward perpendicular E x B convection is approximately V/sub i/N = -5+13 cos (2..pi../12)(t-10.5)+6 cos (2..pi../24) (t-11.5) m/s during quiet conditions. During disturbed conditions the semidiurnal component of the northward convection increases by about a factor of 3 and becomes larger than the diurnal.

  2. Effect of nonlinear absorption on electric field applied lead chloride by Z-scan technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rejeena, I. [International School of Photonics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin Kerala, India and M.S.M. College, Kayamkulam, Kerala (India); Lillibai,; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P. [International School of Photonics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin Kerala (India); Rahimkutty, M. H. [M.S.M. College, Kayamkulam, Kerala (India)

    2014-10-15

    The preparation, spectral response and optical nonlinearity of gel grown lead chloride single crystals subjected to electric field of 20V using parallel plate arrangements have been investigated. Optical band gap of the samples were determined using linear absorption spectra. Open aperture z-scan was employed for the determination of nonlinear absorption coefficient of PbCl{sub 2} solution. The normalized transmittance curve exhibits a valley shows reverse saturable absorption. The non linear absorption at different input fluences were recorded using a single Gaussian laser beam in tight focus geometry. The RSA nature of the sample makes it suitable for optical limiting applications.

  3. Quantifying sources of black carbon in Western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-05-04

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source-receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over Western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over the Northwest USA andmore »West Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  4. Quantifying sources of black carbon in western North America using observationally based analysis and an emission tagging technique in the Community Atmosphere Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Hegg, D. A.; Qian, Y.; Doherty, S. J.; Dang, C.; Ma, P.-L.; Rasch, P. J.; Fu, Q.

    2015-11-18

    The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5), equipped with a technique to tag black carbon (BC) emissions by source regions and types, has been employed to establish source–receptor relationships for atmospheric BC and its deposition to snow over western North America. The CAM5 simulation was conducted with meteorological fields constrained by reanalysis for year 2013 when measurements of BC in both near-surface air and snow are available for model evaluation. We find that CAM5 has a significant low bias in predicted mixing ratios of BC in snow but only a small low bias in predicted atmospheric concentrations over northwestern USA and westernmore »Canada. Even with a strong low bias in snow mixing ratios, radiative transfer calculations show that the BC-in-snow darkening effect is substantially larger than the BC dimming effect at the surface by atmospheric BC. Local sources contribute more to near-surface atmospheric BC and to deposition than distant sources, while the latter are more important in the middle and upper troposphere where wet removal is relatively weak. Fossil fuel (FF) is the dominant source type for total column BC burden over the two regions. FF is also the dominant local source type for BC column burden, deposition, and near-surface BC, while for all distant source regions combined the contribution of biomass/biofuel (BB) is larger than FF. An observationally based positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the snow-impurity chemistry is conducted to quantitatively evaluate the CAM5 BC source-type attribution. While CAM5 is qualitatively consistent with the PMF analysis with respect to partitioning of BC originating from BB and FF emissions, it significantly underestimates the relative contribution of BB. In addition to a possible low bias in BB emissions used in the simulation, the model is likely missing a significant source of snow darkening from local soil found in the observations.« less

  5. Observations of magnetic fields in the Milky Way and in nearby galaxies with a Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Beck; B. M. Gaensler

    2004-10-26

    The role of magnetic fields in the dynamical evolution of galaxies and of the interstellar medium (ISM) is not well understood, mainly because such fields are difficult to directly observe. Radio astronomy provides the best tools to measure magnetic fields: synchrotron radiation traces fields illuminated by cosmic-ray electrons, while Faraday rotation and Zeeman splitting allow us to detect fields in all kinds of astronomical plasmas, from lowest to highest densities. Here we describe how fundamental new advances in studying magnetic fields, both in our own Milky Way and in other nearby galaxies, can be made through observations with the proposed Square Kilometre Array. Underpinning much of what we propose is an all-sky survey of Faraday rotation, in which we will accumulate tens of millions of rotation measure measurements toward background radio sources. This will provide a unique database for studying magnetic fields in individual Galactic supernova remnants and HII regions, for characterizing the overall magnetic geometry of our Galaxy's disk and halo, and for understanding the structure and evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies. Also of considerable interest will be the mapping of diffuse polarized emission from the Milky Way in many narrow bands over a wide frequency range. This will allow us to carry out Faraday tomography of the Galaxy, yielding a high-resolution three-dimensional picture of the magnetic field within a few kpc of the Sun, and allowing us to understand its coupling to the other components of the ISM. Finally, direct synchrotron imaging of a large number of nearby galaxies, combined with Faraday rotation data, will allow us to determine the magnetic field structure in these sources, and to test both the dynamo and primordial field theories for field origin and amplification.

  6. The Origin of Magnetic Fields in Galaxies: Observational Tests with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Beck

    2006-04-07

    The all-sky survey of Faraday rotation, a Key Science Project of the planned Square Kilometre Array, will accumulate tens of millions of rotation measure measurements toward background radio sources and will provide a unique database for characterizing the overall magnetic geometry of magnetic fields in galaxies and in the intergalactic medium. Deep imaging of the polarized synchrotron emission from a large number of nearby galaxies, combined with Faraday rotation data, will allow us to test the primordial, flow and dynamo models for field origin and amplification. The SKA will find the first fields in young galaxies and determine the timescale for building up small-scale turbulent and large-scale coherent fields. The spectrum of dynamo modes, if existing, will be resolved. The direction of the present-day coherent field keeps memory of the direction of the seed field which can be used for mapping the structure of the seed field before galaxy formation.

  7. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael (Brooktondale, NY) [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  8. Evolution of magnetic fields in galaxies and future observational tests with the Square Kilometre Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tigran G. Arshakian; Rainer Beck; Marita Krause; Dmitry Sokoloff

    2008-11-18

    Aims. We investigate the cosmological evolution of large- and small-scale magnetic fields in galaxies in the light of present models of formation and evolution of galaxies. Methods. We use the dynamo theory to derive the timescales of amplification and ordering of magnetic fields in disk and puffy galaxies. Turbulence in protogalactic halos generated by thermal virialization can drive an efficient turbulent dynamo. Results from simulations of hierarchical structure formation cosmology provide a tool to develop an evolutionary model of regular magnetic fields coupled with galaxy formation and evolution. Results. The turbulent (small-scale) dynamo was able to amplify a weak seed magnetic field in halos of protogalaxies to a few muG strength within a few 10^8 yr. This turbulent field served as a seed to the mean-field (large-scale) dynamo. Galaxies similar to the Milky Way formed their disks at z~10 and regular fields of muG strength and a few kpc coherence length were generated within 2 Gyr (at z~3), but field-ordering on the coherence scale of the galaxy size required an additional 6 Gyr (at z~0.5). Giant galaxies formed their disks at z~10, allowing more efficient dynamo generation of strong regular fields (with kpc coherence length) already at z~4. However, the age of the Universe is short for fully coherent fields in giant galaxies larger than 15 kpc to have been achieved. Dwarf galaxies should have hosted fully coherent fields at z~1. After a major merger, the strength of the turbulent field is enhanced by a factor of a few. Conclusions. This evolutionary scenario can be tested by measurements of polarized synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation with the planned SKA. We predict an anticorrelation between galaxy size and ratio between ordering scale and galaxy size (abridged).

  9. Observed limiting cases of horizontal field coherence and array performance in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Shallow-Water 2006 (SW06) field program2 are used here to measure coherence. As part of the experiment

  10. Ferroelastic Domain Patterns in Free-Standing Nanoferroelectrics Phase Field Studies with Comparisons to Experimental Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Ferroelastic Domain Patterns in Free-Standing Nanoferroelectrics Phase Field Studies., Acta Materialia, 60(8), 3632 (2012). Free Standing Nanostructures 4 · Devonshire-Ginzburg-Landau energy

  11. WHAT DO FIELD OBSERVATIONS TELL US ABOUT AVALANCHE DANGER? Shane Haladuick*, Michael Schirmer, and Bruce Jamieson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    observations (instability, snowpack, and weather factors), which do not require digging a snow profile on weather, ava- lanche and snowpack observations, as well as observations from snow profiles and snowpack tests that require digging a pit. They also rely on their previous experience travelling in similar con

  12. A Survey Of Optimization Techniques Being Used In The Field Vivek D. Pinto, NCSA, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pottenger, William M.

    of factors that may be optimized are cost, raw materials used, time required and pollution causedA Survey Of Optimization Techniques Being Used In The Field Vivek D. Pinto, NCSA, University of optimization techniques to industrial processes has been driven primarily by the increase in global

  13. Ozone production efficiency and NOx depletion in an urban plume: Interpretation of field observations and implications for evaluating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3 to a wide span of NOx and VOC emission changes. Properly constrained and well-evaluated modelsOzone production efficiency and NOx depletion in an urban plume: Interpretation of field observations and implications for evaluating O3-NOx-VOC sensitivity Rahul A. Zaveri,1 Carl M. Berkowitz,1

  14. Effects of Pulsed Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Water Characterized by Light Scattering Techniques: Role of Bubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallée, P; Legrand, L; Mentré, P; Monod, M O; Thomas, Y; Vall\\'{e}e, Philippe; Lafait, Jacques; Legrand, Laurent; Mentr\\'{e}, Pascale; Monod, Marie-Odile; Thomas, Yol\\`{e}ne

    2005-01-01

    Well-characterized purified water was exposed for 6 h to pulsed low-frequency weak electromagnetic fields. After various time periods, nondegassed and degassed water samples were analyzed by static light scattering. Just after electromagnetic exposure (day 0), a reduction of over 20% in the maximum light scattering intensity at 488 nm wavelength in both nondegassed and degassed samples was observed. By contrast, on day 12 the difference was observed only in nondegassed water samples. The latter effect was attributed to the different geometries of the containers combined with the basic origin of the whole phenomenon due to gas bubbles present in water. By the use of dynamic light scattering, the bubble mean diameter was estimated to be around 300 nm. Our results suggest that the electromagnetic exposure acts on gas nanobubbles present in water and emphasizes the role of the gas/liquid interface. The possibility that exposure to electromagnetic fields disturbs the ionic double-layer that contributes to bubble s...

  15. OBSERVATIONS OF THE INTERACTION OF ACOUSTIC WAVES AND SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN A QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chitta, Lakshmi Pradeep; Kariyappa, R.; Jain, Rekha; Jefferies, Stuart M. E-mail: rkari@iiap.res.in E-mail: stuartj@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2012-01-10

    The effect of the magnetic field on photospheric intensity and velocity oscillations at the sites of small-scale magnetic fields (SMFs) in a quiet Sun near the solar disk center is studied. We use observations made by the G-band filter in the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode for intensity oscillations; Doppler velocity, magnetic field, and continuum intensity are derived from an Ni I photospheric absorption line at 6767.8 A using the Michelson Doppler Imager on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. Our analysis shows that both the high-resolution intensity observed in the G band and velocity oscillations are influenced by the presence of a magnetic field. While intensity oscillations are suppressed at all frequencies in strong magnetic field regions compared to weak magnetic field regions, velocity oscillations show an enhancement of power in the frequency band 5.5-7 mHz. We find that there is a drop of 20%-30% in the p-mode power of velocity oscillations within the SMFs when compared to the regions surrounding them. Our findings indicate that the nature of the interaction of acoustic waves with the quiet Sun SMFs is similar to that of large-scale magnetic fields in active regions. We also report the first results of the center-to-limb variation of such effects using the observations of the quiet Sun from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The independent verification of these interactions using SDO/HMI suggests that the velocity power drop of 20%-30% in p-modes is fairly constant across the solar disk.

  16. Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: to detect and locate more microearthquakes observed during EGS operations using the matched field processing (MFP) technique.

  17. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF THE TURBULENT emf AND TRANSPORT OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN A LIQUID SODIUM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahbarnia, Kian; Brown, Benjamin P.; Clark, Mike M.; Kaplan, Elliot J.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Rasmus, Alex M.; Taylor, Nicholas Zane; Forest, Cary B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Jenko, Frank; Limone, Angelo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pinton, Jean-Francois; Plihon, Nicolas; Verhille, Gautier, E-mail: kian.rahbarnia@ipp.mpg.de [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS and Universite de Lyon, F-69364 Lyon (France)

    2012-11-10

    For the first time, we have directly measured the transport of a vector magnetic field by isotropic turbulence in a high Reynolds number liquid metal flow. In analogy with direct measurements of the turbulent Reynolds stress (turbulent viscosity) that governs momentum transport, we have measured the turbulent electromotive force (emf) by simultaneously measuring three components of velocity and magnetic fields, and computed the correlations that lead to mean-field current generation. Furthermore, we show that this turbulent emf tends to oppose and cancel out the local current, acting to increase the effective resistivity of the medium, i.e., it acts as an enhanced magnetic diffusivity. This has important implications for turbulent transport in astrophysical objects, particularly in dynamos and accretion disks.

  18. Changes in permeability caused by transiemt stresses: Field observations, experiments, and mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    into granite at 3.5 km at Soultz: 1. Borehole observations,EGS reservoir stimulation at Soultz (upper line) and Basel (Borehole (KTB), and the Soultz and Basel EGS sites have

  19. HINODE OBSERVATION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN A SUNSPOT LIGHT BRIDGE ACCOMPANIED BY LONG-LASTING CHROMOSPHERIC PLASMA EJECTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimizu, Toshifumi [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8510 (Japan); Katsukawa, Yukio; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Tsuneta, Saku [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kubo, Masahito; Lites, Bruce W. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Shin'ichi [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kamitakara-cho, Takayama, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Shine, Richard A.; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)], E-mail: shimizu.toshifumi@isas.jaxa.jp

    2009-05-01

    We present high-resolution magnetic field measurements of a sunspot light bridge (LB) that produced chromospheric plasma ejections intermittently and recurrently for more than 1 day. The observations were carried out with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope on 2007 April 29 and 30. The spectro-polarimeter reveals obliquely oriented magnetic fields with vertical electric current density higher than 100 mA m{sup -2} along the LB. The observations suggest that current-carrying highly twisted magnetic flux tubes are trapped below a cusp-shaped magnetic structure along the LB. The presence of trapped current-carrying flux tubes is essential for causing long-lasting chromospheric plasma ejections at the interface with pre-existing vertically oriented umbral fields. A bidirectional jet was clearly detected, suggesting magnetic reconnections occurring at very low altitudes, slightly above the height where the vector magnetic fields are measured. Moreover, we found another strong vertical electric current on the interface between the current-carrying flux tube and pre-existing umbral field, which might be a direct detection of the currents flowing in the current sheet formed at the magnetic reconnection sites.

  20. Near-earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; et al

    2015-08-10

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L~5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ~40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ~3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front.more »Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt (L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.« less

  1. Observation of the Dynamical Structure of Turbulence in Plasma Confined by a Dipole Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    improvements that allow observation of quasi-coherent structures and measurement of multipoint statistics-off-layers of toroidal fusion confinement devices[14­16], in the solar wind[17], in magnetized columns of electrons[18 the large-scale structure of turbulence consists of rotating, long-wavelength convective cells with ampli

  2. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

    field field-type-text field-field-page-name">
  3. Assess the Efficacy of an Aerial Distant Observer Tool Capable of Rapid Analysis of Large Sections of Collector Fields: FY 2008 CSP Milestone Report, September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G.; Burkholder, F.; Gray, A.; Wendelin, T.

    2009-02-01

    We assessed the feasibility of developing an aerial Distant Observer optical characterization tool for collector fields in concentrating solar power plants.

  4. Magnetic field fluctuations observed in the heliosheath and interstellar magnetic field by Voyager 1 at 115.7-124.9 AU during 2011-2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ness, N. F. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Florinski, V.; Heerikhuisen, J., E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We discuss microscale fluctuations of the hour averages of the magnetic field B observed on a scale of one day by Voyager 1 (V1) from 2011.0 to 2012.3143 (when it was within the distant heliosheath, where the average magnetic field strength (B) = 0.17 nT) and during the interval from 2012.6503 to 2013.5855 (when it was within the interstellar plasma with (B) = 0.47 nT). In both regions, the fluctuations were primarily compressive fluctuations, varying along the average B (?T direction in RTN coordinates). In the heliosheath, the average of the daily standard deviations (SDs) of the compressive and transverse components of B were (SD{sub c}) = 0.010 nT and (SD{sub t}) ? 0.005 nT (which is the limit of the measurement). In the distant heliosheath (SD{sub c})/(B) = 0.06, and the distributions of SD were skewed and highly kurtotic. The interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) strength was B = 0.48 nT, but the fluctuations were below the limit of measurement: (SD{sub c}) = 0.004 nT and (abs(SD{sub t})) = 0.004 nT. The distributions of these interstellar SDs have skewness and kurtosis consistent with a Gaussian noise distribution. We also discuss the fluctuations of 48 s averages of B on a scale of 1 day during a 30 day interval when V1 was observing the ISMF. For the fluctuations in all three components of B, SD = 0.010 nT, which gives an upper limit on the fluctuations of the ISMF on the scales observed by V1. This SD rules out the possibility that there is significant power in electromagnetic fluctuations generated by pickup ion ring instabilities at these scales, which strongly constrains models of the IBEX ribbon.

  5. The effect of a radial electric field on ripple-trapped ions observed by neutral particle fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heikkinen, J.A. [VTT Energy, Euratom-TEKES Association, P.O. Box 1604, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)] [VTT Energy, Euratom-TEKES Association, P.O. Box 1604, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Herrmann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik--EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik--EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kurki-Suonio, T. [Helsinki University of Technology, Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Euratom-TEKES Association, FIN-02150 Espoo (Finland)] [Helsinki University of Technology, Department of Engineering Physics and Mathematics, Euratom-TEKES Association, FIN-02150 Espoo (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    The effect of a radial electric field on nonthermal ripple-trapped ions is investigated using toroidal Monte Carlo simulations for edge tokamak plasmas. The increase in the neutral particle flux from the ions trapped in local magnetic wells observed by the charge exchange (CX) detector at a low confinement to high confinement transition at ASDEX (Axially Symmetric Divertor Experiment). Upgrade tokamak [{ital Proceedings of the 20th European Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics}, Lisbon (European Physical Society, Petit-Lancy, Switzerland, 1993), Vol. 17C, Part I, p. 267] is reproduced in the simulations by turning on a radial electric field near the plasma periphery. The poloidal and toroidal angles at which the CX detector signal is most sensitive to the radial electric field are determined. A fast response time of the signal in the range of 50{endash}100 {mu}s to the appearance of the electric field can be found in the simulations with a relatively large half-width of the negative electric field region. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. LAMOST observations in the Kepler field. Database of low-resolution spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Cat, P; Ren, A B; Yang, X H; Shi, J R; Luo, A L; Yang, M; Wang, J L; Zhang, H T; Shi, H M; Zhang, W; Dong, Subo; Catanzaro, G; Corbally, C J; Frasca, A; Gray, R O; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Uytterhoeven, K; Briquet, M; Bruntt, H; Frandsen, S; Kiss, L; Kurtz, D W; Marconi, M; Niemczura, E; Oestensen, R H; Ripepi, V; Smalley, B; Southworth, J; Szabo, R; Telting, J H; Karoff, C; Aguirre, V Silva; Wu, Y; Hou, Y H; Jin, G; Zhou, X L

    2015-01-01

    The nearly continuous light curves with micromagnitude precision provided by the space mission Kepler are revolutionising our view of pulsating stars. They have revealed a vast sea of low-amplitude pulsation modes that were undetectable from Earth. The long time base of Kepler light curves allows an accurate determination of frequencies and amplitudes of pulsation modes needed for in-depth asteroseismic modeling. However, for an asteroseismic study to be successful, the first estimates of stellar parameters need to be known and they can not be derived from the Kepler photometry itself. The Kepler Input Catalog (KIC) provides values for the effective temperature, the surface gravity and the metallicity, but not always with a sufficient accuracy. Moreover, information on the chemical composition and rotation rate is lacking. We are collecting low-resolution spectra for objects in the Kepler field of view with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST, Xinglong observatory, China). Al...

  7. Observation of localized states in atomically thin MoS{sub 2} field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatak, Subhamoy; Pal, Atindra Nath; Ghosh, Arindam

    2013-12-04

    We present electrical transport and low frequency (1/f) noise measurements on mechanically exfoliated single, bi and trilayer MoS{sub 2}-based FET devices on Si/SiO{sub 2} substrate. We find that the electronic states in MoS{sub 2} are localized at low temperatures (T) and conduction happens through variable range hopping (VRH). A steep increase of 1/f noise with decreasing T, typical for localized regime was observed in all of our devices. From gate voltage dependence of noise, we find that the noise power is inversely proportional to square of the number density (? 1/n{sup 2}) for a wide range of T, indicating number density fluctuations to be the dominant source of 1/f noise in these MoS{sub 2} FETs.

  8. Observation of Rashba zero-field spin splitting in a strained germanium 2D hole gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, C., E-mail: c.morrison.2@warwick.ac.uk; Rhead, S. D.; Foronda, J.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Wi?niewski, P. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2014-11-03

    We report the observation, through Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance, of spin splitting caused by the Rashba spin-orbit interaction in a strained Ge quantum well epitaxially grown on a standard Si(001) substrate. The Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations display a beating pattern due to the spin split Landau levels. The spin-orbit parameter and Rashba spin-splitting energy are found to be 1.0?×?10{sup ?28?}?eVm{sup 3} and 1.4?meV, respectively. This energy is comparable to 2D electron gases in III-V semiconductors, but substantially larger than in Si, and illustrates the suitability of Ge for modulated hole spin transport devices.

  9. Observation of Two New L4 Neptune Trojans in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerdes, D W; Bernstein, G M; Sako, M; Adams, F; Goldstein, D; Kessler, R; Abbott, T; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; DePoy, D L; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Neto, A Fausti; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Li, T S; Maia, M A G; March, M; Martini, P; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Nichol, R C; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Santiago, B; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarlé, G; Thaler, J; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of the eighth and ninth known Trojans in stable orbits around Neptune's leading Lagrange point, L4. The objects 2014 QO$_{441}$ and 2014 QP$_{441}$ were detected in data obtained during the 2013-14 and 2014-15 observing seasons by the Dark Energy Survey, using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. Both are in high-inclination orbits (18.8$^{\\circ}$ and 19.4$^{\\circ}$ respectively). With an eccentricity of 0.104, 2014 QO$_{441}$ has the most eccentric orbit of the eleven known stable Neptune Trojans. Here we describe the search procedure and investigate the objects' long-term dynamical stability and physical properties.

  10. Observation of Two New L4 Neptune Trojans in the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerdes, D. W.

    2015-07-18

    We report the discovery of the eighth and ninth known Trojans in stable orbits around Neptune's leading Lagrange point, L4. The objects 2014 QO441 and 2014 QP441 were detected in data obtained during the 2013-14 and 2014-15 observing seasons by the Dark Energy Survey, using the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) on the 4-meter Blanco telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter- American Observatory. Both are in high-inclination orbits (18.8° and 19.4° respectively). Furthermore, with an eccentricity of 0.104, 2014 QO441 has the most eccentric orbit of the eleven known stable Neptune Trojans. We describe the search procedure and investigate the objects' long-term dynamical stability and physical properties.

  11. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, C.D.; Allison, M.L.

    1997-08-01

    The Bluebell field is productive from the Tertiary lower Green River and Wasatch Formations of the Uinta Basin, Utah. The productive interval consists of thousands of feet of interbedded fractured clastic and carbonate beds deposited in a fluvial-dominated lacustrine environment. Wells in the Bluebell field are typically completed by perforating 40 or more beds over 1,000 to 3,000 vertical feet (300-900 m), then stimulating the entire interval. This completion technique is believed to leave many potentially productive beds damaged and/or untreated, while allowing water-bearing and low-pressure (thief) zones to communicate with the wellbore. Geologic and engineering characterization has been used to define improved completion techniques. A two-year characterization study involved detailed examination of outcrop, core, well logs, surface and subsurface fractures, produced oil-field waters, engineering parameters of the two demonstration wells, and analysis of past completion techniques and effectiveness. The characterization study resulted in recommendations for improved completion techniques and a field-demonstration program to test those techniques. The results of the characterization study and the proposed demonstration program are discussed in the second annual technical progress report. The operator of the wells was unable to begin the field demonstration this project year (October 1, 1995 to September 20, 1996). Correlation and thickness mapping of individual beds in the Wasatch Formation was completed and resulted in a. series of maps of each of the individual beds. These data were used in constructing the reservoir models. Non-fractured and fractured geostatistical models and reservoir simulations were generated for a 20-square-mile (51.8-km{sup 2}) portion of the Bluebell field. The modeling provides insights into the effects of fracture porosity and permeability in the Green River and Wasatch reservoirs.

  12. Methane storage in nanoporous media as observed via high field NMR relaxometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papaioannou, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    The storage properties of methane gas in Vycor porous glass (5.7 nm) are characterized in a wide pressure range from 0.7 MPa-89.7 MPa using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). We demonstrate the capability of high field NMR relaxometry for the determination of the methane gas storage capacity and the measurement of the Hydrogen Index, to a high degree of accuracy. This helps determine the excess gas in the pore space which can be identified to exhibit Langmuir properties in the low pressure regime of 0.7 MPa to 39.6 Mpa. The Langmuir model enables us to determine the equilibrium density of the monolayer of adsorbed gas to be 8.5% lower than that of liquid methane. We also identify the signatures of multilayer adsorption at the high pressure regime from 39.6 Mpa to 89.7 Mpa and use the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) theory to determine the number of adsorbed layers of methane gas. We show how these measurements help us differentiate the gas stored in the Vycor pore space into free and adsorbed fractions for the ent...

  13. Application of geochemical techniques to deduce the reservoir performance of the Palinpinon Geothermal Field, Philippines - an update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos-Candelaria, M.N.; Garcia, S.E.; Hermoso, D.Z.

    1997-12-31

    Regular monitoring of various geochemical parameters in the water and vapor phases of the production wells at the Palinpinon I and II sectors of the Southern Negros Geothermal Field have been useful in the identification of the dominant reservoir processes occurring related to the present exploitation strategy. Observed geochemical and physical changes in the output of production wells have dictated production and injection strategies adopted to maximize production to meet the steam requirements of the power plant. Correlation of both physical and chemical data have identified the following reservoir processes: (1) Injection breakthrough via the Ticala Fault of the highly mineralized (Cl {approximately}8,000-10,500 mg/kg), isotopically enriched ({delta}{sup 18}O = -3.00{per_thousand}, {delta}{sup 2} H = -39{per_thousand}), and gas depleted brine for wells in the SW and central Puhagan. Injection breakthrough is also occurring in Palinpinon II and has resulted in temperature drops of 5-10{degrees}C.2. Pressure drawdown enhanced boiling in the liquid reservoir with steam separation of 220-240{degrees}C, feeding wells tapping the natural steam zone. However, enhanced drawdown has induced the entry of shallow acid steam condensate fluids in some wells (e.g. OK-7, PN-29D, PN-18D), which if not arrested could reduce production.

  14. Final Report on Development of Optimized Field-Reversed Configuration Plasma Formation Techniques for Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Alan

    2013-11-01

    The University of New Mexico (UNM) proposed a collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop and test methods for improved formation of field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas relevant to magnetized target fusion (MTF) energy research. MTF is an innovative approach for a relatively fast and cheap path to the production of fusion energy that utilizes magnetic confinement to assist in the compression of a hot plasma to thermonuclear conditions by an external driver. LANL is currently pursing demonstration of the MTF concept via compression of an FRC plasma by a metal liner z-pinch in conjunction with the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM. A key physics issue for the FRC's ultimate success as an MTF target lies in the initial pre-ionization (PI) stage. The PI plasma sets the initial conditions from which the FRC is created. In particular, the PI formation process determines the amount of magnetic flux that can be trapped to form the FRC. A ringing theta pinch ionization (RTPI) technique, such as currently used by the FRX-L device at LANL, has the advantages of high ionization fraction, simplicity (since no additional coils are required), and does not require internal electrodes which can introduce impurities into the plasma. However RTPI has been shown to only trap #24;50% of the initial bias flux at best and imposes additional engineering constraints on the capacitor banks. The amount of trapped flux plays an important role in the FRC's final equilibrium, transport, and stability properties, and provides increased ohmic heating of the FRC through induced currents as the magnetic field decays. Increasing the trapped flux also provides the route to greatest potential gains in FRC lifetime, which is essential to provide enough time to translate and compress the FRC effectively. In conjunction with LANL we initially planned to develop and test a microwave break- down system to improve the initial PI plasma formation. The UNM team would design the microwave optics and oversee the fabrication and assembly of all components and assist with integration into the FRX-L machine control system. LANL would provide a preexisting 65 kW X-band microwave source and some associated waveguide hardware. Once constructed and installed, UNM would take the lead in operating the microwave breakdown system and conducting studies to optimize its use in FRC PI formation in close cooperation with the needs of the LANL MTF team. In conjunction with our LANL collaborators, we decided after starting the project to switch from a microwave plasma breakdown approach to a plasma gun technology to use for enhanced plasma formation in the FRX-L field-reversed configuration experiment at LANL. Plasma guns would be able to provide significantly higher density plasma with greater control over its distribution in time and space within the experiment. This would allow greater control and #12;ne-tuning of the PI plasma formed in the experiment. Multiple plasma guns would be employed to fill a Pyrex glass test chamber (built at UNM) with plasma which would then be characterized and optimized for the MTF effort.

  15. SU-E-T-272: Radiation Damage Comparison Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy and Field-In-Field Technique in Breast Cancer Treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ai, H; Zhang, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare normal tissue complications between IMRT and FIF treatment in breast cancer. Methods: 16 patients treated with IMRT plan and 20 patients treated with FIF plan were evaluated in this study. Both kinds of plans were generated using Eclipse treatment planning system by dosimetrist following clinical radiotherapy treatment guidelines. The plans were reviewed and approved by radiation oncologist. The average survival fraction (SF) for three different normal tissue cells of each concerned structure can be calculated from differential dose volume histogram (DVH) using linear quadratic model. The three types of normal tissues include radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant that represents 70%, 50% and 30% survival fractions, respectively, for a 2-Gy open field. Equivalent uniform doses (EUD) for corresponding normal tissues of each structure were calculated. Results: The EUDs of the lungs, heart, healthy breast and spinal cord with both IMRT and FIF treatments were calculated. Considering the average value of all IMRT plans, the lung of treated side absorbed 16.0% of dosage prescribed to the tumor if the radiosensitivity of the lung is similar to the radiosensitive cell line. For moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, the average EUDs can be 18.9% and 22.4% of prescription. In contrast, patients treated with FIF plans were delivered 6.0%, 7.5% and 10.3% of prescribed dose for radiosensitive, moderately radiosensitive and radio-resistant lung tissue, respectively. Comparing heart EUDs between IMRT and FIF plans, average absorbed doses in IMRT treatment were 7.7%, 8.7% and 9.7% of prescription for three types of heart normal tissue cell lines while FIF treatments delivered only 1.3%, 1.5% and 1.6% of prescription dose. For the other organs, the results were similar. Conclusion: The results indicated that breast cancer treatment using IMRT technique had more normal tissue damage than FIF treatment. FIF demonstrated more effective normal tissue dose reduction in breast cancer treatment.

  16. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH:USING ARM OBSERVATIONS & ADVANCED STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES TO EVALUATE CAM3 CLOUDS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF STOCHASTIC CLOUD-RADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerville, Richard

    2013-08-22

    The long-range goal of several past and current projects in our DOE-supported research has been the development of new and improved parameterizations of cloud-radiation effects and related processes, using ARM data, and the implementation and testing of these parameterizations in global models. The main objective of the present project being reported on here has been to develop and apply advanced statistical techniques, including Bayesian posterior estimates, to diagnose and evaluate features of both observed and simulated clouds. The research carried out under this project has been novel in two important ways. The first is that it is a key step in the development of practical stochastic cloud-radiation parameterizations, a new category of parameterizations that offers great promise for overcoming many shortcomings of conventional schemes. The second is that this work has brought powerful new tools to bear on the problem, because it has been a collaboration between a meteorologist with long experience in ARM research (Somerville) and a mathematician who is an expert on a class of advanced statistical techniques that are well-suited for diagnosing model cloud simulations using ARM observations (Shen).

  17. The first observed stellar X-ray flare oscillation: Constraints on the flare loop length and the magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Mitra-Kraev; L. K. Harra; D. R. Williams; E. Kraev

    2005-03-17

    We present the first X-ray observation of an oscillation during a stellar flare. The flare occurred on the active M-type dwarf AT Mic and was observed with XMM-Newton. The soft X-ray light curve (0.2-12 keV) is investigated with wavelet analysis. The flare's extended, flat peak shows clear evidence for a damped oscillation with a period of around 750 s, an exponential damping time of around 2000 s, and an initial, relative peak-to-peak amplitude of around 15%. We suggest that the oscillation is a standing magneto-acoustic wave tied to the flare loop, and find that the most likely interpretation is a longitudinal, slow-mode wave, with a resulting loop length of (2.5 +- 0.2) e10 cm. The local magnetic field strength is found to be (105 +- 50) G. These values are consistent with (oscillation-independent) flare cooling time models and pressure balance scaling laws. Such a flare oscillation provides an excellent opportunity to obtain coronal properties like the size of a flare loop or the local magnetic field strength for the otherwise spatially-unresolved star.

  18. SU-E-T-426: Dose Delivery Accuracy in Breast Field Junction for Free Breath and Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, D; Shekel, E; Levin, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to verify the accuracy of the dose distribution along the field junction in a half beam irradiation technique for breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast or chest wall (CW) and the supraclavicular LN region for both free breathing and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique. Methods: We performed in vivo measurements for nine breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast/CW and to the supraclavicular LN region. Six patients were treated to the left breast/CW using DIBH technique and three patients were treated to the right breast/CW in free breath. We used five microMOSFET dosimeters: three located along the field junction, one located 1 cm above the junction and the fifth microMOSFET located 1 cm below the junction. We performed consecutive measurements over several days for each patient and compared the measurements to the TPS calculation (Eclipse, Varian™). Results: The calculated and measured doses along the junction were 0.97±0.08 Gy and 1.02±0.14 Gy, respectively. Above the junction calculated and measured doses were 0.91±0.08 Gy and 0.98±0.09 Gy respectively, and below the junction calculated and measured doses were 1.70±0.15 Gy and 1.61±0.09 Gy, respectively. All differences were not statistically significant. When comparing calculated and measured doses for DIBH patients only, there was still no statistically significant difference between values for all dosimeter locations. Analysis was done using the Mann-Whitney Rank-Sum Test. Conclusion: We found excellent correlation between calculated doses from the TPS and measured skin doses at the junction of several half beam fields. Even for the DIBH technique, where there is more potential for variance due to depth of breath, there is no over or underdose along the field junction. This correlation validates the TPS, as well an accurate, reproducible patient setup.

  19. Radio Observations of the Hubble Deep Field South Region IV: Optical Properties of the Faint Radio Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. T. Huynh; C. A. Jackson; R. P. Norris; A. Fernandez-Soto

    2008-03-31

    The Australia Telescope Hubble Deep Field-South (ATHDFS) survey of the Hubble Deep Field South reaches sensitivities of ~10 miceoJyJy at 1.4, 2.5, 5.2 and 8.7 GHz, making the ATHDFS one of the deepest surveys ever performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Here we present the optical identifications of the ATHDFS radio sources using data from the literature. We find that ~66% of the radio sources have optical counterparts to I = 23.5 mag. Deep HST imaging of the area identifies a further 12% of radio sources. We present new spectroscopic observations for 98 of the radio sources, and supplement these spectroscopic redshifts with photometric ones calculated from 5-band optical imaging. The host galaxy colors and radio-to-optical ratios indicate that low luminosity (or "radio quiet") AGN make up a significant proportion of the sub-mJy radio population, a result which is in accordance with a number of other deep radio studies. The radio-to-optical ratios of the bright (S_1.4GHz > 1 mJy) sources is consistent with a bimodal distribution.

  20. TRANSITION FROM THE SECTOR ZONE TO THE UNIPOLAR ZONE IN THE HELIOSHEATH: VOYAGER 2 MAGNETIC FIELD OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ness, N. F., E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2011-08-10

    The magnetic polarity pattern observed by Voyager 2 (V2) evolved with time from a nearly equal mixture of positive and negative polarity sectors in the sector zone from 2007.00 to 2007.67 to nearly uniform positive polarity (magnetic fields directed away from the Sun) in the unipolar zone from 2009.6 to 2010.3. This change was caused by the decreasing latitudinal extent of the sector zone, when the minimum extent of the heliospheric current sheet moved northward toward the solar equator as the solar activity associated with solar cycle 23 decreased a minimum in 2010. In the heliosheath, the distribution of daily averages of the magnetic field strength B was lognormal in the sector zone from 2008.83 to 2009.57 and Gaussian in the unipolar zone from 2009.57 to 2010.27. The distribution of daily increments of B was a Tsallis distribution (q-Gaussian distribution) with q = 1.66 {+-} 0.01 in the sector zone and {approx}Gaussian (q = 1.01 {+-} 0.29) in the unipolar zone. The unipolar region appears to be in a relatively undisturbed equilibrium state.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF PIV TECHNIQUE UNDER MAGNETIC FIELDS AND MEASUREMENT OF TURBULENT PIPE FLOW OF FLIBE SIMULANT FLUID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    reports a development of unique experimental techniques using aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide commercial nuclear fusion reactor.1 The main functions of the blankets for D-T fusion reactors are to breed shielding. An essential idea of a liquid breeder concept is that if a liquid containing lithium can

  2. THE LOW-FREQUENCY CHARACTERISTICS OF PSR J0437–4715 OBSERVED WITH THE MURCHISON WIDE-FIELD ARRAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; Tingay, S. J.; Oronsaye, S.; Emrich, D.; Deshpande, A. A.; Van Straten, W.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Goeke, R.; Hewitt, J. N.; Greenhill, L. J.; Kasper, J. C.; Hazelton, B. J.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; and others

    2014-08-20

    We report on the detection of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0437–4715 with the Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA) at a frequency of 192 MHz. Our observations show rapid modulations of pulse intensity in time and frequency that arise from diffractive scintillation effects in the interstellar medium (ISM), as well as prominent drifts of intensity maxima in the time-frequency plane that arise from refractive effects. Our analysis suggests that the scattering screen is located at a distance of ?80-120 pc from the Sun, in disagreement with a recent claim that the screen is closer (?10 pc). Comparisons with higher frequency data from Parkes reveal a dramatic evolution of the pulse profile with frequency, with the outer conal emission becoming comparable in strength to that from the core and inner conal regions. As well as demonstrating the high time resolution science capabilities currently possible with the MWA, our observations underscore the potential to conduct low-frequency investigations of timing-array millisecond pulsars, which may lead to increased sensitivity in the detection of nanoHertz gravitational waves via the accurate characterization of ISM effects.

  3. Radio Observations of the Pulsar Wind Nebula HESS J1303-631 Field of View with ATCA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sushch, Iurii; Schwanke, Ullrich; Johnston, Simon; Dalton, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Based on its energy-dependent morphology the initially unidentified very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray source HESS J1303-631 was recently associated with the pulsar PSR J1301-6305. Subsequent detection of X-ray and GeV counterparts also supports the identification of the H.E.S.S. source as evolved pulsar wind nebula (PWN). We report here on recent radio observations of the PSR J1301-6305 field of view (FOV) with ATCA dedicated to search for the radio counterpart of this evolved PWN. Observations at 5.5 GHz and 7.5 GHz do not reveal any extended emission associated with the pulsar. The analysis of the archival 1.384 GHz and 2.368 GHz data also does not show any significant emission. The 1.384 GHz data reveal a hint of an extended shell-like emission in the PSR J1301-6305 FOV which might be a supernova remnant. We discuss the implications of the non-detection at radio wavelengths on the nature and evolution of the PWN as well as the possibility of the SNR candidate being the birth place of PSR J1301-63...

  4. ON THE FORCE-FREE NATURE OF PHOTOSPHERIC SUNSPOT MAGNETIC FIELDS AS OBSERVED FROM HINODE (SOT/SP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar, E-mail: tiwari@mps.mpg.de [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Bari Road, Udaipur 313 001 (India)

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic field is force-free if there is no interaction between it and the plasma in the surrounding atmosphere, i.e., electric currents are aligned with the magnetic field, giving rise to zero Lorentz force. The computation of various magnetic parameters, such as magnetic energy (using the virial theorem), gradient of twist of sunspot magnetic fields (computed from the force-free parameter {alpha}), and any kind of extrapolation, heavily hinges on the force-free approximation of the photospheric sunspot magnetic fields. Thus, it is of vital importance to inspect the force-free behavior of sunspot magnetic fields. The force-free nature of sunspot magnetic fields has been examined earlier by some researchers, ending with incoherent results. Accurate photospheric vector field measurements with high spatial resolution are required to inspect the force-free nature of sunspots. For this purpose, we use several vector magnetograms of high spatial resolution obtained from the Solar Optical Telescope/Spectro-Polarimeter on board Hinode. Both the necessary and sufficient conditions for force-free nature are examined by checking the global and local nature of equilibrium magnetic forces over sunspots. We find that sunspot magnetic fields are not very far from the force-free configuration, although they are not completely force-free on the photosphere. The umbral and inner penumbral fields are more force-free than the middle and outer penumbral fields. During their evolution, sunspot magnetic fields are found to maintain their proximity to force-free field behavior. Although a dependence of net Lorentz force components is seen on the evolutionary stages of the sunspots, we do not find a systematic relationship between the nature of sunspot magnetic fields and the associated flare activity. Further, we examine whether the fields at the photosphere follow linear or nonlinear force-free conditions. After examining this in various complex and simple sunspots, we conclude that, in either case, photospheric sunspot magnetic fields are closer to satisfying the nonlinear force-free field approximation.

  5. Modelling gamma-ray-axion-like particle oscillations in turbulent magnetic fields: relevance for observations with Cherenkov telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Meyer

    2014-12-08

    Axion-like particles (ALPs) are a common prediction of certain theories beyond the Standard Model and couple to photons in the presence of external magnetic fields. As a consequence, photon-ALP conversions could lead to an enhancement of the flux of extragalactic gamma-ray sources that is otherwise attenuated due to the interactions with background radiation fields. The magnetic fields traversed by the gamma rays are often turbulent and frequently modelled with a simple domain-like structure. Given a maximum mixing between photons and ALPs, we show that in such models realisations of the fields exist for which the photon-ALP oscillation probability vanishes. This behaviour does not occur in more sophisticated magnetic-field models.

  6. Numerical Simulation of the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami Based on a New Transient FEM Co-seismic Source: Comparison to Far-and Near-Field Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Numerical Simulation of the 2011 Tohoku Tsunami Based on a New Transient FEM Co-seismic Source Abstract--In this work, we simulate the 2011 M9 Tohoku-Oki tsunami using new coseismic tsunami sources com- pare observations and numerical simulations of the tsunami's far- and near-field coastal impact

  7. Deep multi-frequency radio observations of the SHADES fields and the nature of the faint radio populaton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibar, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The two SCUBA HAlf-Degree Extragalactic Survey (SHADES) fields are amongst the richest places in the sky in terms of multi-wavelength coverage. They comprise an eastern section of the Lockman Hole (LH) and the central ...

  8. Direct observation and mechanism for enhanced field emission sites in platinum ion implanted/post-annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panda, Kalpataru E-mail: phy.kalpa@gmail.com; Inami, Eiichi; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Sankaran, Kamatchi J.; Tai, Nyan Hwa; Lin, I-Nan

    2014-10-20

    Enhanced electron field emission (EFE) properties for ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films upon platinum (Pt) ion implantation and subsequent post-annealing processes is reported, viz., low turn-on field of 4.17?V/?m with high EFE current density of 5.08?mA/cm{sup 2} at an applied field of 7.0?V/?m. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) mode in scanning tunneling spectroscopy directly revealed the increased electron emission sites density for Pt ion implanted/post-annealed UNCD films than the pristine one. The high resolution CITS mapping and local current–voltage characteristic curves demonstrated that the electrons are dominantly emitted from the diamond grain boundaries and Pt nanoparticles.

  9. Field Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbHFarinello GeothermalFideris Inc formerly1-2003)EmidioMapping

  10. Solar Magnetic Field Studies Using the 12-Micron Emission Lines. IV. Observations of a Delta-Region Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald E. Jennings; Drake Deming; George McCabe; Pedro Sada; Thomas Moran

    2001-12-05

    We have recently developed the capability to make solar vector (Stokes IQUV) magnetograms using the infrared line of MgI at 12.32 microns. On 24 April 2001, we obtained a vector magnetic map of solar active region NOAA 9433, fortuitously just prior to the occurrence of an M2 flare. Examination of a sequence of SOHO/MDI magnetograms, and comparison with ground-based H-alpha images, shows that the flare was produced by the cancellation of newly emergent magnetic flux outside of the main sunspot. The very high Zeeman-sensitivity of the 12-micron data allowed us to measure field strengths on a spatial scale which was not directly resolvable. At the flare trigger site, opposite polarity fields of 2700 and 1000 Gauss occurred within a single 2 arc-sec resolution element, as revealed by two resolved Zeeman splittings in a single spectrum. Our results imply an extremely high horizontal field strength gradient (5 G/km) prior to the flare, significantly greater than seen in previous studies. We also find that the magnetic energy of the cancelling fields was more than sufficient to account for the flare's X-ray luminosity.

  11. Observations of Improved Stability and Confinement in a High-Self-Organized Spherical-Torus-Like Field-Reversed Configuration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    -Torus-Like Field-Reversed Configuration H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, L. C. Steinhauer, and K. E. Miller Redmond Plasma (FRC) with a spherical- torus- (ST-)like core is produced in the translation, confinement. This plasma state exhibits a remarkable stabilizing property for the ubiquitous n 2 centrifugally driven

  12. Three-Year Global Survey of Coronal Null Points from Potential-Field-Source-Surface (PFSS) Modeling and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freed, Michael; McKenize, David

    2014-01-01

    This article compiles and examines a comprehensive coronal magnetic-null-point survey created by potential-field-source-surface (PFSS) modeling and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) observations. The locations of 582 potential magnetic null points in the corona were predicted from the PFSS model between Carrington Rotations (CR) 2098 (June 2010) and 2139 (July 2013). These locations were manually inspected, using contrast-enhanced SDO/AIA images in 171 angstroms at the east and west solar limb, for structures associated with nulls. A Kolmogorov--Smirnov (K--S) test showed a statistically significant difference between observed and predicted latitudinal distributions of null points. This finding is explored further to show that the observability of null points could be affected by the Sun's asymmetric hemisphere activity. Additional K--S tests show no effect on observability related to eigenvalues associated with the fan and spine structure surrounding null points or to the orie...

  13. Quality Control and Census of SMART-R Observations from the DYNAMO/CINDY2011 Field Campaign 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fliegel, Jonathan 1988-

    2012-09-24

    , noise filtering, and an attenuation correction. It was observed that data from SMART-R appeared to be slanted towards the WNW, and after analysis, a 0.75? tilt correction was applied towards azimuth 285?. The data was then converted into Cartesian...

  14. ATLAS: Australia Telescope Large Area Survey: Deep Radio Observations of the CDFS-SWIRE and ELAIS-S1 fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Ray

    . · Radio observations give information which is not available at any other wavelength. For example, we have~10 µJy. · We identify a class of radio sources (IFRS=Infrared-faint radio sources) with no visible Center, California Institute of Technology, USA 3: University of California at San Diego, USA. 4: Anglo

  15. Probing few-excitation eigenstates of interacting atoms on a lattice by observing their collective light emission in the far field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longo, P

    2014-01-01

    The collective emission from a one-dimensional chain of interacting two-level atoms coupled to a common electromagnetic reservoir is investigated. We derive the system's dissipative few-excitation eigenstates, and analyze their static properties, including the collective dipole moments and branching ratios between different eigenstates. Next, we study the dynamics, and characterize the light emitted or scattered by such a system via different far-field observables. Throughout the analysis, we consider spontaneous emission from an excited state as well as two different pump field setups, and contrast the two extreme cases of non-interacting and strongly interacting atoms. For the latter case, the two-excitation submanifold contains a two-body bound state, and we find that the two cases lead to different dynamics and far-field signatures. Finally we exploit these signatures to characterize the wavefunctions of the collective eigenstates. For this, we identify a direct relation between the collective branching r...

  16. Observation of multiple ionization pathways for OCS in an intense laser field resolved by three-dimensional covariance mapping and visualized by hierarchical ionization topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, W A; Newell, W R; Sanderson, J H

    2006-01-01

    The two- and three-body Coulomb explosion of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) by 790 nm, 50 fs laser pulses focussed to $\\approx $ 10$^{16}$ Wcm$^{-2}$ has been investigated by three-dimensional covariance mapping technique. For the first time in a triatomic molecule, a single charge state, in this case the trication, has been observed to dissociate into two distinct energy channels. With the aid of a three dimensional visualization technique to reveal the ionization hierarchy, evidence is presented for the existence of two sets of ionization pathways resulting from these two initial states. While one group of ions can be modeled using a Classical enhanced ionization model, the second group, consisting of mainly asymmetric channels, can not. The results provide clear evidence that an enhanced ionization approach must also be accompanied by an appreciation of the effects of excited ionic states and multi-electronic processes.

  17. Observation of multiple ionization pathways for OCS in an intense laser field resolved by three-dimensional covariance mapping and visualized by hierarchical ionization topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Bryan; W. R. Newell; J. H. Sanderson; A. J. Langley

    2006-10-10

    The two- and three-body Coulomb explosion of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) by 790 nm, 50 fs laser pulses focussed to $\\approx $ 10$^{16}$ Wcm$^{-2}$ has been investigated by three-dimensional covariance mapping technique. For the first time in a triatomic molecule, a single charge state, in this case the trication, has been observed to dissociate into two distinct energy channels. With the aid of a three dimensional visualization technique to reveal the ionization hierarchy, evidence is presented for the existence of two sets of ionization pathways resulting from these two initial states. While one group of ions can be modeled using a Classical enhanced ionization model, the second group, consisting of mainly asymmetric channels, can not. The results provide clear evidence that an enhanced ionization approach must also be accompanied by an appreciation of the effects of excited ionic states and multi-electronic processes.

  18. Observation of multiple ionization pathways for OCS in an intense laser field resolved by three-dimensional covariance mapping and visualized by hierarchical ionization topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, W. A.; Newell, W. R.; Sanderson, J. H.; Langley, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada); Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-15

    The two- and three-body Coulomb explosion of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) by 790 nm, 50 fs laser pulses focused to {approx_equal}10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2} has been investigated by the three-dimensional covariance mapping technique. In a triatomic molecule, a single charge state, in this case the trication, has been observed to dissociate into two distinct energy channels. With the aid of a three-dimensional visualization technique to reveal the ionization hierarchy, evidence is presented for the existence of two sets of ionization pathways resulting from these two initial states. While one group of ions can be modeled using a classical enhanced ionization model, the second group, consisting of mainly asymmetric channels, cannot. The results provide clear evidence that an enhanced ionization approach must also be accompanied by an appreciation of the effects of excited ionic states and multielectronic processes.

  19. Measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willis, W.L.

    1980-10-01

    The discussion will be restricted to measurements of voltage and current. Also, although the measurements themselves should be as quantitative as possible, the discussion is rather nonquantitative. Emphasis is on types of instruments, how they may be used, and the inherent advantages and limitations of a given technique. A great deal of information can be obtained from good, clean voltage and current data. Power and impedance are obviously inherent if the proper time relationships are preserved. Often an associated, difficult-to-determine, physical event can be evaluated from the V-I data, such as a time-varying load characteristic, or the time of light emission, etc. The lack of active high voltage devices, such as 50-kV operational amplifiers, restricts measurement devices to passive elements, primarily R and C. There are a few more exotic techniques that are still passive in nature. There are several well-developed techniques for voltage measurements. These include: spark gaps; electrostatic meters; capacitive dividers; mixed RC dividers; and the electro-optic effect. Current is measured by either direct measurement of charge flow or by measuring the resulting magnetic field.

  20. Time-Resolved Observation of Discrete and Continuous Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamo in the Reversed-Field Pinch Edge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories (Journal Article)Clean4,Time to Talk3,

  1. Measurements of 222Rn, 220Rn, and CO Emissions in Natural CO2 Fields in Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John; Sims, Kenneth

    2014-09-30

    An integrated field-laboratory program evaluated the use of radon and CO2 flux measurements to constrain source and timescale of CO2 fluxes in environments proximate to CO2 storage reservoirs. By understanding the type and depth of the gas source, the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir can be assessed and monitored. The concept is based on correlations of radon and CO2 fluxes observed in volcanic systems. This fundamental research is designed to advance the science of Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) and to address the Carbon Storage Program goal of developing and validating technologies to ensure 99 percent storage performance. Graduate and undergraduate students conducted the research under the guidance of the Principal Investigators; in doing so they were provided with training opportunities in skills required for implementing and deploying CCS technologies. Although a final method or “tool” was not developed, significant progress was made. The field program identified issues with measuring radon in environments rich in CO2. Laboratory experiments determined a correction factor to apply to radon measurements made in CO2-bearing environments. The field program also identified issues with radon and CO2-flux measurements in soil gases at a natural CO2 analog. A systematic survey of radon and CO2 flux in soil gases at the LaBarge CO2 Field in Southwest Wyoming indicates that measurements of 222Rn (radon), 220Rn (thoron), and CO2 flux may not be a robust method for monitoring the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir. The field program was also not able to correlate radon and CO2 flux in the CO2-charged springs of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system. However, this part of the program helped to motivate the aforementioned laboratory experiments that determined correction factors for measuring radon in CO2-rich environments. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; she is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Measurement of radon in springs has improved significantly since the field program first began; however, in situ measurement of 222Rn and particularly 220Rn in springs is problematic. Future refinements include simultaneous salinity measurements and systematic corrections, or adjustments to the partition coefficient as needed for more accurate radon concentration determination. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; he is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Both graduate students are poised to begin work in a CCS technology area. Laboratory experiments evaluated important process-level fundamentals that effect measurements of radon and CO2. Laboratory tests established that fine-grained source minerals yield higher radon emissivity compared to coarser-sized source minerals; subtleties in the dataset suggest that grain size alone is not fully representative of all the processes controlling the ability of radon to escape its mineral host. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn increases linearly with temperature due to reaction of rocks with water, consistent with faster diffusion and enhanced mineral dissolution at higher temperatures. The presence of CO2 changes the relative importance of the factors that control release of radon. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn in CO2-bearing experiments is greater at all temperatures compared to the experiments without CO2, but emissivity does not increase as a simple function of temperature. Governing processes may include a balance between enhanced dissolution versus carbonate mineral formation in CO2-rich waters.

  2. Nonlinear force-free field modeling of the solar magnetic carpet and comparison with SDO/HMI and Sunrise/IMAX observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chitta, L. P.; Kariyappa, R. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS-58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Solanki, S. K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-10-01

    In the quiet solar photosphere, the mixed polarity fields form a magnetic carpet that continuously evolves due to dynamical interaction between the convective motions and magnetic field. This interplay is a viable source to heat the solar atmosphere. In this work, we used the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms obtained from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and the Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment instrument on the Sunrise balloon-borne observatory, as time-dependent lower boundary conditions, to study the evolution of the coronal magnetic field. We use a magneto-frictional relaxation method, including hyperdiffusion, to produce a time series of three-dimensional nonlinear force-free fields from a sequence of photospheric LOS magnetograms. Vertical flows are added up to a height of 0.7 Mm in the modeling to simulate the non-force-freeness at the photosphere-chromosphere layers. Among the derived quantities, we study the spatial and temporal variations of the energy dissipation rate and energy flux. Our results show that the energy deposited in the solar atmosphere is concentrated within 2 Mm of the photosphere and there is not sufficient energy flux at the base of the corona to cover radiative and conductive losses. Possible reasons and implications are discussed. Better observational constraints of the magnetic field in the chromosphere are crucial to understand the role of the magnetic carpet in coronal heating.

  3. Reservoir monitoring and characterization using satellite geodetic data: Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar observations from the Krechba field, Algeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Ferretti, Alessandro; Novali, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    Deformation in the material overlying an active reservoir is used to monitor pressure change at depth. A sequence of pressure field estimates, eleven in all, allow us to construct a measure of diffusive travel time throughout the reservoir. The dense distribution of travel time values means that we can construct an exactly linear inverse problem for reservoir flow properties. Application to Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data gathered over a CO{sub 2} injection in Algeria reveals pressure propagation along two northwest trending corridors. An inversion of the travel times indicates the existence of two northwest-trending high permeability zones. The high permeability features trend in the same direction as the regional fault and fracture zones. Model parameter resolution estimates indicate that the features are well resolved.

  4. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atchley, A. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA; Painter, S. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA; Harp, D. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA; Coon, E. T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA; Wilson, C. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA; Liljedahl, A. K. [Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks, USA; Romanovsky, V. E. [Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks, USA] (ORCID:0000000295152087)

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. However, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth System Models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth System Models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface/subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurements to calibrate and identify fine scale controls of ALT in ice wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze/thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g. troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.

  5. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Painter, Scott L.; Harp, Dylan R.; Coon, Ethan T.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Liljedahl, Anna K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-09-01

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. Thus, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth system models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth system models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface–subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurementsmore »to achieve the goals of constructing a process-rich model based on plausible parameters and to identify fine-scale controls of ALT in ice-wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze–thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g., troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.« less

  6. Using field observations to inform thermal hydrology models of permafrost dynamics with ATS (v0.83)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Atchley, A. L.; Painter, S. L.; Harp, D. R.; Coon, E. T.; Wilson, C. J.; Liljedahl, A. K.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2015-04-14

    Climate change is profoundly transforming the carbon-rich Arctic tundra landscape, potentially moving it from a carbon sink to a carbon source by increasing the thickness of soil that thaws on a seasonal basis. However, the modeling capability and precise parameterizations of the physical characteristics needed to estimate projected active layer thickness (ALT) are limited in Earth System Models (ESMs). In particular, discrepancies in spatial scale between field measurements and Earth System Models challenge validation and parameterization of hydrothermal models. A recently developed surface/subsurface model for permafrost thermal hydrology, the Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS), is used in combination with field measurementsmore »to calibrate and identify fine scale controls of ALT in ice wedge polygon tundra in Barrow, Alaska. An iterative model refinement procedure that cycles between borehole temperature and snow cover measurements and simulations functions to evaluate and parameterize different model processes necessary to simulate freeze/thaw processes and ALT formation. After model refinement and calibration, reasonable matches between simulated and measured soil temperatures are obtained, with the largest errors occurring during early summer above ice wedges (e.g. troughs). The results suggest that properly constructed and calibrated one-dimensional thermal hydrology models have the potential to provide reasonable representation of the subsurface thermal response and can be used to infer model input parameters and process representations. The models for soil thermal conductivity and snow distribution were found to be the most sensitive process representations. However, information on lateral flow and snowpack evolution might be needed to constrain model representations of surface hydrology and snow depth.« less

  7. CO2 leakage impacts on shallow groundwater. Field-scale reactive-transport simulations informed by observations at a natural analog site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keating, Elizabeth H.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Viswanathan, Hari; Carey, J. William; Pawar, Rajesh; Guthrie, George D.; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna

    2013-03-01

    It is challenging to predict the degree to which shallow groundwater might be affected by leaks from a CO2 sequestration reservoir, particularly over long time scales and large spatial scales. In this study observations at a CO2 enriched shallow aquifer natural analog were used to develop a predictive model which is then used to simulate leakage scenarios. This natural analog provides the opportunity to make direct field observations of groundwater chemistry in the presence of elevated CO2, to collect aquifer samples and expose them to CO2 under controlled conditions in the laboratory, and to test the ability of multiphase reactivemore »transport models to reproduce measured geochemical trends at the field-scale. The field observations suggest that brackish water entrained with the upwelling CO2 are a more significant source of trace metals than in situ mobilization of metals due to exposure to CO2. The study focuses on a single trace metal of concern at this site: U. Experimental results indicate that cation exchange/adsorption and dissolution/precipitation of calcite containing trace amounts of U are important reactions controlling U in groundwater at this site, and that the amount of U associated with calcite is fairly well constrained. Simulations incorporating these results into a 3-D multi-phase reactive transport model are able to reproduce the measured ranges and trends between pH, pCO2, Ca, total C, U and Cl-at the field site. Although the true fluxes at the natural analog site are unknown, the cumulative CO2 flux inferred from these simulations are approximately equivalent to 37.8E-3 MT, approximately corresponding to a .001% leak rate for injection at a large (750 MW) power plant. The leakage scenario simulations suggest that if the leak only persists for a short time the volume of aquifer contaminated by CO2-induced mobilization of U will be relatively small, yet persistent over 100 a.« less

  8. Observation of multi-scale oscillation of laminar lifted flames with low-frequency AC electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, S.K.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, M.K.; Won, S.H. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea); Chung, S.H. [Clean Combustion Research Center, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-01-15

    The oscillation behavior of laminar lifted flames under the influence of low-frequency AC has been investigated experimentally in coflow jets. Various oscillation modes were existed depending on jet velocity and the voltage and frequency of AC, especially when the AC frequency was typically smaller than 30 Hz. Three different oscillation modes were observed: (1) large-scale oscillation with the oscillation frequency of about 0.1 Hz, which was independent of the applied AC frequency, (2) small-scale oscillation synchronized to the applied AC frequency, and (3) doubly-periodic oscillation with small-scale oscillation embedded in large-scale oscillation. As the AC frequency decreased from 30 Hz, the oscillation modes were in the order of the large-scale oscillation, doubly-periodic oscillation, and small-scale oscillation. The onset of the oscillation for the AC frequency smaller than 30 Hz was in close agreement with the delay time scale for the ionic wind effect to occur, that is, the collision response time. Frequency-doubling behavior for the small-scale oscillation has also been observed. Possible mechanisms for the large-scale oscillation and the frequency-doubling behavior have been discussed, although the detailed understanding of the underlying mechanisms will be a future study. (author)

  9. A High shear stress segment along the San Andreas Fault: Inferences based on near-field stress direction and stress magnitude observations in the Carrizo Plain Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, D. A., [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Adelaide (Australia); Younker, L.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-01-30

    Nearly 200 new in-situ determinations of stress directions and stress magnitudes near the Carrizo plain segment of the San Andreas fault indicate a marked change in stress state occurring within 20 km of this principal transform plate boundary. A natural consequence of this stress transition is that if the observed near-field ``fault-oblique`` stress directions are representative of the fault stress state, the Mohr-Coulomb shear stresses resolved on San Andreas sub-parallel planes are substantially greater than previously inferred based on fault-normal compression. Although the directional stress data and near-hydrostatic pore pressures, which exist within 15 km of the fault, support a high shear stress environment near the fault, appealing to elevated pore pressures in the fault zone (Byerlee-Rice Model) merely enhances the likelihood of shear failure. These near-field stress observations raise important questions regarding what previous stress observations have actually been measuring. The ``fault-normal`` stress direction measured out to 70 km from the fault can be interpreted as representing a comparable depth average shear strength of the principal plate boundary. Stress measurements closer to the fault reflect a shallower depth-average representation of the fault zone shear strength. If this is true, only stress observations at fault distances comparable to the seismogenic depth will be representative of the fault zone shear strength. This is consistent with results from dislocation monitoring where there is pronounced shear stress accumulation out to 20 km of the fault as a result of aseismic slip within the lower crust loading the upper locked section. Beyond about 20 km, the shear stress resolved on San Andreas fault-parallel planes becomes negligible. 65 refs., 15 figs.

  10. A Method for energy estimation and mass composition determination of primary cosmic rays at Chacaltaya observation level based on atmospheric Cerenkov light technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mavrodiev; A. Mishev; J. Stamenov

    2003-10-23

    A new method for energy and mass composition estimation of primary cosmic ray radiation based on atmospheric Cerenkov light flux in extensive air showers (EAS) analysis is proposed. The Cerenkov light flux in EAS initiated by primary protons and iron nuclei is simulated with CORSIKA 5.62 code for Chacaltaya observation level (536 g/cm2) in the energy range 10 TeV - 10 PeV. An adequate model, approximation of lateral distribution of Cerenkov light in showers is obtained. Using the proposed model and solution of overdetermined system of nonlinear equations based on Gauss Newton method with autoregularization, two different array detector arrangements are compared. The detector response for the detector sets is simulated. The accuracies in energy and shower axis determination are studied and the corresponding selection criteria are proposed. An approximation with nonlinear fit is obtained and the energy dependence of the proposed model function parameters is studied. The approximation of model parameters as function of the primary energy is carried out. This permits, taking into account the properties of the proposed method and model, to distinguish proton primaries from iron primaries. The detector response for the detector sets is simulated and the accuracies in energy determination are calculated. Moreover the accuracies in shower axis determination are studied and criteria in shower axis position estimation are proposed.

  11. Probing few-excitation eigenstates of interacting atoms on a lattice by observing their collective light emission in the far field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Longo; J. Evers

    2015-01-07

    The collective emission from a one-dimensional chain of interacting two-level atoms coupled to a common electromagnetic reservoir is investigated. We derive the system's dissipative few-excitation eigenstates, and analyze their static properties, including the collective dipole moments and branching ratios between different eigenstates. Next, we study the dynamics, and characterize the light emitted or scattered by such a system via different far-field observables. Throughout the analysis, we consider spontaneous emission from an excited state as well as two different pump field setups, and contrast the two extreme cases of non-interacting and strongly interacting atoms. For the latter case, the two-excitation submanifold contains a two-body bound state, and we find that the two cases lead to different dynamics and far-field signatures. Finally we exploit these signatures to characterize the wavefunctions of the collective eigenstates. For this, we identify a direct relation between the collective branching ratio and the momentum distribution of the collective eigenstates' wavefunction. This provides a method to proof the existence of certain collective eigenstates and to access their wave function without the need to individually address and/or manipulate single atoms.

  12. CHANGESINPERMEABILITYCAUSEDBYTRANSIENT STRESSES: FIELD OBSERVATIONS, EXPERIMENTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkhoury, Jean

    , and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to prestimulated of California, Irvine, California, USA. 5 Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, Center for Geomechanics

  13. CHANGESINPERMEABILITYCAUSEDBYTRANSIENT STRESSES: FIELD OBSERVATIONS, EXPERIMENTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    to seal pores. Monitor- ing permeability in geothermal systems where there is abun- dant seismicity increase permeability and fluid mobility in geo- logic media. In natural systems, strain amplitudes, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to prestimulated

  14. DEEP X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF THE YOUNG HIGH-MAGNETIC-FIELD RADIO PULSAR J1119-6127 AND SUPERNOVA REMNANT G292.2-0.5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Ho, W. C. G. [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Weltevrede, P. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bogdanov, S. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Shannon, R. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Sciences, Australia Telescope National Facility, Marsfield, NSW 2210 (Australia); Gonzalez, M. E., E-mail: ncy@physics.mcgill.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2012-12-10

    High-magnetic-field radio pulsars are important transition objects for understanding the connection between magnetars and conventional radio pulsars. We present a detailed study of the young radio pulsar J1119-6127, which has a characteristic age of 1900 yr and a spin-down-inferred magnetic field of 4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G, and its associated supernova remnant G292.2-0.5, using deep XMM-Newton and Chandra X-ray Observatory exposures of over 120 ks from each telescope. The pulsar emission shows strong modulation below 2.5 keV with a single-peaked profile and a large pulsed fraction of 0.48 {+-} 0.12. Employing a magnetic, partially ionized hydrogen atmosphere model, we find that the observed pulse profile can be produced by a single hot spot of temperature 0.13 keV covering about one-third of the stellar surface, and we place an upper limit of 0.08 keV for an antipodal hot spot with the same area. The non-uniform surface temperature distribution could be the result of anisotropic heat conduction under a strong magnetic field, and a single-peaked profile seems common among high-B radio pulsars. For the associated remnant G292.2-0.5, its large diameter could be attributed to fast expansion in a low-density wind cavity, likely formed by a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, similar to two other high-B radio pulsars.

  15. Technique development for uiper critical field studies of SmFeAs(O,F) in the 300T single turn system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcdonald, Ross D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Balakirev, F. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Altarawneh, M. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Betts, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mielke, C. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moll, Philip Jw [ETH ZURICH; Zhigadlo, N D [ETH ZURICH; Karpinski, J [ETH ZURICH; Batlogg, B. [ETH ZURICH

    2011-01-14

    In high temperature superconductors, such as the most recent class of iron pnictides, extremely high upper critical fields H{sub c2} are common. The determination of H{sub c2}(T) is crucial to understand the detailed nature of the superconductor, in particular H{sub c2}(T = 0K) is of great interest. It is not only related to fundamental properties of the system, it is furthermore of great importance for materials science, as it is the ultimate limit of applicability of this superconductor in high field applications. However, this important quantity can only be estimated by extrapolation, as H{sub c2}(T = 0K) well exceeds hundreds of Tesla in optimally doped SillFeAs(O,F). We are developing methods to measure Ha(T) in direct transport in the extreme magnetic fields generated by the LANL single turn magnet.

  16. A Deep, Wide-Field, and Panchromatic View of 47 Tuc and the SMC with HST: Observations and Data Analysis Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalirai, Jason S; Anderson, Jay; Dotter, Aaron; Fahlman, Gregory G; Hansen, Brad M S; Hurley, Jarrod; King, Ivan R; Reitzel, David; Rich, R Michael; Shara, Michael M; Stetson, Peter B; Woodley, Kristin A

    2011-01-01

    In HST Cycle 17, we imaged the well known globular star cluster 47 Tucanae for 121 orbits using ACS and both the UVIS and IR channels of WFC3 (GO-11677, PI - H. Richer). This unique data set was obtained to address many scientific questions that demand a very deep, panchromatic, and panoramic view of the cluster's stellar populations. In total, the program obtained over 0.75 Ms of imaging exposure time with the three HST cameras, over a time span of 9 months in 2010. The primary ACS field was imaged in the two broadband filters F606W and F814W filters, at 13 orientations, for all 121 orbits. The parallel WFC3 imaging provides a panchromatic (0.4 - 1.7 micron) and contiguous imaging swath over a 250 degree azimuthal range at impact radii of 6.5 -- 17.9 pc in 47 Tuc. This imaging totals over 60 arcmin^2 in area and utilizes the F390W and F606W broadband filters on WFC3/UVIS and the F110W and F160W broadband filters on WFC3/IR. In this paper, we describe the observational design of the new survey and one of the ...

  17. JOURNALOF GEOPHYSICALRESEARCH,VOL. 89, NO. A5, PAGES2735-2744, MAY1, 1984 OBSERVATION OF AN OSCILLATING MAGNETIC FIELD SHELL AT THREE LOCATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    OF AN OSCILLATING MAGNETIC FIELD SHELL AT THREE LOCATIONS L. J. Cahill, 1 M. Sugiura,2 N. G. Lin, 1 R. L. Arnoldy,3 -- 4 i· about 2 hours while it moves field components and at the ground magnetic obser- from-10 to +10 of a magnetic field shell. Since the a few hundred seconds during both magnetically first 180-s pulsation

  18. Increased oil production and reserves from improved completion techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996, 11th Quarter of the project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, E.; Morgan, C.D.

    1996-07-30

    The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin wells is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and unperforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project.

  19. WE-G-17A-08: Electron Gun Operation for in Line MRI-Linac Configurations: An Assessment of Beam Fidelity and Recovery Techniques for Different SIDs and Magnetic Field Strengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, B; Keall, P; Constantin, D; Holloway, L; Kolling, S; Oborn, B; Fahrig, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To test the functionality of medical electron guns within the fringe field of a purpose built superconducting MRI magnet, and to test different recovery techniques for a variety of imaging field strengths and SIDs. Methods: Three different electron guns were simulated using Finite Element Modelling; a standard diode gun, a standard triode gun, and a novel diode gun designed to operate within parallel magnetic fields. The approximate working regime of each gun was established by assessing exit current in constant magnetic fields of varying strength and defining ‘working’ as less than 10% change in injection current. Next, the 1.0T MRI magnet was simulated within Comsol Multiphysics. The coil currents in this model were also scaled to produce field strengths of .5, 1, 1.5 and 3T. Various magnetic shield configurations were simulated, varying the SID from 800 to 1300mm. The average magnetic field within the gun region was assessed together with the distortion in the imaging volume - greater than 150uT distortion was considered unacceptable. Results: The conventional guns functioned in fields of less than 7.5mT. Conversely, the redesigned diode required fields greater than .1T to function correctly. Magnetic shielding was feasible for SIDS of greater than 1000mm for field strengths of .5T and 1T, and 1100mm for 1.5 and 3.0T. Beyond these limits shielding resulted in unacceptable MRI distortion. In contrast, the redesigned diode could perform acceptably for SIDs of less than 812, 896, 931, and 974mm for imaging strengths of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 3.0T. Conclusions: For in-line MRIlinac configurations where the electron gun is operating in low field regions, shielding is a straight forward option. However, as magnetic field strength increases and the SID is reduced, shielding results in too great a distortion in the MRI and redesigning the electron optics is the preferable solution. The authors would like to acknowledge funding from the National Health and Research Council (AUS), National Institute of Health (NIH), and Cancer Institute NSW.

  20. Teaching Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10

    with others such as a small group discussion or the question-answer technique to al- low the 4-H?ers to express their opinion. 2. Illustrated talk This method is an offshoot of the lecture technique, in which the teacher supports the talk with such things... as drawings, posters, copies of articles and other materials. The drawings or posters need not be professional art pieces, they need only be interesting and clear. For ex- ample, in entomology, rather than just talking about the various shapes...

  1. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  2. Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2: Buena Vista Oil and Gas Field, Kern County, California: Proved reserves, Developed and undeveloped, Sections 6 and 8: Development history and exploitation techniques, Effective July 1, 1987: (Final technical report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, K.B.

    1987-09-09

    The research for the initial Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), study Task Assignment 010, showed the possibility of undeveloped proved reserves in the Shallow Pool on Government leases. Task Assignment 010C included a study to confirm or disprove the possibility. The six-section area, which is highlighted on Exhibit M-2, was chosen as the area for specific study of this subject. The Shallow Oil Zone, as depicted on Exhibit S-1, was the focal point of the study in the area. Competitive development of Government land with adjacent privately held land is an issue which has often been raised regarding NPR-2; however, it has never been formally addressed. Task Assignment 010C commissioned a study of the subject in the same six-section area designated for the study of proved undeveloped reserves. The producing formations in the Buena Vista Field of NPR-2 are very similar to the producing formations in the Elk Hills Field of NPR-1 to the north. It is possible that some of the successful development techniques utilized in NPR-2 by the various operators might enhance production efficiency at NPR-1. Task Assignment 010C included a detailed task of researching techniques used in NPR-2 for possible application in NPR-1. Because the detailed tasks of Task Assignment 010C are divergent in scope, a composite summary of the study's research is not included in this report. Each task's research is detailed in a separate Discussion section. Exhibits for these discussions are contained in an Exhibit section at the end of this volume. The appendices include: task assignment; DOE letters to lessees; Evans, Carey and Crozier letters to lessees; reports and studies from lessees; core analysis data; production data; geologic picks of formation tops; and annotated well logs. 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Extracting cosmological information from galaxy spectra and observations of high-redshift objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raul Jimenez

    2000-11-06

    I review the statistical techniques needed to extract information about physical parameters of galaxies from their observed spectra. This is important given the sheer size of the next generation of large galaxy redshift surveys. Going to the opposite extreme I review what we can learn about the nature of the primordial density field from observations of high--redshift objects.

  4. Whitmeyer, S., Feely, M., De Paor, D., Hennessy, R., Whitmeyer, S., Nicoletti, J., Santangelo, B., Daniels, J., and Rivera, M., 2009, Visualization techniques in field geology education: A case study from western Ireland, in Whitmeyer, S.J., Mogk, D.W., a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitmeyer, Steven J.

    , B., Daniels, J., and Rivera, M., 2009, Visualization techniques in field geology education: A case study from western Ireland, in Whitmeyer, S.J., Mogk, D.W., and Pyle, E.J., eds., Field Geology Education: Historical Perspectives and Modern Approaches: Geological Society of America Special Paper 461, p

  5. Reported Significant Observation (RSO) studies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eicher, R.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Reported Significant Observation (RSO) study used in the field of safety is an information-gathering technique where employee-participants describe situations they have personally witnessed involving good and bad practices and safe and unsafe conditions. This information is useful in the risk assessment process because it focuses on hazards and thereby facilitates their elimination. However, RSO cannot be the only component in a risk assessment program. Used by the Air Force in their aviation psychology program and further developed by John C. Flanagan, RSO is more commonly known as the ``Critical Incident Technique.`` However, the words ``Critical`` and ``Incident`` had other connotations in nuclear safety, prompting early users within the Aerojet Nuclear Company to coin the more fitting title of ``Reported Significant Observations.`` The technique spread slowly in the safety field primarily because the majority of users were researchers interested in after-the-fact data, with application to everyday problems and behavioral factors. RSO was formally recognized as a significant hazard reduction tool during the development of the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) program for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The Department of Energy (DOE) has, in turn, adopted MORT for its system safety program, and this has resulted in RSO being a modern and viable technique for DOE contractor safety programs.

  6. Relation between photospheric flow fields and the magnetic field distribution on the solar surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, G.W.; Title, A.M.; Topka, K.P.; Tarbell, T.D.; Shine, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Using the technique of local correlation tracking on a 28 minute time sequence of white-light images of solar granulation, the horizontal flow field on the solar surface is measured. The time series was obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 (Space Shuttle flight 51-F) and is free from atmospheric blurring and distortion. The SOUP flow fields have been compared with carefully aligned magnetograms taken over a nine hour period at the Big Bear Solar Observatory before, during, and after the SOUP images. The flow field and the magnetic field agree in considerable detail: vectors which define the flow of the white-light intensity pattern (granulation) point toward magnetic field regions, magnetic fields surround flow cells, and magnetic features move along the flow arrows. The projected locations of free particles (corks) in the measured flow field congregate at the same locations where the magnetic field is observed. 31 references.

  7. Exoplanet Detection Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Debra A; Laughlin, Greg P; Macintosh, Bruce; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Sahlmann, Johannes; Yee, Jennifer C

    2015-01-01

    We are still in the early days of exoplanet discovery. Astronomers are beginning to model the atmospheres and interiors of exoplanets and have developed a deeper understanding of processes of planet formation and evolution. However, we have yet to map out the full complexity of multi-planet architectures or to detect Earth analogues around nearby stars. Reaching these ambitious goals will require further improvements in instrumentation and new analysis tools. In this chapter, we provide an overview of five observational techniques that are currently employed in the detection of exoplanets: optical and IR Doppler measurements, transit photometry, direct imaging, microlensing, and astrometry. We provide a basic description of how each of these techniques works and discuss forefront developments that will result in new discoveries. We also highlight the observational limitations and synergies of each method and their connections to future space missions.

  8. Hidden activity in high-redshift spheroidal galaxies from mid-infrared and X-ray observations in the GOODS-North field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodighiero, G; Civano, F; Comastri, A; Franceschini, A; Mignoli, M; Fritz, J; Vignali, C; Treu, T

    2007-01-01

    We exploit very deep mid-IR (MIR) and X-ray observations by Spitzer and Chandra in the GOODS North to identify signs of hidden (either starburst or AGN) activity in spheroidal galaxies between z~0.3 and 1. Our reference is a complete sample of 168 morphologically classified spheroidal galaxies with z[AB]<22.5 selected from GOODS ACS imaging. Nineteen of these have 24 micron detections in the GOODS catalogue, half of which have an X-ray counterpart in the 2 Ms Chandra catalogue, while about 25% have 1.4 GHz fluxes larger than 40 microJy. Traces of hidden activity in the spheroidal population are also searched for in the deep X-ray images and 14 additional galaxies are detected in X-rays only. The nature of the observed MIR emissions is investigated by modelling their SEDs based on the available multi-wavelength photometry, including X-ray, UV, optical, near-IR, MIR and radio fluxes, and optical spectroscopy. The amount of dust derived from the IR emission observed by Spitzer appears in excess of that expect...

  9. Near-infrared integral-field spectroscopy of HD209458b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Angerhausen; Alfred Krabbe; Christof Iserlohe

    2006-05-12

    We present first results of an exploratory study to use integral field spectroscopy to observe extrasolar planets. We focus on transiting "Hot Jupiters" and emphasize the importance of observing strategy and exact timing. We demonstrate how integral field spectroscopy compares with other spectroscopic techniques currently applied. We have tested our concept with a time series observation of HD209458b obtained with SINFONI at the VLT during a superior conjunction.

  10. Synthesis of Remote Sensing and Field Observations to Model and Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of Oregon & Northern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly Law; David Turner; Warren Cohen; Mathias Goeckede

    2008-05-22

    The goal is to quantify and explain the carbon (C) budget for Oregon and N. California. The research compares "bottom -up" and "top-down" methods, and develops prototype analytical systems for regional analysis of the carbon balance that are potentially applicable to other continental regions, and that can be used to explore climate, disturbance and land-use effects on the carbon cycle. Objectives are: 1) Improve, test and apply a bottom up approach that synthesizes a spatially nested hierarchy of observations (multispectral remote sensing, inventories, flux and extensive sites), and the Biome-BGC model to quantify the C balance across the region; 2) Improve, test and apply a top down approach for regional and global C flux modeling that uses a model-data fusion scheme (MODIS products, AmeriFlux, atmospheric CO2 concentration network), and a boundary layer model to estimate net ecosystem production (NEP) across the region and partition it among GPP, R(a) and R(h). 3) Provide critical understanding of the controls on regional C balance (how NEP and carbon stocks are influenced by disturbance from fire and management, land use, and interannual climate variation). The key science questions are, "What are the magnitudes and distributions of C sources and sinks on seasonal to decadal time scales, and what processes are controlling their dynamics? What are regional spatial and temporal variations of C sources and sinks? What are the errors and uncertainties in the data products and results (i.e., in situ observations, remote sensing, models)?

  11. Use of geostatistic techniques to describe a reservoir to be submitted into a secondary recovery process field case: {open_quotes}Eocene B-Inferior/VLG-3659, Ceuta, Venezuela{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, T.; Poquioma, W.

    1997-08-01

    This study presents the results of an integrated reservoir study of the Eocene B-Inferior/VLG-3659, Area 7, Ceuta filed. This field located in the Maracaibo Lake in the western side of Venezuela. The objective was to evaluating the feasibility to implement a secondary recovery project by means of water flooding. Core information was used for this study (194 ft), PVT analysis, RFI, build-up and statistic`s pressure analysis, modem logs and production history data. Using geostatistical techniques (Kriging) it was defined a low uncertainty geological model that was validated by means of a black oil simulator (Eclipse). The results showed a good comparison of historical pressure of the reservoir against those obtained from the model, without the need of {open_quotes}history matching{close_quotes}. It means without modifying neither the initial rock properties nor reservoir fluids. The results of this study recommended drilling in two new locations, also the reactivation of four producing wells and water flooding under peripherical array by means of four injection wells, with the recovery of an additional 30.2 MMSTB. The economical evaluation shows an internal return rate of 31.4%.

  12. Polymer Parametrised Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok Laddha; Madhavan Varadarajan

    2008-05-02

    Free scalar field theory on 2 dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using LQG type `polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation- annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the `triangulation' dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non- Fock nature of the representation ensures that the algebra of conformal isometries as well as that of spacetime diffeomorphisms are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analysed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that `physical weaves' necessarily underly such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  13. Integrating Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of the West Coast U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.E. Law; D. Turner; M. Goeckede

    2010-06-01

    GOAL: To develop and apply an approach to quantify and understand the regional carbon balance of the west coast states for the North American Carbon Program. OBJECTIVE: As an element of NACP research, the proposed investigation is a two pronged approach that derives and evaluates a regional carbon (C) budget for Oregon, Washington, and California. Objectives are (1) Use multiple data sources, including AmeriFlux data, inventories, and multispectral remote sensing data to investigate trends in carbon storage and exchanges of CO2 and water with variation in climate and disturbance history; (2) Develop and apply regional modeling that relies on these multiple data sources to reduce uncertainty in spatial estimates of carbon storage and NEP, and relative contributions of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic emissions to atmospheric CO2 in the region; (3) Model terrestrial carbon processes across the region, using the Biome-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model, and an atmospheric inverse modeling approach to estimate variation in rate and timing of terrestrial uptake and feedbacks to the atmosphere in response to climate and disturbance. APPROACH: In performing the regional analysis, the research plan for the bottom-up approach uses a nested hierarchy of observations that include AmeriFlux data (i.e., net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from eddy covariance and associated biometric data), intermediate intensity inventories from an extended plot array partially developed from the PI's previous research, Forest Service FIA and CVS inventory data, time since disturbance, disturbance type, and cover type from Landsat developed in this study, and productivity estimates from MODIS algorithms. The BIOME-BGC model is used to integrate information from these sources and quantify C balance across the region. The inverse modeling approach assimilates flux data from AmeriFlux sites, high precision CO2 concentration data from AmeriFlux towers and four new calibrated CO2 sites, reanalysis meteorology and various remote sensing products to generate statewide estimates of biosphere carbon exchange from the atmospheric point of view.

  14. High Harmonic Generation Basic Techniques & Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    High Harmonic Generation Basic Techniques & Challenges C. Michael R. Greaves #12;Regimes-cycle laser fields #12;Outline · Optical Field Atomic Ionization · High Harmonic Generation (HHG-rays · References #12;Optical Field Atomic Ionization · Harmonics are generated by the tunneling, transport

  15. High energy heavy ions: techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    Pioneering work at the Bevalac has given significant insight into the field of relativistic heavy ions, both in the development of techniques for acceleration and delivery of these beams as well as in many novel areas of applications. This paper will outline our experiences at the Bevalac; ion sources, low velocity acceleration, matching to the synchrotron booster, and beam delivery. Applications discussed will include the observation of new effects in central nuclear collisions, production of beams of exotic short-lived (down to 1 ..mu..sec) isotopes through peripheral nuclear collisions, atomic physics with hydrogen-like uranium ions, effects of heavy ''cosmic rays'' on satellite equipment, and an ongoing cancer radiotherapy program with heavy ions. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. High-Spatial Resolution Observations of Pores and the Formation of a Rudimentary Penumbra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    images derived from Local Correlation Tracking is different from the previous observations. Also. Subject headings: Sun: activity, Sun: magnetic fields, Sun: sunspots, techniques: high angular resolution 1. Introduction A sunspot is a complex magnetic concentration on the surface of the Sun

  17. Flows and Non-thermal Velocities in Solar Active Regions Observed with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode: A Tracer of Active Region Sources of Heliospheric Magnetic Fields?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Doschek; H. P. Warren; J. T. Mariska; K. Muglach; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara; T Watanabe

    2008-07-17

    From Doppler velocity maps of active regions constructed from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft we observe large areas of outflow (20-50 km/s) that can persist for at least a day. These outflows occur in areas of active regions that are faint in coronal spectral lines formed at typical quiet Sun and active region temperatures. The outflows are positively correlated with non-thermal velocities in coronal plasmas. The bulk mass motions and non-thermal velocities are derived from spectral line centroids and line widths, mostly from a strong line of Fe XII at 195.12 Angstroms. The electron temperature of the outflow regions estimated from an Fe XIII to Fe XII line intensity ratio is about 1.2-1.4 MK. The electron density of the outflow regions derived from a density sensitive intensity ratio of Fe XII lines is rather low for an active region. Most regions average around 7E10+8 cm(-3), but there are variations on pixel spatial scales of about a factor of 4. We discuss results in detail for two active regions observed by EIS. Images of active regions in line intensity, line width, and line centroid are obtained by rastering the regions. We also discuss data from the active regions obtained from other orbiting spacecraft that support the conclusions obtained from analysis of the EIS spectra. The locations of the flows in the active regions with respect to the longitudinal photospheric magnetic fields suggest that these regions might be tracers of long loops and/or open magnetic fields that extend into the heliosphere, and thus the flows could possibly contribute significantly to the solar wind.

  18. The effect of E{sub r} on MSE measurements of q, a new technique for measuring E{sub r}, and a test of the neoclassical electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarnstorff, M.C.; Synakowski, E.J.; Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H.

    1996-10-01

    Previous analysis of motional-Stark Effect (MSE) data to measure the q-profile ignored contributions from the plasma electric field. The MSE measurements are shown to be sensitive to the electric field and require significant corrections for plasmas with large rotation velocities or pressure gradients. MSE measurements from rotating plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) confirm the significance of these corrections and verify their magnitude. Several attractive configurations are considered for future MSE-based diagnostics for measuring the plasma radial electric field. MSE data from TFTR is analyzed to determine the change in the radial electric field between two plasmas. The measured electric field quantitatively agrees with the predictions of neoclassical theory. These results confirm the utility of a MSE electric field measurement.

  19. Continuous Profiling of Magnetotelluric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdin, C.T.

    2009-01-01

    those employed in seismic data interpretation under the nameseismic nature, these techniques power implicit in the at least two decades of continued field and interpretation

  20. Stargate: Energy Management Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijay Raghunathan; Mani Srivastava; Trevor Pering; Roy Want

    2004-01-01

    Stargate: Energy Management Techniques Vijay Raghunathan,Platform specific energy management is crucial for longSolution: System level energy management techniques and

  1. Rapid assessment of redevelopment potential in marginal oil fields, application to the cut bank field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chavez Ballesteros, Luis Eladio

    2005-02-17

    Incremental oil, MSTB 34 We attribute these observed waterflood performance characteristics to gravity segregation combined with generally higher permeability at the base of the Cut Bank sand, neither of which are captured in the single-layer synthetic model.... Infill predictions on a single-phase synthetic case showed greater accuracy than results from statistical techniques. The methodology successfully identified infill well locations iv on a synthetic case derived from Cut Bank field, a water-flooded oil...

  2. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  3. Data Mining: Foundation, Techniques and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tung, Anthony Kum Hoe

    Data Mining: Foundation, Techniques and Applications Anthony Tung() School of Computing National #12;11/30/2007 Data Mining: Foundation, Techniques and Applications 2 Main objectives of this course: · Data mining is a diverse field which draw its foundation from many research areas like databases

  4. Field Guide Field Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    and demand in the U.S., with only part of the demand being met by U.S. production. Canola oil has achieved1 1 June 2011 A-1280 Canola Production Field Guide Canola Production Field Guide 2 2 Edited.....................................101 · Contributors to Canola Production Field Guide........102 · Resource Contact Information

  5. AIR INFILTRATION MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    serious study of research problems in infiltration. THEORYInfiltration Measurement Techniques REFERENCES J .B. Dick, "Experimental Studies

  6. CCD Observing Manual 49 Bay State Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    Stars 5.6. Supernovae/Novae Patrols 5.7. Designing Your Own: Using AAVSO VSX 6.0 Observing Techniques 6

  7. Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science) Dr. Tom Frank tdfrank@uiuc.edu www.sdal.uiuc.edu 333-7248 321 Davenport Hall #12;Geography 478 Techniques Perspective #12;Geography 478 Techniques of Remote Sensing Image Analysis (Earth Observation System Science

  8. Monitoring Erebus volcano's active lava lake; tools, techniques and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Nial John

    2015-03-03

    serves the crater rim was replaced. The old system was approaching ten years of service, and had become overly com- plex, and unreliable. A combination of extreme winds and corrosive gases makes the crater rim of Erebus an unsuitable site for solar panels... and wind generators. Instead, power is generated 0.5 km down-slope at the Nausea Knob (NKB) seismic station site, where a 1000 Ah battery bank is charged using a ? 0.5 kW array of photovoltaic panels, and a 100 W wind turbine. A Schaefer AEP-1500 inverter...

  9. Observational techniques to measure solar and stellar oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Rafael A

    2015-01-01

    As said by Sir A. Eddington in 1925: Our telescopes may probe farther and farther into the depths of space. At first sight it would seem that the deep interior of the sun and stars is less accessible to scientific investigation than any other region of the universe. What appliance can pierce through the outer layers of a star and test the conditions within? Eddington (1926). Nowadays, asteroseismology has proven its ability to pierce below stellar pho- tospheres and allow us to see inside the interior of thousands of stars down to the stellar cores, answering the question asked by Eddington ninety years ago. In this chapter we review the general properties of the spectral analysis which is the base of any asteroseismic investigation. After describing the stellar power spectrum, we will describe in details the characterization of the modal spec- trum. This chapter will end by a brief description of the instrumentation in both helio and asteroseismology.

  10. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  11. Magnetic fields, spots and weather in chemically peculiar stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Kochukhov

    2007-11-30

    New observational techniques and sophisticated modelling methods has led to dramatic breakthroughs in our understanding of the interplay between the surface magnetism, atomic diffusion and atmospheric dynamics in chemically peculiar stars. Magnetic Doppler images, constructed using spectropolarimetric observations of Ap stars in all four Stokes parameters, reveal the presence of small-scale field topologies. Abundance Doppler mapping has been perfected to the level where distributions of many different chemical elements can be deduced self-consistently for one star. The inferred chemical spot structures are diverse and do not always trace underlying magnetic field geometry. Moreover, horizontal chemical inhomogeneities are discovered in non-magnetic CP stars and evolving chemical spots are observed for the first time in the bright mercury-manganese star alpha And. These results show that in addition to magnetic fields, another important non-magnetic structure formation mechanism acts in CP stars.

  12. Quantum Techniques for Reaction Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John C. Baez

    2013-06-14

    Reaction networks are a general formalism for describing collections of classical entities interacting in a random way. While reaction networks are mainly studied by chemists, they are equivalent to Petri nets, which are used for similar purposes in computer science and biology. As noted by Doi and others, techniques from quantum field theory can be adapted to apply to such systems. Here we use these techniques to study how the "master equation" describing stochastic time evolution for a reaction network reduces is related to the "rate equation" describing the deterministic evolution of the expected number of particles of each species in the large-number limit. We show that the relation is especially strong when a solution of master equation is a "coherent state", meaning that the numbers of entities of each kind are described by independent Poisson distributions.

  13. Measurement of the Kerr spin parameter by observation of a compact object's shadow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hioki, Kenta; Maeda, Kei-ichi

    2009-07-15

    A black hole casts a shadow as an optical appearance because of its strong gravitational field. We study how to determine the spin parameter and the inclination angle by observing the apparent shape of the shadow, which is distorted mainly by those two parameters. Defining some observables characterizing the apparent shape (its radius and distortion parameter), we find that the spin parameter and inclination angle of a Kerr black hole can be determined by the observation. This technique is also extended to the case of a Kerr naked singularity.

  14. Accelerated Expansion: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Polarski

    2001-09-20

    The present paradigm in cosmology is the usual Big-Bang Cosmology in which two stages of accelerated expansion are incorporated: the inflationary phase in the very early universe which produces the classical inhomogeneities observed in the universe, and a second stage of acceleration at the present time as the latest Supernovae observations seem to imply. Both stages could be produced by a scalar field and observations will strongly constrain the microscopic lagrangian of any proposed model.

  15. Ulysses observations of magnetic waves due to newborn interstellar pickup ions. I. New observations and linear analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu E-mail: raquel.nuno@asu.edu

    2014-04-01

    We have examined Ulysses magnetic field data using dynamic spectrogram techniques that compute wave amplitude, polarization, and direction of propagation over a broad range of frequencies and time. Events were identified that showed a strong polarization signature and an enhancement of power above the local proton gyrofrequency. We perform a statistical study of 502 wave events in an effort to determine when, where, and why they are observed. Most notably, we find that waves arising from newborn interstellar pickup ions are relatively rare and difficult to find. The quantities normally employed in theories of wave growth are neutral atom density and quantities related to their ionization and the subsequent dynamics such as wind speed, solar wind flux, and magnetic field orientation. We find the observations of waves to be largely uncorrelated to these quantities except for mean field direction where quasi-radial magnetic fields are favored and solar wind proton flux where wave observations appear to be favored by low flux conditions which runs contrary to theoretical expectations of wave generation. It would appear that an explanation based on source physics and instability growth rates alone is not adequate to account for the times when these waves are seen.

  16. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  17. Stability and confinement of spheromaks and field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    The formation, confinement and stability of two types of compact toroids, spheromaks and field reversed configurations (FRC), are reviewed. Spheromaks, which contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, have been formed with magnetized coaxial plasma guns, by a combination of Z- and theta-pinch techniques and by an electrodeless slow induction technique, and trapped in both prolate and oblate flux conservers. As predicted by theory, the prolate configuration is unstable to the tilt mode, but the oblate configuration with a conducting wall is stable. Configuration lifetimes of up to 0.8 ms are observed. The FRC is a high-beta, highly prolate compact toroid formed with field-reversed theta-pinch techniques and having purely poloidal magnetic field. Theory predicts unstable fluting and internal tilting modes, but they are not observed experimentally. Configurations with high densities approx. 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/ and with lifetimes of 50 to 120 ..mu..s are terminated by an n=2 rotational mode of instability.

  18. Superhydrophobic Materials Technology-PVC Bonding Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Scott R.; Efird, Marty

    2013-05-03

    The purpose of the technology maturation project was to develop an enhanced application technique for applying diatomaceous earth with pinned polysiloxane oil to PVC pipes and materials. The oil infiltration technique is applied as a spray of diluted oil in a solvent onto the superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth substrate. This makes the surface take on the following characteristics: • wet?cleanable • anti?biofouling • waterproof • anti?corrosion. The project involved obtaining input and supplies from VeloxFlow and the development of successful techniques that would quickly result in a commercial license agreement with VeloxFlow and other companies that use PVC materials in a variety of other fields of use.

  19. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  20. Fiber optic diagnostic techniques for the electrical discharge machining process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pillans, Brandon William

    1998-01-01

    Plasma sparks from an electrical discharge machining phics. (EDM) process were observed using fiber optics positioned the dielectric oil. New measurement techniques were developed to observe the spark in the extremely noisy environment. Optical data...

  1. FULLY RESOLVED QUIET-SUN MAGNETIC FLUX TUBE OBSERVED WITH THE SUNRISE/IMAX INSTRUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagg, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Riethmueller, T. L.; Schuessler, M.; Hirzberger, J.; Feller, A.; Borrero, J. M.; Barthol, P.; Gandorfer, A.; MartInez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Domingo, V.; Knoelker, M.; Title, A. M.

    2010-11-10

    Until today, the small size of magnetic elements in quiet-Sun areas has required the application of indirect methods, such as the line-ratio technique or multi-component inversions, to infer their physical properties. A consistent match to the observed Stokes profiles could only be obtained by introducing a magnetic filling factor that specifies the fraction of the observed pixel filled with magnetic field. Here, we investigate the properties of a small magnetic patch in the quiet Sun observed with the IMaX magnetograph on board the balloon-borne telescope SUNRISE with unprecedented spatial resolution and low instrumental stray light. We apply an inversion technique based on the numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve the temperature stratification and the field strength in the magnetic patch. The observations can be well reproduced with a one-component, fully magnetized atmosphere with a field strength exceeding 1 kG and a significantly enhanced temperature in the mid to upper photosphere with respect to its surroundings, consistent with semi-empirical flux tube models for plage regions. We therefore conclude that, within the framework of a simple atmospheric model, the IMaX measurements resolve the observed quiet-Sun flux tube.

  2. Magnetic fields in massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Hubrig; M. Schoeller; M. Briquet; M. A. Pogodin; R. V. Yudin; J. F. Gonzalez; T. Morel; P. De Cat; R. Ignace; P. North; G. Mathys; G. J. Peters

    2007-12-02

    We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

  3. Magnetic fields in massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Briquet, M; Pogodin, M A; Yudin, R V; González, J F; Morel, T; De Cat, P; Ignace, R; North, P; Mathys, G; Peters, G J

    2007-01-01

    We review the recent discoveries of magnetic fields in different types of massive stars and briefly discuss strategies for spectropolarimetric observations to be carried out in the future.

  4. Electromagnetic field of a charge intersecting a cold plasma boundary in a waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alekhina, Tatiana Yu.; Tyukhtin, Andrey V.

    2011-06-15

    We analyze the electromagnetic field of a charge crossing a boundary between a vacuum and cold plasma in a waveguide. We obtain exact expressions for the field components and the spectral density of the transition radiation. With the steepest descent technique, we investigate the field components. We show that the electromagnetic field has a different structure in a vacuum than in cold plasma. We also develop an algorithm for the computation of the field based on a certain transformation of the integration path. The behavior of the field depending on distance and time and the spectral density depending on frequency are explored for different charge velocities. Some important physical effects are noted. A considerable increase and concentration of the field near the wave front in the plasma is observed for the case of ultrarelativistic particles. In the plasma, the mode envelopes and spectral density show zero points when the charge velocity is within certain limits.

  5. Observation of Deeply-Bound $^{85}$Rb$_{2}$ Vibrational Levels Using Feshbach Optimized Photoassociation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzyzewski, S P; Dizikes, J; Morrison, Micheal A; Abraham, E R I

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate Feshbach optimized photoassociation (FOPA) into the $0_{g}^{-} (5$S$_{1/2}+5$P$_{1/2}$) state in $^{85}$Rb$_{2}$. FOPA uses the enhancement of the amplitude of the initial atomic scattering wave function due to a Feshbach resonance to increase the molecular formation rate from photoassociation. We observe three vibrational levels, $v=$127, 140, and 150, with previously unmeasured binding energies of 256, 154, and 96 cm$^{-1}$. We measure the frequency, central magnetic field position, and magnetic field width of each Feshbach resonance. Our findings experimentally confirm that this technique can measure vibrational levels lower than those accessible to traditional photoassociative spectroscopy.

  6. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  7. NS&T Management Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-09-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  8. Adaptive array technique for differential-phase reflectometry in QUEST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idei, H., E-mail: idei@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, 816-8560 Japan (Japan); Nagata, K.; Mishra, K.; Itado, T.; Akimoto, R. [Interdisciplinary Grad. School of Eng. Sci., Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, 816-8580 Japan (Japan); Yamamoto, M. K. [Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto Univ., Uji, 611-0011 Japan (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A Phased Array Antenna (PAA) was considered as launching and receiving antennae in reflectometry to attain good directivity in its applied microwave range. A well-focused beam was obtained in a launching antenna application, and differential-phase evolution was properly measured by using a metal reflector plate in the proof-of-principle experiment at low power test facilities. Differential-phase evolution was also evaluated by using the PAA in the Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak (QUEST). A beam-forming technique was applied in receiving phased-array antenna measurements. In the QUEST device that should be considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave effect was significantly observed with perturbed phase evolution. A new approach using derivative of measured field on propagating wavenumber was proposed to eliminate the standing wave effect.

  9. Similarity Matching Techniques for Fault Diagnosis in Automotive Infotainment Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabir, Mashud

    2009-01-01

    Fault diagnosis has become a very important area of research during the last decade due to the advancement of mechanical and electrical systems in industries. The automobile is a crucial field where fault diagnosis is given a special attention. Due to the increasing complexity and newly added features in vehicles, a comprehensive study has to be performed in order to achieve an appropriate diagnosis model. A diagnosis system is capable of identifying the faults of a system by investigating the observable effects (or symptoms). The system categorizes the fault into a diagnosis class and identifies a probable cause based on the supplied fault symptoms. Fault categorization and identification are done using similarity matching techniques. The development of diagnosis classes is done by making use of previous experience, knowledge or information within an application area. The necessary information used may come from several sources of knowledge, such as from system analysis. In this paper similarity matching tec...

  10. Retinoblastoma-comparative analysis of external radiotherapy techniques, including an IMRT technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reisner, Marcio Lemberg [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)]. E-mail: mreisner@uol.com.br; Viegas, Celia Maria Pais [Department of Radiation Oncology, Instituto Nacional de Cancer, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Grazziotin, Rachele Zanchet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Instituto Nacional de Cancer, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Santos Batista, Delano Valdivino [Division of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, Instituto Nacional de Cancer, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Carneiro, Tulio Meneses; Mendonca de Araujo, Carlos Manoel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Instituto Nacional de Cancer, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the numerous external radiotherapy (RT) techniques for the treatment of retinoblastoma, as well as an intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) technique. The latter was elaborated to evaluate the potential dose reduction in the surrounding tissue, as well as the potential avoidance of subdosage in the ora serrata retinae. Methods and Materials: A 2-year-old patient with unilateral retinoblastoma underwent CT. With the aid of an ophthalmologist, the ocular structures were delimited, and 13 techniques described in published reports were reproduced on three-dimensional planning software and identified according to their authors. A technique with four noncoplanar fields using IMRT was also elaborated. These techniques were compared according to the dose to the ora serrata retinae, lens, orbit (volume that received a dose of {>=}20 Gy), vitreous, optic nerve, lacrimal gland (volume that received a dose of {>=}34 Gy), and cornea and according to their ease of reproducibility. Results: The techniques that attained the therapeutic dose to the ora serrata retinae were the IMRT technique and the techniques of Haye, Cassady, Cormack, and al-Beteri. The Cormack technique had the lowest volume that received a dose of {>=}20 Gy in the orbit, followed by the IMRT technique. The IMRT technique also achieved the lowest volume that received a dose of {>=}34 Gy (14%) in the lacrimal gland. The Abramson/McCormick/Blach, Cassady, Reese, and Schipper techniques were the easiest to reproduce and the Chin the most complex. Conclusion: Retinoblastoma treatment with IMRT has an advantage over the other techniques, because it allows for the greatest reduction of dose to the orbit and lacrimal gland, while maintaining the therapeutic dose to the ora serrata retinae and vitreous.

  11. Particle observations in space plasma have shown that high energy particles have some degree of gyrophase organization. Namely, the velocity distributions of the particle populations in the plane perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field depend on the g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Particle observations in space plasma have shown that high energy particles have some = = ='( ) 2[1 ( )]Z Z = - + Nongyrotropic Anisotropy instability Isotropic Beam-Plasma instability Gyrotropic dispersion Anisotropic Beam-Plasma instability Plasma Parameters 1.0C0.00013vti 4.0Ab0.0058vte 1.0Ai0.0005i

  12. Compensation Techniques in Accelerator Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hisham Kamal Sayed

    2011-05-31

    Accelerator physics is one of the most diverse multidisciplinary fields of physics, wherein the dynamics of particle beams is studied. It takes more than the understanding of basic electromagnetic interactions to be able to predict the beam dynamics, and to be able to develop new techniques to produce, maintain, and deliver high quality beams for different applications. In this work, some basic theory regarding particle beam dynamics in accelerators will be presented. This basic theory, along with applying state of the art techniques in beam dynamics will be used in this dissertation to study and solve accelerator physics problems. Two problems involving compensation are studied in the context of the MEIC (Medium Energy Electron Ion Collider) project at Jefferson Laboratory. Several chromaticity (the energy dependence of the particle tune) compensation methods are evaluated numerically and deployed in a figure eight ring designed for the electrons in the collider. Furthermore, transverse coupling optics have been developed to compensate the coupling introduced by the spin rotators in the MEIC electron ring design.

  13. Query Optimization Techniques Class Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    Query Optimization Techniques Exploiting Class Hierarchies Sophie Cluet 1 Guido Moerkotte 2 1 INRIA Since the introduction of object base management systems (OBMS), many query optimization techniques tailored for object query languages have been proposed. They adapt known optimization techniques

  14. Detectors and Data Analysis Techniques for Wide Field Optical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin, Mike

    and digital image centering and photometry methods. Although the emphasis is geared toward optical imaging classification process, Fisher et al. argued that for any procedural sub­classification scheme based on combining

  15. Effective Field Theory Techniques for Resummation in Jet Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Nicholas Daniel

    2012-01-01

    et al. Review of particle physics. J.Phys.G, G37:075021,for Resummation in Jet Physics by Nicholas Daniel Dunn Aof Doctor of Philosophy in Physics in the Graduate Division

  16. ALPHA SPECTROSCOPIC TECHNIQUES FOR FIELD MEASUREMENT OF RADON DAUGHTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazaroff, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    ventilation with heat recovery for controlling radonand radon-daughter concentrations in residences, Lawrencealpha energy concentration of radon decay products, Lawrence

  17. Techniques and Technologies for Field Detection of Asbestos Containing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Asbestos has been used in numerous applications at DOE sites including sprayed-on fireproofing, asphalt and vinyl floor tile, and asbestos-cement(transite) siding.

  18. Effective Field Theory Techniques for Resummation in Jet Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunn, Nicholas Daniel

    2012-01-01

    QCD corrections to WW+jet production at hadron colliders.al. Substructure of high-p T Jets at the LHC. Phys. Rev. ,decorrelations between QCD jets at all orders. Phys.Lett. ,

  19. Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)ask queries TypeDeveloper|WindsDifwind I'02-

  20. Imaging vector fields using Line Integral Convolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, B.; Leedom, L.C.

    1993-03-01

    Imaging vector fields has applications in science, art, image processing and special effects. An effective new approach is to use linear and curvilinear filtering techniques to locally blur textures along a vector field. This approach builds on several previous texture generation and filtering techniques. It is, however, unique because it is local, one-dimensional and independent of any predefined geometry or texture. The technique is general and capable of imaging arbitrary two- and three-dimensional vector fields. The local one-dimensional nature of the algorithm lends itself to highly parallel and efficient implementations. Furthermore, the curvilinear filter is capable of rendering detail on very intricate vector fields. Combining this technique with other rendering and image processing techniques -- like periodic motion filtering -- results in richly informative and striking images. The technique can also produce novel special effects.

  1. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

    2009-12-08

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  2. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

    1997-03-25

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

  3. Image compression technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fu, Chi-Yung (San Francisco, CA); Petrich, Loren I. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace's equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image.

  4. Improving the reproducibility of pyrolysis MS techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roussis, S.G.; Fedora, J.W. [Imperial Oil, Sarnia (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The analysis of the majority of volatile samples is primarily accomplished with established techniques (EI, CI). These techniques are based on the direct vapourization of the sample, upon heating, in the ionization source of a mass spectrometer. Typical analytical techniques, able to analyze non-volatile samples are those that allow the desorption of components from the solid or liquid phase directly to the gas phase. Field Desorption (FD) and Desorption Chemical Ionization (DCI) are two of these techniques. Fast Atom Bombardment (FAB) has been more successful in analyzing polar samples than non-volatile hydrocarbon samples. Limited information is available for the capabilities of the newer ionization techniques (Electrospray Ionization, ESI; Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization, MALDI) to characterize the non-volatile hydrocarbon samples. ESI of mixtures of compounds produces complex mass spectra, consisting of multiply charged ion species, that may be difficult to interpret. MALDI has the potential for ionization of non-volatile hydrocarbon samples, but extensive research is required to determine the appropriate matrix compounds that will permit the unbiased desorption of all sample components. An important requirement in the characterization of the non-volatile samples using direct desorption techniques without prior chromatographic separation, is the use of ultra high resolution (>50,000), for the separation of high molecular weight isobaric peaks. In the present work, the experimental parameters affecting reproducibility have been studied, optimum conditions have been determined that permit reproducible analysis.

  5. Infrared Inspection Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, A. B.; Bevers, D. V.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared scanning equipment has been used at Amoco's Texas City refinery since 1971 as an inspection tool. A camera scans the field of view and focuses the infrared radiation on a detector which converts the infrared signal to an electrical signal...

  6. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Dam, C.P.; Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J.

    2008-07-01

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  7. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  8. Cosmology of Bifundamental Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanmay Vachaspati

    2008-12-17

    If a field theory contains gauged, non-Abelian, bi-fundamental fields i.e. fields that are charged under two separate non-Abelian gauge groups, the transition from a deconfined phase to a hadronic phase may be frustrated. Similar frustration may occur in non-Abelian gauge models containing matter only in higher dimensional representations e.g. models with pure glue, or if ordinary quarks are confined by two flux tubes, as implied in the triangular configuration of baryons within QCD. In a cosmological setting, such models can lead to the formation of a web of confining electric flux tubes that can potentially have observational signatures.

  9. INFRARED OBSERVATIONS OF VOLATILE MOLECULES IN COMET HALEBOPP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    ­slit spectroscopy --- of the space distribution of these species. With ISO, carbon dioxide was directly observed case the only remote­ sensing technique allowing to observe non­polar molecules such as CO 2

  10. New characterization techniques for LSST sensors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nomerotski, A.

    2015-06-18

    Fully depleted, thick CCDs with extended infra-red response have become the sensor of choice for modern sky surveys. The charge transport effects in the silicon and associated astrometric distortions could make mapping between the sky coordinates and sensor coordinates non-trivial, and limit the ultimate precision achievable with these sensors. Two new characterization techniques for the CCDs, which both could probe these issues, are discussed: x-ray flat fielding and imaging of pinhole arrays.

  11. MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS AND THE q-TRIPLET IN THE HELIOSHEATH: VOYAGER 2 OBSERVATIONS FROM 91.0 TO 94.2 AU AT LATITUDE 30 Degree-Sign S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burlaga, L. F. [Geospace Physics Laboratory, Code 673, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Geospace Physics Laboratory, Code 673, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ness, N. F., E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Voyager 2 (V2) was in the heliosheath during 2010, at (91.0-94.2) AU from the Sun and at the latitudes (28. Degree-Sign 8-29. Degree-Sign 3 S) AU, observing solar wind that left the Sun during 2009, when solar activity was very low. There was no feature in B(t) associated with the changes in the plasma parameters observed near 2010.4. The CR-B relation was satisfied. The fluctuations of daily averages of B showed (1) a Gaussian distribution of B, (2) a q-Gaussian of the daily increments of B with q = 1.6, (3) a power-law correlation of B on scales from 1 to 16 days, (4) multifractal structure of B on scales from 1 to 8 days, and (5) a 1/f spectrum of B on scales from 1 to 100 days. The amplitude of the compressive microscale fluctuations of B during several hours on each day is described by the standard deviation (SD) of the 48 s averages of B during the day. Items 2, 3, and 4 determine a 'q-triplet' in the heliosheath. Large-scale fluctuations of SD show (1) a lognormal distribution of SD; (2) an average value of SD = 0.19, 20% of the average B; (3) a q-Gaussian distribution of the increments of SD with q = 1.4; (4) a power-law correlation on scales from 1 to 16 days; and (5) a 1/f spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days. The heliosheath was in a quasi-stationary, metastable equilibrium state with well-defined structure over a wide range of scales near V2 during 2010.

  12. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  13. Applied Science/Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools to someone byApplied Science/Techniques

  14. Constraints on the structure of 16 Cyg A and 16 Cyg B using inversion techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buldgen, G; Dupret, M A

    2015-01-01

    Constraining mixing processes and chemical composition is a central problem in stellar physics as their impact on stellar age determinations leads to biases in our studies of stellar evolution, galactic history and exoplanetary systems. In two previous papers, we showed how seismic inversion techniques could offer strong constraints on such processes by pointing out weaknesses in theoretical models. We now apply our technique to the solar analogues 16CygA and 16CygB, being amongst the best targets in the Kepler field to test the diagnostic potential of seismic inversions. The combination of various seismic indicators helps to provide more constrained and accurate fundamendal parameters for these stars. We use the latest seismic, spectroscopic and interferometric observational constraints in the litterature for this system to determine reference models independently for both stars. We carry out seismic inversions of the acoustic radius, the mean density and a core conditions indicator. We note that a degenerac...

  15. Sphere Light Field Rendering Zigang Wang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sphere Light Field Rendering Zigang Wang1 and Zhengrong Liang1,2 Departments of Radiology1 and Computer Science2 , State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA ABSTRACT Light field algorithm is one of the most famous image-based rendering techniques. In this paper, an improved light field

  16. Observing The Cosmic Ray Moon Shadow With VERITAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bird, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The Earth is subjected to a uniform flux of very-high-energy (VHE, E > 100 GeV) cosmic rays unless they are obscured by an object, such as the Moon, in which case a deficit or shadow is created. Since cosmic rays are charged this deficit is deflected by the Earth's magnetic field, enabling the rigidity of the obstructed cosmic rays to be determined. Measurement of the relative deficits of different species enables the positron fraction and the antiproton ratio to be measured. The April 15, 2014 lunar eclipse was visible with the VERITAS Cherenkov telescopes, which allowed (with special UV bandpass filters) 74 minutes of direct observations of the Moon and the associated deficit in the cosmic-ray flux. The results of this observation are presented. In addition VERITAS has been conducting a series of observations by pointing close to a partially illuminated Moon, with a reduced photomultiplier tube high voltage and UV bandpass filters. We present the technique developed for these observations and their current ...

  17. The Lunar Cherenkov Technique: From Parkes Onwards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. W. James; R. D. Ekers; R. A. McFadden; R. J. Protheroe

    2007-09-03

    The lunar Cherenkov technique, which aims to detect the coherent Cherenkov radiation produced when UHE particles interact in the lunar regolith, was first attempted with the Parkes radio-telescope in 1995, though the theory was not sufficiently developed at this time to calculate a limit on the UHE neutrino flux from the non-observation. Since then, the technique has evolved to include experiments utilising lower frequencies, wider bandwidths, and entire arrays of antenna. We develop a simulation to analyse the full range of experiments, and calculate the UHE neutrino flux limit from the Parkes experiment, including the directional dependence. Our results suggest a methodology for planning future observations, and demonstrate how to utilise all available information on the nature of radio pulses from the Moon for the detection of UHE particles.

  18. Microslit Nod-shuffle Spectroscopy - a technique for achieving very high densities of spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Glazebrook; Joss Bland-Hawthorn

    2000-11-04

    We describe a new approach to obtaining very high surface densities of optical spectra in astronomical observations with extremely accurate subtraction of night sky emission. The observing technique requires that the telescope is nodded rapidly between targets and adjacent sky positions; object and sky spectra are recorded on adjacent regions of a low-noise CCD through charge shuffling. This permits the use of extremely high densities of small slit apertures (`microslits') since an extended slit is not required for sky interpolation. The overall multi-object advantage of this technique is as large as 2.9x that of conventional multi-slit observing for an instrument configuration which has an underfilled CCD detector and is always >1.5 for high target densities. The `nod-shuffle' technique has been practically implemented at the Anglo-Australian Telescope as the `LDSS++ project' and achieves sky-subtraction accuracies as good as 0.04%, with even better performance possible. This is a factor of ten better than is routinely achieved with long-slits. LDSS++ has been used in various observational modes, which we describe, and for a wide variety of astronomical projects. The nod-shuffle approach should be of great benefit to most spectroscopic (e.g. long-slit, fiber, integral field) methods and would allow much deeper spectroscopy on very large telescopes (10m or greater) than is currently possible. Finally we discuss the prospects of using nod-shuffle to pursue extremely long spectroscopic exposures (many days) and of mimicking nod-shuffle observations with infrared arrays.

  19. Observation of ground-state Ramsey fringes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weel, M.; Kumarakrishnan, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3 (Canada)

    2003-06-01

    We have used trapped {sup 85}Rb atoms to demonstrate an atom interferometric measurement of atomic recoil in the frequency domain. The measurement uses echo techniques to generate a Ramsey fringe pattern. The pattern exhibits recoil components consistent with theoretical predictions. We find the measurement to be insensitive to magnetic field gradients and discuss the prospects for a precision measurement of the recoil frequency.

  20. Overcoming the far-field diffraction limit via absorbance modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Hsin-Yu Sidney

    2011-01-01

    Diffraction limits the resolution of far-field lithography and imaging to about half of the wavelength, which greatly limits the capability of optical techniques. The proposed technique with absorbance modulation aims to ...

  1. Magnetic Fields via Polarimetry: Progress of Grain Alignment Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lazarian

    2002-08-28

    Most astrophysical systems, e.g. stellar winds, the diffuse interstellar medium, molecular clouds, are magnetized with magnetic fields that influence almost all of their properties. One of the most informative techniques of magnetic field studies is based on the use of starlight polarization and polarized emission arising from aligned dust. How reliable the interpretation of the polarization maps in terms of magnetic fields is the issue that the grain alignment theory addresses. Although grain alignment is a problem of half a century standing, recent progress achieved in the field makes us believe that we are approaching the solution of this mystery. I review basic physical processes involved in grain alignment and discuss the niches for different alignment mechanisms. I show why mechanisms that were favored for decades do not look so promising right now, while the radiative torque mechanism ignored for more than 20 years looks so attractive. I define the observational tests and outline the circumstances when grain alignment theory predicts that new yet untapped information of magnetic field structure is available through polarimetry. In particular, I touch upon mapping magnetic fields in circumstellar regions, interplanetary space and in comet comae.

  2. Observation of interference fringes in Autler-Townes line shapes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, S. R.; Smith, A. V.; Scully, Marlan O.; Fry, Edward

    1996-01-01

    We observe Ramsey fringes in the absorption line shape for a weak optical field probing the transition between an unperturbed quantum state and one that is dynamically Stark shifted by a strong pump field....

  3. Dose Reduction Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  4. Tachyonic field interacting with Scalar (Phantom) Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

    2009-01-29

    In this letter, we have considered the universe is filled with the mixture of tachyonic field and scalar or phantom field. If the tachyonic field interacts with scalar or phantom field, the interaction term decays with time and the energy for scalar field is transferred to tachyonic field or the energy for phantom field is transferred to tachyonic field. The tachyonic field and scalar field potentials always decrease, but phantom field potential always increases.

  5. Magnetars: the physics behind observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turolla, Roberto; Watts, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Magnetars are the strongest magnets in the present universe and the combination of extreme magnetic field, gravity and density makes them unique laboratories to probe current physical theories (from quantum electrodynamics to general relativity) in the strong field limit. Magnetars are observed as peculiar, burst--active X-ray pulsars, the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and the Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs); the latter emitted also three "giant flares," extremely powerful events during which luminosities can reach up to 10^47 erg/s for about one second. The last five years have witnessed an explosion in magnetar research which has led, among other things, to the discovery of transient, or "outbursting," and "low-field" magnetars. Substantial progress has been made also on the theoretical side. Quite detailed models for explaining the magnetars' persistent X-ray emission, the properties of the bursts, the flux evolution in transient sources have been developed and confronted with observations. New insight on neu...

  6. First observation of magnetic moment precession of channeled particles in bent crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, D.; Albuquerque, I.F.; Baublis, V.V.; Bondar, N.F.; Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Cooper, P.S.; Lisheng, D.; Denisov, A.S.; Dobrovolsky, A.V.; Dubbs, T.; Endler, A.M.F.; Escobar, C.O.; Foucher, M.; Golovtsov, V.L.; Goritchev, P.A.; Gottschalk, H.; Gouffon, P.; Grachev, V.T.; Khanzadeev, A.V.; Kubantsev, M.A.; Kuropatkin, N.P.; Lach, J.; Lang Pengfei; Lebedenko, V.N.; Li Chengze; Li Yunshan; Mahon, J.R.P.; McCliment, E.; Morelos, A.; Newsom, C.; Pommot Maia, M.C.; Samsonov, V.M.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Shi Huanzhang; Smith, V.J.; Sun, C.R.; Tang Fukun; Terentyev, N.K.; Timm, S.; Tkatch, I.I.; Uvarov, L.N.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Yan Jie; Zhao Wenheng; Zheng Shuchen; Zhong Yuanyuan Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510

    1992-12-07

    Spin precession of channeled particles in bent crystals has been observed for the first time. Polarized [Sigma][sup +] were channeled using bent Si crystals. These crystals provided an effective magnetic field of 45 T which resulted in a measured spin precession of 60[plus minus]17[degree]. This agrees with the prediction of 62[plus minus]2[degree] using the world average of [Sigma][sup +] magnetic moment measurements. This new technique gives a [Sigma][sup +] magnetic moment of (2.40[plus minus]0.46[plus minus]0.40)[mu][sub [ital N

  7. Field Mapping At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Field Mapping...

  8. Hybrid conformal field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bertolini; Ilarion V. Melnikov; M. Ronen Plesser

    2013-07-26

    We describe a class of (2,2) superconformal field theories obtained by fibering a Landau-Ginzburg orbifold CFT over a compact Kaehler base manifold. While such models are naturally obtained as phases in a gauged linear sigma model, our construction is independent of such an embedding. We discuss the general properties of such theories and present a technique to study the massless spectrum of the associated heterotic compactification. We test the validity of our method by applying it to hybrid phases of linear models and comparing spectra among the phases.

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    directly outside the instrument container, a 10 m tower, a remote controlled helicopter, and a tethered balloon system. The final product will be the identification and...

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientist : Frank Keutsch Abstract The formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and ozone (O3), two secondary pollutants that impact human health, the biosphere, and climate,...

  11. Field observations of soil moisture variability across scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Famiglietti, James S; Ryu, Dongryeol; Berg, Aaron A; Rodell, Matthew; Jackson, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    extent scales and wet- ness conditions. The more than 36,000deviation, CV, and skew- ness versus mean moisture contentstandard deviation and skew- ness versus mean soil moisture,

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHUVA is the short name for the "Cloud processes of the main precipitation systems in Brazil: A contribution to cloud resolving modeling and to the GPM (Global Precipitation...

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    population. This relation between respiratory diseases and environmental factors about air pollution can help to building an epidemiological hypothesis for this region. So, it...

  14. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlantic (ACE-ENA)Study

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Biomass Burning Observation Project - BBOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22, 2012IIIAtlanticMarine Boundary

  16. ARM - Field Campaign - Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design togovCampaignsMASRAD:govCampaignsReplicator Sonde Campaign ARM Data

  17. ARM - Field Campaign - Supplement to Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring Single Column Model IOP ARMStructure (ALTOS)

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - The ARM Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring Single Column Model IOP(PROBE) govCampaignsThe ARM Pilot

  19. ARM - Field Campaign - Water Cycle Pilot Study Intensive Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode DesigngovCampaignsSpring Single Column ModelRSPExperimentgovCampaignsWater Cycle Pilot

  20. Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation JumpSet RenewableFuelStandard Jump to:using Seismic

  1. LOWER BOUNDS ON INTERGALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM SIMULTANEOUSLY OBSERVED

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journalspectroscopy of aerosols(Technical Report) |Connect|RADIONUCLIDES IN

  2. Diagnostic techniques used in AVLIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heestand, G.M.; Beeler, R.G.

    1992-12-01

    This is the second part of a general overview talk on the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. In this presentation the authors will discuss the diagnostic techniques used to measure key parameters in their atomic vapor including densities, temperature, velocities charge exchange rates and background ionization levels. Although these techniques have been extensively applied to their uranium program they do have applicability to other systems. Relevant data demonstrating these techniques will be shown.

  3. Comet tail formation: Giotto observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilken, B.; Jockers, K.; Johnstone, A.; Coates, A.; Heath, J.; Formisano, V.; Amata, E.; Winningham, J.D.; Thomsen, M.; Bryant, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The process of mass loading of the solar wind by cometary ions, which forms comet tails, has been observed throughout the coma of comet Halley. Three distinct regimes were found where the nature of the energy and momentum coupling between solar wind and cometary ions is different. Outside the bow shock, where there is little angular scattering of the freshly ionized particles, the coupling is described by the simple pickup trajectory and the energy is controlled by the angle between the flow and the magnetic field. Just inside the bow shock, there is considerable scattering accompanied by another acceleration process which raises some particle energies well above the straightforward pickup value. Finally, closer to the nucleus, the amount of scattering decreases and the coupling is once more controlled by the magnetic field direction. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Profiler Instrumentation Using Metaprogramming Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    Profiler Instrumentation Using Metaprogramming Techniques Ritu Arora, Yu Sun, Zekai Demirezen, Jeff manipulation) before it enters into the available class pool of an executing application. Javassist [9] (see

  5. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  6. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  7. Integrated reservoir characterization for the Mazari oil field, Pakistan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashraf, Ejaz

    1994-01-01

    This thesis describes a field study performed on the Mazari oil field located in Sind province, Pakistan. We used an integrated reservoir characterization technique to incorporate the geological, petrophysical, and reservoir performance data...

  8. A reservoir management study of a mature oil field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peruzzi, Tave

    1995-01-01

    An integrated geological, petrophysical and reservoir engineering review was performed for a mature, producing oil field. Like many older fields, important data are missing or were not collected. The techniques used in this thesis may be applied...

  9. Uncertain Probabilistic Roadmaps with Observations Richard Dearden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xin

    Uncertain Probabilistic Roadmaps with Observations Richard Dearden School of Computer Science Science University of Birmingham Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK mlk@cs.bham.ac.uk Abstract Probabilistic roadmaps. Introduction Probabilistic Roadmaps (PRM) are a popular technique for path planning in high dimensional spaces

  10. Primordial Magnetic Fields in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain A. Brown

    2008-12-09

    Magnetic fields have been observed in galaxies, clusters of galaxies and probably in superclusters. While mechanisms exist to generate these in the late universe, it is possible that magnetic fields have existed since very early times. This thesis is concerned with methods to predict the form of such imprints. We review in detail a standard, linearised cosmology before introducing an electromagnetic field. We then consider the intrinsic statistics of the magnetic stresses in two ways, analytically and via static realisations. We construct the power spectra, some of which we present for the first time. At the one- and three-point level we find significant intrinsic non-Gaussianities. Finally we turn to the observable impacts a primordial magnetic field. Assuming coherence, the statistics of the source can be mapped onto the CMB in a simple manner. We demonstrate that our approach is valid by reproducing the signals for Gaussian power law fields on the microwave sky. [ABRIDGED

  11. Electromagnetic Interrogation Techniques Damage Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic Interrogation Techniques for Damage Detection H. T. Banks and M. L. Joyner Center.P. Winfree Nasa Langley Research Center Hampton, VA Plenary Lecture, Electromagnetic Nondestructive Evaluation 2001 (ENDE 2001), Kobe, Japan, May 18-19, 20001 #12;Electromagnetic Interrogation Techniques

  12. Long-term monitoring of ULF electromagnetic fields at Parkfield, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kappler, K.N.; Morrison, H.F.; Egbert, G.D.

    2009-08-01

    Electric and magnetic fields in the (10{sup -4}-1.0) Hz band were monitored at two sites adjacent to the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield and Hollister, California from 1995 to present. A data window [2002-2005], enclosing the September 28, 2004 M6 Parkfield earthquake, was analyzed to determine if anomalous electric or magnetic fields, or changes in ground conductivity, occurred before the earthquake. The data were edited, removing intervals of instrument malfunction leaving 875 days in the four-year period. Frequent, spike-like disturbances were common, but were not more frequent around the time of the earthquake; these were removed before subsequent processing. Signal to noise amplitude spectra, estimated via magnetotelluric processing showed the behavior of the ULF fields to be remarkably constant over the period of analysis. These first-order plots make clear that most of the recorded energy is coherent over the spatial extent of the array. Three main statistical techniques were employed to separate local anomalous electrical or magnetic fields from the dominant coherent natural fields: transfer function estimates between components at each site were employed to subtract the dominant field, and look deeper at the 'residual' fields; the data were decomposed into principal components to identify the dominant coherent array modes; and the technique of canonical coherences was employed to distinguish anomalous fields which are spatially broad from anomalies which occur at a single site only, and furthermore to distinguish anomalies which are present in both the electric and magnetic fields from those which are present in only one field type. Standard remote reference apparent resistivity estimates were generated daily at Parkfield. A significant seasonal component of variability was observed suggesting local distortion due to variations in near surface resistance. In all cases, high levels of sensitivity to subtle electromagnetic effects were demonstrated, but no effects which can be reasonably characterized as precursors to the Parkfield earthquake were found.

  13. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  14. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

  15. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  16. Numerical models of the geodynamo and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    , and paleomagnetic observations have been interpreted as actual geomagnetic features and used as constraints. Keywords: Geodynamo; Earth core; geomagnetic field; magnetic records. Index terms: Dynamo theory; time much more recently. Papers coauthored by dynamo specialists and geophysicists observing the field over

  17. Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lochner, Michelle; Zwart, Jonathan T L; Smirnov, Oleg; Bassett, Bruce A; Oozeer, Nadeem; Kunz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) New telescopes like the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will push into a new sensitivity regime and expose systematics, such as direction-dependent effects, that could previously be ignored. Current methods for handling such systematics rely on alternating best estimates of instrumental calibration and models of the underlying sky, which can lead to inaccurate uncertainty estimates and biased results because such methods ignore any correlations between parameters. These deconvolution algorithms produce a single image that is assumed to be a true representation of the sky, when in fact it is just one realisation of an infinite ensemble of images compatible with the noise in the data. In contrast, here we report a Bayesian formalism that simultaneously infers both systematics and science. Our technique, Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations (BIRO), determines all parameters directly from the raw data, bypassing image-making entirely, by sampling from the joint posterior probability distribution. Thi...

  18. First VLBI observations of methanol maser polarisation, in G339.88-1.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Dodson

    2008-04-14

    We investigate class II methanol masers and the environment in which they form with the Long Baseline Array (LBA). Using full polarisation VLBI, we're able to measure the magnetic field directions so as to distinguish between the two main models of the environment in which methanol masers form: disks or shocks. We present polarised images of the methanol maser source G339.88-1.2, made with the LBA at 6.7-GHz. With these first polarisation maps made with the LBA, which successfully reproduce observations with the ATCA confirming the new AIPS code, a new technique for Southern VLBI is opened. The magnetic field directions found are inconstant with methanol masers arising in disks for the majority of the emission.

  19. Navigation System for Ground Vehicles using Temporally Interconnected Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    navigation technique for an automotive vehicle. This method involves several observers, each designed attitude measurements from an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is performed (at rest) on the launch platform

  20. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article) | SciTechSubmittedEcologist for a Day Field Guide Program

  1. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2014-11-25

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  2. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  3. Conceptual Ideas for New Nondestructive UF6 Cylinder Assay Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Karen A.

    2012-05-02

    Nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of uranium cylinders play an important role in helping the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguard uranium enrichment plants. Traditionally, these measurements have consisted of a scale or load cell to determine the mass of UF{sub 6} in the cylinder combined with a gamma-ray measurement of the 186 keV peak from {sup 235}U to determine enrichment. More recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed systems that exploit the passive neutron signal from UF{sub 6} to determine uranium mass and/or enrichment. These include the Uranium Cylinder Assay System (UCAS), the Passive Neutron Enrichment Meter (PNEM), and the Hybrid Enrichment Verification Array (HEVA). The purpose of this report is to provide the IAEA with new ideas on technologies that may or may not be under active development but could be useful for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay. To begin, we have included two feasibility studies of active interrogation techniques. There is a long history of active interrogation in the field of nuclear safeguards, especially for uranium assay. Both of the active techniques provide a direct measure of {sup 235}U content. The first is an active neutron method based on the existing PNEM design that uses a correlated {sup 252}Cf interrogation source. This technique shows great promise for UF{sub 6} cylinder assay and is based on advanced technology that could be implemented in the field in the near term. The second active technique is nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF). In the NRF technique, a bremsstrahlung photon beam could be used to illuminate the cylinder, and high-resolution gamma-ray detectors would detect the characteristic de-excitation photons. The results of the feasibility study show that under certain measurement geometries, NRF is impractical for UF6 cylinder assay, but the 'grazing transmission' and 'secant transmission' geometries have more potential for this application and should be assessed quantitatively. The next set of techniques leverage scintillator detectors that are sensitive to both neutron and gamma radiation. The first is the BC-523A capture-gated organic liquid scintillator. The detector response from several different neutron energies has been characterized and is included in the study. The BC-523A has not yet been tested with UF{sub 6} cylinders, but the application appears to be well suited for this technology. The second detector type is a relatively new inorganic scintillator called CLYC. CLYC provides a complementary detection approach to the HEVA and PNEM systems that could be used to determine uranium enrichment in UF{sub 6} cylinders. In this section, the conceptual idea for an integrated CLYC-HEVA/PNEM system is explored that could yield more precision and robustness against systemic uncertainties than any one of the systems by itself. This is followed by a feasibility study on using alpha-particle-induced reaction gamma-rays as a way to estimate {sup 234}U abundance in UF{sub 6}. Until now, there has been no readily available estimate of the strength of these reaction gamma-rays. Thick target yields of the chief reaction gammas are computed and show that they are too weak for practical safeguards applications. In special circumstances where long count times are permissible, the 1,275 keV F({alpha},x{gamma}) is observable. Its strength could help verify an operator declaration provided other knowledge is available (especially the age). The other F({alpha},x{gamma}) lines are concealed by the dominant uranium line spectrum and associated continuum. Finally, the last section provides several ideas for electromagnetic and acoustic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. These can be used to measure cylinder wall thickness, which is a source of systematic uncertainty for gamma-ray-based NDA techniques; characterize the UF{sub 6} filling profile inside the cylinder, which is a source of systematic uncertainty for neutron-based NDA techniques; locate hidden objects inside the cylinder; a

  4. Sensitivity to parameter and data variations in dimensionality reduction techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verleysen, Michel

    - Machine Learning Group ICTEAM/ELEN - Place du Levant, 3 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium 3- Univ. Catholique, Belgium Abstract. Dimensionality reduction techniques aim at representing high- dimensional data of data is available in many different fields, such as medical imaging, process control and text mining

  5. Measurement of Untruncated Nuclear Spin Interactions via Zero- to Ultra-Low-Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John W. Blanchard; Tobias F. Sjolander; Jonathan P. King; Micah P. Ledbetter; Emma H. Levine; Vikram S. Bajaj; Dmitry Budker; Alexander Pines

    2015-07-09

    Zero- to ultra-low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (ZULF NMR) provides a new regime for the measurement of nuclear spin-spin interactions free from effects of large magnetic fields, such as truncation of terms that do not commute with the Zeeman Hamiltonian. One such interaction, the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling, is a valuable source of spatial information in NMR, though many terms are unobservable in high-field NMR, and the coupling averages to zero under isotropic molecular tumbling. Under partial alignment, this information is retained in the form of so-called residual dipolar couplings. We report zero- to ultra-low-field NMR measurements of residual dipolar couplings in acetonitrile-2-$^{13}$C aligned in stretched polyvinyl acetate gels. This represents the first investigation of dipolar couplings as a perturbation on the indirect spin-spin $J$-coupling in the absence of an applied magnetic field. As a consequence of working at zero magnetic field, we observe terms of the dipole-dipole coupling Hamiltonian that are invisible in conventional high-field NMR. This technique expands the capabilities of zero- to ultra-low-field NMR and may have applications in precision measurement of subtle physical interactions, chemical analysis, and characterization of local mesoscale structure in materials.

  6. Prudhoe Bay Oil Production Optimization: Using Virtual intelligence Techniques, Stage One: Neural Model Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 77659 Prudhoe Bay Oil Production Optimization: Using Virtual intelligence Techniques, Stage One, TX 75083-3836, U.S.A., fax 01-972-952-9435. Abstract Field data from the Prudhoe Bay oil field.998 respectively. This is the first phase in the development of a tool to maximize total field oil production

  7. Observables on Quantum Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatolij Dvure?enskij; Mária Kuková

    2012-04-29

    An observable on a quantum structure is any $\\sigma$-homomorphism of quantum structures from the Borel $\\sigma$-algebra into the quantum structure. We show that our partial information on an observable known only for all intervals of the form $(-\\infty,t)$ is sufficient to determine uniquely the whole observable defined on quantum structures like $\\sigma$-MV-algebras, $\\sigma$-effect algebras, Boolean $\\sigma$-algebras, monotone $\\sigma$-complete effect algebras with the Riesz Decomposition Property, the effect algebra of effect operators of a Hilbert space, and a system of functions, and an effect-tribe.

  8. THE MAGNETIC FIELD IN TAURUS PROBED BY INFRARED POLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Nicholas L.; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Li Di [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, MS 301-429, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Clemens, D. P. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Krco, Marko, E-mail: nchapman@u.northwestern.edu [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2011-11-01

    We present maps of the plane-of-sky magnetic field within two regions of the Taurus molecular cloud: one in the dense core L1495/B213 filament and the other in a diffuse region to the west. The field is measured from the polarization of background starlight seen through the cloud. In total, we measured 287 high-quality near-infrared polarization vectors in these regions. In L1495/B213, the percent polarization increases with column density up to A{sub V} {approx} 9 mag, the limits of our data. The radiative torques model for grain alignment can explain this behavior, but models that invoke turbulence are inconsistent with the data. We also combine our data with published optical and near-infrared polarization measurements in Taurus. Using this large sample, we estimate the strength of the plane-of-sky component of the magnetic field in nine subregions. This estimation is done with two different techniques that use the observed dispersion in polarization angles. Our values range from 5 to 82 {mu}G and tend to be higher in denser regions. In all subregions, the critical index of the mass-to-magnetic flux ratio is sub-unity, implying that Taurus is magnetically supported on large scales ({approx}2 pc). Within the region observed, the B213 filament takes a sharp turn to the north and the direction of the magnetic field also takes a sharp turn, switching from being perpendicular to the filament to becoming parallel. This behavior can be understood if we are observing the rim of a bubble. We argue that it has resulted from a supernova remnant associated with a recently discovered nearby gamma-ray pulsar.

  9. Quantum observables, Lie algebra homology and TQFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert Schwarz

    1999-04-25

    Let us consider a Lie (super)algebra $G$ spanned by $T_{\\alpha}$ where $T_{\\alpha}$ are quantum observables in BV-formalism. It is proved that for every tensor $c^{\\alpha_1...\\alpha_k}$ that determines a homology class of the Lie algebra $G$ the expression $c^{\\alpha_1...\\alpha_k}T_{\\alpha _1}...T_{\\alpha_k}$ is again a quantum observables. This theorem is used to construct quantum observables in BV sigma-model. We apply this construction to explain Kontsevich's results about the relation between homology of the Lie algebra of Hamiltonian vector fields and topological invariants of manifolds.

  10. MARS OBSERVER Mission Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    of Mars Observer Mission Failure.. ................... D-12 a. Most Probable Cause: Leakage of NT0 Through Check Valves .................................................................. D-14 b. Potential Cause: Pressure Regulator Failure....................... D-28 c. Potential Cause: Failure of a Pyro Valve Charge

  11. 8) Stratospheric equatorial variability a) Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Francois

    speed. Phase lines inclined eastward when altitude increases indicating upward propation Signal field) Westward phase propagation but eastward group propagation Phase lines inclined westward Signal;5 Satellites wind observations (UARS, Swinbak et Ortland 1997) The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (low stratosphere

  12. Heat pulse propagation in chaotic 3-dimensional magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. del-Castillo-Negrete; D. Blazevski

    2014-09-10

    Heat pulse propagation in $3$-D chaotic magnetic fields is studied by solving the parallel heat transport equation using a Lagrangian-Green's function (LG) method. The LG method provides an efficient and accurate technique that circumvents limitations of finite elements and finite difference methods. The main two problems addressed are: (i) The dependence of the radial transport on the magnetic field stochasticity (controlled by the amplitude of the perturbation, $\\epsilon$); and (ii) The role of reversed shear configurations on pulse propagation. In all the cases considered there are no magnetic flux surfaces. However, radial transport is observed to depend strongly on $\\epsilon$ due to the presence of high-order magnetic islands and Cantori that act as quasi-transport barriers that preclude the radial penetration of heat pulses within physically relevant time scale. The dependence of the magnetic field connection length, $\\ell_B$, on $\\epsilon$ is studied in detail. The decay rate of the temperature maximum, $\\langle T \\rangle_{max}(t)$, the time delay of the temperature response as function of the radius, $\\tau$, and the radial heat flux $\\langle {{\\bf q}\\cdot {\\hat e}_\\psi} \\rangle$, are also studied as functions of the magnetic field stochasticity and $\\ell_B$. In all cases, the scaling of $\\langle T \\rangle_{max}$ with $t$ transitions from sub-diffusive, $\\langle T \\rangle_{max} \\sim t^{-1/4}$, at short times ($\\chi_\\parallel t 10^5$). A strong dependence on $\\epsilon$ is also observed on $\\tau$ and $\\langle {{\\bf q}\\cdot {\\hat e}_\\psi} \\rangle$. The radial propagation of pulses in fully chaotic fields considerably slows down in the shear reversal region and, as a result, $\\tau$, in reversed shear configurations is an order of magnitude longer than the one in monotonic $q$-profiles.

  13. Electric field induced spin and valley polarization within a magnetically confined silicene channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yiman; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhou, Ma; Zhou, Guanghui; Long, Meng-Qiu

    2014-12-28

    We study the electronic structure and transport properties of Dirac electrons along a channel created by an exchange field through the proximity of ferromagnets on a silicene sheet. The multiple total internal reflection induces localized states in the channel, which behaves like an electron waveguide. An effect of spin- and valley-filtering originating from the coupling between valley and spin degrees is predicted for such a structure. Interestingly, this feature can be tuned significantly by locally applying electric and exchange fields simultaneously. The parameter condition for observing fully spin- and valley-polarized current is obtained. These findings may be observable in todays' experimental technique and useful for spintronic and valleytronic applications based on silicene.

  14. Techniques for determining physical zones of influence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamann, Hendrik F; Lopez-Marrero, Vanessa

    2013-11-26

    Techniques for analyzing flow of a quantity in a given domain are provided. In one aspect, a method for modeling regions in a domain affected by a flow of a quantity is provided which includes the following steps. A physical representation of the domain is provided. A grid that contains a plurality of grid-points in the domain is created. Sources are identified in the domain. Given a vector field that defines a direction of flow of the quantity within the domain, a boundary value problem is defined for each of one or more of the sources identified in the domain. Each of the boundary value problems is solved numerically to obtain a solution for the boundary value problems at each of the grid-points. The boundary problem solutions are post-processed to model the regions affected by the flow of the quantity on the physical representation of the domain.

  15. Design and construction of the IMACS-IFU, a 2000-element integral field unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Schmoll; G. N. Dodsworth; R. Content; J. R. Allington-Smith

    2004-08-24

    The IMACS-IFU is an Integral Field Unit built for the IMACS spectrograph at the Magellan-I-Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. It consists of two rectangular fields of 5 by 7 arcseconds, separated by roughly one arcminute. With a total number of 2000 spatial elements it is the second largest fiber-lenslet based IFU worldwide, working in a wavelength range between 400 and 900 nm. Due to the equally sized fields classical background subtraction, beam switching and shuffling are possible observation techniques. One particular design challenge was the single, half a metre long curved slit in combination with a non telecentric output. Besides the construction some preliminary results are described.

  16. New Techniques for Particle Acclerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    of a 100 MW X- Band Klystron". Proc. of the IEEE Part.Mizuno. et aI, "X-Band Klystron Diode Test for Japan Linearl6 II. Power Sources Klystrons 18 Crossed Field Amplifiers

  17. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  18. Quantum Mechanics Without Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. H. Sulis

    2013-03-03

    The measurement problem and the role of observers have plagued quantum mechanics since its conception. Attempts to resolve these have introduced anthropomorphic or non-realist notions into physics. A shift of perspective based upon process theory and utilizing methods from combinatorial games, interpolation theory and complex systems theory results in a novel realist version of quantum mechanics incorporating quasi-local, nondeterministic hidden variables that are compatible with the no-hidden variable theorems and relativistic invariance, and reproduce the standard results of quantum mechanics to a high degree of accuracy without invoking observers.

  19. Electromagnetic Interrogation Techniques Damage Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electromagnetic Interrogation Techniques for Damage Detection H. T. Banks #3; and M. L. Joyner Wincheski and W.P. Winfree Nasa Langley Research Center Hampton, VA #3; Plenary Lecture, Electromagnetic Nondestructive Evaluation 2001 (ENDE 2001), Kobe, Japan, May 18­19, 20001 #12; Electromagnetic Interrogation

  20. Inorganic Materials and Assembly Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    a transformational set of capabilities for high performance flexible/stretchable electronics. KEYWORDS | Bio-integrated electronics; flexible electronics; inorganic materials; integrated systems; stretchable electron- icsINVITED P A P E R Inorganic Materials and Assembly Techniques for Flexible and Stretchable

  1. Observability of Stuck-at-Faults with Differential Power Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ,flottes,rouzeyre}@lirmm.fr Abstract In this paper we propose an innovative method to test integrated circuits based on the use of the current consumed by the circuit during net transitions, it does not require observing primary outputs of the circuit and allows the test of hard-to-observe faults. Conversely to Iddq, this technique is not sensible

  2. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  3. Management and Labor Relations Techniques of Japanese-Owned Automotive Assembly Plants in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitney, Paul

    2005-12-16

    This field project involves a study of the Japanese-owned automotive assembly plants, or “transplants,” in the United States and the management and labor-relations techniques that have made them successful. The management and labor...

  4. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  5. Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Innovative Exploration Techniques for Geothermal Assessment at Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico Innovative Exploration...

  6. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  7. Observable primordial vector modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Lewis

    2004-06-04

    Primordial vector modes describe vortical fluid perturbations in the early universe. A regular solution exists with constant non-zero radiation vorticities on super-horizon scales. Baryons are tightly coupled to the photons, and the baryon velocity only decays by an order unity factor by recombination, leading to an observable CMB anisotropy signature via the Doppler effect. There is also a large B-mode CMB polarization signal, with significant power on scales larger than l~2000. This B-mode signature is distinct from that expected from tensor modes or gravitational lensing, and makes a primordial vector to scalar mode power ratio ~10^(-6) detectable. Future observations aimed at detecting large scale B-modes from gravitational waves will also be sensitive to regular vector modes at around this level.

  8. Data mining and visualization techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Chung (Richland, WA); Whitney, Paul (Richland, WA); Thomas, Jim (Richland, WA)

    2004-03-23

    Disclosed are association rule identification and visualization methods, systems, and apparatus. An association rule in data mining is an implication of the form X.fwdarw.Y where X is a set of antecedent items and Y is the consequent item. A unique visualization technique that provides multiple antecedent, consequent, confidence, and support information is disclosed to facilitate better presentation of large quantities of complex association rules.

  9. Observations on European Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01

    AS ACKICUL-I-uRAL EXPE RIMENT STATIONS bLLETIN No. 14-1 DECEMBER, 1911 Division of Chemistry Observations on European Agriculture BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist 0 Postoffice : CULLEGE STATION; TEXAS AUSTIN. TEXAS I AUSTIN PRINTING CO:. PRINTERS... ............................................... and Conclusions 35 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] rrvations on European Agriculture By C. S. FRAPS ie object of this Bulletin is to present such abservadons on :ulture in Europe as may offer suggestions of value to Texas - :ulturists. The writer...

  10. Exploring the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars: II. New magnetic field measurements in cluster and field stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubrig, S; Ilyin, I; Kharchenko, N V; Oskinova, L M; Langer, N; Gonzalez, J F; Kholtygin, A F; Briquet, M

    2013-01-01

    Theories on the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars remain poorly developed, because the properties of their magnetic field as function of stellar parameters could not yet be investigated. To investigate whether magnetic fields in massive stars are ubiquitous or appear only in stars with a specific spectral classification, certain ages, or in a special environment, we acquired 67 new spectropolarimetric observations for 30 massive stars. Among the observed sample, roughly one third of the stars are probable members of clusters at different ages, whereas the remaining stars are field stars not known to belong to any cluster or association. Spectropolarimetric observations were obtained during four different nights using the low-resolution spectropolarimetric mode of FORS2 (FOcal Reducer low dispersion Spectrograph) mounted on the 8-m Antu telescope of the VLT. Furthermore, we present a number of follow-up observations carried out with the high-resolution spectropolarimeters SOFIN mounted at the Nordic O...

  11. On the consistent use of Constructed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trott, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We define "constructed observables" as relating experimental measurements to terms in a Lagrangian while simultaneously making assumptions about possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM), in other Lagrangian terms. Ensuring that the SM effective field theory (EFT) is constrained correctly when using constructed observables requires that their defining conditions are imposed on the EFT in a manner that is consistent with the equations of motion. Failing to do so can result in a "functionally redundant" operator basis and the wrong expectation as to how experimental quantities are related in the EFT. We illustrate the issues involved considering the $\\rm S$ parameter and the off shell triple gauge coupling (TGC) verticies. We show that the relationships between $h \\rightarrow V \\bar{f} \\, f$ decay and the off shell TGC verticies are subject to these subtleties, and how the connections between these observables vanish in the limit of strong bounds due to LEP. The challenge of using constructed observables...

  12. Using Groupings of Static Analysis Alerts to Identify Files Likely to Contain Field Failures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherriff, Mark S.

    of a field failure. Our technique uses singular value decomposition to generate groupings of static analysisUsing Groupings of Static Analysis Alerts to Identify Files Likely to Contain Field Failures Mark S@csc.ncsu.edu ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose a technique for leveraging historical field failure records

  13. MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY (MR-EIT): A new technique for high resolution conductivity imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyüboðlu, Murat

    MAGNETIC RESONANCE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE TOMOGRAPHY (MR-EIT): A new technique for high resolution are measured by using conventional electrical impedance tomography techniques and high resolution magnetic and the point spread function is not space invariant. On the other hand, magnetic field and electrical current

  14. Internal split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat; Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  15. A study of discrete and continuum joint modeling techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, J.; Brown, S.R.

    1992-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical and experimental study in which finite element and discrete element techniques were used to analyze a layered polycarbonate plate model subjected to uniaxial compression. Also, the two analysis techniques were used to compute the response of an eight meter diameter drift in jointed-rock. The drift was subjected to in-situ and far-field induced thermal stresses. The finite element analyses used a continuum rock model to represent the jointed-rock. A comparison of the analyses showed that the finite element continuum joint model consistently predicted less joint slippage than did the discrete element analyses, although far-field displacements compared well.

  16. Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2006-04-13

    This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

  17. Crosshole EM for oil field characterization and EOR monitoring: Field examples from Lost Hills, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, M.; Schenkel, C.; Wratcher, M.; Lambert, I.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Tseng H.W.

    1996-07-16

    A steamflood recently initiated by Mobil Development and Production U.S. at the Lost Hills No 3 oil field in California is notable for its shallow depth and the application of electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques to monitor the subsurface steam flow. Steam was injected into three stacked eastward-dipping unconsolidated oil sands at depths from 60 to 120 m; the plume is expected to develop as an ellipsoid aligned with the regional northwest-southeast strike. Because of the shallow depth of the sands and the high viscosity of the heavy oil, it is important to track the steam in the unconsolidated sediments for both economic and safety reasons. Crosshole and surface-to-borehole electromagnetic imaging were applied for reservoir characterization and steamflood monitoring. The crosshole EM data were collected to map the interwell distribution of the high-resistivity oil sands and to track the injected steam and hot water. Measurements were made in two fiberglass-cased observation wells straddling the steam injector on a northeast-southwest profile. Field data were collected before the steam drive, to map the distribution of the oil sands, and then 6 and 10 months after steam was injected, to monitor the expansion of the steam chest. Resistivity images derived from the collected data clearly delineated the distribution and dipping structure of the target oil sands. Difference images from data collected before and during steamflooding indicate that the steam chest has developed only in the middle and lower oil sands, and it has preferentially migrated westward in the middle oil sand and eastward in the deeper sand. Surface-to-borehole field data sets at Lost Hills were responsive to the large-scale subsurface structure but insufficiently sensitive to model steam chest development in the middle and lower oil sands. As the steam chest develops further, these data will be of more use for process monitoring.

  18. SECURITY TECHNIQUES Chris J Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Chris

    SECURITY TECHNIQUES Chris J Mitchell1 Introduction In this paper we consider the range of security security has been exerted. However, the techniques described are of general applicability by a security technique; in doing so we will distinguish between security features and security techniques (or

  19. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gulminelli; M. D'Agostino

    2006-11-09

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurational energy fluctuations, that may give important information on the heat capacity of the fragmenting system at the freeze out stage, are not fully compatible among different data sets and require further analysis to properly account for Coulomb effects and secondary decays. Some basic theoretical questions, concerning the interplay between the dynamics of the collision and the fragmentation process, and the cluster definition in dense and hot media, are still open and are addressed at the end of the paper. A comparison with realistic models and/or a quantitative analysis of the fluctuation properties will be needed to clarify in the next future the nature of the transition observed from compound nucleus evaporation to multi-fragment production.

  20. ARM Observations Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProductsObservations Projected

  1. Cathodic protection of storage field well casings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J.

    1986-01-01

    Downhole logging of gas storage field wells to determine cathodic protection (CP) levels is expensive and requires removing the well from service. A technique allowing the prediction of downhole CP levels by modeling combined with limiting field measurements would provide the industry with a cost-effective means of implementing and monitoring casing protection. A computer model has been developed for a cathodically protected well casing.

  2. Tsunami effects on the Z component of the geomagnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klausner, Virginia; Mendes, Odim; Papa, Andres R R

    2011-01-01

    The vertical component (Z) of the geomagnetic field observed by ground-based observatories of the INTERMAGNET network has been used to analyze the effects of the movement of electrically conducting sea water through the geomagnetic field due to a propagation of a tsumani. The purpose of this work is to study the geomagnetic variations induced by the tsunamis occurred at 26 December, 2004, 27 February, 2010 and 11 March, 2011. For each case study, we selected four magnetic stations belonging to the INTERMAGNET programme that were influenced or more direct affected by the tsumani. To detect these disturbances in the geomagnetic data, the discrete wavelet technique have been used in four levels of decomposition. We were able to detect the localized behavior of the geomagnetic variations induced by the movement of electrically conducting sea-water through the geomagnetic field, i. e., the identification of transients related to the tsunamis. As well, using the minutely magnetogram data, it was able to localize th...

  3. Microseismic techniques for avoiding induced seismicity during fluid injection

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Matzel, Eric; White, Joshua; Templeton, Dennise; Pyle, Moira; Morency, Christina; Trainor-Guitton, Whitney

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a fundamentally better approach to geological site characterization and early hazard detection. We combine innovative techniques for analyzing microseismic data with a physics-based inversion model to forecast microseismic cloud evolution. The key challenge is that faults at risk of slipping are often too small to detect during the site characterization phase. Our objective is to devise fast-running methodologies that will allow field operators to respond quickly to changing subsurface conditions.

  4. Repositioning of Covered Stents: The Grip Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, John Martin; Guo Xiaofeng; Midia, Mehran

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Retrieval and repositioning of a stent deployed beyond its intended target region may be a difficult technical challenge. Materials and Methods: A balloon-mounted snare technique, a variant of the coaxial loop snare technique, is described. Results: The technique is described for the repositioning of a covered transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt stent and a covered biliary stent. Conclusion: The balloon-mounted snare technique is a useful technique for retrieval of migrated stents.

  5. Techniques for Automated Performance Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus, Ryan C.

    2014-09-02

    The performance of a particular HPC code depends on a multitude of variables, including compiler selection, optimization flags, OpenMP pool size, file system load, memory usage, MPI configuration, etc. As a result of this complexity, current predictive models have limited applicability, especially at scale. We present a formulation of scientific codes, nodes, and clusters that reduces complex performance analysis to well-known mathematical techniques. Building accurate predictive models and enhancing our understanding of scientific codes at scale is an important step towards exascale computing.

  6. Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway EditOpenTechniques Jump to: navigation,

  7. Downhole Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOEDixmont,Missouri:Dow ChemicalDownersTechniques Jump

  8. Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUDSectional Model FlumeSeeoTechniques Jump

  9. Geophysical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprintGEXAGeminiEnergyHawaii |Methods JumpTechniques Jump

  10. Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric telescope automation and observing software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr. et al.

    2002-10-16

    The photometric telescope (PT) provides observations necessary for the photometric calibration of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Because the attention of the observing staff is occupied by the operation of the 2.5 meter telescope which takes the survey data proper, the PT must reliably take data with little supervision. In this paper we describe the PT's observing program, MOP, which automates most tasks necessary for observing. MOP's automated target selection is closely modeled on the actions a human observer might take, and is built upon a user interface that can be (and has been) used for manual operation. This results in an interface that makes it easy for an observer to track the activities of the automating procedures and intervene with minimum disturbance when necessary. MOP selects targets from the same list of standard star and calibration fields presented to the user, and chooses standard star fields covering ranges of airmass, color, and time necessary to monitor atmospheric extinction and produce a photometric solution. The software determines when additional standard star fields are unnecessary, and selects survey calibration fields according to availability and priority. Other automated features of MOP, such as maintaining the focus and keeping a night log, are also built around still functional manual interfaces, allowing the observer to be as active in observing as desired; MOP's automated features may be used as tools for manual observing, ignored entirely, or allowed to run the telescope with minimal supervision when taking routine data.

  11. Geophysical Techniques for Monitoring CO2 Movement During Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erika Gasperikova; G. Michael Hoversten

    2005-11-15

    The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, and electromagnetic (EM) geophysical techniques are examined as monitoring tools for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques for two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. EOR/sequestration projects in general and Schrader Bluff in particular represent relatively thin injection intervals with multiple fluid components (oil, hydrocarbon gas, brine, and CO{sub 2}). This model represents the most difficult end member of a complex spectrum of possible sequestration scenarios. The time-lapse performance of seismic, gravity, and EM techniques are considered for the Schrader Bluff model. The second scenario is a gas field that in general resembles conditions of Rio Vista reservoir in the Sacramento Basin of California. Surface gravity, and seismic measurements are considered for this model.

  12. Thermodynamic Spectrum of Solar Flares Based on SDO/EVE Observations: Techniques and First Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuming; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai; Liu, Rui; Shen, Chenglong; Chamberlin, Phillip C

    2015-01-01

    SDO/EVE provide rich information of the thermodynamic processes of solar activities, particularly of solar flares. Here, we develop a method to construct thermodynamic spectrum (TDS) charts based on the EVE spectral lines. Reading from the charts, we are able to easily recognize if there is a late phase following a main phase of a flare, and able to learn the begin, peak and end times of the flare as well as the drift of the temperature, i.e., the cooling rate, of the heated plasma during the flare. Through four M-class flares of different types, we illustrate which thermodynamic information can be revealed from the TDS charts. Further, we investigate the TDS charts of all the flares greater than M5.0, and some interesting results are achieved. First, there are two distinct drift patterns, called Type I and Type II. For Type I flares, the enhanced emission drifts from high to low temperture, whereas for Type II flares, the drift is somewhat reversed, suggesting a more violent and durable heating during Type I...

  13. A geostatistical data fusion technique for merging remote sensing and groundbased observations of aerosol optical thickness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalak, Anna M.

    that aerosols contrib- ute significantly to reflected solar radiation (the aerosol direct effect) and modify of aerosols in climate and atmospheric chemistry. To date, however, there have been only limited attempts of the growing concentrations of CO2 and other greenhouse gases. Although the radiative forcing of aerosols

  14. Observer error in identifying species using indirect signs: analysis of a river otter track survey technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jonah Wy

    2007-09-17

    Indirect signs of species presence (e.g., tracks, scats, hairs) are frequently used to detect target species in occupancy, presence/absence, and other wildlife studies. Indirect signs are often more efficient than direct ...

  15. Thermodynamics of Blue Phases In Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; D. Marenduzzo; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates

    2010-03-04

    We present extensive numerical studies to determine the phase diagrams of cubic and hexagonal blue phases in an electric field. We confirm the earlier prediction that hexagonal phases, both 2 and 3 dimensional, are stabilized by a field, but we significantly refine the phase boundaries, which were previously estimated by means of a semi-analytical approximation. In particular, our simulations show that the blue phase I -- blue phase II transition at fixed chirality is largely unaffected by electric field, as observed experimentally.

  16. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-03-14

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  17. Apparatus having reduced mechanical forces for supporting high magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM); Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention identifies several configurations of conducting elements capable of supporting extremely high magnetic fields suitable for plasma confinement, wherein forces experienced by the conducting elements are significantly reduced over those which are present as a result of the generation of such high fields by conventional techniques. It is anticipated that the use of superconducting materials will both permit the attainment of such high fields and further permit such fields to be generated with vastly improved efficiency.

  18. VLBI FOR GRAVITY PROBE B. IV. A NEW ASTROMETRIC ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE AND A COMPARISON WITH RESULTS FROM OTHER TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebach, D. E.; Ratner, M. I.; Shapiro, I. I.; Bartel, N.; Bietenholz, M. F.; Lederman, J. I.; Ransom, R. R.; Campbell, R. M.; Gordon, D.

    2012-07-01

    When very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations are used to determine the position or motion of a radio source relative to reference sources nearby on the sky, the astrometric information is usually obtained via (1) phase-referenced maps or (2) parametric model fits to measured fringe phases or multiband delays. In this paper, we describe a 'merged' analysis technique which combines some of the most important advantages of these other two approaches. In particular, our merged technique combines the superior model-correction capabilities of parametric model fits with the ability of phase-referenced maps to yield astrometric measurements of sources that are too weak to be used in parametric model fits. We compare the results from this merged technique with the results from phase-referenced maps and from parametric model fits in the analysis of astrometric VLBI observations of the radio-bright star IM Pegasi (HR 8703) and the radio source B2252+172 nearby on the sky. In these studies we use central-core components of radio sources 3C 454.3 and B2250+194 as our positional references. We obtain astrometric results for IM Peg with our merged technique even when the source is too weak to be used in parametric model fits, and we find that our merged technique yields astrometric results superior to the phase-referenced mapping technique. We used our merged technique to estimate the proper motion and other astrometric parameters of IM Peg in support of the NASA/Stanford Gravity Probe B mission.

  19. Observational constraints on Tachyon and DBI inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Sheng; Liddle, Andrew R., E-mail: sl277@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: arl@roe.ac.uk [Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic method for evaluation of perturbation observables in non-canonical single-field inflation models within the slow-roll approximation, which allied with field redefinitions enables predictions to be established for a wide range of models. We use this to investigate various non-canonical inflation models, including Tachyon inflation and DBI inflation. The Lambert W function will be used extensively in our method for the evaluation of observables. In the Tachyon case, in the slow-roll approximation the model can be approximated by a canonical field with a redefined potential, which yields predictions in better agreement with observations than the canonical equivalents. For DBI inflation models we consider contributions from both the scalar potential and the warp geometry. In the case of a quartic potential, we find a formula for the observables under both non-relativistic (sound speed c{sub s}{sup 2} ? 1) and relativistic behaviour (c{sub s}{sup 2} || 1) of the scalar DBI inflaton. For a quadratic potential we find two branches in the non-relativistic c{sub s}{sup 2} ? 1 case, determined by the competition of model parameters, while for the relativistic case c{sub s}{sup 2} ? 0, we find consistency with results already in the literature. We present a comparison to the latest Planck satellite observations. Most of the non-canonical models we investigate, including the Tachyon, are better fits to data than canonical models with the same potential, but we find that DBI models in the slow-roll regime have difficulty in matching the data.

  20. On the Velocity Field and the 3D Structure of the Galactic Soccer Ball Abell 43

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Rauch; Klaus Werner; Barbara Ercolano; Joachim Köppen

    2005-09-29

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) and their central stars (CSs) are ideal tools to test evolutionary theory: photospheric properties of their exciting stars give stringent constraints for theoretical predictions of stellar evolution. The nebular abundances display the star's photosphere at the time of the nebula's ejection which allows to look back into the history of stellar evolution - but, more importantly, they even provide a possibility to investigate on the chemical evolution of our Galaxy because most of the nuclear processed material goes back into the interstellar medium via PNe. The recent developments in observation techniques and a new three-dimensional photoionization code MOCASSIN enable us to analyze PNe properties precisely by the construction of consistent models of PNe and CSs. In addition to PNe imaging and spectroscopy, detailed information about the velocity field within the PNe is a pre-requisite to employ de-projection techniques in modeling the physical structureof the PNe.

  1. On the Velocity Field and the 3D Structure of the Galactic Soccer Ball Abell 43

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rauch, T; Ercolano, B; Köppen, J; Rauch, Thomas; Werner, Klaus; Ercolano, Barbara; K\\"oppen, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) and their central stars (CSs) are ideal tools to test evolutionary theory: photospheric properties of their exciting stars give stringent constraints for theoretical predictions of stellar evolution. The nebular abundances display the star's photosphere at the time of the nebula's ejection which allows to look back into the history of stellar evolution - but, more importantly, they even provide a possibility to investigate on the chemical evolution of our Galaxy because most of the nuclear processed material goes back into the interstellar medium via PNe. The recent developments in observation techniques and a new three-dimensional photoionization code MOCASSIN enable us to analyze PNe properties precisely by the construction of consistent models of PNe and CSs. In addition to PNe imaging and spectroscopy, detailed information about the velocity field within the PNe is a pre-requisite to employ de-projection techniques in modeling the physical structureof the PNe.

  2. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bildsten; Deepto Chakrabarty; John Chiu; Mark H. Finger; Danny T. Koh; Robert W. Nelson; Thomas A. Prince; Bradley C. Rubin; D. Matthew Scott; Mark Stollberg; Brian A. Vaughan; Colleen A. Wilson; Robert B. Wilson

    1997-07-22

    We summarize five years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered 5 new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A 0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619 and A 1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history of during outbursts of 6 of those transients whose orbital parameters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eight persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long time scales, blurring the conventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars, but uncorrelated, or even anticorrelated, in persistent sources.

  3. Spin echo without an external permanent magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Bergli; Leonid Glazman

    2006-09-19

    The spin echo techniques aim at the elimination of the effect of a random magnetic field on the spin evolution. These techniques conventionally utlize the application of a permanent field which is much stronger than the random one. The strong field, however, may also modify the magnetic response of the medium containing the spins, thus altering their ``natural'' dynamics. We suggest an iterative scheme for generating a sequence of pulses which create an echo without an external permanent field. The approximation to the ideal echo improves with the sequence length.

  4. Embedding quantum and random optics in a larger field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Morgan

    2008-06-09

    Introducing creation and annihilation operators for negative frequency components extends the algebra of smeared local observables of quantum optics to include an associated classical random field optics.

  5. Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporal Velocity Variations beneath the Coso Geothermal Field Observed using Seismic Double Difference Tomography of Compressional and Shear Wave Arrival Times Jump to:...

  6. SU-E-T-426: Dose Delivery Accuracy in Breast Field Junction for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    distribution along the field junction in a half beam irradiation technique for breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast or chest wall (CW) and the supraclavicular...

  7. Phase field study of interfacial diffusion-driven spheroidization in a composite comprized of two mutually insoluble phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Liang [Ames Laboratory; Russell, Alan [Ames Laboratory

    2014-03-27

    The phase field approach is a powerful computational technique to simulate morphological and microstructural evolution at the mesoscale. Spheroidization is a frequently observed morphological change of mesoscale heterogeneous structures during annealing. In this study, we used the diffuse interface phase field method to investigate the interfacial diffusion-driven spheroidization of cylindrical rod structures in a composite comprised of two mutually insoluble phases in a two-dimensional case. Perturbation of rod radius along a cylinder's axis has long been known to cause the necessary chemical potential gradient that drives spheroidization of the rod by Lord Rayleigh's instability theory. This theory indicates that a radius perturbation wavelength larger than the initial rod circumference would lead to cylindrical spheroidization. We investigated the effect of perturbation wavelength, interfacial energy, volume diffusion, phase composition, and interfacial percentage on the kinetics of spheroidization. The results match well with both the Rayleigh's instability criterion and experimental observations.

  8. Field validation of monitoring method for ditertiary butylperoxide (DTBP) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stansbury, Anna Michelle

    1997-01-01

    In this field study, a new air monitoring method, developed in the laboratory for measuring occupational exposure to ditertiary butylperoxide (DTBP) was validated by testing the overall accuracy and precision of the technique under more realistic...

  9. Chiral anomaly of antisymmetric tensor fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.

    1988-03-15

    For antisymmetric tensor gauge fields of rank 2n-1 coupled to gravity in 4n dimensions it is shown that the symmetry under duality rotations is broken by quantum effects. The anomaly is related to a local version of the signature index theorem. The zeta-function technique, Fujikawa's method, and the stochastic regularization scheme are discussed.

  10. A microsystems enabled field desorption source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertz, Kristin L.; Resnick, Paul James; Schwoebel, Paul R. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Holland, Christopher E. (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA); Chichester, David L. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-07-01

    Technologies that have been developed for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been applied to the fabrication of field desorption arrays. These techniques include the use of thick films for enhanced dielectric stand-off, as well as an integrated gate electrode. The increased complexity of MEMS fabrication provides enhanced design flexibility over traditional methods.

  11. Observation of atomic scale compositional and displacive modulations in incommensurate melilite electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Fengxia [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Williams, Tim [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Melbourne (Australia); An, Tao; Baikie, Tom; Kloc, Christian [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Wei, Jun [Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, Agency for Science Technology and Research (Singapore); White, Tim, E-mail: tjwhite@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2013-07-15

    The paradigm that functional materials are adequately described as three-dimensional crystal structures is not universally tenable. Gallate melilites are efficient oxide ion conductors at intermediate temperatures (?750 °C) with non-rational crystallographic modulations presumed to play a key role in significantly enhancing oxygen mobility. Lattice distortions associated with incommensuration are usually extrapolated from diffraction analysis of volumes greatly exceeding the scale of modulation. Therefore, opportunities for making direct nanometric measurements are exceptionally valuable for correlating structure with function. In [CaLn]{sub 2}[Ga]{sub 2}[Ga{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sub 2} (Ln=Nd, La) melilites, atomic displacive and compositional modulation waves can be imaged by high angle annular dark field and bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy with contrast quantified through electron scattering simulation. Here, we present atomic scale observations of (3+2)-dimensional modulations in gallate melilites which expands our understanding of the ion conduction mechanism and provides guidance for enhancing the performance of solid oxide fuel cells through crystal chemical tailoring. - Highlights: • Characterise the (3+2)-dimensional melilite electrolytes using STEM technique. • Direct observation on displacive and compositional modulation in melilites. • Structural flexibility reduces when increasing interstitial oxygen. • Domain-like incommensurate modulation model is proposed.

  12. OBSERVATION OF BERNSTEIN WAVES EXCITED BY NEWBORN INTERSTELLAR PICKUP IONS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, Colin J.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A. [Physics Department, Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Peter Gary, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Murphy, Neil [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Mail Stop 180-600, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA (United States); Gray, Perry C. [P.O. Box 790, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Burlaga, Leonard F., E-mail: cjl46@unh.edu, E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu, E-mail: Phil.Isenberg@unh.edu, E-mail: pgary@lanl.gov, E-mail: Neil.Murphy@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: Perry.Gray@dtra.mil, E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    A recent examination of 1.9 s magnetic field data recorded by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in transit to Jupiter revealed several instances of strongly aliased spectra suggestive of unresolved high-frequency magnetic fluctuations at 4.4 AU. A closer examination of these intervals using the highest resolution data available revealed one clear instance of wave activity at spacecraft frame frequencies from 0.2 to 1 Hz. Using various analysis techniques, we have characterized these fluctuations as Bernstein mode waves excited by newborn interstellar pickup ions. We can find no other interpretation or source consistent with the observations, but this interpretation is not without questions. In this paper, we report a detailed analysis of the waves, including their frequency and polarization, that supports our interpretation.

  13. What Eco-Driving Techniques Do You Use on the Road?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What eco-driving techniques do you use on the road? Simple measures such as observing the speed limit, planning your trips, and keeping your tires properly inflated can make a big difference in your savings.

  14. Implementation of State Transfer Hamiltonians in Spin Chains with Magnetic Resonance Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappellaro, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear spin systems and magnetic resonance techniques have provided a fertile platform for experimental investigation of quantum state transfer in spin chains. From the first observation of polarization transfer, predating ...

  15. Superconductivity observed in platinum-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Pai-Chia, E-mail: paichia@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Research Program on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lee, Ku-Pin; Shiue, Jessie, E-mail: yshiue@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Research Program on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-26

    We report the discovery of superconductivity with an onset temperature of ?0.6?K in a platinum-silicon interface. The interface was formed by using a unique focused ion beam sputtering micro-deposition method in which the energies of most sputtered Pt atoms are ?2.5?eV. Structural and elemental analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveal a???7?nm interface layer with abundant Pt, which is the layer likely responsible for the superconducting transport behavior. Similar transport behavior was also observed in a gold-silicon interface prepared by the same technique, indicating the possible generality of this phenomenon.

  16. Observations of cold antihydrogen , N.S. Bowden a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxley, Paul

    Muunchen, Germany f Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3 states is made using a pre-ionizing electric field between separated production and detection regions at 4 K [2,3], an energy more than 1010 times lower than any other source. These techniques, developed

  17. Gravitational repulsion in the Schwarzschild field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGruder, C.H. III

    1982-06-15

    To the distant observer, who uses measuring instruments not affected by gravity, gravitational repulsion can occur anywhere in the Schwarzschild field. It depends on the relationship between the transverse and radial Schwarzschild velocities. On the other hand, local observers, whose measuring instruments are affected by gravity, can not detect a positive value for the acceleration of gravity.

  18. Subranging technique using superconducting technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gupta, Deepnarayan (Hawthorne, NY)

    2003-01-01

    Subranging techniques using "digital SQUIDs" are used to design systems with large dynamic range, high resolution and large bandwidth. Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) embodying the invention include a first SQUID based "coarse" resolution circuit and a second SQUID based "fine" resolution circuit to convert an analog input signal into "coarse" and "fine" digital signals for subsequent processing. In one embodiment, an ADC includes circuitry for supplying an analog input signal to an input coil having at least a first inductive section and a second inductive section. A first superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) is coupled to the first inductive section and a second SQUID is coupled to the second inductive section. The first SQUID is designed to produce "coarse" (large amplitude, low resolution) output signals and the second SQUID is designed to produce "fine" (low amplitude, high resolution) output signals in response to the analog input signals.

  19. Experimental investigation of 2D and 3D internal wave fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saidi, Sasan John

    2011-01-01

    The generation of 2D and 3D internal wave fields is extensively studied via planarand stereo- Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) flow field measurement techniques. A benchmark was provided by an experiment involving tidal ...

  20. Intense Field Multiphoton Ionization via Complex Dressed States: Application to the H Atom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Reinhardt, William P.

    1977-11-07

    Extension of Floquet theory to include continuum as well as bound atomic states yields a practical technique for computation of multiphoton ionization rates in the region where rms field strengths approach the strength of the internal atomic fields....

  1. Positron plasma control techniques for the production of cold antihydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funakoshi, R.; Hayano, R. S. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Amoretti, M.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Bonomi, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Brescia, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Universita di Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Madsen, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Canali, C.; Carraro, C.; Lagomarsino, V.; Manuzio, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Genova, 16146 Genova (Italy); Cesar, C. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade do Brasil, Cx Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L. V.; Mitchard, D.; Werf, D. P. van der [Department of Physics, University of Wales Swansea, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Doser, M. [PH Department, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)] (and others)

    2007-07-15

    An observation of a clear dependence of antihydrogen production on positron plasma shapes is reported. For this purpose a plasma control method has been developed combining the plasma rotating-wall technique with a mode diagnostic system. With the help of real-time and nondestructive observations, the rotating-wall parameters have been optimized. The positron plasma can be manipulated into a wide range of shapes (aspect ratio 6.5{<=}{alpha} < or approx. 80) and densities (1.5x10{sup 8}{<=}n < or approx. 7x10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}) within a short duration (25 s) compatible with the ATHENA antihydrogen production cycle.

  2. Techniques for Foundry Identification James B. Wendt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Techniques for Foundry Identification James B. Wendt Computer Science Department, University of California, Los Angeles miodrag@cs.ucla.edu ABSTRACT Foundry identification is essential for many tasks introduce statistical techniques for foundry detection, specifically for identifying from which foundry

  3. Modeling techniques for simulating well behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rattu, Bungen Christina

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is a catalog of modeling techniques useful in simulating well behavior in certain types of reservoirs that are often encountered in petroleum reservoirs. Emphasis has been placed on techniques that can be used with any conventional...

  4. EERE's Usability and Analysis Techniques Guidebook

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    For more information on the usability techniques associated with the templates, see EERE's Usability and Analysis Techniques Guidebook, which is a collection of best practices for creating and running different kinds of user-centered design projects.

  5. External split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  6. One-loop calculations in quantum field theory: from Feynman diagrams to unitarity cuts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, R. Keith [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kunszt, Zoltan [Institute for Theoretical Physics (Switzerland); Melnikov, Kirill [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zanderighi, Giulia [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-01

    The success of the experimental program at the Tevatron re-inforced the idea that precision physics at hadron colliders is desirable and, indeed, possible. The Tevatron data strongly suggests that one-loop computations in QCD describe hard scattering well. Extrapolating this observation to the LHC, we conclude that knowledge of many short-distance processes at next-to-leading order may be required to describe the physics of hard scattering. While the field of one-loop computations is quite mature, parton multiplicities in hard LHC events are so high that traditional computational techniques become inefficient. Recently new approaches based on unitarity have been developed for calculating one-loop scattering amplitudes in quantum field theory. These methods are especially suitable for the description of multi-particle processes in QCD and are amenable to numerical implementations. We present a systematic pedagogical description of both conceptual and technical aspects of the new methods.

  7. Demystifying an unidentified EGRET source by VHE gamma-ray observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olaf Reimer; Stefan Funk

    2006-11-22

    In a novel approach in observational high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, observations carried out by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes provide necessary templates to pinpoint the nature of intriguing, yet unidentified EGRET gamma-ray sources. Using GeV-photons detected by CGRO EGRET and taking advantage of high spatial resolution images from H.E.S.S. observations, we were able to shed new light on the EGRET observed gamma-ray emission in the Kookaburra complex, whose previous coverage in the literature is somewhat contradictory. 3EGJ1420-6038 very likely accounts for two GeV gamma-ray sources (E>1 GeV), both in positional coincidence with the recently reported pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) by HESS in the Kookaburra/Rabbit complex. PWN associations at VHE energies, supported by accumulating evidence from observations in the radio and X-ray band, are indicative for the PSR/plerionic origin of spatially coincident, but still unidentified Galactic gamma-ray sources from EGRET. This not only supports the already suggested connection between variable, but unidentified low-latitude gamma-ray sources with pulsar wind nebulae (3EGJ1420-6038 has been suggested as PWN candidate previoulsy), it also documents the ability of resolving apparently confused EGRET sources by connecting the GeV emission as measured from a large-aperture space-based gamma-ray instrument with narrow field-of-view but superior spatial resolution observations by ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes, a very promising identification technique for achieving convincing individual source identifications in the era of GLAST-LAT.

  8. Inflating with large effective fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, C.P. [PH-TH Division, CERN, CH-1211, Genève 23 (Switzerland); Cicoli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Quevedo, F. [Abdus Salam ICTP, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy); Williams, M., E-mail: cburgess@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it, E-mail: f.quevedo@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: mwilliams@perimeterinsititute.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton ON (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    We re-examine large scalar fields within effective field theory, in particular focussing on the issues raised by their use in inflationary models (as suggested by BICEP2 to obtain primordial tensor modes). We argue that when the large-field and low-energy regimes coincide the scalar dynamics is most effectively described in terms of an asymptotic large-field expansion whose form can be dictated by approximate symmetries, which also help control the size of quantum corrections. We discuss several possible symmetries that can achieve this, including pseudo-Goldstone inflatons characterized by a coset G/H (based on abelian and non-abelian, compact and non-compact symmetries), as well as symmetries that are intrinsically higher dimensional. Besides the usual trigonometric potentials of Natural Inflation we also find in this way simple large-field power laws (like V ? ?{sup 2}) and exponential potentials, V(?) = ?{sub k}V{sub x}e{sup ?k?/M}. Both of these can describe the data well and give slow-roll inflation for large fields without the need for a precise balancing of terms in the potential. The exponential potentials achieve large r through the limit |?| || ? and so predict r ? (8/3)(1-n{sub s}); consequently n{sub s} ? 0.96 gives r ? 0.11 but not much larger (and so could be ruled out as measurements on r and n{sub s} improve). We examine the naturalness issues for these models and give simple examples where symmetries protect these forms, using both pseudo-Goldstone inflatons (with non-abelian non-compact shift symmetries following familiar techniques from chiral perturbation theory) and extra-dimensional models.

  9. On the Bel radiative gravitational fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joan Josep Ferrando; Juan Antonio Sáez

    2012-04-18

    We analyze the concept of intrinsic radiative gravitational fields defined by Bel and we show that the three radiative types, N, III and II, correspond with the three following different physical situations: {\\it pure radiation}, {\\it asymptotic pure radiation} and {\\it generic} (non pure, non asymptotic pure) {\\it radiation}. We introduce the concept of {\\em observer at rest} with respect to the gravitational field and that of {\\em proper super-energy} of the gravitational field and we show that, for non radiative fields, the minimum value of the relative super-energy density is the proper super-energy density, which is acquired by the observers at rest with respect to the field. Several {\\it super-energy inequalities} are also examined.

  10. Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars institute;Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars Institute,markov}@cs.uu.nl. Abstract The probabilistic roadmap approach is a commonly used motion planning technique. A crucial

  11. Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars institute; Sampling Techniques for Probabilistic Roadmap Planners Roland Geraerts Mark H. Overmars Institute,markov}@cs.uu.nl. Abstract The probabilistic roadmap approach is a commonly used motion planning technique. A crucial

  12. Personal observations on interdisciplinarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, E. N.

    1999-10-11

    The author's assignment was to report on how I{sup 3} relates to professional societies and journals he has known, a not unreasonable request given past associations with the Materials Research Society (MRS) and its journal, JMR, particularly in their more formative years. Some recollections and some comments on current postures of MRS and JMR will be found in the section following. There are manifold anecdotes one might relate about overcoming (or not) barriers raised by disciplinary preconception and much revered institutional norms. But to what end? On recalling his own involvements and on trying to discern the common elements, the author concludes that lessons learned from such accounts are, at the detail level, too situation-specific to be generally useful while at the same time being easily generalized to a few tenets that most of us by now find obvious in principle but that provide no actionable roadmap for implementing I{sup 3} in a specific new arena. How can that be? Other contributors are submitting the I{sup 3}R challenge to scholarly analysis and reporting on significant impediments and enviable achievements. He notes that the common themes permeating the entire discussion reduce to a few fundamental aspects of human nature well known and ubiquitous not merely in the universe of science, technology and research, but in broader society. He feels it is important not to lose sight of this as one examines I{sup 3} problems and solutions, for it is often the larger context that rises to thwart the best of local intentions. He feels that humans are a risk averse species. This translates into resistance to change and thus to institutional inertia. When taken in concert with the subjective propensity to categorize and the objective need at any given stage of development to parse complex systems into manageable subunits, it becomes clear why rigid taxonomies are the rule. Be they definitions of departments on campus, political labels, or finding program classifications. It is fair to say that in the examples presented at this gathering, the origin of hurdles confronting introduction of an I{sup 3} approach in extant systems is the inevitable rigidity of existing structures. Similarly, successes seem to arise when one or more of a few criteria are met. Based on enlightened self-interest, the principal movers find the risk-reward calculus of success compelling enough to pay the price of breaking with tradition. This is often facilitated when the entrepreneurial venture does not risk the mainstay of the principals' vocations. Also, barriers are lowered considerably when the new I{sup 3} enterprise is green field i.e., not making a frontal assault on a preexisting structure. Otherwise, the organizations involved must offer some open avenues to change or at least to circumvent boundaries. Having the right-sized, well-positioned resources is certainly also necessary. Of course, it would be naive to underestimate the importance of the details underlying any and all I{sup 3} successes, but these must be devised in the milieu of the particular people and institutions involved. The author believes that no generic protocols for barrier reduction or for incentives that balance risk will fit differing circumstances. Attempts to map one successful formula onto a new situation are likely to disappoint. Likewise, general programs to promote I{sup 3} in a top down fashion may raise awareness and enthusiasm, but are always tested at the bench--just as in technology transfer, I{sup 3}R is a contact sport. Although not sufficient, it is nevertheless still clearly a necessary prerequisite to create and sustain genuine and practical inducements that mitigate the risk attendant to disturbing the status quo and blunt institutional disincentives.

  13. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing techniques. Bootstrap techniques have been developed to estimate confidence intervals for the electromechanical modes from field measured data. Results were obtained using injected signal data provided by BPA. A new probing signal was designed that puts more strength into the signal for a given maximum peak to peak swing. Further simulations were conducted on a model based on measured data and with the modifications of the 19-machine simulation model. Montana Tech researchers participated in two primary activities: (1) continued development of the 19-machine simulation test system to include a DC line; and (2) extensive simulation analysis of the various system identification algorithms and bootstrap techniques using the 19 machine model. Researchers at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks focused on the development and testing of adaptive filter algorithms for mode estimation using data generated from simulation models and on data provided in collaboration with BPA and PNNL. There efforts consist of pre-processing field data, testing and refining adaptive filter techniques (specifically the Least Mean Squares (LMS), the Adaptive Step-size LMS (ASLMS), and Error Tracking (ET) algorithms). They also improved convergence of the adaptive algorithms by using an initial estimate from block processing AR method to initialize the weight vector for LMS. Extensive testing was performed on simulated data from the 19 machine model. This project was also extensively involved in the WECC (Western Electricity Coordinating Council) system wide tests carried out in 2005 and 2006. These tests involved injecting known probing signals into the western power grid. One of the primary goals of these tests was the reliable estimation of electromechanical mode properties from measured PMU data. Applied to the system were three types of probing inputs: (1) activation of the Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake, (2) mid-level probing at the Pacific DC Intertie (PDCI), and (3) low-level probing on the PDCI. The Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake is a 1400 MW disturbance to the system and is injected for a ha

  14. Indirect fracture delineation in a carbonate reservoir: The Upper Jurassic Hanifa of Abqaiq field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, D.L. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1991-03-01

    Abqaiq field is a northeast-trending anticline approximately 60 km long and 12 km wide and contains several reservoirs. The Hanifa Reservoir is approximately 100 m thick and consists of fine-grained, muddy limestone with subordinate dolomite and anhydrite. Since discovery of the Hanifa oil pool in 1947, pressure fluctuations have indicated communication with the overlying Arab-D Reservoir. Welltest permeability measurements are approximately 40 times higher than core permeability measurements of the Hanifa. This divergence of Hanifa permeability measurements combined with the indicated Arab-D communication suggests the presence of a natural fracture network. Direct observations of Hanifa cores reveal common, sub-vertical fractures with average apertures <200 microns. With limited core coverage and no oriented cores, a new technique was needed to delineate the areas affected by fractures. A technique combining indirect fracture indicators was devised for Abqaiq field and can be applied to other, similar fields. The actual flow system of the Abqaiq Hanifa is a complex interaction between matrix porosity/permeability and fracture permeability or enhanced permeability. Future development plans allow for low matrix permeability access to much of the Hanifa storage space and high fracture permeability both within the Hanifa and connecting to the Arab-D Reservoir.

  15. Hybrid mesons and auxiliary fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabien Buisseret; Vincent Mathieu

    2006-09-29

    Hybrid mesons are exotic mesons in which the color field is not in the ground state. Their understanding deserves interest from a theoretical point of view, because it is intimately related to nonperturbative aspects of QCD. Moreover, it seems that some recently detected particles, such as the $\\pi_1(1600)$ and the Y(4260), are serious hybrid candidates. In this work, we investigate the description of such exotic hadrons by applying the auxiliary fields technique to the widely used spinless Salpeter Hamiltonian with appropriate linear confinement. Instead of the usual numerical resolution, this technique allows to find simplified analytical mass spectra and wave functions of the Hamiltonian, which still lead to reliable qualitative predictions. We analyse and compare two different descriptions of hybrid mesons, namely a two-body $q\\bar q$ system with an excited flux tube, or a three-body $q\\bar q g$ system. We also compute the masses of the $1^{-+}$ hybrids. Our results are shown to be in satisfactory agreement with lattice QCD and other effective models.

  16. Upper critical fields in liquid-quenched metastable superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, K.M.; Cotts, E.J.; Poon, S.J.

    1984-08-01

    A systematic and quantitative study of upper critical fields in alloys with increasing atomic number is carried out. The alloys are prepared by the technique of liquid (splat) quenching. They include the metastable body-centered-cubic (..beta..) phase of Ti-Pd, Zr-Mo, Zr-Pd, and Hf-Mo, amorphous phase of Zr-Rh, and the stable ..beta.. phase of Ti-Mo and Ta-Hf. Measurements are made in magnetic fields up to 90 kG and in temperatures down to 0.5 K. The results are analyzed within the framework of the dirty-limit theory of Werthamer, Helfand, Hohenberg, and Maki (WHHM). A least-squares fitting routine is performed using all the data (weighted equally) for a given sample. It is emphasized that the visual critical-field gradient near the transition temperature cannot be taken as the actual gradient in the presence of Pauli paramagnetic limitation. The main findings are the following: (i) Even without including renormalization corrections due to electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, very good fits to the WHHM theory are obtained; (ii) critical-field data for all our samples (with minor exceptions in Hf-Mo)= are found to fall below or on the Maki curve (i.e., when the spin-orbit scattering parameter lambda/sub s.o./ goes to infinity); (iii) values of lambda/sub s.o./ are observed to range from 0.28 to 2.51 for the 3d and 4d alloys; (iv) the spin-orbit scattering rates 1/tau/sub s.o./ are found to compare well with theoretical estimation using results from band-structure calculation. The effect of sample inhomogeneity on the value of lambda/sub s.o./ in Zr-Mo alloys is also illustrated.

  17. Group field theories generating polyhedral complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Thürigen

    2015-06-28

    Group field theories are a generalization of matrix models which provide both a second quantized reformulation of loop quantum gravity as well as generating functions for spin foam models. While states in canonical loop quantum gravity, in the traditional continuum setting, are based on graphs with vertices of arbitrary valence, group field theories have been defined so far in a simplicial setting such that states have support only on graphs of fixed valency. This has led to the question whether group field theory can indeed cover the whole state space of loop quantum gravity. In this contribution based on [1] I present two new classes of group field theories which satisfy this objective: i) a straightforward, but rather formal generalization to multiple fields, one for each valency and ii) a simplicial group field theory which effectively covers the larger state space through a dual weighting, a technique common in matrix and tensor models. To this end I will further discuss in some detail the combinatorial structure of the complexes generated by the group field theory partition function. The new group field theories do not only strengthen the links between the mentioned quantum gravity approaches but, broadening the theory space of group field theories, they might also prove useful in the investigation of renormalizability.

  18. Vacuum magnetic field mapping experiments for validated determination of the helical field coil location in stellarators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J.; Hanson, J.; Hartwell, G.; Knowlton, S. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Understanding the behavior of plasmas in magnetic confinement fusion devices typically requires accurate knowledge of the magnetic field structure. In stellarator-type confinement devices, the helical magnetic field is produced by currents in external coils and may be traced experimentally in the absence of plasma through the experimental technique of vacuum magnetic field mapping. Field mapping experiments, such as these, were performed on the recently constructed compact toroidal hybrid to verify the range of accessible magnetic configurations, compare the actual magnetic configuration with the design configuration, and identify any vacuum field errors that lead to perturbations of the vacuum magnetic flux surfaces. Furthermore, through the use of a new coil optimization routine, modifications are made to the simulation coil model such that better agreement exists between the experimental and simulation results. An outline of the optimization procedure is discussed in conjunction with the results of one such optimization process performed on the helical field coil.

  19. MULTI-SPACECRAFT OBSERVATIONS OF LINEAR MODES AND SIDEBAND WAVES IN ION-SCALE SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perschke, Christopher; Motschmann, Uwe; Narita, Yasuhito; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2014-10-01

    In the scenario of weak turbulence, energy is believed to be cascaded from smaller to larger wave numbers and frequencies due to weak wave-wave interactions. Based on its perturbative treatment one may regard plasma turbulence as a superposition of linear modes (or normal modes) and sideband waves (or nonlinear modes). In this study, we use magnetic field and plasma measurements of nine solar wind events obtained by the Cluster spacecraft and make extensive use of a high-resolution wave vector analysis method, the Multi-point Signal Resonator technique, to find frequencies and wave vectors of discrete modes on ion kinetic scales in the plasma rest frame. The primarily unstructured wave observations in the frequency-wave number diagram are classified into three distinct linear modes (proton Bernstein modes, helium-alpha Bernstein modes, and kinetic Alfvén waves) and the sideband waves by comparing with the dispersion relations derived theoretically from linear Vlasov theory using observational values of the plasma parameter beta and the propagation angle from the mean magnetic field. About 60% of the observed discrete modes can be explained by the linear modes, primarily as the proton Bernstein and the kinetic Alfvén waves, within the frequency uncertainties, while the rest of the population (about 40%) cannot be classified as linear modes due to the large deviation from dispersion relations. We conclude that both the linear modes and sideband wave components are needed to construct the wave picture of solar wind turbulence on ion-kinetic scales.

  20. Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyzin, Leonid

    Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali Leonid Reyzin November 29, 2003 Abstract.) inherent in the physical execution of any cryptographic algorithm. Such "physical observation attacks mathematically impregnable systems. The great practicality and the inherent availability of physical attacks

  1. Dark Energy: Observational Evidence and Theoretical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Novosyadlyj; V. Pelykh; Yu. Shtanov; A. Zhuk

    2015-02-14

    The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.

  2. Application of AI techniques to blast furnace operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iida, Osamu; Ushijima, Yuichi; Sawada, Toshiro [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Kurashiki (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    It was during the first stages of application of artificial intelligence (AI) to industrial fields, that the ironmaking division of Mizushima works at Kawasaki Steel recognized its potential. Since that time, the division has sought applications for these techniques to solve various problems. AI techniques applied to control the No. 3 blast furnace operations at the Mizushima works include: Blast furnace control by a diagnostic type of expert system that gives guidance to the actions required for blast furnace operation as well as control of furnace heat by automatically setting blast temperature; Hot stove combustion control by a combination of fuzzy inference and a physical model to insure good thermal efficiency of the stove; and blast furnace burden control using neural networks makes it possible to connect the pattern of gas flow distribution with the condition of the furnace. Experience of AI to control the blast furnace and other ironmaking operations has proved its capability for achieving automation and increased operating efficiency. The benefits are very high. For these reasons, the applications of AI techniques will be extended in the future and new techniques studied to further improve the power of AI.

  3. Forward-illumination light-extinction technique for soot measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Yi; Lee, Chiafon F

    2006-03-20

    A forward-illumination light-extinction (FILE) soot volume fraction measurement technique was developed and tested. By using a camera and a point light source in front of the flame and a diffuser behind the flame, with this technique one can achieve a two-dimensional soot concentration measurement with only one window when one is studying confined combustion. The line-of-sight quantitative soot volume fraction is obtained by calculation of the reflected light intensity with or without the presence of soot cloud. Verification of this technique was accomplished by measurement of an axisymmetric ethylene diffusion flame. The field distribution obtained by Abel inversion is presented and matched well with previous point measurements. The FILE technique has high time resolution when a high-speed camera and a copper vapor laser are adopted. All these advantages of FILE make it suitable for line-of-sight integrated, two-dimensional soot distribution of transient combustion, e.g., in the case of in-cylinder Diesel combustion.

  4. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  5. OBSERVING THE EARTH FROM SPACE "It is the science of deriving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    and interpretation (remote sensing) for evaluation and making decisions. · Remote sensing techniques helped to take to develop image processing techniques that later were used with Landsat data. In the 70's other sensors, like the mid infrared and the thermal infrared. They had large field of view (in hundreds

  6. Distortion-free magnetic resonance imaging in the zero-field limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelso, Nathan; Lee, Seung-Kyun; Bouchard, Louis-S.; Demas, Vasiliki; Muck, Michael; Pines, Alexander; Clarke, John

    2009-07-09

    MRI is a powerful technique for clinical diagnosis and materials characterization. Images are acquired in a homogeneous static magnetic field much higher than the fields generated across the field of view by the spatially encoding field gradients. Without such a high field, the concomitant components of the field gradient dictated by Maxwell's equations lead to severe distortions that make imaging impossible with conventional MRI encoding. In this paper, we present a distortion-free image of a phantom acquired with a fundamentally different methodology in which the applied static field approaches zero. Our technique involves encoding with pulses of uniform and gradient field, and acquiring the magnetic field signals with a SQUID. The method can be extended to weak ambient fields, potentially enabling imaging in the Earth's field without cancellation coils or shielding. Other potential applications include quantum information processing and fundamental studies of long-range ferromagnetic interactions.

  7. Observations of Solids in Protoplanetary Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Sean M

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the state of research that employs astronomical (remote sensing) observations of solids ("dust") in young circumstellar disks to learn about planet formation. The intention is for it to serve as an accessible, introductory, pedagogical resource for junior scientists interested in the subject. After some historical background and a basic observational primer, the focus is shifted to the three fundamental topics that broadly define the field: (1) demographics -- the relationships between disk properties and the characteristics of their environments and hosts; (2) structure -- the spatial distribution of disk material and its associated physical conditions and composition; and (3) evolution -- the signposts of key changes in disk properties, including the growth and migration of solids and the impact of dynamical interactions with young planetary systems. Based on the state of the art results in these areas, suggestions are made for potentially fruitful lines of work in the near future.

  8. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lang, Jeffrey H. (Waltham, MA)

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  9. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvie, T.P.

    1989-10-01

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed.

  10. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moskowitz, Philip E. (Peabody, MA); Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

    1987-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed.

  11. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

    1987-09-08

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

  12. Neutrino spin-flavor oscillations in rapidly varying magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Dvornikov

    2006-11-13

    The general formalism for the description of neutrino oscillations in arbitrary rapidly varying external fields is elaborated. We obtain the new effective Hamiltonian which determines the evolution of the averaged neutrino wave function. The general technique is applied to the neutrino oscillations in rapidly varying magnetic fields. We evaluate the transition probabilities of the neutrino spin-flavor oscillations in magnetic fields of the Sun and compare them with the numerical solutions of the Schroedinger equation with the exact Hamiltonian.

  13. Magnetic fields in non-convective regions of stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braithwaite, J

    2015-01-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of magnetic fields inside stars, concentrating on recent developments concerning magnetic fields in stably stratified (zones of) stars, leaving out convective dynamo theories and observations of convective envelopes. We include the observational properties of A, B and O-type main-sequence stars, which have radiative envelopes, and the fossil field model which is normally invoked to explain the strong fields sometimes seen in these stars. Observations seem to show that Ap-type stable fields are excluded in stars with convective envelopes. Most stars contain both radiative and convective zones, and there are potentially important effects arising from the interaction of magnetic fields at the boundaries between them, the solar cycle being one of the better known examples. Related to this, we discuss whether the Sun could harbour a magnetic field in its core. Recent developments regarding the various convective and radiative layers near the surfaces of early-type stars and...

  14. Empirical comparison of network sampling techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blagus, Neli; Bahec, Marko

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, the storage and analysis of large-scale and fast evolving networks present a great challenge. Therefore, a number of different techniques have been proposed for sampling large networks. In general, network exploration techniques approximate the original networks more accurately than random node and link selection. Yet, link selection with additional subgraph induction step outperforms most other techniques. In this paper, we apply subgraph induction also to random walk and forest-fire sampling. We analyze different real-world networks and the changes of their properties introduced by sampling. We compare several sampling techniques based on the match between the original networks and their sampled variants. The results reveal that the techniques with subgraph induction underestimate the degree and clustering distribution, while overestimate average degree and density of the original networks. Techniques without subgraph induction step exhibit exactly the opposite behavior. Hence, the pe...

  15. Accelerator-mode-based technique for studying quantum chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Arcy, M.B.; Godun, R.M.; Cassettari, D. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Summy, G.S. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States)

    2003-02-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a method for selecting small regions of phase space for kicked rotor quantum chaos experiments with cold atoms. Our technique uses quantum accelerator modes to selectively accelerate atomic wave packets with localized spatial and momentum distributions. The potential used to create the accelerator mode and subsequently realize the kicked rotor system is formed by a set of off-resonant standing-wave light pulses. We also propose a method for testing whether a selected region of phase space exhibits chaotic or regular behavior using a Ramsey type separated field experiment.

  16. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  17. On the consistent use of Constructed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Trott

    2015-01-17

    We define "constructed observables" as relating experimental measurements to terms in a Lagrangian while simultaneously making assumptions about possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM), in other Lagrangian terms. Ensuring that the SM effective field theory (EFT) is constrained correctly when using constructed observables requires that their defining conditions are imposed on the EFT in a manner that is consistent with the equations of motion. Failing to do so can result in a "functionally redundant" operator basis and the wrong expectation as to how experimental quantities are related in the EFT. We illustrate the issues involved considering the $\\rm S$ parameter and the off shell triple gauge coupling (TGC) verticies. We show that the relationships between $h \\rightarrow V \\bar{f} \\, f$ decay and the off shell TGC verticies are subject to these subtleties, and how the connections between these observables vanish in the limit of strong bounds due to LEP. The challenge of using constructed observables to consistently constrain the Standard Model EFT is only expected to grow with future LHC data, as more complex processes are studied.

  18. Production optimization in the Provincia field, Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blann, J.; Jacobson, L.; Faber, C.

    1989-02-01

    Designing or redesigning production facilities for optimum operation usually results in the generation of maximum profit from an installation. But in older fields, or fields where a short life is expected, design changes may not be a viable option. In such cases, obtaining maximum production within the limits of existing facilities, thereby minimizing new investments, may be an attractive option. This paper discusses application of the latter technique in the Provincia field, Colombia, to optimize oil and gas production within constraints imposed by periodic temporary gas-compression-capacity restrictions and by the configuration of existing oil and gas facilities. The multistep optimization program used at Provincia included improvement of individual well performance, optimization of individual well facilities, fieldwide optimization of surface facilities, and optimization of the field production scheme.

  19. Promising technique improves hydrogen production of affordable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Materialscientist, Wikipedia) (click image to enlarge) Promising technique improves hydrogen production of affordable alternative to platinum By Angela Hardin * October 26, 2015...

  20. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically...

  1. Eddy current technique for predicting burst pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petri, Mark C. (Yorkville, IL); Kupperman, David S. (Oak Park, IL); Morman, James A. (Woodridge, IL); Reifman, Jaques (Western Springs, IL); Wei, Thomas Y. C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2003-01-01

    A signal processing technique which correlates eddy current inspection data from a tube having a critical tubing defect with a range of predicted burst pressures for the tube is provided. The method can directly correlate the raw eddy current inspection data representing the critical tubing defect with the range of burst pressures using a regression technique, preferably an artificial neural network. Alternatively, the technique deconvolves the raw eddy current inspection data into a set of undistorted signals, each of which represents a separate defect of the tube. The undistorted defect signal which represents the critical tubing defect is related to a range of burst pressures utilizing a regression technique.

  2. THE DYNAMICS OF THE SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD: POLARITY REVERSALS, BUTTERFLY DIAGRAM, AND QUASI-BIENNIAL OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vecchio, A.; Meduri, D.; Carbone, V. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, 87036 Rende (Italy); Laurenza, M.; Storini, M., E-mail: vecchio@fis.unical.it [INAF/IFSI-Roma, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2012-04-10

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of the solar magnetic field has been investigated by using NSO/Kitt Peak magnetic synoptic maps covering the period 1976 August-2003 September. The field radial component, for each heliographic latitude, has been decomposed in intrinsic mode functions through the Empirical Mode Decomposition in order to investigate the time evolution of the various characteristic oscillating modes at different latitudes. The same technique has also been applied on synoptic maps of the meridional and east-west components, which were derived from the observed line-of-sight projection of the field by using the differential rotation. Results obtained for the {approx}22 yr cycle, related to the polarity inversions of the large-scale dipolar field, show an antisymmetric behavior with respect to the equator in all the field components and a marked poleward flux migration in the radial and meridional components (from about -35 Degree-Sign and +35 Degree-Sign in the southern and northern hemispheres, respectively). The quasi-biennial oscillations (QBOs) are also identified as a fundamental timescale of variability of the magnetic field and associated with poleward magnetic flux migration from low latitudes around the maximum and descending phase of the solar cycle. Moreover, signs of an equatorward drift, at a {approx}2 yr rate, seem to appear in the radial and toroidal components. Hence, the QBO patterns suggest a link to a dynamo action. Finally, the high-frequency component of the magnetic field, at timescales less than 1 yr, provides the most energetic contribution and it is associated with the outbreaks of the bipolar regions on the solar surface.

  3. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  4. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and OilPublictearing

  5. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and

  6. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeeding access

  7. 16th Int Symp on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics Lisbon, Portugal, 912 July, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    16th Int Symp on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics Lisbon, Portugal, 9­12 July on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics Lisbon, Portugal, 9­12 July, 2012 In this equation, (gx, gy, 2012 Plenoptic Particle Streak Velocimetry (pPSV): 3D3C fluid flow measurement from light fields

  8. Magnetic field studies of massive main sequence stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoeller, M; Ilyin, I; Kharchenko, N V; Briquet, M; Langer, N; Oskinova, L M

    2011-01-01

    We report on the status of our spectropolarimetric observations of massive stars. During the last years, we have discovered magnetic fields in many objects of the upper main sequence, including Be stars, beta Cephei and Slowly Pulsating B stars, and a dozen O stars. Since the effects of those magnetic fields have been found to be substantial by recent models, we are looking into their impact on stellar rotation, pulsation, stellar winds, and chemical abundances. Accurate studies of the age, environment, and kinematic characteristics of the magnetic stars are also promising to give us new insight into the origin of the magnetic fields. Furthermore, longer time series of magnetic field measurements allow us to observe the temporal variability of the magnetic field and to deduce the stellar rotation period and the magnetic field geometry. Studies of the magnetic field in massive stars are indispensable to understand the conditions controlling the presence of those fields and their implications on the stellar phy...

  9. Use of Harmonic Inversion Techniques in Semiclassical Quantization and Analysis of Quantum Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Main

    1999-02-11

    Harmonic inversion is introduced as a powerful tool for both the analysis of quantum spectra and semiclassical periodic orbit quantization. The method allows to circumvent the uncertainty principle of the conventional Fourier transform and to extract dynamical information from quantum spectra which has been unattainable before, such as bifurcations of orbits, the uncovering of hidden ghost orbits in complex phase space, and the direct observation of symmetry breaking effects. The method also solves the fundamental convergence problems in semiclassical periodic orbit theories - for both the Berry-Tabor formula and Gutzwiller's trace formula - and can therefore be applied as a novel technique for periodic orbit quantization, i.e., to calculate semiclassical eigenenergies from a finite set of classical periodic orbits. The advantage of periodic orbit quantization by harmonic inversion is the universality and wide applicability of the method, which will be demonstrated in this work for various open and bound systems with underlying regular, chaotic, and even mixed classical dynamics. The efficiency of the method is increased, i.e., the number of orbits required for periodic orbit quantization is reduced, when the harmonic inversion technique is generalized to the analysis of cross-correlated periodic orbit sums. The method provides not only the eigenenergies and resonances of systems but also allows the semiclassical calculation of diagonal matrix elements and, e.g., for atoms in external fields, individual non-diagonal transition strengths. Furthermore, it is possible to include higher order terms of the hbar expanded periodic orbit sum to obtain semiclassical spectra beyond the Gutzwiller and Berry-Tabor approximation.

  10. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  11. A Pulse Shape Analysis Technique for the MAJORANA Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Reynold J [ORNL; Radford, David C [ORNL; Lagergren, K. [Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Oak Ridge; Colaresi, James F. [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT; Darken, Larry [Canberra Industries, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN; Henning, Reyco [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Marino, Michael [University of Washington, Seattle; Yocum, K. Michael [Canberra Industries, Inc., Meriden, CT

    2011-01-01

    In order to achieve background count rates sufficiently low as to allow the observation of rare events such as neutrinoless double beta (0 ) decay, background suppression techniques are routinely employed. In this paper we present details of a novel Pulse Shape Analysis algorithm which allows single-site events such as 0 decay to be distinguished from multi site background events. The algorithm, which is based on the event by event 2 fitting of experimental signals to a basis data set of unique single site pulse shapes, has been developed through simulation studies and tested experimentally using a Broad Energy Germanium detector. It is found experimentally that the technique is able to successfully identify and reject 99% of multi site events in the single escape peak associated with the gamma decay of 208Tl, whilst maintaining a survival probability of 98% for '0 like' double escape peak events.

  12. Descriptive Guide to Observing Fish Lesions Supported by US Environmental Protection Agency,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    between agencies and individuals. This challenge can lead to reduced quality of observational data observations, take high quality tissue samples, and make substantial contributions to field fish health studies in the field as well as in the laboratory. This guide contains common terminology, sample descriptions and data

  13. Laser frequency combs for astronomical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilo Steinmetz; Tobias Wilken; Constanza Araujo-Hauck; Ronald Holzwarth; Theodor W. Hänsch; Luca Pasquini; Antonio Manescau; Sandro D'Odorico; Michael T. Murphy; Thomas Kentischer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Thomas Udem

    2008-09-09

    A direct measurement of the universe's expansion history could be made by observing in real time the evolution of the cosmological redshift of distant objects. However, this would require measurements of Doppler velocity drifts of about 1 centimeter per second per year, and astronomical spectrographs have not yet been calibrated to this tolerance. We demonstrate the first use of a laser frequency comb for wavelength calibration of an astronomical telescope. Even with a simple analysis, absolute calibration is achieved with an equivalent Doppler precision of approximately 9 meters per second at about 1.5 micrometers - beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. We show that tracking complex, time-varying systematic effects in the spectrograph and detector system is a particular advantage of laser frequency comb calibration. This technique promises an effective means for modeling and removal of such systematic effects to the accuracy required by future experiments to see direct evidence of the universe's putative acceleration.

  14. Development of Extraction Techniques for the Detection of Signature Lipids from Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borglin, Sharon; Geller, Jil; Chakraborty, Romy; Hazen, Terry; Mason, Olivia

    2010-05-17

    Pure cultures, including Desulfovibrio vulgaris and Methanococcus maripaludus, were combined with model oil samples and oil/diesel mixtures to optimize extraction techniques of signature lipids from oil in support of investigation of microbial communities in oil deposit samples targets for microbial enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. Several techniques were evaluated, including standard phospholipid extraction, ether linked lipid for Archaeal bacterial detection, and high pressure extractiontechniques. Recovery of lipids ranged from 50-80percent as compared to extraction of the pure culture. Extraction efficiency was evaluated by the use of internal standards. Field samples will also be tested for recovery of signature lipids with optimized extraction techniques.

  15. Applied Microearthquake Techniques for Geothermal Resource Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    . In recent years, interest in exploiting geothermal energy has increased greatly, accompanied by interest. The microearthquake techniques currently producing the most useful results for geothermal energy production, and whichApplied Microearthquake Techniques for Geothermal Resource Development Gillian R. Foulger1 & Bruce

  16. e! Science News Semiconductor manufacturing technique holds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    e! Science News Semiconductor manufacturing technique holds promise for solar energy PublishedSemiconductor manufacturing technique holds promise for solar energy | e! Science News 5/26/2010http semiconductor manufacturing method pioneered at the University of Illinois, the future of solar energy just got

  17. Design techniques for forest management planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design techniques for forest management planning Practice Guide #12;#12;Practice Guide Design by the Forestry Commission in 1998 as `Forest design planning: a guide to good practice'. This revised second edition published in 2014. ISBN: 978-0-85538-894-2 Forestry Commission (2014). Design techniques

  18. QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Embrechts, Paul

    QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES AND TOOLS* Paul Embrechts Department of Mathematics ETH Zurich www.math.ethz.ch/~embrechts #12;QUANTITATIVE RISK MANAGEMENT: CONCEPTS, TECHNIQUES Theorems of Quantitative Risk Management · PE's Desert-Island Copula · Example 1: Credit Risk · Example 2

  19. Opto-electrokinetic manipulation technique for highperformance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Jae-Sung [Purdue University; Ravindranath, Sandeep [Purdue University; Kumar, Aloke [ORNL; Irudayaraj, Joseph [Purdue University; Wereley, Steven T. [Purdue University

    2012-01-01

    This communication first demonstrates bio-compatibility of a recently developed opto-electrokinetic manipulation technique, using microorganisms. Aggregation, patterning, translation, trapping and size-based separation of microorganisms performed with the technique firmly establishes its usefulness for development of a high-performance on-chip bioassay system.

  20. Directed Test Suite Augmentation: Techniques and Tradeoffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Directed Test Suite Augmentation: Techniques and Tradeoffs Zhihong Xu, Yunho Kim, Moonzoo Kim and Technology kimyunho@kaist.ac.kr, moonzoo@cs.kaist.ac.kr ABSTRACT Test suite augmentation techniques are used in regression testing to identify code elements affected by changes and to generate test cases to cover those

  1. Dependable Computing Techniques for Reconfigurable Hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Hardware Wei-Je Robert Huang TR 01-7 June 2001 Center for Reliable Computing Gates Building 2A, Room 236 "Dependable Computing Techniques for Reconfigurable Hardware." Funding: This research was supported TECHNIQUES FOR RECONFIGURABLE HARDWARE A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING

  2. Techniques and Trends for Embedded System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    Techniques and Trends for Embedded System Design & Energy Estimation and Low-Power Design;Contents Introduction Techniques and trends for embedded system design Power estimation and low-powerHW development High cost & inefficient design loop Early separation of HW and SW Long design time/ high cost

  3. Photospheric Electric Fields and Energy Fluxes in the Eruptive Active Region NOAA 11158

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazachenko, Maria D; Welsch, Brian T; Liu, Yang; Sun, Xudong

    2015-01-01

    How much electromagnetic energy crosses the photosphere in evolving solar active regions? With the advent of high-cadence vector magnetic field observations, addressing this fundamental question has become tractable. In this paper, we apply the "PTD-Doppler-FLCT-Ideal" (PDFI) electric field inversion technique of Kazachenko et al. (2014) to a 6-day HMI/SDO vector magnetogram and Doppler velocity sequence, to find the electric field and Poynting flux evolution in NOAA active region 11158, which produced an X2.2 flare early on 2011 February 15. We find photospheric electric fields ranging up to $1.5$ V/cm. The Poynting fluxes range up to $2\\times10^{10}$ ergs$\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with mean values around $10^8$-$10^9$ ergs$\\cdot$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. Integrating the instantaneous energy flux over space and time, we find that the total magnetic energy accumulated above the photosphere from emergence to the moment before the X2.2 flare to be $E=10.6\\times10^{32}$ ergs, which is partitioned as $2.0\\times10^{32}$ er...

  4. Displacement fields of point defects in two-dimensional colloidal crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Lechner; Elisabeth Schöll-Paschinger; Christoph Dellago

    2008-05-20

    Point defects such as interstitials, vacancies, and impurities in otherwise perfect crystals induce complex displacement fields that are of long-range nature. In the present paper we study numerically the response of a two-dimensional colloidal crystal on a triangular lattice to the introduction of an interstitial particle. While far from the defect position the resulting displacement field is accurately described by linear elasticity theory, lattice effects dominate in the vicinity of the defect. In comparing the results of particle based simulations with continuum theory, it is crucial to employ corresponding boundary conditions in both cases. For the periodic boundary condition used here, the equations of elasticity theory can be solved in a consistent way with the technique of Ewald summation familiar from the electrostatics of periodically replicated systems of charges and dipoles. Very good agreement of the displacement fields calculated in this way with those determined in particle simulations is observed for distances of more than about 10 lattice constants. Closer to the interstitial, strongly anisotropic displacement fields with exponential behavior can occur for certain defect configurations. Here we rationalize this behavior with a simple bead-spring that relates the exponential decay constant to the elastic constants of the crystal.

  5. RECONSTRUCTING CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS WITH COORDINATED IMAGING AND IN SITU OBSERVATIONS: GLOBAL STRUCTURE, KINEMATICS, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR SPACE WEATHER FORECASTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Ying; Luhmann, Janet G.; Lin, Robert P.; Bale, Stuart D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Thernisien, Arnaud [Universities of Space Research Association, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States); Vourlidas, Angelos [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Davies, Jackie A., E-mail: liuxying@ssl.berkeley.ed [Space Science and Technology Department, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-20

    We reconstruct the global structure and kinematics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using coordinated imaging and in situ observations from multiple vantage points. A forward modeling technique, which assumes a rope-like morphology for CMEs, is used to determine the global structure (including orientation and propagation direction) from coronagraph observations. We reconstruct the corresponding structure from in situ measurements at 1 AU with the Grad-Shafranov method, which gives the flux-rope orientation, cross section, and a rough knowledge of the propagation direction. CME kinematics (propagation direction and radial distance) during the transit from the Sun to 1 AU are studied with a geometric triangulation technique, which provides an unambiguous association between solar observations and in situ signatures; a track fitting approach is invoked when data are available from only one spacecraft. We show how the results obtained from imaging and in situ data can be compared by applying these methods to the 2007 November 14-16 and 2008 December 12 CMEs. This merged imaging and in situ study shows important consequences and implications for CME research as well as space weather forecasting: (1) CME propagation directions can be determined to a relatively good precision as shown by the consistency between different methods; (2) the geometric triangulation technique shows a promising capability to link solar observations with corresponding in situ signatures at 1 AU and to predict CME arrival at the Earth; (3) the flux rope within CMEs, which has the most hazardous southward magnetic field, cannot be imaged at large distances due to expansion; (4) the flux-rope orientation derived from in situ measurements at 1 AU may have a large deviation from that determined by coronagraph image modeling; and (5) we find, for the first time, that CMEs undergo a westward migration with respect to the Sun-Earth line at their acceleration phase, which we suggest is a universal feature produced by the magnetic field connecting the Sun and ejecta. The importance of having dedicated spacecraft at L4 and L5, which are well situated for the triangulation concept, is also discussed based on the results.

  6. Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of the DOC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A technique for accelerated aging of SCR system (DOC -> SCR-> DPF) reveals two deactivation mechanisms and replicates field-aged effects

  7. Strong Field, Noncommutative QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anton Ilderton; Joakim Lundin; Mattias Marklund

    2010-05-26

    We review the effects of strong background fields in noncommutative QED. Beginning with the noncommutative Maxwell and Dirac equations, we describe how combined noncommutative and strong field effects modify the propagation of fermions and photons. We extend these studies beyond the case of constant backgrounds by giving a new and revealing interpretation of the photon dispersion relation. Considering scattering in background fields, we then show that the noncommutative photon is primarily responsible for generating deviations from strong field QED results. Finally, we propose a new method for constructing gauge invariant variables in noncommutative QED, and use it to analyse the physics of our null background fields.

  8. ESO Imaging Survey. Deep Public Survey: Multi-Color Optical Data for the Chandra Deep Field South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Arnouts; B. Vandame; C. Benoist; M. A. T. Groenewegen; L. da Costa; M. Schirmer; R. P. Mignani; R. Slijkhuis; E. Hatziminaoglou; R. Hook; R. Madejsky; C. Rite'; A. Wicenec

    2001-09-28

    This paper presents multi-passband optical data obtained from observations of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S), located at alpha ~ 3h 32m, delta ~ -27d 48m. The observations were conducted at the ESO/MPG 2.2m telescope at La Silla using the 8kx8k Wide-Field Imager (WFI). This data set, taken over a period of one year, represents the first field to be completed by the ongoing Deep Public Survey (DPS) being carried out by the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) project. This paper describes the optical observations, the techniques employed for un-supervised pipeline processing and the general characteristics of the final data set. The paper includes data taken in six different filters U'UBVRI. The data cover an area of about 0.25 square degrees reaching 5 sigma limiting magnitudes of U'_AB=26.0, U_AB=25.7, B_AB=26.4$, V_AB=25.4, R_AB=25.5 and I_AB= 24.7 mag, as measured within a 2xFWHM aperture. The optical data covers the area of ~ 0.1

  9. Gravitational waves induced by spinor fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Kaixi

    2015-01-01

    In realistic model-building, spinor fields with various masses are present. During inflation, spinor field may induce gravitational waves as a second order effect. In this paper, we calculate the contribution of single massive spinor field to the power spectrum of primordial gravitational wave by using retarded Green propagator. We find that the correction is scale-invariant and of order $H^4/M_P^4$ for arbitrary spinor mass $m_{\\psi}$. Additionally, we also observe that when $m_\\psi \\gtrsim H$, the dependence of correction on $m_\\psi/H$ is nontrivial.

  10. Gravitational waves induced by spinor fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaixi Feng; Yun-Song Piao

    2015-09-03

    In realistic model-building, spinor fields with various masses are present. During inflation, spinor field may induce gravitational waves as a second order effect. In this paper, we calculate the contribution of single massive spinor field to the power spectrum of primordial gravitational wave by using retarded Green propagator. We find that the correction is scale-invariant and of order $H^4/M_P^4$ for arbitrary spinor mass $m_{\\psi}$. Additionally, we also observe that when $m_\\psi \\gtrsim H$, the dependence of correction on $m_\\psi/H$ is nontrivial.

  11. PFT Air Infiltration Measurement Technique | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infiltration Measurement Technique PFT Air Infiltration Measurement Technique The Brookhaven National Laboratory developed the PFT (PerFluorocarbon tracer gas) technique to...

  12. Observational and numerical study of Atlantic tropical instability waves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qiaoyan

    2009-06-02

    (solid line) and Atlantic ATL3 index (dot line) from 1998 to 2005. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 4 The scheme of Radon transform to estimate wave characteristics from the longitude-time TIW distribution... variance is computed at each point, then averaged over the active TIW region. We use this filter to derive anomaly fields of SST. After the filtering, the Radon transform technique is applied to estimate the propagation characteristics of the TIW. The Radon...

  13. THE HST EXTREME DEEP FIELD (XDF): COMBINING ALL ACS AND WFC3/IR DATA ON THE HUDF REGION INTO THE DEEPEST FIELD EVER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Oesch, P. A. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bouwens, R. J.; Labbé, I.; Franx, M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Stiavelli, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van Dokkum, P. G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Trenti, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Carollo, C. M. [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Gonzalez, V., E-mail: gdi@ucolick.org [University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) combines data from 10 years of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide-Field Camera 3 Infra-Red (WFC3/IR) into the deepest image of the sky ever in the optical/near-IR. Since the initial observations of the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) in 2003, numerous surveys and programs, including supernovae follow-up, HUDF09, CANDELS, and HUDF12, have contributed additional imaging data across this region. However, these images have never been combined and made available as one complete ultra-deep image dataset. We combine them now with the XDF program. Our new and improved processing techniques provide higher quality reductions of the total dataset. All WFC3/IR and optical ACS data sets have been fully combined and accurately matched, resulting in the deepest imaging ever taken at these wavelengths, ranging from 29.1 to 30.3 AB mag (5? in a 0.''35 diameter aperture) in 9 filters. The combined image therefore reaches to 31.2 AB mag 5? (32.9 at 1?) for a flat f {sub ?} source. The gains in the optical for the four filters done in the original ACS HUDF correspond to a typical improvement of 0.15 mag, with gains of 0.25 mag in the deepest areas. Such gains are equivalent to adding ?130 to ?240 orbits of ACS data to the HUDF. Improved processing alone results in a typical gain of ?0.1 mag. Our 5? (optical+near-IR) SExtractor catalogs reveal about 14,140 sources in the full field and about 7121 galaxies in the deepest part of the XDF.

  14. NS&T Managment Observations - 1st Quarter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gianotto

    2014-06-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  15. Hawking radiation as perceived by different observers (ERE2011 proceedings)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbado, Luis C; Garay, Luis J

    2012-01-01

    We study the perception of Hawking radiation by different observers outside a black hole. The analysis is done in terms of an effective-temperature function that varies along the trajectory of each observer. The vacuum state of the radiation field is chosen to be non-stationary, so as to mimic the switching-on of Hawking radiation that would appear in a real black hole collapse. We analyse how this vacuum is perceived by observers staying at a fixed radius, by observers coming in free-fall from radial infinity at different times, and by observers in free-fall released from finite radial positions. Results found have a compelling physical interpretation. One main result, at first unexpected, is that in general free-falling observers do perceive particle emission by the black hole when crossing the event horizon. This happens because of a diverging Doppler shift at the event horizon.

  16. Hawking radiation as perceived by different observers (ERE2011 proceedings)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luis C. Barbado; Carlos Barceló; Luis J. Garay

    2012-10-01

    We study the perception of Hawking radiation by different observers outside a black hole. The analysis is done in terms of an effective-temperature function that varies along the trajectory of each observer. The vacuum state of the radiation field is chosen to be non-stationary, so as to mimic the switching-on of Hawking radiation that would appear in a real black hole collapse. We analyse how this vacuum is perceived by observers staying at a fixed radius, by observers coming in free-fall from radial infinity at different times, and by observers in free-fall released from finite radial positions. Results found have a compelling physical interpretation. One main result, at first unexpected, is that in general free-falling observers do perceive particle emission by the black hole when crossing the event horizon. This happens because of a diverging Doppler shift at the event horizon.

  17. Report on Physics of Channelization: Theory, Experiment, and Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kudrolli, Arshad [Clark University] [Clark University

    2014-05-19

    The project involved a study of physical processes that create eroded channel and drainage networks. A particular focus was on how the shape of the channels and the network depended on the nature of the fluid flow. Our approach was to combine theoretical, experimental, and observational studies in close collaboration with Professor Daniel Rothman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Laboratory -scaled experiments were developed and quantitative data on the shape of the pattern and erosion dynamics are obtained with a laser-aided topography technique and fluorescent optical imaging techniques.

  18. Initial Observations of Sunspot Oscillations Excited by Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Kosovichev; T. Sekii

    2007-10-09

    Observations of a large solar flare of December 13, 2006, using Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode spacecraft revealed high-frequency oscillations excited by the flare in the sunspot chromosphere. These oscillations are observed in the region of strong magnetic field of the sunspot umbra, and may provide a new diagnostic tool for probing the structure of sunspots and understanding physical processes in solar flares.

  19. Swift observations of GRB050904: the most distant cosmic explosion ever observed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cusumano; V. Mangano; G. Chincarini; A. Panaitescu; D. N. Burrows; V. La Parola; T. Sakamoto; S. Campana; T. Mineo; G. Tagliaferri; L. Angelini; S. D. Barthelemy; A. P. Beardmore; P. T. Boyd; L. Cominsky; C. Gronwall; E. E. Fenimore; N. Gehrels; P. Giommi; M. Goad; K. Hurley; S. Immler; J. A. Kennea; K. O. Mason; F. Marshall; P. Meszaros; J. A. Nousek; J. P. Osborne; D. M. Palmer; P. W. A. Roming; A. Wells; N. E. White; B. Zhang

    2006-11-08

    Swift discovered the high redshift (z=6.29) GRB050904 with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and began observing with its narrow field instruments 161 s after the burst onset. This gamma-ray burst is the most distant cosmic explosion ever observed. Because of its high redshift, the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and BAT simultaneous observations provide 4 orders of magnitude of spectral coverage (0.2-150 keV; 1.4-1090 keV in the source rest frame) at a very early source-frame time (22 s). GRB050904 was a long, multi-peaked, bright GRB with strong variability during its entire evolution. The light curve observed by the XRT is characterized by the presence of a long flaring activity lasting up to 1-2 hours after the burst onset in the burst rest frame, with no evidence of a smooth power-law decay following the prompt emission as seen in other GRBs. However, the BAT tail extrapolated to the XRT band joins the XRT early light curve and the overall behavior resembles that of a very long GRB prompt. The spectral energy distribution softens with time, with the photon index decreasing from -1.2 during the BAT observation to -1.9 at the end of the XRT observation. The dips of the late X-ray flares may be consistent with an underlying X-ray emission arising from the forward shock and with the properties of the optical afterglow reported by Tagliaferri et al. (2005b). We interpret the BAT and XRT data as a single continuous observation of the prompt emission from a very long GRB. The peculiarities observed in GRB050904 could be due to its origin within one of the first star-forming regions in the Universe; very low metallicities of the progenitor at these epochs may provide an explanation.

  20. Erasing the Milky Way: new cleaning technique applied to GBT intensity mapping data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolz, L; Abdalla, F B; Anderson, C M; Chang, T -C; Li, Y -C; Masui, K W; Switzer, E; Pen, U -L; Voytek, T C; Yadav, J

    2015-01-01

    We present the first application of a new foreground removal pipeline to the current leading HI intensity mapping dataset, obtained by the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). We study the 15hr and 1hr field data of the GBT observations previously presented in Masui et al. (2013) and Switzer et al. (2013) covering about 41 square degrees at 0.6 < z < 1.0 which overlaps with the WiggleZ galaxy survey employed for the cross-correlation with the maps. In the presented pipeline, we subtract the Galactic foreground continuum and the point source contaminations using an independent component analysis technique (fastica) and develop a description for a Fourier-based optimal weighting estimator to compute the temperature power spectrum of the intensity maps and cross-correlation with the galaxy survey data. We show that fastica is a reliable tool to subtract diffuse and point-source emission by using the non-Gaussian nature of their probability functions. The power spectra of the intensity maps and the cross-correlation...

  1. Loop quantum gravity and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Barrau; J. Grain

    2015-10-28

    Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

  2. Observational Study PAUL R. ROSENBAUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    . Howell John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, 2005 #12;Observational Study Observational Studies Defined describing the subjects before treatment. As a consequence, random assignment tends to make the groups comparable both in terms of measured char- acteristics and characteristics that were not or could

  3. The Mississippian Leadville Limestone Exploration Play, Utah and Colorado-Exploration Techniques and Studies for Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2008-09-30

    The Mississippian (late Kinderhookian to early Meramecian) Leadville Limestone is a shallow, open-marine, carbonate-shelf deposit. The Leadville has produced over 53 million barrels (8.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil/condensate from seven fields in the Paradox fold and fault belt of the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. The environmentally sensitive, 7500-square-mile (19,400 km{sup 2}) area that makes up the fold and fault belt is relatively unexplored. Only independent producers operate and continue to hunt for Leadville oil targets in the region. The overall goal of this study is to assist these independents by (1) developing and demonstrating techniques and exploration methods never tried on the Leadville Limestone, (2) targeting areas for exploration, (3) increasing deliverability from new and old Leadville fields through detailed reservoir characterization, (4) reducing exploration costs and risk especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and (5) adding new oil discoveries and reserves. The final results will hopefully reduce exploration costs and risks, especially in environmentally sensitive areas, and add new oil discoveries and reserves. The study consists of three sections: (1) description of lithofacies and diagenetic history of the Leadville at Lisbon field, San Juan County, Utah, (2) methodology and results of a surface geochemical survey conducted over the Lisbon and Lightning Draw Southeast fields (and areas in between) and identification of oil-prone areas using epifluorescence in well cuttings from regional wells, and (3) determination of regional lithofacies, description of modern and outcrop depositional analogs, and estimation of potential oil migration directions (evaluating the middle Paleozoic hydrodynamic pressure regime and water chemistry). Leadville lithofacies at Libon field include open marine (crinoidal banks or shoals and Waulsortian-type buildups), oolitic and peloid shoals, and middle shelf. Rock units with open-marine and restricted-marine facies constitute a significant reservoir potential, having both effective porosity and permeability when dissolution of skeletal grains, followed by dolomitization, has occurred. Two major types of diagenetic dolomite are observed in the Leadville Limestone at Lisbon field: (1) tight 'early' dolomite consisting of very fine grained (<5 {micro}m), interlocking crystals that faithfully preserve depositional fabrics; and (2) porous, coarser (>100-250 {micro}m), rhombic and saddle crystals that discordantly replace limestone and earlier very fine grained dolomite. Predating or concomitant with late dolomite formation are pervasive leaching episodes that produced vugs and extensive microporosity. Most reservoir rocks within Lisbon field appear to be associated with the second, late type of dolomitization and associated leaching events. Other diagenetic products include pyrobitumen, syntaxial cement, sulfide minerals, anhydrite cement and replacement, and late macrocalcite. Fracturing (solution enlarged) and brecciation (autobrecciation) caused by hydrofracturing are widespread within Lisbon field. Sediment-filled cavities, related to karstification of the exposed Leadville, are present in the upper third of the formation. Pyrobitumen and sulfide minerals appear to coat most crystal faces of the rhombic and saddle dolomites. The fluid inclusion and mineral relationships suggest the following sequence of events: (1) dolomite precipitation, (2) anhydrite deposition, (3) anhydrite dissolution and quartz precipitation, (4) dolomite dissolution and late calcite precipitation, (5) trapping of a mobile oil phase, and (6) formation of bitumen. Fluid inclusions in calcite and dolomite display variable liquid to vapor ratios suggesting reequilibration at elevated temperatures (50 C). Fluid salinities exceed 10 weight percent NaCl equivalent. Low ice melting temperatures of quartz- and calcite-hosted inclusions suggest chemically complex Ca-Mg-bearing brines associated with evaporite deposits were responsible for mineral deposition. The overall conclusion from th

  4. Electron Beam Polarization Measurement Using Touschek Lifetime Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Changchun; /Duke U., DFELL; Li, Jingyi; /Duke U., DFELL; Mikhailov, Stepan; /Duke U., DFELL; Popov, Victor; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Wenzhong; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Ying; /Duke U., DFELL; Chao, Alex; /SLAC; Xu, Hong-liang; /Hefei, NSRL; Zhang, Jian-feng; /Hefei, NSRL

    2012-08-24

    Electron beam loss due to intra-beam scattering, the Touschek effect, in a storage ring depends on the electron beam polarization. The polarization of an electron beam can be determined from the difference in the Touschek lifetime compared with an unpolarized beam. In this paper, we report on a systematic experimental procedure recently developed at Duke FEL laboratory to study the radiative polarization of a stored electron beam. Using this technique, we have successfully observed the radiative polarization build-up of an electron beam in the Duke storage ring, and determined the equilibrium degree of polarization and the time constant of the polarization build-up process.

  5. Forces in electromagnetic field and gravitational field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zihua Weng

    2011-03-31

    The force can be defined from the linear momentum in the gravitational field and electromagnetic field. But this definition can not cover the gradient of energy. In the paper, the force will be defined from the energy and torque in a new way, which involves the gravitational force, electromagnetic force, inertial force, gradient of energy, and some other new force terms etc. One of these new force terms can be used to explain why the solar wind varies velocity along the magnetic force line in the interplanetary space between the sun and the earth.

  6. Including stereoscopic information in the reconstruction of coronal magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Wiegelmann; T. Neukirch

    2008-01-23

    We present a method to include stereoscopic information about the three dimensional structure of flux tubes into the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field. Due to the low plasma beta in the corona we can assume a force free magnetic field, with the current density parallel to the magnetic field lines. Here we use linear force free fields for simplicity. The method uses the line of sight magnetic field on the photosphere as observational input. The value of $\\alpha$ is determined iteratively by comparing the reconstructed magnetic field with the observed structures. The final configuration is the optimal linear force solution constrained by both the photospheric magnetogram and the observed plasma structures. As an example we apply our method to SOHO MDI/EIT data of an active region. In the future it is planned to apply the method to analyse data from the SECCHI instrument aboard the STEREO mission.

  7. Structure of W3(OH) from Very High Spectral Resolution Observations of 5 Centimeter OH Masers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish; Loránt O. Sjouwerman

    2007-06-22

    Recent studies of methanol and ground-state OH masers at very high spectral resolution have shed new light on small-scale maser processes. The nearby source W3(OH), which contains numerous bright masers in several different transitions, provides an excellent laboratory for high spectral resolution techniques. We present a model of W3(OH) based on EVN observations of the rotationally-excited 6030 and 6035 MHz OH masers taken at 0.024 km/s spectral resolution. The 6.0 GHz masers are becoming brighter with time and show evidence for tangential proper motions. We confirm the existence of a region of magnetic field oriented toward the observer to the southeast and find another such region to the northeast in W3(OH), near the champagne flow. The 6.0 GHz masers trace the inner edge of a counterclockwise rotating torus feature. Masers at 6030 MHz are usually a factor of a few weaker than at 6035 MHz but trace the same material. Velocity gradients of nearby Zeeman components are much more closely correlated than in the ground state, likely due to the smaller spatial separation between Zeeman components. Hydroxyl maser peaks at very long baseline interferometric resolution appear to have structure on scales both smaller than that resolvable as well as on larger scales.

  8. HUBBLE TARANTULA TREASURY PROJECT: UNRAVELING TARANTULA'S WEB. I. OBSERVATIONAL OVERVIEW AND FIRST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Van der Marel, R. P.; Aloisi, A.; De Mink, S. E.; Gordon, K.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Panagia, N. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lennon, D. J. [ESA-European Space Astronomy Center, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Boyer, M. L. [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cignoni, M. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, via Ranzani, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); De Marchi, G. [Space Science Department, European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2200-AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Evans, C. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Center, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Gallagher, J. S. III; Ryon, J. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Gouliermis, D. A. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Grebel, E. K. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg, Moenchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Larsen, S. S. [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500-GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Smith, L. J. [ESA/STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tosi, M., E-mail: sabbi@stsci.edu [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); and others

    2013-09-15

    The Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP) is an ongoing panchromatic imaging survey of stellar populations in the Tarantula Nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud that reaches into the sub-solar mass regime (<0.5 M{sub Sun }). HTTP utilizes the capability of the Hubble Space Telescope to operate the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Camera 3 in parallel to study this remarkable region in the near-ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared spectral regions, including narrow-band H{alpha} images. The combination of all these bands provides a unique multi-band view. The resulting maps of the stellar content of the Tarantula Nebula within its main body provide the basis for investigations of star formation in an environment resembling the extreme conditions found in starburst galaxies and in the early universe. Access to detailed properties of individual stars allows us to begin to reconstruct the temporal and spatial evolution of the stellar skeleton of the Tarantula Nebula over space and time on a sub-parsec scale. In this first paper we describe the observing strategy, the photometric techniques, and the upcoming data products from this survey and present preliminary results obtained from the analysis of the initial set of near-infrared observations.

  9. Volume rendering of 3D scalar and vector fields at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawfis, R.; Max, N.; Becker, B.; Cabral, B.

    1993-04-01

    Simulation of complex 3-dimensional phenomena data sets which are hard to comprehend using conventional 2-dimensionally oriented visualization tools. One way to overcome this limitation is to employ various volume visualization techniques. While early volume visualization techniques worked well on simple scalar volumes they failed to exploit frame buffer hardware capabilities and handle higher order data such as vector field. Work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has centered on developing new techniques and extending existing techniques.

  10. Pole placement design for quantum systems via coherent observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zibo Miao; Matthew R. James; Valery A. Ugrinovskii

    2015-09-17

    We previously extended Luenberger's approach for observer design to the quantum case, and developed a class of coherent observers which tracks linear quantum stochastic systems in the sense of mean values. In light of the fact that the Luenberger observer is commonly and successfully applied in classical control, it is interesting to investigate the role of coherent observers in quantum feedback. As the first step in exploring observer-based coherent control, in this paper we study pole-placement techniques for quantum systems using coherent observers, and in such a fashion, poles of a closed-loop quantum system can be relocated at any desired locations. In comparison to classical feedback control design incorporating the Luenberger observer, here direct coupling between a quantum plant and the observer-based controller are allowed to enable a greater degree of freedom for the design of controller parameters. A separation principle is presented, and we show how to design the observer and feedback independently to be consistent with the laws of quantum mechanics. The proposed scheme is applicable to coherent feedback control of quantum systems, especially when the transient dynamic response is of interest, and this issue is illustrated in an example.

  11. Experimental techniques for measurement of available potential energy as applied to the Drake Passage region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jessen, Paul Frederik

    1986-01-01

    - ergy contributions to APE are treated and in the method used to identify and calculate a reference field. The results of each method are compared to estimate the relative accuracy of APE estimates and investigate the differences between them... surfaces during the adiabatic lev- eling of the observed field. Differences between methods which calculate the reference field differently are greatest where displacements are large and in the deeper parts of the ocean basin. An APE anomaly...

  12. Gravitational slopes, geomorphology, and material strengths of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from OSIRIS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groussin, O; Auger, A -T; Kührt, E; Gaskell, R; Capanna, C; Scholten, F; Preusker, F; Lamy, P; Hviid, S; Knollenberg, J; Keller, U; Huettig, C; Sierks, H; Barbieri, C; Rodrigo, R; Koschny, D; Rickman, H; Hearn, M F A; Agarwal, J; Barucci, M A; Bertaux, J -L; Bertini, I; Boudreault, S; Cremonese, G; Da Deppo, V; Davidsson, B; Debei, S; De Cecco, M; El-Maarry, M R; Fornasier, S; Fulle, M; Gutiérrez, P J; Güttler, C; Ip, W -H; Kramm, J -R; Küppers, M; Lazzarin, M; Lara, L M; Moreno, J J Lopez; Marchi, S; Marzari, F; Massironi, M; Michalik, H; Naletto, G; Oklay, N; Pommerol, A; Pajola, M; Thomas, N; Toth, I; Tubiana, C; Vincent, J -B

    2015-01-01

    We study the link between gravitational slopes and the surface morphology on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and provide constraints on the mechanical properties of the cometary material. We computed the gravitational slopes for five regions on the nucleus that are representative of the different morphologies observed on the surface, using two shape models computed from OSIRIS images by the stereo-photoclinometry (SPC) and stereo-photogrammetry (SPG) techniques. We estimated the tensile, shear, and compressive strengths using different surface morphologies and mechanical considerations. The different regions show a similar general pattern in terms of the relation between gravitational slopes and terrain morphology: i) low-slope terrains (0-20 deg) are covered by a fine material and contain a few large ($>$10 m) and isolated boulders, ii) intermediate-slope terrains (20-45 deg) are mainly fallen consolidated materials and debris fields, with numerous intermediate-size boulders from $<$1 m to ...

  13. Effect of an external magnetic field on the nematic-isotropic phase transition in mesogenic systems of uniaxial and biaxial molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nababrata Ghoshal; Kisor Mukhopadhyay; Soumen Kumar Roy

    2012-12-17

    Influence of an external magnetic field on the nematic-isotropic ($N-I$) phase transition in a dispersion model of nematic liquid crystals, where the molecules are either perfectly uniaxial or biaxial (board-like), has been studied by Monte Carlo simulation. Using multiple histogram reweighting technique and finite size scaling analysis the order of the phase transition, the transition temperature at the thermodynamic limit and the stability limit of the isotropic phase below the transition temperature for different magnetic field strengths have been determined. The magnetic field dependence of the shift in $N-I$ transition temperature is observed to be more rapid than that predicted by the standard Landau-de Gennes and Maier-Saupe mean field theories. We have shown that for a given field strength the shift in the transition temperature is higher for the biaxial molecules in comparison with the uniaxial case. The study shows that the $N-I$ transition for the biaxial molecules is weaker than the well known weak first order $N-I$ transition for the uniaxial molecules and the presence of the external magnetic field (up to a certain critical value) makes the transition much more weaker for both the systems. The estimate of the critical magnetic field ($\\sim 110 T$) for the common nematics is found to be smaller than the earlier estimates.

  14. Top-down estimate of anthropogenic emission inventories and their interannual variability in Houston using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brioude, J.; Kim, S. W.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Frost, G. J.; Lee, S. H.; McKeen, S. A.; Trainer, Michael; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Holloway, J. S.; Ryerson, T. B.; Williams, E. J.; Petron, Gabrielle; Fast, Jerome D.

    2011-10-31

    The 2000 and 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS 2000 and 2006) field campaigns took place in eastern Texas in August-October of 2000 and 2006. Several flights of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) research aircraft were dedicated to characterizing anthropogenic emissions over Houston. Houston is known for having serious problems with non-attainment of air quality standards. We present a method that uses three models and aircraft observations to assess and improve existing emission inventories using an inverse modeling technique. We used 3-dimensional and 4-dimensional variational (3D-VAR and 4D-VAR) inverse modeling techniques based on a least-squares method to improve the spatial and temporal distribution of CO, NOy (sum of all reactive nitrogen compounds), and SO2 emissions predicted by the 4-km-resolution U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Emission Inventory (NEI) for 2005. Differences between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed in detail. We found that in 2006 the prior daytime emissions in the urban area of Houston have to be reduced by 40% {+-} 12% for CO and 7% {+-} 13% for NOy. Over the Houston Ship Channel, where industrial emissions are predominant, the prior emissions have to be reduced by 41% {+-} 15% for CO and 51% {+-} 9% for NOy. Major ports around Houston have their NOy emissions reduced as well, probably due to uncertainties in near-shore ship emissions in the EPA NEI inventory. Using the measurements from the two field campaigns, we assessed the interannual emission variability between 2000 and 2006. Daytime CO emissions from the Houston urban area have been reduced by 8% {+-} 20%, while the NOy emissions have increased by 20% {+-} 12% from 2000 to 2006. In the Houston Ship Channel, the daytime NOy emissions have increased by 13% {+-} 17%. Our results show qualitative consistencies with known changes in Houston emissions sources.

  15. Stokes Inversion Techniques: Recent Advances and New Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. R. Bellot Rubio

    2006-09-27

    Inversion techniques (ITs) allow us to infer the magnetic, dynamic, and thermal properties of the solar atmosphere from polarization line profiles. In recent years, major progress has come from the application of ITs to state-of-the-art observations. This paper summarizes the main results achieved both in the photosphere and in the chromosphere. It also discusses the challenges facing ITs in the near future. Understanding the limitations of spectral lines, implementing more complex atmospheric models, and devising efficient strategies of data analysis for upcoming ground-based and space-borne instruments, are among the most important issues that need to be addressed. It is argued that proper interpretations of diffraction-limited Stokes profiles will not be possible without accounting for gradients of the atmospheric parameters along the line of sight. The feasibility of determining gradients in real time from space-borne observations is examined.

  16. Rice Field Geochemistry and Hydrology: An Explanation for Why Groundwater Irrigated Fields in Bangladesh are Net Sinks of Arsenic from Groundwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumann, Rebecca B.

    Irrigation of rice fields in Bangladesh with arsenic-contaminated groundwater transfers tens of cubic kilometers of water and thousands of tons of arsenic from aquifers to rice fields each year. Here we combine observations ...

  17. Defect model for the dependence of breakdown rate on external electric fields K. Nordlund and F. Djurabekova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    on an external electric field, observed in test components for the compact linear collider concept. The model

  18. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  19. The Ness field: An integrated field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasek, R.M.; Kean, K.R.; Richards, M.L. (Mobil North Sea Ltd., London (England))

    1990-05-01

    The Ness oil field, located in UK Block 9/13, was discovered in May 1986 by well 9/13b-28A. The field comprises a high-quality Middle Jurassic reservoir with an average 148-ft oil column trapped in a west-dipping, fault-bounded closure. The oil is substantially undersaturated. The field was brought on production as a subsea satellite development tied back to the Beryl B Platform. Oil was first delivered on August 11, 1987, just over a year from discovery. Initial producing rates from the 9/13B-28A well averaged about 10,000 BOPD. Since this well, another producer and water injector have been completed. Based on the frequent and accurate pressure data available from permanent downhole gauges installed in all three wells of the Ness field, material balance was used to calculate initial oil in place. These calculations gave an oil in place value consistent with recent calculations of 87 {times} 166 STB after less than 3% of the oil-in-place had been produced, compared with 55 {times} 106 STB initially mapped. Pressure monitoring enabled reservoir drive mechanisms to be tracked and a high offtake rate to be maintained by balancing water injection with withdrawals. A reevaluation of the mapped structure was prompted by a revision of the geological model following the 9/13b-38/38Z appraisal wells, together with the discrepancy between the oil in place from mapping and material balance. The seismic data was reinterpreted using the additional well control, and the field remapped. This resulted in a revised volume of 129 {times} 106 STB. Additional insight into the differentiation between oil and water volumes in this low compressibility system and a resolution of the differences between material balance and volumetrics were obtained through a black-oil simulation.

  20. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-01-01

    X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.X-Ray Techniques to Study Mesoscale Magnetism Jeffrey B.

  1. PROTOSTELLAR DISK FORMATION ENABLED BY WEAK, MISALIGNED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumholz, Mark R.; Crutcher, Richard M.; Hull, Charles L. H.

    2013-04-10

    The gas from which stars form is magnetized, and strong magnetic fields can efficiently transport angular momentum. Most theoretical models of this phenomenon find that it should prevent formation of large (>100 AU), rotationally supported disks around most protostars, even when non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects that allow the field and gas to decouple are taken into account. Using recent observations of magnetic field strengths and orientations in protostellar cores, we show that this conclusion is incorrect. The distribution of magnetic field strengths is very broad, and alignments between fields and angular momentum vectors within protostellar cores are essentially random. By combining the field strength and misalignment data with MHD simulations showing that disk formation is expected for both weak and misaligned fields, we show that these observations imply that we should expect disk fractions of {approx}10%-50% even when protostars are still deeply embedded in their parent cores, and even if the gas is governed by ideal MHD.

  2. World-line observables and clocks in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossein Farajollahi

    2005-11-20

    A proposal for the issue of time and observables in any parameterized theory such as general relativity is addressed. Introduction of a gauge potential 3-form A in the theory of relativity enables us to define a gauge-invariant quantity which can be used by observers as a clock to measure the passage of time. This dynamical variable increases monotonically and continuously along a world line. Then we define world line observables to be any covariantly defined quantity obtained from the field configurations on any such causal past with dynamical time T.

  3. Overview of Field Experience - Degradation Rates & Lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Dirk; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    The way a PV module fails may depend not only on its design and the materials used in its construction, but also on the weather it experiences, the way it is mounted, and the quality control during its manufacture. This presentation gives an overview of Field Experience - what degradation rates and what lifetimes are being observed in various regions.

  4. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  5. Passive States for Essential Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Strich

    2008-01-23

    The aim of this note is to present a unified approach to the results given in \\cite{bb99} and \\cite{bs04} which also covers examples of models not presented in these two papers (e.g. $d$-dimensional Minkowski space-time for $d\\geq 3$). Assuming that a state is passive for an observer travelling along certain (essential) worldlines, we show that this state is invariant under the isometry group, is a KMS-state for the observer at a temperature uniquely determined by the structure constants of the Lie algebra involved and fulfills (a variant of) the Reeh-Schlieder property. Also the modular objects associated to such a state and the observable algebra of an observer are computed and a version of weak locality is examined.

  6. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolini, Daniele

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but ...

  7. Baryon Resonances Observed at BES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Zou

    2008-02-01

    The $\\psi$ decays provide a novel way to explore baryon spectroscopy and baryon structure. The baryon resonances observed from $\\psi$ decays at BES are reviewed. The implications and prospects at upgraded BESIII/BEPCII are discussed.

  8. SEPARATION OF THE RIBBON FROM GLOBALLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOM FLUX USING THE FIRST FIVE YEARS OF IBEX OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; Fairchild, K.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M.; Livadiotis, G.; Reno, M.; Funsten, H. O.; Janzen, P.; Reisenfeld, D.; Bzowski, M.; Sokó?, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Christian, E. R.; DeMajistre, R.; Frisch, P.; and others

    2014-11-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes the IBEX ribbon, which stretches across much of the sky observed in energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). The ribbon covers a narrow (?20°-50°) region that is believed to be roughly perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field. Superimposed on the IBEX ribbon is the globally distributed flux that is controlled by the processes and properties of the heliosheath. This is a second study that utilizes a previously developed technique to separate ENA emissions in the ribbon from the globally distributed flux. A transparency mask is applied over the ribbon and regions of high emissions. We then solve for the globally distributed flux using an interpolation scheme. Previously, ribbon separation techniques were applied to the first year of IBEX-Hi data at and above 0.71 keV. Here we extend the separation analysis down to 0.2 keV and to five years of IBEX data enabling first maps of the ribbon and the globally distributed flux across the full sky of ENA emissions. Our analysis shows the broadening of the ribbon peak at energies below 0.71 keV and demonstrates the apparent deformation of the ribbon in the nose and heliotail. We show global asymmetries of the heliosheath, including both deflection of the heliotail and differing widths of the lobes, in context of the direction, draping, and compression of the heliospheric magnetic field. We discuss implications of the ribbon maps for the wide array of concepts that attempt to explain the ribbon's origin. Thus, we present the five-year separation of the IBEX ribbon from the globally distributed flux in preparation for a formal IBEX data release of ribbon and globally distributed flux maps to the heliophysics community.

  9. Techniques for enhanced physical-layer security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinto, Pedro C.

    Information-theoretic security--widely accepted as the strictest notion of security--relies on channel coding techniques that exploit the inherent randomness of propagation channels to strengthen the security of communications ...

  10. Tailoring couple therapy techniques to client needs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsueh, Annie C.

    2010-01-14

    Research illuminating which therapist techniques are used in care-as-usual couple therapy, and under what circumstances, can contribute to a fuller understanding of how therapy works. The overall goal of the present study was to better understand...

  11. Continuous flow separation techniques for microchemical synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kralj, Jason G

    2006-01-01

    Performing multistep microchemical synthesis requires many techniques from combining micromixers in series to the development of continuous microfluidic separation tools. Safety, high heat and mass transfer rates, and cost ...

  12. Internal Benchmarking Outreach and Data Collection Techniques

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance Program (TAP) presentation at a TAP webinar held on April 11, 2013 and dealing with internal benchmarking outreach and data collection techniques.

  13. Proper Injection Techniques in Dairy Cattle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villarino, Mario A.

    2009-05-04

    sanitation guidelines. Selecting the drug, dosage and injection technique Consult a veterinarian and read the medication label ? and/or package insert before vaccinating animals. Administer only drugs labeled for use in dairy ? cattle. Refer...

  14. Comparison of Virtualization and Containerization Techniques...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Virtualization and Containerization Techniques for High-Performance Computing July 31, 2015 1:30PM to 2:30PM Presenter Yuyu Zhou, University of Pittsburgh Location...

  15. Comparison of receiver function deconvolution techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesce, Kathryn A

    2010-01-01

    Receiver function (RF) techniques are commonly used by geophysicists to image discontinuities and estimate layer thicknesses within the crust and upper mantle. A receiver function is a time-series record of the P-to-S (Ps) ...

  16. The lunar Askaryan technique: a technical roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bray, J D; Buitink, S; Dagkesamanskii, R D; Ekers, R D; Falcke, H; Gayley, K G; Huege, T; James, C W; Mevius, M; Mutel, R L; Protheroe, R J; Scholten, O; Spencer, R E; ter Veen, S

    2015-01-01

    The lunar Askaryan technique, which involves searching for Askaryan radio pulses from particle cascades in the outer layers of the Moon, is a method for using the lunar surface as an extremely large detector of ultra-high-energy particles. The high time resolution required to detect these pulses, which have a duration of around a nanosecond, puts this technique in a regime quite different from other forms of radio astronomy, with a unique set of associated technical challenges which have been addressed in a series of experiments by various groups. Implementing the methods and techniques developed by these groups for detecting lunar Askaryan pulses will be important for a future experiment with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which is expected to have sufficient sensitivity to allow the first positive detection using this technique. Key issues include correction for ionospheric dispersion, beamforming, efficient triggering, and the exclusion of spurious events from radio-frequency interference. We review the...

  17. Techniques for green radio cellular communications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Videv, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    This thesis proposes four novel techniques to solve the problem of growing energy consumption requirements in cellular communication networks. The first and second part of this work propose a novel energy efficient ...

  18. Review of Building Energy Saving Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, X.; Zhu, D.

    2006-01-01

    The pace of building energy saving in our country is late, compared with developed countries, and the consumption of building energy is much higher. Therefore, it is imperative to open up new building energy saving techniques and heighten energy use...

  19. Spring Semester, Course Title: Scanned Probe Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    : a fundamental understanding of the theoretical underpinnings behind each scanned probe technique Scanning Probe Methods (Vol. 1-13) ­ Bharat Bhushan, ed. Springer Handbook of Nanotechnology - Bharat Roughness o Representative applications in surface science HOPG Silicon Screw dislocations Liquid

  20. High Beta Observations of the Hot Electron Interchange Instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been made in the presence of the magnetic levitation fields. We find the HEI mode is characterized observed in high-beta plasma created in the Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX). We have previously that characterize these modes now incorporate fast magnetic measurements in an attempt to put together a coherent

  1. Input Observer: Measuring Text Entry and Pointing Performance from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wobbrock, Jacob O.

    Input Observer: Measuring Text Entry and Pointing Performance from Naturalistic Everyday Computer that will be capable of measuring a user's text entry and pointing abilities from everyday computer use "in the wild for both text entry and mouse pointing. Keywords Text entry, mouse pointing, field studies, naturalistic

  2. Identification of a mesoscale model with multiscale experimental observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Identification of a mesoscale model with multiscale experimental observations M.T. Nguyen, C and at mesoscale within the framework of a heterogeneous microstruc- ture which is modeled by a random elastic measurements of the displacement fields at macroscale and at mesoscale performed with only a single specimen

  3. Casimir effect for a scalar field via Krein quantization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pejhan, H.; Tanhayi, M.R.; Takook, M.V.

    2014-02-15

    In this work, we present a rather simple method to study the Casimir effect on a spherical shell for a massless scalar field with Dirichlet boundary condition by applying the indefinite metric field (Krein) quantization technique. In this technique, the field operators are constructed from both negative and positive norm states. Having understood that negative norm states are un-physical, they are only used as a mathematical tool for renormalizing the theory and then one can get rid of them by imposing some proper physical conditions. -- Highlights: • A modification of QFT is considered to address the vacuum energy divergence problem. • Casimir energy of a spherical shell is calculated, through this approach. • In this technique, it is shown, the theory is automatically regularized.

  4. Method for automatically evaluating a transition from a batch manufacturing technique to a lean manufacturing technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivezic, Nenad; Potok, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    A method for automatically evaluating a manufacturing technique comprises the steps of: receiving from a user manufacturing process step parameters characterizing a manufacturing process; accepting from the user a selection for an analysis of a particular lean manufacturing technique; automatically compiling process step data for each process step in the manufacturing process; automatically calculating process metrics from a summation of the compiled process step data for each process step; and, presenting the automatically calculated process metrics to the user. A method for evaluating a transition from a batch manufacturing technique to a lean manufacturing technique can comprise the steps of: collecting manufacturing process step characterization parameters; selecting a lean manufacturing technique for analysis; communicating the selected lean manufacturing technique and the manufacturing process step characterization parameters to an automatic manufacturing technique evaluation engine having a mathematical model for generating manufacturing technique evaluation data; and, using the lean manufacturing technique evaluation data to determine whether to transition from an existing manufacturing technique to the selected lean manufacturing technique.

  5. Lyapunov Vector Fields for Autonomous UAV Flight Control1 Dale A. Lawrence2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frew, Eric W.

    Lyapunov Vector Fields for Autonomous UAV Flight Control1 Dale A. Lawrence2 , Eric. W. Frew3 that incorporate Lyapunov stability properties to produce simple, globally stable vector fields in 3D. Use of the vector field is considered, using Lyapunov techniques to show global stability of heading and path

  6. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Myers, R.

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

  7. Data Capture Technique for High Speed Signaling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrett, Wayne Melvin (Rochester, MN); Chen, Dong (Croton On Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul William (Yorktwon Heights, NY); Gara, Alan Gene (Mount Kisco, NY); Jackson, Rory (Eastchester, NY); Kopcsay, Gerard Vincent (Yorktown Hieghts, NY); Nathanson, Ben Jesse (Teaneck, NY); Vranas, Paylos Michael (Bedford Hills, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Brewster, NY)

    2008-08-26

    A data capture technique for high speed signaling to allow for optimal sampling of an asynchronous data stream. This technique allows for extremely high data rates and does not require that a clock be sent with the data as is done in source synchronous systems. The present invention also provides a hardware mechanism for automatically adjusting transmission delays for optimal two-bit simultaneous bi-directional (SiBiDi) signaling.

  8. Cascade Training Technique for Particle Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong Liu; Ion Stancu

    2006-11-27

    The cascade training technique which was developed during our work on the MiniBooNE particle identification has been found to be a very efficient way to improve the selection performance, especially when very low background contamination levels are desired. The detailed description of this technique is presented here based on the MiniBooNE detector Monte Carlo simulations, using both artifical neural networks and boosted decision trees as examples.

  9. Lidar techniques for search and rescue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    Four techniques for using LIDAR in Search and Rescue Operations will be discussed. The topic will include laser retroreflection, laser-induced fluorescence in the visible, laser-induced fluorescence during daylight hours, and laser-induced fluorescence in the uv. These techniques use high-repetition rate lasers at a variety of frequencies to induce either fluorescence in dye markers or retroreflection from plastic corner cubes on life preservers and other emergency markers.

  10. MANUFACTURE OF ARBITRARY CROSS-SECTION COMPOSITE HONEYCOMB CORES BASED ON ORIGAMI TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    the partially soft composite techniques, folding lines are materialized by silicon rubber hinges on carbon fiber reinforced plastic. Complex FLD patterns are then printed using masks on carbon fabrics. Finally of composite materials has drastically increased in this field. In the case of sandwich panels, carbon fiber

  11. Dechlorination of Pentachlorophenol by ammonium amended clays: development of field applicable techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Junying

    1997-01-01

    superfund sites in both soil and groundwater. The objective of this thesis is to study mechanisms to dechlorinate PCP into less harmful derivatives. The method that we are interested in utilizes ammonium-amended clays to dechlorinate PCP. Based...

  12. Subdivision based Isogeometric Analysis technique for Electric Field Integral Equations for Simply Connected Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jie; Liu, Beibei; Tong, Yiying; Shanker, Balasubramaniam

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of electromagnetic scattering has long been performed on a discrete representation of the geometry. This representation is typically continuous but {\\em not} differentiable. The need to define physical quantities on this geometric representation has led to development of sets of basis functions that need to satisfy constraints at the boundaries of the elements/tesselations (viz., continuity of normal or tangential components across element boundaries). For electromagnetics, these result in either curl/div-conforming basis sets. The geometric representation used for analysis is in stark contrast with that used for design, wherein the surface representation is higher order differentiable. Using this representation for {\\em both} geometry and physics on geometry has several advantages, and is eludicated in Hughes et al., Isogeometric analysis: CAD, finite elements, NURBS, exact geometry and mesh refinement, Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering 194 (39-41) (2005). Until now, a bulk o...

  13. Steam turbine field testing techniques using a computerized data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, H.S.; Cotton, K.C.; Kellyhouse, W.W.; Smith, D.P.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic data acquisition system for conducting full-scale ASME (1) acceptance tests of large steam turbine-generators is described. This includes the instrumentation, the interfacing hardware for analog to digital conversion and transmission of the data to the trailer mounted computer, the software that controls the acquisition of the data, and the calculation of test results. In addition, the application of this automatic data acquisition system for conducting the ASME acceptance test at Consumers Power Company's J.H. Campbell Unit 3 is discussed.

  14. Biomechanical caracterisation of lumbar belt by full-field techniques: Preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnaire, Rebecca; Calmels, Paul; Convert, Reynald

    2013-01-01

    In France, 50% of the population per year is suffering from low back pain. Lumbar belt are frequently proposed as a part of the treatment of this pathology. However mechanical ways of working of this medical device is not clearly understood, but abdominal pressure is often related. So an optical method was developed in this study to measure strain in lumbar belt and trunk interface and to derive a pressure estimation. Optical method consisted of coupling fringe projection and digital image correlation (DIC). Measurement has been carried out on the right side of a manikin wearing a lumbar belt. Average strain is 0.2 and average pressure is 1 kPa. Continuation of this study will be comparison of strain and pressure in different areas of lumbar belt (left side, front and back) and comparison of different lumbar belts. Results will be used in a finite elements model to determine lumbar belt impact in intern body. In long term, this kind of study will be done on human.

  15. J. Field Ornithol. 77(1):6770, 2006 A nondamaging blood sampling technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernatchez, Louis

    Biologie and Centre d' ´Etudes Nordiques, Universit´e Laval, Qu´ebec, Qu´ebec, G1K7P4 Canada 2 D´epartement de Biologie, Universit´e Laval, Qu´ebec, Qu´ebec, G1K7P4, Canada 3 D´epartement des Sciences Biologiques, Universit´e du Qu´ebec `a Montr´eal, 141 Pr´esident-Kennedy, SB-R880, Succursale Centre

  16. Oral Field Techniques and Women's History: The Case of Owan Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogbomo, Onaiwu W.

    1994-01-01

    TIlE CASE OF OWAN. NIGERIA Onaiwu W. Ogbomo Following theof Owan Communities, Nigeria c.1320-1900: Ph.D ThesisGovernment Anas) of Edo Swe, Nigeria. wan lies between the

  17. Quantification of Salt Marsh Carbon Stocks: Integration of Remote Sensing Data and Techniques with Field Measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulawardhana, Ranjani W

    2013-12-02

    in this study show the capability of remote sensing data for the characterization of salt marsh terrain and vegetation heights and the estimation of above-ground biomass quantities. The best biomass prediction models using lidar heights reported considerably...

  18. Evaluation of a Decoupling-Based Fault Detection and Diagnostic Technique - Part I: Field Emulation Evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, H.; Braun, J.

    2006-01-01

    Existing methods addressing automated fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) for vapor compression air conditioning system have good performance for faults that occur individually, but they have difficulty in handling multiple-simultaneous faults...

  19. Coupled near and far field thermal plume analysis using finite element techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, John T.

    1981-01-01

    The use of the open cycle cooling process for thermal power plants requires significant effluent discharges into aquatic environments. Both engineering and environmental considerations require accurate prediction of resulting ...

  20. TH-C-12A-03: Development of Expanded Field Irradiation Technique with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaled X-Ray Head (Journal Article) | SciTech