Sample records for field studies laboratory

  1. Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Static and Variable Magnetic Fields on Freshwater Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the effect on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields (EMF) created by the projects. The submerged electrical generator will emit an EMF into the surrounding water, as will underwater cables used to transmit electricity from the generator to the shore, between individual units in an array (inter-turbine cables), and between the array and a submerged step-up transformer. The electric current moving through these cables will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of fish and benthic invertebrates (Gill et al. 2005, 2009). It is known that numerous marine and freshwater organisms are sensitive to electrical and magnetic fields, often depending on them for such diverse activities as prey location and navigation (DOE 2009; Normandeau et al. 2011). Despite the wide range of aquatic organisms that are sensitive to EMF and the increasing numbers of underwater electrical transmitting cables being installed in rivers and coastal waters, little information is available to assess whether animals will be attracted, repelled, or unaffected by these new sources of EMF. This knowledge gap is especially significant for freshwater systems, where electrosensitive organisms such as paddlefish and sturgeon may interact with electrical transmission cables. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments to test the sensitivity of freshwater fish and invertebrates to the levels of EMF that are expected to be produced by HK projects in rivers. In this context, EM fields are likely to be emitted primarily by generators in the water column and by transmission cables on or buried in the substrate. The HK units will be located in areas of high-velocity waters that are used as only temporary habitats for most riverine species, so long-term exposure of fish and benthic invertebrates to EMF is unlikely. Rather, most aquatic organisms will be briefly exposed to the fields as they drift downstream or migrate upstream. Because the exposure of most aquatic organisms to EMF in a river would be relatively brief and non-lethal, we focused our investigations on detecting behavioral effects. For example, attraction to the EM fields could result in prolonged exposures to the fields or the HK rotor. On the other hand, avoidance reactions might hinder upstream migrations of fish. The experiments reported here are a continuation of studies begun in FY 2010, which focused on the potential effects of static magnetic fields on snails, clams, and fathead minnows (Cada et al. 2011). Those experiments found little indication that the behaviors of these freshwater species were a

  2. An evaluation of new asphaltene inhibitors: Laboratory study and field testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouts, M.N.; Wiersma, R.J.; Muijs, H.M.; Samuel, A.J.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three candidate asphaltene inhibitors have been laboratory tested for their effectiveness on a Canadian crude. One inhibitor, an oil-soluble polymeric dispersant developed by Shell Chemicals, showed superior behavior compared to the others: flocculation titrations with n-heptane resulted in an optimum concentration of 1,300 ppm. PVT calculations, however, indicated that the prevailing conditions downhole can be quite favorable with respect to the amount of effective inhibitor compared to the atmospheric laboratory titrations which appear to be quite severe tests. Therefore, lower initial concentrations were recommended for a field trial. The chemical could be continuously injected through a capillary string, thereby avoiding the lost oil production associated with solvent cleaning operations. It has proved to be very effective at concentrations as low as 66 ppm, resulting in both a technically and an economically successful trial.

  3. Large-Scale Field Study of Landfill Covers at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for dry environments. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper presents an overview of the ongoing demonstration.

  4. Laboratory Studies of the Short-term Responses of Freshwater Fish to Electromagnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrokinetic energy technologies are being proposed as an environmentally preferred means of generating electricity from river and tidal currents. Among the potential issues that must be investigated in order to resolve environmental concerns are the effects on aquatic organisms of electromagnetic fields created by underwater generators and transmission cables. The behavioral responses of common freshwater fishes to static and variable electromagnetic fields (EMF) that may be emitted by hydrokinetic projects were evaluated in laboratory experiments. Various fish species were exposed to either static (DC) EMF fields created by a permanent bar magnet or variable (AC) EMF fields created by a switched electromagnet for 48 h, fish locations were recorded with a digital imaging system, and changes in activity level and distribution relative to the magnet position were quantified at 5-min intervals. Experiments with fathead minnows, redear sunfish, striped bass, lake sturgeon, and channel catfish produced mixed results. Except for fathead minnows there was no effect on activity level. Only redear sunfish and channel catfish exhibited a change in distribution relative to the position of the magnet with an apparent attraction to the EMF source. In separate experiments, rapid behavioral responses of paddlefish and lake sturgeon to onset of the AC field were recorded with high-speed video. Paddlefish did not react to a variable, 60-Hz magnetic field like that which would be emitted by an AC generator or cable, but lake sturgeon consistently responded to the variable, AC-generated magnetic field with a variety of altered swimming behaviors. These results will be useful for determining under what circumstances cables or generators need to be positioned to minimize interactions with sensitive species.

  5. Laboratory and field studies related to the Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.L. (comp.)

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual report describes research conducted in FY 1990 by Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Project. This multi-agency project measures the underground movement of radionuclides related to nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site. This project continues the long-term experiment at the site of the Cambric nuclear test. Water pumped from a well adjacent to the explosion cavity continues to show decreasing amounts of tritium and Krypton 85 but no Cesium 139. Analyses of drillback debris shows a distinction between refractory and volatile materials in respect to both their location in the test cavity and their leachability with groundwater. We surveyed materials used during nuclear testing to evaluate any post-test hazard; we concluded that most such materials pose a minimal hazard. The Los Alamos drilling program provided an opportunity for us to sample a collapsed zone above the cavity of a test, which was fired 2 years ago. We continue our research in colloid characterization and in detection of low levels of Technetium 99 in Nevada Test Site water. During FY 1990, we drilled a new hole in the Yucca Flat area to study radionuclide migration. This report also describes Los Alamos management and planning activities in support of this project. 20 refs., 2 figs., 14 tabs.

  6. Laboratory and Field Studies Related to Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. A. Martinez; D. L. Finnegan; Joseph L. Thompson; K. S. Kung

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we describe the work done in FY 1998 at Los Alamos National Laboratory as part of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMA) funded by the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy (DOE/NV). The major part of our research effort was to measure radionuclides present in water or soil samples collected from near nuclear tests. We report our measurements for materials collected in both saturated and unsaturated horizons adjacent to nuclear test cavities or collapse chimneys and from within several cavities. Soil samples collected from above the cavities formed by the Halfbeak, Jerboa, and Bobac tests contained no radioactivity, although a test similar to Bobac in the same area had been contaminated with {sup 137}Cs. Water samples from near the Shoal test contained no measurable radionuclides, whereas those from near Faultless and Aleman had concentrations similar to previous measurements. Water from the Tybo-Benham site was similar to earlier collections at that site; this year, we added {sup 241}Am to the list of radionuclides measured at this location. Two Bennett pumps in tandem were used to extract water from the piezometer tube in the cavity of the Dalhart event. This extraction is a significant achievement in that it opens the possibility of purging similar tubes at other locations on the NTS. The Cheshire post shot hole was reconfigured and pumped from two horizons for the first time since mid-1980. We are especially interested in examining water from the level of the working point to determine the hydrologic source term in a cavity filled with groundwater for over 20 years. We devoted much time this year to examining the colloid content of NTS groundwater. After developing protocols for collecting, handling, and storing groundwater samples without altering their colloid content, we analyzed water from the Tybo-Benham and from the Cheshire sites. Whereas the colloid concentration did not vary much with depth at Tybo-Benham, there were 20 times more colloids in groundwater from the Cheshire cavity than were found a few hundred meters higher. Electron micrographs show the wide variety of colloid sizes and shapes present in NTS groundwater. Our experiences with filtration of groundwater samples illustrate the difficulties of colloid size characterization using this methodology. Our report ends with a description of our consultative and educational activities and a list of recent publications.

  7. Laboratory study and subsequent field results of chemical stimulation for use in open hole environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFontaine-McLarty, J.; Ali, S.A.; Sanclemente, L.W.; Sketchler, B.C.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of a two-year study conducted to optimize cleanup systems in open hole environments. Specifically, the study originated from problems encountered in the design of a series of open hole horizontal completions and the effort to improve well productivity. It was determined that the design of the drilling and completion phases would have to address not only which fluid would provide the necessary requirements for drilling the intervals, but also address the cleanup process during the completion phase. The fluid and cleanup treatment selections would have to be designed to work together to eliminate damage. A combination of a pay zone drilling fluid and an effective cleanup system resulted from the study and productivity numbers have been more than anticipated in all of the completions.

  8. Trace Metal Bioremediation: Assessment of Model Components from Laboratory and Field Studies to Identify Critical Variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Jaffe; Herschel Rabitz

    2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to gain an insight into the modeling support needed for the understanding, design, and operation of trace metal/radionuclide bioremediation. To achieve this objective, a workshop was convened to discuss the elements such a model should contain. A ''protomodel'' was developed, based on the recommendations of the workshop, and was used to perform sensitivity analysis as well as some preliminary simulations in support for bioremediation test experiments at UMTRA sites. To simulate the numerous biogeochemical processes that will occur during the bioremediation of uranium contaminated aquifers, a time-dependent one-dimensional reactive transport model has been developed. The model consists of a set of coupled, steady state mass balance equations, accounting for advection, diffusion, dispersion, and a kinetic formulation of the transformations affecting an organic substrate, electron acceptors, corresponding reduced species, and uranium. This set of equations is solved numerically, using a finite element scheme. The redox conditions of the domain are characterized by estimating the pE, based on the concentrations of the dominant terminal electron acceptor and its corresponding reduced specie. This pE and the concentrations of relevant species are passed to a modified version of MINTEQA2, which calculates the speciation and solubilities of the species of interest. Kinetics of abiotic reactions are described as being proportional to the difference between the actual and equilibrium concentration. A global uncertainty assessment, determined by Random Sampling High Dimensional Model Representation (RS-HDMR), was performed to attain a phenomenological understanding of the origins of output variability and to suggest input parameter refinements as well as to provide guidance for field experiments to improve the quality of the model predictions. Results indicated that for the usually high nitrate contents found ate many DOE sites, overall bioremediation of trace metals was highly sensitive to the formulation of the denitrification process. Simulations were performed to illustrate the effect of biostimulation on the transport and precipitation of uranium in the subsurface, at conditions equivalent to UMTRA sites. These simulations predicted that uranium would precipitate in bands that are located relatively close to the acetate injection well. The simulations also showed the importance of properly determining U(IV) oxidative dissolution rates, in order to assess the stability of precipitates once oxygenated water reenters the aquifer after bioremediation is discontinued. The objective of this project was to provide guidance to NABIR's Systems Integration Element, on the development of models to simulate the bioremediation of trace metals and radionuclides. Such models necessarily need to integrate hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological processes. In order to gain a better understanding of the key processes that such a model should contain, it was deemed desirable to convene a workshop with experts from these different fields. The goal was to obtain a preliminary consensus on the required level of detail for the formulations of these different chemical, physical, and microbiological processes. The workshop was held on December 18, 1998.

  9. LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ELECTRIC POTENTIALS In this lab you will continue to investigate the abstract concept of electric field. If you know the electric field at a point in space, you). With this simulation you can construct a complicated charge configuration and read out the resulting electric field

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Heliostat Field

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  11. As transport characterization in the vadose zone of the soil: a combined study between field and laboratory experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -mail contact: julien.michel@ineris.fr 1. Introduction In industrialized countries, a lot of brownfields specific approach. This corresponds to a combined approach between field investigations and modeling to the water table, in order to put forward potential risks for groundwater. Most of the time, pollutant

  12. Probing Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and Laboratory-Generated SOA with Nano-DESI High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Probing Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and...

  13. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory: Cryogenics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities The Mag Lab's Cryogenics Laboratory is a fully developed facility for conducting low temperature experimental research and development. The laboratory, which...

  14. Laboratory studies of radionuclide migration in tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rundberg, R.S.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.; Thompson, J.L.; Triay, I.R.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The movement of selected radionuclides has been observed in crushed tuff, intact tuff, and fractured tuff columns. Retardation factors and dispersivities were determined from the elution profiles. Retardation factors have been compared with those predicted on the basis of batch sorption studies. This comparison forms a basis for either validating distribution coefficients or providing evidence of speciation, including colloid formation. Dispersivities measured as a function of velocity provide a means of determining the effect of sorption kinetics or mass transfer on radionuclide migration. Dispersion is also being studied in the context of scaling symmetry to develop a basis for extrapolating from the laboratory scale to the field. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Laboratory measured characteristics of hot-mix asphaltic concrete as related to field performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TenBrook, James Joseph

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory Army Corps of Engineers Study o THD 1';otorized Press Gyratory Testing 1'~machine ~'marshall Device California Ilachine 1G Field Test Sites Test Section Layout 12 Maco Section Layout 13 Paving A Test Section 14 Coring One Meek Samples 15... molded in their laboratories at the standard $0 blow compactive effort. These marshall specimens were used to provide density and stability data; and to provide a means of comparison between field and laboratory specimens. The significant conclusions...

  16. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Site Index

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning Lab-wide Media and Public Affairs Personnel Search Covariance NMR Metabolomics Web Portal Cryogenics Curricula D DC Field Program Dictionary Directions Gainesville Site...

  17. Field Work Proposal (FWP) | The Ames Laboratory

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  18. Behavioural Ecology Field Course Mols Laboratories, Denmark 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    1 REPORTS Behavioural Ecology Field Course Mols Laboratories, Denmark 2007 Teachers: Dr. Trine ................................................................................................................................... 64 Receptor based feeding preferences; An investigation of the taste perception of three classes ............................................................................................................................ 79 Taste perception in the wood ant, Formica rufa Jeppe Jensen

  19. Laboratory Toxicity and Field Effects of a Complex Mixture: Oil-field Produced Water.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Jonathan C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This dissertation investigated how organisms in the field and the laboratory responded to complex mixtures or combinations of stressors. Organisms are continually exposed to natural (more)

  20. A laboratory and field investigation of naphthenic acid corrosion inhibition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zetlmeisl, M.J. [Petrolite Corp., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of a laboratory and field study of naphthenic acid corrosion and the development of an effective chemical inhibitor for this type of corrosive attack. In the laboratory corrosion test, which involved 20 hour weight loss measurements in high flash solvent with a total acid number (TAN) of 16 mg KOH/gm at a temperature of 600 F (316 C), blank corrosion rates averaged 140 to 150 mpy (3.56 to 3.81 mm/y). Inhibited rates averaged about 10 to 12 mpy (0.254 to 0.305 mm/y). The field test was carried out on a heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO) stream at 550 F (288 C) . Blanks varied from a high of 425 mpy (10.79 mm/y) for a 24 hour test to a low of about 100 mpy (2.54 mm/y) for a 150 hour test. Both electrical resistance (ER) probes and weight loss coupons showed corrosion rates below 5 mpy (0.127 mm/y) as long as they were adequately passivated. Passivation consisted of exposing the coupons to a high inhibitor dosage for a relatively short time to establish a protective layer on the metal surface. Acceleration of corrosion rates by the interaction between some reportedly corrosive refinery fluids and HCl vapor is also demonstrated. A model, which represents naphthenic acid and other potentially corrosive materials as nonaqueous electrolytes, is presented.

  1. Dark Field Microscopy for Analytical Laboratory Courses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augspurger, Ashley E.; Stender, Anthony S.; Marchuk, Kyle; Greenbowe, Thomas J.; Fang, Ning

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative and inexpensive optical microscopy experiment for a quantitative analysis or an instrumental analysis chemistry course is described. The students have hands-on experience with a dark field microscope and investigate the wavelength dependence of localized surface plasmon resonance in gold and silver nanoparticles. Students also observe and measure individual crystal growth during a replacement reaction between copper and silver nitrate. The experiment allows for quantitative, qualitative, and image data analyses for undergraduate students.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: optical electric field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  3. Memorandum Approval of a Permanenet Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 1021)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanenet Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 1021)

  4. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were performed enhanced oil recovery field pilot was performed in Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Studies were performed to determine a nutrient system to encourage growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria an inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient material were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor an additional production well in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicated the additional production well monitored during the field trial was also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels of tertiary oil was recovered. Microbial activity increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulphide concentration was experienced. These observations indicate that an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. The three production wells monitored in the pilot area demonstrated significant permeability reduction indicated by interwell pressure interference tests. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform (15 md maximum difference between post-treatment permeability values) indicating that preferential plugging had occurred.

  5. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

  6. NREL Study of Fielded PV Systems Demonstrates PV Reliability (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

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  7. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  8. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  9. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  10. Physical barriers formed from gelling liquids: 1. numerical design of laboratory and field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.J.; Pruess, K.; Persoff, P.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emplacement of liquids under controlled viscosity conditions is investigated by means of numerical simulations. Design calculations are performed for a laboratory experiment on a decimeter scale, and a field experiment on a meter scale. The purpose of the laboratory experiment is to study the behavior of multiple gout plumes when injected in a porous medium. The calculations for the field trial aim at designing a grout injection test from a vertical well in order to create a grout plume of a significant extent in the subsurface.

  11. Field and Laboratory Study of a Ground-Coupled Water Source Heat Pump with an Integral Enthalpy Exchange System for Classrooms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domitrovic, R.; Hayzen, G. J.; Johnson, W. S.; Chen, F. C.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technologies is needed to increase the dehumidification abilities of equipment without compromising energy efficiency or the need for fresh ventilation air. To study the effectiveness of integrated heat pump and enthalpy exchange equipment, a nominal 4-ton...

  12. Experimental and Modeling Study of the Flammability of Fuel Tank Headspace Vapors from Ethanol/Gasoline Fuels, Phase 2: Evaluations of Field Samples and Laboratory Blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, D. P.; Bardon, M. F.; LaViolette, M.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study to measure the flammability of gasoline/ethanol fuel vapors at low ambient temperatures and develop a mathematical model to predict temperatures at which flammable vapors were likely to form.

  13. ULTimateCO2 project: Field experiment in an underground rock laboratory to study the well sealing integrity in the context of CO2 geological storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    located at the surface. The long term well sealing integrity is therefore essential for the fluids confinements. The well sealing integrity can be lowered by geochemical reactions occurring between well the cement matrix. Understanding the near well sealing integrity then requires studying the potential

  14. Symmetry Breaking in Graphene Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Symmetry Breaking in Graphene Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory DMR. In this experiment, Landau levels in graphene were used to study the breaking of SU(4) symmetry--a higher dimensional states by their spin polarization. It was found that graphene turns into either a spin ferromagnet

  15. Debye size microprobes for electric field measurements in laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pribyl, P.; Gekelman, W.; Nakamoto, M.; Lawrence, E.; Chiang, F.; Stillman, J.; Judy, J.; Katz, N.; Kintner, P.; Niknejadi, P. [Department of Physics Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Department of Physics, MIT, Cambridge, Massachussetts (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 (United States); Cal Poly, Pomona, California 91768 (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have led to the development of a host of tiny machines and sensors over the past decade. Plasma physics is in great need of small detectors for several reasons. First of all, very small detectors do not disturb a plasma, and secondly some detectors can only work because they are very small. We report on the first of a series of small (sub-Debye length) probes for laboratory plasmas undertaken at the basic Plasma Science Facility at UCLA. The goal of the work is to develop robust and sensitive diagnostic probes that can survive in a plasma. The probes must have electronics packages in close proximity. We report on the construction and testing of probes that measure the electric field.

  16. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Results are reported on the isolation/characterization of anaerobic bacteria; bacterial mobility and the importance of chemotaxis; careflood experiments; microbial modeling; and surface facilities design. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Progress is reported on growth/activity in porous media; coreflooding; and microbial modeling. 3 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

  20. Memorandum, Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 102 1)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanenet Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 1021)

  1. Laboratories for the 21st Century Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These case studies feature examples of energy-efficient laboratories for the 21st century. The Featured Concepts Table outlines technologies covered in each case study.

  2. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory: Museum of Electricity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyrus Field, who had made his fortune in paper manufacturing. Transatlantic Telegraph Cable Field knew little about the telegraph. But after meeting with owners of the...

  3. Overview of UIUC's Concrete Cross-tie and Fastening System Laboratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Instrumentation plan overview Preliminary laboratory test Built up load cell feasibility study Partial the flow of forces Lab-Field Develop field instrumentation plan Develop test load conditions Lab measurement (strain gauges) Deflection measurement (LVDT/potentiometers) Load transfer measurement (load

  4. Laboratory and field evaluation of several insecticides for control of the hickory shuckworm, Laspeyresia caryana (Fitch)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boethel, David John

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' s data azinphosc e& hy1 and Epk (at the rate r f 0. 5 lb AI/100 al water applied 3 ti&ies at 2 week . :&iter- vals starting August 15) i;ere recomr ended for control of th= hi&-gory shuckworm under Texas conditions. Althougl& phosp'namidon gave en...: azinphosmethyl (0. 5 lb AI/100 gal water) and uiazinon (0. 5 lb Ai/100 gal water). Prior to the 1968 field e. pezime~t, pzeliminary laboratory studies had been conducted with diazinon. This was the res. on foz its nckusion in the test. Azinphos...

  5. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Beryllium Testing Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACKRadiologicalEric Dulmes Student'sDuringandOakBeLPT

  6. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Magnets and Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Loss Measurements of a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor with Nb3Sn Strands for the High Field Section of the Series-Connected Hybrid Outsert Coil, IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond., 19 (3,...

  7. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory: Team Tesla - How we...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    read all about how our DC Field Facility's world-record magnets are powered, take a virtual look at how the many components of this amazing system work together. Click on any...

  8. Opportunities for Field Research | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships,(SC) Laboratories » OPMOpportunities for

  9. FIELD EXPERIMENTATION OF COTS-BASED UAV NETWORKING Air Force Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kung, H. T.

    1 of 7 FIELD EXPERIMENTATION OF COTS-BASED UAV NETWORKING Dan Hague Air Force Research Laboratory Vehicles (UAVs). This new capability has inspired many novel application ideas in UAV networking. We argue that field experimentation of UAV networking is essential in collecting link meas- urement data, developing

  10. NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    NHMFL Breaks the 100 Tesla Barrier Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. 109no. 31 12404-12407 On March 22nd 2012, the NHMFL ­ Pulsed Field Facility broke the 100T tesla barrier, setting a world record of 100.75 tesla for a non-destructive magnet. By using advanced

  11. Fermi Surface of Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Fermi Surface of ­Uranium at Ambient Pressure Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory DMR-Award 0654118 DC Field Facility User Program The fermi surface of ­Uranium has been measured surface of alpha-uranium at ambient pressure, Phys. Rev. B Rapid Commun., 80, 241101 (2009). B//c-axis B

  12. A COMPARISON OF LABORATORY AND FIELD-TEST MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;A COMPARISON OF LABORATORY AND FIELD-TEST MEASUREMENTS OF HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS William P a heat pump water heater (HPWH). After developing the HPWH, a field-test plan was implemented whereby 20 evaluate this effect. #12;INTRODUCTION Domestic water heaters account for approximately 2.5 EJ (2.4 x 1015

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory Groundwater Recharge Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    of wetland areas for mosquito control Some segments of the river downstream of the treatment facility were Options report presented as an appendix in the Q&R Study #12;3 Waste Water Treatment Facility Operations beds - An area ~2,700 feet west of the treatment plant · Under all three upland recharge scenarios

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: light-soak studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine blade manufacturinglife-cycle analysissoak studies HelioVolt

  15. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - High B/T Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hrubesh, L.W. and Osheroff, D.D., NMR studies of superfluid He in low density silica aerogels, Physica B, 329-333, 292-295 (2003) 3 Hamida, J.A.; Pilla, S.; Muttalib, K. and...

  16. Radionuclide migration laboratory studies for validation of batch sorption data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Triay, I.R.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Advective and diffusive migration experiments (within the Dynamic Transport Column Experiments and Diffusion Studies of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project) involve utilizing crushed material, intact, and fractured tuff in order to test and improve (if necessary) transport models by experimentally observing the migration of sorbing and non-sorbing radionuclides on a laboratory scale. Performing a validation of the sorption data obtained with batch techniques (within the Batch Sorption Study) is an integral part of the mission of the Dynamic Transport Column Experiments and Diffusion Studies. In this paper the work scope of the radionuclide migration laboratory experiments (as they apply to validation of batch sorption data) is reviewed.

  17. Validation of a Hot Water Distribution Model Using Laboratory and Field Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backman, C.; Hoeschele, M.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterizing the performance of hot water distribution systems is a critical step in developing best practice guidelines for the design and installation of high performance hot water systems. Developing and validating simulation models is critical to this effort, as well as collecting accurate input data to drive the models. In this project, the ARBI team validated the newly developed TRNSYS Type 604 pipe model against both detailed laboratory and field distribution system performance data. Validation efforts indicate that the model performs very well in handling different pipe materials, insulation cases, and varying hot water load conditions. Limitations of the model include the complexity of setting up the input file and long simulation run times. In addition to completing validation activities, this project looked at recent field hot water studies to better understand use patterns and potential behavioral changes as homeowners convert from conventional storage water heaters to gas tankless units. Based on these datasets, we conclude that the current Energy Factor test procedure overestimates typical use and underestimates the number of hot water draws. This has implications for both equipment and distribution system performance. Gas tankless water heaters were found to impact how people use hot water, but the data does not necessarily suggest an increase in usage. Further study in hot water usage and patterns is needed to better define these characteristics in different climates and home vintages.

  18. Nonclassical transport processes in geologic media: Review of field and laboratory observations and basic physical concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolshov, L.; Kondratenko, P.; Pruess, K.; Semenov, V.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of the problem of solute transport in unsaturated heterogeneous media. We first review field and laboratory observations that demonstrate nonclassical flow and transport behavior. The main physical principles causing anomalous transport regimes in fractured rock media are identified. The basic factors and physical concepts needed to describe anomalous transport in saturated and unsaturated fractured rock are discussed in detail.

  19. FIELD PERFORMANCE AND LABORATORY EVALUATION OF WARM MIX ASPHALT PRODUCED WITH RUBBERIZED BITUMEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    FIELD PERFORMANCE AND LABORATORY EVALUATION OF WARM MIX ASPHALT PRODUCED WITH RUBBERIZED BITUMEN of rubberized bitumen has been spread out mainly due to environmental aspects, but high mixing and compaction temperatures are necessary due to the higher viscosity of this bitumen. A WMA mixture (using a surfactant

  20. Evaluations of Transgenic Potatoes for Resistance to Potato Tuberworm in the Laboratory and Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Evaluations of Transgenic Potatoes for Resistance to Potato Tuberworm in the Laboratory and Field online: 7 October 2010 # Potato Association of America 2010 Abstract The potato variety `Spunta to potato tuberworm (Phthorimaea operculella Zeller). Because potato tuberworm is becoming a serious pest

  1. NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSVOLUME 11 N0.1 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSVOLUME 11 N0.1 2004 OPERATED BY: FLORIDA STATE R E V I E W BIOLOGY BIOCHEMISTRY CHEMISTRY CRYOGENICS ENGINEERING MATERIALS GEOCHEMISTRY INSTRUMENTATION KONDO/HEAVY FERMION SYSTEMS MAGNET TECHNOLOGY MAGNETIC RESONANCE TECHNIQUES MAGNETISMAND MAGNETIC

  2. Google+ Virtual Field Trip on Vehicle Electrification at Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Don't miss this exclusive peek into the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory. Attendees will meet three researchers who will explain a different phase of vehicle electrification research. This field trip is very similar to the tou

  3. Solute and Sediment Transport at Laboratory and Field Scale: Contributions of J.-Y. Parlange1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenstra, Arjen K.

    , 1866 Soil moisture, 1838 Infiltration, 1831 Groundwater quality, 1832 Groundwater transport, 1815Solute and Sediment Transport at Laboratory and Field Scale: Contributions of J.-Y. Parlange1 D. A.sander@lboro.ac.uk S. Jomaa, Department of Bioenergy and Department of Aquatic Ecosystem Analysis and Management

  4. A new method of coating oilfield core for laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menzie, D.E.; Dutta, S.; Shadizadeh, R.S.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method has been developed for coating oilfield core for laboratory studies. It consists of applying a steel coating and aluminum wraps around the outer surface of a core. The strength of the coating, the short time needed to apply it, and its low cost are the major advantages of this new method.

  5. The Coso Geothermal Area: A Laboratory for Advanced MEQ Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    - 1 - The Coso Geothermal Area: A Laboratory for Advanced MEQ Studies for Geothermal Monitoring-Dinger Geothermal Program Office, U. S. Navy, China Lake, CA 93555-6001 Keith.Richards-Dinge@navy.mil Keywords of three-component digital seismometers at the Coso geothermal area, California, supplemented by 14

  6. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energys Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanfords vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNLs Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

  7. Laboratory and Field Evidence for Long-Term Starvation Survival of Microorganisms in Subsurface Terrestrial Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T.L. [Biology Dept., New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Murphy, E.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Amy, P.S.; Haldeman, D.L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringelberg, D. B. [Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND NUTRIENT FLUX IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS INDICATES THAT INHABITANT MICROORGANISMS EXPERIENCE SEVERE NUTRIENT LIMITATION. USING LABORATORY AND FIELD METHODS, WE HAVE BEEN TESTING STARVATION SURVIVAL IN SUBSURFACE MICROORGANISMS. IN MICROCOSM EXPERIMENTS, WE HAVE SHOWN THAT STRAINS OF TWO COMMONLY ISOLATED SUBSURFACE GENERA, ARTHROBACTER AND PSEUDOMONAS, ARE ABLE TO MAINTAIN VIABILITY IN LOW-NUTRIENT, NATURAL SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS FOR OVER ONE YEAR. THESE NON-SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA UNDERGO RAPID INITIAL MINIATURIZATION FOLLOWED BY A STABILIZATION OF CELL SIZE. MEMBRANE LIPID PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID (PLFA) PROFILES OF THE PSEUDOMONAS ARE CONSISTENT WITH ADAPTATION TO NUTRIENT STRESS; ARTHROBACTER APPARENTLY RESPONDS TO NUTRIENT DEPRIVATION WITHOUT ALTERING MEMBRANE PLFA. TO TEST SURVIVABILITY OF MICROORGANISMS OVER A GEOLOGIC TIME SCALE, WE CHARACTERIZED MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES IN A SEQUENCE OF UNSATURATED SEDIMENTS RANGING IN AGE FROM MODEM TO {gt}780,000 years. Sediments were relatively uniform silts in Eastern Washington State. Porewater ages at depth (measured by the chloride mass-balance approach) were as old as 3,600 years. Microbial abundance, biomass, and activities (measured by direct counts, culture counts, total PLFAs, and radiorespirometry) declined with sediment age. The pattern is consistent with laboratory microcosm studies of Microbial survival: rapid short-term change followed by long-term survival of a proportion of cells. Even the oldest sediments evinced a small but viable Microbial community. Microbial survival appeared to be a function of sediment age. Porewater age appeared to influence the markup of surviving communities, as indicated by PLFA profiles. Sites with different Porewater recharge rates and patterns of Pleistocene flooding had different communities.

  8. Duplex stainless steel corrosion behavior during acidification: Laboratory versus field test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheldi, T.; Obracaj, I. [AGIP S.p.A. CORM, San Donato Milanese (Italy). Corrosion and Materials Technologies Dept.; Cigada, A.; Cabrini, M. [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica Applicata; Vicentini, B.; Rondelli, G. [C.N.R.-I.T.M., Milano (Italy)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory tests and field acidizing operations have been conducted on a 25% Cr-140 ksi duplex stainless steel utilizing a 90% HCl 15% + 10% CHs{sub 3}COOH acid mixture inhibited with a commercial package. Laboratory tests proved that the duplex stainless steel can be effectively protected in the adopted experimental conditions at 150 C. Examination of parts of tubings extracted from a real completion showed appreciable corrosion attack only in the sections of the string placed at higher depth (operating temperatures {approximately}130 C): in these cases the estimated rates of corrosion attack can be about one order of magnitude higher than that foreseeable on the basis of laboratory tests. However even in these cases the severity of attack is maintained within acceptable limits.

  9. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOSEngineering |LabVideoLaboratories

  10. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOSEngineering |LabVideoLaboratoriesForest fire

  11. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LOSEngineering |LabVideoLaboratoriesForest

  12. EA-1440-S1: National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex, Golden Field Office, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ThIs EA evaluates the potential environmental impact of aDOE proposal thatconsists ofthree site development projects at the National Renewable Energy Laboratorys (NREL) South Table Mountain ...

  13. Laboratory and field-scale test methodology for reliable characterization of solidified/stabilized hazardous wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, K.E.; Holder, J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Center for Earth Sciences and Engineering; Mollah, M.Y.A.; Hess, T.R.; Vempati, R.K.; Cocke, D.L. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology for flow through leach testing is proposed and discussed and preliminary testing using strontium doped cement based S/S samples is presented. The complementary and necessary characterization of the S/S matrix before and after testing is discussed and placed in perspective to the total evaluation of the laboratory-field scale leach testing for predicting long term performance and S/S technology design and improvement.

  14. Field versus laboratory characterization of clay deposits for use as in situ municipal landfill liners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Sharon Elizabeth

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and trimming, use of distilled water as a permeant, existence of air voids in the sample, and the backcalculation of permeability values from consolidation theory rather than the use of directly measured values (Olson and Daniel, 1979). Differences between... measurements showed that the flow was straight down with a hydraulic gradient of one. Permeabilities calculated from field observations were around 10 times greater than laboratory permeabilities. Olson and Daniel (1979) tabulated data from 23 sites where...

  15. Muon-Induced Background Study for Underground Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. -M. Mei; A. Hime

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a comprehensive study of the cosmic-ray muon flux and induced activity as a function of overburden along with a convenient parameterization of the salient fluxes and differential distributions for a suite of underground laboratories ranging in depth from $\\sim$1 to 8 km.w.e.. Particular attention is given to the muon-induced fast neutron activity for the underground sites and we develop a Depth-Sensitivity-Relation to characterize the effect of such background in experiments searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  16. EIS-0402: Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EIS for cleanup of Area IV, including the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), as well as the Northern Buffer Zone of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) in eastern Ventura County, California, approximately 29 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. (DOEs operations bordered the Northern Buffer Zone. DOE is responsible for soil cleanup in Area IV and the Northern Buffer Zone.) In the EIS, DOE will evaluate reasonable alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, and disposal of all resulting waste at permitted facilities.

  17. Laboratory and Modeling Evaluations in Support of Field Testing for Desiccation at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau includes testing of the desiccation technology as a potential technology to be used in conjunction with surface infiltration control to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. Laboratory and modeling efforts were conducted to investigate technical uncertainties related to the desiccation process and its impact on contaminant transport. This information is intended to support planning, operation, and interpretation of a field test for desiccation in the Hanford Central Plateau.

  18. Laboratory and field corrosion test results on aluminum-transition-steel systems on automobiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, G.; Baboian, R. [Texas Instruments Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States). Electrochemical and Corrosion Lab.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of steel clad aluminum transition material to join aluminum body panels and structural members to steel is demonstrated. The transition material allows joining of aluminum and steel by conventional techniques such as spot welding and eliminates galvanic corrosion at the joints. Corrosion test results for a wide range of aluminum-transition-steel systems in laboratory tests, atmospheric exposure, and field test plates are presented. The break strength of joints containing two, three, or four members was used as a measure of performance after corrosion testing. Statistical analysis of the results showed that the transition material prevented degradation of the mechanical properties of the joints.

  19. DOE Announces $1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    .4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using Nuclear Energy for Clean Hydrogen DOE Announces 1.4 Million for Industry-Laboratory Teams to Study Using Nuclear Energy for...

  20. Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Regulatory Assessment Dept.] [and others

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.

  1. Urban Dispersion Program Overview and MID05 Field Study Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) was a 4-year project (20042007) funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security with additional support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also contributed to UDP through funding a human-exposure component of the New York City (NYC) field studies in addition to supporting an EPA scientist in conducting modeling studies of NYC. The primary goal of UDP was to improve the scientific understanding of the flow and diffusion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of NYC. The overall UDP project manager and lead scientist was Dr. Jerry Allwine of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. UDP had several accomplishments that included conducting two tracer and meteorological field studies in Midtown Manhattan.

  2. Field, Laboratory, and Modeling Study of Reactive Transport of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of New York, Flushing, New York 11367, Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Bay, MA, shed light on coupled control of chemistry and hydrology on reactive transport), phosphate (5), and oxyanions of molybdenum (6) and uranium (7, 8) in aquifers. In addition

  3. Laboratory Study Of Magnetic Reconnection With A Density Asymmetry Across The Current Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Joseph; Yamada, Massaaki; Ji, Hantao; Meyers,, Clayton E.; Jara-Almonte,; Chen, Li-Jen

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of an upstream density asymmetry on magnetic reconnection are studied systematically in a laboratory plasma. Despite a significant upstream density asymmetry of up to 10, the reconnecting magnetic field pro file is not signifi cantly changed. On the other hand, the out-of-plane magnetic field profile is considerably modified; it is almost bipolar in structure with the density asymmetry, as compared to the quadrupolar structure in the symmetric configuration. The in-plane ion flow pattern and the electrostatic potential pro file are also affected by the density asymmetry. Strong bulk electron heating is observed near the low-density-side separatrix together with electromagnetic fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range. The dependence of the ion outflow and reconnection electric field on the density asymmetry is measured and compared with theoretical expectations.

  4. Study of CSR Effects in the Jefferson Laboratory FEL Driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, C. C. [Colorado State U.; Biedron, S. [Colorado State U.; Burleson, Theodore A. [Colorado State U.; Milton, Stephen V. [Colorado State U.; Morin, Auralee L. [Colorado State U.; Benson, Stephen V. [JLAB; Douglas, David R. [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel E. [JLAB; Hannon, Fay E. [JLAB; Li, Rui [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher D. [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB; Carlsten, Bruce E. [LANL; Lewellen, John W. [LANL

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent experiment conducted on the Jefferson Laboratory IR FEL driver the effects of Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on beam quality were studied. The primary goal of this work was to explore CSR output and effect on the beam with variation of the bunch compression in the IR chicane. This experiment also provides a valuable opportunity to benchmark existing CSR models in a system that may not be fully represented by a 1-D CSR model. Here we present results from this experiment and compare to initial simulations of CSR in the magnetic compression chicane of the machine. Finally, we touch upon the possibility for CSR induced microbunching gain in the magnetic compression chicane, and show that parameters in the machine are such that it should be thoroughly damped.

  5. Laboratory studies of imbibition flooding using carbonated brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharif, Qamar Javaid

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressures was a major part of the phase II studies. A high pressure core holder was developed and set inside a temperature regulated in-house constructed oven for this purpose. The core face flushing method was developed for conducting imbibition... and the field for improving oil recovery. The most common techniques used to increase oil recovery include water injection, steam injection, in-situ combustion, carbon dioxide (CO&) injection, chemical flooding and caustic injection. Currently, however, due...

  6. In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Final report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callow, R.A.; Weidner, J.R.; Loehr, C.A.; Bates, S.O. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Thompson, L.E.; McGrail, B.P. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes two in situ vitrification field tests conducted on simulated buried waste pits during June and July 1990 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to access the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information on the field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste. Test results indicate the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 33 refs., 109 figs., 39 tabs.

  7. Methane Hydrate Field Studies | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMay 20Field Studies Methane Hydrate Field

  8. Louis Stokes Laboratories, Building 50, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland: Laboratories for the 21st Century Case Studies (Revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study was prepared by participants in the Laboratories for the 21st Century program, a joint endeavor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The goal of this program is to foster greater energy efficiency in new laboratory buildings for both the public and the private sectors. Retrofits of existing laboratories are also encouraged. The energy-efficient features of the new laboratories in Building 50 at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, include extensive use of daylighting, variable-air-volume control of the ventilation air supply and exhaust air system, and a unique energy recovery system that makes use of large desiccant energy wheels. With nearly 300,000 gross square feet, the building is estimated to use much less energy than traditional research facilities consume because of its energy-efficient design and features.

  9. Louis Stokes Laboratories, Building 50, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland: Laboratories for the 21st Century Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study was prepared by participants in the Laboratories for the 21st Century program, a joint endeavor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The goal of this program is to foster greater energy efficiency in new laboratory buildings for both the public and the private sectors. Retrofits of existing laboratories are also encouraged. The energy-efficient features of the new laboratories in Building 50 at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, include extensive use of daylighting, variable-air-volume control of the ventilation air supply and exhaust air system, and a unique energy recovery system that makes use of large desiccant energy wheels. With nearly 300,000 gross square feet, the building is estimated to use much less energy than traditional research facilities consume because of its energy-efficient design and features.

  10. Whole-Home Dehumidifiers: Field-Monitoring Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, Tom; Willem, Henry; Ni, Chun Chun; Stratton, Hannah; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Johnson, Russell

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) initiated a WHD field-metering study to expand current knowledge of and obtain data on WHD operation and energy consumption in real-world applications. The field study collected real-time data on WHD energy consumption, along with information regarding housing characteristics, consumer behavior, and various outdoor conditions expected to affect WHD performance and efficiency. Although the metering study collected similar data regarding air conditioner operation, this report discusses only WHDs. The primary objectives of the LBNL field-metering study are to (1) expand knowledge of the configurations, energy consumption profiles, consumer patterns of use (e.g., relative humidity [RH] settings), and environmental parameters of whole-home dehumidification systems; and (2) develop distributions of hours of dehumidifier operation in four operating modes: off, standby, fan-only, and compressor (also called dehumidification mode). Profiling energy consumption entails documenting the power consumption, duration of power consumption in different modes, condensate generation, and properties of output air of an installed system under field conditions of varying inlet air temperature and RH, as well as system configuration. This profiling provides a more detailed and deeper understanding of WHD operation and its complexities. This report describes LBNLs whole-home dehumidification field-metering study conducted at four homes in Wisconsin and Florida. The initial phase of the WHD field-metering study was conducted on one home in Madison, Wisconsin, from June to December of 2013. During a second phase, three Florida homes were metered from June to October of 2014. This report presents and examines data from the Wisconsin site and from the three Florida sites.

  11. Field studies of leaf gas exchanges in oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Field studies of leaf gas exchanges in oil palm tree (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) E. Dufrene B This study is part of a larger research pro- gram on climatic and biological factors affecting oil palm yield (A) in oil palm. Most of them have used young plants under laboratory conditions to study effects

  12. A laboratory study of the friction behavior of granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frye, Kevin M. (Kevin Michael), 1972-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I report on laboratory experiments designed to investigate the microphysical processes that result in rate- and state-dependent friction behavior and experiments designed to match the boundary conditions used by numerical ...

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abeln, Terri G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory underground coal gasification data base. [US DOE-supported field tests; data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cena, R. J.; Thorsness, C. B.

    1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has sponsored a number of field projects to determine the feasibility of converting the nation's vast coal reserves into a clean efficient energy source via underground coal gasification (UCG). Due to these tests, a significant data base of process information has developed covering a range of coal seams (flat subbituminous, deep flat bituminous and steeply dipping subbituminous) and processing techniques. A summary of all DOE-sponsored tests to data is shown. The development of UCG on a commercial scale requires involvement from both the public and private sectors. However, without detailed process information, accurate assessments of the commercial viability of UCG cannot be determined. To help overcome this problem the DOE has directed the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a UCG data base containing raw and reduced process data from all DOE-sponsored field tests. It is our intent to make the data base available upon request to interested parties, to help them assess the true potential of UCG.

  15. Wild mouse open field behavior is embedded within the multidimensional data space spanned by laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golani, Ilan

    Wild mouse open field behavior is embedded within the multidimensional data space spanned- ius), while studies of wild-mouse behavior are relatively rare. An interesting question is the relationship between the phenotypes of M. laboratorius and the phenotypes of their wild ancestors

  16. Pinon Pine Tree Study, Los Alamos National Laboratory: Source document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. R. Fresquez; J. D. Huchton; M. A. Mullen; L. Naranjo, Jr.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the dominant tree species growing within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM, lands is the pinon pine (Pinus edulis) tree. Pinon pine is used for firewood, fence posts, and building materials and is a source of nuts for food--the seeds are consumed by a wide variety of animals and are also gathered by people in the area and eaten raw or roasted. This study investigated the (1) concentration of {sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup tot}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soils (0- to 12-in. [31 cm] depth underneath the tree), pinon pine shoots (PPS), and pinon pine nuts (PPN) collected from LANL lands and regional background (BG) locations, (2) concentrations of radionuclides in PPN collected in 1977 to present data, (3) committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) from the ingestion of nuts, and (4) soil to PPS to PPN concentration ratios (CRs). Most radionuclides, with the exception of {sup 3}H in soils, were not significantly higher (p < 0.10) in soils, PPS, and PPN collected from LANL as compared to BG locations, and concentrations of most radionuclides in PPN from LANL have decreased over time. The maximum net CEDE (the CEDE plus two sigma minus BG) at the most conservative ingestion rate (10 lb [4.5 kg]) was 0.0018 mrem (0.018 {micro}Sv). Soil-to-nut CRs for most radionuclides were within the range of default values in the literature for common fruits and vegetables.

  17. Plasmon-Induced Optical Field Enhancement studied by Correlated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasmon-Induced Optical Field Enhancement studied by Correlated Scanning and Photoemission Electron Microscopy. Plasmon-Induced Optical Field Enhancement studied by Correlated...

  18. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  19. Studies with a laboratory atmospheric fluidized bed combustor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orndorff, W.W.; Su, Shi; Napier, J. [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing public concerns over acid rain and municipal solid waste problems have created interest in the development of atmospheric fluidized bed combustion systems. A computer controlled 12-inch laboratory atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) system has been developed at Western Kentucky University. On-line analysis by gas chromatography, Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and mass spectrometry (MS) allows extensive analysis of the flux gases. Laboratory experiments with a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) interfaced with FTIR and MS systems are used to screen fuel blends for runs in the AFBC system. Current experiments being conducted include co-firing blends of refuse derived fuels with coal and extended burns with coals containing different levels of chlorine.

  20. Laboratory life-fertility table assessment and field biology of millet head miner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Niger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou Kadi Kadi, Hame

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life tables were used to study millet head miner, Heliocheilus albipunctella de Joannis, under controlled conditions in a laboratory. Population reproductive statistics were estimated and survivorship curves described. Survival, oviposition period...

  1. Wayne field: A horizontal drilling case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, J.B. [GeoResources, Inc., Williston, ND (United States); Johnson, R.P. [Harris, Brown, & Kiemer, Inc., Bismarck, ND (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in the spring of 1994, studies of Wayne field located on the northeastern flank of the Williston Basin were initiated to determine the feasibility of using horizontal drilling to increase recoverable reserves in the field. The Wayne subinterval is one of several shoaling-upwards cycles within the Mission Canyon Formation of the Mississippian Madison Group. The reservoir pay averages 24% porosity, 100 millidarcys permeability, and 50% water saturation. Vertical wells, since field discovery in 1957, typically IP for 70 bopd and 20% water with a rapid decline within a few months to 10 bopd and 90% water. This type of well performance is characteristic of severe water coning for which horizontal development can help to minimize. In late 1994 and early 1995 the Ballantyne Hedges No.7H and GeoResources O. Fossum No.H1 were drilled. The wells recorded IP`s of 280 bopd/5 bwpd and 390 bopd/80 bwpd respectively. After six months of production both wells stabilized at approximately 110 bopd with a 35% water cut. Projections indicate that each horizontal well will recover 250,000 bbls of oil as compared to 115,000 bbls for an average vertical well and will do so in half the time. These early results provide a significant improvement over the vertical production and would seem to be reducing water coning. Three more horizontal wells are planned for the fourth quarter of 1995.

  2. LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab V -1 LABORATORY V ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Electrical devices are the cornerstones of our modern world understanding of them. In the previous laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect on the motion of electrons using a cathode ray tube (CRT). This beam of electrons is one example of an electric

  3. LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab IV - 1 In the first laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect on the motion of electrons using a cathode ray tube (CRT). This beam of electrons is one example of an electric current ­ charges in motion. The current in the CRT was simple

  4. Surface Science Laboratory for Studying the Surfaces of Superconducting Radio Frequency Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andy Wu

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Surface Science Laboratory (SSL) has been established at JLab to study surfaces relevant to superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Current operational facilities include a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive x-ray analysis, a secondary ion mass spectrometry, a metallographic optical microscope, a transmission electron microscope, a high precision and large scan area 3-D profilometer, a scanning field emission microscope, and a fully equipped sample preparation room. A scanning Auger microscope is being commissioned, and will be available for routine usage soon. Results from typical examples of the R&D projects on SRF cavities that were supported in the past through the use of the facilities in the SSL will be briefly reported.

  5. Preliminary Evaluation of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) for Sampling Attribution Signatures from Building Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Scott D.; He, Lijian; Wahl, Jon H.

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a preliminary evaluation of the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) for its suitability for sampling building materials for toxic compounds and their associated impurities and residues that might remain after a terrorist chemical attack. Chemical warfare (CW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals were represented by a range of test probes that included CW surrogates. The test probes encompassed the acid-base properties, volatilities, and polarities of the expected chemical agents and residual compounds. Results indicated that dissipation of the test probes depended heavily on the underlying material. Near complete dissipation of almost all test probes occurred from galvanized stainless steel within 3.0 hrs, whereas far stronger retention with concomitant slower release was observed for vinyl composition floor tiles. The test probes displayed immediated permanence on Teflon. FLEC sampling was further evaluated by profiling residues remaining after the evaporation of 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, a sulfur mustard simulant. This study lays the groundwork for the eventual goal of applying this sampling approach for collection of forensic attribution signatures that remain after a terrorist chemical attack.

  6. Underground coal gasification: Development of theory, laboratory experimentation, interpretation, and correlation with the Hanna field tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunn, R.D.; Krantz, W.B.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report is a description of a 7 year effort to develop a theoretical understanding of the underground coal gasification process. The approach used is one of the mathematical model development from known chemical and principles, simplification of the models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models to isolate important effects, and through validation of models with laboratory experiments and field test data. Chapter I contains only introductory material. Chapter II describes the development of two models for reverse combustion: a combustion model and a linearized model for combustion front instability. Both models are required for realistic field predictions. Chapter III contains a discussion of a successful forward gasification model. Chapter IV discusses the spalling-enhanced-drying model is applicable to prediction of cavity growth and subsidence. Chapter VI decribes the correct use of energy and material balances for the analysis of UCG field test data. Chapter VII shows how laboratory experiments were used to validate the models for reverse combustion and forward gasification. It is also shown that laboratory combustion tube experiments can be used to simulate gas compositions expected from field tests. Finally, Chapter VII presents results from a comprehensive economic analysis of UCG involving 1296 separate cases. 37 refs., 49 figs., 12 tabs.

  7. Renewable Energy Laboratory Development for Biofuels Advanced Combustion Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soloiu, Valentin

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The research advanced fundamental science and applied engineering for increasing the efficiency of internal combustion engines and meeting emissions regulations with biofuels. The project developed a laboratory with new experiments and allowed investigation of new fuels and their combustion and emissions. This project supports a sustainable domestic biofuels and automotive industry creating economic opportunities across the nation, reducing the dependence on foreign oil, and enhancing U.S. energy security. The one year period of research developed fundamental knowledge and applied technology in advanced combustion, emissions and biofuels formulation to increase vehicle's efficiency. Biofuels?? combustion was investigated in a Compression Ignition Direct Injection (DI) to develop idling strategies with biofuels and an Indirect Diesel Injection (IDI) intended for auxiliary power unit.

  8. Studies of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory at Colorado State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studies of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory at Colorado State for Testing of Models of Photovoltaic Roofing Systems, at Wind Engineering and Fluids Laboratory, Colorado issues considered in this process. Over several decades, researchers affiliated with Wind Engineering

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Study Compares Floating-Platform...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECEnergyStudy Compares Floating-Platform Options for Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines Study Compares Floating-Platform Options for Offshore Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines...

  10. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 331 Life Sciences Laboratory Drain Field Septic System, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The 331 Life Sciences Laboratory Drain Field (LSLDF) septic system waste site consists of a diversion chamber, two septic tanks, a distribution box, and a drain field. This septic system was designed to receive sanitary waste water, from animal studies conducted in the 331-A and 331-B Buildings, for discharge into the soil column. However, field observations and testing suggest the 331 LSLDF septic system did not receive any discharges. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of the 331 LSLDF waste site to No Action. This site does not have a deep zone or other condition that would warrant an institutional control in accordance with the 300-FF-2 ROD under the industrial land use scenario.

  11. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Case Studies, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study provides information on the Molecular Foundry, which incorporates Labs21 principles in its design and construction. The design includes many of the strategies researched at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory for energy efficient cleanroom and data centers.

  12. Laboratory Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Product Speciation Studies of the LNT + in situ SCR NOx Emission Control Concept M. Crocker, V. Easterling, J. Wang University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research M....

  13. Hands-on Training through the University of Florida Living Extension IPM Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    , reduction of pesticides were also utilized. Training workshops were taught to County Agents, clientele (farmers and homeowners) and partners. A 330-acre farm at the Suwannee Valley Agricultural Extension Center into this concept. Experiential learning opportunities of on-farm laboratories are an effective method of training

  14. Laboratory and Field Evaluations of Oviposition Responses of Aedes albopictus and Aedes triseriatus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Diptera: Culicidae) to Oak Leaf Infusions JONATHAN D. TREXLER, CHARLES S. APPERSON, AND COBY SCHAL. 35(6): 967-976 (1998) ABSTRACT Organic infusions created by fermenting white oak (Quercus alba L for gravid Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Aedes triseriatus (Say). Infusions were bioassayed in the laboratory

  15. A survey of field instruction laboratories in the United States and Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikus, Timothy August

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Person in charge of facility Address Enrollment at parent institution Enrollment in recreation and parks department Degrees awarded Major program emphasis areas Location of laboratory 16 When facility was acquired Original state of property raw... housing other buildings Recreational facilities Programming Staff and personnel Manager responsibility breakdown Program and use Other departments using facility Primary purpose of facility Major changes perceived occupies In addition...

  16. An integrated approach to seismic stimulation of oil reservoirs: laboratory, field and theoretical results from DOE/industry collaborations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, P. M. (Peter M.); Majer, Ernest Luther; Lo, W. C. (Wei-Cheng); Sposito, Garrison,; Daley, T. M. (Thomas M.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been observed repeatedly that low-frequency (10-500 Hz) seismic stress waves can enhance oil production from depleted reservoirs . Until recently, the majority of these observations have been anecdotal or at the proof-of-concept level. The physics coupling stress waves to multiphase fluid flow behavior in porous media is still poorly understood, even though numerous underlying physical mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observations . Basic research on the phenomenon is being conducted through a U .S. Department of Energy funded collaboration between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of California at Berkeley, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the U .S . oil and gas industry . The project has focused on three main areas of research: (1) laboratory core flow experiments, (2) field seismic monitoring of downhole stimulation tests, and (3) theoretical modeling of the coupled stress/flow phenomenon . The major goal is to obtain a comprehensive scientific understanding of the seismic stimulation phenomenon so that field application technologies can be improved. Initial developments and experimental results in all three research focus areas confirm historic observations that the stimulated flow phenomenon is real and that a fundamental scientific understanding can be obtained through continued research . Examples of project results and developments are presented here.

  17. Trace-level beryllium analysis in the laboratory and in the field: State of the art, challenges, and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRISSON, MICHAEL

    2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of workplace exposure to beryllium is a growing issue in the United States and other nations. As the health risks associated with low-level exposure to beryllium are better understood, the need increases for improved analytical techniques both in the laboratory and in the field. These techniques also require a greater degree of standardization to permit reliable comparison of data obtained from different locations and at different times. Analysis of low-level beryllium samples, in the form of air filters or surface wipes, is frequently required for workplace monitoring or to provide data to support decision-making on implementation of exposure controls. In the United States and the United Kingdom, the current permissible exposure level is 2 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (air), and the United States Department of Energy has implemented an action level of 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (air) and 0.2 {micro}g/100 cm{sup 2} (surface). These low-level samples present a number of analytical challenges, including (1) a lack of suitable standard reference materials, (2) unknown robustness of sample preparation techniques, (3) interferences during analysis, (4) sensitivity (sufficiently low detection limits), (5) specificity (beryllium speciation), and (6) data comparability among laboratories. Additionally, there is a need for portable, real-time (or near real-time) equipment for beryllium air monitoring and surface wipe analysis that is both laboratory-validated and field-validated in a manner that would be accepted by national and/or international standards organizations. This paper provides a review of the current analytical requirements for trace-level beryllium analysis for worker protection, and also addresses issues that may change those requirements. The current analytical state of the art and relevant challenges facing the analytical community will be presented, followed by suggested criteria for real-time monitoring equipment. Recognizing and addressing these challenges will present opportunities for laboratories, research and development organizations, instrument manufacturers, and others.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Degradation Study of Components and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandia InvolvesDOE-BER NASASubsystems Degradation Study

  19. Field performance of residential refrigerators: A comparison with the laboratory test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, A.; Jansky, R.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field electricity use of 209 refrigerators was compared to their labeled consumption. The mean field use of all units was 1009 kWh/year, 882 kWh/year for top-freezers, and 1366 kWh/year for side-by-sides. There was considerable scatter in the results but, in general, the label overpredicted field use. The relationship could be best described with the formula, Annual Field Use = 0.94 [times] (Annual Label Us) - 85. For a typical unit with a labeled use of 1160 kWh/year, the field use was about 15% lower. There was considerable seasonality in energy use: the peak weeks generally occurred around the beginning of August. However, there was no simple relationship between the label value and the peak-week consumption.

  20. Field performance of residential refrigerators: A comparison with the laboratory test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, A.; Jansky, R.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field electricity use of 209 refrigerators was compared to their labeled consumption. The mean field use of all units was 1009 kWh/year, 882 kWh/year for top-freezers, and 1366 kWh/year for side-by-sides. There was considerable scatter in the results but, in general, the label overpredicted field use. The relationship could be best described with the formula, Annual Field Use = 0.94 {times} (Annual Label Us) - 85. For a typical unit with a labeled use of 1160 kWh/year, the field use was about 15% lower. There was considerable seasonality in energy use: the peak weeks generally occurred around the beginning of August. However, there was no simple relationship between the label value and the peak-week consumption.

  1. Laboratory Studies on the Effects of Shear on Fish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neitzel, Duane A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.; Moursund, Russell A.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Guensch, Greg R.

    2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of our studies was to specify an index describing the hydraulic force that fish experience when subjected to a shear environment. Fluid shear is a phenomenon that is important to fish. However, elevated levels of shear may result in strain rates that injure or kill fish. At hydroelectric generating facilities, concerns have been expressed that strain rates associated with passage through turbines, spillways, and fish bypass systems may adversely affect migrating fish. Development of fish friendly hydroelectric turbines requires knowledge of the physical forces (injury mechanisms) that impact entrained fish and the fish's tolerance to these forces. It requires up-front, pre-design specifications for the environmental conditions that occur within the turbine system, in other words, determining or assuming that those conditions known to injure fish will provide the descriptions of conditions that engineers must consider in the design of a turbine system. These biological specifications must be carefully and thoroughly documented throughout the design of a fish friendly turbine. To address the development of biological specifications, we designed and built a test facility where juvenile fish could be subjected to a range of shear environments and quantified their biological response.

  2. Ecology of Neoschongastia americana (Hirst): laboratory life cycle, developmental period in the field and influence of selected external factors.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Jerry Real

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    date of sperm production Sept. 18 Nov. 20 Feb. 20 Jan. 26 Nov. 11 Nov. 30 Oct. 10 Sept. 11 March 2 Dec. 29 March 2 Feb. 23 Oct. 10 Oct. 17 Oct. 31 March 2 Dec. 29 Feb. 2 Dec. 9 Dec. 22 Dec. 14 Total days sperm product&. on 79...): Laboratory Life Cycle, Developmental Period in the Field and Influence of Selected External Factors (August 1974 ) Jerry Real Cunningham, B. S. , Texas A8cw University Chairman of Advisory Committees Prof. Manning AD Price In the summers of 1971 and 1972...

  3. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington: Laboratories for the 21st Century Case Studies (Revision)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study was prepared by participants in the Laboratories for the 21st Century program, a joint endeavor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The goal of this program is to foster greater energy efficiency in new laboratory buildings for both the public and the private sectors. Retrofits of existing laboratories are also encouraged. The energy-efficient features of the laboratories in the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center complex in Seattle, Washington, include extensive use of efficient lighting, variable-air-volume controls, variable-speed drives, motion sensors, and high-efficiency chillers and motors. With about 532,000 gross square feet, the complex is estimated to use 33% less electrical energy than most traditional research facilities consume because of its energy-efficient design and features.

  4. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington: Laboratories for the 21st Century Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study was prepared by participants in the Laboratories for the 21st Century program, a joint endeavor of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The goal of this program is to foster greater energy efficiency in new laboratory buildings for both the public and the private sectors. Retrofits of existing laboratories are also encouraged. The energy-efficient features of the laboratories in the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center complex in Seattle, Washington, include extensive use of efficient lighting, variable-air-volume controls, variable-speed drives, motion sensors, and high-efficiency chillers and motors. With about 532,000 gross square feet, the complex is estimated to use 33% less electrical energy than most traditional research facilities consume because of its energy-efficient design and features.

  5. University of California, Berkeley INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    and Interdisciplinary Studies (UGIS) College of Letters and Sciences http://ugis.ls.berkeley.edu/isf/ ISF Major Student of Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies (UGIS) of the College of Letters and Science. It is one of many

  6. NATIONAL HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD LABORATORY REPORTSWinter EDITION VOLUME 13 N0. 5 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    PPlication to the interaction of Packaging motor With the PolymeraSe comPlex of dSrna BacterioPhage 8 NEWS FROM THE DC FIELD crystal growth program to enhance LAB's materials research efforts 23 Commissioning of 100 Tesla Multi-Shot pushes boundaries of science beyond 80 tesla 24 Cooling power of new dilution refrigerator is world class

  7. A design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of the viscous barrier technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Yen, P. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States); Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Williams, P.; Myer, L.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The test site is located in central California in a quarry owned by the Los Banos Gravel Company in Los Banos, California, in heterogeneous unsaturated deposits of sand, silt, and -ravel typical of many of the and DOE cleanup sites and particularly analogous to the Hanford site. The coals of the field demonstration are (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier isolating a medium-scale volume (30 ft long by 30 ft wide by 20 ft deep, i.e. 1/10th to 1/8th the size of a buried tank at the Hanford Reservation) in the subsurface, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier.

  8. Recovery Boiler Superheater Ash Corrosion Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiser, James R [ORNL] [ORNL; Kish, Joseph [McMaster University] [McMaster University; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations] [FPInnovations

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the trend towards increasing the energy efficiency of black liquor recovery boilers operated in North America, there is a need to utilize superheater tubes with increased corrosion resistance that will permit operation at higher temperatures and pressures. In an effort to identify alloys with improved corrosion resistance under more harsh operating conditions, a field exposure was conducted that involved the insertion of an air-cooled probe, containing six candidate alloys, into the superheater section of an operating recovery boiler. A metallographic examination, complete with corrosion scale characterization using EMPA, was conducted after a 1,000 hour exposure period. Based on the results, a ranking of alloys based on corrosion performance was obtained.

  9. A Laboratory Study of the Schmidt Number Dependency of Air-Water Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    . Sc = /D denotes the Schmidt number, the ratio of kinematic viscosity of water and the tracersA Laboratory Study of the Schmidt Number Dependency of Air-Water Gas Transfer Kerstin Richter1 of exchange hap- pens with an exponent of 1/2 and links this fraction with a physical property of the wave

  10. Earth Planets Space, 53, 539545, 2001 Study of local reconnection physics in a laboratory plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, Hantao

    Earth Planets Space, 53, 539­545, 2001 Study of local reconnection physics in a laboratory plasma reconnection rates are found to be quantitatively consistent with a generalized Sweet-Parker model which of the increased ion energy must be due to nonclassical processes, consistent with the resistivity enhancement

  11. TACKLEY ET AL.:THERMO-CHEMICAL PHILOSOPHY Numerical and laboratory studies of mantle convection: Philosophy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    TACKLEY ET AL.:THERMO-CHEMICAL PHILOSOPHY 1 Numerical and laboratory studies of mantle convection: Philosophy, accomplishments and thermo-chemical structure and evolution Paul J. Tackley Department of Earth how the solid parts of Earth and other terrestrial planets work. Here, the general philosophy

  12. Guidelines for ACUC Oversight of Satellite Facilities, Study Areas, Laboratories and other Animal Activity Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    Guidelines for ACUC Oversight of Satellite Facilities, Study Areas, Laboratories and other Animal? · Are pharmaceuticals in-date? Are chemical-grade materials in use for compounds for which pharmaceutical preparations familiar with procedures for receipt and disposition of animals and transport containers? If applicable

  13. The role of hair in swimming of laboratory mice: implications for behavioural studies in animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    The role of hair in swimming of laboratory mice: implications for behavioural studies in animals with abnormal hair A V Kalueff1 and P Tuohimaa2 1 Department of Anatomy, Medical School; 2 Department behaviour. Hair and skin exposed to water may be an important factor affecting the performance in this test

  14. BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SEISMIC ENERGY of Explosive Engineers, 2-5 Feb 97, Las Vegas, NV #12;BLACK THUNDER COAL MINE AND LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL and David Gross Thunder Basin Coal Company Post Office Box 406 Wright, Wyoming 82732 D. Craig Pearson

  15. SQM studied in the Field Correlator Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. I. M. Pereira

    2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    By using the recent nonperturbative equation of state of the quark gluon plasma derived in the formalism of the Field Correlator Method, we investigate the bulk properties of the strange quark matter in beta-equilibrium and with charge neutrality at T=p=0. The results show that the stability of strange quark matter with respect to $^{56}Fe$ is strongly dependent on the model parameters, namely, the gluon condensate $G_2$ and the q$\\bar{\\rm q}$ interaction potential $V_1$. A remarkable result is that the width of the stability window decreases as $V_1$ increases, being maximum at $V_1=0$ and nearly zero at $V_1=0.5$ GeV. For $V_1$ in the range $0\\leq V_1\\leq0.5$ GeV, all values of $G_2$ are lower than $0.006-0.007\\;{\\rm GeV}^4$ obtained from comparison with lattice results at $T_c\\;(\\mu=0)\\sim170$ MeV. These results do not favor the possibilities for the existence of (either nonnegative or negative) absolutely stable strange quark matter.

  16. Laboratory and field investigation of the adsorption of gaseous organic compounds onto quartz filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Corrigan, Craig E.; Novakov, T.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A common method for measuring the mass of organic carbon in airborne particulate matter involves collection on a quartz filter and subsequent thermal analysis. If unaccounted for, the adsorption of organic gases onto quartz filters will lead to the overestimation of aerosol organic carbon concentrations (positive artifact). A recommended method of correction for the positive artifact involves sampling with a backup filter. Placed behind either the primary quartz filter, or behind a Teflon filter and collected in parallel with the primary quartz filter, the carbon content of the quartz backup filter is a measure of the adsorbed organic material on the primary quartz filter. In this paper, we illustrate the application of this technique to samples collected in Berkeley, California. While the tandem quartz filter method can be successfully applied to correct for the positive artifact, we discuss two cases when this method will fail. We have found that the capacity for adsorption of organic gases is not uniform for all filters. Instead, filters manufactured by the same company, but having different lot numbers, exhibit variable adsorption capacity. Thus, a filter pair composed of filters from different lots may lead to significant under- or overestimation of particulate organic carbon concentration. Additionally, we have observed that the tandem filter method under-corrects for the positive artifact if the sampling time is short (few hours). Laboratory experiments with vapors of single organic compounds corroborate results based on ambient samples. The evolution of adsorbed organic gases, particularly polar compounds, during thermal analysis indicates that a single compound may experience two distinct adsorbent-adsorbate binding energies. Adsorbed gases may co-evolve with particles at temperatures in excess of 250-degree C.

  17. Urine Radiobioassay Intercomparison Results From The Intercomparison Studies Program At Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bores, Norman [ORNL; Schultz, Michael K [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN USA) provides natural-matrix human urine quality-assurance/quality-control (QA/QC) samples to radiobioassay analysis laboratories. Samples are provided to these laboratories as 'single-blind' or 'double-blind' unknowns, spiked with radioactive-solution standards at 'low' levels (e.g., 0-250 mBq {center_dot} kg{sup -1} for alpha-emitters). Participants use the results as a tool for self-evaluation and a measure of performance. In this paper, sample preparation and the results of testing during the years 2000-2004 for the radionuclides natural uranium (U-nat), {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Am are presented and discussed.

  18. Quintessence Scalar Field: A Dynamical Systems Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nandan Roy; Narayan Banerjee

    2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work deals with a dynamical systems study of quintessence potentials leading to the present accelerated expansion of the universe. The principal interest is to check for late time attractors which give an accelerated expansion for the universe. Two examples are worked out, namely the exponential and the power-law potentials.

  19. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were initiated at the Hanford Site to evaluate the process controlling the transport of fluids in the vadose zone and to develop a reliable database upon which vadose-zone transport models can be calibrated. These models are needed to evaluate contaminant migration through the vadose zone to underlying groundwaters at Hanford. A study site that had previously been extensively characterized using geophysical monitoring techniques was selected in the 200 E Area. Techniques used previously included neutron probe for water content, spectral gamma logging for radionuclide tracers, and gamma scattering for wet bulk density. Building on the characterization efforts of the past 20 years, the site was instrumented to facilitate the comparison of nine vadose-zone characterization methods: advanced tensiometers, neutron probe, electrical resistance tomography (ERT), high-resolution resistivity (HRR), electromagnetic induction imaging (EMI), cross-borehole radar (XBR), and cross-borehole seismic (XBS). Soil coring was used to obtain soil samples for analyzing ionic and isotopic tracers.

  20. Laboratory Experiments and Instrument Development for the Study of Atmospheric Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidovits, Paul

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Soot particles are generated by incomplete combustion of fossil and biomass fuels. Through direct effects clear air aerosols containing black carbon (BC) such as soot aerosols, absorb incoming light heating the atmosphere, while most other aerosols scatter light and produce cooling. Even though BC represents only 1-2% of the total annual emissions of particulate mass to the atmosphere, it has been estimated that the direct radiative effect of BC is the second-most important contributor to global warming after absorption by CO2. Ongoing studies continue to underscore the climate forcing importance of black carbon. However, estimates of the radiative effects of black carbon on climate remain highly uncertain due to the complexity of particles containing black carbon. Quantitative measurement of BC is challenging because BC often occurs in highly non-spherical soot particles of complex morphology. Freshly emitted soot particles are typically fractal hydrophobic aggregates. The aggregates consist of black carbon spherules with diameters typically in the range of about 15-40 nm, and they are usually coated by adsorbed polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced during combustion. Diesel-generated soot particles are often emitted with an organic coating composed primarily of lubricating oil and unburned fuel, as well as well as PAH compounds. Sulfuric acid has also been detected in diesel and aircraft-emitted soot particles. In the course of aging, these particle coatings may be substantially altered by chemical reactions and/or the deposition of other materials. Such processes transform the optical and CCN properties of the soot aerosols in ways that are not yet well understood. Our work over the past seven years consisted of laboratory research, instrument development and characterization, and field studies with the central focus of improving our understanding of the black carbon aerosol climate impacts. During the sixth year as well as during this seventh year (no-cost extension period) of our grant, we extended our studies to perform experiments on the controlled production and characterization of secondary organic aerosol.

  1. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokelson, Robert J.; Burling, Ian R.; Gilman, Jessica; Warneke, Carsten; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Veres, Patrick; Roberts, James M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, James; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Hosseini, SeyedEhsan; Miller, J. Wayne; Cocker, David R.; Jung, H.; Weise, David

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for smoldering compounds emitted by burning the semi-arid SW fuels should likely be increased by about a factor of 2.7 to better represent field fires. Based on the lab/field comparison, we present a table with emission factors for 365 pyrogenic species (including unidentified species) for 4 broad fuel types: pine understory, semi-arid shrublands, evergreen canopy, and duff. To our knowledge this is the most complete measurement of biomass burning emissions to date and it should enable improved representation of smoke in atmospheric models. The results provide important insights into the nature of smoke. For example, ~35% (range from 16-71%) of the mass of gas-phase NMOC species was attributed to the species that we could not identify. These unidentified species are likely not represented in most models, but some provision should be made for the fact that they will react in the atmosphere. In addition, the total mass of gas-phase NMOC divided by the mass of co-emitted PM2.5 averaged ~2.6 for the main fire types with a range from ~1.8-8.8. About 36-63% of the NMOC were likely semivolatile or of intermediate volatility. Thus, the gas-phase NMOC represent a large reservoir of potential precursors for secondary formation of organic aerosol. For the one fire in organic soil (Alaskan duff) about 28% of the emitted carbon was present as gas-phase NMOC in contrast to the other fuels for which NMOC accounted for only ~1-3% of emitted carbon. 71% of the mass of NMOC emitted by the smoldering duff was un-identified. The duff results highlight the need to learn more about the emissions from smoldering organic soils. The ?NMOC/NOx-as-NO ratio was consistently about ten for the main fire types when accounting for all NMOC, indicating strongly NOx-limited O3 production conditions. Finally, the fuel consumption per unit area was measured on 6 of the 14 prescribed fires and averaged 7.08 2.09 (1?) Mg ha-1.

  2. Effects of Prudhoe Bay crude oil in sediment on Abarenicola pacifica in laboratory and field experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augenfeld, J.M.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Behavioral responses of organisms are often sensitive indicators of changes in the environment over short time frames. The rate of burrowing of Abarenicola pacifica, a lugworm typical of muddy tidal flats, was studied to determine its response to the presence of hydrocarbons in the environment. If a reduction in burrowing rates is reflected in reduced food intake, a decline in nutritional status might be expected. The level of free amino acids in the tissues was examined as a possible indicator of nutritional status. (ACR)

  3. The development of new tools for field and laboratory diagnosis of Pierces Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Kelly Asbill

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, David N. Appel Committee Members, Carlos F. Gonzalez B. Greg Cobb Head of Department, Dennis C... members, Dr. Carlos Gonzalez and Dr. Greg Cobb. A special thanks goes out to my lab colleagues, for without their help, this project wouldn?t have been possible. I would also like to express my appreciation towards my family, friends, and most of all...

  4. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1: Results of treatability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Naney, M.T.; Cline, S.R.; Bogle, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Tixier, J.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993 to apply in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was later extended to include all of Pit 1 and was performed to support a possible Interim Record of Decision or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches beginning as early as FY 1997. This treatability study was carried out to establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability for the overlap of melt settings which will be necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. In April 1996 an expulsion of an estimated 10% of the 196 Mg (216 tons) melt body occurred resulting in significant damage to ISV equipment and, ultimately, led to an indefinite suspension of further ISV operations at Pit 1. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and status of the project in fulfilling these objectives through September 1997.

  5. The TITAN reversed-field-pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper on titan plasma engineering contains papers on the following topics: reversed-field pinch as a fusion reactor; parametric systems studies; magnetics; burning-plasma simulations; plasma transient operations; current drive; and physics issues for compact RFP reactors.

  6. FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES AT STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Approach to the Fracture Hydrology at Stripa, PreliminaryRocks. On Recent Trends in Hydrology, Special PublicationsDE86 013586 W FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES

  7. Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in aModular Classroom Test Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Buchanan, Ian S.; Faulkner, David; Fisk,William J.; Lai, Chi-Ming; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms.

  8. A study of the requirements for the electrical engineering laboratories at Lamar State College of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtkamp, William Edward

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    entering into a new four year technical school whioh has only the engineering build1ng available. An eleotrical engineering currioulum must be decided upon and the equipment selected to oorrelate the laboratory oourses with the theory. Wherever.... courses is as / follows& Electric and Magnetio Circuits, (3-3) Credit 4 D1rect ourrent electric and magnetic cirouits under steady state and transient ocnditions. 8. Direot Current Machinery, (3-3) Credit 4 A study of the theory and application...

  9. R E P O R T SThe National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Operated by: FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    · UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA · LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY CAPS continued on page 4 CIRL/ST&U continued on page 5 is in the works at Innovation Park (between the Magnet Lab and the College of Engineering) that will provide CAPS S ALAMOS STATEFLOR IDA UN IVE R SITY #12;2 From the Director's Desk Jack Crow National Science Board

  10. Experimental Study of the Hall Effect and Electron Diffusion Region During Magnetic Reconnection in a Laboratory Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Yang; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Dorfman, Seth; Gerhardt, Stefan; Kulsrud, Russel

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hall effect during magnetic reconnection without an external guide field has been extensively studied in the laboratory plasma of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) [Yamada et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 1936 (1997)] by measuring its key signature, an out-of-plane quadrupole magnetic field, with magnetic probe arrays whose spatial resolution is on the order of the electron skin depth. The in-plane electron flow is deduced from out-of-plane magnetic field measurements. The measured in-plane electron flow and numerical results are in good agreement. The electron diffusion region is identified by measuring the electron outflow channel. The width of the electron diffusion region scales with the electron skin depth (~ 8c/?pe) and the peak electron outflow velocity scales with the electron Alfven velocity (~ 0:11VeA), independent of ion mass. The measured width of the electron diffusion region is much wider and the observed electron outflow is much slower than those obtained in 2D numerical simulations. It is found that the classical and anomalous dissipation present in the experiment can broaden the electron diffusion region and slow the electron outflow. As a consequence, the electron outflow flux remain consistent with numerical simulations. The ions, as measured by a Mach probe, have a much wider outflow channel than the electrons, and their outflow is much slower than the electron outflow everywhere in the electron diffusion region.

  11. Water Efficiency Improvements at Various Environmental Protection Agency Sites: Best Management Practice Case Study #12 - Laboratory/Medical Equipment (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blakley, H.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) built a successful water conservation program and reduced potable water use through a series of initiatives at EPA laboratories. The projects highlighted in this case study demonstrate EPA's ability to reduce water use in laboratory and medical equipment by implementing vacuum pump and steam sterilizer replacements and retrofits. Due to the success of the initial vacuum pump and steam sterilizer projects described here, EPA is implementing similar projects at several laboratories throughout the nation.

  12. A Laboratory Study of Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection in Strongly-Driven Plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Fox, W.; Igumenshchev, I.; Seguin, F. H.; Town, R. P.J.; Frenje, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely-directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. Additionally, the regime of strongly-driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly-driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly-driven system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. Additionally, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.

  13. Kelly, R. B., Houlsby, G. T. & Byrne, B. W. (2006). Geotechnique 56, No. 9, 617626 A comparison of field and laboratory tests of caisson foundations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Byron

    Kelly, R. B., Houlsby, G. T. & Byrne, B. W. (2006). Ge´otechnique 56, No. 9, 617­626 617 A comparison of field and laboratory tests of caisson foundations in sand and clay R. B. KELLY ? , G. T. (2002, 2003), Kelly et al. (2003, 2004) and Houlsby et al. (2005, 2006). Suction caissons for offshore

  14. Comparative laboratory selection and field testing of polymers for selective control of water production in gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranjbar, M. [Technical Univ., Clausthal (Germany); Czolbe, P. [DBI-GUT, Freiberg (Germany); Kohler, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive comparative feasibility studies were performed in different laboratories in order to select the most promising polymer based technology for water control in gas production and storage wells exhibiting low matrix permeability, high temperature and high produced brine salinity. Core flow experiments performed under reservoir conditions with different commercially available chemical systems have pointed to the superiority of two relatively low-molecular-weight vinyl sulfonated/vinyl amide/acrylamide terpolymers over other polymers to decrease selectively and effectively the water permeability without affecting the gas flow. These polymers have excellent compatibility with all types of reservoir brines and good thermal stability up to 150 C. Furthermore, because of their high shear resistance, and excellent injectability even in low permeability cores, solutions of these polymers can be pumped at high injection rates with a moderate wellhead pressure.

  15. Studies of inflation and dark energy with coupled scalar fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vu, Susan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently there is no definitive description for the accelerated expansion of the Universe at both early and late times; we know these two periods as the epochs of inflation and dark energy. Contained within this Thesis are two studies of inflation and one in the context of dark energy. The first study involves two noncanonical kinetic terms each in a two-field scenario, and their effects on the generation of isocurvature modes. As a result, these terms affect the isocurvature perturbations produced, and consequently the Cosmic Microwave Background. In the following study, the impact of a sharp transition upon the effective Planck mass is considered in both a single-field and two-field model. A feature in the primordial power spectrum arising from these transitions is found in single-field models, but not for two-field models. The final model discussed is on the subject of dark energy. A type of nonconformal coupling is examined namely the "disformal" coupling; in this scenario a scalar field is disformally c...

  16. Laboratory and Field Evaluation of Imidacloprid against Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) and Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) Subterranean Termites in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keefer, Tony Christopher

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    3 Urban field setting dominated by grasses surrounded by Q. stellata ......... 17 4 BASF Advance Termite Bait Station with lid and wood insert ................. 18 5 Diagram of individual grid for Premise? Granule 0.5% AI study... marked with survey flags. There was a minimum distance of 10 m between each grid. Six in-ground commercial termite monitors (Advance Termite Bait Station, BASF-formerly Whitmire Micro-Gen, St. Louis, MO) (Fig. 4) were evenly spaced in each grid...

  17. DISORDERED SILICATES IN SPACE: A STUDY OF LABORATORY SPECTRA OF 'AMORPHOUS' SILICATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speck, Angela K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Whittington, Alan G. [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Hofmeister, Anne M. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a laboratory study of silicate glasses of astrophysically relevant compositions including olivines, pyroxenes, and melilites. With emphasis on the classic Si-O stretching feature near 10 {mu}m, we compare infrared spectra of our new samples with laboratory spectra on ostensibly similar compositions, and also with synthetic silicate spectral data commonly used in dust modeling. Several different factors affect spectral features including sample chemistry (e.g., polymerization, Mg/Fe ratio, oxidation state, and Al-content) whereas different sample preparation techniques lead to variations in porosity, density, and water content. The convolution of chemical and physical effects makes it difficult to attribute changes in spectral parameters to any given variable. It is important that detailed chemical and structural characterization be provided along with laboratory spectra. In addition to composition and density, we measured the glass transition temperatures for the samples which place upper limits on the formation and/or processing temperatures of these solids in space. Popular synthetically generated optical functions do not have spectral features that match any of our glass samples. However, the {approx}10 {mu}m feature generated by the synthetic data rarely exactly matches the shape and peak position of astronomically observed silicate features. Our comparison with the synthetic spectra allows astronomers to determine likely candidates among our glass samples for matching astronomical observations.

  18. Rapid multiplexed data acquisition: Application to three-dimensional magnetic field measurements in a turbulent laboratory plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael R.

    acquisition at the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment SSX and Redmond Plasma Physics Laboratory. An application. The Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment SSX 3 has re- cently completed construction, calibration, and testing

  19. Laboratory Studies on Surface Sampling of Bacillus anthracis Contamination: Summary, Gaps, and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Hu, Rebecca

    2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes previous laboratory studies to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing/transporting, processing, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis or related surrogates. The focus is on plate culture and count estimates of surface contamination for swab, wipe, and vacuum samples of porous and nonporous surfaces. Summaries of the previous studies and their results were assessed to identify gaps in information needed as inputs to calculate key parameters critical to risk management in biothreat incidents. One key parameter is the number of samples needed to make characterization or clearance decisions with specified statistical confidence. Other key parameters include the ability to calculate, following contamination incidents, the (1) estimates of Bacillus anthracis contamination, as well as the bias and uncertainties in the estimates, and (2) confidence in characterization and clearance decisions for contaminated or decontaminated buildings. Gaps in knowledge and understanding identified during the summary of the studies are discussed and recommendations are given for future studies.

  20. Laboratory studies on the evolution of iodine-129 during Purex-uranium metal dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bray, L.A.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The path of iodine from the Purex dissolver was determined during fuel dissolution using /sup 125/I tracer. Laboratory-scale equipment qualification studies were completed using sections of nonirradiated uranium N-reactor fuel elements. A proof-of-principle dissolution study was completed at the end of FY 1979 in the PNL hot cells using wafers of irradiated N-reactor fuel. The findings include the following: the laboratory-scale dissolver/downdraft condenser was designed at a factor of 5 x 10/sup -5/ of the Purex flowsheet; with no refluxing, 5.6 moles of HNO/sub 3/ were required per mole of dissolved uranium. With NO/sub x/ recovery in the reflux stream, an average of 3.6 moles of HNO/sub 3/ was required. These results formed the basis for adequate modeling of the laboratory Purex downdraft dissolver; approximately 8% of the iodine was found in the final dissolver solution when the /sup 125/I tracer was added to the initial dissolver solution prior to the first cut, 6-h dissolution; when the /sup 125/I was added continuously during the 6-h dissolution without any refluxing of the condenser acid back to the dissolver, approximately 16% of the iodine was found in the dissolver solution; when irradiated N-reactor fuel was dissolved while /sup 125/I tracer was continuously added to the dissolver during the 6-h test, 11% of the /sup 125/I tracer was found in the dissolver solution. After 2 h of refluxing with air sparging, 6% of the /sup 125/I tracer was found in the dissolver solution; and analysis of the fission product /sup 129/I in the fuel duplicated the tracer study results with 8% and 7% of the iodine remaining in the dissolver solution after 6 and 8 h, respectively.

  1. Beta decay studies of r-process nuclei at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pereira; A. Aprahamian; O. Arndt; A. Becerril; T. Elliot; A. Estrade; D. Galaviz; S. Hennrich; P. Hosmer; R. Kessler; K. -L. Kratz; G. Lorusso; P. F. Mantica; M. Matos; F. Montes; P. Santi; B. Pfeiffer; M. Quinn; H. Schatz; F. Schertz; L. Schnorrenberger; E. Smith; B. E. Tomlin; W. Walters; A. Wohr

    2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of nuclear physics on astrophysical r-process models is discussed, emphasizing the importance of beta-decay properties of neutron-rich nuclei. Several r-process motivated beta-decay experiments performed at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory are presented. The experiments include the measurement of beta-decay half-lives and neutron emission probabilities of nuclei in regions around Ni-78; Se-90; Zr-106 and Rh-120, as well as spectroscopic studies of Pd-120. A summary on the different experimental techniques employed, data analysis, results and impact on model calculations is presented.

  2. Real-Time Measurement of Rates of Outdoor Airflow into HVACSystems: A Field Study of Three Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies for real-time continuous measurement of the flow rates of outdoor air (OA) into HVAC systems are now available commercially. Our prior papers reported on laboratory-based evaluations of these measurement technologies and this document describes the methods and results of a field study of the accuracy of three of these technologies. From the field study data, we determined that neither wind speed nor wind direction have an important adverse impact on measurement accuracy. The field study confirmed that these three measurement technologies can provide reasonably accurate measurements of outdoor air intake rates in field settings, if the pressure signals are measured with high accuracy. Some of the pressure transducers marketed for use with commercial HVAC systems were determined to be sufficiently accurate for this application. Given the significant impact of OA flow rates on both energy use and occupant health, more widespread use of technologies that provide for real time measurements of OA flow rates seems warranted.

  3. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Courtney, Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumentation is needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. This paper describes the development and characterization of oxy-acetylene driven, laboratory scale shock tubes for use in studying blast injury, candidate armor materials, and material properties at blast loading rates. The pressure-time profiles show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of blast waves and have relevant durations. The modular design includes shock tube diameters of 27 mm and 41 mm, and a selection of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 920 kPa can be produced by selection of the driver section diameter and placement of the test sample. Characterization studies of several driver/driven section combinations showed consistent results, with peak pressures having 0.8 - 6.9 percent uncertainty in the mean. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current air-driven shock tubes. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven...

  4. Microearthquake Study of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California: Evidence of Stress Triggering - Masters Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Austin Adams

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A digital network of 24 seismograph stations was operated from September 15, 1987 to September 30, 1988, by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Unocal as part of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project to study seismicity related to tectonics and geothermal activity near the drilling site. More than 2001 microearthquakes were relocated in this study in order to image any pervasive structures that may exist within the Salton Sea geothermal field. First, detailed velocity models were obtained through standard 1-D inversion techniques. These velocity models were then used to relocate events using both single event methods and Double-Differencing, a joint hypocenter location method. An anisotropic velocity model was built from anisotropy estimates obtained from well logs within the study area. During the study period, the Superstition wills sequence occurred with two moderate earthquakes of MS 6.2 and MS 6.6. These moderate earthquakes caused a rotation of the stress field as observed from the inversion of first motion data from microearthquakes at the Salton Sea geothermal field. Coulomb failure analysis also indicates that microearthquakes occurring after the Superstition Hills sequence are located within a region of stress increase suggesting stress triggering caused by the moderate earthquakes.

  5. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEAs interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  6. Emittance studies at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Free-Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsten, B.E.; Feldman, D.W.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Stein, W.E.; Warren, R.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent emittance studies at the Los Alamos FEL have indicated several areas of concern in the linac and beamline feeding the wiggler. Four emittance growth mechanisms of special importance have been studied. First, a rapid growth of the electron beam's emittance immediately after the spherical gridded Pierce gun resulted, in part, from the long time required for our pulsing electronics to ramp the grid voltage up at the start and down at the end of the pulse, which created a pulse with a cosine-like current distribution as a function of time. The growth was compounded by the extremely small radial beam size (almost a waist) leaving the gun. In addition, we saw evidence of electrostatic charging of the insulators in the gun, reducing the quality of the electron beam further. Second, the action of the solenoidal focusing fields in the low-voltage bunching region was studied, and criteria for a minimum emittance growth were established. Third, maximum misalignment angles and displacements for various elements of the beamline were calculated for the desired low emittance growth. Finally, emittance growth in the horizontal dimension through the nonisochronous bend caused by varying energy depression on the particles due to longitudinal wake fields was both calculated and observed. In addition, we measured energy depressions caused by the wake fields generated by various other elements in the beamline. Strategies were developed to relieve the magnitude of these wake-field effects. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

  8. A versatile facility for laboratory studies of viscoelastic and poroelastic behaviour of rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Ian [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Schijns, Heather; Schmitt, Douglas R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Mu Junjie; Delmenico, Alison [Department of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel laboratory equipment has been modified to allow both torsional and flexural oscillation measurements at sub-microstrain amplitudes, thereby providing seismic-frequency constraints on both the shear and compressional wave properties of cylindrical rock specimens within the linear regime. The new flexural mode capability has been tested on experimental assemblies containing fused silica control specimens. Close consistency between the experimental data and the results of numerical modelling with both finite-difference and finite-element methods demonstrates the viability of the new technique. The capability to perform such measurements under conditions of independently controlled confining and pore-fluid pressure, with emerging strategies for distinguishing between local (squirt) and global (specimen-wide) fluid flow, will have particular application to the study of frequency-dependent seismic properties expected of cracked and fluid-saturated rocks of the Earth's upper crust.

  9. Simulating the photometric study of pulsating white dwarf stars in the physics laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chote, Paul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed a realistic simulation of astronomical observing using a relatively low-cost commercial CCD camera and a microcontroller-based circuit that drives LEDs inside a light-tight box with time-varying intensities. As part of a laboratory experiment, students can acquire sequences of images using the camera, and then perform data analysis using a language such as MATLAB or Python to: (a) extract the intensity of the imaged LEDs, (b) perform basic calibrations on the time-series data, and (c) convert their data into the frequency domain where they can then identify the frequency structure. The primary focus is on studying light curves produced by the pulsating white dwarf stars. The exercise provides an introduction to CCD observing, a framework for teaching concepts in numerical data analysis and Fourier techniques, and connections with the physics of white dwarf stars.

  10. Studies of the velocity fields near a submerged rectangular object

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young-Ki

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    of the time periodic waves past a submerged rectangular object. For sotne wave conditions, large energy dissipation occurred at the submerged object due to vortex generation. The amount of energy dissipation was examined by comparing incident wave energy... object. A two component laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) was used to obtain detailed measurements of the instantaneous velocity field and flow visualization was conducted to study the vortex structure around the submerged object. The measured wave...

  11. Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.; Click, D.; Feller, M.

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) supported the qualification of the processing of this glass system at the DWPF. A recommendation from the SRNL studies was the need for the DWPF Laboratory to establish a method to measure thorium by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES). This recommendation led to the set of thorium-bearing glasses from the SB6 Variability Study (VS) being submitted to the DWPF Laboratory for chemical composition measurement. The measurements were conducted by the DWPF Laboratory using the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method routinely employed for analysis of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). These measurements are presented and reviewed in this report. The review indicates that the measurements provided by the DWPF Laboratory are comparable to those provided by Analytical Development's laboratory at SRNL for these same glasses. As a result, the authors of this report recommend that the DWPF Laboratory begin using its routine peroxide fusion dissolution method for the measurement of thorium in SME samples of SB6. The purpose of this technical report is to present the measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory for the SB6 VS glasses and to compare the measurements to the targeted compositions for these VS glasses as well as to SRNL's measurements (both sets, targeted and measured, of compositional values were reported by SRNL in [2]). The goal of these comparisons is to provide information that will lead to the qualification of peroxide fusion dissolution as a method for the measurement by the DWPF Laboratory of thorium in SME glass samples.

  12. On-site field tests for study of low-rank western coal fly ash. Technical summary report, field test No. 3. Big Brown Station electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlin, R. S.; Bickelhaupt, R. E.; Marchant, Jr., G. H.; Gooch, J. P.

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of field and laboratory studies of combined NH/sub 3/ and SO/sub 3/ conditioning at the Big Brown Station of Texas Utilities Generating Company. This unusual combination of conditioning agents is used routinely at the Big Brown Station in order to improve the performance of the cold-side electrostatic precipitators. The primary objectives of this field study were to evaluate the performance of one of the Big Brown precipitators, and to obtain data on the concentration, composition, and size distribution of the fly ash, as well as the composition of the flue gas and the overall and fractional collection efficiencies of the precipitator. The laboratory studies of the Big Brown fly ash were intended to further characterize the ash both physically and chemically, and to study the attenuation of the electrical resistivity of the ash associated with the surface film produced by the dual conditioning process and by the use of SO/sub 3/ conditioning alone. 6 references, 22 figures, 9 tables.

  13. Integrated modeling and field study of potential mechanisms forinduced seismicity at The Geysers Goethermal Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Majer, Ernie; Oldenburg, Curt; Peterson, John; Vasco, Don

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present progress made in a study aimed atincreasing the understanding of the relative contributions of differentmechanisms that may be causing the seismicity occurring at The Geysersgeothermal field, California. The approach we take is to integrate: (1)coupled reservoir geomechanical numerical modeling, (2) data fromrecently upgraded and expanded NCPA/Calpine/LBNL seismic arrays, and (3)tens of years of archival InSAR data from monthly satellite passes. Wehave conducted a coupled reservoir geomechanical analysis to studypotential mechanisms induced by steam production. Our simulation resultscorroborate co-locations of hypocenter field observations of inducedseismicity and their correlation with steam production as reported in theliterature. Seismic and InSAR data are being collected and processed foruse in constraining the coupled reservoir geomechanicalmodel.

  14. Final Technical Report for DOE DE-FG02-05ER54831 "Laboratory Studies of Dynamos."

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forest, Cary B. [UW-Madison

    2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory Studies of Dynamos: Executive Summary. The self-generation of magnetic #12;fields by astrophysical bodies like planets, stars, accretion disks, galaxies, and even galaxy clusters arises due to a mechanism referred to as a homogeneous dynamo. It is quite simple to demonstrate the generation of a magnetic fi#12;eld from a rotating copper disk coupled with a coil of wire, a device known as the homopolar dynamo. The device works like a magnetic fi#12;eld ampli#12;er with a feedback circuit: the differential rotation of a metal disk past an infinitesimally small seed magnetic field induces currents in the disk which, when coupled to a coil winding, can amplify the #12;field until it becomes strong enough to slow the rotation of the disk. What is remarkable is that the same type of circuit may be achieved in a flowing conducting fluid such as a liquid metal in the case of planetary dynamos or a plasma in the case of astrophysical dynamos. The complexity of describing planetary and stellar dynamos despite their ubiquity and the plethora of observational data from the Earth and the Sun motivates the demonstration of a laboratory homogenous dynamo. To create a homogenous dynamo, one #12;first needs a su#14;fficiently large, fast flow of a highly conducting fluid that the velocity shear in the fluid can bend magnetic #12;field lines. With a high Rm-flow, the magnetic fi#12;eld can be ampli#12;ed by the stretching action provided by di#11;fferential rotation. The other critical ingredient is a flow geometry that provides feedback so that the ampli#12;ed #12;eld reinforces the initial in#12;nitesimal seed #12;field - a mechanism that recreates the feedback provided by the coil of wire in the homopolar dynamo. In the Madison Dynamo Experiment, this combination of magnetic ampli#12;cation and feedback is feasible in the simple geometry of two counter-rotating helical vortices in a 1 meter-diameter spherical vessel #12;lled with liquid sodium. For an optimal helical pitch of the flow the threshold for exciting a dynamo is predicted from laminar flow modeling to be at peak flow speeds of 5 m/s. Liquid metals tend to have viscosities similar to that of water yielding inviscid flows. Whereas the timescale for the dynamo instability is on the resistive dissipation time, the timescale for hydrodynamic instability of the shear layer is quite short meaning that the shear layer required to generate the magnetic #12;eld is broken up by Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. The eddies generated by large-scale flow drive instabilities at progressively smaller scale giving rise to a cascade of turbulent eddies driven at the largest scale of the experiment. The major contribution of the Madison Dynamo Experiment has been quantifying the role this turbulence plays in the generation of magnetic #12;elds. Overall, the Madison Dynamo Experiment has now operated for about 1 decade and carried out experiments related to magnetic fi#12;eld generation by turbulent flows of liquid metal. The principle thrust of research and indeed the main scienti#12;fic outcomes are related to how turbulent flows create and transport magnetic fi#12;elds.

  15. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong Wang

    2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To address concerns on the effect of natural air drying process on EFE, a comparative study was conducted on Nb and the results showed insignificant difference under the experimental conditions. Nb thin films deposited on Cu present a possible alternative to bulk Nb in superconducting cavities. The EFE performance of a preliminary energetically deposited Nb thin film sample are presented.

  16. Assessment of the genotoxic potential of contaminated estuarine sediments in fish peripheral blood: Laboratory versus in situ studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costa, Pedro M., E-mail: pmcosta@fct.unl.pt [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Neuparth, Teresa S. [CIIMAR-Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal)] [CIIMAR-Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigacao Marinha e Ambiental, Laboratorio de Toxicologia Ambiental, Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas 289, 4050-123 Porto (Portugal); Caeiro, Sandra [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal) [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Departamento de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Aberta, Rua da Escola Politecnica, 141, 1269-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lobo, Jorge [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)] [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Martins, Marta; Ferreira, Ana M.; Caetano, Miguel; Vale, Carlos [IPIMAR-INRB, Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biologicos, Avenida de Brasilia, 1449-006 Lisboa (Portugal)] [IPIMAR-INRB, Instituto Nacional dos Recursos Biologicos, Avenida de Brasilia, 1449-006 Lisboa (Portugal); Angel DelValls, T. [UNESCO/UNITWIN/WiCop Chair-Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)] [UNESCO/UNITWIN/WiCop Chair-Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cadiz, Poligono rio San Pedro s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Costa, Maria H. [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)] [IMAR-Instituto do Mar, Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia do Ambiente, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Juvenile Senegalese soles (Solea senegalensis) were exposed to estuarine sediments through 28-day laboratory and in situ (field) bioassays. The sediments, collected from three distinct sites (a reference plus two contaminated) of the Sado Estuary (W Portugal) were characterized for total organic matter, redox potential, fine fraction and for the levels of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorines, namely polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichloro diphenyl tricholoethane plus its main metabolites (DDTs). Genotoxicity was determined in whole peripheral blood by the single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE or 'comet') assay and by scoring erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities (ENA). Analysis was complemented with the determination of lipid peroxidation in blood plasma by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) protocol and cell type sorting. The results showed that exposure to contaminated sediments induced DNA fragmentation and clastogenesis. Still, laboratory exposure to the most contaminated sediment revealed a possible antagonistic effect between metallic and organic contaminants that might have been enhanced by increased bioavailability. The laboratory assay caused a more pronounced increase in ENA whereas a very significant increase in DNA fragmentation was observed in field-tested fish exposed to the reference sediment, which is likely linked to increased lipid peroxidation that probably occurred due to impaired access to food. Influence of natural pathogens was ruled out by unaltered leukocyte counts. The statistical integration of data correlated lipid peroxidation with biological variables such as fish length and weight, whereas the genotoxicity biomarkers were more correlated to sediment contamination. It was demonstrated that laboratory and field bioassays for the risk assessment of sediment contamination may yield different genotoxicity profiles although both provided results that are in overall accordance with sediment contamination levels. While field assays may provide more ecologically relevant data, the multiple environmental variables may produce sufficient background noise to mask the true effects of contamination.

  17. Proposal for study of $\\pi^{-}$ nucleur collisions in nuclear emulsion exposed in a pulsed magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva. SPS Experiments Committee

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for study of $\\pi^{-}$ nucleur collisions in nuclear emulsion exposed in a pulsed magnetic field

  18. Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goals of this research effort are to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a very practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms (CRs) with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research is motivated by the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many CRs are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in CRs. This document provides a summary of the detailed plans developed for the field study that will take place in 2005 to evaluate the energy and IAQ performance of a new classroom HVAC technology. The field study will include measurements of HVAC energy use, ventilation rates, and IEQ conditions in 10 classrooms with the new HVAC technology and in six control classrooms with a standard HVAC system. Energy use and many IEQ parameters will be monitored continuously, while other IEQ measurements will be will be performed seasonally. Continuously monitored data will be remotely accessed via a LonWorks network. Instrument calibration plans that vary with the type of instrumentation used are established. Statistical tests will be employed to compare energy use and IEQ conditions with the new and standard HVAC systems. Strengths of this study plan include the collection of real time data for a full school year, the use of high quality instrumentation, the incorporation of many quality control measures, and the extensive collaborations with industry that limit costs to the sponsors.

  19. Magnetic resonance studies of cement based materials in inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boguszynska, Joanna [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, Poznan (Poland); Brown, Marc C.A. [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NR (United Kingdom); McDonald, Peter J. [School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.mcdonald@surrey.ac.uk; Mitchell, Jonathan [School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Mulheron, Mike [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Tritt-Goc, Jadwiga [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, Poznan (Poland); Verganelakis, Dimitris A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-sided magnets give hope that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) might in future be used for in situ characterisation of hydration and water transport in the surface layers of concrete slabs. Towards that end, a portable NMR-MOUSE (MObile Universal Surface Explorer) has been used to follow the hydration of gypsum based plaster, a Portland cement paste and concrete mortar. The results compare favourably to those obtained using a standard laboratory bench-top spectrometer. Further, stray field imaging (STRAFI) based methods have been used with embedded NMR detector coils to study water transport across a mortar/topping interface. The measured signal amplitudes are found to correlate with varying sample conditions.

  20. Technology study of Gunite tank sludge mobilization at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVore, J.R.; Herrick, T.J.; Lott, K.E.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite Tank Sludge Mobilization Technology Study was initiated to support the Gunite Tank Treatability Study effort. The technology study surveyed the methods and technologies available for tank cleaning and sludge mobilization in a radioactive environment. Technologies were identified and considered for applicability to the Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAAT) problems. These were then either accepted for further study or rejected as not applicable. Technologies deemed applicable to the GAAT sludge removal project were grouped for evaluation according to (1) deployment method, (2) types of remotely operated end effector equipment applicable to removal of sludge, (3) methods for removing wastes from the tanks, and (4) methods for concrete removal. There were three major groups of deployment technologies: ``past practice`` technologies, mechanical arm-based technologies, and vehicle-based technologies. The different technologies were then combined into logical sequences of deployment platform, problem, end effector, conveyance, post-removal treatment required (if any), and disposition of the waste. Many waste removal options are available, but the best technology in one set of circumstances at one site might not be the best type to use at a different site. No single technology is capable of treating the entire spectrum of wastes that will be encountered in GAAT. None of the systems used in other industries appears to be suitable, primarily because of the nature of the sludges in the GAAT Operable Unit (OU), their radiation levels, and tank geometries. Other commercial technologies were investigated but rejected because the authors did not believe them to be applicable.

  1. A reservoir management study of a mature oil field.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peruzzi, Tave

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??An integrated geological, petrophysical and reservoir engineering review was performed for a mature, producing oil field. Like many older fields, important data are missing or (more)

  2. Helium isotope study of geothermal features in Chile with field and laboratory data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dobson, Patrick

    Dobson, P.F., Kennedy, B.M., Reich, M., Sanchez, P., and Morata, D. (2013) Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile. Proceedings, 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Feb. 11-13, 2013

  3. Laboratory and Field Experimental Studies of CO2 as Heat Transmission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    started in February 2010; end date has not been determined. * Collaboration between LBNL (Pruess), UC Berkeley (Glaser), Central Research Institute of the Electric Power...

  4. Helium isotope study of geothermal features in Chile with field and laboratory data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Helium isotope and stable isotope data from the El Tatio, Tinginguirica, Chillan, and Tolhuaca geothermal systems, Chile. Data from this submission are discussed in: Dobson, P.F., Kennedy, B.M., Reich, M., Sanchez, P., and Morata, D. (2013) Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile. Proceedings, 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Feb. 11-13, 2013

  5. Laboratory and Field Experimental Studies of CO2 as Heat Transmission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Systems (EGS) with CO2as Heat Transmission Fluid Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) Development of Chemical Model to...

  6. Numerical, field and laboratory studies of three-dimensional flow structures at river channel confluences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradbrook, Kathryn Frances

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ' secondary circulation and transient turbulent eddies may not be as clear as often implied. 2. Examination of bed shear stress predictions indicate some implications of particular flow patterns for sediment transport and morphological change. For example...

  7. Harmful algal bloom species and phosphate-processing effluent: Field and laboratory studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Harbor in southern Tampa Bay (Fig. 1). The State of Florida was then left to dispose of more than 1). Instabilities in the aging phospho- gypsum stacks of the Piney Point phosphate plant, along with potential an emergency permit to the FDEP allowing transport by barge of wastewater to an area greater than 74 km

  8. Numerical, Laboratory And Field Studies of Gas Production From Natural Hydrate Accumulations in Geologic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Kowalsky, Michael; Reagan, Matthew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrate (Class 1W) or gas and hydrate (Class 1G). In Class 1Economic Geology of Natural Gas Hydrates, M. Max, A.H. John-of the thermal test of gas hydrate dissociation in the

  9. Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid wastes produced by advanced coal combustion processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites were selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute's fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison's limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United's mine site in central Illinois with wastes supplied by the nearby Midwest Grain FBC unit. During the past year, field monitoring and sampling of the four landfill test cases constructed in 1989 and 1991 has continued. Option 1 of the contract was approved last year to add financing for the fifth test case at the Freeman United site. The construction of the Test Case 5 cells is scheduled to begin in November, 1992. Work during this past year has focused on obtaining data on the physical and chemical properties of the landfilled wastes, and on developing a conceptual framework for interpreting this information. Results to date indicate that hydration reactions within the landfilled wastes have had a major impact on the physical and chemical properties of the materials but these reactions largely ceased after the first year, and physical properties have changed little since then. Conditions in Colorado remained dry and no porewater samples were collected. In Ohio, hydration reactions and increases in the moisture content of the waste tied up much of the water initially infiltrating the test cells.

  10. The tropical brown alga Lobophora variegata as a bioindicator of mining1 contamination in the New Caledonia lagoon: a field transplantation study2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 The tropical brown alga Lobophora variegata as a bioindicator of mining1 contamination in the New field and laboratory studies have identified the alga Lobophora variegata as a good21 candidate key contaminants, i.e. Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr,25 Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn. Algae from clean and contaminated

  11. Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

    2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

  12. HD172189: another step in furnishing one of the best laboratories known for asteroseismic studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creevey, O L; Martn-Ruiz, S; Amado, P J; Niemczura, E; VanWinckel, H; Surez, J C; Rolland, A; Rodler, F; Rodrguez-Lpez, C; Rodrguez, E; Raskin, G; Rainer, M; Poretti, E; Pall, P; Molina, R; Moya, A; Mathias, P; Guillou, L Le; Hadrava, P; Fabbian, D; Garrido, R; Decin, L; Cutispoto, G; Casanova, V; Broeders, E; Ferro, A Arellano; Aceituno, F

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HD172189 is a spectroscopic eclipsing binary system with a rapidly-rotating pulsating delta Scuti component. It is also a member of the open cluster IC4756. These combined characteristics make it an excellent laboratory for asteroseismic studies. To date, HD172189 has been analysed in detail photometrically but not spectroscopically. For this reason we have compiled a set of spectroscopic data to determine the absolute and atmospheric parameters of the components. We determined the radial velocities (RV) of both components using four different techniques. We disentangled the binary spectra using KOREL, and performed the first abundance analysis on both disentangled spectra. By combining the spectroscopic results and the photometric data, we obtained the component masses, 1.8 and 1.7 solar masses, and radii, 4.0 and 2.4 solar radii, for inclination i = 73.2 degrees, eccentricity e = 0.28, and orbital period 5.70198 days. Effective temperatures of 7600 K and 8100 K were also determined. The measured vsini are 7...

  13. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

  14. Laboratory study on intracranial hypotension created by pumping the chamber of a hydrocephalus shunt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromby, Adam; Czosnyka, Zofia; Allin, David M; Richards, Hugh K; Pickard, John D; Czosnyka, Marek

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Background It has been reported that pumping a shunt in situ may precipitate a proximal occlusion, and/or lead to ventricular over-drainage, particularly in the context of small ventricles. In the laboratory we measured the effect...

  15. A laboratory study of localized boundary mixing in a rotating stratified fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Judith R. (Judith Roberta)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic observations indicate that abyssal mixing is localized in regions of rough topography. How locally mixed fluid interacts with the ambient fluid is an open question. Laboratory experiments explore the interaction ...

  16. Radiation from Small-Scale Magnetic Field Turbulence: Implications for Gamma-Ray Bursts and Laboratory Astrophysical Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Sarah J

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    a region of current filamentation, and show that the jitter radiation may be used as a radiative diagnostic to determine features of the magnetic field distribution within this region. For gamma-ray bursts, this instability may play a significant...

  17. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Steven Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a potential Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed low-level, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area (TA)-54. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to seven sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. The top site choice is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. The seven sites are as follows. TA-18/36 (62 acres) is located on Potrillo Drive that intersects Pajarito Road at the bottom of a steep grade. It has some blast zone issues on its southwest side and some important archeological sites on the southeast section. TA-60 (50 acres) is located at the end of Eniwetok Road off Diamond Drive, east of TA-3. Most of the site is within a fifty foot-deep ravine (that may have contamination in the drainage), with a small section on the mesa above. TA-63/52/46 (110 acres) lies to the north of Pajarito Road along Puye Road. It is centrally located in a brown field industrial area, with good access to generators on a controlled road. TA-46 (22 acres) is a narrow site on the south side of Pajarito Road across from TA-46 office buildings. TA-48 (14 acres) is also narrow, and is located on the north side of Pajarito Road near the west vehicle access portal (VAP). TA-51 (19 acres) is located on the south side of Pajarito Road at the top of the hill above TA-18 near the current entrance to the TA-54. TA-54 West (16 acres) is just north of the entrance to TA-54 at Pajarito Road and is close to Zone 4. Although it is near the San Ildefonso Pueblo property line, there may be adequate set-back for sight screening.

  18. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings contained in this report have not been, 2013 Final Report #12;CIVL 498C: Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research LaboratoryUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Daniel Tse Life Cycle

  19. When learning about the real world is better done virtually: A study of substituting computer simulations for laboratory equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    When learning about the real world is better done virtually: A study of substituting computer simulations for laboratory equipment N. D. Finkelstein, W. K. Adams, C. J. Keller, P. B. Kohl, K. K. Perkins; published 6 October 2005 This paper examines the effects of substituting a computer simulation for real

  20. Study on neutron radiation field of carbon ions therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun-Kui; Li, Wu-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xi-Meng; Mao, Wang; Pang, Cheng-Guo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon ions offer significant advantages for deep-seated local tumors therapy due to their physical and biological properties. Secondary particles, especially neutrons caused by heavy ion reactions should be carefully considered in treatment process and radiation protection. For radiation protection purposes, the FLUKA Code was used in order to evaluate the radiation field at deep tumor therapy room of HIRFL in this paper. The neutron energy spectra, neutron dose and energy deposition of carbon ion and neutron in tissue-like media was studied for bombardment of solid water target by 430MeV/u C ions. It is found that the calculated neutron dose have a good agreement with the experimental date, and the secondary neutron dose may not exceed one in a thousand of the carbon ions dose at Bragg peak area in tissue-like media.

  1. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

  2. A reservoir management study of a mature oil field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peruzzi, Tave

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to other mature oil fields to make sound engineering and business decisions. I interpreted the geological structure and stratigaphy of the salt dome oil field. Structure, isopach and cross-sectional maps were constructed. Depositional environments...

  3. Laboratory studies of spectroscopic markers for the characterization of surface erosion by plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manos, D.M.; Bennett, T.; Herzer, M.; Schwarzmann, J.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The erosion rates in portions of fusion plasma devices like the ITER tokamak are sufficiently high that nearly real-time information on cumulative removal is needed for control and machine safety. We are developing a digitally--encoded scheme to indicate the depth of erosion at numerous poloidal and toroidal locations around ITER. The scheme uses materials embedded in the walls and divertors, which, when uncovered, present remotely detectable signals. This paper reports laboratory experiments on prototype markers consisting of combinations of up to 5 elements (Au,Pd,Ag,In,Ga) along with Au,Pt, and Ta pure metals. The markers were bonded to 4-D carbon-carbon composite of the type proposed for use in the ITER first wall, and placed in the lower-hybrid-driven plasma of the atomic beam facility at PPL. The paper describes this device Light emission was characterized using a 1 meter Czerny-Turner vacuum ultraviolet monochromator. The samples were characterized both before and after plasma exposure by Auger spectroscopy. We report the time-dependent behavior of the spectra of the visible and ultraviolet light emitted by the plasma when the markers are uncovered by the erosion showing emission lines of the marker elements which are easily distinguished from the background plasma lines. The dependence of the light intensity on bias voltage is compared to the known sputtering yields of the elements. The optical detection method allows exploration of the threshold dependence of these multi-element targets. An exponential dependence of yield above threshold was observed for all of the elements studied.

  4. Laboratory studies of spectroscopic markers for the characterization of surface erosion by plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manos, D.M.; Bennett, T.; Herzer, M.; Schwarzmann, J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The erosion rates in portions of fusion plasma devices like the ITER tokamak are sufficiently high that nearly real-time information on cumulative removal is needed for control and machine safety. We are developing a digitally--encoded scheme to indicate the depth of erosion at numerous poloidal and toroidal locations around ITER. The scheme uses materials embedded in the walls and divertors, which, when uncovered, present remotely detectable signals. This paper reports laboratory experiments on prototype markers consisting of combinations of up to 5 elements (Au,Pd,Ag,In,Ga) along with Au,Pt, and Ta pure metals. The markers were bonded to 4-D carbon-carbon composite of the type proposed for use in the ITER first wall, and placed in the lower-hybrid-driven plasma of the atomic beam facility at PPL. The paper describes this device Light emission was characterized using a 1 meter Czerny-Turner vacuum ultraviolet monochromator. The samples were characterized both before and after plasma exposure by Auger spectroscopy. We report the time-dependent behavior of the spectra of the visible and ultraviolet light emitted by the plasma when the markers are uncovered by the erosion showing emission lines of the marker elements which are easily distinguished from the background plasma lines. The dependence of the light intensity on bias voltage is compared to the known sputtering yields of the elements. The optical detection method allows exploration of the threshold dependence of these multi-element targets. An exponential dependence of yield above threshold was observed for all of the elements studied.

  5. Studies of Avalanche Photodiode Performance in a High Magnetic Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marler; T. McCauley; S. Reucroft; J. Swain; D. Budil; S. Kolaczkowski

    2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of exposing a Hamamatsu avalanche photodiode (APD) to a 7.9 Tesla magnetic field. The effect of the magnetic field on the gain of the APD is shown and discussed. We find APD gain to be unaffected in the presence of such a magnetic field.

  6. Open-closed field line boundary position: A parametric study using an MHD model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Zeeuw, Darren L.

    Laboratory, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA Received 29 July 2003; revised 26 March 2004 in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), solar wind dynamic pressure, and dipole tilt angle on the position as a function of the solar wind By and Bz which we find to have the largest effect on the OCB location. We

  7. Final Report: Laboratory Studies of Spontaneous Reconnection and Intermittent Plasma Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egedal-Pedersen, Jan [Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Porkolab, Miklos [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the collisionless magnetic reconnection constituted the primary work carried out under this grant. The investigations utilized two magnetic configurations with distinct boundary conditions. Both configurations were based upon the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF) at the MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and the MIT Physics Department. The NSF/DOE award No. 0613734, supported two graduate students (now Drs. W. Fox and N. Katz) and material expenses. The grant enabled these students to operate the VTF basic plasma physics experiment on magnetic reconnection. The first configuration was characterized by open boundary conditions where the magnetic field lines interface directly with the vacuum vessel walls. The reconnection dynamics for this configuration has been methodically characterized and it has been shown that kinetic effects related to trapped electron trajectories are responsible for the high rates of reconnection observed. This type of reconnection has not been investigated before. Nevertheless, the results are directly relevant to observations by the Wind spacecraft of fast reconnection deep in the Earth magnetotail. The second configuration was developed to be relevant to specifically to numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, allowing the magnetic field-lines to be contained inside the device. The configuration is compatible with the presence of large current sheets in the reconnection region and reconnection is observed in fast powerful bursts. These reconnection events facilitate the first experimental investigations of the physics governing the spontaneous onset of fast reconnection. In the Report we review the general motivation of this work and provide an overview of our experimental and theoretical results enabled by the support through the awards.

  8. ThermalEngineeringLaboratory,VanderbiltUniversity Monte Carlo Study of Thermal Transport of Direction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, D. Greg

    refrigeration and energy saving buildings 2/12 #12;ThermalEngineeringLaboratory,VanderbiltUniversity Analog into n-type semiconductor, this creates the space charge region and built-in potential (voltage (Temperature Distribution) V Space Charge Region P N Iq, T, V 3/12 #12;Thermal

  9. Office of Enterprise Assessments Review of Field Element Line Management Oversight at Sandia National Laboratories, March 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLC OrderEfficiencyOceanOctober Field Element Line

  10. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) fusion reactor study is a multi-institutional research effort to determine the technical feasibility and key developmental issues of an RFP fusion reactor, especially at high power density, and to determine the potential economics, operations, safety, and environmental features of high-mass-power-density fusion systems. The TITAN conceptual designs are DT burning, 1000 MWe power reactors based on the RFP confinement concept. The designs are compact, have a high neutron wall loading of 18 MW/m{sup 2} and a mass power density of 700 kWe/tonne. The inherent characteristics of the RFP confinement concept make fusion reactors with such a high mass power density possible. Two different detailed designs have emerged: the TITAN-I lithium-vanadium design, incorporating the integrated-blanket-coil concept; and the TITAN-II aqueous loop-in-pool design with ferritic steel structure. This report contains a collection of 16 papers on the results of the TITAN study which were presented at the International Symposium on Fusion Nuclear Technology. This collection describes the TITAN research effort, and specifically the TITAN-I and TITAN-II designs, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions and recommendations. Overall, the basic conclusions are that high-mass power-density fusion reactors appear to be technically feasible even with neutron wall loadings up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}; that single-piece maintenance of the FPC is possible and advantageous; that the economics of the reactor is enhanced by its compactness; and the safety and environmental features need not to be sacrificed in high-power-density designs. The fact that two design approaches have emerged, and others may also be possible, in some sense indicates the robustness of the general findings.

  11. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: a facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, C M; Brookhart, M; Clark, M; Collins, C; Ding, W X; Flanagan, K; Khalzov, I; Li, Y; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Nonn, P; Weisberg, D; Whyte, D G; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and other high-$\\beta$ phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains $\\sim$14 m$^{3}$ of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized $(>50\\%)$. At present, up to 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB$_6$) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB$_6$ cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies...

  12. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, C. M.; Brookhart, M.; Collins, C.; Khalzov, I.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Weisberg, D.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wallace, J.; Clark, M.; Flanagan, K.; Li, Y.; Nonn, P. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Ding, W. X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Whyte, D. G. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Zweibel, E. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-? phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3?m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000?G samarium cobalt magnets, which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains ?14 m{sup 3} of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized (>50%). At present, 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB{sub 6}) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500?V, drawing 40?A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100?kW of electron cyclotron heating power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB{sub 6} cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through J??B torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies on MPDX require a high magnetic Reynolds number Rm?>?1000, and an adjustable fluid Reynolds number 10?1). Initial results from MPDX are presented along with a 0-dimensional power and particle balance model to predict the viscosity and resistivity to achieve dynamo action.

  13. The 10 $?$m infrared band of silicate dust: A laboratory study comparing the aerosol and KBr pellet techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tamanai; H. Mutschke; J. Blum; G. Meeus

    2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The profile of the silicate 10 $\\mu$m IR band contains important information about the evolutional stage of dust in circumstellar environments and the possible ongoing process of planetesimal formation. In order to extract this information, the observed band profiles are compared with calculated or laboratory-measured absorption cross sections of amorphous and crystalline grains with different sizes and compositions. We present in this study the first laboratory measurements of the 10 $\\mu$m band profiles of nonembedded, i.e. free-flying, particles of amorphous and crystalline Mg$_2$SiO$_4$ (with two different particle shapes), amorphous and crystalline MgSiO$_3$, and crystalline olivine. We compare the spectra with those measured on embedded grains and discuss the potential of the new experimental method for comparison with observed spectra, as well as for future studies of agglomeration and surface manipulation of the grains.

  14. The 10 $\\mu$m infrared band of silicate dust: A laboratory study comparing the aerosol and KBr pellet techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamanai, A; Blum, J; Meeus, G

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The profile of the silicate 10 $\\mu$m IR band contains important information about the evolutional stage of dust in circumstellar environments and the possible ongoing process of planetesimal formation. In order to extract this information, the observed band profiles are compared with calculated or laboratory-measured absorption cross sections of amorphous and crystalline grains with different sizes and compositions. We present in this study the first laboratory measurements of the 10 $\\mu$m band profiles of nonembedded, i.e. free-flying, particles of amorphous and crystalline Mg$_2$SiO$_4$ (with two different particle shapes), amorphous and crystalline MgSiO$_3$, and crystalline olivine. We compare the spectra with those measured on embedded grains and discuss the potential of the new experimental method for comparison with observed spectra, as well as for future studies of agglomeration and surface manipulation of the grains.

  15. Laboratory studies of 2H evaporator scale dissolution in dilute nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oji, L.

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of 2H evaporator scale solids dissolution in dilute nitric acid has been experimentally evaluated under laboratory conditions in the SRNL shielded cells. The 2H scale sample used for the dissolution study came from the bottom of the evaporator cone section and the wall section of the evaporator cone. The accumulation rate of aluminum and silicon, assumed to be the two principal elemental constituents of the 2H evaporator scale aluminosilicate mineral, were monitored in solution. Aluminum and silicon concentration changes, with heating time at a constant oven temperature of 90 deg C, were used to ascertain the extent of dissolution of the 2H evaporator scale mineral. The 2H evaporator scale solids, assumed to be composed of mostly aluminosilicate mineral, readily dissolves in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solutions yielding principal elemental components of aluminum and silicon in solution. The 2H scale dissolution rate constant, based on aluminum accumulation in 1.5 and 1.25 M dilute nitric acid solution are, respectively, 9.21E-04 6.39E-04 min{sup -1} and 1.07E-03 7.51E-05 min{sup -1}. Silicon accumulation rate in solution does track the aluminum accumulation profile during the first few minutes of scale dissolution. It however diverges towards the end of the scale dissolution. This divergence therefore means the aluminum-to-silicon ratio in the first phase of the scale dissolution (non-steady state conditions) is different from the ratio towards the end of the scale dissolution. Possible causes of this change in silicon accumulation in solution as the scale dissolution progresses may include silicon precipitation from solution or the 2H evaporator scale is a heterogeneous mixture of aluminosilicate minerals with several impurities. The average half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale mineral in 1.5 M nitric acid is 12.5 hours, while the half-life for the decomposition of the 2H evaporator scale in 1.25 M nitric acid is 10.8 hours. Based on averaging the two half-lives from the 2H scale acid dissolution in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid solutions, a reasonable half-live for the dissolution of 2H scales in dilute nitric acid is 11.7 1.3 hours. The plant operational time for chemically cleaning (soaking) the 2H evaporator with dilute nitric acid is 32 hours. It therefore may require about 3 half-lives or less to completely dissolve most of the scales in the Evaporator pot which come into contact with the dilute nitric acid solution. On a mass basis, the Al-to-Si ratio for the scale dissolution in 1.5 M nitric acid averaged 1.30 0.20 and averaged 1.18 0.10 for the 2H scale dissolution in 1.25 M nitric acid. These aluminum-to-silicon ratios are in fairly good agreement with ratios from previous studies. Therefore, there is still more aluminum in the 2H evaporator scales than silicon which implies that there are no significant changes in scale properties which will exclude nitric acid as a viable protic solvent for aluminosilicate scale buildup dissolution from the 2H evaporator. Overall, the monitoring of the scale decomposition reaction in 1.25 and 1.5 M nitric acid may be better ascertained through the determination of aluminum concentration in solution than monitoring silicon in solution. Silicon solution chemistry may lead to partial precipitating of silicon with time as the scale and acid solution is heated.

  16. A study of the field of values of a matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chynoweth, Linda

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VITA 41 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1. Region of Inclusion vs. Field of Values. Z. Region of Inclusion vs. Field of Values. 3. Region of Inclusion vs. Field of Values, Page 18 19 20 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1 . Definitions and notation...(C) is convex. Proof. The proof of the theorem is arrived at through the following lemmas. Lemma 2. 3. If z is a vector with ~z ~ = 1 , then 0 0 (&l&(z )) is connected. 0 Proof. Assume P (P(z )) is disconnected. Then there are non- 0 empty, disjoint...

  17. An integral field spectrograph for SNAP supernova studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identification of Type Ia supernovae and to standardize theof the mission. Keywords: SNAP, Supernovae, Integral field,measurement of some 2000 supernovae (SNe) of Type Ia up to a

  18. Field studies of virus transport in a heterogeneous sandy aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Jason Robert

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water. Ground water transport models can be used to predict the transport of viruses. However, if current public domain virus transport models are to be used for this purpose, they need to be verified under operating field conditions. To evaluate...

  19. Mirror-Image Stimulation Applied to Field Behavioral Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svendsen, Gerald E.; Armitage, Kenneth

    1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aggre- sive female limits recruitment into the colony (Down- hower and Armitage 1971). The behavioral profiles derived from factor anal- ysis of MIS (Fig. 1) fit well with our field observa- tions of social behavior and activity patterns. Of those...

  20. A Numerical Study of the Mid-field River Plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Kelly Lynne

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    estuary and plume . . . . . . 12 1.2.1 The Merrimack River estuary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.2.2 The Merrimack near-field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 1.2.3 Offshore mid-field forcings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17... is shown in the right panels. . . . 28 viii 3.1 Merrimack River estuary and shelf domain. Grid spans approximately 10 km up the estuary from the mouth to 20 km offshore into the Gulf of Maine. Grid spacing is 40 m at the estuary mouth and 100 m...

  1. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1994--31 August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers the second year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas of nuclear physics: parity violation in neutron and charged-particle resonances--the mass and energy dependence of the weak interaction spreading width; chaotic behavior in {sup 30}P from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; studies of few-body systems; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear data evaluation for A = 3--20, for which TUNL is now the international center; high-spin spectroscopy and superdeformation in nuclei, involving collaborations at Argonne National Laboratory. Developments in technology and instrumentation have been vital to the research and training program. In this progress report the author describes: a proposed polarized {gamma}-beam facility at the Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory; cryogenic systems and microcalorimeter development; continuing development of the Low Energy Beam Facility. The research summaries presented in this progress report are preliminary.

  2. NANO EXPRESS A Study on Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    NANO EXPRESS A Study on Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Graphene Layers Obtained from on field emission characteristics of individual graphene layers for vacuum nanoelectronics. Graphene layers enabled electric con- nection with the graphene layers without postfabrication. The maximum emitted

  3. A field evaluation of the movement of selected metals in revegetated strip mine overburden and laboratory assessment of transport mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launius, Kenneth Wayne

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    placement of materials following the excavation and sampling of lignite at a test pit. The effect of varying ratios of lime and gypsum had on revegetation were studied. Resultant overburden'pH and electrical conductivity (EC) wire evaluated... are needed to ach1eve energy self sufficiency for the Un1ted States. Advanced technology is needed to economically harness the cleanest source of alternate energy, the sun. However, another source of energy available us1ng present-day technology is coal...

  4. Laboratory study related to the production and properties of pig iron nuggets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anameric, B.; Kawatra, S.K. [Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States). Dept. for Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pig iron nuggets were produced in a laboratory-scale furnace at Michigan Technological University. The process was intended to replicate Kobe Steel's ITmk3 direct ironmaking process. These nuggets were produced from pellets that were made from a mixture of iron oxide, coal, flux and a binder and heated in a furnace with a chamber temperature of 1450{sup o}C. The pellets then self-reduced to produce a solid, high-density, highly metallized (96.5% Fe) pig iron. During the nugget production process, a separate liquid slag phase formed that cleanly separated from the molten metal. The physical and chemical properties of the pig iron nuggets were similar to pig iron produced by blast furnaces, which is distinct from direct reduced iron (DRI).

  5. Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, Steven Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a new Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed lowlevel, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's TA-54 Area G. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to ten sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. Three passes of the analysis were required to assess different site scenarios: 1) a fully consolidated CWC with both transfer/storage and LL W disposal in one location (45 acre minimum), 2) CWC transfer/storage only (12 acre minimum), and 3) LLW disposal only (33 acre minimum). The top site choice for all three options is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. TA-54 East, Zone 4 also deserves consideration as a LLW disposal site.

  6. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL 51550 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Evaluation of Flow Capture of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. 3 #12 available flow hoods for residential applications. Results of laboratory and field tests indicate

  7. Laboratory study on the use of tire shreds and rubber-sand in backfills and reinforced soil applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernal, A.; Lovell, C.W.; Salgado, R.

    1996-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Millions of scrap tires are discarded annually in the United States, the bulk of which are currently landfilled or stockpiled. This consumes valuable landfill space, or, if improperly disposed, creates a fire hazard and provides a prolific breeding ground for rates and mosquitoes. The use of tire shreds as lightweight fill material can sharply reduce the tire disposal problem. The present study, based on laboratory testing and numerical modeling, examines the feasibility of incorporating tire shreds and rubber-sand mixtures as lightweight geomaterial in embankments and backfills.

  8. Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan Geologic Field Course and Study Abroad Experience Winter Break 2015 Interested in field geology? Interested in environmental hazards and climate? Want to visit #12;Geology and Geohazards in Taiwan This is a 3-week course for students interested in mixing field

  9. Analytical Plans Supporting The Sludge Batch 8 Glass Variability Study Being Conducted By Energysolutions And Cua's Vitreous State Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

  10. The Management of Silica in Los Alamos National Laboratory Tap Water - A Study of Silica Solubility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlberg, C.; Worland, V.P.; Kozubal, M.A.; Erickson, G.F.; Jacobson, H.M.; McCarthy, K.T.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well water at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has a silica (SiO{sub 2}) content of 60 to 100 mg/L, with 4 mg/L of magnesium, 13 mg/L calcium and lesser concentrations of other ions. On evaporation in cooling towers, when the silica concentration reaches 150 to 220 mg/L, silica deposits on heat transfer surfaces. When the high silica well water is used in the reprocessing of plutonium, silica remains in solution at the end of the process and creates a problem of removal from the effluent prior to discharge or evaporation. The work described in this Report is divided into two major parts. The first part describes the behavior of silica when the water is evaporated at various conditions of pH and in the presence of different classes of anions: inorganic and organic. In the second part of this work it was found that precipitation (floccing) of silica was a function of solution pH and mole ratio of metal to silica.

  11. Analysis and Methane Gas Separations Studies for City of Marsing, Idaho An Idaho National Laboratory Technical Assistance Program Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopher Orme

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction and Background Large amounts of methane in well water is a wide spread problem in North America. Methane gas from decaying biomass and oil and gas deposits escape into water wells typically through cracks or faults in otherwise non-porous rock strata producing saturated water systems. This methane saturated water can pose several problems in the delivery of drinking water. The problems range from pumps vapor locking (cavitating), to pump houses exploding. The City of Marsing requested Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to assist with some water analyses as well as to provide some engineering approaches to methane capture through the INL Technical Assistance Program (TAP). There are several engineering approaches to the removal of methane and natural gas from water sources that include gas stripping followed by compression and/or dehydration; membrane gas separators coupled with dehydration processes, membrane water contactors with dehydration processes.

  12. Field sampling and analysis plan for the remedial investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H.L.; Ashwood, T.L.; Borders, D.M.; Chidambariah, V.; Downing, D.J.; Fontaine, T.A.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Miller, D.E.; Moore, G.K.; Suter, G.W.; Tardiff, M.F.; Watts, J.A.; Wickliff, D.S.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This field sampling and analysis (S & A) plan has been developed as part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) remedial investigation (RI) of Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The S & A plan has been written in support of the remedial investigation (RI) plan for WAG 2 (ORNL 1990). WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the ORNL main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), White Oak Creek embayment (WOCE) on the Clinch River, and the associated floodplain and subsurface environment (Fig. 1.1). The WOC system is the surface drainage for the major ORNL WAGs and has been exposed to a diversity of contaminants from operations and waste disposal activities in the WOC watershed. WAG 2 acts as a conduit through which hydrologic fluxes carry contaminants from upgradient areas to the Clinch River. Water, sediment, soil, and biota in WAG 2 are contaminated and continue to receive contaminants from upgradient WAGs. This document describes the following: an overview of the RI plan, background information for the WAG 2 system, and objectives of the S & A plan; the scope and implementation of the first 2 years of effort of the S & A plan and includes recent information about contaminants of concern, organization of S & A activities, interactions with other programs, and quality assurance specific to the S & A activities; provides details of the field sampling plans for sediment, surface water, groundwater, and biota, respectively; and describes the sample tracking and records management plan.

  13. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ANNUAL REPORT RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS: CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

  14. Classroom HVAC: Improving ventilation and saving energy -- field study plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.; Faulkner, David; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in this study. Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation andV8doc.sas.com/sashtml. Classroom HVAC: Improving VentilationBerkeley, CA 94720. Classroom HVAC: Improving Ventilation

  15. Building America Case Study: Field Testing of Compartmentalization...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    BUILDING AMERICA CASE STUDY: TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS FOR NEW AND EXISTING HOMES Garage Mechanical Room Mechanical rooms are located in the rear-facing garage and house the furnace...

  16. Microearthquake Studies at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Dennise

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to detect and locate microearthquakes to aid in the characterization of reservoir fracture networks. Accurate identification and mapping of the large numbers of microearthquakes induced in EGS is one technique that provides diagnostic information when determining the location, orientation and length of underground crack systems for use in reservoir development and management applications. Conventional earthquake location techniques often are employed to locate microearthquakes. However, these techniques require labor-intensive picking of individual seismic phase onsets across a network of sensors. For this project we adapt the Matched Field Processing (MFP) technique to the elastic propagation problem in geothermal reservoirs to identify more and smaller events than traditional methods alone.

  17. Microearthquake Studies at the Salton Sea Geothermal Field

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Templeton, Dennise

    The objective of this project is to detect and locate microearthquakes to aid in the characterization of reservoir fracture networks. Accurate identification and mapping of the large numbers of microearthquakes induced in EGS is one technique that provides diagnostic information when determining the location, orientation and length of underground crack systems for use in reservoir development and management applications. Conventional earthquake location techniques often are employed to locate microearthquakes. However, these techniques require labor-intensive picking of individual seismic phase onsets across a network of sensors. For this project we adapt the Matched Field Processing (MFP) technique to the elastic propagation problem in geothermal reservoirs to identify more and smaller events than traditional methods alone.

  18. A phase-field study of ternary multiphase microstructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cogswell, Daniel A. (Daniel Aaron)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A diffuse-interface model for microstructures with an arbitrary number of components and phases was developed from basic thermodynamic and kinetic principles and applied to the study of ternary eutectic phase transformations. ...

  19. Study of limiter damage in a magnetic-field error region of the ZT-40M experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makowitz, H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study has been initiated of material plasma interactions on the ZT-40M, Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) plasma physics confinement experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Observations of the evaporation and cracking to TiC coatings, initially placed on an AXF-5Q Graphite mushroom limiter, installed in a high field error region (e.g. an experimental vacuum vessel/liner port) were investigated. A parametric study was performed of the thermal and stress behavior of the limiter and coating materials undergoing plasma material heat exchange processes, in order to infer the magnitude of heat flux necessary to explain the observed material damage. In addition the vacuum (liner) wall material behavior was studied parametrically using the same heat flux values as the limiter study. A one-dimensional conduction model was used with applied heat and radiation boundary conditions, for predicting temperature distributions in space and time, where the thermal stress was calculated using a restrained in bending only plate model. Wall loadings corresponding to first wall, limiter energy fluxes ranging between 1 x 10/sup 2/ W/cm/sup 2/ and 1 x 10/sup 5/ W/cm/sup 2/ were used as parameters with plasma material interaction times (tau/sub QO) between 0.5 ms and 10 ms. Short plasma energy deposition time (tau/sub QO/ > 10 ms) spacial and time histories of temperature and stress were calculated for SS-304, Inconel-625, TiC and AXF -5Q Graphite materials.

  20. Boosting Potato Defence Against Late A Study from Field to Molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boosting Potato Defence Against Late Blight A Study from Field to Molecule Therése Bengtsson Cover: A hypersensitive response (HR)-like lesion in a BABA-treated leaflet of the potato cultivar by trypan blue. (photo: T. Bengtsson) #12;Boosting Potato Defence Against Late Blight. A Study from Field

  1. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is one-page, two-sided fact sheet presents high-level summary results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2, which examined operational impacts of high penetrations of variable renewable generation in the West.

  2. Study of fusion product effects in field-reversed mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driemeyer, D.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of fusion products (fps) on Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) reactor concepts has been evaluated through the development of two new computer models. The first code (MCFRM) treats fps as test particles in a fixed background plasma, which is represented as a fluid. MCFRM includes a Monte Carlo treatment of Coulomb scattering and thus provides an accurate treatment of fp behavior even at lower energies where pitch-angle scattering becomes important. The second code (FRMOD) is a steady-state, globally averaged, two-fluid (ion and electron), point model of the FRM plasma that incorporates fp heating and ash buildup values which are consistent with the MCFRM calculations. These codes have been used extensively in the development of an advanced-fuel FRM reactor design (SAFFIRE). A Catalyzed-D version of the plant is also discussed along with an investigation of the steady-state energy distribution of fps in the FRM. User guides for the two computer codes are also included.

  3. The impact of immersion training on complementing organizational goals and accelerating culture change - a field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, S.M.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory, a national defense laboratory with a history of working in seclusion and secrecy, scientists and engineers have received an important new mission to partner with industry. The scientists and engineers need to expand their skill base beyond science and understand the business of innovation to be successful in this new environment. An administrative field experiment of conducting intensive, immersion training about the commercialization process was piloted at Los Alamos in September, 1992. This Field Research Project addresses the following research question: {open_quotes}Does {open_quotes}immersion{close_quotes} commercialization training complement organizational goals and does the method accelerate cultural change?{close_quotes} The field experiment first began as a pilot Commercialization Workshop conducted for twelve scientists in September, 1992. The objective was to create commercialization action plans for promising environmental technologies. The immersion method was compared to the indoctrination method of training also. The indoctrination training was a one-day lecture style session conducted for one hundred and fifty scientists in July, 1993. The impact of the training was measured by perceived attitude change and the amount of subsequent industrial partnerships that followed the training. The key management question addressed on the job was, {open_quotes}With a limited budget, how do we maximize the impact of training and achieve the best results?{close_quotes}

  4. Edmund G. Brown, Jr. EXPERIMENTAL AND FIELD STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Stroud, and J. Braun of UC Davis provided help at various stages of the study with statistical models PIERFINALPROJECTREPORT Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: University of California Davis August 2011 CEC-500-2009-067 #12;#12;Prepared By: University of California

  5. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (Black and Hower 1965). Clays consist of negatively charged aluminosilicate layers kept together by cations. The most characteristic property is their ability to adsorb water between the layers, resulting in strong repulsive forces and clay expansion... chemicals used in water fracturing such as friction reducers, fluid-loss additives, and surfactants (Black and Hower 1965). The samples used in this study had significant clay-like content. To prevent swelling, a 2% KCl solution was used throughout...

  6. Laboratory studies of radionuclide distributions between selected groundwaters and geologic media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdal, B.R. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive studies of the behavior of plutonium and americium in pH 8 groundwaters were made, particularly with respect to container sorption, filtering, and centrifugation. Significant improvements in the method used for measuring sorption ratios for these elements were developed, and their sorption-desorption ratios on argillite and tuff were measured. Effects of particle size, temperature, sampling location, mineralogy, and time were investigated for these elements. The chemical composition of the water was found to be a major factor that governs sorption behavior for some elements. Studies of the sorption of strontium, cesium, barium, cerium, europium, uranium, and americium on Hainesville salt dome materials were made under aerobic and anoxic (< 0.2 ppm oxygen) conditions using two synthetic groundwaters: one represented the Wilcox aquifer in the Hainesville region and the second was a dilute brine. Studies of the sorption of strontium, cesium, barium, cerium, europium, and uranium(VI) on granite and argillite were made under anoxic (< 0.2 ppm oxygen) conditions and the results were compared to earlier measurements made under aerobic conditions. The sorption of uranium(VI) on argillite under atmospheric conditions was investigated. Measurements of migration rates in crushed granite, argillite, and tuff were made and compared with batch results. Infiltration experiments involving the forced injection of activity into intact and fractured cores were also performed. Microautoradiographic techniques were used to detect specific sorption sites. This latter technique was also used to characterize the sorption of plutonium and neptunium on polished thin-sections of alluvium, granite, tuff, and argillite and to assess the amount of aggregation that occurred. Additional physical and chemical characterizations of the materials used in these studies were made, and new analytical techniques were developed.

  7. Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

  8. High-field As NMR Study of Arsenic Oxysalts. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmas in theinPlastics - EnergyBiofuelfield As NMR Study of

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - IR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,CloudgovCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study ARM Data

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - IRSI Inter-Comparison Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3,CloudgovCampaignsIR Cloud Camera Feasibility Study ARM

  11. FIELD RELIABILITY OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I Ww i 1 i FIELD RELIABILITY OF ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS wcwotoias R I S 0 - M - 2 4 1 8 An analytical study of in-the fiald axparlanca of electronics reliability Tag© Elm Rise National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark February 1 0 8 4 #12;RIS?-M-2418 FIELD RELIABILITY OP ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS An analytical

  12. Performance of underfloor air distribution: Results of a field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas

    2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) is a new method of supplying heated or cooled air throughout a building. Reported advantages of UFAD include easy relocation of air supply diffusers, energy savings, and improved indoor air quality (IAQ). We measured several aspects of the performance of an UFAD system installed in a medium-size office building. The measured air change effectiveness was very close to unity, which is comparable to that measured in buildings with typical overhead air distribution. The pollutant removal efficiency for carbon dioxide was 13 percent higher than expected in a space with well-mixed air, suggesting a 13 percent reduction in exposures to occupant generated pollutants. The increase in indoor air temperatures with height above the floor was only 1 to 2 C (2-4 F). This amount of thermal stratification could reduce the sensible energy requirements for cooling of outdoor air by approximately 10 percent. The occupants level of satisfaction with thermal conditions w as well above average and this high satisfaction rating could possibly be due, in all or part, to the use of a UFAD system. The results of this study provide some evidence of moderate energy and IAQ-related benefits of UFAD. Before general conclusions are drawn, the benefits need to be confirmed in other studies.

  13. This study was performed at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe1A: Handling of4,3, 20114,0,24,This is'\ .study

  14. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goles, Ronald W.; Johnson, Michelle Lynn; Piper, Roman K.; Peters, Jerry D.; Murphy, Mark K.; Mercado, Mike S.; Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  15. Radiation and Health Technology Laboratory Capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bihl, Donald E.; Lynch, Timothy P.; Murphy, Mark K.; Myers, Lynette E.; Piper, Roman K.; Rolph, James T.

    2005-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)(a) performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE and commercial nuclear sites and research and characterization programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, thermoluminescent and radiochromic Dosimetry, and calibration of measurement and test equipment (M&TE). The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations and M&TE laboratories. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentation, photon and neutron transfer standards alpha, beta, and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site, and a wide variety of M&TE. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory.

  16. Numerical study of the THM effects on the near-field safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository--BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project. Part 2: Effects of THM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Numerical study of the THM effects on the near-field safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste, Germany (7) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), Ottawa, Canada (8) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, USA (9) INERIS-LAEGO, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Nancy, France (10) Japan Nuclear

  17. Regional Field Verification -- Case Study of Small Wind Turbines in the Pacific Northwest: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (DOE/NREL) Regional Field Verification (RFV) project supports industry needs for gaining initial field operation experience with small wind turbines and verify the performance, reliability, maintainability, and cost of small wind turbines in diverse applications. In addition, RFV aims to help expand opportunities for wind energy in new regions of the United States by tailoring projects to meet unique regional requirements and document and communicate the experience from these projects for the benefit of others in the wind power development community and rural utilities. Between August 2003 and August 2004, six turbines were installed at different host sites. At least one year of data has been collected from five of these sites. This paper describes DOE/NREL's RFV project, reviews some of the lessons learned with regards to small wind turbine installations, summarizes operations data from these sites, and provides preliminary BOS costs.

  18. A laboratory study of the seasonal life history and seasonal abundance of the black cutworm, Agrotis ipsilon (Hufnagel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latham, Elwin Eugene

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Seasonal History of Agrotis ~l allen (Hufnagel) Development of Artificial Diets for Laboratory Use Laboratory Rearing of ~rotis ~l silon. Head Capsule Measurements . Seasonal Abundance of ~A retie ~i ellen in Texas MATERIALS AND METHODS Establishment.... 40 40 CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES CITED. 50 53 VITA. 57 f Table 1 LIST OF TABLES Ingredients of the artificial diet used for rearing black cutworm larvae Page . 21 Life history of black cutworm moths maintained in the laboratory at College...

  19. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors concluded their program to establish the trends of isospin mixing in nuclei ranging from {sup 12}C to {sup 40}Ca. This program revealed a systematic variation in the proton reduced widths from one A = 4N nucleus to the next as T = 0 nuclei were bombarded by protons and T = 3/2 states were populated in the compound system. In few-body physics, their program of studies of D-state properties of light nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 3}He, and {sup 4}He) resulted in precise determinations of the {eta} parameters for {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H which agreed well with theoretical predictions and served as an important constraint on theoretical calculations. The D{sub 2} parameter determination for {sup 4}He, carried out in collaboration with researchers at Munich and Lisbon, was not as precise but did indicate that {sup 4}He has significant deformation. A program was initiated during this period to measure the ratio of asymptotic D- to S-state normalization constant ({eta}) for {sup 6}Li at Florida State University using the ({sup 6}Li,d) reaction. They determined that the {eta} parameter for {sup 6}Li is extremely small, contrary to expectations.

  20. Laboratory studies of the dynamic of resonance cones formation in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarov, V. V.; Starodubtsev, M. V.; Kostrov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is devoted to experimental studies of formation of resonance cones in magnetized plasmas by pulsed RF source in the lower-hybrid (whistler) and the upper-hybrid frequency ranges. It is shown that in both frequency ranges, resonance cones exhibit similar dynamics after switching-on the RF source: at first, wide maxima of radiation are formed in non-resonance directions, which then become narrower, with their direction approaching the resonance one. While the resonance cones are being formed, one observes a fine structure in the form of secondary radiation maxima. It is shown that the characteristic formation time of stationary resonance cones is determined by the minimal value of the group velocity of the quasi-electrostatic waves excited by the antenna. In the low-temperature plasma, this value is limited in the lower-hybrid frequency range by the spatial spectrum of the emitting antenna and in the upper-hybrid range, by the effects of spatial plasma dispersion.

  1. PITTING CORROSION ON MAGNESIUM ALLOYS : A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FIELD DATA USING EXTREME VALUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maume-Deschamps, Véronique

    PITTING CORROSION ON MAGNESIUM ALLOYS : A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FIELD DATA USING EXTREME VALUE corrosion of the magnesium alloys AZ91D and AM60B combined with different coatings on steel bolts was investigated in field corrosion tests carried out by Volvo Car Corporation. Light metals like magnesium

  2. Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida, Manuel F. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: mfa@fe.up.pt; Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done for most of potential reactions between components in the batteries as well as between them and the surrounding atmosphere and it reasonably agrees the experimental results. The results obtained show the role of alkaline batteries at the acid gases cleaning process, through the neutralization reactions of some of their components. Therefore, LCA of spent AA alkaline batteries at the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process must consider this contribution.

  3. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Che, Xueke, E-mail: chedk@163.com, E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao [Equipment Academy, Beijing 101416 (China)] [Equipment Academy, Beijing 101416 (China); Shao, Tao, E-mail: chedk@163.com, E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7?kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  4. Electric field controlled reversible magnetic anisotropy switching studied by spin rectification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Hengan; Fan, Xiaolong, E-mail: fanxiaolong@lzu.edu.cn; Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Changjun; Rao, Jinwei; Zhao, Xiaobing; Xue, Desheng [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gui, Y. S.; Hu, C.-M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter, spin rectification was used to study the electric field controlled dynamic magnetic properties of the multiferroic composite which is a Co stripe with induced in-plane anisotropy deposited onto a Pb(Mg{sub 1?3}Nb{sub 2?3})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} substrate. Due to the coupling between piezoelectric and magnetoelastic effects, a reversible in-plane anisotropy switching has been realized by varying the history of the applied electric field. This merit results from the electric hysteresis of the polarization in the nonlinear piezoelectric regime, which has been proved by a butterfly type electric field dependence of the in-plane anisotropy field. Moreover, the electric field dependent effective demagnetization field and linewidth have been observed at the same time.

  5. A Study for Sustainable Facilities of University Part3 Field survey for the Renovation of Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyashita, Yasushi

    A Study for Sustainable Facilities of University Part3 Field survey for the Renovation of Buildings-conditioning System's Energy, Environmental and Economic Performance by Simulation 2003 2. Y X 1 [MJ/] [m2] 1

  6. Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    Field Study of Growth and Calcification Rates of Three Species of Articulated Coralline Algae of coralline algae. Decreases in coralline abundance may have cascading effects on marine ecosys- tems- mon species of articulated coralline algae (Bossiella plu- mosa, Calliarthron tuberculosum

  7. Natural gas pipelines after field price decontrol : a study of risk, return and regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Paul R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a study of a regulated industry undergoing rapid change. For the first time in its history, following the partial decontrol of field prices in 1978, natural gas is being priced at a level which places it in direct ...

  8. Crustal melting in the Himalayan orogen : field, geochemical and geochronological studies in the Everest region, Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viskupic, Karen M. (Karen Marie), 1975-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of field studies and geochemical techniques were used to investigate the timing and processes involved in leucogranite generation in the Everest region of the Himalayan orogen. Geochemical investigations ...

  9. Alternatives evaluation and decommissioning study on shielded transfer tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVore, J.R.; Hinton, R.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shielded transfer tanks (STTs) are five obsolete cylindrical shipping casks which were used to transport high specific activity radioactive solutions by rail during the 1960s and early 1970s. The STTs are currently stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under a shed roof. This report is an evaluation to determine the preferred alternative for the final disposition of the five STTs. The decommissioning alternatives assessed include: (1) the no action alternative to leave the STTs in their present location with continued surveillance and maintenance; (2) solidification of contents within the tanks and holding the STTs in long term retrievable storage; (3) sale of one or more of the used STTs to private industry for use at their treatment facility with the remaining STTs processed as in Alternative 4; and (4) removal of tank contents for de-watering/retrievable storage, limited decontamination to meet acceptance criteria, smelting the STTs to recycle the metal through the DOE contaminated scrap metal program, and returning the shielding lead to the ORNL lead recovery program because the smelting contractor cannot reprocess the lead. To completely evaluate the alternatives for the disposition of the STTs, the contents of the tanks must be characterized. Shielding and handling requirements, risk considerations, and waste acceptance criteria all require that the radioactive inventory and free liquids residual in the STTs be known. Because characterization of the STT contents in the field was not input into a computer model to predict the probable inventory and amount of free liquid. The four alternatives considered were subjected to a numerical scoring procedure. Alternative 4, smelting the STTs to recycle the metal after removal/de-watering of the tank contents, had the highest score and is, therefore, recommended as the preferred alternative. However, if a buyer for one or more STT could be found, it is recommended that Alternative 3 be reconsidered.

  10. Small scale laboratory studies of flow and transport phenomena in pores and fractures: Phase 2. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, J.L.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pore level laboratory experiments using microscopy permit the in situ visualization of flow and transport phenomena, that can be recorded on film or videotape. One of the principal tools for visualization is the etched glass micromodel, which is composed of a transparent two dimensional network of three dimensional pores. The spatial scale of interest in these models extends from the individual pore, up to a network of pores, perhaps with small scale heterogeneities. Micromodels are best used to help validate concepts and assumptions, and to elucidate new, previously unrecognized phenomena for further study. They are not quantitative tools, but should be used in combination with quantitative tools such as column studies or mathematical models. There are three applications: multi-phase flow, colloid transport, and bacterial transport and colonization. Specifically the authors have examined behavior of relevance to liquid-liquid mass transfer (solubilization of capillary trapped organic liquids); liquid-gas mass transfer (in situ volatilization); mathematical models of multi-phase pressure-saturation relationships; colloid movement, attachment and detachment in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces, clay interference with multi-phase flow; and heterogeneity effects on multi-phase flow and colloid movement.

  11. In situ heat exchanger tube fouling thickness measurements using ultrasonics. Final report on a laboratory feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshman, J; Munier, R S.C.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of fouling layers on heat exchanger surfaces and the corrosion of heat exchanger materials exposed to seawater have been recognized since the beginning of OTEC research as basic problems which could render the concept uneconomical. Consequently, a significant effort has been directed toward predicting, measuring, identifying, explaining and solving potential biofouling and corrosion phenomena. To address this problem, the feasibility of establishing a practical microacoustic technique to measure fouling film thickness in situ on typical OTEC heat exchanger tasks was studied. Seven techniques were studied for this application, including velocity measurements, acoustic diffraction, acoustic interferometer, Doppler flow velocity, pulse echo, critical angle, and surface (shear) wave effects. Of these, the latter five were laboratory tested using conventional microacoustic system components in various configuratons. Only the pulse echo technique yielded promising results. On fouled aluminum plates, thin film layers of 40 ..mu..m and greater were measured using a focused 30 MHz ceramic transducer operated at 25 MHz; this represents a resolution of about 2/3 wavelength. Measurements made on the inside of fouled 1'' aluminum pipes yielded film thicknesses of 75 to 125 ..mu..m. The thinnest layer resolved was approximately 1-1/4 wavelength. The resolution of slime layer thicknesses in the magnitudes of OTEC interest (5 to 30 ..mu..m) using pulse echo microacoustics will require transducer development. In particular, a higher operating frequency (150 to 200 MHz) and advanced material construction is recommended for further research.

  12. Studies of nuclear processes at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory. Progress report, 1 September 1995--31 August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwig, E.J.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL)--a collaboration of Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill--has had a very productive year. This report covers parts of the second and third year of a three-year grant between the US Department of Energy and the three collaborating universities. The TUNL research program focuses on the following areas: precision test of parity-invariance violation in resonance neutron scattering at LANSCE/LANL; parity violation measurements using charged-particle resonances in A = 20--40 targets and the A = 4 system at TUNL; chaotic behavior in the nuclei {sup 30}P and {sup 34}Cl from studies of eigenvalue fluctuations in nuclear level schemes; search for anomalies in the level density (pairing phase transition) in 1f-2p shell nuclei using GEANIE at LANSCE/LANL; parity-conserving time-reversal noninvariance tests using {sup 166}Ho resonances at Geel, ORELA, or LANSCE/LANL; nuclear astrophysics; few-body nuclear systems; Nuclear Data evaluation for A = 3--20 for which TUNL is now the international center. Developments in technology and instrumentation are vital to the research and training program. Innovative work was continued in: polarized beam development; polarized target development; designing new cryogenic systems; designing new detectors; improving high-resolution beams for the KN and FN accelerators; development of an unpolarized Low-Energy Beam Facility for radiative capture studies of astrophysical interest. Preliminary research summaries are presented.

  13. Los Alamos National Laboratory: A guide to records series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records that pertains to the epidemiologic studies conducted by the Epidemiology Section of the Occupational Medicine Group (ESH-2) at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The records described in this guide relate to occupational studies performed by the Epidemiology Section, including those pertaining to workers at LANL, Mound Plant, Oak Ridge Reservation, Pantex Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, and Savannah River Site. Also included are descriptions of other health-related records generated or collected by the Epidemiology Section and a small set of records collected by the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Group. This guide is not designed to describe the universe of records generated by LANL which may be used for epidemiologic studies of the LANL work force. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of LANL the history and functions of LANL`s Health Division and Epidemiology Section, and the various epidemiologic studies performed by the Epidemiology Section. It provides information on the methodology that HAI used to inventory and describe records housed in the offices of the LANL Epidemiology Section in Technical Area 59 and at the LANL Records Center. Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to records repositories.

  14. Gas release during salt-well pumping: Model predictions and laboratory validation studies for soluble and insoluble gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Of these, 67 are known or suspected to have leaked liquid from the tanks into the surrounding soil. Salt-well pumping, or interim stabilization, is a well-established operation for removing drainable interstitial liquid from SSTs. The overall objective of this ongoing study is to develop a quantitative understanding of the release rates and cumulative releases of flammable gases from SSTs as a result of salt-well pumping. The current study is an extension of the previous work reported by Peurrung et al. (1996). The first objective of this current study was to conduct laboratory experiments to quantify the release of soluble and insoluble gases. The second was to determine experimentally the role of characteristic waste heterogeneities on the gas release rates. The third objective was to evaluate and validate the computer model STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases) used by Peurrung et al. (1996) to predict the release of both soluble (typically ammonia) and insoluble gases (typically hydrogen) during and after salt-well pumping. The fourth and final objective of the current study was to predict the gas release behavior for a range of typical tank conditions and actual tank geometry. In these models, the authors seek to include all the pertinent salt-well pumping operational parameters and a realistic range of physical properties of the SST wastes. For predicting actual tank behavior, two-dimensional (2-D) simulations were performed with a representative 2-D tank geometry.

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Geomechanics Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science: Latest News and Events Earth Science: Facilities and Equipment Bureau of Land Management Fossil Energy Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) Clean Coal Geomechanics Laboratory User...

  16. Radiological standards and calibration laboratory capabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goles, R.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiological Standards and Calibrations Laboratory, a part of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), performs calibrations and upholds reference standards necessary to maintain traceability to national radiological standards. The facility supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs at the Hanford Site, programs sponsored by DOE Headquarters and other federal agencies, radiological protection programs at other DOE sites, and research programs sponsored through the commercial sector. The laboratory is located in the 318 Building of the Hanford Site`s 300 Area. The facility contains five major exposure rooms and several laboratories used for exposure work preparation, low-activity instrument calibrations, instrument performance evaluations, instrument maintenance, instrument design and fabrication work, and thermoluminescent and radiochromic dosimetry. The major exposure facilities are a low-scatter room used for neutron and photon exposures, a source well room used for high-volume instrument calibration work, an x-ray facility used for energy response studies, a high-exposure facility used for high-rate photon calibration work, and a beta standards laboratory used for beta energy response studies and beta reference calibrations. Calibrations are routinely performed for personnel dosimeters, health physics instrumentations, photon transfer standards and alpha, beta and gamma field sources used throughout the Hanford Site. This report describes the standards and calibrations laboratory. Photographs that accompany the text appear in the Appendix and are designated Figure A.1 through A.29.

  17. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process: Laboratory scale studies modelling and technical assessment. Final report, [October 1, 1988--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Lee, L.K.; Popper, G.A.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reported herein are the details and results of Laboratory-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous and bituminous coal concluded at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. AC22-88PCB8818 during the period October 1, 1988 to June 30, 1993. The work described in this report is primarily concerned with tests on a Laboratory Scale primarily using microautoclaves. Experiments were conducted evaluating coal, solvents, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatments, C0{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects. Other microautoclave tests are included in the companion topical reports for this contract, DE-88818-TOP-01 & 02 on Sub-Bituminous and Bituminous Bench-Scale and PDU activities. In addition to the Laboratory Scale Studies, kinetic data and modelling results from Bench-Scale and Microautoclave tests are interpreted and presented along with some economic updates and sensitivity studies.

  18. Assessment of Load and Energy Reduction Techniques (ALERT) Retrocommissioning Case Study of Two National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Schwab, J.; Beattie, D.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portland Energy Conservation Incorporated (PECI) in conjunction with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) staff performed an Assessment of Load and Energy Reduction Techniques (ALERT) retrocommissioning evaluation on several buildings...

  19. A longitudinal study of field emission in CEBAF's SRF cavities 1995-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benesch, Jay

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission is one of the key issues in superconducting RF. When present, it limits operating gradient directly or via induced heat load at 2K. In order to minimize particulate contamination of and thus field emission in the CEBAF SRF cavities during assembly, a ceramic RF window was placed very close to the accelerating cavity proper. As an unintended consequence of this, it has been possible to monitor and model field emission in the CEBAF cavities since in-tunnel operation began. The ceramic is charged by field emission to a stable voltage and then discharges. This phenomenon had to be studied statistically to minimize the number of interruptions to accelerator operation for nuclear physics. We report here the results of our twenty year study of this and related phenomena.

  20. A longitudinal study of field emission in CEBAF's SRF cavities 1995-2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Benesch

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Field emission is one of the key issues in superconducting RF. When present, it limits operating gradient directly or via induced heat load at 2K. In order to minimize particulate contamination of and thus field emission in the CEBAF SRF cavities during assembly, a ceramic RF window was placed very close to the accelerating cavity proper. As an unintended consequence of this, it has been possible to monitor and model field emission in the CEBAF cavities since in-tunnel operation began. The ceramic is charged by field emission to a stable voltage and then discharges. This phenomenon had to be studied statistically to minimize the number of interruptions to accelerator operation for nuclear physics. We report here the results of our twenty year study of this and related phenomena.

  1. Welding processes in volcanology: insights from field, experimental, and modeling studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Kelly

    Welding processes in volcanology: insights from field, experimental, and modeling studies Anita This volume is a collection of ten papers largely derived from a special session, Welding Processes, experimental, and modeling studies. We briefly review advances in understanding welding as represented

  2. Three-dimensional seismic stratigraphic study of downdip Yegua sandstones, Edna Field, Jackson County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trikania, Andra

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study reports an investigation of the structure and stratigraphy of the downdip Yegua sandstones at Edna Field, Jackson County, South Texas. The study is based on 22.9 square miles of three dimensional (3-D) seismic data, well-logs from 15...

  3. Statistical Laboratory established 1933

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistical Laboratory established 1933 Biennial Report July 1, 1997 to June 30, 1999 #12;Index 50 years of statistics ....................... 1 Self study & external review .......... 2 Social sciences statistics ................ 3 On the lighter side........................... 6 Publications 1997

  4. Laboratory and Field Experimental Studies of CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: obtain basic information on the performance of CO2-based EGS; and enhance and calibrate modeling capabilities for such systems.

  5. Molecular composition of biogenic secondary organic aerosols using ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry: comparing laboratory and field studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kourtchev, I.; Fuller, S. J.; Giorio, C.; Healy, R. M.; Wilson, E.; O'Connor, I.; Wenger, J. C.; McLeod, M.; Aalto, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Maenhaut, W.; Jones, R.; Venables, D. S.; Sodeau, J. R.; Kulmala, M.; Kalberer, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fluorineethene propene (FEP) Teflon foil with a volume of 3.91 m3. It was operated at 296 2 K using purified air at 0.11 mbar above atmospheric pressure. The experiments were performed at 6068 % relative humidity produced from bubbling puri- fied air... can possibly be used for parameterisation of OA at the boreal site. O / C ratios may not accurately describe the degree of ox- idation of organics, because other non-oxidative processes (e.g. hydration and dehydration) can also affect these pa...

  6. Molecular composition of biogenic secondary organic aerosols using ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry: comparing laboratory and field studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kourtchev, I.; Fuller, S. J.; Giorio, C.; Healy, R. M.; Wilson, E.; O'Connor, I.; Wenger, J. C.; McLeod, M.; Aalto, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Maenhaut, W.; Jones, R.; Venables, D. S.; Sodeau, J. R.; Kulmala, M.; Kalberer, M.

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of fluorineethene propene (FEP) Teflon foil with a volume of 3.91 m3. It was operated at 296 2 K using purified air at 0.11 mbar above atmospheric pressure. The experiments were performed at 6068 % relative humidity produced from bubbling puri- fied air... can possibly be used for parameterisation of OA at the boreal site. O / C ratios may not accurately describe the degree of ox- idation of organics, because other non-oxidative processes (e.g. hydration and dehydration) can also affect these pa...

  7. When is More Data Valuable to Human Operators? The Cognitive Engineering Laboratory (CEL) plans to conduct a microworld simulator study during the summer of 2014.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    When is More Data Valuable to Human Operators? The Cognitive Engineering Laboratory (CEL) plans to conduct a microworld simulator study during the summer of 2014. The objective is to evaluate human only looked at operator performance under normal operating conditions. Will having additional sensor

  8. from Astrophysical Implications of the Laboratory Study of Presolar Materials, edited by T. J. Bernatowicz and E. Zinner, AIP CP402, 1997, pp.5982

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittler, Larry R.

    from Astrophysical Implications of the Laboratory Study of Presolar Materials, edited by T. J unusual O-isotopic ratios have been found in acid-resistant residues of five primitive meteorites. Thirty-up of this isotope in early thermal pulses in AGB stars or an origin in low-mass red giants of unusually high

  9. MICROSYSTEMS LABORATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culpepper, Martin L.

    15 nm MICROSYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2014 MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY CAMBRIDGE, MA AUGUST 2014 #12;MTL Annual Research Report 2014 Director Jesús A. del Alamo Project........................................................................ 47 Energy: Photovoltaics, Energy Harvesting, Batteries, Fuel Cells

  10. The Momotombo Geothermal Field, Nicaragua: Exploration and development case history study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case history discusses the exploration methods used at the Momotombo Geothermal Field in western Nicaragua, and evaluates their contributions to the development of the geothermal field models. Subsequent reservoir engineering has not been synthesized or evaluated. A geothermal exploration program was started in Nicaragua in 1966 to discover and delineate potential geothermal reservoirs in western Nicaragua. Exploration began at the Momotombo field in 1970 using geological, geochemical, and geophysical methods. A regional study of thermal manifestations was undertaken and the area on the southern flank of Volcan Momotombo was chosen for more detailed investigation. Subsequent exploration by various consultants produced a number of geotechnical reports on the geology, geophysics, and geochemistry of the field as well as describing production well drilling. Geological investigations at Momotombo included photogeology, field mapping, binocular microscope examination of cuttings, and drillhole correlations. Among the geophysical techniques used to investigate the field sub-structure were: Schlumberger and electromagnetic soundings, dipole mapping and audio-magnetotelluric surveys, gravity and magnetic measurements, frequency domain soundings, self-potential surveys, and subsurface temperature determinations. The geochemical program analyzed the thermal fluids of the surface and in the wells. This report presents the description and results of exploration methods used during the investigative stages of the Momotombo Geothermal Field. A conceptual model of the geothermal field was drawn from the information available at each exploration phase. The exploration methods have been evaluated with respect to their contributions to the understanding of the field and their utilization in planning further development. Our principal finding is that data developed at each stage were not sufficiently integrated to guide further work at the field, causing inefficient use of resources.

  11. Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

  12. Using laboratory flow experiments and reactive chemical transport modeling for designing waterflooding of the Agua Fria Reservoir, Poza Rica-Altamira Field, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkle, P.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Williams, P. : Mexico, Oil and Gas Investor (July 2003)oil field, bordering the Gulf coast in the eastern part of Mexico,

  13. Probing Molecular Associations of Field-Collected and Laboratory-Generated SOA with Nano-DESI High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Hayes, Patrick L.; Liu, Shang; Jimenez, Jose L.; Russell, Lynn M.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol samples from the 2010 CalNex field study in Bakersfield (BF) and Los Angeles (LA) were analyzed using positive mode nanospray-desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI-MS). Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced in a photochemical chamber by photooxidation of diesel (DSL) fuel and isoprene (ISO) under humid, high-NOx conditions, was analyzed for comparison. Three groups of organic compounds with zero, one, or two nitrogen atoms in their molecular formulas (0N, 1N, 2N) were compared in detail. The composition of ambient SOA exhibited greater overlap with DSL than with ISO. The overlap of the chamber experiments with the BF data was relatively consistent throughout the day while the overlap with LA data increased significantly in the noon-6pm sample, consistent with the SOA plume arriving from downtown Los Angeles. BF samples were more oxidized, contained more organic nitrogen, and had more overlap with the chamber data compared to LA samples. The addition of gaseous ammonia (NH3) to the DSL experiment was necessary to generate many of the 2N compounds observed in BF. This analysis demonstrates that DSL and ISO were important sources but cannot account for all of the observed ambient compounds indicating that other sources of organics were also likely important.

  14. Outreach and Education in the Life Sciences A Case Study of the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weller, Richard E.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was intended to assess the impact of the U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) -sponsored education and outreach activities on the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) in DOE national laboratories. Key activities focused on a series of pilot education and outreach workshops conducted at ten national laboratories. These workshops were designed to increase awareness of the BWC, familiarize scientists with dual-use concerns related to biological research, and promote the concept of individual responsibility and accountability

  15. Development of the plasma thruster particle-in-cell simulator to complement empirical studies of a low-power cusped-field thruster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gildea, Stephen Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cusped-field plasma thrusters are an electric propulsion concept being investigated by several laboratories in the United States and Europe. This technology was implemented as a low-power prototype in 2007 to ascertain if ...

  16. Experimental study of the D-OSKIL mechanism for controlling the stick-slip oscillations in a drilling laboratory testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in a drilling laboratory testbed Haochuan Lu Electrical&Electronic Engineering Nanyang Technological University details of the experimental process and the obtained drilling performance. Results show that the stick are drilled with a rotary drillstring system. Different drillstring oscillations are an important cause

  17. Political Science Sample 4-5 Year Study Plan for Doctoral Program Current catalog for student with B.A., major field International Relations with minor fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Political Science Sample 4-5 Year Study Plan for Doctoral Program Current catalog for student with B.A., major field International Relations with minor fields Comparative Politics and Political Politics PSC 710r Proseminar in American Politics Year One: Semester 2 PSC 702 Advanced Quantitative

  18. Daylighting control performance of a thin-film ceramic electrochromic window: field study results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Daylighting control performance of a thin-film ceramic electrochromic window: field study results of this emerging technology. Keywords: Building energy-efficiency; Electrochromic windows; Daylighting; Control switched across their dynamic range and could be fully integrated into a complete daylight, glare

  19. carleton.ca Philosophy may be the oldest field of rigorous study,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    carleton.ca Philosophy #12;Philosophy may be the oldest field of rigorous study, but philosophical are limited mainly to critical thinking, common sense and abstract insights. As a Philosophy student, you that are applicable in many careers and professions. The Carleton advantage Small classes As a Philosophy student

  20. Single-Molecule Microscopy Studies of Electric-Field Poling in Chromophore-Polymer Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Philip J.

    Single-Molecule Microscopy Studies of Electric-Field Poling in Chromophore-Polymer Composite electrooptic devices based on chromophore-polymer composite materials is to improve chromophore ordering of susceptibility.16 Chromophore-polymer composite materials lack inherent non- centrosymmetry, which is required

  1. Indoor exposure from building materials: A field study Dafni A. Missia a,*, E. Demetriou b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    conducted in the frame of BUMA (Prioritization of Building Materials Emissions as indoor pollution sourcesIndoor exposure from building materials: A field study Dafni A. Missia a,*, E. Demetriou b , N. Michael b , E.I. Tolis a , J.G. Bartzis a a University of West Macedonia, Environmental Technology

  2. Adsorption of supramolecular building blocks on graphite: A force field and density functional theory study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    that both adsorption energies as well as adsorption geometries of or- ganic molecules on graphite determined studies in which the adsorption energies of supramolecular building blocks are measured.12 This hampersAdsorption of supramolecular building blocks on graphite: A force field and density functional

  3. Exploiting Two Intelligent Models to Predict Water Level: A field study of Urmia lake, Iran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Exploiting Two Intelligent Models to Predict Water Level: A field study of Urmia lake, Iran Shahab. The measurements from a single tide gauge at Urmia Lake, Northwest Iran, were used to train and validate the GP of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran. Tel: 0098-411-3392786 Fax: 0098-411-3345332, (e-mail: sha- hab kvk66@yahoo

  4. Proceedings: Indoor Air 2005 A PRELIMINARY FIELD STUDY OF INDOOR CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is to assess the impact of outdoor ozone on indoor air quality (IAQ) during photochemical pollution episodes). Based on the Paris area outdoor air pollution monitoring network (AIRPARIF) daily forecast, specificProceedings: Indoor Air 2005 1739 A PRELIMINARY FIELD STUDY OF INDOOR CHEMISTRY M Nicolas, O

  5. Real-time formalism for studying the nonlinear response of "smart" materials to an electric field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freericks, Jim

    Real-time formalism for studying the nonlinear response of "smart" materials to an electric field J developed for so-called "smart" materials that are tuned to lie close to the metal- insulator transition (RSFQ) ideas [3]. A "smart" material is a mate- rial that can have its properties altered by changing

  6. Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

  7. Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    independent laboratories for experiments and advanced diagnostics in the fields of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, multiphase flows, aerosols, and material...

  9. NREL Launches Collaborative Resource for Field Test Best Practices (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National Nuclearover two yearsNPResults give insight on a

  10. Requirements for Computer Based-Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Operators Results from a Qualitative Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although computer-based procedures (CBPs) have been investigated as a way to enhance operator performance on procedural tasks in the nuclear industry for almost thirty years, they are not currently widely deployed at United States utilities. One of the barriers to the wide scale deployment of CBPs is the lack of operational experience with CBPs that could serve as a sound basis for justifying the use of CBPs for nuclear utilities. Utilities are hesitant to adopt CBPs because of concern over potential costs of implementation, and concern over regulatory approval. Regulators require a sound technical basis for the use of any procedure at the utilities; without operating experience to support the use CBPs, it is difficult to establish such a technical basis. In an effort to begin the process of developing a technical basis for CBPs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory are partnering with industry to explore CBPs with the objective of defining requirements for CBPs and developing an industry-wide vision and path forward for the use of CBPs. This paper describes the results from a qualitative study aimed at defining requirements for CBPs to be used by field operators and maintenance technicians.

  11. Microbial field pilot study. [Quarterly report], July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

  12. A field study evaluation of short-term refined Gaussian dispersion models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piper, A.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A tracer study was conducted at the Duke Forest Site in Chapel Hill, North Carolina in January, 1995 to evaluate the ability of three short-term refined Gaussian dispersion models to predict the fate of volume source emissions under field study conditions. Study participants included the American Petroleum Institute (API), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), and private consulting firms. The models evaluated were Industrial Source Complex--Short Term versions 2 and 3 (ISC2, ISC3) and the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulatory Model Improvement Committee (AERMIC) model, AERMOD. All three models are based on the steady-state Gaussian plume dispersion equation, which predicts concentrations at downwind receptor locations when integrated over the distance between the source and receptor. Chemicals were released at known rates and measurements were taken at various points in the study field using Tedlar bag point sampling and open-path Fourier Transform infrared (OP-FTIR) monitoring. The study found that ISC and AERMOD underpredicted the measured concentrations for each dataset collected in the field study. ISC and AERMOD each underpredicted the OPFTIR dataset by a factor of approximately 1.6. ISC underpredicted the Tedlar{reg_sign} dataset by approximately 2.1, while AERMOD underpredicted by a factor of approximately 2.6. Regardless of source configuration or measurement technique used, under-prediction with respect to the measured concentration was consistently observed. This indicates that safety factors or other corrections may be necessary in predicting contaminant concentrations over the distances examined in this study, i.e., in the near field of less than 200 meters.

  13. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

  14. Notes on analytical study of holographic superconductors with Lifshitz scaling in external magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zixu Zhao; Qiyuan Pan; Jiliang Jing

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ the matching method to analytically investigate the holographic superconductors with Lifshitz scaling in an external magnetic field. We discuss systematically the restricted conditions for the matching method and find that this analytic method is not always powerful to explore the effect of external magnetic field on the holographic superconductors unless the matching point is chosen in an appropriate range and the dynamical exponent $z$ satisfies the relation $z=d-1$ or $z=d-2$. From the analytic treatment, we observe that Lifshitz scaling can hinder the condensation to be formed, which can be used to back up the numerical results. Moreover, we study the effect of Lifshitz scaling on the upper critical magnetic field and reproduce the well-known relation obtained from Ginzburg-Landau theory.

  15. Gas generation and retention in Tank 101-SY: A summary of laboratory studies, tank data, and information needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pederson, L.R. [comp.] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ashby, E.C. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States); Jonah, C.; Meisel, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Strachan, D.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical and radioactive wastes from processes used to separate plutonium from uranium are stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington state. In March 1981, it was observed that the volume of wastes in Tank 101-SY slowly increased, followed by a rapid decrease and the venting of large quantities of gases. These cycles occurred every 8 to 15 weeks and continue to the present time. Subsequent analyses showed that these gases were composed primarily of hydrogen and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In response to the potential for explosion and release of hazardous materials to the environment, laboratory programs were initiated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), to develop a better understanding of the physical and chemical processes occurring in this waste tank. An aggressive sampling and analysis effort is also under way to characterize the wastes as fully as possible. These efforts will provide a technically defensible basis for safety analyses and future mitigation/remediation of the tank and its contents.

  16. SULI at Ames Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A video snapshot of the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program at Ames Laboratory.

  17. Numerical and laboratory simulations of auroral acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunell, H.; De Keyser, J. [1Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)] [1Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Mann, I. [EISCAT Scientific Association, P.O. Box 812, SE-981 28 Kiruna, Sweden and Department of Physics, Ume University, SE-901 87 Ume (Sweden)] [EISCAT Scientific Association, P.O. Box 812, SE-981 28 Kiruna, Sweden and Department of Physics, Ume University, SE-901 87 Ume (Sweden)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of parallel electric fields is an essential ingredient of auroral physics, leading to the acceleration of particles that give rise to the auroral displays. An auroral flux tube is modelled using electrostatic Vlasov simulations, and the results are compared to simulations of a proposed laboratory device that is meant for studies of the plasma physical processes that occur on auroral field lines. The hot magnetospheric plasma is represented by a gas discharge plasma source in the laboratory device, and the cold plasma mimicking the ionospheric plasma is generated by a Q-machine source. In both systems, double layers form with plasma density gradients concentrated on their high potential sides. The systems differ regarding the properties of ion acoustic waves that are heavily damped in the magnetosphere, where the ion population is hot, but weakly damped in the laboratory, where the discharge ions are cold. Ion waves are excited by the ion beam that is created by acceleration in the double layer in both systems. The efficiency of this beam-plasma interaction depends on the acceleration voltage. For voltages where the interaction is less efficient, the laboratory experiment is more space-like.

  18. Laboratory Directed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space controlAppraisal Process Laboratory

  19. Laboratory Directors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space controlAppraisalLaboratory Directors

  20. ComputerBased Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers: Preliminary Results from Two Evaluation Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katya L Le Blanc; Johanna H Oxstrand

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory and participants from the U.S. nuclear industry are collaborating on a research effort aimed to augment the existing guidance on computer-based procedure (CBP) design with specific guidance on how to design CBP user interfaces such that they support procedure execution in ways that exceed the capabilities of paper-based procedures (PBPs) without introducing new errors. Researchers are employing an iterative process where the human factors issues and interface design principles related to CBP usage are systematically addressed and evaluated in realistic settings. This paper describes the process of developing a CBP prototype and the two studies conducted to evaluate the prototype. The results indicate that CBPs may improve performance by reducing errors, but may increase the time it takes to complete procedural tasks.

  1. Sampling of Borehole WL-3A through -12 in Support of the Vadose Zone Transport Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Caldwell, Todd G.; Owen, Antionette T.

    2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the fiscal year 2001 core sampling effort conducted to support the Vadose Zone Transport Field Study.

  2. Feasibility study of Nb3Al Rutherford cable for high field accelerator magnet application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, R.; /Fermilab; Kikuchi, A.; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Cooper, C.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab; Takeuchi, T.; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Tartaglia, M.; Turrioni, D.; /Fermilab; Verweij, A.P.; /CERN; Wake, M.; Willering, G; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feasibility study of Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}Al strand and Rutherford cable for the application to high field accelerator magnets are being done at Fermilab in collaboration with NIMS. The Nb{sub 3}Al strand, which was developed and manufactured at NIMS in Japan, has a non-copper Jc of about 844 A/mm{sup 2} at 15 Tesla at 4.2 K, a copper content of 50%, and filament size of about 50 microns. Rutherford cables with 27 Nb{sub 3}Al strands of 1.03 mm diameter were fabricated and tested. Quench tests on a short cable were done to study its stability with only its self field, utilizing a high current transformer. A pair of 2 meter long Nb{sub 3}Al cables was tested extensively at CERN at 4.3 and 1.9 K up to 11 Tesla including its self field with a high transport current of 20.2 kA. In the low field test we observed instability near splices and in the central region. This is related to the flux-jump like behavior, because of excessive amount of Nb in the Nb{sub 3}Al strand. There is possibility that the Nb in Nb{sub 3}Al can cause instability below 2 Tesla field regions. We need further investigation on this problem. Above 8 Tesla, we observed quenches near the critical surface at fast ramp rate from 1000 to 3000 A/sec, with quench velocity over 100 m/sec. A small racetrack magnet was made using a 14 m of Rutherford cable and successfully tested up to 21.8 kA, corresponding to 8.7 T.

  3. Resource guide for electrokinetics laboratory and field processes applicable to radioactive and hazardous mixed wastes in soil and groundwater from 1992-1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document attempted to list and describe all published work on electrokinetic remediation 1992 to 1997. This work includes electrokinetic remediation being used commercially or on a bench, pilot, field, or conceptual scale. There are three categories in this resource guide. The category, Category A, lists all electrokinetic processes that are used as the remediation tool at a contaminated site. Category B lists all electrokinetic processes that are being used on the bench, pilot, or field scale. Finally, Category C lists all electrokinetic process that are in the conceptual development stage. Electrokinetic remediation being used abroad was also included in this resource guide. Information about each electrokinetic system includes the developers` name and address, technical description, status, cost, and illustration (if available).

  4. On the efficiency of electrical submersible pumps equipped with variable frequency drives: A field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, M.M. [Patterson (Maurice M.), Hemphill, TX (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field study was conducted on 18 electrical-submersible-pump- (ESP-) equipped wells operating in the Williston basin. Fifteen of these wells were run with variable frequency drives (VFD`s). The purpose of the study was to determine the efficiency and operating characteristics of ESP`s operating with VFD`s and compare them to those without. Voltage, current, power, and frequency were measured at the drive input, the drive output, and ESP input. Production data were recorded and power and efficiency were calculated at all measurement locations and compared to published data.

  5. Field grouting summary report on the WAG 4 seeps 4 and 6 removal action project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes E and F

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1996, a unique multi-phase, multi-stage, low-pressure permeation grouting pilot program was performed inside portions of four unlined waste disposal trenches at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The project was deemed a non-time-critical removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); however, due to a history of heavy precipitation in the fall, the schedule was fast-tracked to meet an October 31, 1996 grouting completion date. The technical objective of the removal action was to reduce the off-site transport of j Strontium 90 ({sup 90}Sr) by grouting portions of four waste disposal trenches believed to be responsible for over 70 percent of the {sup 90}Sr leaving the site. A goal of the grouting operation was to reduce the average in situ hydraulic conductivity of the grouted waste materials to a value equal to or less than 1 x 10{sup -6} cm/sec. This target hydraulic conductivity value was established to be at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of the surrounding natural ground.

  6. Bar Mar field Point field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Bone Spring Seay Nance Regional Study (Cimarex Energy) West Texas (Various Counties) West Texas Yates Seay Nance Regional Study (Lynx Production) West Texas (Various Counties) #12;Bar Mar field Umbrella Point field Nuare field East Texas field Copano Bay Bar Mar field Umbrella

  7. Laboratory Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 CERN 73-11 Laboratory I | Nuclear

  8. Google+ Virtual Field Trip on Vehicle Electrification at Argonne...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Google+ Virtual Field Trip on Vehicle Electrification at Argonne National Laboratory Google+ Virtual Field Trip on Vehicle Electrification at Argonne National Laboratory November...

  9. Studies of time dependence of fields in TEVATRON superconducting dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanft, R.W.; Brown, B.C.; Herrup, D.A.; Lamm, M.J.; McInturff, A.D.; Syphers, M.J.

    1988-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The time variation in the magnetic field of a model Tevatron dipole magnet at constant excitation current has been studied. Variations in symmetry allowed harmonic components over long time ranges show a log t behavior indicative of ''flux creep.'' Both short time range and long time range behavior depend in a detailed way on the excitation history. Similar effects are seen in the remnant fields present in full-scale Tevatron dipoles following current ramping. Both magnitudes and time dependences are observed to depend on details for the ramps, such as ramp rate, flattop duration, and number of ramps. In a few magnets, variations are also seen in symmetry unallowed harmonics. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Seismic attribute studies, Mississippian Frobisher-Alida oil fields, northeast Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, T.L.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subtle Mississippian stratigraphic traps of the Wiley and Glenburn fields of North Dakota and the Creelman field of southeast Saskatchewan illustrate similar seismic response to distinctly different geologic settings. Shoreline facies change, thick supratidal salt pans, carbonate porosity zones, buried hills, and structure on the top of the Mississippian unconformity can all cause similar seismic response (seismic facies). In each instance, vertical and lateral thickness and lithologic changes are the dominant influence on the seismic response. In addition, pitfalls due to tuning, multiples, and other causes can make it difficult, if not impossible, to differentiate these anomalies based on seismic response alone. Careful attribute studies must be coordinated with sound geologic control and models to explore effectively for these subtle stratigraphic traps.

  11. A Study of Liquid Metal Film Flow, Under Fusion Relevant Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narula, M.; Ying, A.; Abdou, M.A. [UCLA (United States)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of flowing liquid metal streams or 'liquid walls' as a plasma contact surface is a very attractive option and has received considerable attention over the past several years both in the plasma physics and fusion engineering programs. A key issue for the feasibility of flowing liquid metal plasma facing component (PFC) systems, lies in their magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) behavior. The spatially varying magnetic field environment, typical of a fusion device can lead to serious flow disrupting MHD forces that hinder the development of a smooth and controllable flow needed for PFC applications. The present study builds up on the ongoing research effort at UCLA, directed towards providing qualitative and quantitative data on liquid metal free surface flow behavior under fusion relevant magnetic fields, to aid in better understanding of flowing liquid metal PFC systems.

  12. Studies of sheath characteristics in a double plasma device with a negatively biased separating grid and a magnetic filter field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, B. K.; Chakraborty, M. [Centre of Plasma Physics-Institute for Plasma Research, Tepesia, Sonapur, Kamrup, Assam-782402 (India); Bandyopadhyay, M. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat-382428 (India)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A double plasma device has two regions: Source region and target region. These two regions are divided by a magnetic filter field. A grid is placed coplanar to the magnetic filter. To study the sheath structure in the target region, a metallic plate is placed at the center, which can be biased with respect to the chamber (ground) potential. Plasma is created in the source region by filament discharge technique. Plasma diffusing from the source region to the target region is subjected to the magnetic filter field and also an electric field applied on the grid. Plasma thus obtained in the target region forms a sheath on the biased plate. The influence of both the magnetic filter field and the electric field, applied between the grid and the chamber wall, on the sheath structure formed on the biased plate is studied. It is found that the magnetic filter field and the electric field change the sheath structure in different ways.

  13. Effect of vitamin B/sub 6/ on the neurotoxicity and pharmacology of desmethylmisonidazole and misonidazole: clinical and laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, C.N.; Hirst, V.K.; Brown, D.M.; Halsey, J.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The clinical usefulness of misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) is severely limited by neurotoxicity. Based on theoretical considerations and on laboratory data suggesting that pyridoxine (PN) decreased MISO toxicity in mice. The authors attempted to ameliorate the clinical neuropathy of DMM using oral PN. Pharmacokinetic analysis suggested interaction of PN and DMM but no protection against neuropathy was observed. Serial experiments with C3H and BALB/c mice were done using various forms of vitamin B/sub 6/ (PN, pyridoxal, pyridoxal phosphate) administered orally and i.p. No consistent protection was observed. Dexamethasone did not alter MISO toxicity in mice, contrary to the clinical findings. They conclude that vitamin B/sub 6/ is not useful in preventing clinical neurotoxicity of MISO or DMM.

  14. Laboratory studies on evaluation of in situ biodegradation at the Hoe Creek UCG (underground coal gasification) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nolan, B.T.; Suthersan, S.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the potential for in situ biodegradation in the contaminated groundwater aquifer at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site. Experiments were performed in electrolytic respirometric cells under simulated environmental conditions. An orthogonal, fractional factorial design was used to evaluate the effects of the following factors on phenol degradation: nutrient dose, amount of bacterial inoculum, temperature, light conditions, and substrate concentration. Microorganisms native to the environment were used as the inoculum, and phosphorus was used as the nutrient. The amount of inoculum introduced and the nutrient dose were found to have a positive effect on phenol degradation. Temperature changes from 15{degree}C (59{degree}F) to 25{degree}C (77{degree}F) had no significant effect. The light conditions (fluorescent or dark) also had no significant effect on phenol degradation. Higher concentrations of substrate required increased amounts of oxygen for biodegradation. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. A multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:sapphire laser system for laser wake-field acceleration studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    ­plasma interaction studies, such as development of laser wake-field accelerators [1-4], X-ray lasers, and laserA multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:sapphire laser system for laser wake-field acceleration studies 71R0259, 1 Cyclotron Rd., Berkeley, CA 94720, USA, e-mail: ctoth@lbl.gov Abstract. The Lasers

  16. Scaling Extreme Astrophysical Phenomena to the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remington, B A

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy-density (HED) physics refers broadly to the study of macroscopic collections of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and density. The experimental facilities most widely used for these studies are high-power lasers and magnetic-pinch generators. The HED physics pursued on these facilities is still in its infancy, yet new regimes of experimental science are emerging. Examples from astrophysics include work relevant to planetary interiors, supernovae, astrophysical jets, and accreting compact objects (such as neutron stars and black holes). In this paper, we review a selection of recent results in this new field of HED laboratory astrophysics and provide a brief look ahead to the coming decade.

  17. THE IPOS FRAMEWORK: LINKING FISH SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN ALTERED FLOWS FROM LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO RIVERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current understanding of the effects of turbulence on the swimming performance of fish 32 is primarily derived from laboratory experiments under pressurized flow swim tunnels 33 and open channel flow facilities. These studies have produced valuable information on 34 the swimming mechanics and behavior of fish in turbulent flow. However, laboratory 35 studies have limited representation of the flows fish experience in nature. The complex 36 flow structure in rivers is imparted primarily by the highly heterogeneous and non37 uniform bed and planform geometry. Our goal is to direct future laboratory and field 38 studies to adopt a common framework that will shape the integration of both approaches. 39 This paper outlines four characteristics of turbulent flow, which we suggest should be 40 evaluated when generalizing results from fish turbulent studies in both the laboratory and 41 the field. The framework is based on four turbulence characteristics that are summarized 42 under the acronym IPOS: Intensity, Periodicity, Orientation, and Scale.

  18. National Laboratory Impact Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Laboratory Impact Initiative supports the relationship between the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and the national laboratory enterprise. The national laboratories...

  19. Tribology Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButlerTransportation From919-660-2694Tribology Laboratory

  20. Laboratory Events | Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space controlAppraisalLaboratoryGet the tools you

  1. Geoscience Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor'sshort version)UnveilsGeorgeGeoscience Laboratory

  2. Toroidal kinetic eta{sub i}-mode study in reversed-field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Songfen [Department of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Guo, S. C. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy); Dong, J. Q. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China) and Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven electrostatic modes in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma are studied with the gyrokinetic integral equation. A systematic threshold study is carried out and the results are compared with that in tokamaks with similar geometry and reveal that the ITG modes in RFP configurations are more stable than in tokamaks. The physics mechanism for such difference is that shorter connection length in RFPs leads to stronger landau damping, which is dominant and ultimately determinant for the stability threshold. The results confirm and extend the previous conclusion obtained with the differential equation [S. C. Guo, Phys. Plasmas 13, 122510 (2008)]. In addition, the effects of magnetic gradient and curvature drifts, which induce important interaction driving the modes, are carefully investigated. The effects of safety factor, ratio of electron temperature to ion temperature, magnetic shear as well as finite Larmor radius are also studied.

  3. Field Study and Energy-Plus Benchmarks for Energy Saver Homes having Different Envelope Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrestha, Som S [ORNL] [ORNL; Childs, Kenneth W [ORNL] [ORNL; Stannard, Eric E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alliance to maximize energy efficiency and cost-effective residential construction (ZEBRAlliance) built and field tested four homes that are 50 percent more energy efficient than a code compliant home. The homes are unoccupied for the duration of a two-year field study, thereby eliminating the confounding issue of occupancy habits. All homes have about the same consistent and scheduled internal load. Each home showcases a unique envelope strategy: 1) structural insulated panel (SIP), 2) optimal value wall framing (OVF), 3) advanced framing featuring the benefits of insulations mixed with phase change materials (PCM), and 4) an exterior insulation and finish system (EIFS). All homes have different weather resistive barriers (WRBs) and/or air barriers to limit air and moisture infiltration. Three homes provide space conditioning and water heating via a ground loop heat exchanger, while the fourth home uses a high efficiency air-to-air heat pump and heat pump water heater. Field performance and results of EnergyPlus V7.0 benchmarks were made for roof and attics as compared to cathedral design and for wall heat flows to validate models. The moisture content of the wall sheathing is shown to prove the protecting effectiveness of WRBs. Temperature distributions through insulations in the wall and ceiling with and without PCMs are described to characterize the performance of the PCM building envelopes.

  4. Treatability Study of In Situ Technologies for Remediation of Hexavalent Chromium in Groundwater at the Puchack Well Field Superfund Site, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vince R.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Truex, Michael J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Girvin, Donald C.; Phillips, Jerry L.; Devary, Brooks J.; Fischer, Ashley E.; Li, Shu-Mei W.

    2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This treatability study was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), at the request of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 2, to evaluate the feasibility of using in situ treatment technologies for chromate reduction and immobilization at the Puchack Well Field Superfund Site in Pennsauken Township, New Jersey. In addition to in situ reductive treatments, which included the evaluation of both abiotic and biotic reduction of Puchack aquifer sediments, natural attenuation mechanisms were evaluated (i.e., chromate adsorption and reduction). Chromate exhibited typical anionic adsorption behavior, with greater adsorption at lower pH, at lower chromate concentration, and at lower concentrations of other competing anions. In particular, sulfate (at 50 mg/L) suppressed chromate adsorption by up to 50%. Chromate adsorption was not influenced by inorganic colloids.

  5. Field study of an unconfined dredge spoil disposal area in Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassi, David Edward

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rainfall, such as follows one of the seasonal hurri- canes, but these effects are short lived and likely exert less influ- ence on the sediments and hydrology of the bay than the winds and 24 waves associated with such storms. Realizing this property...FIELD STUDY OF AN UNCONFINED DREDGE SPOIL DISPOSAL AREA IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS A Thesis by DAUID EDWARD BASSI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  6. Laser velocimetry study of the flow field in a centrifugal pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashid, Kazi M.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ I 0 ((I (K IE 0 Eg g 0 :5 8 O 0 g E( (((E QO . . E- 6i EEE 5!X. . ( N CC E(: NI RS KR OQ 0 EEW AA 0 -"ni V 0 O CO (EP 4 EEE 0 ~ E Q Og ((E O ~ 0(O A 00 ~ 0 E' ~ 29 the beam splitter prism. The direction of the flow...-Chair of Committee) PS4~ Yassin A. Hassan (Member) W. L. Bradley (Head of Department) MAY 1993 ABSTRACT Laser Velocimetry Study of the Flow Field in a Centrifugal Pump. (May 1993) Kazi M. Rashid, B. S. , Bangladesh University of Engineering & Technology Co...

  7. Report on GRG18, Session A3, Mathematical Studies of the Field Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Andersson

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report I will give a summary of some of the main topics covered in Session A3, mathematical studies of the field equations, at GRG18, Sydney. Unfortunately, due to length constraints, some of the topics covered at the session will be very briefly mentioned or left out altogether. The summary is mainly based on extended abstracts submitted by the speakers and some of those who presented posters at the session. I would like to thank all participants for their contributions and help with this summary.

  8. Microbial field pilot study: Quarterly technical progress report: November 22, 1988--February 28, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; Mcinerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1989-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field test pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug the flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to encounter regions of the reservoir bypassed by the first flood, thereby increasing sweep efficiency. During this quarter studies were made to characterize the in situ bacteria in brine samples recovered from various locations in the SEVVSU. The characteristics of five anaerobic nitrate-using bacteria have been investigated. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Beyond mean-field study of elastic and inelastic electron scattering off nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Yao; M. Bender; P. -H. Heenen

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron scattering provides a powerful tool to determine charge distributions and transition densities of nuclei. This tool will soon be available for short-lived neutron-rich nuclei. [Purpose] Beyond mean-field methods have been successfully applied to the study of excitation spectra of nuclei in the whole nuclear chart. These methods permit to determine energies and transition probabilities starting from an effective in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction but without other phenomenological ingredients. Such a method has recently been extended to calculate the charge density of nuclei deformed at the mean-field level of approximation [J. M. Yao et al., Phys. Rev. C86, 014310 (2012)]. The aim of this work is to further extend the method to the determination of transition densities between low-lying excited states. [Method] The starting point of our method is a set of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov wave functions generated with a constraint on the axial quadrupole moment and using a Skyrme energy density functional. Correlations beyond the mean field are introduced by projecting mean-field wave functions on angular-momentum and particle number and by mixing the symmetry restored wave functions.[Results] We give in this paper detailed formulae derived for the calculation of densities and form factors. These formulae are rather easy to obtain when both initial and final states are $0^+$ states but are far from being trivial when one of the states has a finite $J$-value. Illustrative applications to $^{24}$Mg and to the even-mass $^{58-68}$Ni have permitted to analyse the main features of our method, in particular the effect of deformation on densities and form factors. An illustration calculation of both elastic and inelastic scattering form factors is presented....

  10. Comparative Study of Laboratory-Scale and Prototypic Production-Scale Fuel Fabrication Processes and Product Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas W. Marshall

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract An objective of the High Temperature Gas Reactor fuel development and qualification program for the United States Department of Energy has been to qualify fuel fabricated in prototypic production-scale equipment. The quality and characteristics of the tristructural isotropic coatings on fuel kernels are influenced by the equipment scale and processing parameters. Some characteristics affecting product quality were suppressed while others have become more significant in the larger equipment. Changes to the composition and method of producing resinated graphite matrix material has eliminated the use of hazardous, flammable liquids and enabled it to be procured as a vendor-supplied feed stock. A new method of overcoating TRISO particles with the resinated graphite matrix eliminates the use of hazardous, flammable liquids, produces highly spherical particles with a narrow size distribution, and attains product yields in excess of 99%. Compact fabrication processes have been scaled-up and automated with relatively minor changes to compact quality to manual laboratory-scale processes. The impact on statistical variability of the processes and the products as equipment was scaled are discussed. The prototypic production-scale processes produce test fuels that meet fuel quality specifications.

  11. Black Thunder Coal Mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory experimental study of seismic energy generated by large scale mine blasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.L.; Gross, D. [Thunder Basin Coal Co., Wright, WY (United States); Pearson, D.C.; Stump, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Anderson, D.P. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In an attempt to better understand the impact that large mining shots will have on verifying compliance with the international, worldwide, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT, no nuclear explosion tests), a series of seismic and videographic experiments has been conducted during the past two years at the Black Thunder Coal Mine. Personnel from the mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory have cooperated closely to design and perform experiments to produce results with mutual benefit to both organizations. This paper summarizes the activities, highlighting the unique results of each. Topics which were covered in these experiments include: (1) synthesis of seismic, videographic, acoustic, and computer modeling data to improve understanding of shot performance and phenomenology; (2) development of computer generated visualizations of observed blasting techniques; (3) documentation of azimuthal variations in radiation of seismic energy from overburden casting shots; (4) identification of, as yet unexplained, out of sequence, simultaneous detonation in some shots using seismic and videographic techniques; (5) comparison of local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic measurements leading to determine of the relationship between local and regional seismic amplitude to explosive yield for overburden cast, coal bulking and single fired explosions; and (6) determination of the types of mining shots triggering the prototype International Monitoring System for the CTBT.

  12. RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY DURING THE WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION INTERCOMPARISON STUDY, MAY-JUNE 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS, R.M.; BARTHOLOMEW, M.J.; MILLER, M.A.; SMITH, S.; EDWARDS, R.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The WHOI buoy radiometer intercomparison took place during May and June, 2000 at the WHOI facility. The WHOI IMET, JAMSTEC Triton, and NOAA TAO buoy systems were operated from a beach site and the Brookhaven National Laboratory set up two Portable Radiation Package systems (P01 and P02) alongside the WHOI instrumentation on the roof of the Clark Building, about 300 m away. The BNL instruments were named ''P01'' and ''P02'' and were identical. Buoy instruments were all leveled to {+-}1{degree} to horizontal. The purpose of the project was to compare the buoy systems with precision measurements so that any differences in data collection or processing would be evaluated. BNL was pleased to participate so the PRP system could be evaluated as a calibration tool. The Portable Radiation Package is an integral component of the BNL Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) system. It is designed to make accurate downwelling radiation measurements, including the three solar irradiance components (direct normal, diffuse and global) at six narrowband channels, aerosol optical depth measurements, and broadband longwave and shortwave irradiance measurements.

  13. Federal laboratories for the 21st century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gover, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Huray, P.G. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal laboratories have successfully filled many roles for the public; however, as the 21st Century nears it is time to rethink and reevaluate how Federal laboratories can better support the public and identify new roles for this class of publicly-owned institutions. The productivity of the Federal laboratory system can be increased by making use of public outcome metrics, by benchmarking laboratories, by deploying innovative new governance models, by partnerships of Federal laboratories with universities and companies, and by accelerating the transition of federal laboratories and the agencies that own them into learning organizations. The authors must learn how government-owned laboratories in other countries serve their public. Taiwan`s government laboratory, Industrial Technology Research Institute, has been particularly successful in promoting economic growth. It is time to stop operating Federal laboratories as monopoly institutions; therefore, competition between Federal laboratories must be promoted. Additionally, Federal laboratories capable of addressing emerging 21st century public problems must be identified and given the challenge of serving the public in innovative new ways. Increased investment in case studies of particular programs at Federal laboratories and research on the public utility of a system of Federal laboratories could lead to increased productivity of laboratories. Elimination of risk-averse Federal laboratory and agency bureaucracies would also have dramatic impact on the productivity of the Federal laboratory system. Appropriately used, the US Federal laboratory system offers the US an innovative advantage over other nations.

  14. Environmental | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Management Program at the Ames Laboratory includes Waste Management, Pollution Prevention, Recycling, Cultural Resources, and the Laboratory's Environmental...

  15. Field Camera Unit for WSO-UV: Phase A Study Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Pagano; F. Bacciotti; L. Bedin; F. Bracciaferri; E. Brocato; A. Bulgarelli; L. Buson; C. Cacciari; A. Capetti; A. Cassatella; E. Cavazzuti; R. Claudi; D. De Martino; G. De Paris; F. Ferraro; M. Fiorini; L. Gambicorti; A. Gherardi; F. Gianotti; D. Magrin; S. Marchi; G. Mulas; M. Munari; M. Nonino; E. Pace; M. Pancrazzi; E. Pian; G. Piotto; C. Pompei; C. Pontoni; G. Preti; S. Scuderi; S. Shore; M. Trifoglio; M. Turatto; M. Uslenghi

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    World Space Observatory UltraViolet (WSO-UV) is a multipurpose space observatory, made by a 170 cm aperture telescope, capable of UV high-resolution spectroscopy, long slit low-resolution spectroscopy, and deep UV and optical imaging. With a nominal mission life time of 5 years, and a planned extension to 10 years, from a geosynchronous orbit with an inclination of 51.8 degrees, WSO-UV will provide observations of exceptional importance for the study of many unsolved astrophysical problems. WSO-UV is implemented in the framework of a collaboration between Russia (chair), China, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Ukraine. This book illustrates the results of the feasibility study for the Field Camera Unit (FCU), a multi-spectral radial instrument on the focal plane of WSO-UV. The book provides an overview of the key science topics that are drivers to the participation of the Italian astronomical community in the WSO-UV project. The science drivers here illustrated have been used to define the technical requirements for the conceptual and architectural design of the Field Camera Unit (FCU) focal plane instrument. In Chapter I we show that WSO-UV will give a significant contribution to solve the key astronomical problems individuated by the ASTRONET consortium, and which are driving the European Space Agency Cosmic Vision program. Chapter II elucidates the scientific requirements for WSO-UV FCU instrument, discussed in Chapter I, which are translated in a list of verifiable top level requirements usable to make the conceptual design of the FCU instrument. Chapter III is dedicated to the Field Camera Unit opto-mechanical design, its detectors and electronics subsystems. Finally, Chapter IV outlines the AIV and GSE plans and activities for the FCU instrument.

  16. Alkali deposits found in biomass boilers: The behavior of inorganic material in biomass-fired power boilers -- Field and laboratory experiences. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Miles, T.R.; Miles, T.R. Jr. [Miles (Thomas R.), Portland, OR (United States); Jenkins, B.M. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States); Dayton, D.C.; Milne, T.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Bryers, R.W. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Oden, L.L. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the major findings of the Alkali Deposits Investigation, a collaborative effort to understand the causes of unmanageable ash deposits in biomass-fired electric power boilers. Volume 1 of this report provide an overview of the project, with selected highlights. This volume provides more detail and discussion of the data and implications. This document includes six sections. The first, the introduction, provides the motivation, context, and focus for the investigation. The remaining sections discuss fuel properties, bench-scale combustion tests, a framework for considering ash deposition processes, pilot-scale tests of biomass fuels, and field tests in commercially operating biomass power generation stations. Detailed chemical analyses of eleven biomass fuels representing a broad cross-section of commercially available fuels reveal their properties that relate to ash deposition tendencies. The fuels fall into three broad categories: (1) straws and grasses (herbaceous materials); (2) pits, shells, hulls and other agricultural byproducts of a generally ligneous nature; and (3) woods and waste fuels of commercial interest. This report presents a systematic and reasonably detailed analysis of fuel property, operating condition, and boiler design issues that dictate ash deposit formation and property development. The span of investigations from bench-top experiments to commercial operation and observations including both practical illustrations and theoretical background provide a self-consistent and reasonably robust basis to understand the qualitative nature of ash deposit formation in biomass boilers. While there remain many quantitative details to be pursued, this project encapsulates essentially all of the conceptual aspects of the issue. It provides a basis for understanding and potentially resolving the technical and environmental issues associated with ash deposition during biomass combustion. 81 refs., 124 figs., 76 tabs.

  17. Toroidal field coil replacement study for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop an estimate of the time required to replace a failed toroidal field (TF) coil in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This estimate is based on the current ITER design which resulted from the Conceptual Design Activities began in spring of 1988 and ending in December 1990. Although the TF Coils in ITER are designated permanent components and expected to last the life of the plant, the history of failures of large coils in fusion devices has prompted an assessment of the down time that might be required for replacement of a failed TF coil in ITER. The difficulty of replacement of a TF Coil in ITER is compounded by the large physical size of ITER, and the radiation fields which necessitate the use of remote handling equipment for most maintenance activities. Since 10 out of 16 TF coils are adjacent to either a Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) port or a remote handling (RH) port, it is probable that a failed TF Coil will be in one of these inconvenient locations. For this study, TF coil number 3 is assumed to fail and its replacement will be evaluated as a typical case. TF coil number 3 is located between a remote handling port ({number sign}3) and a port allocated to the lower hybrid ({number sign}4).

  18. Toroidal field coil replacement study for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to develop an estimate of the time required to replace a failed toroidal field (TF) coil in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). This estimate is based on the current ITER design which resulted from the Conceptual Design Activities began in spring of 1988 and ending in December 1990. Although the TF Coils in ITER are designated permanent components and expected to last the life of the plant, the history of failures of large coils in fusion devices has prompted an assessment of the down time that might be required for replacement of a failed TF coil in ITER. The difficulty of replacement of a TF Coil in ITER is compounded by the large physical size of ITER, and the radiation fields which necessitate the use of remote handling equipment for most maintenance activities. Since 10 out of 16 TF coils are adjacent to either a Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) port or a remote handling (RH) port, it is probable that a failed TF Coil will be in one of these inconvenient locations. For this study, TF coil number 3 is assumed to fail and its replacement will be evaluated as a typical case. TF coil number 3 is located between a remote handling port ({number_sign}3) and a port allocated to the lower hybrid ({number_sign}4).

  19. The in-situ decontamination of sand and gravel aquifers by chemically enhanced solubilization of multiple-compound DNAPLs with surfactant solutions: Phase 1 -- Laboratory and pilot field-scale testing and Phase 2 -- Solubilization test and partitioning and interwell tracer tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, numerical simulation, and field studies have been conducted to assess the potential use of micellar-surfactant solutions to solubilize chlorinated solvents contaminating sand and gravel aquifers. Ninety-nine surfactants were screened for their ability to solubilize trichloroethene (TCE), perchloroethylene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CTET). The field test was conducted in the alluvial aquifer which is located 20 to 30 meters beneath a vapor degreasing operation at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. This aquifer has become contaminated with TCE due to leakage of perhaps 40,000 liters of TCE, which has generated a plume of dissolved TCE extending throughout an area of approximately 3 km{sup 2} in the aquifer. Most of the TCE is believed to be present in the overlying lacustrine deposits and in the aquifer itself as a dense, non-aqueous phase liquid, or DNAPL. The objective of the field test was to assess the efficacy of the surfactant for in situ TCE solubilization. Although the test demonstrated that sorbitan monooleate was unsuitable as a solubilizer in this aquifer, the single-well test was demonstrated to be a viable method for the in situ testing of surfactants or cosolvents prior to proceeding to full-scale remediation.

  20. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies of quadrupolar nuclei and dipolar field effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, Jeffry Todd

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and theoretical research conducted in two areas in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is presented: (1) studies of the coherent quantum-mechanical control of the angular momentum dynamics of quadrupolar (spin I > 1/2) nuclei and its application to the determination of molecular structure; and (2) applications of the long-range nuclear dipolar field to novel NMR detection methodologies.The dissertation is organized into six chapters. The first two chapters and associated appendices are intended to be pedagogical and include an introduction to the quantum mechanical theory of pulsed NMR spectroscopy and the time dependent theory of quantum mechanics. The third chapter describes investigations of the solid-state multiple-quantum magic angle spinning (MQMAS) NMR experiment applied to I = 5/2 quadrupolar nuclei. This work reports the use of rotary resonance-matched radiofrequency irradiation for sensitivity enhancement of the I = 5/2 MQMAS experiment. These experiments exhibited certain selective line narrowing effects which were investigated theoretically.The fourth chapter extends the discussion of multiple quantum spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to a mostly theoretical study of the feasibility of enhancing the resolution of nitrogen-14 NMR of large biomolecules in solution via double-quantum spectroscopy. The fifth chapter continues to extend the principles of multiple quantum NMR spectroscopy of quadrupolar nuclei to make analogies between experiments in NMR/nuclear quadrupolar resonance (NQR) and experiments in atomic/molecular optics (AMO). These analogies are made through the Hamiltonian and density operator formalism of angular momentum dynamics in the presence of electric and magnetic fields.The sixth chapter investigates the use of the macroscopic nuclear dipolar field to encode the NMR spectrum of an analyte nucleus indirectly in the magnetization of a sensor nucleus. This technique could potentially serve as an encoding module for the recently developed NMR remote detection experiment. The feasibility of using hyperpolarized xenon-129 gas as a sensor is discussed. This work also reports the use of an optical atomic magnetometer to detect the nuclear magnetization of Xe-129 gas, which has potential applicability as a detection module for NMR remote detection experiments.

  1. A model study of the impact of magnetic field structure on atmospheric composition during solar proton events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    A model study of the impact of magnetic field structure on atmospheric composition during solar is possible into regions that are at the moment effectively shielded by the Earth's magnetic field. A two (process, timescale, magnetostratigraphy); 1650 Global Change: Solar variability; 2716 Magnetospheric

  2. A HIGH-FIELD EPR STUDY OF THE POLARITY PROFILE OF THE BACTERIO-RHODOPSIN PROTON CHANNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    A HIGH-FIELD EPR STUDY OF THE POLARITY PROFILE OF THE BACTERIO- RHODOPSIN PROTON CHANNEL Christoph Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin, Germany. Introduction Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR-field EPR spectra with respect to the g-tensor anisotropy allows additionally to follow the behavior of gxx

  3. Feasibility study on the solidification of liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trussell, S. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Spence, R.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature survey was conducted to help determine the feasibility of solidifying a liquid low-level radioactive mixed waste in the inactive tank system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The goal of this report is to facilitate a decision on the disposition of these wastes by identifying any waste constituents that might (1) compromise the strength or stability of the waste form or (2) be highly leachable. Furthermore, its goal is to identify ways to circumvent interferences and to decrease the leachability of the waste constituents. This study has sought to provide an understanding of inhibition of cement set by identifying the fundamental chemical mechanisms by which this inhibition takes place. From this fundamental information, it is possible to draw some conclusions about the potential effects of waste constituents, even in the absence of particular studies on specific compounds.

  4. Integrated petrographic and petrophysical study of the Smackover formation, Womack Hill field, Clarke and Choctaw counties, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Tiffany Lynn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to describe depositional and diagenetic characteristics of the Oxfordian (Jurassic) Smackover formation in Womack Hill field, Alabama, as part of an integrated reservoir description program. In order to understand...

  5. Computational study of self-assembly in block copolymer/superparamagnetic nanoparticle composites under external magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Vinay

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This computational and theoretical study investigates the self-assembly of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and block copolymers under external magnetic fields. A variety of morphological transitions are observed based on ...

  6. Inelastic neutron scttering study o fcrystal field levels in PrOs4As12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chi, Songxue [ORNL; Dai, Pengcheng [ORNL; Barnes, Ted {F E } [ORNL; Kang, H. J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Lynn, J. W. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Ye, Feng [ORNL; Maple, M. B. [University of California, San Diego

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use neutron scattering to study the Pr$^{3+}$ crystalline electric field (CEF) excitations in the filled skutterudite PrOs$_4$As$_{12}$. By comparing the observed levels and their strengths under neutron excitation with the theoretical spectrum and neutron excitation intensities, we identify the Pr$^{3+}$ CEF levels, and show that the ground state is a magnetic $\\Gamma_4^{(2)}$ triplet, and the excited states $\\Gamma_1$, $\\Gamma_4^{(1)}$ and $\\Gamma_{23}$ are at 0.4, 13 and 23~meV, respectively. A comparison of the observed CEF levels in PrOs$_4$As$_{12}$ with the heavy fermion superconductor PrOs$_4$Sb$_{12}$ reveals the microscopic origin of the differences in the ground states of these two filled skutterudites.

  7. Monte Carlo Study of a 137Cs calibration field of the China institute of atomic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Fei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MCNP code was used to study the characteristics of gamma radiation field with collimated beam geometry. A close-to-reality simulation model of the facility was used for calculation air-kerma along the whole range of source-detector-distance (SDD) along the central beam and air-kerma off-axis beam profiles at two different source-detector-distance (SDD). The simulation results were tested by the measured results which were acquired in the Radiation Metrology Center of CIAE. Other characteristics such as the individual contributions of photons scattered in collimator, floor, walls, mobile platform and other parts of the irradiation halls to the total air kerma rate on the beam axis were calculated for the purpose of future improvement of metrological parameters in CIAE. Finally, factors which influence the simulation results were investigated, including e.g., detector volume effects or source density effects.

  8. Monte Carlo Study of a 137Cs calibration field of the China institute of atomic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei Gao

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The MCNP code was used to study the characteristics of gamma radiation field with collimated beam geometry. A close-to-reality simulation model of the facility was used for calculation air-kerma along the whole range of source-detector-distance (SDD) along the central beam and air-kerma off-axis beam profiles at two different source-detector-distance (SDD). The simulation results were tested by the measured results which were acquired in the Radiation Metrology Center of CIAE. Other characteristics such as the individual contributions of photons scattered in collimator, floor, walls, mobile platform and other parts of the irradiation halls to the total air kerma rate on the beam axis were calculated for the purpose of future improvement of metrological parameters in CIAE. Finally, factors which influence the simulation results were investigated, including e.g., detector volume effects or source density effects.

  9. A quantitative study of fish populations associated with a platform within Buccaneer Oil Field, northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putt, Russell Eugene

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF FISH POPULATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH A PLATFORM WITHIN BUCCANEER OIL FIELD, NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by RUSSELL EUGENE PUTT, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Oceanography A QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF FISH POPULATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH A PLATFORM WITHIN BUCCANEER OIL FIELD, NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by RUSSELL EUGENE PUTT, JR...

  10. LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored by electric currents. This lab will carry that investigation one step further, determining how changing magnetic fields can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation

  11. LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored the magnetic field and its effect on moving charges. You also saw how electric currents could create magnetic can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation of electricity

  12. Integrated reservoir study of the Monument Northwest field: a waterflood performance evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nduonyi, Moses Asuquo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    methodology for a deterministic approach. The data history of the wells in the field beginning from spud date were gathered and analyzed into information necessary for building an upscaled reservoir model of the field. Means of increasing production...

  13. Integrated reservoir study of the Monument Northwest field: a waterflood performance evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nduonyi, Moses Asuquo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    methodology for a deterministic approach. The data history of the wells in the field beginning from spud date were gathered and analyzed into information necessary for building an upscaled reservoir model of the field. Means of increasing production...

  14. Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R.K. Johnson. Heat Pump Water Heater Field Test: 30a Market-Optimized Heat- Pump Water Heater. Prepared by TIAXcost savings of heat pump water heaters Field test of

  15. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Mulholland, P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  16. Project OPTEX: Field study at a petrochemical facility to assess optical remote sensing and dispersion modeling techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paien, R.J. [ENSR Corp., Acton, MA (United States); Zwicker, J.O. [Remote Sensing Air, Inc., St. Louis, MO (United States); Feldman, H. [American Petroleum Inst., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Petroleum Inst. has conducted a field study at a petrochemical facility for the purpose of (1) testing the ability of optical remote sensing (ORS) techniques to characterize fugitive emissions, and (2) assembling ambient and tracer sampler data for evaluating air dispersion models. The study, referred to as the OPTEX (Operational Petrochemical Tracer Experiment) Project, took place during October 1996 at a Texas petrochemical facility. This paper reports on the design of the field study and summarizes the measurements that were obtained in the field. Several aspects of the field study are described in the paper: the types and locations of the emission releases and tracer gases that were used, the deployment of tracer samplers at various downwind distances, the use of open-path FTIR (OP-FTIR) equipment at the site to quantify tracer gas emissions, special short-term tracer gas emissions designed to test the ability of the ORS systems to detect accidental releases, and the use of a Doppler sodar to evaluate vertical profiles of wind and turbulence upwind and downwind of the facility. The data base for this study, as well as that from an earlier field study that took place at the Duke Forest green field site in North Carolina, will be used for evaluating air dispersion model performance and the ability of ORS measurements to quantify fugitive emissions.

  17. A Code Comparison Study for the Bigten Critical Assembly Robert E. MacFarlane (Los Alamos National Laboratory)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cullen, Red

    different nuclear data evaluations. This particular critical assembly was chosen because it is sensitive to predict nuclear criticality in recent years. This has been due to three factors: (1) improved nuclear data#12;A Code Comparison Study for the Bigten Critical Assembly by Robert E. MacFarlane (Los Alamos

  18. A Case Study of Consecutive Reorganizations of the Science Laboratories at the NASA -Goddard Space Flight Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    here seeks to explore cyclical reorganizations of government-owned and -operated scientific are similarly bifurcated. Three lenses are utilized in assessing the reorganizations of GSFC, attempting interviews were conducted borrowing freely from the instrument and protocol utilized by earlier studies

  19. Erroneous Model Field Representations in Multiple Pseudoproxy Studies: Corrections and Implications*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (CCSM), version 1.4, field was incorrectly oriented geographically and the GKSS ECHO-g FOR1 field- periments that used the corrupted ECHO-g field and those aspects of previous CCSM experiments that focused millennial simulations for this purpose are the GKSS ECHO-g FOR1 (here- after ECHO-g; Gonzalez-Rouco et al

  20. Laboratory studies of radionuclide distributions between selected groundwaters and geologic media. Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdal, B.R. (comp.)

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive studies of the behavior of plutonium and americium in pH approx. = 8 groundwaters were made, particularly with respect to container sorption, filtering, and centrifugation. Significant improvements in the method used for measuring sorption ratios for these elements were developed, and their sorption-desorption ratios on argillite and tuff were measured. Effects of particle size, temperature, sampling location, mineralogy, and time were investigated for these elements. The chemical composition of the water was found to be a major factor that governs sorption behavior. Studies of the sorption of strontion, cesium, barium, cerium, europium, uranium, and americium on Hainesville salt dome materials were made under aerobic and anoxic (<0.2 ppM oxygen) conditions using two synthetic groundwaters: one represented the Wilcox aquifer in the Hainesville region and the second was a dilute brine. Studies of the sorption of strontium, cesium, barium, cerium, europium, and uranium(VI) on granite and argillite were made under anoxic (<0.2 ppM oxygen) conditions and the results were compared to earlier measurements made under aerobic conditions. The sorption of uranium(VI) on argillite under atmospheric conditions was investigated. Measurements of migration rates in crushed granite, argillite, and tuff were made and compared with batch results. Infiltration experiments involving the forced injection of activity into intact and fractured cores were also performed. Microautoradiographic techniques were used to detect specific sorption sites. This latter technique was also used to characterize the sorption of plutonium and neptunium on polished thin-sections of alluvium, granite, tuff, and argillite and to assess the amount of aggregation that occurred. Additional physical and chemical characterizations of the materials used in these studies were made, and new analytical techniques were developed.

  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  2. Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory A multidisciplinary research fields. The Climate Change Science Institute at Oak Ridge National Laboratory routinely partners simulations to improve regional modeling of climate extremes - Partners from Oak Ridge, Lawrence Berkeley

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Research and Innovation in U.S...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Paquette is the laboratory's Task Leader for Laboratory and Field Testing of Wind Turbine Blades. When REM caught up with him, Paquette was running between meetings on various...

  4. Environmental, Safety, and Health Plan for the remedial investigation/feasibility study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Revision 1, Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan presents the concepts and methodologies to be followed during the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to protect the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. This ES&H Plan acts as a management extension for ORNL and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to direct and control implementation of the project ES&H program. The subsections that follow describe the program philosophy, requirements, quality assurance measures, and methods for applying the ES&H program to individual waste area grouping (WAG) remedial investigations. Hazardous work permits (HWPs) will be used to provide task-specific health and safety requirements.

  5. Study of the properties of mine waste in the midwestern coal fields. Phase I report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effort to assist the coal industry in complying with the applicable regulations, to design safe and environmentally acceptable disposal systems, and to encourage secondary use of coal mine waste, the US Department of Energy has initiated research programs to develop coal mine waste disposal and use technology. This study of the properties of mine wastes in the Midwestern coal fields has been limited to the waste materials obtained from underground coal mines and preparation plants attached to both underground and surface mines. The program has been divided into two phases. In Phase I, the 20 most important properties relevant to safe disposal, reclamation, underground disposal, and secondary uses have been identified. An inventory of the significant waste disposal sites in the Midwestern coal fields has been prepared. The site locations have been plotted on USGS maps. Estimates of coal production and coal mine waste production during the next 2 decades have been prepared and are presented in this report. Also, all available information obtained from a search of existing literature on physical and chemical properties, including analysis results of the general runoff from the refuse disposal areas, has been collected and is presented. In order to fill the gaps in information, 20 sites have been identified for drilling and sampling to determine the various physical and chemical properties. They have been selected on the basis of the distribution and quantity of waste at the existing locations (both abandoned and active), the future trends in production and likely locations of waste disposal areas, their geographical and geological distribution, and ease of accessibility for drilling and sampling.

  6. Field Theoretic Study of Bilayer Membrane Fusion: II. Mechanism of a Stalk-Hole Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirill Katsov; Marcus Mueller; Michael Schick

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We use self-consistent field theory to determine structural and energetic properties of intermediates and transition states involved in bilayer membrane fusion. In particular, we extend our original calculations from those of the standard hemifusion mechanism, which was studied in detail in the first paper of this series, to consider a possible alternative to it. This mechanism involves non-axial stalk expansion, in contrast to the axially symmetric evolution postulated in the classical mechanism. Elongation of the initial stalk facilitates the nucleation of holes and leads to destabilization of the fusing membranes via the formation of a stalk-hole complex. We study properties of this complex in detail, and show how transient leakage during fusion, previously predicted and recently observed in experiment, should vary with system architecture and tension. We also show that the barrier to fusion in the alternative mechanism is lower than that of the standard mechanism by a few $k_BT$ over most of the relevant region of system parameters, so that this alternative mechanism is a viable alternative to the standard pathway.

  7. THE NEW YORK CITY URBAN DISPERSION PROGRAM MARCH 2005 FIELD STUDY: TRACER METHODS AND RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WATSON, T.B.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; WIESER, R.; VIGNATO, G.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Dispersion Program March 2005 Field Study tracer releases, sampling, and analytical methods are described in detail. There were two days where tracer releases and sampling were conducted. A total of 16.0 g of six tracers were released during the first test day or Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 1 and 15.7 g during IOP 2. Three types of sampling instruments were used in this study. Sequential air samplers, or SAS, collected six-minute samples, while Brookhaven atmospheric tracer samplers (BATS) and personal air samplers (PAS) collected thirty-minute samples. There were a total of 1300 samples resulting from the two IOPs. Confidence limits in the sampling and analysis method were 20% as determined from 100 duplicate samples. The sample recovery rate was 84%. The integrally averaged 6-minute samples were compared to the 30-minute samples. The agreement was found to be good in most cases. The validity of using a background tracer to calculate sample volumes was examined and also found to have a confidence level of 20%. Methods for improving sampling and analysis are discussed. The data described in this report are available as Excel files. An additional Excel file of quality assured tracer data for use in model validation efforts is also available. The file consists of extensively quality assured BATS tracer data with background concentrations subtracted.

  8. Field Camera Unit for WSO-UV: Phase A Study Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pagano, I; Bedin, L; Bracciaferri, F; Brocato, E; Bulgarelli, A; Buson, L; Cacciari, C; Capetti, A; Cassatella, A; Cavazzuti, E; Claudi, R; De Martino, D; De Paris, G; Ferraro, F; Fiorini, M; Gambicorti, L; Gherardi, A; Gianotti, F; Magrin, D; Marchi, S; Mulas, G; Munari, M; Nonino, M; Pace, E; Pancrazzi, M; Pian, E; Piotto, G; Pompei, C; Pontoni, C; Preti, G; Scuderi, S; Shore, S; Trifoglio, M; Turatto, M; Uslenghi, M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World Space Observatory UltraViolet (WSO-UV) is a multipurpose space observatory, made by a 170 cm aperture telescope, capable of UV high-resolution spectroscopy, long slit low-resolution spectroscopy, and deep UV and optical imaging. With a nominal mission life time of 5 years, and a planned extension to 10 years, from a geosynchronous orbit with an inclination of 51.8 degrees, WSO-UV will provide observations of exceptional importance for the study of many unsolved astrophysical problems. WSO-UV is implemented in the framework of a collaboration between Russia (chair), China, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Ukraine. This book illustrates the results of the feasibility study for the Field Camera Unit (FCU), a multi-spectral radial instrument on the focal plane of WSO-UV. The book provides an overview of the key science topics that are drivers to the participation of the Italian astronomical community in the WSO-UV project. The science drivers here illustrated have been used to define the technical requirements fo...

  9. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (2012). FiguRe 19. (Left) simulated 1d NMR spectra of a two-site chemical exchange process. FiguRe 20. (Right) select 1 H- 15 N HsQc spectra of HiV-1 PR in the apo (red) state...

  10. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory: Optical Microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of materials (such as this metallic superlattice) are produced in Optical Microscopy. Web-based Education This department runs four microscopy Web sites that together comprise...

  11. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Optical Microscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Kinetic Evaluations, Inorg. Chem., 20 (52), 5838-5850 (2013) read online 16 Stricker, J.; Beckham, Y.; Davidson, M.W. and Gardel, M.L., Myosin II-Mediated Focal Adhesion...

  12. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory moves closer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleetEngineeringAnnual Report ThisNationalNationalview

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Clean Energy Demonstration Field

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0Energy AdvancedEnergyEnergy EfficientFacility

  14. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Recent Publications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Scientific Activities Peer-Reviewed Publications 1 Besara, T.; Ramirez, D.; Sun, J.; Whalen, J.B.; Tokumoto, T.D.; McGill, S.A.; Singh, D.J. and Siegrist, T., Ba2TeO:...

  15. AERONAUTICS The Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, the Krmn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Julia R.

    . Physics of Fluids. Fluid dynamics as a discipline is as much a part of physics as of engineering. PhysicsAERONAUTICS The Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory, the Kármán Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics the broad field known as aeronautics and space engineering. Areas of Research Aeronautics has evolved

  16. Modeling aerosols and their interactions with shallow cumuli during the 2007 CHAPS field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Berg, Larry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Laskin, Alexander; Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Liu, Ying; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate relationships between aerosols and clouds in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during the June 2007 Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS). The regional scale simulation completed using 2 km horizontal grid spacing evaluates four important relationships between aerosols and shallow cumulus clouds observed during CHAPS. First, the model reproduces the trends of higher nitrate volume fractions in cloud droplet residuals compared to interstitial non-activated aerosols, as measured using the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer. Comparing simulations with cloud chemistry turned on and off, we show that nitric acid vapor uptake by cloud droplets explains the higher nitrate content of cloud droplet residuals. Second, as documented using an offline code, both aerosol water and other inorganics (OIN), which are related to dust and crustal emissions, significantly affect predicted aerosol optical properties. Reducing the OIN content of wet aerosols by 50% significantly improves agreement of model predictions with measurements of aerosol optical properties. Third, the simulated hygroscopicity of aerosols is too high as compared to their hygroscopicity derived from cloud condensation nuclei and particle size distribution measurements, indicating uncertainties associated with simulating size-dependent chemical composition and treatment of aerosol mixing state within the model. Fourth, the model reasonably represents the observations of the first aerosol indirect effect where pollutants in the vicinity of Oklahoma City increase cloud droplet number concentrations and decrease the droplet effective radius. While previous studies have often focused on cloud-aerosol interactions in stratiform and deep convective clouds, this study highlights the ability of regional-scale models to represent some of the important aspects of cloud-aerosol interactions associated with fields of short-lived shallow cumuli.

  17. Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Demand Electric Water Heaters for Northeast Utilities.Two Demand Electric Water Heaters for Northeast Utilities.Johnson. Heat Pump Water Heater Field Test: 30 Crispaire

  18. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL 57225 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Duct Tape and Sealant Performance I of California. Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. Legal Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), we have studied the durability and longevity of duct sealants for more

  19. Report on HVAC option selections for a relocatable classroom energy and indoor environmental quality field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Michael G.; Delp, Woody W.; Diamond, Richard C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Kumar, Satish; Rainer, Leo I.; Shendell, Derek G.; Sullivan, Doug P.; Fisk, William J.

    2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    It is commonly assumed that efforts to simultaneously develop energy efficient building technologies and to improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) are unfeasible. The primary reason for this is that IEQ improvements often require additional ventilation that is costly from an energy standpoint. It is currently thought that health and productivity in work and learning environments requires adequate, if not superior, IEQ. Despite common assumptions, opportunities do exist to design building systems that provide improvements in both energy efficiency and IEQ. This report outlines the selection of a heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system to be used in demonstrating such an opportunity in a field study using relocatable school classrooms. Standard classrooms use a common wall mounted heat pump HVAC system. After reviewing alternative systems, a wall-mounting indirect/direct evaporative cooling system with an integral hydronic gas heating is selected. The anticipated advantages of this system include continuous ventilation of 100 percent outside air at or above minimum standards, projected cooling energy reductions of about 70 percent, inexpensive gas heating, improved airborne particle filtration, and reduced peak load electricity use. Potential disadvantages include restricted climate regions and possible increases in indoor relative humidity levels under some conditions.

  20. A NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC STUDY OF YOUNG FIELD ULTRACOOL DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allers, K. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Liu, Michael C., E-mail: k.allers@bucknell.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a near-infrared (0.9-2.4 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 73 field ultracool dwarfs having spectroscopic and/or kinematic evidence of youth ( Almost-Equal-To 10-300 Myr). Our sample is composed of 48 low-resolution (R Almost-Equal-To 100) spectra and 41 moderate-resolution spectra (R {approx}> 750-2000). First, we establish a method for spectral typing M5-L7 dwarfs at near-IR wavelengths that is independent of gravity. We find that both visual and index-based classification in the near-IR provides consistent spectral types with optical spectral types, though with a small systematic offset in the case of visual classification at J and K band. Second, we examine features in the spectra of {approx}10 Myr ultracool dwarfs to define a set of gravity-sensitive indices based on FeH, VO, K I, Na I, and H-band continuum shape. We then create an index-based method for classifying the gravities of M6-L5 dwarfs that provides consistent results with gravity classifications from optical spectroscopy. Our index-based classification can distinguish between young and dusty objects. Guided by the resulting classifications, we propose a set of low-gravity spectral standards for the near-IR. Finally, we estimate the ages corresponding to our gravity classifications.

  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  2. LETTER TO THE EDITOR Forest canopy studies as an emerging field of science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    fields go through stages of maturity, as do plants, people, and societies. A scientific field in its specializing in arboreal biota. The development of three technological innovations coincided with the subse conferences are held every 4 years. Formal networks exist for communication among researchers. Effects

  3. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future ponsorship Format Reversed Color:White rtical Format Reversed-A ertical Format Reversed-B National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  4. Study of Inflationary Generalized Cosmic Chaplygin Gas for Standard and Tachyon Scalar Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; Rabia Saleem

    2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an inflationary universe model in the context of generalized cosmic Chaplygin gas by taking matter field as standard and tachyon scalar fields. We evaluate the corresponding scalar fields and scalar potentials during intermediate and logamediate inflationary regimes by modifying the first Friedmann equation. In each case, we evaluate the number of e-folds, scalar as well as tensor power spectra, scalar spectral index and important observational parameter, i.e., tensor-scalar ratio in terms of inflatons. The graphical behavior of this parameter shows that the model remains incompatible with WMAP7 and Planck observational data in each case.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: isotope studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbine blade manufacturing therenewableswind bladeligninisotope

  6. Two color laser fields for studying the Cooper minimum with phase-matched high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ba Dinh, Khuong, E-mail: kdinh@swin.edu.au; Vu Le, Hoang; Hannaford, Peter; Van Dao, Lap [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-Ray Science and Centre for Quantum and Optical Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Vic 3122 (Australia)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the observation of the Cooper minimum in a semi-infinite argon-filled gas cell using two-color laser fields at wavelengths of 1400?nm and 800?nm. The experimental results show that the additional 800?nm field can change the macroscopic phase-matching condition through change of the atomic dipole phase associated with the electron in the continuum state and that this approach can be used to control the appearance of the Cooper minimum in the high-order harmonic spectrum in order to study the electronic structure of atoms and molecules.

  7. Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

  8. The TITAN Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor study: Scoping phase report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TITAN research program is a multi-institutional effort to determine the potential of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) magnetic fusion concept as a compact, high-power-density, and ''attractive'' fusion energy system from economic (cost of electricity, COE), environmental, and operational viewpoints. In particular, a high neutron wall loading design (18 MW/m/sup 2/) has been chosen as the reference case in order to quantify the issue of engineering practicality, to determine the physics requirements and plasma operating mode, to assess significant benefits of compact systems, and to illuminate the main drawbacks. The program has been divided into two phases, each roughly one year in length: the Scoping Phase and the Design Phase. During the scoping phase, the TITAN design team has defined the parameter space for a high mass power density (MPD) RFP reactor, and explored a variety of approaches to the design of major subsystems. Two major design approaches consistent with high MPD and low COE, the lithium-vanadium blanket design and aqueous loop-in-pool design, have been selected for more detailed engineering evaluation in the design phase. The program has retained a balance in its approach to investigating high MPD systems. On the one hand, parametric investigations of both subsystems and overall system performance are carried out. On the other hand, more detailed analysis and engineering design and integration are performed, appropriate to determining the technical feasibility of the high MPD approach to RFP fusion reactors. This report describes the work of the scoping phase activities of the TITAN program. A synopsis of the principal technical findings and a brief description of the TITAN multiple-design approach is given. The individual chapters on Plasma Physics and Engineering, Parameter Systems Studies, Divertor, Reactor Engineering, and Fusion Power Core Engineering have been cataloged separately.

  9. Remedial investigation/feasibility study Work Plan and addenda for Operable Unit 4-12: Central Facilities Area Landfills II and III at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, K.N.; Stormberg, G.J.; Porro, I.; Sondrup, A.J.; McCormick, S.H.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is divided into two main sections -- the Work Plan and the addenda. The Work Plan describes the regulatory history and physical setting of Operable Unit 4-12, previous sampling activities, and data. It also identifies a preliminary conceptual model, preliminary remedial action alternatives, and preliminary applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. In addition, the Work Plan discusses data gaps and data quality objectives for proposed remedial investigation activities. Also included are tasks identified for the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) and a schedule of RI/FS activities. The addenda include details of the proposed field activities (Field Sampling Plan), anticipated quality assurance activities (Quality Assurance Project Plan), policies and procedures to protect RI/FS workers and the environment during field investigations (Health and Safety Plan), and policies, procedures, and activities that the Department of Energy will use to involve the public in the decision-making process concerning CFA Landfills II and III RI/FS activities (Community Relations Plan).

  10. Materials Design Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Design Laboratory, scheduled for completion in FY 2020, is designed to meet U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold...

  11. Studies of coaxial multipactor in the presence of a magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becerra, Gabriel E. (Becerra Toledo)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multipactor discharges consists of electron multiplication between two surfaces by secondary electron emission in resonance with an alternating electric field. They are detrimental to the performance of radio frequency ...

  12. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory: DC Field Facility Publication...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Taniguchi, T., and Goldhaber-Gordon, D. , Composite fermions and broken symmetries in graphene, Nature Communications, 6, 5838 (2015) 2 Besara, T.; Ramirez, D.; Sun, J.; Whalen,...

  13. National High Magnetic Field Laboratory - Pulsed Field Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K.A.D.; Dattelbaum, A.M. and Doorn, S.K., Fluorescent single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels in surfactant-free environments, ACS Nano, 5, 6686 (2011) 10 Franco, Jr, A.; Machado,...

  14. ORISE: Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles in the field of worker health studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK MappingHistory TheManagement Man participating

  15. A dosimetric study of small photon fields using polymer gel and Gafchromic EBT films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassani, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nedaie, Hassan Ali, E-mail: Nedaieha@sina.tums.ac.ir [Cancer Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahmatkesh, Mohammad Hassan [Department of Medical Physics, Shahid Beheshti university of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shirani, Kaveh [Department of Medical Radiation Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of small field sizes is increasingly becoming important in radiotherapy particularly since the introduction of stereotactic radiosurgery and intensity-modulated radiation therapy techniques. The reliable measurement of delivered dose from such fields with conventional dosimeters, such as ionization chambers, is a challenging task. In this work, methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper polymer gel dosimeters are employed to measure dose in 3 dimensions. Field sizes of 5 5 mm{sup 2}, 10 10 mm{sup 2}, 20 20 mm{sup 2}, and 30 30 mm{sup 2} are investigated for a 6-MV x-rays. The results show an agreement with Gafchromic film, with some variation in measured doses near the edge of the fields, where the film data decrease more rapidly than the other methods. Dose penumbra widths obtained with gel dosimeters and Gafchormic film were generally in agreement with each other. The results of this work indicate that polymer gel dosimetry could be invaluable for the quantification of the 3-dimensional dose distribution in small field size.

  16. 4D gravity monitoring of fluid movement at Delhi Field, LA: A feasibility study with seismic and well data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4D gravity monitoring of fluid movement at Delhi Field, LA: A feasibility study with seismic and well data Richard A. Krahenbuhl *, Yaoguo Li , & Tom Davis Center for Gravity, Electrical & Magnetic in a reservoir at various injection times using 4D micro-gravity method. Simulations are performed using

  17. Four recent National Academy studies of materials and manufacturing [1-4] have identified the recently established field of Integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    in a computational materials design team project in MSc390 Materials Design. [1] NRC 2003, Materials Research to MeetFour recent National Academy studies of materials and manufacturing [1-4] have identified the recently established field of Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) as the greatest

  18. Computer science is the study of design, theory, and application of computers. It is a continuously evolving field based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Computer science is the study of design, theory, and application of computers. It is a continuously evolving field based on electronics, linguistics, logic, mathematics, and systems engineering. The computer science program emphasizes the development of software and the use of computers focusing around

  19. Impact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F. Maupetit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    indoor air quality (IAQ) since they produce secondary pollutants, mainly aldehydes which are known to document the impact on IAQ of outdoor ozone during summer air pollution episodes. For this purpose, a oneImpact of ozone on indoor air quality: a preliminary field study M. Nicolas, O. Ramalho, F

  20. Simulation studies of a horizontal well producing from a thin oil-rim reservoir in the SSB1 field, Malaysia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdul Hakim, Hazlan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional simulation studies have been carried out to investigate the performance of a horizontal well producing from a thin oil-rim reservoir, X3/X4 in the SSBI field, Malaysia. A heterogeneous model was used which honored the reservoir...

  1. Advanced measurements and techniques in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lacerda, A.H. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Kim, Y. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). High magnetic fields present a unique environment for studying the electronic structure of materials. Two classes of materials were chosen for experiments at the national high Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos: highly correlated electron systems and semiconductors. Magnetotransport and thermodynamic experiments were performed on the renormalized ground states of highly correlated electron systems (such as heavy fermion materials and Kondo insulators) in the presence of magnetic fields that are large enough to disrupt the many-body correlations. A variety of optical measurements in high magnetic fields were performed on semiconductor heterostructures including GaAs/AlGaAs single heterojunctions (HEMT structure), coupled double quantum wells (CDQW), asymmetric coupled double quantum wells (ACDQW), multiple quantum wells and a CdTe single crystal thin film.

  2. Case study of a horizontal well in a layered Rotliegendes gas field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catterall, S.J.A.; Yaliz, A. (Hamilton Oil Co. Ltd., London (United Kingdom))

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A horizontal well was drilled in the Ravenspurn North field to drain a thin gas column above the aquifer. The field has a significant variation in reservoir quality, with most of the wells requiring stimulation by hydraulic fracturing. The reservoir is formed from a stacked sequence of aeolian dune and fluvial sandstones with a wide permeability range. The horizontal well was chosen as an alternative to stimulation by hydraulic fracturing to avoid water production from the aquifer. The well was successful, flowing at higher gas rates than expected with no water production. Production, core, and production logging data were used to demonstrate greater than expected lateral heterogeneity in the field. The horizontal well was found to be appropriate for the very specific conditions found in one part of the reservoir; however, the overall development strategy of using hydraulic fracture remains the preferred technique.

  3. Non-local kinetic transport studies of a Field-Reversed Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Chan K.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer code was developed and tested, during this past period, to determine the global, linear kinetic stability of a one-dimensional Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC). A difficulty in verifying the code for fully electromagnetic perturbations caused the model to be simplified so that it would be easier to verify. The changes in the model were going from a fully electromagnetic field operator to an electrostatic field operator. The resultant simplifications allowed the code to be tested against well-known, analytic results from elementary plasma physics. This report will review the physical assumptions used to model the plasma and describe the extra assumptions inherent in using an electrostatic model. In addition, the rationale for simplifying the model and the results of the test of the model will be presented.

  4. Computer usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Fuchs, Heidi; Greenblatt, Jeffery; Pratt, Stacy; Willem, Henry; Claybaugh, Erin; Beraki, Bereket; Nagaraju, Mythri; Price, Sarah; Young, Scott

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electricity consumption of miscellaneous electronic loads (MELs) in the home has grown in recent years, and is expected to continue rising. Consumer electronics, in particular, are characterized by swift technological innovation, with varying impacts on energy use. Desktop and laptop computers make up a significant share of MELs electricity consumption, but their national energy use is difficult to estimate, given uncertainties around shifting user behavior. This report analyzes usage data from 64 computers (45 desktop, 11 laptop, and 8 unknown) collected in 2012 as part of a larger field monitoring effort of 880 households in the San Francisco Bay Area, and compares our results to recent values from the literature. We find that desktop computers are used for an average of 7.3 hours per day (median = 4.2 h/d), while laptops are used for a mean 4.8 hours per day (median = 2.1 h/d). The results for laptops are likely underestimated since they can be charged in other, unmetered outlets. Average unit annual energy consumption (AEC) for desktops is estimated to be 194 kWh/yr (median = 125 kWh/yr), and for laptops 75 kWh/yr (median = 31 kWh/yr). We estimate national annual energy consumption for desktop computers to be 20 TWh. National annual energy use for laptops is estimated to be 11 TWh, markedly higher than previous estimates, likely reflective of laptops drawing more power in On mode in addition to greater market penetration. This result for laptops, however, carries relatively higher uncertainty compared to desktops. Different study methodologies and definitions, changing usage patterns, and uncertainty about how consumers use computers must be considered when interpreting our results with respect to existing analyses. Finally, as energy consumption in On mode is predominant, we outline several energy savings opportunities: improved power management (defaulting to low-power modes after periods of inactivity as well as power scaling), matching the rated power of power supplies to computing needs, and improving the efficiency of individual components.

  5. Studies of high-field sections of a muon helical cooling channel with coil separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopes, M.L.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) was proposed for 6D cooling of muon beams required for muon collider and some other applications. HCC uses a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets which produce solenoidal field superimposed with transverse helical dipole and helical gradient fields. HCC is usually divided into several sections each with progressively stronger fields, smaller aperture and shorter helix period to achieve the optimal muon cooling rate. This paper presents the design issues of the high field section of HCC with coil separation. The effect of coil spacing on the longitudinal and transverse field components is presented and its impact on the muon cooling discussed. The paper also describes methods for field corrections and their practical limits. The magnetic performance of the helical solenoid with coil separation was discussed in this work. The separation could be done in three different ways and the performances could be very different which is important and should be carefully described during the beam cooling simulations. The design that is currently being considered is the one that has the poorest magnetic performance because it presents ripples in all three components, in particular in the helical gradient which could be quite large. Moreover, the average gradient could be off, which could affect the cooling performance. This work summarized methods to tune the gradient regarding the average value and the ripple. The coil longitudinal thickness and the helix period can be used to tune G. Thinner coils tend to reduce the ripples and also bring G to its target value. However, this technique reduces dramatically the operational margin. Wider coils can also reduce the ripple (not as much as thinner coils) and also tune the gradient to its target value. Longer helix periods reduce ripple and correct the gradient to the target value.

  6. Study of two-dimensional transient cavity fields using the finite-difference time-domain technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisp, J.L.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is intended to be a study into the application of the finite-difference time-domain, or FD-TD technique, to some of the problems faced by designers of equipment used in modern accelerators. In particular it discusses using the FD-TD algorithm to study the field distribution of a simple two-dimensional cavity in both space and time. 18 refs.

  7. A study of coherent nonlinear processes in dense media with continuous and pulsed laser fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Aihua

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 22 A schematic of experimental setup for group velocity: ECDL is external cavity diode laser, PBS is polarization beamsplitter, ?/2 is half wave plate, ?/4 is quarter wave plate, PD is photodiode detector, P is polarizer, AMO is acoustic modulator... . . . . . . . . . . 61 23 A schematic of experimental setup: P is polarizer,?/2 is half wave plate, ?/4 is quarter wave plate, PD is photodiode detector. . . . . . 63 24 Dependence of EIT width of input power of pump and probe optical fields with probe and pump field...

  8. Summary of modeling studies of the East Olkaria geothermal field, Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Pruess, K.; Stefansson, V.; Bjornsson, S.; Ojiambo, S.B.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed three-dimensional well-by-well model of the East Olkaria geothermal field in Kenya has been developed. The model matches reasonably well the flow rate and enthalpy data from all wells, as well as the overall pressure decline in the reservoir. The model is used to predict the generating capacity of the field, well decline, enthalpy behavior, the number of make-up wells needed and the effects of injection on well performance and overall reservoir depletion. 26 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Integrated Reservoir Characterization and Simulation Studies in Stripper Oil and Gas Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jianwei

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The demand for oil and gas is increasing yearly, whereas proven oil and gas reserves are being depleted. The potential of stripper oil and gas fields to supplement the national energy supply is large. In 2006, stripper wells accounted for 15% and 8...

  10. Argonne National Laboratory's Nondestructive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne National Laboratory's Nondestructive Evaluation Technologies NDE #12;Over45yearsexperienceinNondestructiveEvaluation... Argonne National Laboratory's world-renowned researchers have a proven the safe operationof advanced nuclear reactors. Argonne's World-Class Nondestructive Evaluation

  11. Hot Water Draw Patterns in Single-Family Houses: Findings from Field Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas or electric storage water heaters. The studys goal washouses used a storage water heater. Without includinghouseholds which have storage water heaters, although this

  12. Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory Personnel from the Power Systems Department have participated in numerous distribution equipment research, development, demonstration, testing,...

  13. A study of hyperons in nuclear matter based on chiral effective field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Haidenbauer; Ulf-G. Meiner

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-medium properties of a hyperon-nucleon potential, derived within chiral effective field theory and fitted to Lambda-N and Sigma-N scattering data, are investigated. Results for the single-particle potentials of the Lambda and Sigma hyperons in nuclear matter are reported, based on a conventional first-order Brueckner calculation. The Sigma-nucleus potential is found to be repulsive, in agreement with phenomenological information. A weak Lambda-nucleus spin-orbit interaction can be achieved by an appropriate adjustment of a low-energy constant corresponding to an antisymmetric Lambda-N -- Sigma-N spin-orbit interaction that arises at next-to-leading order in the effective field theory approach.

  14. A full field model study of the East Velma West Block Sims Sand Unit reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolling, J.D.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A full-field numerical model of the East Velma West Block Sims Sand Unit (EVWBSSU) reservoir was developed. From the history-matched model, field performance predictions were made for continued waterflood and various operating scenarios under the present CO/sub 2/ injection scheme. Results include the effect of CO/sub 2/ pipeline supply rate, allocation of CO/sub 2/ and water to injection wells, and uncertain parameters on reservoir performance. From these projections it was concluded that the amount of injected CO/sub 2/ required to produce an incremental barrel of oil over waterflood was not strongly dependent on CO/sub 2/ pipeline supply rate or allocation of injected fluids to injection wells. This conclusion seems reasonable mechanistically because the miscible displacement was dominated by gravity, the areal variation in predicted updip oil saturation was not great, and the continuous injection coupled with high permeability updip caused uniform distribution of CO/sub 2/.

  15. A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF BCS RF SURFACE IMPEDANCE WITH MAGNETIC FIELD USING THE XIAO CODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Xiao, Binping [JLAB, BNL

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent new analysis of field-dependent BCS rf surface impedance based on moving Cooper pairs has been presented.[1] Using this analysis coded in Mathematica TM, survey calculations have been completed which examine the sensitivities of this surface impedance to variation of the BCS material parameters and temperature. The results present a refined description of the "best theoretical" performance available to potential applications with corresponding materials.

  16. PREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind and solar integration study May 2010 Prepared for NREL by GE Energy 1 River Road Schenectady, New York 12345PREPARED FOR: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory A national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy PREPARED BY: GE Energy MAY 2010 WESTERNWIND AND SOLAR INTEGRATION STUDY #12;#12;Western

  17. Forces on laboratory model dredge cutterhead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Dustin Ray

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    FORCES ON LABORATORY MODEL DREDGE CUTTERHEAD A Thesis by DUSTIN RAY YOUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2009 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering FORCES ON LABORATORY MODEL DREDGE CUTTERHEAD A Thesis by DUSTIN RAY YOUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - association studies field Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contemporary Iberian Studies Association for Dance Movement Therapy... Association for French ... Source: Mottram, Nigel - Department of Mathematics, University of Strathclyde...

  19. Laboratory Studies of Processing of Carbonaceous Aerosols by Atmospheric Oxidants/Hygroscopicity and CCN Activity of Secondary & Processed Primary Organic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemann, P.J.; Arey, J.; Atkinson, R.; Kreidenweis, S.M.; Petters, M.D.

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The atmosphere is composed of a complex mixture of gases and suspended microscopic aerosol particles. The ability of these particles to take up water (hygroscopicity) and to act as nuclei for cloud droplet formation significantly impacts aerosol light scattering and absorption, and cloud formation, thereby influencing air quality, visibility, and climate in important ways. A substantial, yet poorly characterized component of the atmospheric aerosol is organic matter. Its major sources are direct emissions from combustion processes, which are referred to as primary organic aerosol (POA), or in situ processes in which volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are oxidized in the atmosphere to low volatility reaction products that subsequent condense to form particles that are referred to as secondary organic aerosol (SOA). POA and VOCs are emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural (biogenic) sources. The overall goal of this experimental research project was to conduct laboratory studies under simulated atmospheric conditions to investigate the effects of the chemical composition of organic aerosol particles on their hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nucleation (CCN) activity, in order to develop quantitative relationships that could be used to more accurately incorporate aerosol-cloud interactions into regional and global atmospheric models. More specifically, the project aimed to determine the products, mechanisms, and rates of chemical reactions involved in the processing of organic aerosol particles by atmospheric oxidants and to investigate the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles (as represented by molecule sizes and the specific functional groups that are present) and the hygroscopicity and CCN activity of oxidized POA and SOA formed from the oxidation of the major classes of anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs that are emitted to the atmosphere, as well as model hydrocarbons. The general approach for this project was to carry out reactions of representative anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs and organic particles with ozone (O3), and hydroxyl (OH), nitrate (NO3), and chlorine (Cl) radicals, which are the major atmospheric oxidants, under simulated atmospheric conditions in large-volume environmental chambers. A combination of on-line and off-line analytical techniques were used to monitor the chemical and physical properties of the particles including their hygroscopicity and CCN activity. The results of the studies were used to (1) improve scientific understanding of the relationships between the chemical composition of organic particles and their hygroscopicity and CCN activity, (2) develop an improved molecular level theoretical framework for describing these relationships, and (3) establish a large database that is being used to develop parameterizations relating organic aerosol chemical properties and SOA sources to particle hygroscopicity and CCN activity for use in regional and global atmospheric air quality and climate models.

  20. Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleary, M.P.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

  1. A field study of some plant-soil relations in aeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegand, Craig Loren

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gases ~ . 29 Platinum microelectrode measurements of the rate of oxygen diffusion in liquid phase (fw) and the oxygen content in the gaseous phase by structure treatments (plots 111, 211, 312, and 411) for Miller clay soil at, field capacity . -32 A...) where R "- the radius of the platinzs. electrode + The author expresses his appreciation to Dz. R. R. Lemon for having made these detexminations. 15 fw - the rate oi' oxygen 3|iffusion to the surface of the platinum electrode (gm x 10 /cm /sec...

  2. Going green earns Laboratory gold

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Going green earns Laboratory gold Going green earns Laboratory gold The Laboratory's newest facility is its first to achieve both the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design...

  3. High-frequency and -field EPR and FDMRS study of the [Fe(H2O)6]2+ ion in ferrous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    High-frequency and -field EPR and FDMRS study of the [Fe(H2O)6]2+ ion in ferrous fluorosilicate J online 29 September 2011 Keywords: High-field EPR Spin Hamiltonian Zero-field splitting Iron(II) a b Resonance (EPR) at conventional frequencies (9­95 GHz) and fields (0­3.5 T), the non-Kramers (integer spin

  4. Bonneville Second Powerhouse Tailrace and High Flow Outfall: ADCP and drogue release field study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.

    2001-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Project is one of four US Army Corps of Engineers operated dams along the Lower Columbia River. Each year thousands of smelt pass through this Project on their way to the Pacific Ocean. High flow outfalls, if specifically designed for fish passage, are thought to have as good or better smelt survival rates as spillways. To better understand the hydrodynamic flow field around an operating outfall, the Corps of Engineers commissioned measurement of water velocities in the tailrace of the Second Powerhouse. These data also are necessary for proper calibration and verification of three-dimensional numerical models currently under development at PNNL. Hydrodynamic characterization of the tailrace with and without the outfall operating was accomplished through use of a surface drogue and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). Both the ADCP and drogue were linked to a GPS (global positioning system); locating the data in both space and time. Measurements focused on the area nearest to the high flow outfall, however several ADCP transects and drogue releases were performed away from the outfall to document ambient flow field conditions when the outfall was not operating.

  5. Experimental study of two-dimensional quantum Wigner solid in zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    At temperatures T ? 0, strongly interacting two-dimensional (2D) electron systems manifest characteristic insulating behaviors that are key for understanding the nature of the ground state in light of the interplay between disorder and electron-electron interaction. In contrast to the hopping conductance demonstrated in the insulating side of the metal-to-insulator transition, the ultra-high quality 2D systems exhibit nonactivated T-dependence of the conductivity even for dilute carrier concentrations down to 710{sup 8} cm{sup ?2}. The apparent metal-to-insulator transition (MIT) occurs for a large r{sub s} value around 40 for which a Wigner Crystalllization is expected. The magnetoresistance for a series of carrier densities in the vicinity of the transition exhibits a characteristic sign change in weak perpendicular magnetic field. Within the Wigner Crystallization regime (with r{sub s} > 40), we report an experimental observation of a characteristic nonlinear threshold behavior from a high-resolution dc dynamical response as an evidence for aWigner crystallization in high-purity GaAs 2D hole systems in zero magnetic field. The system under an increasing current drive exhibits voltage oscillations with negative differential resistance. They confirm the coexistence of a moving crystal along with striped edge states as observed for electrons on helium surfaces. Moreover, the threshold is well below the typical classical levels due to a different pinning and depinning mechanism that is possibly related to quantum processes.

  6. Microbial field pilot study: Quarterly progress report, March 1, 1989--June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Experiments are underway to determine the influence of permeability, pore throat size, and porosity on bacterial movement within porous media. The penetration rates of two motile Escherichia coli strains, as well as two nonmotile strains, are being compared for their ability to penetrate cores consisting of uniformity packed glass beads. To establish if gas production has an effect at differing pore throat sizes, each strain will be compared either under a condition which supports gas production for both wild type strains only (i.e. fermentation), or one which does not result in gas production from any strain (i.e. nitrate-reducing conditions). Research progress on mathematical modeling, core flooding and field experiments is also briefly discussed. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Traditional and Host-Associated Fecal Indicator Bacterial Patterns in Southern California Watersheds: Field Source Identification Studies and Laboratory Microcosms Investigating Presence and Persistence in Water and Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mika, Kathryn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of eutrophication and sediment resuspension in the largeM.J. ( 2007) Beach sand and sediments are temporal sinks andin Santa Monica Bay beach sediments. Water Research 40(14),

  8. Traditional and Host-Associated Fecal Indicator Bacterial Patterns in Southern California Watersheds: Field Source Identification Studies and Laboratory Microcosms Investigating Presence and Persistence in Water and Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mika, Kathryn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federation 57(5), 384-389. Sinton, L. ; Finlay, R. ; Lynch,solar inactivation (Sinton, 1999) or increased protectionsunlight inactivation (Sinton et al. , 1999), protection

  9. Integrated Field, Laboratory, and Modeling Studies to Determine the Effects of Linked Microbial and Physical Spatial Heterogeneity on Engineered Vadose Zone Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Brokman; John Selker; Mark Rockhold

    2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    While numerous techniques exist for remediation of contaminant plumes in groundwater or near the soil surface, remediation methods in the deep vadose zone are less established due to complex transport dynamics and sparse microbial populations. There is a lack of knowledge on how physical and hydrologic features of the vadose zone control microbial growth and colonization in response to nutrient delivery during bioremediation. Yet pollution in the vadose zone poses a serious threat to the groundwater resources lying deeper in the sediment. While the contaminants may be slowly degraded by native microbial communities, microbial degradation rates rarely keep pace with the spread of the pollutant. It is crucial to increase indigenous microbial degradation in the vadose zone to combat groundwater contamination.

  10. Integrated Field, Laboratory, and Modeling Studies to Determine the Effects of Linked Microbial and Physical Spatial Heterogeneity on Engineered Vadose Zone Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockman, Fred J.; Selker, John S.; Rockhold, Mark L.

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary - While numerous techniques exist for remediation of contaminant plumes in groundwater or near the soil surface, remediation methods in the deep vadose zone are less established due to complex transport dynamics and sparse microbial populations. There is a lack of knowledge on how physical and hydrologic features of the vadose zone control microbial growth and colonization in response to nutrient delivery during bioremediation. Yet pollution in the vadose zone poses a serious threat to the groundwater resources lying deeper in the sediment. While the contaminants may be slowly degraded by native microbial communities, microbial degradation rates rarely keep pace with the spread of the pollutant. It is crucial to increase indigenous microbial degradation in the vadose zone to combat groundwater contamination...

  11. HOLLINGS SCHOLARS 2008 Last Name First Name Field of Study Name of School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Michigan State University Beaver Melanie Environmental Science Studies Washington College Beri Jr Douglas Biology Smith College Henthorn Justin Applied Mathematics and Chemistry Ohio University Hines Coral Marine

  12. Joint Research Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    research works on advanced solid state spectroscopy. In 2005, the operation of the PF ring was quitted from Laboratory (SRL) was estab- lished in 1975 as a research group dedicating to study solid state physics using of the accelerator physics group and the solid state spectroscopy group. The members of the accelerator group have

  13. LOCAL STUDY OF ACCRETION DISKS WITH A STRONG VERTICAL MAGNETIC FIELD: MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY AND DISK OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M., E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform three-dimensional, vertically-stratified, local shearing-box ideal MHD simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) that include a net vertical magnetic flux, which is characterized by midplane plasma {beta}{sub 0} (ratio of gas to magnetic pressure). We have considered {beta}{sub 0} = 10{sup 2}, 10{sup 3}, and 10{sup 4}, and in the first two cases the most unstable linear MRI modes are well resolved in the simulations. We find that the behavior of the MRI turbulence strongly depends on {beta}{sub 0}: the radial transport of angular momentum increases with net vertical flux, achieving {alpha} {approx} 0.08 for {beta} = 10{sup 4} and {alpha} {approx}> 1.0 for {beta}{sub 0} = 100, where {alpha} is the height-integrated and mass-weighted Shakura-Sunyaev parameter. A critical value lies at {beta}{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 3}: for {beta}{sub 0} {approx}> 10{sup 3}, the disk consists of a gas pressure dominated midplane and a magnetically dominated corona. The turbulent strength increases with net flux, and angular momentum transport is dominated by turbulent fluctuations. The magnetic dynamo that leads to cyclic flips of large-scale fields still exists, but becomes more sporadic as net flux increases. For {beta}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup 3}, the entire disk becomes magnetically dominated. The turbulent strength saturates, and the magnetic dynamo is fully quenched. Stronger large-scale fields are generated with increasing net flux, which dominates angular momentum transport. A strong outflow is launched from the disk by the magnetocentrifugal mechanism, and the mass flux increases linearly with net vertical flux and shows sign of saturation at {beta}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup 2}. However, the outflow is unlikely to be directly connected to a global wind: for {beta}{sub 0} {approx}> 10{sup 3}, the large-scale field has no permanent bending direction due to dynamo activities, while for {beta}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup 3}, the outflows from the top and bottom sides of the disk bend towards opposite directions, inconsistent with a physical disk wind geometry. Global simulations are needed to address the fate of the outflow.

  14. Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Neu, Alexander; Epstein, Scott A.; MacMillan, Amanda; Wang, Bingbing; Kelly, Stephen T.; Nizkorodov, Sergey; Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Mary K.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The size and thickness of organic aerosol particles collected by impaction in five field campaigns were compared to those of laboratory generated secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM) was used to measure the total carbon absorbance (TCA) by individual particles as a function of their projection areas on the substrate. Because they flatten less upon impaction, particles with higher viscosity and surface tension can be identified by a steeper slope on a plot of TCA vs. size. The slopes of the ambient data are statistically similar indicating a small range of average viscosities and surface tensions across five field campaigns. Steeper slopes were observed for the plots corresponding to ambient particles, while smaller slopes were indicative of the laboratory generated SOA. This comparison indicates that ambient organic particles have higher viscosities and surface tensions than those typically generated in laboratory SOA studies.

  15. Study of electron trapping by a transversely ellipsoidal bubble in the laser wake-field acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Myung-Hoon [School of Natural Science, UNIST, BanYeon-Ri 100, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Natural Science, UNIST, BanYeon-Ri 100, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Kuk; Hur, Min Sup [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UNIST, BanYeon-Ri 100, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)] [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UNIST, BanYeon-Ri 100, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present electron trapping in an ellipsoidal bubble which is not well explained by the spherical bubble model by [Kostyukov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 175003 (2009)]. The formation of an ellipsoidal bubble, which is elongated transversely, frequently occurs when the spot size of the laser pulse is large compared to the plasma wavelength. First, we introduce the relation between the bubble size and the field slope inside the bubble in longitudinal and transverse directions. Then, we provide an ellipsoidal model of the bubble potential and investigate the electron trapping condition by numerical integration of the equations of motion. We found that the ellipsoidal model gives a significantly less restrictive trapping condition than that of the spherical bubble model. The trapping condition is compared with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and the electron trajectory in test potential simulations.

  16. Simulation studies of steam-propane injection for the Hamaca heavy oil field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venturini, Gilberto Jose

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation studies were performed to evaluate a novel technology, steam-propane injection, for the heavy Hamaca crude oil. The oil has a gravity of 9.3?API and a viscosity of 25,000 cp at 50?C. Two types of simulation studies were performed: a...

  17. Comparisons of field performance to closed-door test T ABLE 1 ratings indicate the laboratory procedure is a valid indica-Design Options to Improve the Energy Efficiency of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    be incorporated into the conventional RF design (a Option 8 High-efficiency fan motor single fan-forced evaporator heat load. Adaptive condensate at the door gaskets were estimated by ..zeroing defrost, efficient fan the laboratory procedure is a valid indica- Design Options to Improve the Energy Efficiency of a tion of energy

  18. Descriptions of Units (Modules) of Study AAP106 Archaeology in the Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yi

    /Description: Greco-Roman classical civilisation (particularly the 'high' culture of art, architecture, literature/Description: How do we know about our remote, pre- human past; how did we evolve, and how do we study those fully

  19. An Integrated Study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, William C.; Trentham, Robert C.; Widner, Kevin; Wienbrandt, Richard

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1997-1998.

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23, 2013-Nearly 400 Los Alamos National Laboratory employees on 47 teams received Pollution Prevention awards for protecting the environment and saving taxpayers more than 8...

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    involving a rail car, a clandestine laboratory, transportation and industrial piping scenarios, a simulated radiological release, and a confined space, said Chris Rittner...

  2. Laborativ matematik; Laboratory mathematics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kresj, Ida

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Research indicates that a more hands-on education in mathematics could improve how students relate to mathematics. Laboratory mathematics is a way of making mathematics (more)

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental service to northern New Mexico," said Jeff Mousseau, associate director for environmental programs at the Laboratory. "Having local companies of this high caliber...

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commitment to the environment and the public," said Jeff Mousseau, associate director for Environmental Programs at the Laboratory. This is the fifth master task order agreement...

  5. Exercise Design Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Emergency Operations Training Academy (EOTA), NA 40.2, Readiness and Training, Albuquerque, NM is pleased to announce the EXR231, Exercise Design Laboratory course

  6. National Laboratory Photovoltaics Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE supports photovoltaic (PV) research and development and facilities at its national laboratories to accelerate progress toward achieving the SunShot Initiative's technological and economic...

  7. Molecular characterization of organic aerosol using nanospray desorption/ electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352, USA c Chemical and Materials Sciences molecular species were detected in the mass range of 50e400 m/z using positive mode ESI of aerosol samples in the 0.18e0.32 mm size range. Our analysis focused on identification of two main groups: compounds

  8. Field Theoretic Study of Bilayer Membrane Fusion III: Membranes with Leaves of Different Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jae Youn Lee; Michael Schick

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend previous work on homogeneous bilayers to calculate the barriers to fusion of planar bilayers which contain two different amphiphiles, a lamellae-former and a hexagonal former, with different compositions of the twoin each leaf. Self-consistent field theory is employed, and both standard and alternative pathways are explored. We first calculate these barriers as the amount of hexagonal former is increased equally in both leaves to levels appropriate to the plasma membrane of human red blood cells. We follow these barriers as the composition of hexagonal-formers is then increased in the cis layer and decreased in the trans layer, again to an extent comparable to the biological system. We find that, while the fusion pathway exhibits two barriers in both the standard and alternative pathways, in both cases the magnitudes of these barriers are comparable to one another, and small, on the order of 13 kT. As a consequence, one expects that once the bilayers are brought sufficiently close to one another to initiate the process, fusion should occur rapidly.

  9. Laboratory Director PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    .C. Zarnstorff Deputy Director for Operations A.B. Cohen Laboratory Management Council Research Council Associate Diagnostics D.W. Johnson Electrical Systems C. Neumeyer Lab Astrophysics M. Yamada, H. Ji Projects: MRX, MRI Science Education A. Post-Zwicker Quality Assurance J.A. Malsbury Tech. Transfer Patents & Publications L

  10. Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar energy information is made available to students through classroom instruction by way of the Solar Energy Education teaching manuals. In this manual solar energy, as well as other energy sources like wind power, is introduced by performing school activities in the area of social studies. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  11. Case study field evaluation of a systems approach to retrofitting a residential HVAC system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain S.; McWiliams, Jennifer A.; Konopacki, Steven J.

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This case study focusing on a residence in northern California was undertaken as a demonstration of the potential of a systems approach to HVAC retrofits. The systems approach means that other retrofits that can affect the HVAC system are also considered. For example, added building envelope insulation reduces building loads so that smaller capacity HVAC system can be used. Secondly, we wanted to examine the practical issues and interactions with contractors and code officials required to accomplish the systems approach because it represents a departure from current practice. We identified problems in the processes of communication and installation of the retrofit that led to compromises in the final energy efficiency of the HVAC system. These issues must be overcome in order for HVAC retrofits to deliver the increased performance that they promise. The experience gained in this case study was used to optimize best practices guidelines for contractors (Walker 2003) that include building diagnostics and checklists as tools to assist in ensuring the energy efficiency of ''house as a system'' HVAC retrofits. The best practices guidelines proved to be an excellent tool for evaluating the eight existing homes in this study, and we received positive feedback from many potential users who reviewed and used them. In addition, we were able to substantially improve the energy efficiency of the retrofitted case study house by adding envelope insulation, a more efficient furnace and air conditioner, an economizer and by reducing duct leakage.

  12. Comparison between cylindrical model and experimental observation on the study of resistive wall mode in reversed field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z. R.; Guo, S. C.; Bolzonella, T.; Baruzzo, M. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy); Shi, L.; Wang, X. G. [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical magnetohydrodynamic model including plasma pressure and longitudinal flow has been employed for the study of resistive wall mode (RWM) in reversed field pinch (RFP) plasmas. In order to validate the model, a careful comparison with the experimental measurements in RFX-mod [P. Sonato et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 66-68, 161 (2003)] on the mode growth rates has been made by well matching the equilibrium parameters F, THETA, and beta{sub p}. The RWM instability spectrum, which varies with the equilibrium parameters, is also calculated for comparison. The sensitivity of the mode growth rate to the equilibrium parameters is studied in details. It is concluded that the model can provide consistent accuracy in studies of RWM in RFP plasmas. The analysis based on the balance of the potential energy components has been carried out in order to obtain the physical understanding on the mode behavior.

  13. Neel Transition of Lattice Fermions in a Harmonic Trap: A Real-Space Dynamic Mean-Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorelik, E. V.; Bluemer, N. [Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg University, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Titvinidze, I.; Hofstetter, W. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, 60438 Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Snoek, M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam, 1090 GL Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the magnetic ordering transition for a system of harmonically trapped ultracold fermions with repulsive interactions in a cubic optical lattice, within a real-space extension of dynamical mean-field theory. Using a quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver, we establish that antiferromagnetic correlations are signaled, at strong coupling, by an enhanced double occupancy. This signature is directly accessible experimentally and should be observable well above the critical temperature for long-range order. Dimensional aspects appear less relevant than naively expected.

  14. Feasibility studies of in-situ coal gasification in the Warrior coal field. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G.W.; McKinley, M.D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies in support of in-situ gasification involved experiments in bench-scale combustors where three parameters were varied independently: initial fuel bed temperature, applied air flow and water vapor influx rate. Methods for measuring the thermal conductivity of solids at high temperatures were evaluated and measurements of the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity were made over a temperature range for several samples of coke. (LTN)

  15. Study on detailed geological modelling for fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oil field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Hanqing; Fu Zhiguo; Lu Xiaoguang [Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, Daqing (China)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guided by the sedimentation theory and knowledge of modern and ancient fluvial deposition and utilizing the abundant information of sedimentary series, microfacies type and petrophysical parameters from well logging curves of close spaced thousands of wells located in a large area. A new method for establishing detailed sedimentation and permeability distribution models for fluvial reservoirs have been developed successfully. This study aimed at the geometry and internal architecture of sandbodies, in accordance to their hierarchical levels of heterogeneity and building up sedimentation and permeability distribution models of fluvial reservoirs, describing the reservoir heterogeneity on the light of the river sedimentary rules. The results and methods obtained in outcrop and modem sedimentation studies have successfully supported the study. Taking advantage of this method, the major producing layers (PI{sub 1-2}), which have been considered as heterogeneous and thick fluvial reservoirs extending widely in lateral are researched in detail. These layers are subdivided into single sedimentary units vertically and the microfacies are identified horizontally. Furthermore, a complex system is recognized according to their hierarchical levels from large to small, meander belt, single channel sandbody, meander scroll, point bar, and lateral accretion bodies of point bar. The achieved results improved the description of areal distribution of point bar sandbodies, provide an accurate and detailed framework model for establishing high resolution predicting model. By using geostatistic technique, it also plays an important role in searching for enriched zone of residual oil distribution.

  16. Russell Furr Laboratory Safety &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell Furr Director 8/20/13 Laboratory Safety & Compliance #12;#12;Research Safety Full Time Students Part- Time #12; Organizational Changes Office of Research Safety Research Safety Advisors Safety Culture Survey Fire Marshal Inspections Laboratory Plans Review New Research Safety Initiatives

  17. Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2007 Prepared by: National Institute to present to the President and the Congress this Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Report summarizing the achievements of Federal technology transfer and partnering programs of the Federal research and development

  18. Technical Report Computer Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    the opportunity to consider a physical attack, with very little to lose. We thus set out to analyse the deviceTechnical Report Number 592 Computer Laboratory UCAM-CL-TR-592 ISSN 1476-2986 Unwrapping J. Murdoch Technical reports published by the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory are freely

  19. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kress, R.L.; Love, L.J.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of the Internet has provided a unique opportunity to expand research collaborations between industry, universities, and the national laboratories. The Virtual Robotics Laboratory (VRL) is an innovative program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is focusing on the issues related to collaborative research through controlled access of laboratory equipment using the World Wide Web. The VRL will provide different levels of access to selected ORNL laboratory secondary education programs. In the past, the ORNL Robotics and Process Systems Division has developed state-of-the-art robotic systems for the Army, NASA, Department of Energy, Department of Defense, as well as many other clients. After proof of concept, many of these systems sit dormant in the laboratories. This is not out of completion of all possible research topics. but from completion of contracts and generation of new programs. In the past, a number of visiting professors have used this equipment for their own research. However, this requires that the professor, and possibly his/her students, spend extended periods at the laboratory facility. In addition, only a very exclusive group of faculty can gain access to the laboratory and hardware. The VRL is a tool that enables extended collaborative efforts without regard to geographic limitations.

  20. LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab I - 1 LABORATORY I: GEOMETRIC OPTICS In this lab, you will solve several problems related to the formation of optical images. Most of us have a great deal of experience with the formation of optical images this laboratory, you should be able to: · Describe features of real optical systems in terms of ray diagrams

  1. amber force fields: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fields and Development of Improved Protein Backbone Parameters Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, ABSTRACT The ff94 force field that is com- monly associated with the Amber a...

  2. amber force field: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fields and Development of Improved Protein Backbone Parameters Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, ABSTRACT The ff94 force field that is com- monly associated with the Amber a...

  3. Deformation associated with transverse-thrust ramps: a field and experimental study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaskey, Michael Donald

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    direction. 2. Marias Pass Location Maps. (A) Generalized geologic map showing location of Marias Pass, and the Lewis Thrust, and (B) schematic diagram illustrates ramp geometries for the Lewis Thrust in the Marias Pass region. 3. Geometry of dip ramp... of Marias Pass showing the location of study sites A, 8, C, and the dip-ramp site at Two Medicine Lake . 85 24. Contour map of the Lewis Thrust surface in the Marias Pass area constructed from sur- vey sites (measured in feet above sea level in order...

  4. A study of bat populations at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Bandelier National Monument, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico: FY95--97 report to Los Alamos National Laboratory and Bandelier National Monument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogan, M.A.; O`Shea, T.J.; Cryan, P.M.; Ditto, A.M.; Schaedla, W.H.; Valdez, E.W.; Castle, K.T.; Ellison, L. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1995, a three-year study was initiated to assess the current status of bat species of concern, elucidate distribution and relative abundance, and obtain information on roosting sites of bats. The authors captured and released 1532 bats of 15 species (Myotis californicus, M. ciliolabrum, M. evotis, M. thysanodes, M. volans, M. yumanensis, Lasiurus cinereus, Lasionycteris noctivagans, Pipistrellus hesperus, Eptesicus fuscus, Euderma maculatum, Corynorhinus townsendii, Antrozous pallidus, Tadarida brasiliensis, and Nyctinomops macrotis) and followed 32 bats of eight species (M. evotis, M. thysanodes, M. volans, E. fuscus, E. maculatum, C. townsendii, A. pallidus, and N. macrotis) to 51 active diurnal roosts. The most abundant species were L. noctivagans, E. fuscus, L. cinereus, M. evotis, M. volans, and M. ciliolabrum. Most of these species are typical inhabitants of ponderosa pine-mixed coniferous forests.

  5. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 4: Physical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braby, L.A.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research includes those programs funded under the title ``Physical and Technological Research.`` The Field Task Program Studies reported in this document are grouped by budget category. Attention is focused on the following subject areas: dosimetry research; and radiological and chemical physics.

  6. UPWARD MOVEMENT OF PLUTONIUM TO SURFACE SEDIMENTS DURING AN 11-YEAR FIELD STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; Beals, D.; Cadieux, J.; Halverson, J.

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An 11-y lysimeter study was established to monitor the movement of Pu through vadose zone sediments. Sediment Pu concentrations as a function of depth indicated that some Pu moved upward from the buried source material. Subsequent numerical modeling suggested that the upward movement was largely the result of invading grasses taking up the Pu and translocating it upward. The objective of this study was to determine if the Pu of surface sediments originated from atmosphere fallout or from the buried lysimeter source material (weapons-grade Pu), providing additional evidence that plants were involved in the upward migration of Pu. The {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu and {sup 242}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atomic fraction ratios of the lysimeter surface sediments, as determined by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (TIMS), were 0.063 and 0.00045, respectively; consistent with the signatures of the weapons-grade Pu. Our numerical simulations indicate that because plants create a large water flux, small concentrations over multiple years may result in a measurable accumulation of Pu on the ground surface. These results may have implications on the conceptual model for calculating risk associated with long-term stewardship and monitored natural attenuation management of Pu contaminated subsurface and surface sediments.

  7. Insights From Laboratory Experiments On Simulated Faults With Application To Fracture Evolution In Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen L. Karner, Ph.D

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments provide a wealth of information related to mechanics of fracture initiation, fracture propagation processes, factors influencing fault strength, and spatio-temporal evolution of fracture properties. Much of the existing literature reports on laboratory studies involving a coupling of thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, and/or chemical processes. As these processes operate within subsurface environments exploited for their energy resource, laboratory results provide insights into factors influencing the mechanical and hydraulic properties of geothermal systems. I report on laboratory observations of strength and fluid transport properties during deformation of simulated faults. The results show systematic trends that vary with stress state, deformation rate, thermal conditions, fluid content, and rock composition. When related to geophysical and geologic measurements obtained from engineered geothermal systems (e.g. microseismicity, wellbore studies, tracer analysis), laboratory results provide a means by which the evolving thermal reservoir can be interpreted in terms of physico-chemical processes. For example, estimates of energy release and microearthquake locations from seismic moment tensor analysis can be related to strength variations observed from friction experiments. Such correlations between laboratory and field data allow for better interpretations about the evolving mechanical and fluid transport properties in the geothermal reservoir ultimately leading to improvements in managing the resource.

  8. Coupling of the Photosphere to the Solar Corona: A laboratory and observational study of Alfvn wave interaction with a neutral gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    watts, Christopher

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The grant funded a three year project to investigate the role of Alfvn waves as a possible mechanism heating plasmas, with relevance to solar coronal heating. Evidence suggests that there is strong coupling between the solar photosphere, corona and solar wind through Alfvn wave interaction with the neutral gas particles. A laboratory experimental and solar observational plan was designed to investigate in detail this interaction. Although many of the original research goals were met, difficulties in detecting the Alfvn wave signature meant that much of the research was stymied. This report summaries the work during the grant period, the challenges encountered and overcome, and the future research directions.

  9. Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes. Annual technical progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid wastes produced by advanced coal combustion processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites were selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute`s fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison`s limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United`s mine site in central Illinois with wastes supplied by the nearby Midwest Grain FBC unit. During the past year, field monitoring and sampling of the four landfill test cases constructed in 1989 and 1991 has continued. Option 1 of the contract was approved last year to add financing for the fifth test case at the Freeman United site. The construction of the Test Case 5 cells is scheduled to begin in November, 1992. Work during this past year has focused on obtaining data on the physical and chemical properties of the landfilled wastes, and on developing a conceptual framework for interpreting this information. Results to date indicate that hydration reactions within the landfilled wastes have had a major impact on the physical and chemical properties of the materials but these reactions largely ceased after the first year, and physical properties have changed little since then. Conditions in Colorado remained dry and no porewater samples were collected. In Ohio, hydration reactions and increases in the moisture content of the waste tied up much of the water initially infiltrating the test cells.

  10. Real-time state estimation of laboratory flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stransky, Scott (Scott M.)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, we use a real time computer model to simulate a differentially heated laboratory annulus. The laboratory annulus allows us to study chaotic flows typical of the atmosphere. Our objective is to bring the ...

  11. Laboratory Equipment & Supplies | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space controlAppraisalLaboratory

  12. Laboratory Graduate Research Appointment | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs space controlAppraisalLaboratoryGet the

  13. Origins of Massive Field Stars in the Galactic Center: a Spectroscopic Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Hui; Morris, Mark R; Wang, Q Daniel; Cotera, Angela

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outside of the known star clusters in the Galactic Center, a large number of evolved massive stars have been detected; but their origins remain uncertain. We present a spectroscopic study of eight such stars, based on new Gemini GNIRS and NIFS near-infrared observations. This work has led to the discovery of a new O If+ star. We compare the reddening-corrected J-K vs K diagram for our stars with the massive ones in the Arches cluster and use stellar evolutionary tracks to constrain their ages and masses. The radial velocities of both the stars and their nearby H II regions are also reported. All of the stars are blueshifted relative to the Arches cluster by > 50 km/s. We find that our source P35 has a velocity consistent with that of the surrounding molecular gas. The velocity gradient of nearby ionized gas along the Gemini GNIRS long slit, relative to P35 and the adjacent -30-0 km/s molecular cloud, can best be explained by a pressure-driven flow model. Thus, P35 most likely formed in situ. Three more of our...

  14. Large-Field Multicolor Study of Abell 168 Subclusters, Dynamics and Luminosity Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Y; Yuan, Q; Jiang, Z; Ma, J; Wu, H; Chen, J; Yang, Yanbin; Zhou, Xu; Yuan, Qirong; Jiang, Zhaoji; Ma, Jun; Wu, Hong; Chen, Jiansheng

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a multicolor study of the nearby cluster of galaxies Abell 168 (z=0.045) with 13 intermediate-band filters in the Beijing-Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) filter system. After a cross-identification between the photometric data obtained from the BATC and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), a catalog containing 1553 galaxies down to r'<20.0 mag is achieved, which includes 121 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies. The technique of photometric redshift has been applied to all these galaxies with combined 18-band (13 from BATC and 5 from SDSS) spectral energy distributions (SEDs), in order to perform a faint membership selection in Abell 168. As a result, 255 galaxies are newly selected as the member candidates. Based on the enlarged sample of cluster galaxies, the spatial distribution and dynamics of Abell 168 are investigated. In the light of the spatial distribution of the member galaxies and the 0.2-3.5 keV X-ray image by Einstein observatory, it seems that Abell 168 consists o...

  15. STUDYING BAT BEHAVIOR IN CAPTIVITY is a valuable comple-ment to field studies. Many classical studies, especially of sensory biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    studies (e.g., Esser and Schmidt, 1989; Balcombe and McCracken, 1992; Boughman, 1998), because it is often

  16. Sonication standard laboratory module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beugelsdijk, Tony (Los Alamos, NM); Hollen, Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Tracy H. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence E. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Jeffrey E. (Santa Fe, NM); Clark, Michael Leon (Menan, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard laboratory module for automatically producing a solution of cominants from a soil sample. A sonication tip agitates a solution containing the soil sample in a beaker while a stepper motor rotates the sample. An aspirator tube, connected to a vacuum, draws the upper layer of solution from the beaker through a filter and into another beaker. This beaker can thereafter be removed for analysis of the solution. The standard laboratory module encloses an embedded controller providing process control, status feedback information and maintenance procedures for the equipment and operations within the standard laboratory module.

  17. The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

  18. Laboratory methods for enhanced oil recovery core floods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, E.P.; Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is investigating microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) systems for application to oil reservoirs. Laboratory corefloods are invaluable in developing technology necessary for a field application of MEOR. Methods used to prepare sandstone cores for experimentation, coreflooding techniques, and quantification of coreflood effluent are discussed in detail. A technique to quantify the small volumes of oil associated with laboratory core floods is described.

  19. Idaho National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INL is the leading laboratory for nuclear R&D. Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy talks aobut the work there and the long-term benefits it will provide.

  20. Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic development in Northern New Mexico focus of new podcast from Los Alamos National Laboratory November 25, 2013 Podcast part of Lab's new multi-channel effort to better...